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Sample records for acid lpa receptor

  1. Phosphorylation and Internalization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Campos-Martínez, Gisselle A.; Meizoso-Huesca, Aldo; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Results The lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3 were individually expressed in C9 cells and their signaling and regulation were studied. Agonist-activation increases intracellular calcium concentration in a concentration-dependent fashion. Phorbol myristate acetate markedly inhibited LPA1- and LPA3-mediated effect, whereas that mediated by LPA2 was only partially diminished; the actions of the phorbol ester were inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide I and by overnight incubation with the protein kinase C activator, which leads to down regulation of this protein kinase. Homologous desensitization was also observed for the three LPA receptors studied, with that of LPA2 receptors being consistently of lesser magnitude; neither inhibition nor down-regulation of protein kinase C exerted any effect on homologous desensitization. Activation of LPA1–3 receptors induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation; this effect was markedly attenuated by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase activity, suggesting growth factor receptor transactivation in this effect. Lysophosphatidic acid and phorbol myristate acetate were able to induce LPA1–3 phosphorylation, in time- and concentration-dependent fashions. It was also clearly observed that agonists and protein kinase C activation induced internalization of these receptors. Phosphorylation of the LPA2 subtype required larger concentrations of these agents and its internalization was less intense than that of the other subtypes. Conclusion Our data show that these three LPA receptors are phosphoproteins whose phosphorylation state is modulated by agonist-stimulation and protein kinase C-activation and that differences in regulation and cellular localization exist, among the subtypes. PMID:26473723

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPA4 and LPA6 differentially promote lymphocyte transmigration across high endothelial venules in lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Erina; Sasaki, Naoko; Takeda, Akira; Tohya, Kazuo; Umemoto, Eiji; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Bando, Kana; Abe, Takaya; Kano, Kuniyuki; Aoki, Junken; Hayasaka, Haruko

    2016-01-01

    Naive lymphocytes continuously migrate from the blood into lymph nodes (LNs) via high endothelial venules (HEVs). To extravasate from the HEVs, lymphocytes undergo multiple adhesion steps, including tethering, rolling, firm adhesion and transmigration. We previously showed that autotaxin (ATX), an enzyme that generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), is highly expressed in HEVs, and that the ATX/LPA axis plays an important role in the lymphocyte transmigration across HEVs. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this axis’s involvement in lymphocyte transmigration has remained ill-defined. Here, we show that two LPA receptors, LPA4 and LPA6, are selectively expressed on HEV endothelial cells (ECs) and that LPA4 plays a major role in the lymphocyte transmigration across HEVs in mice. In the absence of LPA4 expression, lymphocytes accumulated heavily within the HEV EC layer, compared to wild-type (WT) mice. This accumulation was also observed in the absence of LPA6 expression, but it was less pronounced. Adoptive transfer experiments using WT lymphocytes revealed that the LPA4 deficiency in ECs specifically compromised the lymphocyte transmigration process, whereas the effect of LPA6 deficiency was not significant. These results indicate that the signals evoked in HEV ECs via the LPA4 and LPA6 differentially regulate lymphocyte extravasation from HEVs in the peripheral LNs. PMID:26714589

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPA4 and LPA6 differentially promote lymphocyte transmigration across high endothelial venules in lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Hata, Erina; Sasaki, Naoko; Takeda, Akira; Tohya, Kazuo; Umemoto, Eiji; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Bando, Kana; Abe, Takaya; Kano, Kuniyuki; Aoki, Junken; Hayasaka, Haruko; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Naive lymphocytes continuously migrate from the blood into lymph nodes (LNs) via high endothelial venules (HEVs). To extravasate from the HEVs, lymphocytes undergo multiple adhesion steps, including tethering, rolling, firm adhesion and transmigration. We previously showed that autotaxin (ATX), an enzyme that generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), is highly expressed in HEVs, and that the ATX/LPA axis plays an important role in the lymphocyte transmigration across HEVs. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this axis's involvement in lymphocyte transmigration has remained ill-defined. Here, we show that two LPA receptors, LPA4 and LPA6, are selectively expressed on HEV endothelial cells (ECs) and that LPA4 plays a major role in the lymphocyte transmigration across HEVs in mice. In the absence of LPA4 expression, lymphocytes accumulated heavily within the HEV EC layer, compared to wild-type (WT) mice. This accumulation was also observed in the absence of LPA6 expression, but it was less pronounced. Adoptive transfer experiments using WT lymphocytes revealed that the LPA4 deficiency in ECs specifically compromised the lymphocyte transmigration process, whereas the effect of LPA6 deficiency was not significant. These results indicate that the signals evoked in HEV ECs via the LPA4 and LPA6 differentially regulate lymphocyte extravasation from HEVs in the peripheral LNs. PMID:26714589

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  5. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  6. The mouse lp(A3)/Edg7 lysophosphatidic acid receptor gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Contos, J J; Chun, J

    2001-04-18

    The extracellular signaling molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), mediates proliferative and morphological effects on cells and has been proposed to be involved in several biological processes including neuronal development, wound healing, and cancer progression. Three mammalian G protein-coupled receptors, encoded by genes designated lp (lysophospholipid) receptor or edg (endothelial differentiation gene), mediate the effects of LPA, activating similar (e.g. Ca(2+) release) as well as distinct (neurite retraction) responses. To understand the evolution and function of LPA receptor genes, we characterized lp(A3)/Edg7 in mouse and human and compared the expression pattern with the other two known LPA receptor genes (lp(A1)/Edg2 and lp(A2)/Edg4non-mutant). We found mouse and human lp(A3) to have nearly identical three-exon genomic structures, with introns upstream of the coding region for transmembrane domain (TMD) I and within the coding region for TMD VI. This structure is similar to lp(A1) and lp(A2), indicating a common ancestral gene with two introns. We localized mouse lp(A3) to distal Chromosome 3 near the varitint waddler (Va) gene, in a region syntenic with the human lp(A3) chromosomal location (1p22.3-31.1). We found highest expression levels of each of the three LPA receptor genes in adult mouse testes, relatively high expression levels of lp(A2) and lp(A3) in kidney, and moderate expression of lp(A2) and lp(A3) in lung. All lp(A) transcripts were expressed during brain development, with lp(A1) and lp(A2) transcripts expressed during the embryonic neurogenic period, and lp(A3) transcript during the early postnatal period. Our results indicate both overlapping as well as distinct functions of lp(A1), lp(A2), and lp(A3). PMID:11313151

  7. Asymmetrical Macromolecular Complex Formation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 2 (LPA2) Mediates Gradient Sensing in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca2+ puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca2+ puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  8. Asymmetrical macromolecular complex formation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 (LPA2) mediates gradient sensing in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2014-12-26

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca(2+) puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca(2+) puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  9. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 3-Mediated LPA Signal Transduction Pathways: A Possible Relationship with Early Development of Peri-Implantation Porcine Conceptus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wooyoung; Seo, Heewon; Sung, Yujin; Ka, Hakhyun; Song, Gwonhwa; Kim, Jinyoung

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid with a variety of fatty acyl groups that mediates diverse biological effects on various types of cells through specific G protein-coupled receptors. LPA appears to play a significant role in many reproductive processes, including luteolysis, implantation, and placentation. Our previous study in pigs demonstrated that LPA and the LPA receptor system are present at the maternal-conceptus interface and that LPA increases uterine endometrial expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) through LPA receptor 3 (LPAR3). However, the role of LPA in conceptuses during early pregnancy has not been determined. Therefore, this study examined the effects of LPA in cell proliferation, migration, and activation of the intracellular signaling pathway in porcine conceptuses by using an established porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cell line isolated from Day 12 conceptuses. All examined LPA species with various fatty acid lengths increased proliferation and migration of pTr cells as the dosage increased. Immunoblot analyses found that LPA activated intracellular signaling molecules, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90 kDa (P90RSK), ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6), and P38 in pTr cells. Furthermore, LPA increased expression of PTGS2 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU), and the LPA-induced increases in PTGS2 and PLAU expression were inhibited by LPAR3 siRNA. Collectively, these results showed that LPA promotes proliferation, migration, and differentiation of pTr cells by activating the ERK1/2-P90RSK-RPS6 and P38 pathways, indicating that the LPA-LPAR3 system may be involved in the development of trophoblast during early pregnancy in pigs. PMID:27030044

  10. Lipid phosphate phosphatase inhibitors locally amplify lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor signalling in rat brain cryosections without affecting global LPA degradation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signalling phospholipid with multiple biological functions, mainly mediated through specific G protein-coupled receptors. Aberrant LPA signalling is being increasingly implicated in the pathology of common human diseases, such as arteriosclerosis and cancer. The lifetime of the signalling pool of LPA is controlled by the equilibrium between synthesizing and degradative enzymatic activity. In the current study, we have characterized these enzymatic pathways in rat brain by pharmacologically manipulating the enzymatic machinery required for LPA degradation. Results In rat brain cryosections, the lifetime of bioactive LPA was found to be controlled by Mg2+-independent, N-ethylmaleimide-insensitive phosphatase activity, attributed to lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs). Pharmacological inhibition of this LPP activity amplified LPA1 receptor signalling, as revealed using functional autoradiography. Although two LPP inhibitors, sodium orthovanadate and propranolol, locally amplified receptor responses, they did not affect global brain LPA phosphatase activity (also attributed to Mg2+-independent, N-ethylmaleimide-insensitive phosphatases), as confirmed by Pi determination and by LC/MS/MS. Interestingly, the phosphate analog, aluminium fluoride (AlFx-) not only irreversibly inhibited LPP activity thereby potentiating LPA1 receptor responses, but also totally prevented LPA degradation, however this latter effect was not essential in order to observe AlFx--dependent potentiation of receptor signalling. Conclusions We conclude that vanadate- and propranolol-sensitive LPP activity locally guards the signalling pool of LPA whereas the majority of brain LPA phosphatase activity is attributed to LPP-like enzymatic activity which, like LPP activity, is sensitive to AlFx- but resistant to the LPP inhibitors, vanadate and propranolol. PMID:22686545

  11. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Michihiro; He, Peijian; Yun, C. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG) human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia. PMID:27124742

  12. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 alters oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, Beatriz; Riquelme, Raquel; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Jiménez, Antonio Jesús; de Diego, Isabel; Gómez-Conde, Ana Isabel; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Aguirre, José Ángel; Chun, Jerold; Pedraza, Carmen; Santín, Luis Javier; Fernández, Oscar; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an intercellular signaling lipid that regulates multiple cellular functions, acting through specific G-protein coupled receptors (LPA(1-6)). Our previous studies using viable Malaga variant maLPA1-null mice demonstrated the requirement of the LPA1 receptor for normal proliferation, differentiation, and survival of the neuronal precursors. In the cerebral cortex LPA1 is expressed extensively in differentiating oligodendrocytes, in parallel with myelination. Although exogenous LPA-induced effects have been investigated in myelinating cells, the in vivo contribution of LPA1 to normal myelination remains to be demonstrated. This study identified a relevant in vivo role for LPA1 as a regulator of cortical myelination. Immunochemical analysis in adult maLPA1-null mice demonstrated a reduction in the steady-state levels of the myelin proteins MBP, PLP/DM20, and CNPase in the cerebral cortex. The myelin defects were confirmed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Stereological analysis limited the defects to adult differentiating oligodendrocytes, without variation in the NG2+ precursor cells. Finally, a possible mechanism involving oligodendrocyte survival was demonstrated by the impaired intracellular transport of the PLP/DM20 myelin protein which was accompanied by cellular loss, suggesting stress-induced apoptosis. These findings describe a previously uncharacterized in vivo functional role for LPA1 in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the CNS, underlining the importance of the maLPA1-null mouse as a model for the study of demyelinating diseases. PMID:25226845

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Signaling in Vertebrate Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoqin; Chun, Jerold

    2009-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a cell membrane phospholipid metabolite that can act as an extracellular signal. Its effects are mediated through at least five G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-5, and likely others as well. Studies in multiple species including LPA receptor-deficient mice and humans have identified or implicated important roles for receptor-mediated LPA signaling in multiple aspects of vertebrate reproduction. These include ovarian function, spermatogenesis, fertilization, early embryo development, embryo implantation, embryo spacing, decidualization, pregnancy maintenance, and parturition. LPA signaling may also have pathological consequences, influencing aspects of endometriosis and ovarian cancer. Here we review recent progress in LPA signaling research relevant to female and male reproduction. PMID:19836970

  14. Analysis of Edg-Like LPA Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Balazs; Pazmany, Tamas; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid derivative lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) serves as a signalling molecule through the activation of LPA receptors, which belong to the G-protein-coupled receptors. From a pharmacological point of view, the ('EDG-like') LPA1-3 receptors have attracted much attention, therefore we have also been focusing in our study on these subtypes. The LPA1receptors are widely expressed in the human body; interestingly, LPA1 might have a role in the pathomechanism of obesity. In order to recognize key structural features of the molecular interactions of human LPA1with its agonists, we built up the 3D structure of the LPA1 through homology modeling. Next, LPA1 agonists and antagonists were docked into the model. The mode of binding and the interactions between ligands and key amino acids (R3.28 and Q3.29) were consistent with mutagenesis assays and previously published models, indicating that this model is able to discriminate high-affinity compounds and may be useful for the development of novel agonists of LPA1. Homology models were also constructed for LPA2 and LPA3. All available agonists with published EC50 values, antagonists with IC50 values and compounds with Ki values for either of LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 were collected from the ChEMBL database and were docked into the corresponding model.Ourmodels for the LPA1-3 receptors can discriminate high-affinity compounds identified in silico HTS studies and may be useful for the development of novel agonistsof LPA receptors. With a better understanding of the differences between LPA1-3 receptors new, selective agonists and antagonist could be designed, which could be used in the therapy of various diseases with a better side-effect profile. PMID:25686617

  15. LPA receptor signaling: pharmacology, physiology, and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Yun C.; Stoddard, Nicole C.; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small ubiquitous lipid found in vertebrate and nonvertebrate organisms that mediates diverse biological actions and demonstrates medicinal relevance. LPA’s functional roles are driven by extracellular signaling through at least six 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are named LPA1–6 and signal through numerous effector pathways activated by heterotrimeric G proteins, including Gi/o, G12/13, Gq, and Gs. LPA receptor-mediated effects have been described in numerous cell types and model systems, both in vitro and in vivo, through gain- and loss-of-function studies. These studies have revealed physiological and pathophysiological influences on virtually every organ system and developmental stage of an organism. These include the nervous, cardiovascular, reproductive, and pulmonary systems. Disturbances in normal LPA signaling may contribute to a range of diseases, including neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, pain, cardiovascular disease, bone disorders, fibrosis, cancer, infertility, and obesity. These studies underscore the potential of LPA receptor subtypes and related signaling mechanisms to provide novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24643338

  16. LPA Is a Chemorepellent for B16 Melanoma Cells: Action through the cAMP-Elevating LPA5 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jongsma, Maikel; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Rzadkowski, Adrian; Jalink, Kees; Moolenaar, Wouter H.

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid mediator enriched in serum, stimulates cell migration, proliferation and other functions in many cell types. LPA acts on six known G protein-coupled receptors, termed LPA1–6, showing both overlapping and distinct signaling properties. Here we show that, unexpectedly, LPA and serum almost completely inhibit the transwell migration of B16 melanoma cells, with alkyl-LPA(18∶1) being 10-fold more potent than acyl-LPA(18∶1). The anti-migratory response to LPA is highly polarized and dependent on protein kinase A (PKA) but not Rho kinase activity; it is associated with a rapid increase in intracellular cAMP levels and PIP3 depletion from the plasma membrane. B16 cells express LPA2, LPA5 and LPA6 receptors. We show that LPA-induced chemorepulsion is mediated specifically by the alkyl-LPA-preferring LPA5 receptor (GPR92), which raises intracellular cAMP via a noncanonical pathway. Our results define LPA5 as an anti-migratory receptor and they implicate the cAMP-PKA pathway, along with reduced PIP3 signaling, as an effector of chemorepulsion in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:22195035

  17. Specific LPA receptor subtype mediation of LPA-induced hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and involvement of Akt and NFkappaB signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghai; Chen, Yuefeng; Zhu, Weiquan; Han, Yu; Han, Bianmei; Xu, Ruixia; Deng, Linzi; Cai, Yan; Cong, Xiangfeng; Yang, Yuejing; Hu, Shengshou; Chen, Xi

    2008-04-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with diverse functions mediated via G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In view of the elevated levels of LPA in acute myocardial infarction (MI) patients we have conducted studies aimed at identifying specific LPA receptor subtypes and signaling events that may mediate its actions in hypertrophic remodeling. Experiments were carried out in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) exposed to LPA and in a rat MI model. In NRCMs, LPA-induced hypertrophic growth was completely abrogated by DGPP, an LPA1/LPA3 antagonist. The LPA3 agonist OMPT, but not the LPA2 agonist dodecylphosphate, promoted hypertrophy as examined by 3[H]-Leucine incorporation, ANF-luciferase expression and cell area. In in vivo experiments, LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 mRNA levels as well as LPA1 and LPA3 protein levels increased together with left ventricular remodeling (LVRM) after MI. In addition, LPA stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and p65 protein and activated NF-kappaB-luciferase expression. Inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), mTOR (rapamycin), and NF-kappaB (PDTC or SN50) effectively prevented LPA-induced 3[H]-Leucine incorporation and ANF-luciferase expression. Furthermore, ERK inhibitors (U0126 and PD98059) suppressed LPA-stimulated activation of NF-kappaB and p65 phosphorylation whereas wortmannin showed no effect on NF-kappaB activation. Our findings indicate that LPA3 and/or LPA1 mediate LPA-induced hypertrophy of NRCMs and that LPA1 and LPA3 may be involved in LVRM of MI rats. Moreover, Akt and NF-kappaB signaling pathways independently implicate in LPA-stimulated myocardial hypertrophic growth. PMID:17891781

  18. Autotaxin-LPA receptor axis in the pathogenesis of lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiangpeng; Wei, Xiaojie; Lu, Shaolin; He, Peijian

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small lipid which mediates a variety of cellular functions via the activation of LPA receptors. LPA is generated from lysophosphatidylcholine by the extracellular enzyme, autotaxin (ATX). Elevated ATX expression, LPA production and their signaling pathways have been reported in multiple pathological conditions of lung tissue, including inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. Emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of ATX and LPA receptors in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. Here, we briefly review the current knowledge of different roles of the ATX-LPA receptor axis in lung diseases focusing on inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. PMID:26770305

  19. Lysophospholipid receptors LPA1–3 are not required for the inhibitory effects of LPA on mouse retinal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Birgbauer, Eric; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    One of the major requirements in the development of the visual system is axonal guidance of retinal ganglion cells toward correct targets in the brain. A novel class of extracellular lipid signaling molecules, lysophospholipids, may serve as potential axon guidance cues. They signal through cognate G protein-coupled receptors, at least some of which are expressed in the visual system. Here we show that in the mouse visual system, a lysophospholipid known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is inhibitory to retinal neurites in vitro when delivered extracellularly, causing growth cone collapse and neurite retraction. This inhibitory effect of LPA is both active in the nanomolar range and specific compared to the related lysophospholipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Knockout mice lacking three of the five known LPA receptors, LPA1–3, continue to display retinal growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in response to LPA, demonstrating that these three receptors are not required for these inhibitory effects and indicating the existence of one or more functional LPA receptors expressed on mouse retinal neurites that can mediate neurite retraction. PMID:26966392

  20. Regulation of the LPA2 Receptor Signaling through the Carboxyl-Terminal Tail-Mediated Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fang-Tsyr; Lai, Yun-Ju

    2008-01-01

    While it is well known that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse physiological and pathophysiological responses through the activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors, the specificity and molecular mechanisms by which different LPA receptors mediate these biological responses remain largely unknown. Recent identification of several PDZ proteins and zinc finger proteins that interact with the carboxyl-terminal tail of the LPA2 receptor provides a considerable progress towards the understanding of the mechanisms how the LPA2 receptor specifically mediates LPA signaling pathways. These findings have led to the proposal that there are at least two distinct protein interaction motifs present in the carboxyl terminus of the LPA2 receptor. Together, these data provide a new concept that the efficiency and specificity of the LPA2 receptor-mediated signal transduction can be achieved through the cross-regulation between the classical G protein-activated signaling cascades and the interacting partner-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:18501721

  1. Autotaxin and LPA Receptors Represent Potential Molecular Targets for the Radiosensitization of Murine Glioma through Effects on Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Linkous, Amanda G.; Hu, Rong; Leahy, Kathleen M.; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite wide margins and high dose irradiation, unresectable malignant glioma (MG) is less responsive to radiation and is uniformly fatal. We previously found that cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is a molecular target for radiosensitizing cancer through the vascular endothelium. Autotaxin (ATX) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors are downstream from cPLA2 and highly expressed in MG. Using the ATX and LPA receptor inhibitor, α-bromomethylene phosphonate LPA (BrP-LPA), we studied ATX and LPA receptors as potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of tumor vasculature in MG. Treatment of Human Umbilical Endothelial cells (HUVEC) and mouse brain microvascular cells bEND.3 with 5 µmol/L BrP-LPA and 3 Gy irradiation showed decreased clonogenic survival, tubule formation, and migration. Exogenous addition of LPA showed radioprotection that was abrogated in the presence of BrP-LPA. In co-culture experiments using bEND.3 and mouse GL-261 glioma cells, treatment with BrP-LPA reduced Akt phosphorylation in both irradiated cell lines and decreased survival and migration of irradiated GL-261 cells. Using siRNA to knock down LPA receptors LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 in HUVEC, we demonstrated that knockdown of LPA2 but neither LPA1 nor LPA3 led to increased viability and proliferation. However, knockdown of LPA1 and LPA3 but not LPA2 resulted in complete abrogation of tubule formation implying that LPA1 and LPA3 on endothelial cells are likely targets of BrP-LPA radiosensitizing effect. Using heterotopic tumor models of GL-261, mice treated with BrP-LPA and irradiation showed a tumor growth delay of 6.8 days compared to mice treated with irradiation alone indicating that inhibition of ATX and LPA receptors may significantly improve malignant glioma response to radiation therapy. These findings identify ATX and LPA receptors as molecular targets for the development of radiosensitizers for MG. PMID:21799791

  2. LPA signaling is required for dopaminergic neuron development and is reduced through low expression of the LPA1 receptor in a 6-OHDA lesion model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Ethan Y; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Sun, Feng-Xiang; Han, Hai-Lin; Han, Hui-Rong; Lin, Zhi-Juan; Pan, Zhi-Fang; Qu, Mei-Hua; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that activates at least five known G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): LPA1-LPA5. The nervous system is a major locus for LPA1 expression. LPA has been shown to regulate neuronal proliferation, migration, and differentiation during central nervous system development as well as neuronal survival. Furthermore, deficient LPA signaling has been implicated in several neurological disorders including neuropathic pain and schizophrenia. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that results from the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The specific molecular pathways that lead to DA neuron degeneration, however, are poorly understood. The influence of LPA in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into DA neurons in vitro and LPA1 expression in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD in vivo were examined in the present study. LPA induced neuronal differentiation in 80.2 % of the MSC population. These MSCs developed characteristic neuronal morphology and expressed the neuronal marker, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), while expression of the glial marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was absent. Moreover, 27.6 % of differentiated MSCs were positive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a marker for DA neurons. In the 6-OHDA PD rat model, LPA1 expression in the substantia nigra was significantly reduced compared to control. These results suggest LPA signaling via activation of LPA1 may be necessary for DA neuron development and survival. Furthermore, reduced LPA/LPA1 signaling may be involved in DA neuron degeneration thus contributing to the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:26169757

  3. Mechanisms of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediated stimulation of intestinal apical Cl-/OH- exchange.

    PubMed

    Singla, Amika; Dwivedi, Alka; Saksena, Seema; Gill, Ravinder K; Alrefai, Waddah A; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2010-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a potent bioactive phospholipid, is a natural component of food products like soy and egg yolk. LPA modulates a number of epithelial functions and has been shown to inhibit cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. Antidiarrheal effects of LPA are known to be mediated by inhibiting chloride secretion. However, the effects of LPA on chloride absorption in the mammalian intestine are not known. The present studies examined the effects of LPA on apical Cl(-)/OH(-) exchangers known to be involved in chloride absorption in intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were treated with LPA, and Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity was measured as DIDS-sensitive (36)Cl(-) uptake. Cell surface biotinylation studies were performed to evaluate the effect of LPA on cell surface levels of apical Cl(-)/OH(-) exchangers, downregulated in adenoma (DRA) (SLC26A3), and putative anion transporter-1 (SLC26A6). Treatment of Caco-2 cells with LPA (100 muM) significantly stimulated Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity. Specific agonist for LPA2 receptor mimicked the effects of LPA. LPA-mediated stimulation of Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity was dependent on activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Consistent with the functional activity, LPA treatment resulted in increased levels of DRA on the apical membrane. Our results demonstrate that LPA stimulates apical Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity and surface levels of DRA in intestinal epithelial cells. This increase in Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange may contribute to the antidiarrheal effects of LPA. PMID:19910524

  4. Identification of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) as a biomarker for lysophosphatidic acid receptor type 1 (LPA1) activation in human breast and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    David, Marion; Sahay, Debashish; Mege, Florence; Descotes, Françoise; Leblanc, Raphaël; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid with growth factor-like functions due to activation of a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA₁₋₆). LPA receptor type 1 (LPA₁) signaling influences the pathophysiology of many diseases including cancer, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as lung, liver and kidney fibrosis. Therefore, LPA₁ is an attractive therapeutic target. However, most mammalian cells co-express multiple LPA receptors whose co-activation impairs the validation of target inhibition in patients because of missing LPA receptor-specific biomarkers. LPA₁ is known to induce IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, as also do LPA₂ and LPA₃. In this work, we first determined the LPA induced early-gene expression profile in three unrelated human cancer cell lines expressing different patterns of LPA receptors (PC3: LPA₁,₂,₆; MDA-MB-231: LPA1,2; MCF-7: LPA₂,₆). Among the set of genes upregulated by LPA only in LPA₁-expressing cells, we validated by QPCR and ELISA that upregulation of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was inhibited by LPA₁-₃ antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719). Upregulation and downregulation of HB-EGF mRNA was confirmed in vitro in human MDA-B02 breast cancer cells stably overexpressing LPA₁ (MDA-B02/LPA₁) and downregulated for LPA₁ (MDA-B02/shLPA1), respectively. At a clinical level, we quantified the expression of LPA₁ and HB-EGF by QPCR in primary tumors of a cohort of 234 breast cancer patients and found a significantly higher expression of HB-EGF in breast tumors expressing high levels of LPA₁. We also generated human xenograph prostate tumors in mice injected with PC3 cells and found that a five-day treatment with Ki16425 significantly decreased both HB-EGF mRNA expression at the primary tumor site and circulating human HB-EGF concentrations in serum. All together our results demonstrate that HB-EGF is a new and relevant biomarker with potentially high value in quantifying LPA

  5. Fear extinction and acute stress reactivity reveal a role of LPA(1) receptor in regulating emotional-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, C; Sánchez-López, J; Castilla-Ortega, E; Rosell-Valle, C; Zambrana-Infantes, E; García-Fernández, M; Rodriguez de Fonseca, F; Chun, J; Santín, L J; Estivill-Torrús, G

    2014-09-01

    LPA1 receptor is one of the six characterized G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6) through which lysophosphatidic acid acts as an intercellular signaling molecule. It has been proposed that this receptor has a role in controlling anxiety-like behaviors and in the detrimental consequences of stress. Here, we sought to establish the involvement of the LPA1 receptor in emotional regulation. To this end, we examined fear extinction in LPA1-null mice, wild-type and LPA1 antagonist-treated animals. In LPA1-null mice we also characterized the morphology and GABAergic properties of the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, the expression of c-Fos protein in the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex, and the corticosterone response following acute stress were examined in both genotypes. Our data indicated that the absence of the LPA1 receptor significantly inhibited fear extinction. Treatment of wild-type mice with the LPA1 antagonist Ki16425 mimicked the behavioral phenotype of LPA1-null mice, revealing that the LPA1 receptor was involved in extinction. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed a reduction in the number of neurons, GABA+ cells, calcium-binding proteins and the volume of the amygdala in LPA1-null mice. Following acute stress, LPA1-null mice showed increased corticosterone and c-Fos expression in the amygdala. In conclusion, LPA1 receptor is involved in emotional behaviors and in the anatomical integrity of the corticolimbic circuit, the deregulation of which may be a susceptibility factor for anxiety disorders and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:23775489

  6. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I.; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  7. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) 18:1 transcriptional regulation of primary human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cerutis, D. Roselyn; Weston, Michael D.; Ogunleye, Afolabi O.; McVaney, Timothy P.; Miyamoto, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    The pleiotropic, bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid [(LPA), 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate] exerts critical regulatory actions in physiology and pathophysiology in many systems. It is present in normal bodily fluids, and is elevated in pathology (1). In vivo, “LPA” exists as distinct molecular species, each having a single fatty acid of varying chain length and degree of unsaturation covalently attached to the glycerol backbone via an acyl, alkyl, or alkenyl link. These species differ in affinities for the individual LPA receptors [(LPARs), LPA1-6] and coupling to G proteins (2). However, LPA 18:1 has been and continues to be the most commonly utilized species in reported studies. The actions of “LPA” remain poorly defined in oral biology and pathophysiology. Our laboratory has addressed this knowledge gap by studying in vitro the actions of the major human salivary LPA species [18:1, 18:0, and 16:0 (3)] in human oral cells [4], [5], [6], [7]. This includes gingival fibroblasts (GF), which our flow cytometry data from multiple donors found that they express LPA1-5 (6). We have also reported that these species are ten-fold elevated to pharmacologic levels in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid obtained from patients with moderate–severe periodontitis (8). As the potential of LPA to regulate transcriptional activity had not been examined in the oral system, this study used whole human genome microarray analysis to test the hypothesis that LPA 18:1-treated human GF would show significant changes in gene transcripts relevant to their biology, wound-healing, and inflammatory responses. LPA 18:1 was found to significantly regulate a large, complex set of genes critical to GF biology in these categories and to periodontal disease. The raw data has been deposited at NCBI's GEO database as record GSE57496. PMID:26484133

  9. Exploratory, anxiety and spatial memory impairments are dissociated in mice lacking the LPA1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Sánchez-López, Jorge; Hoyo-Becerra, Carolina; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Zambrana-Infantes, Emma; Chun, Jerold; Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez De; Pedraza, Carmen; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santin, Luis J.

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a new, intercellular signalling molecule in the brain that has an important role in adult hippocampal plasticity. Mice lacking the LPA1 receptor exhibit motor, emotional and cognitive alterations. However, the potential relationship among these concomitant impairments was unclear. Wild-type and maLPA1-null mice were tested on the hole-board for habituation and spatial learning. MaLPA1-null mice exhibited reduced exploration in a novel context and a defective intersession habituation that also revealed increased anxiety-like behaviour throughout the hole-board testing. In regard to spatial memory, maLPA1 nulls failed to reach the controls’ performance at the end of the reference memory task. Moreover, their defective working memory on the first training day suggested a delayed acquisition of the task’s working memory rule, which is also a long term memory component. The temporal interval between trials and the task’s difficulty may explain some of the deficits found in these mice. Principal components analysis revealed that alterations found in each behavioural dimension were independent. Therefore, exploratory and emotional impairments did not account for the cognitive deficits that may be attributed to maLPA1 nulls’ hippocampal malfunction. PMID:20388543

  10. Cross-talk between LPA1 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Mediates Up-regulation of Sphingosine Kinase 1 to Promote Gastric Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Fang, Xianjun; Kordula, Tomasz; Takabe, Kazuaki; Lépine, Sandrine; Alvarez, Sergio E.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are lysophospholipid mediators of diverse cellular processes important for cancer progression. S1P is produced by two sphingosine kinases, SphK1 and SphK2. Expression of SphK1 is elevated in many cancers. Here, we report that LPA markedly enhanced SphK1 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer MKN1 cells but had no effect on SphK2. LPA also up-regulated SphK1 expression in other human cancer cells that endogenously express the LPA1 receptor, such as DLD1 colon cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, but not in HT29 colon cancer cells or MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells, which do not express the LPA1 receptor. An LPA1 receptor antagonist or down-regulation of its expression prevented SphK1 and S1P3 receptor up-regulation by LPA. LPA transactivated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in these cells, and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 attenuated the increased SphK1 and S1P3 expression induced by LPA. Moreover, down-regulation of SphK1 attenuated LPA-stimulated migration and invasion of MNK1 cells yet had no effect on expression of neovascularizing factors, such as interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), or uPA receptor induced by LPA. Finally, down-regulation of S1P3, but not S1P1, also reduced LPA-stimulated migration and invasion of MKN1 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that SphK1 is a convergence point of multiple cell surface receptors for three different ligands, LPA, EGF, and S1P, which have all been implicated in regulation of motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. PMID:18701480

  11. Participation of analogues of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA): oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (L-alpha-LPA) and 1-oleoyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerophosphothionate (OMPT) in uterine smooth muscle contractility of the pregnant pigs.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, W; Kamińska, K; Bogacki, M; Maślanka, T; Jaroszewski, J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies show that a representative of phospholipids, namely lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPA1.3) play a significant role in the reproductive processes, i. a, in the modulation of the uterine contractility. The participation of LPA3 in the reproductive processes has been revealed in mice and has not been studied in gilts. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the role/action of LPA and its receptors LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 on the contraction activity in the porcine uterus. The study was conducted on an experimental model in which the pig uterus consisted of the one whole uterine horn and a part of the second horn, both connected with the uterine corpus. Uterine strips consisting of the endometrium with the myometrium (ENDO/MYO) and myometrium (MYO) alone were collected on days 12-14 of the estrous cycle (control group; n = 5) or pregnancy (experimental group; n = 5). Two analogues of LPA at increasing doses were used: oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (L-alpha-LPA, a selective agonist of LPA1 and LPA2 receptors; 10(-7) M; 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M) and 1-oleoyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerophosphothionate (OMPT, a selective agonist of LPA3 receptor; 68 nM; 136 nM and 680 nM). L-alpha-LPA caused an increase in the contraction tension, amplitude and frequency of ENDO/MYO from the uterine horn with the developing embryos. This effect was not observed in MYO in both groups examined. In the ENDO/MYO strips of the uterine horn with developing embryos, OMPT significantly increased the contraction tension at the highest dose (680 nM) and amplitude at all doses examined, while frequency of contractions was decreased at doses of 136 nM and 680 nM. In the MYO strips of the uterine horn with embryos a significant increase in the contraction tension and amplitude after the highest dose of OMPT was observed. The results obtained imply the important role of receptors LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 in the contraction activity of the porcine uterus during early pregnancy. PMID

  12. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  13. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Effects of bisphenol A and 4-nonylphenol on cellular responses through the different induction of LPA receptors in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Araki, Mutsumi; Hirane, Miku; Tanabe, Eriko; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors (LPA1 to LPA6) mediates a variety of cellular functions, including cell proliferation, migration, morphogenesis, and differentiation. Recently, we demonstrated that the different induction of LPA receptors by estrogens regulates cell motile activity of rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells. In the present study, to assess whether endocrine disruptors (EDs) are involved in cellular functions through LPA signaling, we measured cell motile activity and LPA receptor expressions in WB-F344 cells treated with bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP). Using quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis, the Lpar1 expression was elevated in BPA-treated cells, whereas the Lpar3 expression was decreased. In contrast, 4-NP increased the Lpar3 expression, but not the Lpar1 and Lpar2. For cell motility assay with a Cell Culture Insert, cell motile activity of BPA-treated cells was significantly lower than that of untreated cells. In contrast, 4-NP markedly enhanced cell motile activity. The effects of BPA and 4-NP on cell motility were inhibited by the Lpar1 or Lpar3 knockdown. These results suggest that BPA and 4-NP may regulate cell motile activity through the different induction of LPA receptors in WB-F344 cells. PMID:24460192

  15. Anatomical location of LPA1 activation and LPA phospholipid precursors in rodent and human brain.

    PubMed

    González de San Román, Estibaliz; Manuel, Iván; Giralt, María Teresa; Chun, Jerold; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis Javier; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors: LPA1 -LPA6 . LPA evokes several responses in the CNS, including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. Those cell processes involve survival, migration, adhesion proliferation, differentiation, and myelination. The anatomical localization of LPA1 is incompletely understood, particularly with regard to LPA binding. Therefore, we have used functional [(35) S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The greatest activity was observed in myelinated areas of the white matter such as corpus callosum, internal capsule and cerebellum. MaLPA1 -null mice (a variant of LPA1 -null) lack [(35) S]GTPγS basal binding in white matter areas, where the LPA1 receptor is expressed at high levels, suggesting a relevant role of the activity of this receptor in the most myelinated brain areas. In addition, phospholipid precursors of LPA were localized by MALDI-IMS in both rodent and human brain slices identifying numerous species of phosphatides and phosphatidylcholines. Both phosphatides and phosphatidylcholines species represent potential LPA precursors. The anatomical distribution of these precursors in rodent and human brain may indicate a metabolic relationship between LPA and LPA1 receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), LPA1 to LPA6 . LPA evokes several responses in the central nervous system (CNS), including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. We used functional [(35) S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 -binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The distribution of LPA1 receptors in rat, mouse and human brains show the highest activity in white matter myelinated areas. The basal and

  16. Anatomical Location of LPA1 Activation and LPA Phospholipid Precursors in Rodent and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    González de San Román, E; Manuel, I; Giralt, MT; Chun, J; Estivill-Torrús, G; Rodriguez de Fonseca, F; Santín, LJ; Ferrer, I; Rodriguez-Puertas, R

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): LPA1–LPA6. LPA evokes several responses in the CNS including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. Those cell processes involve survival, migration, adhesion proliferation, differentiation and myelination. The anatomical localization of LPA1 is incompletely understood, particularly with regard to LPA binding. Therefore, we have used functional [35S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The greatest activity was observed in myelinated areas of the white matter such as corpus callosum, internal capsule and cerebellum. MaLPA1-null mice (a variant of LPA1-null) lack [35S]GTPγS basal binding in white matter areas, where the LPA1 receptor is expressed at high levels, suggesting a relevant role of the activity of this receptor in the most myelinated brain areas. In addition, phospholipid precursors of LPA were localized by MALDI-IMS in both rodent and human brain slices identifying numerous species of phosphatides (PA) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Both PA and PC species represent potential LPA precursors. The anatomical distribution of these precursors in rodent and human brain may indicate a metabolic relationship between LPA and LPA1 receptors. PMID:25857358

  17. Diverse effects of LPA4, LPA5 and LPA6 on the activation of tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shuhei; Hirane, Miku; Fukushima, Kaori; Tomimatsu, Ayaka; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-05-22

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular biological lipid which interacts with G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1 to LPA6). LPA signaling via LPA receptors mediates several cellular responses. In the present study, to assess the roles of LPA4, LPA5 and LPA6 in cellular functions of pancreatic cancer cells, we generated LPA receptor knockdown cells from PANC-1 cells (PANC-sh4, PANC-sh5 and PANC-sh6 cells, respectively). In cell motility assay, PANC-sh4 and PANC-sh5 cells enhanced the cell motile activities, compared with control cells. In contrast, the cell motile activity of PANC-sh6 cells was suppressed. The invasive activities of PANC-sh4 and PANC-sh5 cells were markedly stimulated, while PANC-sh6 cells showed the low invasive activity. In colony assay, PANC-sh4 and PANC-sh5 cells formed the large sized colonies, but not PANC-sh6 cells. When endothelial cells were incubated with supernatants from PANC-sh4 and PANC-sh5 cells, the cell motility and tube formation of endothelial cells were significantly induced, but not PANC-sh6 cells. These results suggest that the diverse roles of LPA4, LPA5 and LPA6 are involved in the activation of tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:25849892

  18. Regulation of T cell motility in vitro and in vivo by LPA and LPA2.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Sara A; Capece, Tara; Popovic, Milan; Chapman, Timothy J; Rezaee, Fariba; Kim, Minsoo; Georas, Steve N

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and the LPA-generating enzyme autotaxin (ATX) have been implicated in lymphocyte trafficking and the regulation of lymphocyte entry into lymph nodes. High local concentrations of LPA are thought to be present in lymph node high endothelial venules, suggesting a direct influence of LPA on cell migration. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of LPA, and more work is needed to define the expression and function of the six known G protein-coupled receptors (LPA 1-6) in T cells. We studied the effects of 18∶1 and 16∶0 LPA on naïve CD4+ T cell migration and show that LPA induces CD4+ T cell chemorepulsion in a Transwell system, and also improves the quality of non-directed migration on ICAM-1 and CCL21 coated plates. Using intravital two-photon microscopy, lpa2-/- CD4+ T cells display a striking defect in early migratory behavior at HEVs and in lymph nodes. However, later homeostatic recirculation and LPA-directed migration in vitro were unaffected by loss of lpa2. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unsuspected and non-redundant role for LPA2 in intranodal T cell motility, and suggest that specific functions of LPA may be manipulated by targeting T cell LPA receptors. PMID:25003200

  19. The rice OsLpa1 gene encodse a novel protein involved in phytic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice low phytic acid 1 (OsLpa1) gene was originally identified using a forward genetics approach. Mutation of this gene resulted in a 45% reduction in rice seed phytic acid with a molar-equivalent increase in inorganic phosphorus; however, the rice lpa1 mutant does not appear to differ significa...

  20. Aggravation of Chronic Stress Effects on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Spatial Memory in LPA1 Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Hoyo-Becerra, Carolina; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor regulates plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. Here, we studied whether absence of the LPA1 receptor modulated the detrimental effects of chronic stress on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial memory. Methodology/Principal Findings Male LPA1-null (NULL) and wild-type (WT) mice were assigned to control or chronic stress conditions (21 days of restraint, 3 h/day). Immunohistochemistry for bromodeoxyuridine and endogenous markers was performed to examine hippocampal cell proliferation, survival, number and maturation of young neurons, hippocampal structure and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Corticosterone levels were measured in another a separate cohort of mice. Finally, the hole-board test assessed spatial reference and working memory. Under control conditions, NULL mice showed reduced cell proliferation, a defective population of young neurons, reduced hippocampal volume and moderate spatial memory deficits. However, the primary result is that chronic stress impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in NULLs more severely than in WT mice in terms of cell proliferation; apoptosis; the number and maturation of young neurons; and both the volume and neuronal density in the granular zone. Only stressed NULLs presented hypocortisolemia. Moreover, a dramatic deficit in spatial reference memory consolidation was observed in chronically stressed NULL mice, which was in contrast to the minor effect observed in stressed WT mice. Conclusions/Significance These results reveal that the absence of the LPA1 receptor aggravates the chronic stress-induced impairment to hippocampal neurogenesis and its dependent functions. Thus, modulation of the LPA1 receptor pathway may be of interest with respect to the treatment of stress-induced hippocampal pathology. PMID:21980482

  1. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom phospholipase D (PLD) generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Envenomation by the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) may cause local dermonecrosis and, rarely, coagulopathies, kidney failure and death. A venom phospholipase, SMaseD (sphingomyelinase D), is responsible for the pathological manifestations of envenomation. Recently, the recombinant SMaseD from Loxosceles laeta was demonstrated to hydrolyse LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) to produce LPA (lysophosphatidic acid) and choline. Therefore activation of LPA signalling pathways may be involved in some manifestations of Loxosceles envenomation. To begin investigating this idea, we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding L. reclusa SMaseD. The 305 amino acid sequence of the L. reclusa enzyme is 87, 85 and 60% identical with those of L. arizonica, L. intermedia and L. laeta respectively. The recombinant enzyme expressed in bacteria had broad substrate specificity. The lysophospholipids LPC, LPI (18:1-1-oleyol lysophosphatidylinositol), LPS, LPG (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylglycerol), LBPA (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysobisphosphatidic acid) (all with various acyl chains), lyso-platelet-activating factor (C16:0), cyclic phosphatidic acid and sphingomyelin were hydrolysed, whereas sphingosylphosphorylcholine, PC (phosphatidylcholine; C22:6, C20:4 and C6:0), oxidized PCs and PAF (platelet-activating factor; C16:0) were not hydrolysed. The PAF analogue, edelfosine, inhibited enzyme activity. Recombinant enzyme plus LPC (C18:1) induced the migration of A2058 melanoma cells, and this activity was blocked by the LPA receptor antagonist, VPC32183. The recombinant spider enzyme was haemolytic, but this activity was absent from catalytically inactive H37N (His37→Asn) and H73N mutants. Our results demonstrate that Loxosceles phospholipase D hydrolyses a wider range of lysophospholipids than previously supposed, and thus the term ‘SMaseD’ is too limited in describing this enzyme. PMID:15926888

  2. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom phospholipase D (PLD) generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangderk; Lynch, Kevin R

    2005-10-15

    Envenomation by the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) may cause local dermonecrosis and, rarely, coagulopathies, kidney failure and death. A venom phospholipase, SMaseD (sphingomyelinase D), is responsible for the pathological manifestations of envenomation. Recently, the recombinant SMaseD from Loxosceles laeta was demonstrated to hydrolyse LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) to produce LPA (lysophosphatidic acid) and choline. Therefore activation of LPA signalling pathways may be involved in some manifestations of Loxosceles envenomation. To begin investigating this idea, we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding L. reclusa SMaseD. The 305 amino acid sequence of the L. reclusa enzyme is 87, 85 and 60% identical with those of L. arizonica, L. intermedia and L. laeta respectively. The recombinant enzyme expressed in bacteria had broad substrate specificity. The lysophospholipids LPC, LPI (18:1-1-oleyol lysophosphatidylinositol), LPS, LPG (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylglycerol), LBPA (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysobisphosphatidic acid) (all with various acyl chains), lyso-platelet-activating factor (C16:0), cyclic phosphatidic acid and sphingomyelin were hydrolysed, whereas sphingosylphosphorylcholine, PC (phosphatidylcholine; C22:6, C20:4 and C6:0), oxidized PCs and PAF (platelet-activating factor; C16:0) were not hydrolysed. The PAF analogue, edelfosine, inhibited enzyme activity. Recombinant enzyme plus LPC (C18:1) induced the migration of A2058 melanoma cells, and this activity was blocked by the LPA receptor antagonist, VPC32183. The recombinant spider enzyme was haemolytic, but this activity was absent from catalytically inactive H37N (His37-->Asn) and H73N mutants. Our results demonstrate that Loxosceles phospholipase D hydrolyses a wider range of lysophospholipids than previously supposed, and thus the term 'SMaseD' is too limited in describing this enzyme. PMID:15926888

  3. Activation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 Contributes to Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Nogueira, Eva; López-Serrano, Clara; Hernández, Joaquim; Lago, Natalia; Astudillo, Alma M.; Balsinde, Jesús; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular lipid mediator involved in many physiological functions that signals through six known G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–LPA6). A wide range of LPA effects have been identified in the CNS, including neural progenitor cell physiology, astrocyte and microglia activation, neuronal cell death, axonal retraction, and development of neuropathic pain. However, little is known about the involvement of LPA in CNS pathologies. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that LPA signaling via LPA1 contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury. LPA levels increase in the contused spinal cord parenchyma during the first 14 d. To model this potential contribution of LPA in the spinal cord, we injected LPA into the normal spinal cord, revealing that LPA induces microglia/macrophage activation and demyelination. Use of a selective LPA1 antagonist or mice lacking LPA1 linked receptor-mediated signaling to demyelination, which was in part mediated by microglia. Finally, we demonstrate that selective blockade of LPA1 after spinal cord injury results in reduced demyelination and improvement in locomotor recovery. Overall, these results support LPA–LPA1 signaling as a novel pathway that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord contusion in mice and suggest that LPA1 antagonism might be useful for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study reveals that LPA signaling via LPA receptor type 1 activation causes demyelination and functional deficits after spinal cord injury. PMID:26180199

  4. Inhibitory effects of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Mutsumi; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Ozaki, Shuhei; Mori, Shiori; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that interacts with G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA receptor-1 (LPA1) to LPA6). Here, we investigated the effects of LPA signaling via LPA5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells by generating Lpar5 overexpressing and Lpar5 knockdown cells from rat osteosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma cells, respectively. The cell motility activity of Lpar5 overexpressing cells was significantly lower, while Lpar5 knockdown cells showed high cell motility, compared with respective controls. Gelatin zymography showed that LPA5 suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2. LPA5 also inhibited the cell motility activity of endothelial cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor genes. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA5 negatively regulates the cellular functions of rat sarcoma cells. PMID:24798396

  5. Expressions of lysophosphatidic acid receptors in the development of human ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jinge; Su, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yifeng; Yan, You-Liang; Tang, Ya-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the associations between the expressions of three lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors (LPA1-3) and the development of ovarian carcinoma (OC). Method: Ovarian tissue specimens, including normal ovarian epithelium tissues, benign ovarian tumor tissues and OC tissues were collected from patients who underwent surgical resections between March 2012 and December 2014. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect LPA receptor expressions in ovarian tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to detect mRNA and protein expression of LPA receptors, respectively. Association analysis between LPA receptors protein expression and clinical pathological characteristics was conducted. The value of LPA2 and LPA3 in discriminating OC was confirmed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. Results: The positive expression rates of LPA2 and LPA3 in OC group was obviously higher than normal control and benign groups. The LPA2 and LPA3 mRNA and protein levels in OC group were higher than in normal control and benign groups. LPA2 and LPA3 mRNA expression levels were positively correlated with LPA2 and LPA3 protein expression in OC group. ROC curve analysis revealed that LPA2 yield a specificity of 96.3% and a sensitivity of 97.9%, and LPA3 yield a specificity of 98.5% and a sensitivity of 97.9% for the detection of OC. Conclusion: LPA2 and LPA3 were highly expressed in OC tissues, which may be involved in the development of OC. Further, LPA2 and LPA3 had higher sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing the OC from benign ovarian tumors, which could be potential diagnostic indictors in OC. PMID:26770382

  6. Cross-talk between lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and tropomyosin receptor kinase A promotes lung epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nan, Ling; Wei, Jianxin; Jacko, Anastasia M; Culley, Miranda K; Zhao, Jing; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Ma, Haichun; Zhao, Yutong

    2016-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid, which plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. LPA exerts its biological effects mainly through binding to cell-surface LPA receptors (LPA1-6), which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and GPCRs modulates GPCRs-mediated signaling. Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) is a RTK, which mediates nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced biological functions including cell migration in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we show LPA1 transactivation of TrkA in murine lung epithelial cells (MLE12). LPA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Down-regulation of LPA1 by siRNA transfection attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA, suggesting a cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA. To investigate the molecular regulation of the cross-talk, we focused on the interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. We found that LPA induced interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. The LPA1/TrkA complex was localized on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. The C-terminus of LPA1 was identified as the binding site for TrkA. Inhibition of TrkA attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA and LPA1 internalization, as well as lung epithelial cell migration. These studies provide a molecular mechanism for the transactivation of TrkA by LPA, and suggest that the cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA regulates LPA-induced receptor internalization and lung epithelial cell migration. PMID:26597701

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPAR) modulators: The current pharmacological toolbox.

    PubMed

    Llona-Minguez, Sabin; Ghassemian, Artin; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) are key lipid-signalling molecules that regulate a remarkably diverse set of cellular events, such as motility, chemotaxis, cell cycle progression, viability, and wound healing. The physiological and pathophysiological consequences of LPA signalling are evident and misregulation of LPA signalling can lead to pathologies like cancer, atherosclerosis, ischaemia, and fibrosis. LPA exerts its biological actions mainly through several types of G protein-coupled receptors, some of which display opposing or redundant effects. For this reason, selective LPA receptor small-molecule ligands can shine light on LPA biology and present an exciting opportunity for drug discovery endeavours. This review provides insights into the detailed chemical nature and pharmacological profile of the small-molecules thus far developed as LPA receptor modulators, as well as information on the preparation of key pharmaceuticals. This summary will facilitate future research efforts and nurture collaboration between chemists and biologists working in this emerging field. PMID:25704399

  8. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  9. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34(+) human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  10. The type 1 lysophosphatidic acid receptor is a target for therapy in bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Boucharaba, Ahmed; Serre, Claire-Marie; Guglielmi, Julien; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-derived lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) supports the progression of breast and ovarian cancer metastasis to bone. The mechanisms through which LPA promotes bone metastasis formation are, however, unknown. Here we report that silencing of the type 1 LPA receptor (LPA1) in cancer cells blocks the production of tumor-derived cytokines that are potent activators of osteoclast-mediated bone destruction and significantly reduces the progression of osteolytic bone metastases. Moreover, functional blockade of LPA action on its cognate receptor LPA1 using a pharmacological antagonist mimics the effects of silencing LPA1 in tumor cells in vitro and substantially reduces bone metastasis progression in animals. Overall, these results suggest that inhibition of platelet-derived LPA action on LPA1 expressed by tumor cells may be a promising therapeutic target for patients with bone metastases. PMID:16769891

  11. Higher LPA2 and LPA6 mRNA Levels in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Are Associated with Poorer Differentiation, Microvascular Invasion and Earlier Recurrence with Higher Serum Autotaxin Levels.

    PubMed

    Enooku, Kenichiro; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Sato, Masaya; Kudo, Hiroki; Maki, Harufumi; Koike, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) commonly develops in patients with liver fibrosis; in these patients, the blood levels of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its generating enzyme autotaxin (ATX) increase with the liver fibrosis stage. We aimed to examine the potential relevance of ATX and LPA in HCC. Fifty-eight HCC patients who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in the study. Among the LPA receptors in HCC, higher LPA2 mRNA levels correlated with poorer differentiation, and higher LPA6 mRNA levels correlated with microvascular invasion, which suggested a higher malignant potential of HCC with increased LPA2 and LPA6 expression. In patients with primary HCC, neither LPA2 nor LPA6 mRNA levels were associated with recurrence. However, when serum ATX levels were combined for analysis as a surrogate for plasma LPA levels, the cumulative intra-hepatic recurrence rate was higher in patients in whom both serum ATX levels and LPA2 or LPA6 mRNA levels were higher than the median. However, the mRNA level of phosphatidic acid-selective phospholipase A1ɑ, another LPA-generating enzyme, in HCC patients was not associated with pathological findings or recurrence, even in combination with the expression of LPA receptors. Higher LPA2 mRNA levels were associated with poorer differentiation, and higher LPA6 levels were associated with microvascular invasion in HCC; both became a risk factor for recurrence after surgical treatment when combined with increased serum ATX levels. ATX and LPA receptors merit consideration as therapeutic targets of HCC. PMID:27583415

  12. Combined mitigation of the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic acute radiation syndromes by an LPA2 receptor-specific nonlipid agonist.

    PubMed

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek D; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W; Yates, C Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I; Miller, Duane D; Tigyi, Gábor J

    2015-02-19

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonist of the type 2 G protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay of up to 72 hr reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not LPA2 knockout mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ-H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering from the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total-body irradiation. DBIBB represents a drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system. PMID:25619933

  13. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  14. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization drives fibrosis through CTGF-dependent fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Norihiko; Chun, Jerold; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Wada, Takashi; Luster, Andrew D.; Tager, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, in fibrotic diseases, but the mechanisms by which LPA-LPA1 signaling promotes pathological fibrosis remain to be fully elucidated. Using a mouse peritoneal fibrosis model, we demonstrate central roles for LPA and LPA1 in fibroblast proliferation. Genetic deletion or pharmacological antagonism of LPA1 protected mice from peritoneal fibrosis, blunting the increases in peritoneal collagen by 65.4 and 52.9%, respectively, compared to control animals and demonstrated that peritoneal fibroblast proliferation was highly LPA1 dependent. Activation of LPA1 on mesothelial cells induced these cells to express connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), driving fibroblast proliferation in a paracrine fashion. Activation of mesothelial cell LPA1 induced CTGF expression by inducing cytoskeleton reorganization in these cells, causing nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A and MRTF-B. Pharmacological inhibition of MRTF-induced transcription also diminished CTGF expression and fibrosis in the peritoneal fibrosis model, mitigating the increase in peritoneal collagen content by 57.9% compared to controls. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization therefore makes a previously unrecognized but critically important contribution to the profibrotic activities of LPA by driving MRTF-dependent CTGF expression, which, in turn, drives fibroblast proliferation.—Sakai, N., Chun, J., Duffield, J. S., Wada, T., Luster, A. D., Tager, A. M. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization drives fibrosis through CTGF-dependent fibroblast proliferation. PMID:23322166

  15. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  16. New insights into the autotaxin/LPA axis in cancer development and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphaël; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a simple lipid with a single fatty acyl chain linked to a glycerophosphate backbone. Despite the simplicity of its structure but owing to its interactions with a series of at least six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6), LPA exerts pleiotropic bioactivities including stimulation of proliferation, migration and survival of many cell types. Autotaxin (ATX) is a unique enzyme with a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity that is responsible for the levels of LPA in the blood circulation. Both LPA receptor family members and ATX/LysoPLD are aberrantly expressed in many human cancers. This review will present the more striking as well as novel experimental evidences using cell lines, cancer mouse models and transgenic animals identifying the roles for ATX and LPA receptors in cancer progression, tumor cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:25460336

  17. New insights into the autotaxin/LPA axis in cancer development and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Leblanc, Raphaël; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a simple lipid with a single fatty acyl chain linked to a glycerophosphate backbone. Despite the simplicity of its structure but owing to its interactions with a series of at least six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA{sub 1–6}), LPA exerts pleiotropic bioactivities including stimulation of proliferation, migration and survival of many cell types. Autotaxin (ATX) is a unique enzyme with a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity that is responsible for the levels of LPA in the blood circulation. Both LPA receptor family members and ATX/LysoPLD are aberrantly expressed in many human cancers. This review will present the more striking as well as novel experimental evidences using cell lines, cancer mouse models and transgenic animals identifying the roles for ATX and LPA receptors in cancer progression, tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  18. PCSK9 inhibition-mediated reduction in Lp(a) with evolocumab: an analysis of 10 clinical trials and the LDL receptor's role.

    PubMed

    Raal, Frederick J; Giugliano, Robert P; Sabatine, Marc S; Koren, Michael J; Blom, Dirk; Seidah, Nabil G; Honarpour, Narimon; Lira, Armando; Xue, Allen; Chiruvolu, Padmaja; Jackson, Simon; Di, Mei; Peach, Matthew; Somaratne, Ransi; Wasserman, Scott M; Scott, Rob; Stein, Evan A

    2016-06-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is independently associated with CVD risk. Evolocumab, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), decreases Lp(a). The potential mechanisms were assessed. A pooled analysis of Lp(a) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) in 3,278 patients from 10 clinical trials (eight phase 2/3; two extensions) was conducted. Within each parent study, biweekly and monthly doses of evolocumab statistically significantly reduced Lp(a) at week 12 versus control (P < 0.001 within each study); pooled median (quartile 1, quartile 3) percent reductions were 24.7% (40.0, 3.6) and 21.7% (39.9, 4.2), respectively. Reductions were maintained through week 52 of the open-label extension, and correlated with LDL-C reductions [with and without correction for Lp(a)-cholesterol] at both time points (P < 0.0001). The effect of LDL and LDL receptor (LDLR) availability on Lp(a) cell-association was measured in HepG2 cells: cell-associated LDL fluorescence was reversed by unlabeled LDL and Lp(a). Lp(a) cell-association was reduced by coincubation with LDL and PCSK9 and reversed by adding PCSK9 mAb. These studies support that reductions in Lp(a) with PCSK9 inhibition are partly due to increased LDLR-mediated uptake. In most situations, Lp(a) appears to compete poorly with LDL for LDLR binding and internalization, but when LDLR expression is increased with evolocumab, particularly in the setting of low circulating LDL, Lp(a) is reduced. PMID:27102113

  19. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling through the Lysophosphatidic Acid-1 Receptor Is Required for Alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Funke, Manuela; Knudsen, Lars; Lagares, David; Ebener, Simone; Probst, Clemens K; Fontaine, Benjamin A; Franklin, Alicia; Kellner, Manuela; Kühnel, Mark; Matthieu, Stephanie; Grothausmann, Roman; Chun, Jerold; Roberts, Jesse D; Ochs, Matthias; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, contributes to both the development and the pathological remodeling after injury of many organs. Because we found previously that LPA-LPA1 signaling contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, here we investigated whether this pathway is also involved in lung development. Quantitative assessment of lung architecture of LPA1-deficient knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of age using design-based stereology suggested the presence of an alveolarization defect in LPA1 KO mice at 3 weeks, which persisted as alveolar numbers increased in WT mice into adulthood. Across the ages examined, the lungs of LPA1 KO mice exhibited decreased alveolar numbers, septal tissue volumes, and surface areas, and increased volumes of the distal airspaces. Elastic fibers, critical to the development of alveolar septa, appeared less organized and condensed and more discontinuous in KO alveoli starting at P4. Tropoelastin messenger RNA expression was decreased in KO lungs, whereas expression of matrix metalloproteinases degrading elastic fibers was either decreased or unchanged. These results are consistent with the abnormal lung phenotype of LPA1 KO mice, being attributable to reduced alveolar septal formation during development, rather than to increased septal destruction as occurs in the emphysema of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Peripheral septal fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, which direct septation in late alveolarization, demonstrated reduced production of tropoelastin and matrix metalloproteinases, and diminished LPA-induced migration, when isolated from LPA1 KO mice. Taken together, our data suggest that LPA-LPA1 signaling is critically required for septation during alveolarization. PMID:27082727

  20. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  1. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  2. Genetic analysis of two OsLpa1-like genes in Arabidopsis reveals that only one is required for wild-type seed phytic acid levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) is the primary storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. The rice OsLpa1 encodes a novel protein required for wild-type levels of seed InsP6 and was identified from a low phytic acid (lpa) mutant exhibiting a 45-50% reduction in seed InsP...

  3. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Tara L.; Overall, Rupert W.; Vogler, Steffen; Sykes, Alex M.; Ruhwald, Susann; Lasse, Daniela; Ichwan, Muhammad; Fabel, Klaus; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1) is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative precursor cells suggested immune mechanisms and cytokine signaling as molecular regulators of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. In addition to LPA1 being a marker of this important stem cell population, we also show that the corresponding ligand LPA is directly involved in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis, an effect that can be attributed to LPA signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. PMID:27050949

  4. The salt stress-induced LPA response in Chlamydomonas is produced via PLA2 hydrolysis of DGK-generated phosphatidic acid[S

    PubMed Central

    Arisz, Steven A.; Munnik, Teun

    2011-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas has frequently been used as a eukaryotic model system to study intracellular phospholipid signaling pathways in response to environmental stresses. Earlier, we found that hypersalinity induced a rapid increase in the putative lipid second messenger, phosphatidic acid (PA), which was suggested to be generated via activation of a phospholipase D (PLD) pathway and the combined action of a phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK) pathway. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was also increased and was suggested to reflect a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity based on pharmacological evidence. The question of PA's and LPA's origin is, however, more complicated, especially as both function as precursors in the biosynthesis of phospho- and galactolipids. To address this complexity, a combination of fatty acid-molecular species analysis and in vivo 32P-radiolabeling was performed. Evidence is provided that LPA is formed from a distinct pool of PA characterized by a high α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) content. This molecular species was highly enriched in the polyphosphoinositide fraction, which is the substrate for PLC to form diacylglycerol. Together with differential 32P-radiolabeling studies and earlier PLD-transphosphatidylation and PLA2-inhibitor assays, the data were consistent with the hypothesis that the salt-induced LPA response is primarily generated through PLA2-mediated hydrolysis of DGK-generated PA and that PLD or de novo synthesis [via endoplasmic reticulum - or plastid-localized routes] is not a major contributor. PMID:21900174

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  6. The LPA1/ZEB1/miR-21-activation pathway regulates metastasis in basal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Debashish; Leblanc, Raphael; Grunewald, Thomas G P; Ambatipudi, Srikant; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2015-08-21

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid promoting cancer metastasis. LPA activates a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6). While blockage of LPA1in vivo inhibits breast carcinoma metastasis, down-stream genes mediating LPA-induced metastasis have not been yet identified. Herein we showed by analyzing publicly available expression data from 1488 human primary breast tumors that the gene encoding the transcription factor ZEB1 was the most correlated with LPAR1 encoding LPA1. This correlation was most prominent in basal primary breast carcinomas and restricted to cell lines of basal subtypes. Functional experiments in three different basal cell lines revealed that LPA-induced ZEB1 expression was regulated by the LPA1/Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (Pi3K) axis. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses further demonstrated that LPA up-regulated the oncomiR miR-21 through an LPA1/Pi3K/ZEB1-dependent mechanism. Strikingly, treatment with a mirVana miR-21 inhibitor, or silencing LPA1 or ZEB1 completely blocked LPA-induced cell migration in vitro, invasion and tumor cell bone colonization in vivo, which can be restored with a mirVana miR-21 mimic. Finally, high LPAR1 expression in basal breast tumors predicted worse lung-metastasis-free survival. Collectively, our results elucidate a new molecular pathway driving LPA-induced metastasis, thus underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting LPA1 in patients with basal breast carcinomas. PMID:26098771

  7. The LPA1/ZEB1/miR-21-activation pathway regulates metastasis in basal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Debashish; Leblanc, Raphael; Grunewald, Thomas G. P.; Ambatipudi, Srikant; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid promoting cancer metastasis. LPA activates a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6). While blockage of LPA1 in vivo inhibits breast carcinoma metastasis, down-stream genes mediating LPA-induced metastasis have not been yet identified. Herein we showed by analyzing publicly available expression data from 1488 human primary breast tumors that the gene encoding the transcription factor ZEB1 was the most correlated with LPAR1 encoding LPA1. This correlation was most prominent in basal primary breast carcinomas and restricted to cell lines of basal subtypes. Functional experiments in three different basal cell lines revealed that LPA-induced ZEB1 expression was regulated by the LPA1/Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (Pi3K) axis. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses further demonstrated that LPA up-regulated the oncomiR miR-21 through an LPA1/Pi3K/ZEB1-dependent mechanism. Strikingly, treatment with a mirVana miR-21 inhibitor, or silencing LPA1 or ZEB1 completely blocked LPA-induced cell migration in vitro, invasion and tumor cell bone colonization in vivo, which can be restored with a mirVana miR-21 mimic. Finally, high LPAR1 expression in basal breast tumors predicted worse lung-metastasis-free survival. Collectively, our results elucidate a new molecular pathway driving LPA-induced metastasis, thus underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting LPA1 in patients with basal breast carcinomas. PMID:26098771

  8. Diverse roles of LPA signaling in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yun, C. Chris; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that modulates a wide variety of cellular functions. Elevated LPA signaling has been reported in patients with colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases, and the tumorigenic role of LPA has been demonstrated in experimental models of colon cancer. However, emerging evidence indicates the importance of LPA signaling in epithelial wound healing and regulation of intestinal electrolyte transport. Here, we briefly review current knowledge of the biological roles of LPA signalling in the intestinal tract. PMID:25433271

  9. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J.; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  10. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 antagonist ki16425 blunts abdominal and systemic inflammation in a mouse model of peritoneal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Weathington, Nathaniel; Jacko, Anastasia M; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan; Zhao, Yutong

    2015-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator of inflammation via the LPA receptors 1-6. We and others have previously described proinflammatory and profibrotic activities of LPA signaling in bleomycin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis or lung injury models. In this study, we investigated if LPA signaling plays a role in the pathogenesis of systemic sepsis from an abdominal source. We report here that antagonism of the LPA receptor LPA1 with the small molecule ki16425 reduces the severity of abdominal inflammation and organ damage in the setting of peritoneal endotoxin exposure. Pretreatment of mice with intraperitoneal ki16425 eliminates LPS-induced peritoneal neutrophil chemokine and cytokine production, liver oxidative stress, liver injury, and cellular apoptosis in visceral organs. Mice pretreated with ki16425 are also protected from LPS-induced mortality. Tissue myeloperoxidase activity is not affected by LPA1 antagonism. We have shown that LPA1 is associated with LPS coreceptor CD14 and the association is suppressed by ki16425. LPS-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in liver cells and interleukin 6 production in Raw264 cells are likewise blunted by LPA1 antagonism. These studies indicate that the small molecule inhibitor of LPA1, ki16425, suppresses cytokine responses and inflammation in a peritoneal sepsis model by blunting downstream signaling through the LPA1-CD14-toll-like receptor 4 receptor complex. This anti-inflammatory effect may represent a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of systemic inflammatory responses to infection of the abdominal cavity. PMID:25701366

  12. Behavioral phenotype of maLPA1-null mice: increased anxiety-like behavior and spatial memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Santin, L.J.; Bilbao, A.; Pedraza, C.; Matas-Rico, E.; López-Barroso, D.; Castilla-Ortega, E.; Sánchez-López, J.; Riquelme, R.; Varela-Nieto, I.; de la Villa, P.; Suardíaz, M.; Chun, J.; De Fonseca, F. Rodriguez; Estivill-Torrús, G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has emerged as a new regulatory molecule in the brain. Recently, some studies have demonstrated a role for this molecule and its LPA1 receptor in the regulation of plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult brain. However, no systematic studies have been conducted to investigate whether the LPA1 receptor is involved in behavior. Here we studied the phenotype of maLPA1–null mice, which bear a targeted deletion at the lpa1 locus, in a battery of tests examining neurologic performance, habituation in exploratory behavior in response to low and mild anxiety environments and spatial memory. MaLPA1-null mutants showed deficits in both olfaction and somesthesis, but not in retinal or auditory functions. Sensorimotor coordination was impaired only in the equilibrium and grasping reflexes. The mice also showed impairments in neuromuscular strength and analgesic response. No additional differences were observed in the rest of the tests used to study sensoriomotor orientation, limb reflexes, and coordinated limb use. At behavioral level, maLPA1-null mice showed an impaired exploration in the open field and increased anxiety-like response when exposed to the elevated plus maze. Furthermore, the mice exhibit impaired spatial memory retention and reduced use of spatial strategies in the Morris water maze. We propose that the LPA1 receptor may play a major role in both spatial memory and response to anxiety-like conditions. PMID:19689455

  13. Melanoma Cells Break Down LPA to Establish Local Gradients That Drive Chemotactic Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Muinonen-Martin, Andrew J.; Susanto, Olivia; Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Faller, William J.; Veltman, Douwe M.; Kalna, Gabriela; Lindsay, Colin; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Sansom, Owen J.; Herd, Robert; Jones, Robert; Machesky, Laura M.; Wakelam, Michael J. O.; Knecht, David A.; Insall, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality of melanoma is caused by rapid spread of cancer cells, which occurs unusually early in tumour evolution. Unlike most solid tumours, thickness rather than cytological markers or differentiation is the best guide to metastatic potential. Multiple stimuli that drive melanoma cell migration have been described, but it is not clear which are responsible for invasion, nor if chemotactic gradients exist in real tumours. In a chamber-based assay for melanoma dispersal, we find that cells migrate efficiently away from one another, even in initially homogeneous medium. This dispersal is driven by positive chemotaxis rather than chemorepulsion or contact inhibition. The principal chemoattractant, unexpectedly active across all tumour stages, is the lipid agonist lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acting through the LPA receptor LPAR1. LPA induces chemotaxis of remarkable accuracy, and is both necessary and sufficient for chemotaxis and invasion in 2-D and 3-D assays. Growth factors, often described as tumour attractants, cause negligible chemotaxis themselves, but potentiate chemotaxis to LPA. Cells rapidly break down LPA present at substantial levels in culture medium and normal skin to generate outward-facing gradients. We measure LPA gradients across the margins of melanomas in vivo, confirming the physiological importance of our results. We conclude that LPA chemotaxis provides a strong drive for melanoma cells to invade outwards. Cells create their own gradients by acting as a sink, breaking down locally present LPA, and thus forming a gradient that is low in the tumour and high in the surrounding areas. The key step is not acquisition of sensitivity to the chemoattractant, but rather the tumour growing to break down enough LPA to form a gradient. Thus the stimulus that drives cell dispersal is not the presence of LPA itself, but the self-generated, outward-directed gradient. PMID:25313567

  14. Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced ERK Activation and Chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 Preosteoblasts are Independent of EGF Receptor Transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Chrisler, William B.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norman J.

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that bone-forming osteoblasts and their progenitors are target cells for the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) which is produced by degranulating platelets at sites of injury. LPA is a potent inducer of bone cell migration, proliferation and survival in vitro and an attractive candidate to facilitate preosteoblast chemotaxis during skeletal regeneration in vivo, but the intracellular signaling pathways mediating the effects of this lipid on bone cells are not defined. In this study we measured the ability of LPA to stimulate extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) in MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells and determined the contribution of this pathway to LPA-stimulated chemotaxis. LPA-treated cells exhibited a bimodal activation of ERK1/2 with maximal phosphorylation at 5 and 60 minutes. The kinetics of ERK1/2 phosphorylation were not coupled to Ras activation or LPA-induced elevations in cytosolic Ca2+. While LPA is coupled to the transactivation of the EGF receptor in many cell types, LPA-stimulated ERK1/2 activation in MC3T3-E1 cells was unaffected by inhibition of EGF receptor function. ERK isoforms rapidly accumulated at nuclear sites in LPA-treated cells, a process that was blocked if ERK1/2 phosphorylation was prevented with the MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Blocking ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 also diminished MC3T3-E1 cell migration and altered the normal disassembly of LPA-induced stress fibers, while the inhibition of EGF receptor function had no effect on LPA-coupled preosteoblast motility. Our results identify ERK1/2 activation as a mediatora mediator of LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell migration that may be relevant to preosteoblast motility during bone repair in vivo.

  15. Lysophosphatidylethanolamine increases intracellular Ca(2+) through LPA(1) in PC-12 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Soo-Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2015-05-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been implicated in lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE)-induced increases in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i), but in different cell types, this response may be dependent or independent of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) GPCR. The effects of LPEs from Grifola frondosa on the neuronal differentiation and apoptosis of PC-12 neuronal cells have been previously reported. In the present study, the authors sought to identify the mechanism responsible for the effects of LPEs in PC-12 neuronal cells. LPE increase [Ca(2+)]i concentration-dependently in PC-12 neuronal cells, but this LPE-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was less than that elicited by LPA. Studies using specific inhibitors showed that LPE-induced Ca(2+) response was mediated via pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins, edelfosine-sensitive phospholipase C, and 2-APB-sensitive IP3 receptor and by Ca(2+) influx across the cell membrane, and that this did not involve the conversion of LPE to LPA. Furthermore, LPE- and LPA-induced responses were found to show homologous and heterologous desensitization in PC-12 cells. VPC32183 and Ki16425 (antagonists of LPA1 and LPA3) inhibited LPE-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Furthermore, AM-095 (a specific inhibitor of LPA1) inhibited LPE-induced Ca(2+) response completely in PC-12 cells. These findings indicate LPE increases [Ca(2+)]i via a LPA1/Gi/o proteins/phospholipase C/IP3/Ca(2+) rise/Ca(2+) influx pathway in PC-12 neuronal cells. PMID:25888792

  16. Identification of the orphan GPCR, P2Y(10) receptor as the sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masanori; Shiraishi, Akira; Tabata, Kenichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2008-07-11

    Phylogenetic analysis of transmembrane regions of GPCRs using PHYLIP indicated that the orphan receptor P2Y(10) receptor was classified into the cluster consisting nucleotide and lipid receptors. Based on the results, we studied the abilities of nucleotides and lipids to activate the P2Y(10) receptors. As a result, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the CHO cells stably expressing the P2Y(10) fused with a G(16alpha) protein. These Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by S1P receptor and LPA receptor antagonists. The introduction of siRNA designed for P2Y(10) receptor into the P2Y(10)-CHO cells effectively blocked both S1P- and LPA-induced Ca(2+) increases. RT-PCR analysis showed that the mouse P2Y(10) was expressed in reproductive organs, brain, lung and skeletal muscle, suggesting the receptor plays physiological roles throughout the whole body. In conclusion, the P2Y(10) receptor is the first receptor identified as a dual lysophospholipid receptor. PMID:18466763

  17. Non-transactivational, dual pathways for LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation in primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstroem, Therese E.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Wang, Yanling; Iakovleva, Irina; Petrovic, Natasa; Nedergaard, Jan

    2010-10-01

    In many cell types, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation is mediated via receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) transactivation, in particular via the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting via GPCRs, is a mitogen and MAP kinase activator in many systems, and LPA can regulate adipocyte proliferation. The mechanism by which LPA activates the Erk1/2 MAP kinase is generally accepted to be via EGF receptor transactivation. In primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes, EGF can induce Erk1/2 activation, which is obligatory and determinant for EGF-induced proliferation of these cells. Therefore, we have here examined whether LPA, via EGF transactivation, can activate Erk1/2 in brown pre-adipocytes. We found that LPA could induce Erk1/2 activation. However, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation was independent of transactivation of EGF receptors (or PDGF receptors) in these cells (whereas in transformed HIB-1B brown adipocytes, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation indeed proceeded via EGF receptor transactivation). In the brown pre-adipocytes, LPA instead induced Erk1/2 activation via two distinct non-transactivational pathways, one G{sub i}-protein dependent, involving PKC and Src activation, the other, a PTX-insensitive pathway, involving PI3K (but not Akt) activation. Earlier studies showing LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation being fully dependent on RTK transactivation have all been performed in cell lines and transfected cells. The present study implies that in non-transformed systems, RTK transactivation may not be involved in the mediation of GPCR-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation.

  18. Identification of Darmstoff analogs as selective agonists and antagonists of lysophosphatidic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gududuru, Veeresa; Zeng, Kui; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Makarova, Natalia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pigg, Kathryn R; Baker, Daniel L; Tigyi, Gabor; Miller, Duane D

    2006-01-15

    Darmstoff describes a family of gut smooth muscle-stimulating acetal phosphatidic acids initially isolated and characterized from the bath fluid of stimulated gut over 50 years ago. Despite similar structural and biological profiles, Darmstoff analogs have not previously been examined as potential LPA mimetics. Here, we report a facile method for the synthesis of potassium salts of Darmstoff analogs. To understand the effect of stereochemistry on lysophosphatidic acid mimetic activity, synthesis of optically pure stereoisomers of selected Darmstoff analogs was achieved starting with chiral methyl glycerates. Each Darmstoff analog was evaluated for subtype-specific LPA receptor agonist/antagonist activity, PPARgamma activation, and autotaxin inhibition. From this study we identified compound 12 as a pan-antagonist and several pan-agonists for the LPA(1-3) receptors. Introduction of an aromatic ring in the lipid chain such as analog 22 produced a subtype-specific LPA(3) agonist with an EC(50) of 692 nM. Interestingly, regardless of their LPA(1/2/3) ligand properties all of the Darmstoff analogs tested activated PPARgamma. However, these compounds are weak inhibitors of autotaxin. The results indicate that Darmstoff analogs constitute a novel class of lysophosphatidic acid mimetics. PMID:16290140

  19. Combined Mitigation of the Gastrointestinal and Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndromes by a Novel LPA2 Receptor-specific Non-lipid Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I.; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek B.; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W.; Yates, C. Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I.; Miller, Duane D.; Tigyi, Gábor J.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonists of the type 2 GPCR for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-Dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay up to 72 hours reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not in LPA2 KO mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ–H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total body irradiation. DBIBB represents the first drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system. PMID:25619933

  20. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid-lysophosphatidic acid receptor cascade: proposal of a novel potential therapeutic target for treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Its prognosis is one of the worst among all cancer types, and it is considered a fatal malignancy, incurable with conventional therapeutic strategies. As the bioactive multifunctional lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is well recognized to be involved in the tumorigenesis of cancers by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonists and LPA synthesis inhibitors have been proposed as promising drugs for cancer treatment. Six LPARs, named LPA1-6, are currently recognized. Among them, LPA1 is the dominant LPAR in the CNS and is highly expressed in GBM in combination with the overexpression of autotaxin (ATX), the enzyme (a phosphodiesterase, which is a potent cell motility-stimulating factor) that produces LPA.Invasion is a defining hallmark of GBM. LPA is significantly related to cell adhesion, cell motility, and invasion through the Rho family GTPases Rho and Rac. LPA1 is responsible for LPA-driven cell motility, which is attenuated by LPA4. GBM is among the most vascular human tumors. Although anti-angiogenic therapy (through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) was established, sufficient results have not been obtained because of the increased invasiveness triggered by anti-angiogenesis. As both ATX and LPA play a significant role in angiogenesis, similar to VEGF, inhibition of the ATX/LPA axis may be beneficial as a two-pronged therapy that includes anti-angiogenic and anti-invasion therapy. Conventional approaches to GBM are predominantly directed at cell proliferation. Recurrent tumors regrow from cells that have invaded brain tissues and are less proliferative, and are thus quite resistant to conventional drugs and radiation, which preferentially kill rapidly proliferating cells. A novel approach that targets this invasive subpopulation of GBM cells may improve the prognosis of GBM. Patients with GBM that

  1. GPCR cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by LPA and S1P

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, the problem of axonal guidance. We are using the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We show that both LPA and S1P cause specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences to mouse, but very similar to Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are GPCRs, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibiting Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA and S1P induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid signalling in development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaoyan; Yung, Yun C; Chen, Allison; Chun, Jerold

    2015-04-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that is present in all tissues examined to date. LPA signals extracellularly via cognate G protein-coupled receptors to mediate cellular processes such as survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, adhesion and morphology. These LPA-influenced processes impact many aspects of organismal development. In particular, LPA signalling has been shown to affect fertility and reproduction, formation of the nervous system, and development of the vasculature. Here and in the accompanying poster, we review the developmentally related features of LPA signalling. PMID:25852197

  3. Modulation of Hexadecyl-LPA-Mediated Activation of Mast Cells and Microglia by a Chemical Probe for LPA5.

    PubMed

    Kozian, Detlef H; von Haeften, Elisabeth; Joho, Sabrina; Czechtizky, Werngard; Anumala, Upendra R; Roux, Pascale; Dudda, Angela; Evers, Andreas; Nazare, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells and microglia play a critical role in innate immunity and inflammation and can be activated by a wide range of endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has recently been reported to activate mast cells and microglia. Using the human mast cell line HMC-1 and the mouse microglia cell line BV-2, we show that LPA-mediated activation can be prevented by blockade of the LPA receptor 5 (LPA5) in both cell lines. The identification of new LPA5-specific antagonists as tool compounds to probe and modulate the LPA5/LPA axis in relevant in vitro and in vivo assays should contribute to better understanding of the underlying role of LPAs in the development and progression of (neuro-) inflammatory diseases. PMID:26812365

  4. Blockade of lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPAR1/3 ameliorates lung fibrosis induced by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Lu; Xue, Jian-Xin; Li, Xin; Liu, De-Song; Ge, Yan; Ni, Pei-Yan; Deng, Lin; Lu, You; Jiang, Wei

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels and its receptors LPAR1/3 transcripts were elevated during the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. {yields} Lung fibrosis was obviously alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. {yields} VPC12249 administration effectively inhibited radiation-induced fibroblast accumulation in vivo, and suppressed LPA-induced fibroblast proliferation in vitro. {yields} LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling regulated TGF{beta}1 and CTGF expressions in radiation-challenged lungs, but only influenced CTGF expression in cultured fibroblasts. {yields} LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling induced fibroblast proliferation through a CTGF-dependent pathway, rather than through TGF{beta}1 activation. -- Abstract: Lung fibrosis is a common and serious complication of radiation therapy for lung cancer, for which there are no efficient treatments. Emerging evidence indicates that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPARs) are involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Here, we reported that thoracic radiation with 16 Gy in mice induced development of radiation lung fibrosis (RLF) accompanied by obvious increases in LPA release and LPAR1 and LPAR3 (LPAR1/3) transcripts. RLF was significantly alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. VPC12249 administration effectively prolonged animal survival, restored lung structure, inhibited fibroblast accumulation and reduced collagen deposition. Moreover, profibrotic cytokines in radiation-challenged lungs obviously decreased following administration of VPC12249, including transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In vitro, LPA induced both fibroblast proliferation and CTGF expression in a dose-dependent manner, and both were suppressed by blockade of LPAR1/3. The pro-proliferative activity of LPA on fibroblasts was inhibited by siRNA directed against CTGF. Together, our data suggest that the LPA-LPAR1

  5. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Anjum; Huang, Ying; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathway activation. LPA moieties efficiently activate AKT phosphorylation and activation in a multitude of cell types. The interplay between LPA, its receptors, the associated Gαi/o subunits, PI3K and AKT contributes to the regulation of cell survival, migration, proliferation and confers chemotherapy-resistance in certain cancers. However, detailed information on the regulation of PI3K–AKT signals induced by LPA receptors is missing from the literature. Here, some urgent issues for investigation are highlighted. PMID:26861299

  6. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Anjum; Huang, Ying; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway activation. LPA moieties efficiently activate AKT phosphorylation and activation in a multitude of cell types. The interplay between LPA, its receptors, the associated Gαi/o subunits, PI3K and AKT contributes to the regulation of cell survival, migration, proliferation and confers chemotherapy-resistance in certain cancers. However, detailed information on the regulation of PI3K-AKT signals induced by LPA receptors is missing from the literature. Here, some urgent issues for investigation are highlighted. PMID:26861299

  7. LPA signaling initiates schizophrenia-like brain and behavioral changes in a mouse model of prenatal brain hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mirendil, H; Thomas, E A; De Loera, C; Okada, K; Inomata, Y; Chun, J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic, environmental and neurodevelopmental factors are thought to underlie the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. How these risk factors collectively contribute to pathology is unclear. Here, we present a mouse model of prenatal intracerebral hemorrhage—an identified risk factor for schizophrenia—using a serum-exposure paradigm. This model exhibits behavioral, neurochemical and schizophrenia-related gene expression alterations in adult females. Behavioral alterations in amphetamine-induced locomotion, prepulse inhibition, thigmotaxis and social interaction—in addition to increases in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area and decreases in parvalbumin-positive cells in the prefrontal cortex—were induced upon prenatal serum exposure. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid component of serum, was identified as a key molecular initiator of schizophrenia-like sequelae induced by serum. Prenatal exposure to LPA alone phenocopied many of the schizophrenia-like alterations seen in the serum model, whereas pretreatment with an antagonist against the LPA receptor subtype LPA1 prevented many of the behavioral and neurochemical alterations. In addition, both prenatal serum and LPA exposure altered the expression of many genes and pathways related to schizophrenia, including the expression of Grin2b, Slc17a7 and Grid1. These findings demonstrate that aberrant LPA receptor signaling associated with fetal brain hemorrhage may contribute to the development of some neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25849980

  8. ATX-LPA1 axis contributes to proliferation of chondrocytes by regulating fibronectin assembly leading to proper cartilage formation.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Tatsuji; Arima, Naoaki; Kano, Kuniyuki; Hama, Kotaro; Itai, Eriko; Yukiura, Hiroshi; Kise, Ryoji; Inoue, Asuka; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Moolenaar, Wouter H; Chun, Jerold; Aoki, Junken

    2016-01-01

    The lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signals via six distinct G protein-coupled receptors to mediate both unique and overlapping biological effects, including cell migration, proliferation and survival. LPA is produced extracellularly by autotaxin (ATX), a secreted lysophospholipase D, from lysophosphatidylcholine. ATX-LPA receptor signaling is essential for normal development and implicated in various (patho)physiological processes, but underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Through gene targeting approaches in zebrafish and mice, we show here that loss of ATX-LPA1 signaling leads to disorganization of chondrocytes, causing severe defects in cartilage formation. Mechanistically, ATX-LPA1 signaling acts by promoting S-phase entry and cell proliferation of chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo, at least in part through β1-integrin translocation leading to fibronectin assembly and further extracellular matrix deposition; this in turn promotes chondrocyte-matrix adhesion and cell proliferation. Thus, the ATX-LPA1 axis is a key regulator of cartilage formation. PMID:27005960

  9. ATX-LPA1 axis contributes to proliferation of chondrocytes by regulating fibronectin assembly leading to proper cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Tatsuji; Arima, Naoaki; Kano, Kuniyuki; Hama, Kotaro; Itai, Eriko; Yukiura, Hiroshi; Kise, Ryoji; Inoue, Asuka; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Chun, Jerold; Aoki, Junken

    2016-01-01

    The lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signals via six distinct G protein-coupled receptors to mediate both unique and overlapping biological effects, including cell migration, proliferation and survival. LPA is produced extracellularly by autotaxin (ATX), a secreted lysophospholipase D, from lysophosphatidylcholine. ATX-LPA receptor signaling is essential for normal development and implicated in various (patho)physiological processes, but underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Through gene targeting approaches in zebrafish and mice, we show here that loss of ATX-LPA1 signaling leads to disorganization of chondrocytes, causing severe defects in cartilage formation. Mechanistically, ATX-LPA1 signaling acts by promoting S-phase entry and cell proliferation of chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo, at least in part through β1-integrin translocation leading to fibronectin assembly and further extracellular matrix deposition; this in turn promotes chondrocyte-matrix adhesion and cell proliferation. Thus, the ATX-LPA1 axis is a key regulator of cartilage formation. PMID:27005960

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid induces chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Masiello, Lisa M; Fotos, Joseph S; Galileo, Deni S; Karin, Norman J

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that has pleiotropic effects on a variety of cell types and enhances the migration of endothelial and cancer cells, but it is not known if this lipid can alter osteoblast motility. We performed transwell migration assays using MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells and found LPA to be a potent chemotactic agent. Quantitative time-lapse video analysis of osteoblast migration after wounds were introduced into cell monolayers indicated that LPA stimulated both migration velocity and the average migration distance per cell. LPA also elicited substantial changes in cell shape and actin cytoskeletal structure; lipid-treated cells contained fewer stress fibers and displayed long membrane processes that were enriched in F-actin. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that MC3T3-E1 cells express all four known LPA-specific G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-LPA4) with a relative mRNA abundance of LPA1>LPA4>LPA2>LPA3. LPA-induced changes in osteoblast motility and morphology were antagonized by both pertussis toxin and Ki16425, a subtype-specific blocker of LPA1 and LPA3 receptor function. Cell migration in many cell types is linked to changes in intracellular Ca2+. Ki16425 also inhibited LPA-induced Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a link between LPA-induced Ca2+ transients and osteoblast chemotaxis. Our data show that LPA stimulates MC3T3-E1 osteoblast motility via a mechanism that is linked primarily to the G-protein-coupled receptor LPA1. PMID:16487757

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid induces chemotaxis in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Masiello, Lisa M.; Fotos, Joseph S.; Galileo, Deni S.; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that has pleiotropic effects on a variety of cell types and enhances the migration of endothelial and cancer cells, but it is not known if this lipid can alter osteoblast motility. We performed transwell migration assays using MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells and found LPA to be a potent chemotactic agent. Quantitative time-lapse video analysis of osteoblast migration after wounds were introduced into cell monolayers indicated that LPA stimulated both migration velocity and the average migration distance per cell. LPA also elicited substantial changes in cell shape and actin cytoskeletal structure; lipid-treated cells contained fewer stress fibers and displayed long membrane processes that were enriched in F-actin. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that MC3T3-E1 cells express all four known LPA-specific G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-LPA4) with a relative mRNA abundance of LPA1 > LPA4 > LPA2 >> LPA3. LPA-induced changes in osteoblast motility and morphology were antagonized by both pertussis toxin and Ki16425, a subtype-specific blocker of LPA1 and LPA3 receptor function. Cell migration in many cell types is linked to changes in intracellular Ca2+. Ki16425 also inhibited LPA-induced Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a link between LPA-induced Ca2+ transients and osteoblast chemotaxis. Our data show that LPA stimulates MC3T3-E1 osteoblast motility via a mechanism that is linked primarily to the G protein-coupled receptor LPA1.

  12. G-protein-coupled receptor cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, i.e. the problem of axonal guidance. We used the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We showed that both LPA and S1P cause a specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences compared to the mouse but very similar to observations in Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibition of Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and with S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA- and S1P-induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  13. LPA Promotes T Cell Recruitment through Synthesis of CXCL13

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Weili; Zhao, Chenqi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid playing an important role in various inflammatory diseases by inducing expression and secretion of many inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Here we report in a murine air pouch model of inflammation that LPA induced CXCL13 secretion in a time-dependent manner and with exacerbation of the response when LPA was administered after a pretreatment with TNF-α, a key inflammatory cytokine. LPA mediates recruitment of leukocytes, including that of CD3+ cells into unprimed and TNF-α-primed air pouches. CXCL13 neutralization using a blocking antibody injected into air pouches prior to administration of LPA into TNF-α-primed air pouches decreased CD3+ cell influx. Our data highlight that LPA-mediated CXCL13 secretion plays a role in T cell recruitment and participates in regulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:26339130

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid as a lipid mediator with multiple biological actions.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shizu; Hashimoto, Takafumi; Kano, Kuniyuki; Aoki, Junken

    2015-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is one of the simplest glycerophospholipids with one fatty acid chain and a phosphate group as a polar head. Although LPA had been viewed just as a metabolic intermediate in de novo lipid synthetic pathways, it has recently been paid much attention as a lipid mediator. LPA exerts many kinds of cellular processes, such as cell proliferation and smooth muscle contraction, through cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Because lipids are not coded by the genome directly, it is difficult to know their patho- and physiological roles. However, recent studies have identified several key factors mediating the biological roles of LPA, such as receptors and producing enzymes. In addition, studies of transgenic and gene knockout animals for these LPA-related genes, have revealed the biological significance of LPA. In this review we will summarize recent advances in the studies of LPA production and its roles in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25500504

  15. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in PC-3 prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Lan, Shun-Yan; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT. •PI3K mediated LPA-induced VEGF-A expression. •AHR signaling inhibited LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor with multiple biological functions and has been shown to stimulate cancer cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and trigger angiogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimer consisting of HIF-1α and HIF-1β (also known as aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) subunits, is an important regulator of angiogenesis in prostate cancer (PC) through the enhancement of VEGF-A expression. In this study, we first confirmed the ability of LPA to induce VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells and then validated that LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a receptor for dioxin-like compounds, functions as a transcription factor through dimerization with ARNT and was found to inhibit prostate carcinogenesis and vanadate-induced VEGF-A production. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AHR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that AHR might suppress LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT. Here we demonstrated that overexpression and ligand activation of AHR inhibited HIF-1-mediated VEGF-A induction by LPA treatment of PC-3 cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that AHR activation may inhibit LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by attenuating HIF-1α signaling, and subsequently, suppressing angiogenesis and metastasis of PC. These results suggested that AHR presents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of PC metastasis.

  16. Application of in utero electroporation of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) genes, for subcellular localization of hardly identifiable GPCR in mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Kim, Seunghyuk; Hong, Jae Seung; Jeon, Sung Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2014-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor that exerts diverse biological effects through its cognate receptors (LPA1-LPA6). LPA1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, plays a pivotal role in brain development. However, the role of LPA1 in neuronal migration has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we delivered LPA1 to mouse cerebral cortex using in utero electroporation. We demonstrated that neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex was not affected by the overexpression of LPA1. Moreover, these results can be applied to the identification of the localization of LPA1. The subcellular localization of LPA1 was endogenously present in the perinuclear area, and overexpressed LPA1 was located in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, LPA1 in developing mouse cerebral cortex was mainly expressed in the ventricular zone and the cortical plate. In summary, the overexpression of LPA1 did not affect neuronal migration, and the protein expression of LPA1 was mainly located in the ventricular zone and cortical plate within the developing mouse cerebral cortex. These studies have provided information on the role of LPA1 in brain development and on the technical advantages of in utero electroporation. PMID:25078448

  17. Interaction between Lysophosphatidic Acid, Prostaglandins and the Endocannabinoid System during the Window of Implantation in the Rat Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Sordelli, Micaela S.; Beltrame, Jimena S.; Cella, Maximiliano; Gervasi, María Gracia; Perez Martinez, Silvina; Burdet, Juliana; Zotta, Elsa; Franchi, Ana M.; Ribeiro, María Laura

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive lipid molecules as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), prostaglandins (PG) and endocannabinoids are important mediators of embryo implantation. Based on previous published data we became interested in studying the interaction between these three groups of lipid derivatives in the rat uterus during the window of implantation. Thus, we adopted a pharmacological approach in vitro using LPA, DGPP (a selective antagonist of LPA3, an LPA receptor), endocannabinoids’ receptor selective antagonists (AM251 and AM630) and non selective (indomethacin) and selective (NS-398) inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 and 2 enzymes. Cyclooxygenase isoforms participate in prostaglandins’ synthesis. The incubation of the uterus from rats pregnant on day 5 of gestation (implantation window) with LPA augmented the activity and the expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the main enzyme involved in the degradation of endocannabinoids in the rodent uteri, suggesting that LPA decreased endocannabinoids’ levels during embryo implantation. It has been reported that high endocannabinoids are deleterious for implantation. Also, LPA increased PGE2 production and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. The incubation of LPA with indomethacin or NS-398 reversed the increment in PGE2 production, suggesting that cyclooxygenase-2 was the isoform involved in LPA effect. PGs are important mediators of decidualization and vascularization at the implantation sites. All these effects were mediated by LPA3, as the incubation with DGPP completely reversed LPA stimulatory actions. Besides, we also observed that endocannabinoids mediated the stimulatory effect of LPA on cyclooxygenase-2 derived PGE2 production, as the incubation of LPA with AM251 or AM630 completely reversed LPA effect. Also, LPA augmented via LPA3 decidualization and vascularization markers. Overall, the results presented here demonstrate the participation of LPA3 in the process of implantation through the interaction with other groups of lipid

  18. [Lysophosphatidic acid and malignant neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Jesionowska, Anna; Cecerska-Heryć, Elżbieta; Marczuk, Natalia; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid compound which plays an important role in the human body, enabling its proper development and functioning. The extracellular LPA is mainly formed of lysophospholipids by the action of autotaxin. LPA activates specific G protein coupled receptors on the cell surface, which results in activation of intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in an increased production of proteins such as VEGF, MMP and uPA. The effect is increased cell proliferation, migration, survival and morphological changes. Aberrant expression of LPA receptors or autotaxin is present in various neoplasms. LPA may be used as a potential diagnostic marker, because its concentrations in the plasma of ovarian cancer patients are significantly higher than in the control group. Scientific research is focused on the searching for the compounds that inhibit the effects of LPA. The promising results of preclinical trials suggest potential usefulness of these compounds in the fight against cancer. PMID:27048092

  19. Structure of ginseng major latex-like protein 151 and its proposed lysophosphatidic acid-binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Hye; Hong, Myoung Ki; Kim, Hyeon Joong; Ryoo, Nayeon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Nah, Seung Yeol; Kang, Lin Woo

    2015-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid growth factor with myriad effects on biological systems. LPA is usually present bound to animal plasma proteins such as albumin or gelsolin. When LPA complexes with plasma proteins, it binds to its cognate receptors with higher affinity than when it is free. Recently, gintonin from ginseng was found to bind to LPA and to activate mammalian LPA receptors. Gintonin contains two components: ginseng major latex-like protein 151 (GLP) and ginseng ribonuclease-like storage protein. Here, the crystal structure of GLP is reported, which belongs to the plant Bet v 1 superfamily, and a model is proposed for how GLP binds LPA. Amino-acid residues of GLP recognizing LPA were identified using site-directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The resulting GLP mutants were used to study the activation of LPA receptor-dependent signalling pathways. In contrast to wild-type GLP, the H147A mutant did not bind LPA, elicit intracellular Ca(2+) transients in neuronal cells or activate Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels in Xenopus oocytes. Based on these results, a mechanism by which GLP recognizes LPA and its requirement to activate G protein-coupled LPA receptors to elicit diverse biological responses were proposed. PMID:25945569

  20. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  2. Expression and function of lysophosphatidic acid receptors (LPARs) 1 and 3 in human hepatic cancer progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Swet, Jacob H.; Ahrens, William A.; Showlater, Victor; Iannitti, David A.; Mckillop, Iain H.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary cancer of the liver and is characterized by rapid tumor expansion and metastasis. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling, via LPA receptors 1–6 (LPARs1–6), regulates diverse cell functions including motility, migration, and proliferation, yet the role of LPARs in hepatic tumor pathology is poorly understood. We sought to determine the expression and function of endothelial differentiation gene (EDG) LPARs (LPAR1–3) in human HCC and complimentary in vitro models. Human HCC were characterized by significantly elevated LPAR1/LPAR3 expression in the microenvironment between the tumor and non-tumor liver (NTL), a finding mirrored in human SKHep1 cells. Analysis of human tissue and human hepatic tumor cells in vitro revealed cells that express LPAR3 (HCC-NTL margin in vivo and SKHep1 in vitro) also express cancer stem cell markers in the absence of hepatocyte markers. Treatment of SKHep1 cells with exogenous LPA led to significantly increased cell motility but not proliferation. Using pharmacological agents and cells transfected to knock-down LPAR1 or LPAR3 demonstrated LPA-dependent cell migration occurs via an LPAR3-Gi-ERK-pathway independent of LPAR1. These data suggest cells that stain positive for both LPAR3 and cancer stem cell markers are distinct from the tumor mass per se, and may mediate tumor invasiveness/expansion via LPA-LPAR3 signaling. PMID:26701886

  3. LYSOPHOSPHATIDIC ACID INHIBITS CD8 T CELL ACTIVATION AND CONTROL OF TUMOR PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Shannon K.; Strauch, Pamela; Fujiwara, Yuko; Al-Shami, Amin; Oravecz, Tamas; Tigyi, Gabor; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2013-01-01

    CD8 T lymphocytes are able to eliminate nascent tumor cells through a process referred to as immune surveillance. However, multiple inhibitory mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment have been described that impede tumor rejection by CD8 T cells, including increased signaling by inhibitory receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that has been shown repeatedly to promote diverse cellular processes benefiting tumorigenesis. Accordingly, the increased expression of LPA and LPA receptors is a common feature of diverse tumor cell lineages and can result in elevated systemic LPA levels. LPA is recognized by at least 6 distinct G-protein-coupled receptors and several of which are expressed by T cells, although the precise role of LPA signaling in CD8 T cell activation and function has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that LPA signaling via the LPA5 receptor expressed by CD8 T cells suppresses antigen receptor signaling, cell activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in a mouse melanoma model tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are LPA5-deficient are able to control tumor growth significantly better than wild-type tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Together, these data suggest that the production of LPA by tumors serves not only in an autocrine manner to promote tumorigenesis but also as a mechanism to suppress adaptive immunity and highlights a potential novel target for cancer treatment. PMID:24455753

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid inhibits CD8 T cell activation and control of tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shannon K; Strauch, Pamela; Fujiwara, Yuko; Al-Shami, Amin; Oravecz, Tamas; Tigyi, Gabor; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M

    2013-10-01

    CD8 T lymphocytes are able to eliminate nascent tumor cells through a process referred to as immune surveillance. However, multiple inhibitory mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment have been described that impede tumor rejection by CD8 T cells, including increased signaling by inhibitory receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that has been shown repeatedly to promote diverse cellular processes benefiting tumorigenesis. Accordingly, the increased expression of LPA and LPA receptors is a common feature of diverse tumor cell lineages and can result in elevated systemic LPA levels. LPA is recognized by at least 6 distinct G-protein-coupled receptors and several of which are expressed by T cells, although the precise role of LPA signaling in CD8 T cell activation and function has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that LPA signaling via the LPA5 receptor expressed by CD8 T cells suppresses antigen receptor signaling, cell activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in a mouse melanoma model tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are LPA5-deficient are able to control tumor growth significantly better than wild-type tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Together, these data suggest that the production of LPA by tumors serves not only in an autocrine manner to promote tumorigenesis but also as a mechanism to suppress adaptive immunity and highlights a potential novel target for cancer treatment. PMID:24455753

  5. Gintonin enhances performance of mice in rotarod test: Involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptors and catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Jisu; Lee, Ra Mi; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Lee, Myung Koo; Bae, Chun-Sik; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewon; Lim, Kiwon; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2016-01-26

    Ginseng has a long history of use as a tonic for restoration of vigor. One example of ginseng-derived tonic effect is that it can improve physical stamina under conditions of stress. However, the active ingredient and the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the ergogenic effect are unknown. Recent studies show that ginseng contains a novel ingredient, gintonin, which consists of a unique class of herbal-medicine lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs). Gintonin activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to produce a transient [Ca(2+)]i signal, which is coupled to diverse intra- and inter-cellular signal transduction pathways that stimulate hormone or neurotransmitter release. However, relatively little is known about how gintonin-mediated cellular modulation is linked to physical endurance. In the present study, systemic administration of gintonin, but not ginsenosides, in fasted mice increased blood glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Gintonin treatment elevated blood glucose to a maximum level after 30min. This elevation in blood glucose level could be abrogated by the LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, Ki16425, or the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Furthermore, gintonin-dependent enhanced performance of fasted mice in rotarod test was likewise abrogated by Ki16425. Gintonin also elevated plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. The present study shows that gintonin mediates catecholamine release through activation of the LPA receptor and that activation of the β-adrenergic receptor is coupled to liver glycogenolysis, thereby increasing the supply of glucose and enhancing performance in the rotarod test. Thus, gintonin acts via the LPA-catecholamine-glycogenolysis axis, representing a candidate mechanism that can explain how ginseng treatment enhances physical stamina. PMID:26706688

  6. Regulation of Lysophosphatidic Acid-induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation and Interleukin-8 Secretion in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Protein Kinase Cδ, Lyn Kinase, and Matrix Metalloproteinases*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; He, Donghong; Saatian, Bahman; Watkins, Tonya; Spannhake, Ernst Wm.; Pyne, Nigel J.; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated earlier that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion is regulated by protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ)-dependent NF-κB activation in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpCs). Here we provide evidence for signaling pathways that regulate LPA-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the role of cross-talk between G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor-tyrosine kinases in IL-8 secretion in HBEpCs. Treatment of HBEpCs with LPA stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, which was attenuated by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001), heparin binding (HB)-EGF inhibitor (CRM 197), and HB-EGF neutralizing antibody. Overexpression of dominant negative PKCδ or pretreatment with a PKCδ inhibitor (rottlerin) or Src kinase family inhibitor (PP2) partially blocked LPA-induced MMP activation, proHB-EGF shedding, and EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation. Down-regulation of Lyn kinase, but not Src kinase, by specific small interfering RNA mitigated LPA-induced MMP activation, proHB-EGF shedding, and EGFR phosphorylation. In addition, overexpression of dominant negative PKCδ blocked LPA-induced phosphorylation and translocation of Lyn kinase to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, down-regulation of EGFR by EGFR small interfering RNA or pretreatment of cells with EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and PD158780 almost completely blocked LPA-dependent EGFR phosphorylation and partially attenuated IL-8 secretion, respectively. These results demonstrate that LPA-induced IL-8 secretion is partly dependent on EGFR transactivation regulated by PKCδ-dependent activation of Lyn kinase and MMPs and proHB-EGF shedding, suggesting a novel mechanism of cross-talk and interaction between G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor-tyrosine kinases in HBEpCs. PMID:16687414

  7. New metabolically stabilized analogues of lysophosphatidic acid: agonists, antagonists and enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Xu, Y; Qian, L; Gajewiak, J; Jiang, G

    2005-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a metabolically labile natural phospholipid with a bewildering array of physiological effects. We describe herein a variety of long-lived receptor-specific agonists and antagonists for LPA receptors. Several LPA and PA (phosphatidic acid) analogues also inhibit LPP (lipid phosphate phosphatase). The sn-1 or sn-2 hydroxy groups have been replaced by fluorine, difluoromethyl, difluoroethyl, O-methyl or O-hydroxyethoxy groups to give non-migrating LPA analogues that resist acyltransferases. Alkyl ether replacement of acyl esters produced lipase and acyltransferase-resistant analogues. Replacement of the bridging oxygen in the monophosphate by an alpha-monofluoromethylene-, alpha-bromomethylene- or alpha,alpha-difluoromethylenephosphonate gave phosphatase-resistant analogues. Phosphorothioate analogues with O-acyl and O-alkyl chains are potent, long-lived agonists for LPA1 and LPA3 receptors. Most recently, we have (i) prepared stabilized O-alkyl analogues of lysobisphosphatidic acid, (ii) explored the structure-activity relationship of stabilized cyclic LPA analogues and (iii) synthesized neutral head group trifluoromethylsulphonamide analogues of LPA. Through collaborative studies, we have collected data for these stabilized analogues as selective LPA receptor (ant)agonists, LPP inhibitors, TREK (transmembrane calcium channel) K+ channel agonists, activators of the nuclear transcription factor PPAR-gamma (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma), promoters of cell motility and survival, and radioprotectants for human B-cells. PMID:16246118

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolic pathways and their receptors are differentially regulated during decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Brünnert, D; Sztachelska, M; Bornkessel, F; Treder, N; Wolczynski, S; Goyal, P; Zygmunt, M

    2014-10-01

    In the luteal phase, human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) undergo proliferation, migration and differentiation during the decidualization process under the control of the ovarian steroids progesterone and estrogen. Proper decidualization of stromal cells is required for blastocyst implantation and the development of pregnancy. The proliferation, migration and differentiation of HESCs in decidualization do not require the presence of a blastocyst but are greatly accelerated during implantation. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are potent bioactive lysophospholipids that have critical roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, angiogenesis and cancer. The expression of the enzymes involved in LPA and S1P turnover and their receptors in HESCs during decidualization has not been characterized yet. We found that the LPAR1 and LPAR6 and S1PR3 receptors are highly expressed in HESCs. LPAR1, autotaxin (ATX), an LPA producing enzyme and lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 were up-regulated during decidualization. Interestingly, the expression of all S1P receptor subtypes and LPA receptors (LPAR2-6) mRNA was down-regulated after decidualization. We found that SPHK1 is highly expressed in HESCs, and is up-regulated during decidualization. S1P phosphatase SGPP1 and S1P lyase SGPL1 are highly expressed in HESCs. SGPP1 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in decidualized HESCs. In conclusion, this study shows the first time that specific LPA and S1P receptors and their metabolizing enzymes are highly regulated in HESCs during decidualization. Furthermore, we suggest that LPAR1 receptor-mediated signaling in HESCs may be crucial in decidualization process. SPHK1 activity and high turnover of S1P and LPA might be essential for precise regulation of their signaling during decidualization of human endometrium and implantation. PMID:24994816

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid induces necrosis and apoptosis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holtsberg, F W; Steiner, M R; Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P; Steiner, S M

    1998-01-01

    A diverse body of evidence indicates a role for the lipid biomediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the CNS. This study identifies and characterizes the induction of neuronal death by LPA. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons from embryonic rat brains with 50 microM LPA resulted in neuronal necrosis, as determined morphologically and by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. A concentration of LPA as low as 10 microM led to the release of lactate dehydrogenase. In contrast, treatment of neurons with 0.1 or 1.0 microM LPA resulted in apoptosis, as determined by chromatin condensation. In addition, neuronal death induced by 1 microM LPA was characterized as apoptotic on the basis of terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and protection against chromatin condensation, TUNEL staining, and phosphatidylserine externalization by treatment with N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases, i.e., members of the interleukin-1beta converting enzyme family. Studies with antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors did not indicate a significant role for these receptors in apoptosis induced by 1 microM LPA. LPA (1 microM) also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, pretreatment of neurons with cyclosporin A protected against the LPA-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal apoptosis. Thus, LPA, at pathophysiological levels, can induce neuronal apoptosis and could thereby participate in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9422348

  10. 1-Oleoyl Lysophosphatidic Acid: A New Mediator of Emotional Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Escuredo, Leticia; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Pedraza, Carmen; Orio, Laura; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The role of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the control of emotional behavior remains to be determined. We analyzed the effects of the central administration of 1-oleoyl-LPA (LPA 18∶1) in rats tested for food consumption and anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors. For this purpose, the elevated plus-maze, open field, Y maze, forced swimming and food intake tests were performed. In addition, c-Fos expression in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) was also determined. The results revealed that the administration of LPA 18∶1 reduced the time in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze and induced hypolocomotion in the open field, suggesting an anxiogenic-like phenotype. Interestingly, these effects were present following LPA 18∶1 infusion under conditions of novelty but not under habituation conditions. In the forced swimming test, the administration of LPA 18∶1 dose-dependently increased depression-like behavior, as evaluated according to immobility time. LPA treatment induced no effects on feeding. However, the immunohistochemical analysis revealed that LPA 18∶1 increased c-Fos expression in the DPAG. The abundant expression of the LPA1 receptor, one of the main targets for LPA 18∶1, was detected in this brain area, which participates in the control of emotional behavior, using immunocytochemistry. These findings indicate that LPA is a relevant transmitter potentially involved in normal and pathological emotional responses, including anxiety and depression. PMID:24409327

  11. 1-Oleoyl lysophosphatidic acid: a new mediator of emotional behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Escuredo, Leticia; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Pedraza, Carmen; Orio, Laura; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The role of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the control of emotional behavior remains to be determined. We analyzed the effects of the central administration of 1-oleoyl-LPA (LPA 18∶1) in rats tested for food consumption and anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors. For this purpose, the elevated plus-maze, open field, Y maze, forced swimming and food intake tests were performed. In addition, c-Fos expression in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) was also determined. The results revealed that the administration of LPA 18∶1 reduced the time in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze and induced hypolocomotion in the open field, suggesting an anxiogenic-like phenotype. Interestingly, these effects were present following LPA 18∶1 infusion under conditions of novelty but not under habituation conditions. In the forced swimming test, the administration of LPA 18∶1 dose-dependently increased depression-like behavior, as evaluated according to immobility time. LPA treatment induced no effects on feeding. However, the immunohistochemical analysis revealed that LPA 18∶1 increased c-Fos expression in the DPAG. The abundant expression of the LPA1 receptor, one of the main targets for LPA 18∶1, was detected in this brain area, which participates in the control of emotional behavior, using immunocytochemistry. These findings indicate that LPA is a relevant transmitter potentially involved in normal and pathological emotional responses, including anxiety and depression. PMID:24409327

  12. Ginseng pharmacology: a new paradigm based on gintonin-lysophosphatidic acid receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng, is used as a traditional medicine. Despite the long history of the use of ginseng, there is no specific scientific or clinical rationale for ginseng pharmacology besides its application as a general tonic. The ambiguous description of ginseng pharmacology might be due to the absence of a predominant active ingredient that represents ginseng pharmacology. Recent studies show that ginseng abundantly contains lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs), which are phospholipid-derived growth factor with diverse biological functions including those claimed to be exhibited by ginseng. LPAs in ginseng form a complex with ginseng proteins, which can bind and deliver LPA to its cognate receptors with a high affinity. As a first messenger, gintonin produces second messenger Ca2+ via G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Ca2+ is an intracellular mediator of gintonin and initiates a cascade of amplifications for further intercellular communications by activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases, receptors, gliotransmitter, and neurotransmitter release. Ginsenosides, which have been regarded as primary ingredients of ginseng, cannot elicit intracellular [Ca2+]i transients, since they lack specific cell surface receptor. However, ginsenosides exhibit non-specific ion channel and receptor regulations. This is the key characteristic that distinguishes gintonin from ginsenosides. Although the current discourse on ginseng pharmacology is focused on ginsenosides, gintonin can definitely provide a mode of action for ginseng pharmacology that ginsenosides cannot. This review article introduces a novel concept of ginseng ligand-LPA receptor interaction and proposes to establish a paradigm that shifts the focus from ginsenosides to gintonin as a major ingredient representing ginseng pharmacology. PMID:26578955

  13. FOXM1 is a downstream target of LPA and YAP oncogenic signaling pathways in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qipeng; Cai, Qingchun; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-29

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a prototypical ligand for G protein coupled receptors, and Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1), a transcription factor that regulates expression of a wide array of genes involved in cancer initiation and progression, are two important oncogenic signaling molecules in human epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC). We conducted in vitro mechanistic studies using pharmacological inhibitors, genetic forms of the signaling molecules, and RNAi-mediated gene knock-down to uncover the molecular mechanisms of how these two molecules interact in EOC cells. Additionally, in vivo mouse studies were performed to confirm the functional involvement of FOXM1 in EOC tumor formation and progression. We show for the first time that LPA up-regulates expression of active FOXM1 splice variants in a time- and dose-dependent manner in the human EOC cell lines OVCA433, CAOV3, and OVCAR5. Gi-PI3K-AKT and G12/13-Rho-YAP signaling pathways were both involved in the LPA receptor (LPA1-3) mediated up-regulation of FOXM1 at the transcriptional level. In addition, down-regulation of FOXM1 in CAOV3 xenografts significantly reduced tumor and ascites formation, metastasis, and expression of FOXM1 target genes involved in cell proliferation, migration, or invasion. Collectively, our data link the oncolipid LPA, the oncogene YAP, and the central regulator of cell proliferation/mutagenesis FOXM1 in EOC cells. Moreover, these results provide further support for the importance of these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in EOC. PMID:26299613

  14. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  15. Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yung, Yun C; Stoddard, Nicole C; Mirendil, Hope; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-18

    The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states. PMID:25695267

  16. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced chemotaxis of bone cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a platelet-derived bioactive lipid that is postulated to regulate wound healing. LPA activates G protein-coupled receptors to induce Ca2+ signaling in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, and is a potent chemotactic stimulus for these cells. Since bone fracture healing requires the migration of osteoblast progenitors, we postulate that LPA is among the factors that stimulate bone repair. UMR 106-01 cells, which express a more mature osteoblastic phenotype than MC3T3-E1 cells, did not migrate in response to LPA, although they express LPA receptors and exhibit LPA-induced Ca2+ signals. This suggests that LPA differentially induces pre-osteoblast chemotaxis, consistent with our hypothesis that LPA stimulates the motility of osteoblast progenitors during bone healing. LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells exhibit striking changes in morphology and F-actin architecture, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) is required for motility-associated cytoskeletal rearrangements in many cell types. We found a dose-dependent reduction in LPA-induced osteoblast migration when cells also were treated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Treatment of many cell types with LPA is associated with an autocrine/paracrine transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) via shedding of surface-tethered EGFR ligands, a phenomenon often required for LPA-induced chemotaxis. MC3T3-E1 cells express multiple EGFR ligands (epigen, epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin) and migrated in response to EGF. However, while EGF-stimulated motility in MC3T3-E1 cells was blocked by an EGFR inhibitor, there was no significant effect on LPA-induced chemotaxis. Activation of MAP kinases is a hallmark of EGFR-mediated signaling, and EGF treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells led to a strong stimulation of ERK1/2 kinase. In contrast, LPA induced only a minor elevation in ERK activity. Thus, it is likely that the increase in ERK activity by LPA is related to cell proliferation associated with lipid treatment. We

  18. Activation of protein kinase C by lysophosphatidic acid: dependence on composition of phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sando, J J; Chertihin, O I

    1996-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has attracted recent attention as a major serum-derived regulator implicated in responses to vascular injury and inflammation, in tumour invasiveness and in neuronal signalling and remodelling. Although the possibility of a specific G-protein-coupled LPA receptor protein has been suggested, characterization of such a receptor is lacking. Since LPA can activate protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in many cells and PKC activators mimic many LPA effects, the possibility of more direct LPA effects on PKC was investigated. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS)/diacylglycerol (DAG) lipid vesicles of defined acyl chain composition were used to activate the enzyme. At total concentrations of saturated PC/PS + DAG vesicles (2-3 mM) that provided maximal PKC activation, 1-10 mol % [18:1]-LPA led to a further approx. 2-fold activation of PKC alpha. At lower lipid concentrations, a greater increase was observed with LPA concentrations up to 16-20 mol %. Higher concentrations of LPA were inhibitory. The LPA activation of PKC was dependent on the presence of DAG, PS and Ca2+. [18:1]-Lysophosphatidylcholine produced similar PKC activation in PC/PS/DAG vesicles. [14:0]-LPA was less effective, and longer-chain saturated lysolipids were ineffective. In unsaturated PC/PS vesicles, very little to no effect of LPA was discernable. These results suggest that physiologically or pathologically relevant concentrations of LPA can contribute to PKC activation depending on the composition of the lipid membrane. We hypothesize that LPA may affect the formation of lipid domains that are recognized by the enzyme. PMID:8713089

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid acts as a nutrient-derived developmental cue to regulate early hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haisen; Yue, Rui; Wei, Bin; Gao, Ge; Du, Jiulin; Pei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Primitive hematopoiesis occurs in the yolk sac blood islands during vertebrate embryogenesis, where abundant phosphatidylcholines (PC) are available as important nutrients for the developing embryo. However, whether these phospholipids also generate developmental cues to promote hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a signaling molecule derived from PC, regulated hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Pharmacological and genetic blockage of LPA receptor 1 (LPAR1) or autotoxin (ATX), a secretory lysophospholipase that catalyzes LPA production, inhibited hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and impaired the formation of hemangioblasts. Mechanistic experiments revealed that the regulatory effect of ATX-LPA signaling was mediated by PI3K/Akt-Smad pathway. Furthermore, during in vivo embryogenesis in zebrafish, LPA functioned as a developmental cue for hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Taken together, we identified LPA as an important nutrient-derived developmental cue for primitive hematopoiesis as well as a novel mechanism of hemangioblast regulation. PMID:24829209

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid Up-Regulates Hexokinase II and Glycolysis to Promote Proliferation of Ovarian Cancer Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Abir; Ma, Yibao; Yuan, Fang; Gong, Yongling; Fang, Zhenyu; Mohamed, Esraa M.; Berrios, Erika; Shao, Huanjie; Fang, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a blood-borne lipid mediator, is present in elevated concentrations in ascites of ovarian cancer patients and other malignant effusions. LPA is a potent mitogen in cancer cells. The mechanism linking LPA signal to cancer cell proliferation is not well understood. Little is known about whether LPA affects glucose metabolism to accommodate rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Here we describe that in ovarian cancer cells, LPA enhances glycolytic rate and lactate efflux. A real time PCR-based miniarray showed that hexokinase II (HK2) was the most dramatically induced glycolytic gene to promote glycolysis in LPA-treated cells. Analysis of the human HK2 gene promoter identified the sterol regulatory element-binding protein as the primary mediator of LPA-induced HK2 transcription. The effects of LPA on HK2 and glycolysis rely on LPA2, an LPA receptor subtype overexpressed in ovarian cancer and many other malignancies. We further examined the general role of growth factor-induced glycolysis in cell proliferation. Like LPA, epidermal growth factor (EGF) elicited robust glycolytic and proliferative responses in ovarian cancer cells. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin, however, potently stimulated cell proliferation but only modestly induced glycolysis. Consistent with their differential effects on glycolysis, LPA and EGF-dependent cell proliferation was highly sensitive to glycolytic inhibition while the growth-promoting effect of IGF-1 or insulin was more resistant. These results indicate that LPA- and EGF-induced cell proliferation selectively involves up-regulation of HK2 and glycolytic metabolism. The work is the first to implicate LPA signaling in promotion of glucose metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:26476080

  1. Source and role of intestinally derived lysophosphatidic acid in dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Navab, Mohamad; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Hough, Greg; Meriwether, David; Fogelman, Spencer I; Wagner, Alan C; Grijalva, Victor; Su, Feng; Anantharamaiah, G M; Hwang, Lin H; Faull, Kym F; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Fogelman, Alan M

    2015-04-01

    We previously reported that i) a Western diet increased levels of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in small intestine and plasma of LDL receptor null (LDLR(-/-)) mice, and ii) supplementing standard mouse chow with unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA produced dyslipidemia and inflammation. Here we report that supplementing chow with unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA resulted in aortic atherosclerosis, which was ameliorated by adding transgenic 6F tomatoes. Supplementing chow with lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) 18:1 (but not LysoPC 18:0) resulted in dyslipidemia similar to that seen on adding LPA 18:1 to chow. PF8380 (a specific inhibitor of autotaxin) significantly ameliorated the LysoPC 18:1-induced dyslipidemia. Supplementing chow with LysoPC 18:1 dramatically increased the levels of unsaturated LPA species in small intestine, liver, and plasma, and the increase was significantly ameliorated by PF8380 indicating that the conversion of LysoPC 18:1 to LPA 18:1 was autotaxin dependent. Adding LysoPC 18:0 to chow increased levels of LPA 18:0 in small intestine, liver, and plasma but was not altered by PF8380 indicating that conversion of LysoPC 18:0 to LPA 18:0 was autotaxin independent. We conclude that i) intestinally derived unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA can cause atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice, and ii) autotaxin mediates the conversion of unsaturated (but not saturated) LysoPC to LPA. PMID:25646365

  2. Source and role of intestinally derived lysophosphatidic acid in dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Navab, Mohamad; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Hough, Greg; Meriwether, David; Fogelman, Spencer I.; Wagner, Alan C.; Grijalva, Victor; Su, Feng; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Hwang, Lin H.; Faull, Kym F.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that i) a Western diet increased levels of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in small intestine and plasma of LDL receptor null (LDLR−/−) mice, and ii) supplementing standard mouse chow with unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA produced dyslipidemia and inflammation. Here we report that supplementing chow with unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA resulted in aortic atherosclerosis, which was ameliorated by adding transgenic 6F tomatoes. Supplementing chow with lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) 18:1 (but not LysoPC 18:0) resulted in dyslipidemia similar to that seen on adding LPA 18:1 to chow. PF8380 (a specific inhibitor of autotaxin) significantly ameliorated the LysoPC 18:1-induced dyslipidemia. Supplementing chow with LysoPC 18:1 dramatically increased the levels of unsaturated LPA species in small intestine, liver, and plasma, and the increase was significantly ameliorated by PF8380 indicating that the conversion of LysoPC 18:1 to LPA 18:1 was autotaxin dependent. Adding LysoPC 18:0 to chow increased levels of LPA 18:0 in small intestine, liver, and plasma but was not altered by PF8380 indicating that conversion of LysoPC 18:0 to LPA 18:0 was autotaxin independent. We conclude that i) intestinally derived unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA can cause atherosclerosis in LDLR−/− mice, and ii) autotaxin mediates the conversion of unsaturated (but not saturated) LysoPC to LPA. PMID:25646365

  3. Lysophosphatidic Acid Inhibits Apoptosis Induced by Cisplatin in Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yanxia; Yang, Ya; Wang, Ji; Li, Yi; Ma, Hongbing; Cai, Hui; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Shufeng; Li, Zongfang; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Wang, Jiansheng; Liu, Rui; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Shi, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Ren, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) level has been found significantly increased in the serum of patients with ovarian, cervical, and colon cancers. LPA level in cervical cancer patients is significantly higher than in healthy controls. LPA receptors were found highly expressed in cervical cancer cells, suggesting LPA may play a role in the development of cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of LPA on the apoptosis induced by cisplatin (DDP) in cervical cancer cell line and the underlying changes in signaling pathways. Our study found that cisplatin induced apoptosis of Hela cell through inhibiting expression of Bcl-2, upregulating the expression of Bax, Fas-L, and the enzyme activity of caspase-3 (p < 0.05); LPA significantly provided protection against the apoptosis induced by cisplatin by inhibiting the above alterations in apoptotic factor caused by cisplatin (p < 0.05). Moreover, PI3K/AKT pathway was found to be important for the LPA antiapoptosis effect, and administration of PI3K/AKT partially reversed the LPA-mediated protection against cisplatin-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05). These findings have shed new lights on the LPA bioactivity in cervical cancer cells and pointed to a possible sensitization scheme through combined administration of PI3K inhibitor and cisplatin for better treatment of cervical cancer patients, especially those with elevated LPA levels. PMID:26366416

  4. Tissue-specific expression, developmentally and spatially regulated alternative splicing, and protein subcellular localization of OsLpa rice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hai-ping; Pang, Wei-qin; Li, Wen-xu; Tan, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Hai-jun; Shu, Qing-yao

    2016-02-01

    The OsLpa1 gene (LOC_Os57400) was identified to be involved in phytic acid (PA) metabolism because its knockout and missense mutants reduce PA content in rice grain. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of OsLpa rice and of its homologues in other plants. In the present study, the spatial pattern of OsLpa1 expression was revealed using OsLpa1 promoter::GUS transgenic plants (GUS: β-glucuronidase); GUS histochemical assay showed that OsLpa1 was strongly expressed in stem, leaf, and root tissues, but in floral organ it is expressed mainly and strongly in filaments. In seeds, GUS staining was concentrated in the aleurone layers; a few blue spots were observed in the outer layers of embryo, but no staining was observed in the endosperm. Three OsLpa1 transcripts (OsLpa1.1, OsLpa1.2, OsLpa1.3) are produced due to alternative splicing; quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the abundance of OsLpa1.3 was negligible compared with OsLpa1.1 and OsLpa all tissues. OsLpa1.2 is predominant in germinating seeds (about 5 times that of OsLpa1.1), but its abundance decreases quickly with the development of seedlings and plants, whereas the abundance of OsLpa1.1 rises and falls, reaching its highest level in 45-d-old plants, with abundance greater than that of OsLpa both leaves and roots. In seeds, the abundance of OsLpa1 continuously increases with seed growth, being 27.5 and 15 times greater in 28-DAF (day after flowering) seeds than in 7-DAF seeds for OsLpa1.1 and OsLpa1.2, respectively. Transient expression of chimeric genes with green fluorescence protein (GFP) in rice protoplasts demonstrated that all proteins encoded by the three OsLpa1 transcripts are localized to the chloroplast. PMID:26834011

  5. Lp(a) glycoprotein phenotypes. Inheritance and relation to Lp(a)-lipoprotein concentrations in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Utermann, G; Menzel, H J; Kraft, H G; Duba, H C; Kemmler, H G; Seitz, C

    1987-01-01

    The Lp(a) lipoprotein represents a quantitative genetic trait. It contains two different polypeptide chains, the Lp(a) glycoprotein and apo B-100. We have demonstrated the Lp(a) glycoprotein directly in human sera by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions after immunoblotting using anti-Lp(a) serum and have observed inter- and intraindividual size heterogeneity of the glycoprotein with apparent molecular weights ranging from approximately 400,000-700,000 D. According to their relative mobilities compared with apo B-100 Lp(a) patterns were categorized into phenotypes F (faster than apo B-100), B (similar to apo B-100), S1, S2, S3, and S4 (all slower than apo B-100), and into the respective double-band phenotypes. Results from neuraminidase treatment of isolated Lp(a) glycoprotein indicate that the phenotypic differences do not reside in the sialic acid moiety of the glycoprotein. Family studies are compatible with the concept that Lp(a) glycoprotein phenotypes are controlled by a series of autosomal alleles (Lp[a]F, Lp[a]B, Lp[a]S1, Lp[a]S2, Lp[a]S3, Lp[a]S4, and Lp[a]0) at a single locus. Comparison of Lp(a) plasma concentrations in different phenotypes revealed a highly significant association of phenotype with concentration. Phenotypes B, S1, and S2 are associated with high and phenotypes S3 and S4 with low Lp(a) concentrations. This suggests that the same gene locus is involved in determining Lp(a) glycoprotein phenotypes and Lp(a) lipoprotein concentrations in plasma and is the first indication for structural differences underlying the quantitative genetic Lp(a)-trait. Images PMID:2956279

  6. Activation of TRESK channels by the inflammatory mediator lysophosphatidic acid balances nociceptive signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kollert, Sina; Dombert, Benjamin; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons TRESK channels constitute a major current component of the standing outward current IKSO. A prominent physiological role of TRESK has been attributed to pain sensation. During inflammation mediators of pain e.g. lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are released and modulate nociception. We demonstrate co-expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in DRG neurons. Heterologous expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in Xenopus oocytes revealed augmentation of basal K+ currents upon LPA application. In DRG neurons nociception can result from TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or LPA. Upon co-expression in Xenopus oocytes LPA simultaneously increased both depolarising TRPV1 and hyperpolarising TRESK currents. Patch-clamp recordings in cultured DRG neurons from TRESK[wt] mice displayed increased IKSO after application of LPA whereas under these conditions IKSO in neurons from TRESK[ko] mice remained unaltered. Under current-clamp conditions LPA application differentially modulated excitability in these genotypes upon depolarising pulses. Spike frequency was attenuated in TRESK[wt] neurons and, in contrast, augmented in TRESK[ko] neurons. Accordingly, excitation of nociceptive neurons by LPA is balanced by co-activation of TRESK channels. Hence excitation of sensory neurons is strongly controlled by the activity of TRESK channels, which therefore are good candidates for the treatment of pain disorders. PMID:26224542

  7. Activation of TRESK channels by the inflammatory mediator lysophosphatidic acid balances nociceptive signalling.

    PubMed

    Kollert, Sina; Dombert, Benjamin; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons TRESK channels constitute a major current component of the standing outward current IKSO. A prominent physiological role of TRESK has been attributed to pain sensation. During inflammation mediators of pain e.g. lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are released and modulate nociception. We demonstrate co-expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in DRG neurons. Heterologous expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in Xenopus oocytes revealed augmentation of basal K(+) currents upon LPA application. In DRG neurons nociception can result from TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or LPA. Upon co-expression in Xenopus oocytes LPA simultaneously increased both depolarising TRPV1 and hyperpolarising TRESK currents. Patch-clamp recordings in cultured DRG neurons from TRESK[wt] mice displayed increased IKSO after application of LPA whereas under these conditions IKSO in neurons from TRESK[ko] mice remained unaltered. Under current-clamp conditions LPA application differentially modulated excitability in these genotypes upon depolarising pulses. Spike frequency was attenuated in TRESK[wt] neurons and, in contrast, augmented in TRESK[ko] neurons. Accordingly, excitation of nociceptive neurons by LPA is balanced by co-activation of TRESK channels. Hence excitation of sensory neurons is strongly controlled by the activity of TRESK channels, which therefore are good candidates for the treatment of pain disorders. PMID:26224542

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid can support the formation of membranous structures and an increase in MBP mRNA levels in differentiating oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nogaroli, Luciana; Yuelling, Larra M.; Dennis, Jameel; Gorse, Karen; Payne, Shawn G.; Fuss, Babette

    2009-01-01

    During development, differentiating oligodendrocytes progress in distinct maturation steps from premyelinating to myelinating cells. Such maturing oligodendrocytes express both receptors mediating signaling via extracellular lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and the major enzyme generating extracellular LPA, namely phosphodiesterase-Iα/autotaxin (PD-Iα/ATX). However, the biological role of extracellular LPA during the maturation of differentiating oligodendrocytes is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that application of exogenous LPA induced an increase in the area occupied by the oligodendrocytes’ process network, but only when PD-Iα/ATX expression was down-regulated. This increase in network area was caused primarily by the formation of membranous structures. In addition, LPA increased the number of cells positive for myelin basic protein (MBP). This effect was associated by an increase in the mRNA levels coding for MBP but not myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Taken together, these data suggest that LPA may play a crucial role in regulating the later stages of oligodendrocyte maturation. PMID:18594965

  9. Endosomal H2O2 production leads to localized cysteine sulfenic acid formation on proteins during lysophosphatidic acid-mediated cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Klomsiri, Chananat; Rogers, LeAnn C; Soito, Laura; McCauley, Anita K; King, S Bruce; Nelson, Kimberly J; Poole, Leslie B; Daniel, Larry W

    2014-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a growth factor for many cells including prostate and ovarian cancer-derived cell lines. LPA stimulates H2O2 production which is required for growth. However, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the spatial and temporal regulation of H2O2-dependent signaling and the way in which signals are transmitted following receptor activation. Herein, we describe the use of two reagents, DCP-Bio1 and DCP-Rho1, to evaluate the localization of active protein oxidation after LPA stimulation by detection of nascent protein sulfenic acids. We found that LPA stimulation causes internalization of LPA receptors into early endosomes that contain NADPH oxidase components and are sites of H2O2 generation. DCP-Rho1 allowed visualization of sulfenic acid formation, indicative of active protein oxidation, which was stimulated by LPA and decreased by an LPA receptor antagonist. Protein oxidation sites colocalized with LPAR1 and the endosomal marker EEA1. Concurrent with the generation of these redox signaling-active endosomes (redoxosomes) is the H2O2- and NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidation of Akt2 and PTP1B detected using DCP-Bio1. These new approaches therefore enable detection of active, H2O2-dependent protein oxidation linked to cell signaling processes. DCP-Rho1 may be a particularly useful protein oxidation imaging agent enabling spatial resolution due to the transient nature of the sulfenic acid intermediate it detects. PMID:24657741

  10. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  11. The early- and late stages in phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells: differential roles for lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huazhang; Makarova, Natalia; Cheng, Yunhui; E, Shuyu; Ji, Rui-Rui; Zhang, Chunxiang; Farrar, Patricia; Tigyi, Gabor

    2008-09-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as causative in phenotypic modulation (PM) of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in their transition to the dedifferentiated phenotype. We evaluated the contribution of the three major LPA receptors, LPA1 and LPA2 GPCR and PPARgamma, on PM of VSMC. Expression of differentiated VSMC-specific marker genes, including smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, calponin, SM-22alpha, and h-caldesmon, was measured by quantitative real-time PCR in VSMC cultures and aortic rings kept in serum-free chemically defined medium or serum- or LPA-containing medium using wild-type C57BL/6, LPA1, LPA2, and LPA1&2 receptor knockout mice. Within hours after cells were deprived of physiological cues, the expression of VSMC marker genes, regardless of genotype, rapidly decreased. This early PM was neither prevented by IGF-I, inhibitors of p38, ERK1/2, or PPARgamma nor significantly accelerated by LPA or serum. To elucidate the mechanism of PM in vivo, carotid artery ligation with/without replacement of blood with Krebs solution was used to evaluate contributions of blood flow and pressure. Early PM in the common carotid was induced by depressurization regardless of the presence/absence of blood, but eliminating blood flow while maintaining blood pressure or after sham surgery elicited no early PM. The present results indicate that LPA, serum, dissociation of VSMC, IGF-I, p38, ERK1/2, LPA1, and LPA2 are not causative factors of early PM of VSMC. Tensile stress generated by blood pressure may be the fundamental signal maintaining the fully differentiated phenotype of VSMC. PMID:18602022

  12. Aiming drug discovery at lysophosphatidic acid targets

    PubMed Central

    Tigyi, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, 1-radyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphate) is the prototype member of a family of lipid mediators and second messengers. LPA and its naturally occurring analogues interact with G protein-coupled receptors on the cell surface and a nuclear hormone receptor within the cell. In addition, there are several enzymes that utilize LPA as a substrate or generate it as a product and are under its regulatory control. LPA is present in biological fluids, and attempts have been made to link changes in its concentration and molecular composition to specific disease conditions. Through their many targets, members of the LPA family regulate cell survival, apoptosis, motility, shape, differentiation, gene transcription, malignant transformation and more. The present review depicts arbitrary aspects of the physiological and pathophysiological actions of LPA and attempts to link them with select targets. Many of us are now convinced that therapies targeting LPA biosynthesis and signalling are feasible for the treatment of devastating human diseases such as cancer, fibrosis and degenerative conditions. However, successful targeting of the pathways associated with this pleiotropic lipid will depend on the future development of as yet undeveloped pharmacons. PMID:20735414

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid-Induced Transcriptional Profile Represents Serous Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma and Worsened Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Murph, Mandi M.; Liu, Wenbin; Yu, Shuangxing; Lu, Yiling; Hall, Hassan; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Lahad, John; Schaner, Marci; Helland, Åslaug; Kristensen, Gunnar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) governs a number of physiologic and pathophysiological processes. Malignant ascites fluid is rich in LPA, and LPA receptors are aberrantly expressed by ovarian cancer cells, implicating LPA in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, there is an absence of systematic data critically analyzing the transcriptional changes induced by LPA in ovarian cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, gene expression profiling was used to examine LPA-mediated transcription by exogenously adding LPA to human epithelial ovarian cancer cells for 24 h to mimic long-term stimulation in the tumor microenvironment. The resultant transcriptional profile comprised a 39-gene signature that closely correlated to serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering of ovarian cancer patient specimens demonstrated that the signature is associated with worsened prognosis. Patients with LPA-signature-positive ovarian tumors have reduced disease-specific and progression-free survival times. They have a higher frequency of stage IIIc serous carcinoma and a greater proportion is deceased. Among the 39-gene signature, a group of seven genes associated with cell adhesion recapitulated the results. Out of those seven, claudin-1, an adhesion molecule and phenotypic epithelial marker, is the only independent biomarker of serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Knockdown of claudin-1 expression in ovarian cancer cells reduces LPA-mediated cellular adhesion, enhances suspended cells and reduces LPA-mediated migration. Conclusions The data suggest that transcriptional events mediated by LPA in the tumor microenvironment influence tumor progression through modulation of cell adhesion molecules like claudin-1 and, for the first time, report an LPA-mediated expression signature in ovarian cancer that predicts a worse prognosis. PMID:19440550

  14. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway. PMID:24845645

  15. PDZ-RhoGEF and LARG Are Essential for Embryonic Development and Provide a Link between Thrombin and LPA Receptors and Rho Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Palmby, Todd R.; Simaan, May; Li, Wenling; Szabo, Roman; Lyons, Ruth; Martin, Daniel; Yagi, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Chikumi, Hiroki; Galisteo, Rebeca; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to both members of the Gα12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins α subunits, Gα12 and Gα13, regulate the activation of Rho GTPases, thereby contributing to many key biological processes. Multiple Rho GEFs have been proposed to link Gα12/13 GPCRs to Rho activation, including PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), leukemia-associated Rho GEF (LARG), p115-RhoGEF (p115), lymphoid blast crisis (Lbc), and Dbl. PRG, LARG, and p115 share the presence of a regulator of G protein signaling homology (RGS) domain. There is limited information on the biological roles of this RGS-containing family of RhoGEFs in vivo. p115-deficient mice are viable with some defects in the immune system and gastrointestinal motor dysfunctions, whereas in an initial study we showed that mice deficient for Larg are viable and resistant to salt-induced hypertension. Here, we generated knock-out mice for Prg and observed that these mice do not display any overt phenotype. However, deficiency in Prg and Larg leads to complex developmental defects and early embryonic lethality. Signaling from Gα11/q-linked GPCRs to Rho was not impaired in mouse embryonic fibroblasts defective in all three RGS-containing RhoGEFs. However, a combined lack of Prg, Larg, and p115 expression abolished signaling through Gα12/13 to Rho and thrombin-induced cell proliferation, directional migration, and nuclear signaling through JNK and p38. These findings provide evidence of an essential role for the RGS-containing RhoGEF family in signaling to Rho by Gα12/13-coupled GPCRs, which may likely play a critical role during embryonic development. PMID:23467409

  16. Tissue-specific expression, developmentally and spatially regulated alternative splicing, and protein subcellular localization of OsLpa1 in rice*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hai-ping; Pang, Wei-qin; Li, Wen-xu; Tan, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Hai-jun; Shu, Qing-yao

    2016-01-01

    The OsLpa1 gene (LOC_Os02g57400) was identified to be involved in phytic acid (PA) metabolism because its knockout and missense mutants reduce PA content in rice grain. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of OsLpa1 in rice and of its homologues in other plants. In the present study, the spatial pattern of OsLpa1 expression was revealed using OsLpa1 promoter::GUS transgenic plants (GUS: β-glucuronidase); GUS histochemical assay showed that OsLpa1 was strongly expressed in stem, leaf, and root tissues, but in floral organ it is expressed mainly and strongly in filaments. In seeds, GUS staining was concentrated in the aleurone layers; a few blue spots were observed in the outer layers of embryo, but no staining was observed in the endosperm. Three OsLpa1 transcripts (OsLpa1.1, OsLpa1.2, OsLpa1.3) are produced due to alternative splicing; quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the abundance of OsLpa1.3 was negligible compared with OsLpa1.1 and OsLpa1.2 in all tissues. OsLpa1.2 is predominant in germinating seeds (about 5 times that of OsLpa1.1), but its abundance decreases quickly with the development of seedlings and plants, whereas the abundance of OsLpa1.1 rises and falls, reaching its highest level in 45-d-old plants, with abundance greater than that of OsLpa1.2 in both leaves and roots. In seeds, the abundance of OsLpa1 continuously increases with seed growth, being 27.5 and 15 times greater in 28-DAF (day after flowering) seeds than in 7-DAF seeds for OsLpa1.1 and OsLpa1.2, respectively. Transient expression of chimeric genes with green fluorescence protein (GFP) in rice protoplasts demonstrated that all proteins encoded by the three OsLpa1 transcripts are localized to the chloroplast. PMID:26834011

  17. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid pathway in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Orosa, Beatriz; García, Samuel; Conde, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid that is mainly produced by the hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by lysophospholipase D, which is also called autotaxin (ATX). LPA interacts with specific G-protein coupled receptors and is involved in the regulation of cellular survival, proliferation, differentiation and motility. LPA also has roles in several pathological disorders, such as cancer and pulmonary, dermal and renal fibrosis. The involvement of the ATX-LPA pathway has recently been demonstrated in inflammatory responses and apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and during the development of experimental arthritis. This review summarises the current literature of the ATX-LPA pathway in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26297977

  18. HIF1α-Induced by Lysophosphatidic Acid Is Stabilized via Interaction with MIF and CSN5

    PubMed Central

    No, Yi Ran; Lee, Sei-Jung; Kumar, Ajay; Yun, C. Chris

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a cytokine that has broad effects on immune system and inflammatory response. A growing body of evidence implicates the role of MIF in tumor growth and metastasis. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid mediator, regulates colon cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and survival through LPA2 receptor. Loss of LPA2 results in decreased expression of MIF in a rodent model of colon cancer, but the mechanism of MIF regulation by LPA is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that LPA transcriptionally regulates MIF expression in colon cancer cells. MIF knockdown decreased LPA-mediated proliferation of HCT116 human adenocarcinoma cells without altering the basal proliferation rates. Conversely, extracellular recombinant MIF stimulated cell proliferation, suggesting that the effect of MIF may in part be mediated through activation of surface receptor. We have shown recently that LPA increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression. We found that MIF regulation by LPA was ablated by knockdown of HIF1α, indicating that MIF is a transcriptional target of HIF1α. Conversely, knockdown of MIF ablated an increase in HIF1α expression in LPA-treated cells, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between HIF1α and MIF. LPA stimulated co-immunoprecipitation of HIF1α and MIF, indicating that their association is necessary for stabilization of HIF1α. It has been shown previously that CSN9 signalosome subunit 5 (CSN5) interacts with HIF1α to stabilize HIF1α under aerobic conditions. We found that LPA did not alter expression of CSN5, but stimulated its interaction with HIF1α and MIF. Depletion of CSN5 mitigated the association between HIF1α and MIF, indicating that CSN5 acts as a physical link. We suggest that HIF1α, MIF, and CSN5 form a ternary complex whose formation is necessary to prevent degradation of HIF1α under aerobic conditions. PMID:26352431

  19. Nuclear receptors in bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and vitamin D receptor, and play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, energy, and drug metabolism. These xenobiotic/endobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors regulate phase I oxidation, phase II conjugation, and phase III transport in bile acid and drug metabolism in the digestive system. Integration of bile acid metabolism with drug metabolism controls absorption, transport, and metabolism of nutrients and drugs to maintain metabolic homeostasis and also protects against liver injury, inflammation, and related metabolic diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile-acid–based drugs targeting nuclear receptors are in clinical trials for treating cholestatic liver diseases and fatty liver disease. PMID:23330546

  20. Lysophospholipid Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Rat Terminal Schwann Cells, As Revealed by a Single Cell RT-PCR and In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Kobashi, Hiroaki; Yaoi, Takeshi; Oda, Ryo; Okajima, Seiichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Terminal Schwann cells (TSCs) that cover motor neuron terminals, are known to play an important role in maintaining neuromuscular junctions, as well as in the repair process after nerve injury. However, the molecular characteristics of TSCs remain unknown, because of the difficulties in analyzing them due to their paucity. By using our previously reported method of selectively and efficiently collecting TSCs, we have analyzed the difference in expression patterns of lysophospholipid (LPL) receptor genes (LPA1, LPA2, LPA3, S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5) between TSCs and myelinating Schwann cells (MSCs). LPL, which includes lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), is the bioactive lipid that induces a myriad of cellular responses through specific members of G-protein coupled receptors for LPA. It turned out that LPA3 was expressed only in TSCs, whereas S1P1 was expressed in TSCs and skeletal muscle, but not in MSCs. Other types of LPL receptor genes, including LPA1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, were expressed in both types of Schwann cells. None of the LPL receptor gene family showed MSCs-specific expression. PMID:17375210

  1. Lysophospholipid receptors are differentially expressed in rat terminal Schwann cells, as revealed by a single cell rt-PCR and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Hiroaki; Yaoi, Takeshi; Oda, Ryo; Okajima, Seiichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-04-22

    Terminal Schwann cells (TSCs) that cover motor neuron terminals, are known to play an important role in maintaining neuromuscular junctions, as well as in the repair process after nerve injury. However, the molecular characteristics of TSCs remain unknown, because of the difficulties in analyzing them due to their paucity. By using our previously reported method of selectively and efficiently collecting TSCs, we have analyzed the difference in expression patterns of lysophospholipid (LPL) receptor genes (LPA1, LPA2, LPA3, S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5) between TSCs and myelinating Schwann cells (MSCs). LPL, which includes lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), is the bioactive lipid that induces a myriad of cellular responses through specific members of G-protein coupled receptors for LPA. It turned out that LPA3 was expressed only in TSCs, whereas S1P1 was expressed in TSCs and skeletal muscle, but not in MSCs. Other types of LPL receptor genes, including LPA1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, were expressed in both types of Schwann cells. None of the LPL receptor gene family showed MSCs-specific expression. PMID:17375210

  2. Gi-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Grb2 (growth-factor-receptor-bound protein 2)-bound dynamin-II by lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Kranenburg, O; Verlaan, I; Moolenaar, W H

    1999-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is the prototypic G-protein-coupled receptor agonist that activates the Ras-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive Gi and enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. We recently detected a 100 kDa protein (p100) that binds to the C-terminal SH3 domain of growth-factor-receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated in a PTX-sensitive manner in LPA-treated Rat-1 cells [Kranenburg, Verlaan, Hordijk and Moolenaar (1997) EMBO J. 16, 3097-3105]. Through glutathione S-transferase-Grb2 affinity purification and microsequencing, we have now identified p100 as dynamin-II, a GTPase that regulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We show that in Rat-1 cells, Grb2-bound dynamin-II is rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in response to LPA in a PTX-sensitive manner. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of Grb2-bound dynamin-II may be a critical event in Gi-mediated activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade in fibroblasts. PMID:10085221

  3. Sphingosine kinase 1 is upregulated with lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Inoue, Satoru; Yoshida, Yuki; Kodaka, Atsushi; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Tsuiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of SphK1, an oncogenic kinase that produces sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and its correlation with the expression of LPAR2, a major lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor overexpressed in various cancers, in human colorectal cancer. METHODS: Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the mRNA expression of SphK1, LPAR2, and the three major S1P receptors in 27 colorectal cancer samples and corresponding normal tissue samples. We also examined the correlation between the expression of SphK1 and LPAR2. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer tissue in 22 of 27 patients had higher levels of SphK1 mRNA than in normal tissue. In two-thirds of the samples, SphK1 mRNA expression was more than two-fold higher than in normal tissue. Consistent with previous reports, LPAR2 mRNA expression in 20 of 27 colorectal cancer tissue samples was higher compared to normal tissue samples. Expression profiles of all three major S1P receptors, S1PR1, S1PR2, and S1PR3, varied without any trend, with no significant difference in expression between cancer and normal tissues. A highly significant positive correlation was found between SphK1 and LPAR2 expression [Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) = 0.784 and P < 0.01]. The mRNA levels of SphK1 and LPAR2 did not correlate with TNM stage. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that S1P and LPA may play important roles in the development of colorectal cancer via the upregulation of SphK1 and LPAR2, both of which could serve as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26937138

  4. The Role of Lysophosphatidic Acid on Airway Epithelial Cell Denudation in a Murine Heterotopic Tracheal Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Tando, Yukiko; Ota, Chiharu; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kamata, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kano, Kuniyuki; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic rejection is the major leading cause of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), a fibroproliferative disorder of the small airways, is the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft rejection. However, there is currently no treatment for the disease. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) participates in the progression of OB. The aim of this study was to reveal the involvement of LPA on the lesion of OB. Methods Ki16198, an antagonist specifically for LPA1 and LPA3, was daily administered into the heterotopic tracheal transplant model mice at the day of transplantation. At days 10 and 28, the allografts were isolated and evaluated histologically. The messenger RNA levels of LPAR in microdissected mouse airway regions were assessed to reveal localization of lysophosphatidic acid receptors. The human airway epithelial cell was used to evaluate the mechanism of LPA-induced suppression of cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Results The administration of Ki16198 attenuated airway epithelial cell loss in the allograft at day 10. Messenger RNAs of LPA1 and LPA3 were detected in the airway epithelial cells of the mice. Lysophosphatidic acid inhibited the attachment of human airway epithelial cells to the ECM and induced cell detachment from the ECM, which was mediated by LPA1 and Rho-kinase pathway. However, Ki16198 did not prevent obliteration of allograft at day 28. Conclusions The LPA signaling is involved in the status of epithelial cells by distinct contribution in 2 different phases of the OB lesion. This finding suggests a role of LPA in the pathogenesis of OB. PMID:27500235

  5. A long-acting and highly selective prostacyclin receptor agonist prodrug, 2-{4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N-(methylsulfonyl)acetamide (NS-304), ameliorates rat pulmonary hypertension with unique relaxant responses of its active form, {4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}acetic acid (MRE-269), on rat pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Keiichi; Hashino, Asami; Noda, Kumiko; Kosugi, Keiji; Kuwabara, Kenji

    2008-09-01

    2-{4-[(5,6-Diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N-(methylsulfonyl)acetamide (NS-304) is an orally available, long-acting nonprostanoid prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonist prodrug. In a rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline (MCT), NS-304 ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, pulmonary arterial wall hypertrophy, and right ventricular hypertrophy, and it elevated right ventricular systolic pressure and improved survival. {4-[(5,6-Diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}acetic acid (MRE-269), the active form of NS-304, is much more selective for the IP receptor than are the prostacyclin analogs beraprost and iloprost, which also have high affinity for the EP(3) receptor. To investigate the effect of receptor selectivity on vasodilation of the pulmonary artery, we assessed the relaxant response to these IP agonists in rats. MRE-269 induced vasodilation equally in large pulmonary arteries (LPA) and small pulmonary arteries (SPA), whereas beraprost and iloprost induced less vasodilation in SPA than in LPA. An EP(3) agonist, sulprostone, induced SPA and LPA vasoconstriction, and an EP(3) antagonist attenuated the vasoconstriction. Beraprost showed EP(3) agonism and induced LPA and SPA vasoconstriction, whereas the EP(3) antagonist inhibited this vasoconstriction and enhanced beraprost- and iloprost-induced SPA vasodilation. These findings suggest that the EP(3) agonism of beraprost and iloprost interfered with the SPA vasodilation resulting from their IP receptor agonism. Endothelium removal markedly attenuated the vasodilation induced by beraprost, but not that induced by MRE-269 or iloprost. Moreover, the vasodilation induced by beraprost and iloprost, but not that induced by MRE-269, was more strongly attenuated in LPA from MCT-treated rats than from normal rats. NS-304 is a promising alternative medication for pulmonary arterial hypertension with prospects for good patient compliance. PMID:18552131

  6. A novel approach for measuring sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid binding to carrier proteins using monoclonal antibodies and the Kinetic Exclusion Assay.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jonathan K; Glass, Thomas R; Lackie, Steve J; Wojciak, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are bioactive signaling lysophospholipids that activate specific G protein-coupled receptors on the cell surface triggering numerous biological events. In circulation, S1P and LPA associate with specific carrier proteins or chaperones; serum albumin binds both S1P and LPA while HDL shuttles S1P via interactions with apoM. We used a series of kinetic exclusion assays in which monoclonal anti-S1P and anti-LPA antibodies competed with carrier protein for the lysophospholipid to measure the equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for these carrier proteins binding S1P and the major LPA species. Fatty acid-free (FAF)-BSA binds these lysophospholipids with the following Kd values: LPA(16:0), 68 nM; LPA(18:1), 130 nM; LPA(18:2), 350 nM; LPA(20:4), 2.2 μM; and S1P, 41 μM. FAF human serum albumin binds each lysophospholipid with comparable affinities. By measuring the apoM concentration and expanding the model to include endogenous ligand, we were able to resolve the Kd values for S1P binding apoM in the context of human HDL and LDL particles (21 nM and 2.4 nM, respectively). The novel competitive assay and analysis described herein enables measurement of Kd values of completely unmodified lysophospholipids binding unmodified carrier proteins in solution, and thus provide insights into S1P and LPA storage in the circulation system and may be useful in understanding chaperone-dependent receptor activation and signaling. PMID:27444045

  7. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH, whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels include TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K(+) channels, voltage-activated K(+) channels, L-type Ca(2+) channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl(-) channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  8. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels comprise TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K+ channels, voltage-activated K+ channels, L-type Ca2+ channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl− channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  9. Human platelets respond differentially to lysophosphatidic acids having a highly unsaturated fatty acyl group and alkyl ether-linked lysophosphatidic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Tokumura, Akira; Sinomiya, Junya; Kishimoto, Seishi; Tanaka, Tamotsu; Kogure, Kentaro; Sugiura, Takayuki; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Waku, Keizo; Fukuzawa, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a physiological agonist that is produced by lysophospholipase D, phospholipase A(1) and phospholipase A(2) in the blood of animals. It exerts diverse biological actions on a broad range of animal cells. Specific receptors for this important agonist have been characterized. In this investigation, for the first time we prepared LPAs having a highly unsaturated fatty acyl group, such as the eicosapentaenoyl or docosahexaenoyl residue, and their acetylated derivatives. Human platelets aggregated more potently in response to the highly unsaturated acyl-LPAs than to LPAs with a C(18) fatty acyl group, such as an oleoyl group, while alkyl ether-linked LPAs (alkyl-LPA) had much stronger aggregating activity. Two positional isomers of LPAs with an arachidonoyl, eicosapentaenoyl or docosahexaenoyl group had equipotent aggregatory activity as well as the positional isomers of their acetylated analogues, indicating that putative LPA receptors could not distinguish the difference between the positional isomers. We found that platelet preparations from two individuals showed no aggregatory response to alkyl-LPAs, although they contained mRNAs for known LPA receptors in the following order of expression level: endothelial differentiation gene (Edg)-4>Edg-7>Edg-2. We also obtained evidence that 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid (ONO-RS-082), a phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, potentiated alkyl-LPA-induced platelet aggregation, but inhibited highly unsaturated acyl-LPA-induced platelet aggregation. These results indicated that human platelets express acyl-LPA-selective and alkyl-LPA-selective receptors on their plasma membrane. PMID:11982483

  10. Transgenic 6F tomatoes act on the small intestine to prevent systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia caused by Western diet and intestinally derived lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Buga, Georgette M; Su, Feng; Wagner, Alan C; Meriwether, David; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Gao, Feng; Grijalva, Victor; Danciger, Janet S; Van Lenten, Brian J; Org, Elin; Lusis, Aldons J; Pan, Calvin; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Smyth, Susan S; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Fogelman, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    We recently reported that levels of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the small intestine significantly correlated with the extent of aortic atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-null (LDLR⁻/⁻) mice fed a Western diet (WD). Here we demonstrate that WD increases unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA levels in the small intestine of LDLR⁻/⁻ mice and causes changes in small intestine gene expression. Confirmation of microarray analysis by quantitative RT-PCR showed that adding transgenic tomatoes expressing the apoA-I mimetic peptide 6F (Tg6F) to WD prevented many WD-mediated small intestine changes in gene expression. If instead of feeding WD, unsaturated LPA was added to chow and fed to the mice: i) levels of LPA in the small intestine were similar to those induced by feeding WD; ii) gene expression changes in the small intestine mimicked WD-mediated changes; and iii) changes in plasma serum amyloid A, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol levels, and the fast-performance liquid chromatography lipoprotein profile mimicked WD-mediated changes. Adding Tg6F (but not control tomatoes) to LPA-supplemented chow prevented the LPA-induced changes. We conclude that: i) WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia may be in part due to WD-induced increases in small intestine LPA levels; and ii) Tg6F reduces WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia by preventing WD-induced increases in LPA levels in the small intestine. PMID:24085744

  11. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as is a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  12. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid-mediated Ca2+ mobilization in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells is independent of phosphoinositide signalling, but dependent on sphingosine kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Young, K W; Challiss, R A; Nahorski, S R; MacKrill, J J

    1999-10-01

    Extracellular application of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The maximal response to LPA occurred between 0. 1 and 1 microM, at which point [Ca(2+)](i) was increased by approx. 500 nM. This increase was of similar magnitude to that caused by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist methacholine (MCh), although the initial rate of release by LPA was slower. Both LPA and MCh released Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, as assessed by inhibition of their effects by thapsigargin, a blocker of endoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) uptake, and by the persistence of their action in nominally Ca(2+)-free extracellular medium. Similarly, both agonists appeared to stimulate store-refilling Ca(2+) entry. MCh produced a marked elevation in cellular Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and stimulated [(3)H]InsP accumulation in the presence of Li(+). In contrast, LPA failed to stimulate detectable phosphoinositide turnover. Chronic down-regulation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) receptor (InsP(3)R) proteins with MCh did not affect Ca(2+) responses to LPA. In addition, heparin, a competitive antagonist of InsP(3)Rs, blocked Ca(2+)-mobilization in permeabilized SH-SY5Y cells in response to MCh or exogenously added Ins(1,4,5)P(3), but failed to inhibit Ca(2+)-release induced by LPA. Elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by LPA was blocked by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]-diphosphate, indicating that this agonist acts via a G-protein-coupled receptor. However, pertussis toxin was without effect on LPA-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) responses, suggesting that G(i/o)-proteins were not involved. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS, 30 microM), a competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked LPA-induced Ca(2+) responses by almost 90%. In addition, MCh-induced Ca(2+) responses were also diminished by the addition of DMS, although to a lesser extent than with LPA. We conclude that LPA mobilizes intracellular Ca(2

  14. Expression of the lysophospholipid receptor family and investigation of lysophospholipid-mediated responses in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Duong, Chinh Quoc; Bared, Salim Maa; Abu-Khader, Ahmad; Buechler, Christa; Schmitz, Anna; Schmitz, Gerd

    2004-06-01

    Some of the biological effects of lipoproteins have been attributed to their association with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC). These lysophospholipids mediate multiple biological responses via several G protein-coupled receptors (GPR). The expression of these receptors, however, has not been systematically investigated in primary human monocytes and macrophages as major cells involved in atherosclerosis. The mRNAs for all 15 receptors described so far were detected in monocytes, macrophages, foam cells and high density lipoprotein (HDL(3))-treated cells using real time RT-PCR. Immunoblots revealed that S1P(1), S1P(2), S1P(4), LPA(1), LPA(2) and GPR65 are expressed in monocytes and macrophages, while S1P(5) and LPA(3) have not been detected. S1P(3) was induced during differentiation but down-regulated by lipid-loading and HDL(3), whereas LPA(1) was down-regulated in differentiated macrophages. The influence of S1P on macrophages was investigated and the induction of CD32 indicates an enhanced phagocytic activity. Altogether, these data give insights into the expression and regulation of lysophospholipid receptors in primary human monocytes, macrophages and foam cells. PMID:15158762

  15. Developmental expression of retinoic acid receptors (RARs)

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Here, I review the developmental expression features of genes encoding the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the 'retinoid X' or rexinoid receptors (RXRs). The first detailed expression studies were performed in the mouse over two decades ago, following the cloning of the murine Rar genes. These studies revealed complex expression features at all stages of post-implantation development, one receptor gene (Rara) showing widespread expression, the two others (Rarb and Rarg) with highly regionalized and/or cell type-specific expression in both neural and non-neural tissues. Rxr genes also have either widespread (Rxra, Rxrb), or highly-restricted (Rxrg) expression patterns. Studies performed in zebrafish and Xenopus demonstrated expression of Rar and Rxr genes (both maternal and zygotic), at early pre-gastrulation stages. The eventual characterization of specific enzymes involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (retinol/retinaldehyde dehydrogenases), or the triggering of its catabolism (CYP26 cytochrome P450s), all of them showing differential expression patterns, led to a clearer understanding of the phenomenons regulated by retinoic acid signaling during development. Functional studies involving targeted gene disruptions in the mouse, and additional approaches such as dominant negative receptor expression in other models, have pinpointed the specific, versus partly redundant, roles of the RARs and RXRs in many developing organ systems. These pleiotropic roles are summarized hereafter in relationship to the receptors’ expression patterns. PMID:19471585

  16. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid and signaling in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Bolier, Ruth; Beuers, Ulrich H

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid is a potent signaling lipid molecule that has initially been characterized as a growth factor. However, later studies have revealed many more functions such as modulation of cell shape, cell migration, prevention of apoptosis, platelet aggregation, wound healing, osteoclast differentiation, vasopressor activity, embryo implantation, angiogenesis, lung fibrosis, hair growth and more. The molecule mainly acts through the activation of a set of at least 6 G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6), but intracellular LPA was also shown to signal through the activation of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. In this short review we discuss the recent observations which suggest that in pathological conditions LPA also modulates signaling in sensory neurons. Thus, LPA has been shown to play a role in the initiation of neuropathic pain and, more recently, a relation was observed between increased LPA levels in the circulation and cholestatic itch. The mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. PMID:25218302

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Lai, Shou-Lun; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Wen-Hsi; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lee, Po-Huang; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs. Methods Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR’s and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor. Results LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA’s were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1), cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1), and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16). The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism. Conclusion LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration. PMID:25822713

  19. Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) determines lamina joint bending by suppressing auxin signalling that interacts with C-22-hydroxylated and 6-deoxo brassinosteroids in rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing Miao; Park, Soon Ju; Huang, Jin; Lee, Eun Jin; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Je, Byoung Il; Kumar, Vikranth; Priatama, Ryza A.; Raj K, Vimal; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Myung Ki; Cho, Jun Hyeon; Kim, Tae Ho; Chandran, Anil Kumar Nalini; Jung, Ki Hong; Takatsuto, Suguru; Fujioka, Shozo; Han, Chang-deok

    2016-01-01

    Lamina inclination is a key agronomical character that determines plant architecture and is sensitive to auxin and brassinosteroids (BRs). Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) in rice (Oryza sativa) and its Arabidopsis homologues (SGR5/AtIDD15) have been reported to control plant architecture and auxin homeostasis. This study explores the role of LPA1 in determining lamina inclination in rice. LPA1 acts as a positive regulator to suppress lamina bending. Genetic and biochemical data indicate that LPA1 suppresses the auxin signalling that interacts with C-22-hydroxylated and 6-deoxo BRs, which regulates lamina inclination independently of OsBRI1. Mutant lpa1 plants are hypersensitive to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the lamina inclination response, which is suppressed by the brassinazole (Brz) inhibitor of C-22 hydroxylase involved in BR synthesis. A strong synergic effect is detected between lpa1 and d2 (the defective mutant for catalysis of C-23-hydroxylated BRs) during IAA-mediated lamina inclination. No significant interaction between LPA1 and OsBRI1 was identified. The lpa1 mutant is sensitive to C-22-hydroxylated and 6-deoxo BRs in the d61-1 (rice BRI1 mutant) background. We present evidence verifying that two independent pathways function via either BRs or BRI1 to determine IAA-mediated lamina inclination in rice. RNA sequencing analysis and qRT-PCR indicate that LPA1 influences the expression of three OsPIN genes (OsPIN1a, OsPIN1c and OsPIN3a), which suggests that auxin flux might be an important factor in LPA1-mediated lamina inclination in rice. PMID:26826218

  20. Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) determines lamina joint bending by suppressing auxin signalling that interacts with C-22-hydroxylated and 6-deoxo brassinosteroids in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing Miao; Park, Soon Ju; Huang, Jin; Lee, Eun Jin; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Je, Byoung Il; Kumar, Vikranth; Priatama, Ryza A; Raj K, Vimal; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Myung Ki; Cho, Jun Hyeon; Kim, Tae Ho; Chandran, Anil Kumar Nalini; Jung, Ki Hong; Takatsuto, Suguru; Fujioka, Shozo; Han, Chang-Deok

    2016-03-01

    Lamina inclination is a key agronomical character that determines plant architecture and is sensitive to auxin and brassinosteroids (BRs). Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) in rice (Oryza sativa) and its Arabidopsis homologues (SGR5/AtIDD15) have been reported to control plant architecture and auxin homeostasis. This study explores the role of LPA1 in determining lamina inclination in rice. LPA1 acts as a positive regulator to suppress lamina bending. Genetic and biochemical data indicate that LPA1 suppresses the auxin signalling that interacts with C-22-hydroxylated and 6-deoxo BRs, which regulates lamina inclination independently of OsBRI1. Mutant lpa1 plants are hypersensitive to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the lamina inclination response, which is suppressed by the brassinazole (Brz) inhibitor of C-22 hydroxylase involved in BR synthesis. A strong synergic effect is detected between lpa1 and d2 (the defective mutant for catalysis of C-23-hydroxylated BRs) during IAA-mediated lamina inclination. No significant interaction between LPA1 and OsBRI1 was identified. The lpa1 mutant is sensitive to C-22-hydroxylated and 6-deoxo BRs in the d61-1 (rice BRI1 mutant) background. We present evidence verifying that two independent pathways function via either BRs or BRI1 to determine IAA-mediated lamina inclination in rice. RNA sequencing analysis and qRT-PCR indicate that LPA1 influences the expression of three OsPIN genes (OsPIN1a, OsPIN1c and OsPIN3a), which suggests that auxin flux might be an important factor in LPA1-mediated lamina inclination in rice. PMID:26826218

  1. Inhibition of transcellular tumor cell migration and metastasis by novel carba-derivatives of cyclic phosphatidic acid

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ayako; Mukai, Mutsuko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Kobayashi, Susumu; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Murofushi, Hiromu; Inoue, Masahiro; Enoki, Shigenori; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Niki, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Tigyi, Gabor; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-2,3-cyclic phosphate; cPA) is a naturally occurring analog of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) with a variety of distinctly different biological activities from those of LPA. In contrast to LPA, a potent inducer of tumor cell invasion, palmitoyl-cPA inhibits FBS- and LPA-induced transcellular migration and metastasis. To prevent the conversion of cPA to LPA we synthesized cPA derivatives by stabilizing the cyclic phosphate ring; to prevent the cleavage of the fatty acid we generated alkyl ether analogs of cPA. Both sets of compounds were tested for inhibitory activity on transcellular tumor cell migration. Carba derivatives, in which the phosphate oxygen was replaced with a methylene group at either the sn-2 or the sn-3 position, showed much more potent inhibitory effects on MM1 tumor cell transcellular migration and the pulmonary metastasis of B16-F0 melanoma than the natural pal-cPA. The antimetastatic effect of carba-cPA was accompanied by the inhibition of RhoA activation and was not due to inhibition of the activation of LPA receptors. PMID:17123862

  2. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs. PMID:24962881

  3. Tubular cell phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy: role of phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Ayasolla, Kamesh R; Rai, Partab; Rahimipour, Shai; Hussain, Mohammad; Malhotra, Ashwani; Singhal, Pravin C

    2015-08-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy and microcysts are characteristic histological features of HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). We have previously reported the role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the development of glomerular and tubular cell phenotypes in HIVAN. Since persistent tubular cell activation of NFκB has been reported in HIVAN, we now hypothesize that HIV may be contributing to tubular cell phenotype via lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediated downstream signaling. Interestingly, LPA and its receptors have also been implicated in the tubular interstitial cell fibrosis (TIF) and cyst formation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Primary human proximal tubular cells (HRPTCs) were transduced with either empty vector (EV/HRPTCs), HIV (HIV/HRPTCs) or treated with LPA (LPA/HRPTC). Immunoelectrophoresis of HIV/HRPTCs and LPA/HRPTCs displayed enhanced expression of pro-fibrotic markers: a) fibronectin (2.25 fold), b) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; 4.8 fold), c) α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; 12 fold), and d) collagen I (5.7 fold). HIV enhanced tubular cell phosphorylation of ILK-1, FAK, PI3K, Akt, ERKs and P38 MAPK. HIV increased tubular cell transcriptional binding activity of NF-κB; whereas, a LPA biosynthesis inhibitor (AACOCF3), a DAG kinase inhibitor, a LPA receptor blocker (Ki16425), a NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) and NFκB-siRNA not only displayed downregulation of a NFκB activity but also showed attenuated expression of profibrotic/EMT genes in HIV milieu. These findings suggest that LPA could be contributing to HIV-induced tubular cell phenotype via NFκB activation in HIVAN. PMID:26079546

  4. A retinoic acid receptor-specific element controls the retinoic acid receptor-beta promoter.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Hermann, T; Husmann, M; Graupner, G; Pfahl, M

    1990-11-01

    The morphogen retinoic acid (RA) regulates gene transcription by interacting with specific nuclear receptors that recognize DNA sequences near responsive promoters. While much has recently been learned about the nuclear receptor proteins, little is known about the genes that are directly regulated by RA and their cis-acting response elements recognized by these receptors. Here we have analyzed the RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) gene promoter that is controlled by RA. We find that a RA-responsive element (RARE) is located adjacent to the TATA box. The RARE shows a direct repeat symmetry which is essential for its function. While thyroid hormone-responsive elements can also function as RAR response elements, we show here that this RARE is activated by endogenous RARs and RAR beta, but cannot be regulated by thyroid hormone receptors and other known nuclear receptors. In addition, we find that RAR gamma is a poor activator of this RARE. However, the response element is bound with high affinity by both RAR beta and RAR gamma as well as by thyroid hormone receptors. Thus, interaction between specific response elements and receptors is insufficient for gene activation. PMID:2177841

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  6. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs' carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  7. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  9. Yap is required for ependymal integrity and is suppressed in LPA-induced hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Park, Raehee; Moon, Uk Yeol; Park, Jun Young; Hughes, Lucinda J; Johnson, Randy L; Cho, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seonhee

    2016-01-01

    Timely generation and normal maturation of ependymal cells along the aqueduct are critical for preventing physical blockage between the third and fourth ventricles and the development of fetal non-communicating hydrocephalus. Our study identifies Yap, the downstream effector of the evolutionarily conserved Hippo pathway, as a central regulator for generating developmentally controlled ependymal cells along the ventricular lining of the aqueduct. Yap function is necessary for proper proliferation of progenitors and apical attachment of ependymal precursor cells. Importantly, an injury signal initiated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an upstream regulator of Yap that can cause fetal haemorrhagic hydrocephalus, deregulates Yap in the developing aqueduct. LPA exposure leads to the loss of N-cadherin concentrations at the apical endfeet, which can be partially restored by forced Yap expression and more efficiently by phosphomimetic Yap. These results reveal a novel function of Yap in retaining tissue junctions during normal development and after fetal brain injury. PMID:26754915

  10. Yap is required for ependymal integrity and is suppressed in LPA-induced hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Raehee; Moon, Uk Yeol; Park, Jun Young; Hughes, Lucinda J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Cho, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seonhee

    2016-01-01

    Timely generation and normal maturation of ependymal cells along the aqueduct are critical for preventing physical blockage between the third and fourth ventricles and the development of fetal non-communicating hydrocephalus. Our study identifies Yap, the downstream effector of the evolutionarily conserved Hippo pathway, as a central regulator for generating developmentally controlled ependymal cells along the ventricular lining of the aqueduct. Yap function is necessary for proper proliferation of progenitors and apical attachment of ependymal precursor cells. Importantly, an injury signal initiated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an upstream regulator of Yap that can cause fetal haemorrhagic hydrocephalus, deregulates Yap in the developing aqueduct. LPA exposure leads to the loss of N-cadherin concentrations at the apical endfeet, which can be partially restored by forced Yap expression and more efficiently by phosphomimetic Yap. These results reveal a novel function of Yap in retaining tissue junctions during normal development and after fetal brain injury. PMID:26754915

  11. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis by a Lysophosphatidic Acid Antagonist in a Engineered Three-dimensional Lung Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND We developed an engineered three-dimensional (3-D) tumor xenograft model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in nude mice, and used this model to evaluate a dual-activity inhibitor of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) biosynthesis and receptor activation. METHODS First, BrP-LPA, a pan-antagonist for four LPA receptors and inhibitor of the lyosphospholipase D activity of autotaxin, was examined for inhibition of cell migration and cell invasion by human NSCLC A549 cells. Second, A549 cells were encapsulated in 3-D in three semi-synthetic ECMs based on chemically-modified glycosaminoglycans, and injected subcutaneously in nude mice. Tumor volume and vascularity were deteremined as a function of sECM composition. Third, engineered NSCLC xenografts were formed from A549 cells in either Extracel-HP or Matrigel, and mice were treated with four intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg of BrP-LPA. RESULTS First, BrP-LPA inhibited cell migration and invasiveness of A549 cells in vitro. Second, tumor growth and microvessel formation for 3-D encapsulated A549 cells in vivo in nude mice increased in the order: buffer only < Extracel < Extracel-HP < Extracel-HP containing growth factors plus laminin. Third, tumor volumes increased rapidly in both Matrigel and Extracel-HP encapsulated A549 cells, and tumor growth was markedly inhibited by BrP-LPA treatment. Finally, tumor vascularization was dramatically reduced in the A549 tumors treated with BrP-LPA. CONCLUSIONS Engineered A549 lung tumors can be created by 3-D encapsulation in an ECM substitute with user controlled composition. The engineered tumors regress and lose vascularity in response to a dual activity inhibitor of the LPA signaling pathway. PMID:20143443

  12. Toluene diisocyanate: Induction of the autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid axis and its association with airways symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Broström, Julia M.; Ye, Zhi-wei; Axmon, Anna; Littorin, Margareta; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Lindh, Christian H.; Zheng, Huiyuan; Ghalali, Aram; Stenius, Ulla; Jönsson, Bo A.G.; Högberg, Johan

    2015-09-15

    Diisocyanates are industrial chemicals which have a wide range of applications in developed and developing countries. They are notorious lung toxicants and respiratory sensitizers. However, the mechanisms behind their adverse effects are not adequately characterized. Autotaxin (ATX) is an enzyme producing lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the ATX-LPA axis has been implicated in lung related inflammatory conditions and diseases, including allergic asthma, but not to toxicity of environmental low-molecular-weight chemicals. We investigated effects of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) on ATX induction in human lung epithelial cell models, and we correlated LPA-levels in plasma to biomarkers of TDI exposure in urine collected from workers exposed to < 5 ppb (parts per billion). Information on workers' symptoms was collected through interviews. One nanomolar TDI robustly induced ATX release within 10 min in vitro. A P2X7- and P2X4-dependent microvesicle formation was implicated in a rapid ATX release and a subsequent protein synthesis. Co-localization between purinergic receptors and ATX was documented by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The release was modulated by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and by extracellular ATP. In workers, we found a dose–response relationship between TDI exposure biomarkers in urine and LPA levels in plasma. Among symptomatic workers reporting “sneezing”, the LPA levels were higher than among non-symptomatic workers. This is the first report indicating induction of the ATX-LPA axis by an environmental low-molecular-weight chemical, and our data suggest a role for the ATX-LPA axis in TDI toxicity. - Highlights: • Human epithelial cells release autotaxin in response to 1 nM toluene diisocyanate (TDI). • The release involves P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and is modulated by ATP and MCP-1. • Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was measured in workers exposed to < 5 ppb TDI. • LPA in plasma correlated to TDI exposure biomarkers in

  13. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  14. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  15. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  16. Acid rain: the relationship between sources and receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Acid Rain: The Relationship Between Sources and Receptors consists of a collection of papers and discussions from the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse. The conference, held in December 1986, was supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research Institute, and the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP).

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G Protein-Coupled Receptor List: Recommendations for New Pairings with Cognate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Pawson, Adam J.; Benson, Helen E.; Monaghan, Amy E.; Liew, Wen Chiy; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Bonner, Tom I.; Neubig, Richard R.; Pin, Jean Philippe; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA1 (GPR81) with lactate, HCA2 (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA3 (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA4 (GPR23), LPA5 (GPR92), LPA6 (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http://www.iuphar-db.org). PMID:23686350

  18. A Boronic Acid Porphyrin Receptor for Ginsenoside Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Amanda E.; Reyes, Ryan N.; Riddington, Ian; Anslyn, Eric V.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    Ginsenoside detection was pursued through the design of a porphyrin receptor containing two boronic acid units. This receptor was found to undergo different degrees of fluorescence quenching with five ginsenoside guests and an acylated derivative. The trends in the 1:1 binding constants, as well as ESI-HRMS analysis, support a binding mode in which the ginsenoside sugar units are bound to the boronic acid groups while the steroid core and porphyrin ring participate in hydrophobic interactions. PMID:20860384

  19. KIF6, LPA, TAS2R50, and VAMP8 genetic variation, low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin, and heart disease risk reduction in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the KIF6 (kinesin like protein 6, rs20455 or 719Arg), LPA (lipoprotein(a), rs3798220), TAS2R50 (taste receptor type 2, member 50, rs1376251) and VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8, rs1010) have previously been associated with low density lipoprotei...

  20. Steroid binding to Autotaxin links bile salts and lysophosphatidic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Keune, Willem-Jan; Hausmann, Jens; Bolier, Ruth; Tolenaars, Dagmar; Kremer, Andreas; Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Joosten, Robbie P; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Moolenaar, Wouter H; Oude Elferink, Ronald P; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2016-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX-LPA signalling is involved in multiple biological and pathophysiological processes, including vasculogenesis, fibrosis, cholestatic pruritus and tumour progression. ATX has a tripartite active site, combining a hydrophilic groove, a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and a tunnel of unclear function. We present crystal structures of rat ATX bound to 7α-hydroxycholesterol and the bile salt tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA), showing how the tunnel selectively binds steroids. A structure of ATX simultaneously harbouring TUDCA in the tunnel and LPA in the pocket, together with kinetic analysis, reveals that bile salts act as partial non-competitive inhibitors of ATX, thereby attenuating LPA receptor activation. This unexpected interplay between ATX-LPA signalling and select steroids, notably natural bile salts, provides a molecular basis for the emerging association of ATX with disorders associated with increased circulating levels of bile salts. Furthermore, our findings suggest potential clinical implications in the use of steroid drugs. PMID:27075612

  1. Steroid binding to Autotaxin links bile salts and lysophosphatidic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Keune, Willem-Jan; Hausmann, Jens; Bolier, Ruth; Tolenaars, Dagmar; Kremer, Andreas; Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Joosten, Robbie P.; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2016-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX-LPA signalling is involved in multiple biological and pathophysiological processes, including vasculogenesis, fibrosis, cholestatic pruritus and tumour progression. ATX has a tripartite active site, combining a hydrophilic groove, a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and a tunnel of unclear function. We present crystal structures of rat ATX bound to 7α-hydroxycholesterol and the bile salt tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA), showing how the tunnel selectively binds steroids. A structure of ATX simultaneously harbouring TUDCA in the tunnel and LPA in the pocket, together with kinetic analysis, reveals that bile salts act as partial non-competitive inhibitors of ATX, thereby attenuating LPA receptor activation. This unexpected interplay between ATX-LPA signalling and select steroids, notably natural bile salts, provides a molecular basis for the emerging association of ATX with disorders associated with increased circulating levels of bile salts. Furthermore, our findings suggest potential clinical implications in the use of steroid drugs. PMID:27075612

  2. Studies on lysophosphatidic acid action during in vitro preimplantation embryo development.

    PubMed

    Boruszewska, D; Sinderewicz, E; Kowalczyk-Zieba, I; Grycmacher, K; Woclawek-Potocka, I

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies, including in vitro embryo production (IVP), have been successfully used in animal reproduction to optimize breeding strategies for improved production and health in animal husbandry. Despite the progress in IVP techniques over the years, further improvements in in vitro embryo culture systems are required for the enhancement of oocyte and embryo developmental competence. One of the most important issues associated with IVP procedures is the optimization of the in vitro culture of oocytes and embryos. Studies in different species of animals and in humans have identified important roles for receptor-mediated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling in multiple aspects of human and animal reproductive tract function. The data on LPA signaling in the ovary and uterus suggest that LPA can directly contribute to embryo-maternal interactions via its influence on early embryo development beginning from the influence of the ovarian environment on the oocyte to the influence of the uterine environment on the preimplantation embryo. This review discusses the current status of LPA as a potential supplement in oocyte maturation, fertilization, and embryo culture media and current views on the potential involvement of the LPA signaling pathway in early embryo development. PMID:26379100

  3. Fatty acid activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR).

    PubMed

    Bocos, C; Göttlicher, M; Gearing, K; Banner, C; Enmark, E; Teboul, M; Crickmore, A; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferators such as clofibric acid, nafenopin, and WY-14,643 have been shown to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. We have cloned the cDNA from rat that is homologous to that from mouse, which encodes a 97% similar protein. To search for physiologically occurring activators, we established a transcriptional transactivation assay by stably expressing in CHO cells a chimera of rat PPAR and the human glucocorticoid receptor that activates expression of the placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. 150 microM concentrations of arachidonic or linoleic acid but not of dehydroepiandrosterone, cholesterol, or 25-hydroxy-cholesterol, activated the receptor chimera. In addition, saturated fatty acids induced the reporter gene. Shortening the chain length to n = 6 or introduction of an omega-terminal carboxylic group abolished the activation potential of the fatty acid. To test whether a common PPAR binding metabolite might be formed from free fatty acids we tested the effects of differentially beta-oxidizable fatty acids and inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. The peroxisomal proliferation-inducing, non-beta-oxidizable, tetradecylthioacetic acid activated PPAR to the same extent as the strong peroxisomal proliferator WY-14,643, whereas the homologous beta-oxidizable tetradecylthiopropionic acid was only as potent as a non-substituted fatty acid. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors, radical scavengers or cytochrome P450 inhibitors did not affect activation of PPAR. In conclusion, beta-oxidation is apparently not required for the formation of the PPAR-activating molecule and this moiety might be a fatty acid, its ester with CoA, or a further derivative of the activated fatty acid prior to beta-oxidation of the acyl-CoA ester. PMID:7626496

  4. Bile acid derivatives as ligands of the farnesoid x receptor: molecular determinants for bile acid binding and receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Gioiello, Antimo; Cerra, Bruno; Mostarda, Serena; Guercini, Chiara; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are a peculiar class of steroidal compounds that never cease to amaze. From being simple detergents with a primary role in aiding the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins, bile acids are now widely considered as crucial hormones endowed with genomic and non-genomic functions that are mediated by their interaction with several proteins including the nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). Taking advantages of the peculiar properties of bile acids in interacting with the FXR receptor, several biliary derivatives have been synthesized and tested as FXR ligands. The availability of these compounds has contributed to characterize the receptor from a structural, patho-physiological and therapeutic standpoint. Among these, obeticholic acid is a first-in-class FXR agonist that is demonstrating hepatoprotective effects upon FXR activation in patients with liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. This review provides an historical overview of the rationale behind the discovery of obeticholic acid and chemical tools generated to depict the molecular features and bio-pharmacological relevance of the FXR receptor, as well as to summarize structure-activity relationships of bile acid-based FXR ligands so far reported. PMID:25388535

  5. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  6. All-trans retinoic acid with daunorubicin or idarubicin for risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a matched-pair analysis of the PETHEMA LPA-2005 and IC-APL studies.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; Montesinos, Pau; Kim, Haesook T; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Undurraga, María S; Uriarte, María R; Martínez, Lem; Jacomo, Rafael H; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Homero; Melo, Raul A M; Bittencourt, Rosane; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pagnano, Katia; Fagundes, Evandro M; Vellenga, Edo; Holowiecka, Alexandra; González-Huerta, Ana J; Fernández, Pascual; De la Serna, Javier; Brunet, Salut; De Lisa, Elena; González-Campos, José; Ribera, José M; Krsnik, Isabel; Ganser, Arnold; Berliner, Nancy; Ribeiro, Raul C; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Löwenberg, Bob; Rego, Eduardo M

    2015-08-01

    Front-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) consists of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. In this setting, a comparison of idarubicin and daunorubicin has never been carried out. Two similar clinical trials using ATRA and chemotherapy for newly diagnosed APL were compared using matched-pair analysis. One was conducted by the PETHEMA/HOVON group with idarubicin and the other by the International Consortium on APL (IC-APL) using daunorubicin. Three hundred and fifty patients from the PETHEMA/HOVON cohort were matched with 175 patients in the IC-APL cohort, adjusting for the significantly unbalanced presenting features of the two entire cohorts. Complete remission (CR) rate was significantly higher in the PETHEMA/HOVON (94 %) than in the IC-APL cohort (85 %) (P = 0.002). The distribution of causes of induction failure and the time to achieve CR were similar in both cohorts. Patients who achieved CR had comparable cumulative incidence of relapse and disease-free survival rates, but lower overall and event-free survivals were observed in the IC-APL cohort, which was mainly due to a higher death rate during induction therapy. A higher death rate during consolidation therapy was also observed in the IC-APL. These results show that daunorubicin and idarubicin have similar antileukaemic efficacy in terms of primary resistance, molecular persistence, as well as molecular and haematological relapse rates when combined with ATRA in treatment of APL. However, a higher toxic death rate during induction and consolidation therapy was observed in the IC-APL cohort. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00408278 [ClinicalTrials.gov]. PMID:25975975

  7. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  8. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jillian H; Mumaw, Jennifer; Machacek, David W; Sturkie, Carla; Callihan, Phillip; Stice, Steve L; Hooks, Shelley B

    2008-01-01

    Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP) cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors. PMID:19077254

  9. AmeriFlux MX-Lpa La Paz

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oechel, Walter [San Diego State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site MX-Lpa La Paz. Site Description - As evident by some very large Cardon (5-7 meters), according to Coyle and Roberts, 1975, extent vegetation has likely been around at least 200 years. Until about 15 years ago from 1996, site was used for livestock production and selective firewood extraction. However, when I look over the fence where there has been livestock activity, not much difference

  10. Lysophospholipid receptor nomenclature review: IUPHAR Review 8

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids encompass a diverse range of small, membrane-derived phospholipids that act as extracellular signals. The signalling properties are mediated by 7-transmembrane GPCRs, constituent members of which have continued to be identified after their initial discovery in the mid-1990s. Here we briefly review this class of receptors, with a particular emphasis on their protein and gene nomenclatures that reflect their cognate ligands. There are six lysophospholipid receptors that interact with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA): protein names LPA1 – LPA6 and italicized gene names LPAR1-LPAR6 (human) and Lpar1-Lpar6 (non-human). There are five sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors: protein names S1P1-S1P5 and italicized gene names S1PR1-S1PR5 (human) and S1pr1-S1pr5 (non-human). Recent additions to the lysophospholipid receptor family have resulted in the proposed names for a lysophosphatidyl inositol (LPI) receptor – protein name LPI1 and gene name LPIR1 (human) and Lpir1 (non-human) – and three lysophosphatidyl serine receptors – protein names LyPS1, LyPS2, LyPS3 and gene names LYPSR1-LYPSR3 (human) and Lypsr1-Lypsr3 (non-human) along with a variant form that does not appear to exist in humans that is provisionally named LyPS2L. This nomenclature incorporates previous recommendations from the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, the Human Genome Organization, the Gene Nomenclature Committee, and the Mouse Genome Informatix. PMID:24602016

  11. 2-Cycloalkyl phenoxyacetic acid CRTh2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Aldcroft, Clive; Baettig, Urs; Barker, Lucy; Beer, David; Bhalay, Gurdip; Brown, Zarin; Dubois, Gerald; Budd, David; Bidlake, Louise; Campbell, Emma; Cox, Brian; Everatt, Brian; Harrison, David; Leblanc, Catherine J; Manini, Jodie; Profit, Rachael; Stringer, Rowan; Thompson, Katy S; Turner, Katharine L; Tweed, Morris F; Walker, Christoph; Watson, Simon J; Whitebread, Steven; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2007-08-01

    High throughput screening identified a phenoxyacetic acid scaffold as a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype, which could be optimised to furnish a compound with functional potency for inhibition of human eosinophil shape change and oral bioavailability in the rat. PMID:17531480

  12. Regulation of NHE3 by lysophosphatidic acid is mediated by phosphorylation of NHE3 by RSK2.

    PubMed

    No, Yi Ran; He, Peijian; Yoo, Byong Kwon; Yun, C Chris

    2015-07-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchange by Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) is a major route of sodium absorption in the intestine and kidney. We have shown previously that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a small phospholipid produced ubiquitously by all types of cells, stimulates NHE3 via LPA5 receptor. Stimulation of NHE3 activity by LPA involves LPA5 transactivating EGF receptor (EGFR) in the apical membrane. EGFR activates proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and ERK, both of which are necessary for NHE3 regulation. However, Pyk2 and ERK are regulated by EGFR via independent pathways and appear to converge on an unidentified intermediate that ultimately targets NHE3. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of Ser/Thr protein kinases is a known effector of EGFR and ERK. Hence, we hypothesized that RSK may be the convergent effector of Pyk2 and ERK although it is not known whether Pyk2 regulates RSK. In this study, we show that Pyk2 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) autophosphorylation, and knockdown of Pyk2 or PDK1 mitigated LPA-induced phosphorylation of RSK and stimulation of NHE3 activity. Additionally, we show that RSK2, but not RSK1, is responsible for NHE3 regulation. RSK2 interacts with NHE3 at the apical membrane domain, where it phosphorylates NHE3. Alteration of S663 of NHE3 ablated LPA-induced phosphorylation of NHE3 and stimulation of the transport activity. Our study identifies RSK2 as a new kinase that regulates NHE3 activity by direct phosphorylation. PMID:25855080

  13. Regulation of NHE3 by lysophosphatidic acid is mediated by phosphorylation of NHE3 by RSK2

    PubMed Central

    No, Yi Ran; He, Peijian; Yoo, Byong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Na+/H+ exchange by Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) is a major route of sodium absorption in the intestine and kidney. We have shown previously that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a small phospholipid produced ubiquitously by all types of cells, stimulates NHE3 via LPA5 receptor. Stimulation of NHE3 activity by LPA involves LPA5 transactivating EGF receptor (EGFR) in the apical membrane. EGFR activates proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and ERK, both of which are necessary for NHE3 regulation. However, Pyk2 and ERK are regulated by EGFR via independent pathways and appear to converge on an unidentified intermediate that ultimately targets NHE3. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of Ser/Thr protein kinases is a known effector of EGFR and ERK. Hence, we hypothesized that RSK may be the convergent effector of Pyk2 and ERK although it is not known whether Pyk2 regulates RSK. In this study, we show that Pyk2 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) autophosphorylation, and knockdown of Pyk2 or PDK1 mitigated LPA-induced phosphorylation of RSK and stimulation of NHE3 activity. Additionally, we show that RSK2, but not RSK1, is responsible for NHE3 regulation. RSK2 interacts with NHE3 at the apical membrane domain, where it phosphorylates NHE3. Alteration of S663 of NHE3 ablated LPA-induced phosphorylation of NHE3 and stimulation of the transport activity. Our study identifies RSK2 as a new kinase that regulates NHE3 activity by direct phosphorylation. PMID:25855080

  14. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  15. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  16. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  17. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  18. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A.; Hardege, Jörg D.; Chen, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    See Rogawski (doi:10.1093/awv369) for a scientific commentary on this article.  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  19. Ligand regulation of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors: implications for development of novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In the late 1980s, the cloning of several nuclear receptors led to the intense search and isolation of new members of this superfamily. Despite their identification, many of these receptors were dubbed ‘orphan’ receptors, as their physiological ligands remained unknown. Recent reports have presented evidence for one family of orphan receptors, the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs), in several pathologies, including osteoporosis, several autoimmune diseases, asthma, cancer, diabetes and obesity. The present review summarizes the studies identifying ligands for the RORs and evaluates their role as targets for potential therapeutics. Recent findings Significant progress was made in the initial identification of ligands for the RORs when X-ray crystallographic studies identified several molecules within the ligand-binding pockets of RORα and RORβ. Recently, we identified endogenous and synthetic ligands for RORα and RORγ, thereby solidifying their function as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Summary Recent studies have established roles for the RORs in physiological development and the advent of disease. Identification of ligands for the RORs, both endogenous and synthetic, has established these receptors as attractive new therapeutic targets for the treatment of ROR-related diseases. PMID:20463469

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Graff, Emily C; Fang, Han; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    The hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors (HCA1-3) are a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that are critical for sensing endogenous intermediates of metabolism. All three receptors are predominantly expressed on adipocytes and mediate anti-lipolytic effects. In addition to adipocytes, HCA2 is highly expressed on immune cells, including macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils and dermal dendritic cells, among other cell types. The endogenous ligand for HCA2 is beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), a ketone body produced by the liver through β-oxidation when an individual is in a negative energy balance. Recent studies demonstrate that HCA2 mediates profound anti-inflammatory effects in a variety of tissues, indicating that HCA2 may be an important therapeutic target for treating inflammatory disease processes. This review summarizes the roles of HCA2 on inflammation in a number of tissues and clinical states. PMID:26773933

  1. Nuclear bile acid signaling through the farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Mazuy, Claire; Helleboid, Audrey; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are amphipathic molecules produced from cholesterol by the liver. Expelled from the gallbladder upon meal ingestion, BAs serve as fat solubilizers in the intestine. BAs are reabsorbed in the ileum and return via the portal vein to the liver where, together with nutrients, they provide signals to coordinate metabolic responses. BAs act on energy and metabolic homeostasis through the activation of membrane and nuclear receptors, among which the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important regulator of several metabolic pathways. Highly expressed in the liver and the small intestine, FXR contributes to BA effects on metabolism, inflammation and cell cycle control. The pharmacological modulation of its activity has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for liver and metabolic diseases. This review highlights recent advances regarding the mechanisms by which the BA sensor FXR contributes to global signaling effects of BAs, and how FXR activity may be regulated by nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways. PMID:25511198

  2. Targeting lysophosphatidic acid signaling retards culture-associated senescence of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Ohkouchi, Shinya; Shibahara, Taizou; Tode, Naoki; Santoso, Arif; Daito, Hisayoshi; Ohta, Hiromitsu; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from mesenchymal tissues can propagate in vitro to some extent and differentiate into various tissue lineages to be used for cell-based therapies. Cellular senescence, which occurs readily in continual MSC culture, leads to loss of these characteristic properties, representing one of the major limitations to achieving the potential of MSCs. In this study, we investigated the effect of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a ubiquitous metabolite in membrane phospholipid synthesis, on the senescence program of human MSCs. We show that MSCs preferentially express the LPA receptor subtype 1, and an abrogation of the receptor engagement with the antagonistic compound Ki16425 attenuates senescence induction in continually propagated human MSCs. This anti-aging effect of Ki16425 results in extended rounds of cellular proliferation, increased clonogenic potential, and retained plasticity for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Expressions of p16(Ink4a), Rb, p53, and p21(Cip1), which have been associated with cellular senescence, were all reduced in human MSCs by the pharmacological inhibition of LPA signaling. Disruption of this signaling pathway was accompanied by morphological changes such as cell thinning and elongation as well as actin filament deformation through decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Prevention of LPA receptor engagement also promoted ubiquitination-mediated c-Myc elimination in MSCs, and consequently the entry into a quiescent state, G(0) phase, of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results highlight the potential of pharmacological intervention against LPA signaling for blunting senescence-associated loss of function characteristic of human MSCs. PMID:22359668

  3. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  4. A third human retinoic acid receptor, hRAR-. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Krust, A.; Kastner, Ph.; Petkovich, M.; Zelent, A.; Chambon, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are retinoic acid (RA)-inducible enhancer factors belonging to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors. The authors have previously characterized two human RAR (hRAR-{alpha} and hRAR-{beta}) cDNAs and have recently cloned their murine cognates (mRAR-{alpha} and mRAR-{beta}) together with a third RAR (mRAR-{gamma}) whose RNA was detected predominantly in skin, a well-known target for RA. mRAR-{gamma} cDNA was used here to clone its human counterpart (hRAR-{gamma}) from a T47D breast cancer cell cDNA library. Using a transient transfection assay in HeLa cells and a reporter gene harboring a synthetic RA responsive element, they demonstrate that hRAR-{gamma} cDNA indeed encodes a RA-inducible transcriptional trans-activator. Interestingly, comparisons of the amino acid sequences of all six human and mouse RARs indicate that the interspecies conservation of a given member of the RAR subfamily (either {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma}) is much higher than the conservation of all three receptors within a given species. These observations indicate that RAR-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} may perform specific functions. They show also that hRAR-{gamma} RNA is the predominant RAR RNA species in human skin, which suggests that hRAR-{gamma} mediates some of the retinoid effects in this tissue.

  5. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Maleeva, Galyna; Buldakova, Svetlana; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision, and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analyzed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30 nM to 25 μM on α1–α3 and α1/β, α2/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10–25 μM) ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2, α2/β, and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S) in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs. PMID:26578878

  6. Novel retinoic acid receptor ligands in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, B; Bolado, J; Derguini, F; Craig, A G; Moreno, T A; Chakravarti, D; Heyman, R A; Buck, J; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Retinoids are a large family of natural and synthetic compounds related to vitamin A that have pleiotropic effects on body physiology, reproduction, immunity, and embryonic development. The diverse activities of retinoids are primarily mediated by two families of nuclear retinoic acid receptors, the RARs and RXRs. Retinoic acids are thought to be the only natural ligands for these receptors and are widely assumed to be the active principle of vitamin A. However, during an unbiased, bioactivity-guided fractionation of Xenopus embryos, we were unable to detect significant levels of all-trans or 9-cis retinoic acids. Instead, we found that the major bioactive retinoid in the Xenopus egg and early embryo is 4-oxoretinaldehyde, which is capable of binding to and transactivating RARs. In addition to its inherent activity, 4-oxoretinaldehyde appears to be a metabolic precursor of two other RAR ligands, 4-oxoretinoic acid and 4-oxoretinol. The remarkable increase in activity of retinaldehyde and retinol as a consequence of 4-oxo derivatization suggests that this metabolic step could serve a critical regulatory function during embryogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8643496

  7. Rapid Remodeling of Invadosomes by Gi-coupled Receptors: DISSECTING THE ROLE OF Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, Katarzyna M; Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Argenzio, Elisabetta; Boumeester, Anja J; van Butselaar, Bram; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Innocenti, Metello; Jalink, Kees; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2016-02-26

    Invadosomes are actin-rich membrane protrusions that degrade the extracellular matrix to drive tumor cell invasion. Key players in invadosome formation are c-Src and Rho family GTPases. Invadosomes can reassemble into circular rosette-like superstructures, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that Src-induced invadosomes in human melanoma cells (A375M and MDA-MB-435) undergo rapid remodeling into dynamic extracellular matrix-degrading rosettes by distinct G protein-coupled receptor agonists, notably lysophosphatidic acid (LPA; acting through the LPA1 receptor) and endothelin. Agonist-induced rosette formation is blocked by pertussis toxin, dependent on PI3K activity and accompanied by localized production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, whereas MAPK and Ca(2+) signaling are dispensable. Using FRET-based biosensors, we show that LPA and endothelin transiently activate Cdc42 through Gi, concurrent with a biphasic decrease in Rac activity and differential effects on RhoA. Cdc42 activity is essential for rosette formation, whereas G12/13-mediated RhoA-ROCK signaling suppresses the remodeling process. Our results reveal a Gi-mediated Cdc42 signaling axis by which G protein-coupled receptors trigger invadosome remodeling, the degree of which is dictated by the Cdc42-RhoA activity balance. PMID:26740622

  8. Electrophysiological evidence for acidic, basic, and neutral amino acid olfactory receptor sites in the catfish.

    PubMed

    Caprio, J; Byrd, R P

    1984-09-01

    Electrophysiological experiments indicate that olfactory receptors of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, contain different receptor sites for the acidic (A), basic (B), and neutral amino acids; further, at least two partially interacting neutral sites exist, one for the hydrophilic neutral amino acids containing short side chains (SCN), and the second for the hydrophobic amino acids containing long side chains (LCN). The extent of cross-adaptation was determined by comparing the electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses to 20 "test" amino acids during continuous bathing of the olfactory mucosa with water only (control) to those during each of the eight "adapting" amino acid regimes. Both the adapting and test amino acids were adjusted in concentrations to provide approximately equal response magnitudes in the unadapted state. Under all eight adapting regimes, the test EOG responses were reduced from those obtained in the unadapted state, but substantial quantitative differences resulted, depending upon the molecular structure of the adapting stimulus. Analyses of the patterns of EOG responses to the test stimuli identified and characterized the respective "transduction processes," a term used to describe membrane events initiated by a particular subset of amino acid stimuli that are intricately linked to the origin of the olfactory receptor potential. Only when the stimulus compounds interact with different transduction processes are the stimuli assumed to bind to different membrane "sites." Four relatively independent L-alpha-amino acid transduction processes (and thus at least four binding sites) identified in this report include: (a) the A process for aspartic and glutamic acids; (b) the B process for arginine and lysine; (c) the SCN process for glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and possibly cysteine; (d) the LCN process for methionine, ethionine, valine, norvaline, leucine, norleucine, glutamic acid-gamma-methyl ester, histidine, phenylalanine, and also

  9. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25582296

  10. Control of Gene Expression by the Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptor Alpha in HepG2 Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauvet, Caroline; Vanhoutteghem, Amandine; Duhem, Christian; Saint-Auret, Gaëlle; Bois-Joyeux, Brigitte; Djian, Philippe; Staels, Bart; Danan, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid-related Orphan Receptor alpha (RORα; NR1F1) is a widely distributed nuclear receptor involved in several (patho)physiological functions including lipid metabolism, inflammation, angiogenesis, and circadian rhythm. To better understand the role of this nuclear receptor in liver, we aimed at displaying genes controlled by RORα in liver cells by generating HepG2 human hepatoma cells stably over-expressing RORα. Genes whose expression was altered in these cells versus control cells were displayed using micro-arrays followed by qRT-PCR analysis. Expression of these genes was also altered in cells in which RORα was transiently over-expressed after adenoviral infection. A number of the genes found were involved in known pathways controlled by RORα, for instance LPA, NR1D2 and ADIPOQ in lipid metabolism, ADIPOQ and PLG in inflammation, PLG in fibrinolysis and NR1D2 and NR1D1 in circadian rhythm. This study also revealed that genes such as G6PC, involved in glucose homeostasis, and AGRP, involved in the control of body weight, are also controlled by RORα. Lastly, SPARC, involved in cell growth and adhesion, and associated with liver carcinogenesis, was up-regulated by RORα. SPARC was found to be a new putative RORα target gene since it possesses, in its promoter, a functional RORE as evidenced by EMSAs and transfection experiments. Most of the other genes that we found regulated by RORα also contained putative ROREs in their regulatory regions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that the ROREs present in the SPARC, PLG, G6PC, NR1D2 and AGRP genes were occupied by RORα in HepG2 cells. Therefore these genes must now be considered as direct RORα targets. Our results open new routes on the roles of RORα in glucose metabolism and carcinogenesis within cells of hepatic origin. PMID:21818335

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid enhances survival of human CD34+ cells in ischemic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Ivana; Fidalgo-Carvalho, Isabel; Aday, Sezin; Vazão, Helena; Carvalheiro, Tiago; Grãos, Mário; Duarte, António; Cardoso, Carla; Gonçalves, Lino; Carvalho, Lina; Paiva, Artur; Ferreira, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials are exploring therapeutic effect of human CD34+ cells in ischemic diseases, including myocardial infarction. Unfortunately, most of the cells die few days after delivery. Herein we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-treated human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells cultured under hypoxic and serum-deprived conditions present 2.2-fold and 1.3-fold higher survival relatively to non-treated cells and prostaglandin E2-treated cells, respectively. The pro-survival effect of LPA is concentration- and time-dependent and it is mediated by the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor γ (PPARγ) and downstream, by the activation of pro-survival ERK and Akt signaling pathways and the inhibition of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In hypoxia and serum-deprived culture conditions, LPA induces CD34+ cell proliferation without maintaining the their undifferentiating state, and enhances IL-8, IL-6 and G-CSF secretion during the first 12 h compared to non-treated cells. LPA-treated CD34+ cells delivered in fibrin gels have enhanced survival and improved cardiac fractional shortening at 2 weeks on rat infarcted hearts as compared to hearts treated with placebo. We have developed a new platform to enhance the survival of CD34+ cells using a natural and cost-effective ligand and demonstrated its utility in the preservation of the functionality of the heart after infarction. PMID:26553339

  12. Generalized Laminar Population Analysis (gLPA) for Interpretation of Multielectrode Data from Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Głąbska, Helena T.; Norheim, Eivind; Devor, Anna; Dale, Anders M.; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Wójcik, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Laminar population analysis (LPA) is a method for analysis of electrical data recorded by linear multielectrodes passing through all lamina of cortex. Like principal components analysis (PCA) and independent components analysis (ICA), LPA offers a way to decompose the data into contributions from separate cortical populations. However, instead of using purely mathematical assumptions in the decomposition, LPA is based on physiological constraints, i.e., that the observed LFP (low-frequency part of signal) is driven by action-potential firing as observed in the MUA (multi-unit activity; high-frequency part of the signal). In the presently developed generalized laminar population analysis (gLPA) the set of basis functions accounting for the LFP data is extended compared to the original LPA, thus allowing for a better fit of the model to experimental data. This enhances the risk for overfitting, however, and we therefore tested various versions of gLPA on virtual LFP data in which we knew the ground truth. These synthetic data were generated by biophysical forward-modeling of electrical signals from network activity in the comprehensive, and well-known, thalamocortical network model developed by Traub and coworkers. The results for the Traub model imply that while the laminar components extracted by the original LPA method overall are in fair agreement with the ground-truth laminar components, the results may be improved by use of gLPA method with two (gLPA-2) or even three (gLPA-3) postsynaptic LFP kernels per laminar population. PMID:26834620

  13. Expression of bile acid receptor TGR5 in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weibiao; Tian, Wei; Hong, Jie; Li, Dan; Tavares, Rosemarie; Noble, Lelia; Moss, Steven F; Resnick, Murray B

    2013-02-15

    Bile reflux is a risk factor in the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach and is believed to function as an initiator of gastric carcinogenesis. However, whether the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 is expressed in this tumor is not known. In this study, we determined the expression of TGR5 in gastric adenocarcinoma and examined the role of TGR5 in cell proliferation. Strong TGR5 staining was present in 12% of cases of intestinal metaplasia but in no cases of normal gastric epithelium (P < 0.01). Moderate to strong TGR5 membranous and cytoplasmic staining was present in 52% of the intestinal but in only 25% of the diffuse subtype of adenocarcinomas (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier univariate survival analysis revealed that moderate to strong TGR5 staining was associated with decreased patient survival (P < 0.05). Treatment with taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA, a bile acid) significantly increased thymidine incorporation in the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line, suggesting that bile acids may increase cell proliferation. This increase was significantly decreased by knockdown of TGR5 with TGR5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, overexpression of TGR5 significantly enhanced TDCA-induced increases in thymidine incorporation. TGR5 is coupled with G(q)α and Gα(i-3) proteins. TDCA-induced increase in thymidine incorporation was significantly decreased by knockdown of G(q)α and Gα(i-3) with their siRNAs. We conclude that TGR5 is overexpressed in most gastric intestinal-type adenocarcinomas, and moderate to strong TGR5 staining is associated with decreased patient survival in all gastric adenocarcinomas. Bile acids increase cell proliferation via activation of TGR5 receptors and G(q)α and Gα(i-3) proteins. PMID:23238937

  14. The genuine ligand of a jasmonic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Daoxin

    2010-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA), its metabolites, such as the methyl ester or amino acid conjugates as well as its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) are lipid-derived signals. JA, OPDA and JA-amino acid conjugates are known to function as signals in plant stress responses and development. More recently, formation of JA-amino acid conjugates and high biological activity of JA-Isoleucine (JA-Ile) were found to be essential in JA signaling. A breakthrough was the identification of JAZ proteins which interact with the F-box protein COI1 if JA-Ile is bound. This interaction leads to proteasomal degradation of JAZs being negative regulators of JA-induced transcription. Surprisingly, a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile, the (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile [(3R,7S) form] is most active. Coronatine, a bacterial phytotoxine with an identical stereochemistry at the cyclopentanone ring, has a similar bioactivity. This was explained by the recent identification of COI1 as the JA receptor and accords well with molecular modeling studies. Whereas over the last two decades JA was quantified to describe any JA dependent process, now we have to take into account a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile. Until recently a quantitative analysis of (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile was missing presumable due to its equilibration to (−)-JA-Ile. Now such an analysis was achieved. These aspects will be discussed based on our new knowledge on JA perception and signaling. PMID:20404483

  15. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Alioto, Tyler S; Ngai, John

    2006-01-01

    Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s), these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms. PMID:17156446

  16. BILE ACIDS REGULATE THE ONTOGENIC EXPRESSION OF ILEAL BILE ACID BINDING PROTEIN IN THE RAT VIA THE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the rat, an increase in ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) expression occurs during the third postnatal week. In vitro studies suggest that bile acids (BAs) increase IBABP transcription by activating the BA receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Thus, we investigated the role of BAs on the on...

  17. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-10-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  18. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  19. Deciphering the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Salvatore; Gadaleta, Raffaella M.; Moschetta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Originally called retinoid X receptor interacting protein 14 (RIP14), the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was renamed after the ability of its rat form to bind supra-physiological concentrations of farnesol. In 1999 FXR was de-orphanized since primary bile acids were identified as natural ligands. Strongly expressed in the liver and intestine, FXR has been shown to be the master transcriptional regulator of several entero-hepatic metabolic pathways with relevance to the pathophysiology of conditions such as cholestasis, fatty liver disease, cholesterol gallstone disease, intestinal inflammation and tumors. Furthermore, given the importance of FXR in the gut-liver axis feedbacks regulating lipid and glucose homeostasis, FXR modulation appears to have great input in diseases such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Exciting results from several cellular and animal models have provided the impetus to develop synthetic FXR ligands as novel pharmacological agents. Fourteen years from its discovery, FXR has gone from bench to bedside; a novel nuclear receptor ligand is going into clinical use. PMID:21383957

  20. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  1. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  2. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  3. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V.; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis. WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, 13C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  4. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-06-14

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, (13)C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  5. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  6. Genome-wide study for circulating metabolites identifies 62 loci and reveals novel systemic effects of LPA

    PubMed Central

    Kettunen, Johannes; Demirkan, Ayşe; Würtz, Peter; Draisma, Harmen H.M.; Haller, Toomas; Rawal, Rajesh; Vaarhorst, Anika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Pirinen, Matti; Pool, René; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Wang, Qin; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Amin, Najaf; Zeller, Tanja; Beekman, Marian; Deelen, Joris; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Esko, Tõnu; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mihailov, Evelin; Rose, Richard J.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Gieger, Christian; Kähönen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Savolainen, Markku J.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Viikari, Jorma; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan; Jula, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Metspalu, Andres; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Slagboom, P. Eline; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ripatti, Samuli; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci linked with complex diseases, for which the molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Comprehensive molecular profiling of circulating metabolites captures highly heritable traits, which can help to uncover metabolic pathophysiology underlying established disease variants. We conduct an extended genome-wide association study of genetic influences on 123 circulating metabolic traits quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics from up to 24,925 individuals and identify eight novel loci for amino acids, pyruvate and fatty acids. The LPA locus link with cardiovascular risk exemplifies how detailed metabolic profiling may inform underlying aetiology via extensive associations with very-low-density lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism. Genetic fine mapping and Mendelian randomization uncover wide-spread causal effects of lipoprotein(a) on overall lipoprotein metabolism and we assess potential pleiotropic consequences of genetically elevated lipoprotein(a) on diverse morbidities via electronic health-care records. Our findings strengthen the argument for safe LPA-targeted intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:27005778

  7. Genome-wide study for circulating metabolites identifies 62 loci and reveals novel systemic effects of LPA.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, Johannes; Demirkan, Ayşe; Würtz, Peter; Draisma, Harmen H M; Haller, Toomas; Rawal, Rajesh; Vaarhorst, Anika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Pirinen, Matti; Pool, René; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Wang, Qin; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Amin, Najaf; Zeller, Tanja; Beekman, Marian; Deelen, Joris; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Esko, Tõnu; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mihailov, Evelin; Rose, Richard J; de Craen, Anton J M; Gieger, Christian; Kähönen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Savolainen, Markku J; Verhoeven, Aswin; Viikari, Jorma; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan; Jula, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Metspalu, Andres; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Slagboom, P Eline; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ripatti, Samuli; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci linked with complex diseases, for which the molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Comprehensive molecular profiling of circulating metabolites captures highly heritable traits, which can help to uncover metabolic pathophysiology underlying established disease variants. We conduct an extended genome-wide association study of genetic influences on 123 circulating metabolic traits quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics from up to 24,925 individuals and identify eight novel loci for amino acids, pyruvate and fatty acids. The LPA locus link with cardiovascular risk exemplifies how detailed metabolic profiling may inform underlying aetiology via extensive associations with very-low-density lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism. Genetic fine mapping and Mendelian randomization uncover wide-spread causal effects of lipoprotein(a) on overall lipoprotein metabolism and we assess potential pleiotropic consequences of genetically elevated lipoprotein(a) on diverse morbidities via electronic health-care records. Our findings strengthen the argument for safe LPA-targeted intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:27005778

  8. Bile Acid-Activated Receptors, Intestinal Microbiota, and the Treatment of Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Distrutti, Eleonora

    2015-11-01

    The composition of the bile acid pool is a function of the microbial metabolism of bile acids in the intestine. Perturbations of the microbiota shape the bile acid pool and modulate the activity of bile acid-activated receptors (BARs) even beyond the gastrointestinal tract, triggering various metabolic axes and altering host metabolism. Bile acids, in turn, can also regulate the composition of the gut microbiome at the highest taxonomic levels. Primary bile acids from the host are preferential ligands for the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), while secondary bile acids from the microbiota are ligands for G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). In this review, we examine the role of bile acid signaling in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and how changes in bile acid composition affect human metabolism. Bile acids may offer novel therapeutic modalities in inflammation, obesity, and diabetes. PMID:26481828

  9. EMBO Retinoids 2011: mechanisms, biology and pathology of signaling by retinoic acid and retinoic acid receptors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the principal active metabolites of vitamin A (retinol) which mediates a spectrum of critical physiological and developmental processes. Transcriptional regulation by RA is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. NRs bind specific genomic DNA sequence motifs and engage coregulators and components of the basal transcription machinery to effect transcriptional regulation at target gene promoters. Disruption of signaling by retinoic acid is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases including breast cancer and haematological malignancies. A meeting of international researchers in retinoid signaling was convened in Strasbourg in September 2011 under the auspices of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). Retinoids 2011 encompassed myriad mechanistic, biological and pathological aspects of these hormones and their cognate receptors, as well as setting these advances in the context of wider current questions on signaling by members of the NR superfamily. PMID:22438793

  10. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in 1918 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Changes Receptor Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Laurel; Stevens, James; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Wilson, Ian A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Palese, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The receptor binding specificity of influenza viruses may be important for host restriction of human and avian viruses. Here, we show that the hemagglutinin (HA) of the virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic has strain-specific differences in its receptor binding specificity. The A/South Carolina/1/18 HA preferentially binds the α2,6 sialic acid (human) cellular receptor, whereas the A/New York/1/18 HA, which differs by only one amino acid, binds both the α2,6 and the α2,3 sialic acid (avian) cellular receptors. Compared to the conserved consensus sequence in the receptor binding site of avian HAs, only a single amino acid at position 190 was changed in the A/New York/1/18 HA. Mutation of this single amino acid back to the avian consensus resulted in a preference for the avian receptor. PMID:16103207

  11. What makes the bioactive lipids phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid so special?

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Carter, Karen M; van Laar, Emma G; Chupin, Vladimir; Burger, Koert N J; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-12-27

    Phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid are minor but important anionic bioactive lipids involved in a number of key cellular processes, yet these molecules have a simple phosphate headgroup. To find out what is so special about these lipids, we determined the ionization behavior of phosphatidic acid (PA) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in extended (flat) mixed lipid bilayers using magic angle spinning 31P NMR. Our data show two surprising results. First, despite identical phosphomonoester headgroups, LPA carries more negative charge than PA when present in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Dehydroxy-LPA [1-oleoyl-3-(phosphoryl)propanediol] behaves in a manner identical to that of PA, indicating that the difference in negative charge between LPA and PA is caused by the hydroxyl on the glycerol backbone of LPA and its interaction with the phosphomonoester headgroup. Second, deprotonation of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid was found to be strongly stimulated by the inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the bilayer, indicating that lipid headgroup charge depends on local lipid composition and will vary between the different subcellular locations of (L)PA. Our findings can be understood in terms of a hydrogen bond formed within the phosphomonoester headgroup of (L)PA and its destabilization by competing intra- or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. We propose that this hydrogen bonding property of (L)PA is involved in the various cellular functions of these lipids. PMID:16363814

  12. Expression of gastric antisecretory and prostaglandin E receptor binding activity of misoprostol by misoprostol free acid.

    PubMed

    Tsai, B S; Kessler, L K; Stolzenbach, J; Schoenhard, G; Bauer, R F

    1991-05-01

    In enriched canine parietal cell preparations, misoprostol, an analog of prostaglandin E1 methyl ester, was rapidly deesterified to misoprostol free acid. Under this circumstance, misoprostol and misoprostol free acid exhibited equal antisecretory potency against histamine-stimulated acid secretion and bound equally well to prostaglandin E receptors. When the deesterification of misoprostol was inhibited by paraoxon, an esterase inhibitor, the antisecretory and receptor binding activity of misoprostol was markedly reduced, with potency much less than misoprostol free acid. These results indicate that misoprostol free acid is the active biological form of misoprostol that binds to prostaglandin E receptors and mediates the antisecretory action of misoprostol. PMID:1850690

  13. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-02-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid-FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid-FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8(+) T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA- or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  14. A 31 year old woman with essential hypertension grade III and branch retinal vein occlusion with homozygous C677T MTHFR hyperhomocysteinemia and high Lp(a) levels.

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Chatzistamatiou, Evangelos; Androulakis, Emmanouil; Moustakas, Georgios; Skiadas, Ioannis; Tsioufis, Constantinos; Antoniades, Charalambos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos I; Kallikazaros, Ioannis E

    2010-09-01

    We report a 31-year old woman with essential hypertension grade III and history of branch retinal vein occlusion in the setting of hyperhomocysteinemia due to homozygous MTHFR gene mutation and elevated Lp(a). The patient was treated successfully with antihypertensive treatment, acetylsalicylic acid and multivitamin complex supplementation. PMID:19135738

  15. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  16. Tulane virus recognizes sialic acids as cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Wei, Chao; Huang, Pengwei; Fan, Qiang; Quigley, Christina; Xia, Ming; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Xufu; Zhong, Weiming; Klassen, John S; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that human noroviruses (huNoVs) recognize sialic acids (SAs) in addition to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) pointed to a new direction in studying virus-host interactions during calicivirus infection. HuNoVs remain difficult to study due to the lack of an effective cell culture model. In this study, we demonstrated that Tulane virus (TV), a cultivable primate calicivirus, also recognizes SAs in addition to the previously known TV-HBGA interactions. Evidence supporting this discovery includes that TV virions bound synthetic sialoglycoconjugates (SGCs) and that treatment of TV permissive LLC-MK2 cells with either neuraminidases or SA-binding lectins inhibited TV infectivity. In addition, we found that Maackia amurensis leukoagglutinin (MAL), a lectin that recognizes the α-2,3 linked SAs, bound LLC-MK2 cells, as well as TV, by which MAL promoted TV infectivity in cell culture. Our findings further highlight TV as a valuable surrogate for huNoVs, particularly in studying virus-host interactions that may involve two host carbohydrate receptors or co-receptors for infection. PMID:26146020

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives as novel free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuekun; Zhao, Tianxiao; Yang, Baowei; Li, Zheng; Cui, Jian; Dai, Yuxuan; Qiu, Qianqian; Qiang, Hao; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) is a new potential drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because of its role in amplifying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cell. In the present studies, we identified phenoxyacetic acid derivative (18b) as a potent FFA1 agonist (EC50=62.3 nM) based on the structure of phenylpropanoic acid derivative 4p. Moreover, compound 18b could significantly improve oral glucose tolerance in ICR mice and dose-dependently reduced glucose levels in type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 mice without observation of hypoglycemic side effect. Additionally, compound 18b exhibited acceptable PK profiles. In summary, compound 18b with ideal PK profiles exhibited good activity in vitro and in vivo, and might be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25481394

  18. Low Phytic Acid Barley Responses to Phosphorus Rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low phytic acid (LPA) barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars partition phosphorus in seed tissue differently than conventional barley cultivars through a reduction in seed phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexkisphosphate) coupled with an increase in inorganic phosphorus. The response of the LPA...

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine-1-phosphate promote morphogenesis and block invasion of prostate cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic models

    PubMed Central

    Härmä, V; Knuuttila, M; Virtanen, J; Mirtti, T; Kohonen, P; Kovanen, P; Happonen, A; Kaewphan, S; Ahonen, I; Kallioniemi, O; Grafström, R; Lötjönen, J; Nees, M

    2012-01-01

    Normal prostate and some malignant prostate cancer (PrCa) cell lines undergo acinar differentiation and form spheroids in three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic culture. Acini formed by PC-3 and PC-3M, less pronounced also in other PrCa cell lines, spontaneously undergo an invasive switch, leading to the disintegration of epithelial structures and the basal lamina, and formation of invadopodia. This demonstrates the highly dynamic nature of epithelial plasticity, balancing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition against metastable acinar differentiation. This study assessed the role of lipid metabolites on epithelial maturation. PC-3 cells completely failed to form acinar structures in delipidated serum. Adding back lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) rescued acinar morphogenesis and repressed invasion effectively. Blocking LPA receptor 1 (LPAR1) functions by siRNA (small interference RNA) or the specific LPAR1 inhibitor Ki16425 promoted invasion, while silencing of other G-protein-coupled receptors responsive to LPA or S1P mainly caused growth arrest or had no effects. The G-proteins Gα12/13 and Gαi were identified as key mediators of LPA signalling via stimulation of RhoA and Rho kinases ROCK1 and 2, activating Rac1, while inhibition of adenylate cyclase and accumulation of cAMP may be secondary. Interfering with these pathways specifically impeded epithelial polarization in transformed cells. In contrast, blocking the same pathways in non-transformed, normal cells promoted differentiation. We conclude that LPA and LPAR1 effectively promote epithelial maturation and block invasion of PrCa cells in 3-D culture. The analysis of clinical transcriptome data confirmed reduced expression of LPAR1 in a subset of PrCa's. Our study demonstrates a metastasis-suppressor function for LPAR1 and Gα12/13 signalling, regulating cell motility and invasion versus epithelial maturation. PMID:21996742

  20. Fibroblastic reticular cell-derived lysophosphatidic acid regulates confined intranodal T-cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Akira; Kobayashi, Daichi; Aoi, Keita; Sasaki, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Tohya, Kazuo; Inoue, Asuka; Hata, Erina; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Hayasaka, Haruko; Kikuta, Junichi; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Ishii, Satoshi; Aoki, Junken; Suematsu, Makoto; Ishii, Masaru; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Umemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are highly confined environments with a cell-dense three-dimensional meshwork, in which lymphocyte migration is regulated by intracellular contractile proteins. However, the molecular cues directing intranodal cell migration remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) produced by LN fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) acts locally to LPA2 to induce T-cell motility. In vivo, either specific ablation of LPA-producing ectoenzyme autotaxin in FRCs or LPA2 deficiency in T cells markedly decreased intranodal T cell motility, and FRC-derived LPA critically affected the LPA2-dependent T-cell motility. In vitro, LPA activated the small GTPase RhoA in T cells and limited T-cell adhesion to the underlying substrate via LPA2. The LPA-LPA2 axis also enhanced T-cell migration through narrow pores in a three-dimensional environment, in a ROCK-myosin II-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that FRC-derived LPA serves as a cell-extrinsic factor that optimizes T-cell movement through the densely packed LN reticular network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10561.001 PMID:26830463

  1. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  2. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peggy P.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid–FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8+ T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA– or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  3. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by substances in the organic acid fraction of Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Izu, Hanae; Shigemori, Kensuke; Eguchi, Masaya; Kawane, Shuhei; Fujii, Shouko; Kitamura, Yuji; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Yamada, Yasue

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substances present in Japanese sake on the response of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sake was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. The fraction containing organic acids (OA fraction) showed agonist activities on the GABAA receptor. OA fractions from sake were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Of the 64 compounds identified, 13 compounds showed GABAA receptor agonist activities. Especially, l-lactic acid showed high agonist activity and its EC50 value was 37μM. Intraperitoneal injections of l-lactic acid, gluconic acid, and pyruvic acid (10, 10, and 5mg/kg BW, respectively), which showed agonistic activity on the GABAA receptor, led to significant anxiolytic effects during an elevated plus-maze test in mice. PMID:27507485

  4. Farnesoid X receptor, the bile acid sensing nuclear receptor, in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guodong; L. Guo, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The liver is unique in regenerative potential, which could recover the lost mass and function after injury from ischemia and resection. The underlying molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been extensively studied in the past using the partial hepatectomy (PH) model in rodents, where 2/3 PH is carried out by removing two lobes. The whole process of liver regeneration is complicated, orchestrated event involving a network of connected interactions, which still remain fully elusive. Bile acids (BAs) are ligands of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor of ligand-activated transcription factor. FXR has been shown to be highly involved in liver regeneration. BAs and FXR not only interact with each other but also regulate various downstream targets independently during liver regeneration. Moreover, recent findings suggest that tissue-specific FXR also contributes to liver regeneration significantly. These novel findings suggest that FXR has much broader role than regulating BA, cholesterol, lipid and glucose metabolism. Therefore, these researches highlight FXR as an important pharmaceutical target for potential use of FXR ligands to regulate liver regeneration in clinic. This review focuses on the roles of BAs and FXR in liver regeneration and the current underlying molecular mechanisms which contribute to liver regeneration. PMID:26579433

  5. A simple and highly sensitive radioenzymatic assay for lysophosphatidic acid quantification

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien; Girard, Alexia; Simon, Marie-Françoise; Lafontan, Max; Valet, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a simple and sensitive radioenzymatic assay to quantify lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). For that, a recombinant rat lysophosphatidic acid acyl transferase (LPAAT) produced in Escherichia coli was used. In the presence of [14C]oleoyl CoA, LPAAT selectively catalyzes the transformation of LPA and alkyl-LPA into [14C]phosphatidic acid. Acylation of LPA was complete and linear from 0 to 200 pmoles with a minimal detection of 0.2 pmoles. This method was used to quantify LPA in butanol- extracted lipids from bovine sera, as well as from human and mouse plasma. This radioenzymatic assay represents a new, simple, and highly sensitive method to quantify LPA in various biological fluids. PMID:11108727

  6. Anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibodies improve traumatic brain injury outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with a potentially causative role in neurotrauma. Blocking LPA signaling with the LPA-directed monoclonal antibody B3/Lpathomab is neuroprotective in the mouse spinal cord following injury. Findings Here we investigated the use of this agent in treatment of secondary brain damage consequent to traumatic brain injury (TBI). LPA was elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with TBI compared to controls. LPA levels were also elevated in a mouse controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of TBI and B3 significantly reduced lesion volume by both histological and MRI assessments. Diminished tissue damage coincided with lower brain IL-6 levels and improvement in functional outcomes. Conclusions This study presents a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of TBI by blocking extracellular LPA signaling to minimize secondary brain damage and neurological dysfunction. PMID:24576351

  7. Polyunsaturated lysophosphatidic acid as a potential asthma biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Steven J; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid mediator in biological fluids and tissues, is generated mainly by autotaxin that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine to LPA and choline. Total LPA levels are increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from asthmatic lung, and are strongly induced following subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen in subjects with allergic asthma. Polyunsaturated molecular species of LPA (C22:5 and C22:6) are selectively synthesized in the airways of asthma subjects following allergen challenge and in mouse models of allergic airway inflammation, having been identified and quantified by LC/MS/MS lipidomics. This review discusses current knowledge of LPA production in asthmatic lung and the potential utility of polyunsaturated LPA molecular species as novel biomarkers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate of asthma subjects. PMID:26808693

  8. Secretion of a lysophospholipase D activity by adipocytes: involvement in lysophosphatidic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gesta, Stéphane; Simon, Marie-Françoise; Rey, Astrid; Sibrac, David; Girard, Alexia; Lafontan, Max; Valet, Philippe; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to depict the metabolic pathways involved in extra-cellular production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) by adipocytes. LPA was followed by quantifying the accumulation of LPA in the incubation medium (conditioned medium: CM) of 3T3F442A adipocytes, or human adipose tissue explants, using a radioenzymatic assay. Surprisingly, after separation from the cells, the amount of LPA present in CM could significantly be increased by further incubation at 37°C. This suggested the presence of a LPA-synthesizing activity (LPA-SA) in CM. LPA-SA appeared as a soluble activity which was inhibited by divalent ion chelators: EDTA and phenanthrolin. The effect of EDTA was preferentially reverted by CoCl2, as described for a lysophospholipase D- (lyso-PLD) activity previously identified in rat plasma. LPA concentration could also be increased by treatment with a bacterial PLD, demonstrating the presence of PLD-sensitive LPA-precursors (mainly lysophosphatidylcholine) in adipocyte CM. LPA-SA could be increased by addition of exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylglycerol, or lyso-platelet activating factor, demonstrating that LPA-SA resulted from the action of a lyso-PLD. LPA-SA was not inhibited, but rather activated, by primary alcohol (ethanol and 1-butanol), suggesting that adipocyte lyso-PLD was not a classical PLD. Finally, LPA-SA was found to be weaker in CM of undifferentiated adipocyte (preadipocytes) as compared to CM of differentiated adipocytes. In conclusion, our results reveal the existence of a secreted lyso-PLD activity regulated during adipocyte-differentiation and involved in extra-cellular production of synthesis of LPA by adipocytes. PMID:12032165

  9. Amino acid conjugates of lithocholic acid as antagonists of the EphA2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Incerti, Matteo; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Russo, Simonetta; Pala, Daniele; Giorgio, Carmine; Hassan-Mohamed, Iftiin; Noberini, Roberta; Pasquale, Elena B.; Vicini, Paola; Piersanti, Silvia; Rivara, Silvia; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    The Eph receptor–ephrin system is an emerging target for the development of novel antiangiogenetic agents. We recently identified lithocholic acid (LCA) as a small molecule able to block EphA2-dependent signals in cancer cells, suggesting that its (5β)-cholan-24-oic acid scaffold can be used as a template to design a new generation of improved EphA2 antagonists. Here, we report the design and synthesis of an extended set of LCA derivatives obtained by conjugation of its carboxyl group with different α-amino acids. Structure-activity relationships indicate that the presence of a lipophilic amino acid side chain is fundamental to achieve good potencies. The L-Trp derivative (20, PCM126) was the most potent antagonist of the series disrupting EphA2-ephrinA1 interaction and blocking EphA2 phosphorylation in prostate cancer cells at low μM concentrations, thus being significantly more potent than LCA. Compound 20 is among the most potent small molecule antagonists of the EphA2 receptor. PMID:23489211

  10. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  11. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  12. Action of Natural Abscisic Acid Precursors and Catabolites on Abscisic Acid Receptor Complexes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kepka, Michal; Benson, Chantel L.; Gonugunta, Vijay K.; Nelson, Ken M.; Christmann, Alexander; Grill, Erwin; Abrams, Suzanne R.

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates stress responses and controls numerous aspects of plant growth and development. Biosynthetic precursors and catabolites of ABA have been shown to trigger ABA responses in physiological assays, but it is not clear whether these are intrinsically active or whether they are converted into ABA in planta. In this study, we analyzed the effect of ABA precursors, conjugates, and catabolites on hormone signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The compounds were also tested in vitro for their ability to regulate the phosphatase moiety of ABA receptor complexes consisting of the protein phosphatase 2C ABI2 and the coreceptors RCAR1/PYL9, RCAR3/PYL8, and RCAR11/PYR1. Using mutants defective in ABA biosynthesis, we show that the physiological activity associated with ABA precursors derives predominantly from their bioconversion to ABA. The ABA glucose ester conjugate, which is the most widespread storage form of ABA, showed weak ABA-like activity in germination assays and in triggering ABA signaling in protoplasts. The ABA conjugate and precursors showed negligible activity as a regulatory ligand of the ABI2/RCAR receptor complexes. The majority of ABA catabolites were inactive in our assays. To analyze the chemically unstable 8′- and 9′-hydroxylated ABA catabolites, we used stable tetralone derivatives of these compounds, which did trigger selective ABA responses. ABA synthetic analogs exhibited differential activity as regulatory ligands of different ABA receptor complexes in vitro. The data show that ABA precursors, catabolites, and conjugates have limited intrinsic bioactivity and that both natural and synthetic ABA-related compounds can be used to probe the structural requirements of ABA ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:21976481

  13. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  14. Interaction of mechanisms involving epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adenosine receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors in neurovascular coupling in rat whisker barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Falck, John R; Harder, David R; Koehler, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine, astrocyte metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have been implicated in neurovascular coupling. Although A2A and A2B receptors mediate cerebral vasodilation to adenosine, the role of each receptor in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to neural activation remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, adenosine can amplify astrocyte calcium, which may increase arachidonic acid metabolites such as EETs. The interaction of these pathways was investigated by determining if combined treatment with antagonists exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the CBF response. During whisker stimulation of anesthetized rats, the increase in cortical CBF was reduced by approximately half after individual administration of A2B, mGluR and EET antagonists and EET synthesis inhibitors. Combining treatment of either a mGluR antagonist, an EET antagonist, or an EET synthesis inhibitor with an A2B receptor antagonist did not produce an additional decrement in the CBF response. Likewise, the CBF response also remained reduced by ~50% when an EET antagonist was combined with an mGluR antagonist or an mGluR antagonist plus an A2B receptor antagonist. In contrast, A2A and A3 receptor antagonists had no effect on the CBF response to whisker stimulation. We conclude that (1) adenosine A2B receptors, rather than A2A or A3 receptors, play a significant role in coupling cortical CBF to neuronal activity, and (2) the adenosine A2B receptor, mGluR, and EETs signaling pathways are not functionally additive, consistent with the possibility of astrocytic mGluR and adenosine A2B receptor linkage to the synthesis and release of vasodilatory EETs. PMID:17519974

  15. Inhibition of lysophospholipase D activity by unsaturated lysophosphatidic acids or seed extracts containing 1-linoleoyl and 1-oleoyl lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Wen; Sok, Dai-Eun; Yook, Hong-Sun; Sohn, Cheon-Bae; Chung, Young-Jin; Kim, Mee Ree

    2007-10-17

    Lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD), generating lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) from lysophosphatidyclcholine (LPC), is known to be inhibited by lysophosphatidic acids. Meanwhile, some plant lipids are known to contain lysophospholipids as minor components. Therefore, it is interesting to test whether edible seed samples, rich in phospholipids, may contain lysophospholipids, which express a strong inhibition of lysoPLD activity. First, the structural importance of fatty acyl group in LPAs was examined by determining the inhibitory effect of various LPAs on bovine lysoPLD activity. The most potent in the inhibition of lysoPLD activity was linoleoyl-LPA ( K i, 0.21 microM), followed by arachidonoyl-LPA ( K i, 0.55 microM), oleoyl-LPA ( K i, 1.2 microM), and palmitoyl-LPA ( K i, 1.4 microM), based on the fluoresecent assay. The same order of inhibitory potency among LPA analogs with different acyl chains was also found in the spectrophotometric assay. Subsequently, the extracts of 12 edible seeds were screened for the inhibition of lysoPLD activity using both spectrophotometric and fluorescent assays. Among seed extracts tested, the extract from soybean seed, sesame seed, or sunflower seed (30 mg seed weight/mL) was found to exhibit a potent inhibition (>80%) of lysoPLD activity. In further study employing ESI-MS/MS analysis, major LPA components in seed extracts were identified to be 1-linoleoyl LPA, 1-oleoyl LPA, and 1-palmitoyl LPA with 1-linoleoyl LPA being more predominant. Thus, the potent inhibition of lysoPLD activity by seed extracts might be ascribed to the presence of LPA with linoleoyl group rather than other acyl chains. PMID:17887800

  16. Reduction in Dietary Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Eicosapentaenoic Acid plus Docosahexaenoic Acid Ratio Minimizes Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation and Inflammatory Response in the LDL Receptor Null Mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary very long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been associated with reduced CVD risk. LDL receptor null mice (LDLr-/-) were used to assess different dietary ratios of omega-6 PUFA to eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-6:EPA+DHA) on atherogenesis and infl...

  17. Hrs recognizes a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in cytokine receptors during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yamashita, Yuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2011-04-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of the ESCRT-0 protein complex that captures ubiquitylated cargo proteins and sorts them to the lysosomal pathway. Although Hrs acts as a key transporter for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting, we previously reported that Hrs is also involved in ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). Here, we show direct interactions between bacterially expressed Hrs and interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), indicating that their binding is not required for ubiquitylation of the receptors, similar to the case for IL-2Rβ. Examinations of the Hrs binding regions of the receptors reveal that a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in both IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα is essential for the binding. Whereas the wild-type receptors are delivered to LAMP1-positive late endosomes, mutant receptors lacking the hydrophobic amino acid cluster are sorted to lysobisphosphatidic acid-positive late endosomes rather than LAMP1-positive late endosomes. We also show that the degradation of these mutant receptors is attenuated. Accordingly, Hrs functions during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of the receptors by recognizing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster. These findings suggest the existence of a group of cargo proteins that have this hydrophobic amino acid cluster as a ubiquitin-independent sorting signal. PMID:21362618

  18. The relationship between Lp(a) and CVD outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Carol A; Quek, Ruben G W; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Wolff, Robert; Stirk, Lisa; Kleijnen, Jos; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Djedjos, Stephen; Wong, Nathan D

    2016-01-01

    Robust associations between lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and CVD outcomes among general populations have been published in previous studies. However, associations in high risk primary prevention and secondary prevention populations are less well defined. In order to investigate this further, a systematic review was performed including prospective studies, which assessed the relationship between Lp(a) and CVD outcomes using multivariable analyses. Additional information was gathered on Lp(a) assays, multivariable modelling and population characteristics. Literature searches from inception up to December 2015 retrieved 2850 records. From these 60 studies were included. Across 39 primary prevention studies in the general population (hazard ratios ranged from 1.16 to 2.97) and seven high risk primary prevention studies (hazard ratios ranged from 1.01 to 3.7), there was evidence of a statistically significant relationship between increased Lp(a) and an increased risk of future CVD. Results in 14 studies of secondary prevention populations were also suggestive of a modest statistically significant relationship (hazard ratios ranged from 0.75 to 3.7).Therefore current evidence would suggest that increased Lp(a) levels are associated with modest increases in the risk of future CVD events in both general and higher risk populations. However, further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:27184891

  19. Amino acid receptors mediate calcium permeability in synaptosomes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pastuszko, A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1986-05-01

    Selected acidic amino acids and amino acid analogues were shown to increase the Ca/sup 2 +/ permeability of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes isolated from rat brain. Increased synaptosomal Ca/sup 2 +/ content was measured by uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Increased intrasynaptosomal free calcium was measured by the fluorescent calcium indicators indo 1 and quin 2. The increase in calcium permeability was maximal within 0.5 seconds (the limit of resolution of the methods used). The calcium permeability system(s) being modulated by the receptors appears to be Ca/sup 2 +/ channels but has properties different from the voltage dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ channels. Four different types of receptors have been observed; a kainate receptor antagonized by quisqualate, an L-cysteine sulfinate receptor, a 2-amino-2-phosphono-valerate receptor and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Each type of receptor is highly specific in ligand binding and none were activated or antagonized by aspartate or glutamate at concentrations up to 10 mM. Currently available data indicate substantial differences in ligand specificity between these presynaptic receptors and the postsynaptic receptors which have been classified by electrophysiological and radio-ligand binding studies. The neurotoxicity of kainate, L-cysteine sulfinate and N-methyl-D-aspartate may be due in part to metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances resulting from increased calcium in neurons having these receptors.

  20. Vitamin D receptor regulation of the steroid/bile acid sulfotransferase SULT2A1.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Bandana; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Song, Chung Seog

    2005-01-01

    SULT2A1 is a sulfo-conjugating phase II enzyme expressed at very high levels in the liver and intestine, the two major first-pass metabolic tissues, and in the steroidogenic adrenal tissue. SULT2A1 acts preferentially on the hydroxysteroids dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone/dihydrotestosterone, and pregnenolone and on cholesterol-derived amphipathic sterol bile acids. Several therapeutic drugs and other xenobiotics, which include xenoestrogens, are also sulfonated by this cytosolic steroid/bile acid sulfotransferase. Nonsteroid nuclear receptors with key roles in the metabolism and detoxification of endobiotics and xenobiotics, such as bile acid-activated farnesoid X receptor, xenobiotic-activated pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and lipid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, mediate transcription induction of SULT2A1 in the enterohepatic system. The ligand-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR) is another nuclear receptor that stimulates SULT2A1 transcription, and the regulatory elements in human, mouse, and rat promoters directing this induction have been characterized. Given that bile acid sulfonation is catalyzed exclusively by SULT2A1 and that the 3alpha-sulfate of the highly toxic lithocholic acid is a major excretory metabolite in humans, we speculate that a role for the VDR pathway in SULT2A1 expression may have emerged to shield first-pass tissues from the cytotoxic effects of a bile acid overload arising from disrupted sterol homeostasis triggered by endogenous and exogenous factors. PMID:16399349

  1. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  2. Kynurenic acid amides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Galgóczy, Kornél; Gere, Anikó; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Greiner, István; Domány, György

    2007-01-15

    A novel series of kynurenic acid amides, ring-enlarged derivatives of indole-2-carboxamides, was prepared and identified as in vivo active NR2B subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The synthesis and SAR studies are discussed. PMID:17074483

  3. Data for amino acid alignment of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors with other gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences, and the ligand selectivity of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Davis, Perry; Reinick, Christina; Mizusawa, Kanta; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Dores, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    This article contains structure and pharmacological characteristics of melanocortin receptors (MCRs) related to research published in "Characterization of melanocortin receptors from stingray Dasyatis akajei, a cartilaginous fish" (Takahashi et al., 2016) [1]. The amino acid sequences of the stingray, D. akajei, MC1R, MC2R, MC3R, MC4R, and MC5R were aligned with the corresponding melanocortin receptor sequences from the elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii, the dogfish, Squalus acanthias, the goldfish, Carassius auratus, and the mouse, Mus musculus. These alignments provide the basis for phylogenetic analysis of these gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences. In addition, the Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors were separately expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and stimulated with stingray ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, γ-MSH, δ-MSH, and β-endorphin. The dose response curves reveal the order of ligand selectivity for each stingray MCR. PMID:27408924

  4. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  5. Unnatural agrochemical ligands for engineered abscisic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pedro L; Lozano-Juste, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Existing agrochemicals can be endowed with new applications through protein engineering of plant receptors. A recent study shows an engineered PYR1 ABA receptor can be activated by mandipropamid. Plants engineered with such PYR1 variant are responsive to this agrochemical, which confers protection against drought through activation of ABA signaling. PMID:25891067

  6. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects. PMID:22615395

  7. Distinct binding determinants for 9-cis retinoic acid are located within AF-2 of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, B F; Allenby, G; Janocha, R; Kazmer, S; Speck, J; Sturzenbecker, L J; Abarzúa, P; Levin, A A; Grippo, J F

    1994-01-01

    Retinoids exert their physiological action by interacting with two families of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs), which regulate gene expression by forming transcriptionally active heterodimeric RAR/RXR or homodimeric RXR/RXR complexes on DNA. Retinoid receptor activity resides in several regions, including the DNA and ligand binding domains, a dimerization interface, and both a ligand-independent (AF-1) and a ligand-dependent (AF-2) transactivation function. While 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) alone is the cognate ligand for the RXRs, both 9-cis RA and all-trans RA (t-RA) compete for binding with high affinity to the RARs. This latter observation suggested to us that the two isomers may interact with a common binding site. Here we report that RAR alpha has two distinct but overlapping binding sites for 9-cis RA and t-RA. Truncation of a human RAR alpha to 419 amino acids yields a receptor that binds both t-RA and 9-cis RA with high affinity, but truncation to amino acid 404 yields a mutant receptor that binds only t-RA with high affinity. Remarkably, this region also defines a C-terminal boundary for AF-2, as addition of amino acids 405 to 419 restores receptor-mediated gene activity to a truncated human RAR alpha lacking this region. It is interesting to speculate that binding of retinoid stereoisomers to unique sites within an RAR may function with AF-2 to cause differential activation of retinoid-responsive gene pathways. Images PMID:8139538

  8. Nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling is required for normal liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Jun; Qatanani, Mohammed; Cuvillier, James; Liu, Jun; Dong, Bingning; Huang, Xiongfei; Moore, David D

    2006-04-14

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth. PMID:16614213

  9. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  10. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) Is Not an Agonist of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  11. Binding characteristics of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as a weak but selective GABAB receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Mathivet, P; Bernasconi, R; De Barry, J; Marescaux, C; Bittiger, H

    1997-02-19

    The aim of this study was to reexamine the concept that gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a weak but selective agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors, using binding experiments with several radioligands. Ki values of GHB were similar (approximately equal to 100 microM) in three agonist radioligand assays for GABAB receptors, [3H]baclofen (beta-para-chlorophenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid), [3H]CGP 27492 (3-aminopropyl-phosphinic acid) and [3H]GABA, in the presence of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine with rat cortical, cerebellar and hippocampal membranes. In competition experiments between GHB and the GABAB receptor antagonist, [3H]CGP 54626 (3-N [1-{(S)-3,4-dichlorophenyl}-ethylamino]-2-(S)-hydroxypropyl cyclo-hexylmethyl phosphinic acid), the IC50 values were significantly increased with 300 microM of 5'-guanyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), which suggested that guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) modulate GHB binding on GABAB receptors. The inhibition by GHB of [3H]CGP 27492 binding in cortical membranes was not altered in the presence of 0.3 or 3 mM of the two GHB dehydrogenase inhibitors, valproate and ethosuximide. Thus, GHB is not reconverted into GABA by GHB dehydrogenase. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that GHB is an endogenous weak but selective agonist at GABAB receptors. PMID:9083788

  12. Nucleic acid recognizing Toll-like receptors and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    von Landenberg, Philipp; Bauer, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    The understanding of autoimmune diseases experienced an impressive boost since the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been identified as possible key players in autoimmune pathophysiology. Although these receptors recognize a variety of structures derived from viruses, bacteria, and fungi leading to subsequent initiation of the relevant immune responses, recent data support the idea that TLRs are crucial in the induction and perpetuation of certain autoimmune diseases, especially the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this review, we will summarize recent data on involvement of TLRs in the development of autoimmune diseases. We will focus on TLRs 7, 8, and 9 that were originally identified as receptors specific for bacterial and viral RNA/DNA, but more recent in vitro and in vivo studies have linked these receptors to the detection of host RNA, DNA, and RNA-associated or DNA-associated proteins in the context of autoimmunity. PMID:18060756

  13. Targeted disruption of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and RAR gamma results in receptor-specific alterations in retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and retinoic acid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, J F; Lufkin, T; Achkar, C C; Taneja, R; Chambon, P; Gudas, L J

    1995-01-01

    F9 embryonic teratocarcinoma stem cells differentiate into an epithelial cell type called extraembryonic endoderm when treated with retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of retinol (vitamin A). This differentiation is presumably mediated through the actions of retinoid receptors, the RARs and RXRs. To delineate the functions of each of the different retinoid receptors in this model system, we have generated F9 cell lines in which both copies of either the RAR alpha gene or the RAR gamma gene are disrupted by homologous recombination. The absence of RAR alpha is associated with a reduction in the RA-induced expression of both the CRABP-II and Hoxb-1 (formerly 2.9) genes. The absence of RAR gamma is associated with a loss of the RA-inducible expression of the Hoxa-1 (formerly Hox-1.6), Hoxa-3 (formerly Hox-1.5), laminin B1, collagen IV (alpha 1), GATA-4, and BMP-2 genes. Furthermore, the loss of RAR gamma is associated with a reduction in the metabolism of all-trans-RA to more polar derivatives, while the loss of RAR alpha is associated with an increase in metabolism of RA relative to wild-type F9 cells. Thus, each of these RARs exhibits some specificity with respect to the regulation of differentiation-specific gene expression. These results provide an explanation for the expression of multiple RAR types within one cell type and suggest that each RAR has specific functions. PMID:7823950

  14. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  15. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF LIGANDS OF MAMMALIAN RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS: A PRELIMINARY COREPA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXR ligands is of interes...

  16. Linking pattern recognition and salicylic acid responses in Arabidopsis through ACCELERATED CELL DEATH6 and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, Chika; Zhang, Zhongqin; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis membrane protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 6 (ACD6) and the defense signal salicylic acid (SA) are part of a positive feedback loop that regulates the levels of at least 2 pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) receptors, including FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR (LYSM domain receptor-like kinase 1, CERK1). ACD6- and SA-mediated regulation of these receptors results in potentiation of responses to FLS2 and CERK1 ligands (e.g. flg22 and chitin, respectively). ACD6, FLS2 and CERK1 are also important for callose induction in response to an SA agonist even in the absence of PAMPs. Here, we report that another receptor, EF-Tu RECEPTOR (EFR) is also part of the ACD6/SA signaling network, similar to FLS2 and CERK1. PMID:26442718

  17. CK-LPA: Efficient community detection algorithm based on label propagation with community kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhen; Zheng, Xiaolin; Xin, Nan; Chen, Deren

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid development of Web 2.0 and the rise of online social networks, finding community structures from user data has become a hot topic in network analysis. Although research achievements are numerous at present, most of these achievements cannot be adopted in large-scale social networks because of heavy computation. Previous studies have shown that label propagation is an efficient means to detect communities in social networks and is easy to implement; however, some drawbacks, such as low accuracy, high randomness, and the formation of a “monster” community, have been found. In this study, we propose an efficient community detection method based on the label propagation algorithm (LPA) with community kernel (CK-LPA). We assign a corresponding weight to each node according to node importance in the whole network and update node labels in sequence based on weight. Then, we discuss the composition of weights, the label updating strategy, the label propagation strategy, and the convergence conditions. Compared with the primitive LPA, existing drawbacks are solved by CK-LPA. Experiments and benchmarks reveal that our proposed method sustains nearly linear time complexity and exhibits significant improvements in the quality aspect of static community detection. Hence, the algorithm can be applied in large-scale social networks.

  18. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Sims, Gary P.; Kolbeck, Roland; Coyle, Anthony J.; Humbles, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) promoted DNA uptake into endosomes and lowered the immune recognition threshold for the activation of Toll-like receptor 9, the principal DNA-recognizing transmembrane signaling receptor. Structural analysis of RAGE–DNA complexes indicated that DNA interacted with dimers of the outermost RAGE extracellular domains, and could induce formation of higher-order receptor complexes. Furthermore, mice deficient in RAGE were unable to mount a typical inflammatory response to DNA in the lung, indicating that RAGE is important for the detection of nucleic acids in vivo. PMID:24081950

  19. The effect of lysophosphatidic acid during in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes: embryonic development and mRNA abundances of genes involved in apoptosis and oocyte competence.

    PubMed

    Boruszewska, Dorota; Torres, Ana Catarina; Kowalczyk-Zieba, Ilona; Diniz, Patricia; Batista, Mariana; Lopes-da-Costa, Luis; Woclawek-Potocka, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we examined whether LPA can be synthesized and act during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs). We found transcription of genes coding for enzymes of LPA synthesis pathway (ATX and PLA2) and of LPA receptors (LPAR 1-4) in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells, following in vitro maturation. COCs were matured in vitro in presence or absence of LPA (10(-5) M) for 24 h. Supplementation of maturation medium with LPA increased mRNA abundance of FST and GDF9 in oocytes and decreased mRNA abundance of CTSs in cumulus cells. Additionally, oocytes stimulated with LPA had higher transcription levels of BCL2 and lower transcription levels of BAX resulting in the significantly lower BAX/BCL2 ratio. Blastocyst rates on day 7 were similar in the control and the LPA-stimulated COCs. Our study demonstrates for the first time that bovine COCs are a potential source and target of LPA action. We postulate that LPA exerts an autocrine and/or paracrine signaling, through several LPARs, between the oocyte and cumulus cells. LPA supplementation of maturation medium improves COC quality, and although this was not translated into an enhanced in vitro development until the blastocyst stage, improved oocyte competence may be relevant for subsequent in vivo survival. PMID:24729661

  20. Modulatory effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the binding of glucocorticoids to rat liver glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vallette, G; Vanet, A; Sumida, C; Nunez, E A

    1991-09-01

    Binding of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone to the rat liver cytosol glucocorticoid receptor was inhibited by physiological concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids as a function of increasing dose, degree of unsaturation, and chain length of the fatty acid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most potent inhibitors. Scatchard analysis and Line-weaver-Burk plots of the binding data revealed that both the association constants and number of binding sites decreased and that polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibition was of a mixed non-competitive type. The dissociation rate constant of [3H]dexamethasone from glucocorticoid receptors was increased by up to 10 times in the presence of docosahexaenoic acid, whereas a competitive inhibitor like the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486 had no effect. Moreover, sucrose density gradient analysis showed that docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the binding of [3H] dexamethasone to both the 8.8S and 4S forms. The results strongly suggest that unsaturated fatty acids are interacting at a site on the receptor different from the hormone binding site and the heat shock protein and that by binding to a second site unsaturated fatty acids greatly change the conformation of the hormone binding site to reduce its affinity for the hormone, either partially or completely depending on the concentration and the class of the fatty acid. PMID:1874175

  1. The Pharmacology and Function of Receptors for Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Daniele; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme; Moss, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Despite some blockbuster G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drugs, only a small fraction (∼ 15%) of the more than 390 nonodorant GPCRs have been successfully targeted by the pharmaceutical industry. One way that this issue might be addressed is via translation of recent deorphanization programs that have opened the prospect of extending the reach of new medicine design to novel receptor types with potential therapeutic value. Prominent among these receptors are those that respond to short-chain free fatty acids of carbon chain length 2-6. These receptors, FFA2 (GPR43) and FFA3 (GPR41), are each predominantly activated by the short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate, and butyrate, ligands that originate largely as fermentation by-products of anaerobic bacteria in the gut. However, the presence of FFA2 and FFA3 on pancreatic β-cells, FFA3 on neurons, and FFA2 on leukocytes and adipocytes means that the biologic role of these receptors likely extends beyond the widely accepted role of regulating peptide hormone release from enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Here, we review the physiologic roles of FFA2 and FFA3, the recent development and use of receptor-selective pharmacological tool compounds and genetic models available to study these receptors, and present evidence of the potential therapeutic value of targeting this emerging receptor pair. PMID:26719580

  2. Stacking interaction and its role in kynurenic acid binding to glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Alexander V; Zakharov, Gennady A; Shchegolev, Boris F; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2012-05-01

    Stacking interaction is known to play an important role in protein folding, enzyme-substrate and ligand-receptor complex formation. It has been shown to make a contribution into the aromatic antagonists binding with glutamate ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), in particular, the complex of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit with the kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivatives. The specificity of KYNA binding to the glutamate receptors subtypes might partially result from the differences in stacking interaction. We have calculated the optimal geometry and binding energy of KYNA dimers with the four types of aromatic amino acid residues in Rattus and Drosophila ionotropic iGluR subunits. All ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed taking into account electron correlations at MP2 and MP4 perturbation theory levels. We have also investigated the potential energy surfaces (PES) of stacking and hydrogen bonds (HBs) within the receptor binding site and calculated the free energy of the ligand-receptor complex formation. The energy of stacking interaction depends both on the size of aromatic moieties and the electrostatic effects. The distribution of charges was shown to determine the geometry of polar aromatic ring dimers. Presumably, stacking interaction is important at the first stage of ligand binding when HBs are weak. The freedom of ligand movements and rotation within receptor site provides the precise tuning of the HBs pattern, while the incorrect stacking binding prohibits the ligand-receptor complex formation. PMID:21833825

  3. Inhibitory effect of PYY on vagally stimulated acid secretion is mediated predominantly by Y1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K C; Grandt, D; Aurang, K; Eysselein, V E; Schimiczek, M; Reeve, J R

    1996-01-01

    Two molecular forms of peptide YY (PYY), PYY-(1--36) and PYY-(3--36), are abundant in rabbit intestine and blood. We have previously shown that PYY-(1--36) (PYYI) activates equipotently Y1 and Y2 receptors and PYY-(3--36) (PYY II) is a highly selective agonist for Y2 receptors. In the present study, we examined the effect of exogenous infusion of PYY on vagally stimulated gastric acid secretion in awake rabbits with chronic gastric fistula. To determine the specific PYY receptor(s) that mediates this effect, we used a highly selective Y1 agonist, Pro34-PYY, a synthetic PYY, and a Y2-selective agonist, PYY II. Vagal stimulation of acid secretion was elicited by an intravenous bolus injection of insulin (0.125 U/kg) 30 min after beginning a 180-min intravenous infusion of either PYY I, PYY II, or [Pro34]-PYY after a 50 micrograms/kg i.v. bolus of atropine followed immediately by a 500 micrograms/kg sc injection. During infusion of 200 pmol.kg 1.h-1 PYY I, acid output was significantly inhibited to 45 +/- 13% of maximum acid output 60 min after injection of insulin. Similarly, acid output during infusion of 200 pmol.kg-1.h-1 [Pro34]-PYY was significantly inhibited to 52 +/- 12% of maximum. In contrast, acid output during infusion of 200 pmol.kg-1.h-1 of PYY II was not significantly inhibited (101 +/- 18% of maximum). Infusion of double the dose (400 pmol.kg-1.h-1) of PYY II resulted in acid inhibition (51 = 15% of maximum), whereas infusion of the same dose did not significantly enhance acid inhibition by infusion of either PYY I or [Pro34]-PYY (28 +/- 11 and 42 +/- 15% of maximum). These results indicate that PYY, acting predominantly at Y1 receptors, is a potent inhibitor of vagally stimulated acid secretion in adult rabbits. PMID:8772509

  4. A label-free impedance-based whole cell assay revealed a new G protein-coupled receptor ligand for mouse microglial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Yasufumi; Okino, Nozomu; Furuya, Shigeki; Ito, Makoto

    2016-09-16

    We report the usefulness of an impedance-based label-free whole cell assay to identify new ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involved in microglial cell migration. Authentic GPCR ligands were subjected to the impedance-based cell assay in order to examine the responses of ligands for MG5 mouse microglial cells. Complement component 5 (C5a), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) were found to elicit different cellular impedance patterns, i.e. C5a, ADP, and UTP caused a transient increase in cellular impedance, while LPA and LysoPS decreased it. The responses for C5a and ADP were abolished by pertussis toxin (PTX), but not rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, indicating that C5a and ADP elicited responses through the Gαi pathway. On the other hand, the response for UTP, LPA or LysoPS was not cancelled by PTX or Y-27632. In a modified Boyden chamber assay, C5a and ADP, but not UTP, LPA, or LysoPS, induced the migration of MG5 cells. These results suggest that PTX-sensitive increase in cellular impedance with the assay is characteristic for ligands of GPCRs involved in microglial cell migration. We found using this assay that 5-oxo-6E,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) is a new chemoattractant inducing microglial cell migration through the activation of Gαi. PMID:27480930

  5. Mechanisms for the activation of Toll-like receptor 2/4 by saturated fatty acids and inhibition by docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Daniel H; Kim, Jeong-A; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-08-15

    Saturated fatty acids can activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 but polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibit the activation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipopetides, ligands for TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, are acylated by saturated fatty acids. Removal of these fatty acids results in loss of their ligand activity suggesting that the saturated fatty acyl moieties are required for the receptor activation. X-ray crystallographic studies revealed that these saturated fatty acyl groups of the ligands directly occupy hydrophobic lipid binding domains of the receptors (or co-receptor) and induce the dimerization which is prerequisite for the receptor activation. Saturated fatty acids also induce the dimerization and translocation of TLR4 and TLR2 into lipid rafts in plasma membrane and this process is inhibited by DHA. Whether saturated fatty acids induce the dimerization of the receptors by interacting with these lipid binding domains is not known. Many experimental results suggest that saturated fatty acids promote the formation of lipid rafts and recruitment of TLRs into lipid rafts leading to ligand independent dimerization of the receptors. Such a mode of ligand independent receptor activation defies the conventional concept of ligand induced receptor activation; however, this may enable diverse non-microbial molecules with endogenous and dietary origins to modulate TLR-mediated immune responses. Emerging experimental evidence reveals that TLRs play a key role in bridging diet-induced endocrine and metabolic changes to immune responses. PMID:27085899

  6. Effect of alkyl glycerophosphate on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and glucose uptake in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Alkyl-LPA specifically interacts with PPARγ. •Alkyl-LPA treatments induces lipid accumulation in C2C12 cells. •Alkyl-LPA enhanced glucose uptake in C2C12 cells. •Alkyl-LPA-treated C2C12 cells express increased amounts of GLUT4 mRNA. •Alkyl-LPA is a novel therapeutic agent that can be used for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. -- Abstract: Studies on the effects of lipids on skeletal muscle cells rarely examine the effects of lysophospholipids. Through our recent studies, we identified select forms of phospholipids, such as alkyl-LPA, as ligands for the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor implicated in many human diseases, including diabetes and obesity. We previously showed that alkyl-LPA is a specific agonist of PPARγ. However, the mechanism by which the alkyl-LPA–PPARγ axis affects skeletal muscle cells is poorly defined. Our objective in the present study was to determine whether alkyl-LPA and PPARγ activation promotes glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Our findings indicate that PPARγ1 mRNA is more abundant than PPARγ2 mRNA in C2C12 cells. We showed that alkyl-LPA (3 μM) significantly activated PPARγ and increased intracellular glucose levels in skeletal muscle cells. We also showed that incubation of C2C12 cells with alkyl-LPA led to lipid accumulation in the cells. These findings suggest that alkyl-LPA activates PPARγ and stimulates glucose uptake in the absence of insulin in C2C12 cells. This may contribute to the plasma glucose-lowering effect in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  7. Genome-wide Linkage Analysis for Identifying Quantitative Trait Loci Involved in the Regulation of Lipoprotein a (Lpa) Levels

    PubMed Central

    López, Sonia; Buil, Alfonso; Ordoñez, Jordi; Souto, Juan Carlos; Almasy, Laura; Lathrop, Mark; Blangero, John; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Soria, José Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Lipoprotein Lp(a) levels are highly heritable and are associated with cardiovascular risk. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis to delineate the genomic regions that influence the concentration of Lp(a) in families from the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia (GAIT) Project. Lp(a) levels were measured in 387 individuals belonging to 21 extended Spanish families. A total of 485 DNA microsatellite markers were genotyped to provide a 7.1 cM genetic map. A variance component linkage method was used to evaluate linkage and to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The main QTL that showed strong evidence of linkage with Lp(a) levels was located at the structural gene for apo(a) on Chromosome 6 (LOD score=13.8). Interestingly, another QTL influencing Lp(a) concentration was located on Chromosome 2 with a LOD score of 2.01. This region contains several candidate genes. One of them is the tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), which has antithrombotic action and also has the ability to bind lipoproteins. However, quantitative trait association analyses performed with 12 SNPs in TFPI gene revealed no association with Lp(a) levels. Our study confirms previous results on the genetic basis of Lp(a) levels. In addition, we report a new QTL on Chromosome 2 involved in the quantitative variation of Lp(a). These data should serve as the basis for further detection of candidate genes and to elucidate the relationship between the concentration of Lp(a) and cardiovascular risk. PMID:18560444

  8. Unbinding of Retinoic Acid from its Receptor Studied by Steered Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in cell growth, differentiation, and development. Binding of the retinoic acid hormone to RAR is accompanied by conformational changes in the protein which induce transactivation or transrepression of the target genes. In this paper we present a study of the hormone binding/unbinding process in order to clarify the role of some of the amino acid contacts and identify possible pathways of the all-trans retinoic acid binding/unbinding to/from human retinoic acid receptor (hRAR)-g. Three possible pathways were explored using steered molecular dynamics simulations. Unbinding was induced on a time scale of 1 ns by applying external forces to the hormone. The simulations suggest that the hormone may employ one pathway for binding and an alternative "back door" pathway for unbinding.

  9. Three amino acids in the D2 dopamine receptor regulate selective ligand function and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David F.; Ericksen, Spencer S.; Schetz, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of psychotic, agitated, and abnormal behavioral states. To better understand the specific interactions of subtype-selective ligands with dopamine receptor subtypes, seven ligands with high selectivity (>120-fold) for the D4 subtype of dopamine receptor were tested on wild-type and mutant D2 receptors. Five of the selective ligands were observed to have 21-fold to 293-fold increases in D2 receptor affinity when three non-conserved amino acids in TM2 and TM3 were mutated to the corresponding D4 amino acids. The two ligands with the greatest improvement in affinity for the D2 mutant receptor [i.e., 3-{[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperazin-1-yl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (L-750,667) and 1-[4-iodobenzyl]-4-[N-(3-isopropoxy-2-pyridinyl)-N-methyl]-aminopiperidine (RBI-257)] were investigated in functional assays. Consistent with their higher affinity for the mutant than for the wild-type receptor, concentrations of L-750,667 or RBI-257 that produced large reductions in the potency of quinpirole’s functional response in the mutant did not significantly reduce quinpirole’s functional response in the wild-type D2 receptor. In contrast to RBI-257 which is an antagonist at all receptors, L-750,667 is a partial agonist at the wild-type D2 but an antagonist at both the mutant D2 and wild-type D4 receptors. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the TM2/3 microdomain of the D2 dopamine receptor not only regulates the selective affinity of ligands, but in selected cases can also regulate their function. Utilizing a new docking technique that incorporates receptor backbone flexibility, the three non-conserved amino acids that encompass the TM2/3 microdomain were found to account in large part for the differences in intermolecular steric contacts between the ligands and receptors. Consistent with the experimental data, this model illustrates the interactions between a variety of subtype

  10. A mollusk retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ortholog sheds light on the evolution of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M; Castro, L Filipe C; Bourguet, William; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  11. A Mollusk Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Ortholog Sheds Light on the Evolution of Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M.; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Bourguet, William

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  12. Peroxisome proliferators and fatty acids negatively regulate liver X receptor-mediated activity and sterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T E; Ledwith, B J

    2001-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) are potent tumor promoters in rodents. The mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis requires the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha), but might also involve the PPARalpha independent alteration of signaling pathways that regulate cell growth. Here, we studied the effects of PPs on the mevalonate pathway, a critical pathway that controls cell proliferation. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that act as sterol sensors in the mevalonate pathway. In gene reporter assays in COS-7 cells, the basal activity of the LXR responsive reporter gene (LXRE-luc) was suppressed by 10 microM lovastatin and zaragozic acid A, suggesting that this activity was attributed to the activation of native LXRs, by endogenously produced mevalonate products. The potent PP and rodent tumor promoter, pirinixic acid (WY-14643) also inhibited LXR-mediated transcription in a dose related manner (approximate IC(50) of 100 microM). As did several other PPs including ciprofibric acid and mono-ethylhexylphthalate. Polyunsaturated and medium to long chain fatty acids at 100 microM were also potent inhibitors; the arachidonic acid analogue eicosatetraynoic acid being the most active (approximate IC(50) of 10 microM). Of the PPs and fatty acids tested, there was a strong correlation between the ability of these agents to suppress de novo sterol synthesis in a rat hepatoma cell line, H4IIEC3, and inhibit LXR-mediated transcription in COS-7 cells, but a discordance between these endpoints and PPARalpha activation and fatty acid acyl-CoA oxidase induction. Taken together, these results suggest that PPs and fatty acids negatively regulate the mevalonate pathway through a mechanism that is not entirely dependent on PPARalpha activation. Because of the importance of the mevalonate pathway in regulating cell proliferation, the modulation of this pathway by PPs and fatty acids might contribute to their actions on cell growth

  13. Role of transient receptor potential and acid-sensing ion channels in peripheral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    White, John P M; Cibelli, Mario; Rei Fidalgo, Antonio; Paule, Cleoper C; Noormohamed, Faruq; Urban, Laszlo; Maze, Mervyn; Nagy, Istvan

    2010-03-01

    Pain originating in inflammation is the most common pathologic pain condition encountered by the anesthesiologist whether in the context of surgery, its aftermath, or in the practice of pain medicine. Inflammatory agents, released as components of the body's response to peripheral tissue damage or disease, are now known to be collectively capable of activating transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4, transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1, and acid-sensing ion channels, whereas individual agents may activate only certain of these ion channels. These ionotropic receptors serve many physiologic functions-as, indeed, do many of the inflammagens released in the inflammatory process. Here, we introduce the reader to the role of these ionotropic receptors in mediating peripheral pain in response to inflammation. PMID:20179512

  14. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    PubMed

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  15. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonists and Other Bile Acid Signaling Strategies for Treatment of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Halilbasic, Emina; Fuchs, Claudia; Traussnigg, Stefan; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) respond to bile acids (BAs) by activating transcriptional networks and/or signaling cascades. These cascades affect the expression of a great number of target genes relevant for BA, cholesterol, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. FXR activation in the liver tissue and beyond, such as the gut-liver axis, kidney and adipose tissue, plays a role in metabolic diseases. These BA receptors activators hold promise to become a new class of drugs to be used in the treatment of chronic liver disease, hepatocellular cancer and extrahepatic inflammatory and metabolic diseases. This review discusses the relevant BA receptors, the new drugs that target BA transport and signaling and their possible applications. PMID:27332721

  16. Site-specific incorporation of keto amino acids into functional G protein-coupled receptors using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shixin; Köhrer, Caroline; Huber, Thomas; Kazmi, Manija; Sachdev, Pallavi; Yan, Elsa C Y; Bhagat, Aditi; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2008-01-18

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous heptahelical transmembrane proteins involved in a wide variety of signaling pathways. The work described here on application of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to two GPCRs, the chemokine receptor CCR5 (a major co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus) and rhodopsin (the visual photoreceptor), adds a new dimension to studies of GPCRs. We incorporated the unnatural amino acids p-acetyl-L-phenylalanine (Acp) and p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bzp) into CCR5 at high efficiency in mammalian cells to produce functional receptors harboring reactive keto groups at three specific positions. We obtained functional mutant CCR5, at levels up to approximately 50% of wild type as judged by immunoblotting, cell surface expression, and ligand-dependent calcium flux. Rhodopsin containing Acp at three different sites was also purified in high yield (0.5-2 microg/10(7) cells) and reacted with fluorescein hydrazide in vitro to produce fluorescently labeled rhodopsin. The incorporation of reactive keto groups such as Acp or Bzp into GPCRs allows their reaction with different reagents to introduce a variety of spectroscopic and other probes. Bzp also provides the possibility of photo-cross-linking to identify precise sites of protein-protein interactions, including GPCR binding to G proteins and arrestins, and for understanding the molecular basis of ligand recognition by chemokine receptors. PMID:17993461

  17. Farnesoid X receptor alpha: a molecular link between bile acids and steroid signaling?

    PubMed

    Baptissart, Marine; Vega, Aurelie; Martinot, Emmanuelle; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Volle, David H

    2013-12-01

    Bile acids are cholesterol metabolites that have been extensively studied in recent decades. In addition to having ancestral roles in digestion and fat solubilization, bile acids have recently been described as signaling molecules involved in many physiological functions, such as glucose and energy metabolisms. These signaling pathways involve the activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXRα) or of the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5. In this review, we will focus on the emerging role of FXRα, suggesting important functions for the receptor in steroid metabolism. It has been described that FXRα is expressed in the adrenal glands and testes, where it seems to control steroid production. FXRα also participates in steroid catabolism in the liver and interferes with the steroid signaling pathways in target tissues via crosstalk with steroid receptors. In this review, we discuss the potential impacts of bile acid (BA), through its interactions with steroid metabolism, on glucose metabolism, sexual function, and prostate and breast cancers. Although several of the published reports rely on in vitro studies, they highlight the need to understand the interactions that may affect health. This effect is important because BA levels are increased in several pathophysiological conditions related to liver injuries. Additionally, BA receptors are targeted clinically using therapeutics to treat liver diseases, diabetes, and cancers. PMID:23784309

  18. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Interaction between the Neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Saxena, Nina C.; Conrad, Kevin A.; Hussain, Arif

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAA receptor ion channels play an important role in the central nervous system. A statistical mechanics model is proposed for the interaction between GABA and GABAA receptors. The model provides good fits to the electrophysiology data as well as an estimation of receptor activation energies, and predicts the temperature dependence consistent with measurements. In addition, the model provides insights into single channel conductance measurements. This model is also applicable to other ligand-gated ion channels with similar pentameric structures.

  19. Role of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFAR2) in the Regulation of Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Besides being an important source of fuel and structural components of biological membranes, free fatty acids (FFAs) are known to display a wide variety of roles that include modulation of receptor signaling and regulation of gene expression among many. FFAs play a significant role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis by activating specific G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in pancreatic β cells, immune cells, white adipose tissue, intestine and several other tissues. Free Fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2) also known as GPR43 belongs to this group of GPCRs and has been shown to participate in a number of important biological activities. FFAR2 is activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFAs are formed in the distal gut by bacterial fermentation of macro-fibrous material that escapes digestion in the upper gastrointestinal tract and enters the colon and have been shown to play vital role in the immune regulation and metabolic homeostasis. FFAR2 and other free fatty acid receptors are considered key components of the body's nutrient sensing mechanism and targeting these receptors is assumed to offer novel therapies for the management of diabetes and other metabolic disorders. This review aims to summarize the current state of our understanding of FFAR2 biology with a particular focus on its role in metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25850624

  20. A Low Phytic Acid Barley Mutation Alters Gene Expression in Early Seed Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) low phytic acid (lpa) mutants have reduced levels of seed phytate, the most abundant form of phosphorus in seeds, and increases in seed inorganic phosphorus. To understand how lpa mutations affect metabolic and developmental processes during seed growth, gene expression ...

  1. Recent Progress on Bile Acid Receptor Modulators for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping

    2016-07-28

    Bile acids are steroid-derived molecules synthesized in the liver, secreted from hepatocytes into the bile canaliculi, and subsequently stored in the gall bladder. During the feeding, bile flows into the duodenum, where it contributes to the solubilization and digestion of lipid-soluble nutrients. After a meal, bile-acid levels increase in the intestine, liver, and also in the systemic circulation. Therefore, serum bile-acid levels serve as an important sensing mechanism for nutrient and energy. Recent studies have described bile acids as versatile signaling molecules endowed with systemic endocrine functions. Bile acids are ligands for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1, M-BAR, and BG37) and nuclear hormone receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR; also known as NR1H4). Acting through these diverse signaling pathways, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose homeostasis, and energy expenditure. These bile-acid-controlled signaling pathways have become the source of promising novel drug targets to treat common metabolic and hepatic diseases. PMID:26878262

  2. Retinoid X receptor and retinoic acid response in the marine sponge Suberites domuncula.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Batel, Renato; Korzhev, Michael; Müller, Werner E G

    2003-09-01

    To date no nuclear receptors have been identified or cloned from the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum, the Porifera (sponges). We show that retinoic acid causes tissue regression in intact individuals of the demosponge Suberites domuncula and in primmorphs, special three-dimensional cell aggregates. Primmorphs were cultivated on a galectin/poly-L-lysine matrix in order to induce canal formation. In the presence of 1 or 50 micromol l(-1) retinoic acid these canals undergo regression, a process that is reversible. We also cloned the cDNA from S. domuncula encoding the retinoid X receptor (RXR), which displays the two motifs of nuclear hormone receptors, the ligand-binding and the DNA-binding domains, and performed phylogenetic analyses of this receptor. RXR expression undergoes strong upregulation in response to treatment with retinoic acid, whereas the expression of the sponge caspase is not increased. The gene encoding the LIM homeodomain protein was found to be strongly upregulated in response to retinoic acid treatment. These data indicate that the RXR and its ligand retinoic acid play a role in the control of morphogenetic events in sponges. PMID:12909707

  3. Induction of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in human endothelial cells by lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and platelets.

    PubMed

    Muehlich, Susanne; Schneider, Nadine; Hinkmann, Fabian; Garlichs, Christoph D; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2004-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by multiple interactions between endothelial cells and components of the blood. This study focussed on the induction of the pro-atherogenic connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in endothelial cells by bioactive lipids and platelets. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) led to a time- and concentration-dependent increase in CTGF mRNA and protein expression in the human endothelial cell line EAHY 926 and in primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). As both cell types expressed various receptors for LPA and S1P, signaling pathways were further characterized by pharmacological means: induction of CTGF was pertussis toxin-insensitive and inhibition of activation of p42/44 MAP kinases only partially reduced CTGF expression. On the contrary, interference with the RhoA signaling pathway by simvastatin, an inhibitor of geranylgeranyltransferases, or the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 prevented induction of CTGF. Co-incubation of endothelial cells with freshly isolated human platelets significantly increased the expression of CTGF mRNA in endothelial cells, which was also sensitive to simvastatin. Up-regulation of CTGF in endothelial cells, induced by LPA, S1P, or platelets, may contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Interference of simvastatin with the synthesis of this pro-atherogenic factor further supports the anti-atherogenic role of statins. PMID:15262182

  4. Effect of mitragynine, derived from Thai folk medicine, on gastric acid secretion through opioid receptor in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shizuko; Miyashita, Sanae; Yamamoto, Makiko; Horie, Syunji; Sakai, Shin-Ichiro; Aimi, Norio; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2002-05-17

    Mitragynine, an indole alkaloid from Thai folk medicine Mitragyna speciosa, exerts agonistic effects on opioid receptors. Gastric acid secretion is proposed to be regulated by opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Previously, we reported the dual roles (inhibition via micro-opioid receptors and stimulation via kappa-opioid receptors) of the opioid system in the central control of gastric acid secretion. We investigated whether mitragynine affects gastric acid secretion via opioid receptors in the CNS. Injection of mitragynine (30 microg) alone into the lateral cerebroventricle did not have a significant effect on basal gastric acid secretion in the perfused stomach of anesthetized rats. Injection of mitragynine (3-30 microg) into the fourth cerebroventricle, like morphine, inhibited 2-deoxy-D-glucose-stimulated gastric acid secretion. The inhibitory effect of mitragynine (30 microg) was reversed by naloxone (100 microg). These results suggest that mitragynine has a morphine-like action on gastric acid secretion in the CNS. PMID:12044808

  5. Electro-olfactogram and multiunit olfactory receptor responses to complex mixtures of amino acids in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Kang, J S; Caprio, J

    1991-10-01

    In vivo electrophysiological recordings from populations of olfactory receptor neurons in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, clearly showed that both electro-olfactogram and integrated neural responses of olfactory receptor cells to complex mixtures consisting of up to 10 different amino acids were predictable with knowledge of (a) the responses to the individual components in the mixture and (b) the relative independence of the respective receptor sites for the component stimuli. All amino acid stimuli used to form the various mixtures were initially adjusted in concentration to provide approximately equal response magnitudes. Olfactory receptor responses to both multimixtures and binary mixtures were recorded. Multimixtures were formed by mixing equal aliquots of 3-10 different amino acids. Binary mixtures were formed by mixing equal aliquots of two equally stimulatory solutions. Solution 1 contained either one to nine different neutral amino acids with long side-chains (LCNs) or one to five different neutral amino acids with short side-chains (SCNs). Solution 2, comprising the binary mixture, consisted of only a single stimulus, either a LCN, SCN, basic, or acidic amino acid. The increasing magnitude of the olfactory receptor responses to mixtures consisting of an increasing number of neutral amino acids indicated that multiple receptor site types with highly overlapping specificities exist to these compounds. For both binary mixtures and multimixtures composed of neutral and basic or neutral and acidic amino acids, the receptor responses were significantly enhanced compared with those mixtures consisting of an equal number of only neutral amino acids. These results demonstrate that receptor sites for the basic and acidic amino acids, respectively, are highly independent of those for the neutral amino acids, and suggest that a mechanism for synergism is the simultaneous activation of relatively independent receptor sites by the components in the mixture

  6. Regulation of Expression of Citrate Synthase by the Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α (RORα)

    PubMed Central

    Crumbley, Christine; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Burris, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays an important role in regulation of the circadian rhythm and metabolism. Mice lacking a functional RORα display a range of metabolic abnormalities including decreased serum cholesterol and plasma triglycerides. Citrate synthase (CS) is a key enzyme of the citric acid cycle that provides energy for cellular function. Additionally, CS plays a critical role in providing citrate derived acetyl-CoA for lipogenesis and cholesterologenesis. Here, we identified a functional RORα response element (RORE) in the promoter of the CS gene. ChIP analysis demonstrates RORα occupancy of the CS promoter and a putative RORE binds to RORα effectively in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and confers RORα responsiveness to a reporter gene in a cotransfection assay. We also observed a decrease in CS gene expression and CS enzymatic activity in the staggerer mouse, which has a mutation of in the Rora gene resulting in nonfunctional RORα protein. Furthermore, we found that SR1001 a RORα inverse agonist eliminated the circadian pattern of expression of CS mRNA in mice. These data suggest that CS is a direct RORα target gene and one mechanism by which RORα regulates lipid metabolism is via regulation of CS expression. PMID:22485150

  7. Bile acid receptors as targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Gross, Barbara; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis. When dyslipidemia coincides with other metabolic disorders such as obesity, hypertension, and glucose intolerance, defined as the metabolic syndrome (MS), individuals present an elevated risk to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) as well as CVD. Because the MS epidemic represents a growing public health problem worldwide, the development of therapies remains a major challenge. Alterations of bile acid pool regulation in T2D have revealed a link between bile acid and metabolic homeostasis. The bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5 both regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, rendering them potential pharmacological targets for MS therapy. This review discusses the mechanisms of metabolic regulation by FXR and TGR5 and the utility relevance of natural and synthetic modulators of FXR and TGR5 activity, including bile acid sequestrants, in the treatment of the MS. PMID:22550135

  8. Odorant receptors activated by amino acids in sensory neurons of the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T T; Caprio, J

    1993-12-01

    Odorant receptors activated by amino acids were investigated with patch-clamp techniques in olfactory receptor neurons of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The L-isomers of alanine, norvaline, arginine, and glutamate, known to act predominantly on different olfactory receptor sites, activated nondesensitizing inward currents with amplitudes of -2.5 to -280 pA in olfactory neurons voltage-clamped at membrane potentials of -72 or -82 mV. Different amino acids were shown to induce responses in the same sensory neurons; however, the amplitude and the kinetics of the observed whole cell currents differed among the stimuli and may therefore reflect activation of different amino acid receptor types or combinations of receptor types in these cells. Amino acid-induced currents appeared to have diverse voltage dependence and could also be classified according to the amplitude of the spontaneous channel fluctuations underlying the macroscopic currents. A mean single-channel conductance (gamma) of 360 fS was estimated from small noise whole-cell currents evoked by arginine within the same olfactory neuron in which a mean gamma value of 23.6 pS was estimated from 'large noise' response to norvaline. Quiescent olfactory neurons fired bursts of action potentials in response to either amino acid stimulation or application of 8-Br-cyclic GMP (100 microM), and voltage-gated channels underlying generation of action potentials were similar in these neurons. However, in whole-cell voltage-clamp, 8-Br-cyclic GMP evoked large rectangular current pulses, and single-channel conductances of 275, 220, and 110 pS were obtained from the discrete current levels. These results suggest that in addition to the cyclic nucleotide-gated transduction channels, olfactory neurons of the channel catfish possess a variety of odor receptors coupled to different types of transduction channels. PMID:8133240

  9. The degradation of airway tight junction protein under acidic conditions is probably mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Qi; Zhou, Jia; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M.; Kolosov, Victor P.

    2013-01-01

    Acidic airway microenvironment is one of the representative pathophysiological features of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by TJs (tight junctions), which act as the first physical barrier against the inhaled substances and pathogens of airway. As previous studies described, acid stress caused impaired epithelial barriers and led the hyperpermeability of epithelium. However, the specific mechanism is still unclear. We have showed previously the existence of TRPV (transient receptor potential vanilloid) 1 channel in airway epithelium, as well as its activation by acidic stress in 16HBE cells. In this study, we explored the acidic stress on airway barrier function and TJ proteins in vitro with 16HBE cell lines. Airway epithelial barrier function was determined by measuring by TER (trans-epithelial electrical resistance). TJ-related protein [claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-4, claudin-5, claudin-7 and ZO-1 (zonula occluden 1)] expression was examined by western blotting of insoluble fractions of cell extraction. The localization of TJ proteins were visualized by immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, stimulation by pH 6.0 for 8 h slightly increased the epithelial resistance in 16HBE cells insignificantly. However, higher concentration of hydrochloric acid (lower than pH 5.0) did reduce the airway epithelial TER of 16HBE cells. The decline of epithelial barrier function induced by acidic stress exhibited a TRPV1-[Ca2+]i-dependent pathway. Of the TJ proteins, claudin-3 and claudin-4 seemed to be sensitive to acidic stress. The degradation of claudin-3 and claudin-4 induced by acidic stress could be attenuated by the specific TRPV1 blocker or intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. PMID:24073800

  10. Rho/ROCK acts downstream of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in modulating P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-xiang; Yuan, Xiao-min; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK signaling is implicated in bone cancer pain development. However, it remains unknown whether the two signaling pathways function together in P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain. Results In this study, using a rat model of bone cancer, we examined the expression of P2X3 and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and further dissected whether lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK-mediated pathways interacted in modulating rat pain behavior. Bone cancer was established by inoculating Walker 256 cells into the left tibia of female Wistar rats. We observed a gradual and yet significant decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold in rats with bone cancer, but not in control rats. Our immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of P2X3- and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1-positive dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly greater in rats with bone cancer than control rats. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 blockade with VPC32183 significantly attenuated decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold. Flinching behavior test further showed that lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 inhibition with VPC32183 transiently but significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Rho inhibition by intrathecal BoTXC3 caused a rapid reversal in decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold of rats with bone cancer. Flinching behavior test showed that BoTXC3 transiently and significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Similar findings were observed with ROCK inhibition by intrathecal Y27632. Furthermore, VPC32183 and BoTXC3 effectively aborted the appearance of lysophosphatidic acid-induced calcium influx peak. Conclusions Lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor LPAR1, acting through the Rho-ROCK pathway, regulate P2X3 receptor in the development of both mechanical and spontaneous pain in bone cancer. PMID:27094551

  11. Identification of etiological agents by LPA and PCR in childhood meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashal; A. Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Pardhan, Khatidja; Ahmed Memon, Ashfaque

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the etiological agents by Latex Particle Agglutination (LPA) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in patients admitted with Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) culture negative bacterial meningitis Methods: This descriptive case series was conducted at National Institute of Child Health, Karachi from January 2010 to December 2012. Patients meeting the WHO case definition of suspected meningitis from one month to 59 months of age were included in the study. CSF examination and culture was carried out on every patient and CSF culture negative patients were enrolled. Demographic data, clinical signs & symptoms and laboratory findings were entered into the proforma. Data was analyzed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 17. P-value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: A total of 166 patients were included. Male were 96 and female were 76 with the male to female ratio of 1.26. The mean age of patient was ± SD 14.6 ± 14.5 months. The etiological agents identified by LPA were in 26/166 (15.66%) cases and the organisms were H. influenzae type b 10 cases, streptococcus pneumoniae 15 cases and meningococcus only one case respectively. The organisms identified by PCR were in 65/166 (39.15%) cases and the isolates were H. influenzae type b 16 cases, streptococcus pneumoniae 48 cases and meningococcus 01 case respectively. Conclusion: LPA and PCR are superior and useful diagnostic tools in microbiology. They can be used for rapid etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis for the early administration of proper antibiotic. Abbreviation: LPA = Latex Particle Agglutination, PCR = Polymerase Chain Reaction, CSF = Cerebrospinal Fluid, CNS = Central Nervous System. PMID:24353712

  12. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  13. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  14. Position and length of fatty acids strongly affect receptor selectivity pattern of human pancreatic polypeptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Mäde, Veronika; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Kaiser, Anette; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a satiety-inducing gut hormone targeting predominantly the Y4 receptor within the neuropeptide Y multiligand/multireceptor family. Palmitoylated PP-based ligands have already been reported to exert prolonged satiety-inducing effects in animal models. Here, we suggest that other lipidation sites and different fatty acid chain lengths may affect receptor selectivity and metabolic stability. Activity tests revealed significantly enhanced potency of long fatty acid conjugates on all four Y receptors with a preference of position 22 over 30 at Y1 , Y2 and Y5 receptors. Improved Y receptor selectivity was observed for two short fatty acid analogues. Moreover, [K(30)(E-Prop)]hPP2-36 (15) displayed enhanced stability in blood plasma and liver homogenates. Thus, short chain lipidation of hPP at key residue 30 is a promising approach for anti-obesity therapy because of maintained selectivity and a sixfold increased plasma half-life. PMID:25156249

  15. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor /sup 3/H-agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-11-16

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic /sup 3/H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the /sup 3/H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total /sup 3/H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable /sup 3/H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable /sup 3/H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of /sup 3/H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific /sup 3/H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors.

  16. Lipoprotein(a) and vitamin C impair development of breast cancer tumors in Lp(a)+; Gulo-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, John; Roomi, M Waheed; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Cancer progression is characterized by loss of extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity, which is a precondition for tumor growth and metastasis. In order to elucidate the precise mechanisms of ECM degradation in cancer we used a genetically modified mouse mimicking two distinct human metabolic features associated with carcinogenesis, the lack of endogenous vitamin C synthesis and the production of human Lp(a). Female Lp(a)+; Gulo(-/-) and control wild-type Balb/c mice without these two metabolic features were orthotopically inoculated with 4T1 breast cancer cells (5x105). The transgenic and control mice were divided into 4 different dietary groups in respect to dietary vitamin C intake: i) low ascorbate intake for 6 weeks; ii) high ascorbate intake for 6 weeks; iii) low ascorbate intake for 3 weeks followed by high ascorbate for 3 weeks; iv) high ascorbate intake for 3 weeks followed by low ascorbate for 3 weeks. After 6 weeks, all wild-type mice developed tumors. In contrast, Lp(a)+; Gulo(-/-) mice developed one third less primary tumors (low ascorbate diet) or no primary tumors at all (high ascorbate diet). Significantly, tumors from Lp(a)+; Gulo(-/-) mice immunostained positively for Lp(a) and their size was inversely proportional to Lp(a) serum levels. The results implicate that Lp(a) may play a role in controlling tumor growth and expansion. The most likely mechanism is the competitive inhibition of plasmin-induced ECM degradation due to the homology of Lp(a) components to plasminogen. The confirmation of this pathomechanism could lead to a universal therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:27573077

  17. Lipoprotein(a) and vitamin C impair development of breast cancer tumors in Lp(a)+; Gulo−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Cha, John; Roomi, M. Waheed; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is characterized by loss of extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity, which is a precondition for tumor growth and metastasis. In order to elucidate the precise mechanisms of ECM degradation in cancer we used a genetically modified mouse mimicking two distinct human metabolic features associated with carcinogenesis, the lack of endogenous vitamin C synthesis and the production of human Lp(a). Female Lp(a)+; Gulo(−/−) and control wild-type Balb/c mice without these two metabolic features were orthotopically inoculated with 4T1 breast cancer cells (5×105). The transgenic and control mice were divided into 4 different dietary groups in respect to dietary vitamin C intake: i) low ascorbate intake for 6 weeks; ii) high ascorbate intake for 6 weeks; iii) low ascorbate intake for 3 weeks followed by high ascorbate for 3 weeks; iv) high ascorbate intake for 3 weeks followed by low ascorbate for 3 weeks. After 6 weeks, all wild-type mice developed tumors. In contrast, Lp(a)+; Gulo(−/−) mice developed one third less primary tumors (low ascorbate diet) or no primary tumors at all (high ascorbate diet). Significantly, tumors from Lp(a)+; Gulo(−/−) mice immunostained positively for Lp(a) and their size was inversely proportional to Lp(a) serum levels. The results implicate that Lp(a) may play a role in controlling tumor growth and expansion. The most likely mechanism is the competitive inhibition of plasmin-induced ECM degradation due to the homology of Lp(a) components to plasminogen. The confirmation of this pathomechanism could lead to a universal therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:27573077

  18. LPA-mediated migration of ovarian cancer cells involves translocalization of Gαi2 to invadopodia and association with Src and β-pix.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeremy D; Ha, Ji Hee; Jayaraman, Muralidharan; Dhanasekaran, Danny N

    2015-01-28

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells. However, the downstream spatiotemporal signaling events involving specific G protein(s) underlying this process are largely unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that LPA signaling causes the translocation of Gαi2 into the invadopodia leading to its interaction with the tyrosine kinase Src and the Rac/CDC42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, β-pix. Our results establish that Gαi2 activates Rac1 through a p130Cas-dependent pathway in ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, our report reveals that knockdown of Gαi2 leads to loss of β-pix and active-Rac association in the invadopodia. We also show that knockdown of Gαi2 leads to the complete loss of translocation to p130Cas to focal adhesions. Finally, when Gαi2 is knocked down, this led to the total distribution of Src being shifted primarily from invadopodia and the leading edge of the cells to the perinuclear region, suggesting that Src is inactive in the absence of Gαi2. Overall, our report provides tantalizing evidence that Gαi2 is a critical signaling component of a large signaling complex in the invadopodia that if disrupted could serve as an excellent target for therapy in ovarian and potentially other cancers. PMID:25451317

  19. Identification of dehydroabietc acid from Boswellia thurifera resin as a positive GABAA receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Diana C; Raith, Melanie; De Mieri, Maria; Schöffmann, Angela; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay with Xenopus laevis oocytes, a petroleum ether extract (100 μg/mL) of the resin of Boswellia thurifera (Burseraceae) potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) through receptors of the subtype α₁β₂γ₂s by 319.8% ± 79.8%. With the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling, three known terpenoids, dehydroabietic acid (1), incensole (2), and AKBA (3), were identified in the active fractions of the extract. Structure elucidation was achieved by means of HR-MS and microprobe 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 induced significant receptor modulation in the oocyte assay, with a maximal potentiation of IGABA of 397.5% ± 34.0%, and EC₅₀ of 8.7 μM ± 1.3 μM. This is the first report of dehydroabietic acid as a positive GABAA receptor modulator. PMID:25200370

  20. Activiation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  1. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy participants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  2. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  3. 7-Azaindole-3-acetic acid derivatives: potent and selective CRTh2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Adcock, Claire; Bala, Kamlesh; Barker, Lucy; Brown, Zarin; Dubois, Gerald; Budd, David; Cox, Brian; Fairhurst, Robin A; Furegati, Markus; Leblanc, Catherine; Manini, Jodie; Profit, Rachael; Reilly, John; Stringer, Rowan; Schmidt, Alfred; Turner, Katharine L; Watson, Simon J; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2009-08-15

    High throughput screening identified a 7-azaindole-3-acetic acid scaffold as a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype, which could be optimised to furnish a highly selective compound with good functional potency for inhibition of human eosinophil shape change in whole blood and oral bioavailability in the rat. PMID:19592244

  4. Highly specific olfactory receptor neurons for types of amino acids in the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Nikonov, Alexander A; Caprio, John

    2007-10-01

    Odorant specificity to l-alpha-amino acids was determined electrophysiologically for 93 single catfish olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) selected for their narrow excitatory molecular response range (EMRR) to only one type of amino acid (i.e., Group I units). These units were excited by either a basic amino acid, a neutral amino acid with a long side chain, or a neutral amino acid with a short side chain when tested at 10(-7) to 10(-5) M. Stimulus-induced inhibition, likely for contrast enhancement, was primarily observed in response to the types of amino acid stimuli different from that which activated a specific ORN. The high specificity of single Group I ORNs to type of amino acid was also previously observed for single Group I neurons in both the olfactory bulb and forebrain of the same species. These results indicate that for Group I neurons olfactory information concerning specific types of amino acids is processed from receptor neurons through mitral cells of the olfactory bulb to higher forebrain neurons without significant alteration in unit odorant specificity. PMID:17686913

  5. AKR1B7 Is Induced by the Farnesoid X Receptor and Metabolizes Bile Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel R.; Schmidt, Samuel; Holmstrom, Sam R.; Makishima, Makoto; Yu, Ruth T.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Although bile acids are crucial for the absorption of lipophilic nutrients in the intestine, they are cytotoxic at high concentrations and can cause liver damage and promote colorectal carcinogenesis. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is activated by bile acids and abundantly expressed in enterohepatic tissues, plays a crucial role in maintaining bile acids at safe concentrations. Here, we show that FXR induces expression of Akr1b7 (aldo-keto reductase 1b7) in murine small intestine, colon, and liver by binding directly to a response element in the Akr1b7 promoter. We further show that AKR1B7 metabolizes 3-keto bile acids to 3β-hydroxy bile acids that are less toxic to cultured cells than their 3α-hydroxy precursors. These findings reveal a feed-forward, protective pathway operative in murine enterohepatic tissues wherein FXR induces AKR1B7 to detoxify bile acids. PMID:21081494

  6. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  7. Different agonist- and antagonist-induced conformational changes in retinoic acid receptors analyzed by protease mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, S; LeMotte, P; Apfel, C

    1994-01-01

    The pleiotropic effects of retinoic acid on cell differentiation and proliferation are mediated by two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Recently the synthetic retinoid Ro 41-5253 was identified as a selective RAR alpha antagonist. As demonstrated by gel retardation assays, Ro 41-5253 and two related new RAR alpha antagonists do not influence RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimerization and DNA binding. In a limited trypsin digestion assay, complexation of RAR alpha with retinoic acid or several other agonistic retinoids altered the degradation of the receptor such that a 30-kDa proteolytic fragment became resistant to proteolysis. This suggests a ligand-induced conformational change, which may be necessary for the interaction of the DNA-bound RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimer with other transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that antagonists compete with agonists for binding to RAR alpha and may induce a different structural alteration, suggested by the tryptic resistance of a shorter 25-kDa protein fragment in the digestion assay. This RAR alpha conformation seems to allow RAR alpha/RXR alpha binding to DNA but not the subsequent transactivation of target genes. Protease mapping with C-terminally truncated receptors revealed that the proposed conformational changes mainly occur in the DE regions of RAR alpha. Complexation of RAR beta, RAR gamma, and RXR alpha, as well as the vitamin D3 receptor, with their natural ligands resulted in a similar resistance of fragments to proteolytic digestion. This could mean that ligand-induced conformational changes are a general feature in the hormonal activation of vitamin D3 and retinoid receptors. Images PMID:8264595

  8. Extraction and carrier-facilitated transport of amino acids using synthetic non-cyclic receptors through bulk liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pratibha; Joshi, Nidhi; Sharma, Uma

    2006-10-01

    The extraction and carrier-facilitated transport of amino acids (leucine, valine and glycine) was studied through chloroform bulk liquid membrane system using a series of non-cyclic receptors such as diethylene glycol (1), diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (2), diethylene glycol dibutyl ether (3), diethylene glycol dibenzoate (4), triethylene glycol (5) and tetraethylene glycol (6). The amount of amino acid extracted and transported depends mainly upon the structure and the concentration of the receptors and also on the concentration of amino acid. The receptors 1 to 4, having small chain length and flexible end groups, formed stable complexes with amino acids, and the flexibility of receptors in different conformational forms was responsible for their carrier ability, while the receptors 5 and 6, having larger chain length showed poor carrier ability. Hydrophobicity of amino acids also play an important role in the extraction as well as transport process. PMID:17133741

  9. Lower expression of sialic acid receptors in the cecum of silky fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson) compared to white leghorn.

    PubMed

    Han, Deping; Hu, Yanxin; Teng, Kedao; Deng, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    Avian influenza virus has received increasing attention in recent years because of the potential for recombination with the human virus. Distributions of sialic acid receptors on target cells are determinants of the susceptibilities of different species to influenza virus infection. In this study, the distribution of sialic acid receptors in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts of Silky Fowl and White Leghorn chickens were compared. The results showed that sialic acid-α-2,3-galactose receptors and sialic acid-α6-galactose receptors were both observed in Silky Fowl and White Leghorn, but fewer positive cells were detected in Silky Fowl with significant difference in the cecum. The lower abundance of sialic acid receptors likely results from the lower abundance of CD3 and F4/80 immune cells in the cecum of Silky Fowl. PMID:26976896

  10. Specificity of the Antibody Receptor Site to D-Lysergamide: Model of a Physiological Receptor for Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    PubMed Central

    Vunakis, Helen Van; Farrow, John T.; Gjika, Hilda B.; Levine, Lawrence

    1971-01-01

    Antibodies to D-lysergic acid have been produced in rabbits and guinea pigs and a radioimmunoassay for the hapten was developed. The specificity of this lysergamide-antilysergamide reaction was determined by competitive binding with unlabeled lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psychotomimetic drugs, neurotransmitters, and other compounds with diverse structures. LSD and several related ergot alkaloids were potent competitors, three to seven times more potent than lysergic acid itself. The N,N-dimethyl derivatives of several compounds, including tryptamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 4-hydroxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptamine, tyramine, and mescaline, were only about ten times less effective than lysergic acid, even though these compounds lack some of the ring systems of lysergic acid. The pattern of inhibition by related compounds with various substituents suggests that the antibody receptor site recognizes structural features resembling the LSD molecule. In particular, the aromatic nucleus and the dimethylated ethylamine side chain in phenylethylamine and tryptamine derivatives may assume in solution a conformation resembling ring A and the methylated nitrogen in ring C of LSD. Among the tryptamine derivatives, a large percentage of the most potent competitors are also psychotomimetic compounds. PMID:5283939

  11. Quail carry sialic acid receptors compatible with binding of avian and human influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Perez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that some terrestrial avian species may play a role in the genesis of influenza viruses with pandemic potential. In the present investigation, we examined whether quail, a widespread-farmed poultry, possess the proper characteristics for serving as an intermediate host for the zoonotic transmission of influenza viruses. Using a lectin-based staining based on specific agglutinins, we found that, in addition to the presence of sialic acid α2,3-galactose (SAα2,3-gal) linked receptors, there are abundant sialic acid α2,6-galactose (SAα2,6-gal) linked receptors in quail trachea and intestine. The presence of abundant SAα2,6-gal-linked receptors explains, at least in part, the circulation of avian influenza viruses with human-like receptor specificity in quail. In quail trachea, SAα2,3-gal linked receptors are present primarily in non-ciliated cells, while SAα2,6-gal linked receptors are localized predominantly on the surface of ciliated cells. In quail intestine, both types of receptors were found on epithelial cells as well as in crypts. In a solid-phase overlay binding assay, both avian and human influenza viruses bind to plasma membranes prepared from epithelial cells of quail trachea and intestine, strongly suggesting that these receptors are functional for binding of influenza viruses from different species. Together with previous observations, these results are consistent with the notion that quail could provide an environment for the spread of reassortants between avian and human influenza viruses, thus acting as a potential intermediate host. PMID:16325879

  12. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  13. Extraction of pyridines into fluorous solvents based on hydrogen bond complex formation with carboxylic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Geib, Steven; Weber, Stephen G

    2007-04-15

    A molecular receptor embedded in a 'poor-solvent' receiving phase, such as a fluorous phase, should offer the ideal medium for selective extraction and sensing. The limited solubility of most solutes in fluorous phases enhances selectivity by reducing the extraction of unwanted matrix components. Thus, receptor-doped fluorous phases may be ideal extraction media. Unfortunately, sufficient data do not exist to judge the capability of this approach. The solubilities of very few nonfluorous solutes are known. As far as we are aware, such important quantities as the strength of a hydrogen bond in a fluorous environment are not known. Thus, it is currently impossible to predict whether a particular receptor/solute complex based on a particular set of noncovalent interactions will provide enough thermodynamic stabilization to extract the solute into the fluorous phase. In this work, fluorous carboxylic acids (a carboxylic acid-terminated perfluoropolypropylene oxide called Krytox and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA)) were used as receptors and substituted pyridines as solutes to show that the fluorous receptor dramatically enhances the liquid-liquid extraction of the polar substrates from chloroform into perfluorohexanes. The method of continuous variations was used to determine the receptor-pyridine complex stoichiometry of 3:1. The free energies of formation of the 3:1 complexes from one pyridine and 3/2 H-bonded cyclic dimers of the fluorous carboxylic acid are -30.4 (Krytox) and -37.3 kJ mol-1 (PFDA). The free energy required to dissociate the dimer in perfluorohexanes is +16.5 kJ mol-1 (Krytox). The crystal structure of the complex showed a 1:1 stoichiometry with a mixed strong-weak hydrogen-bonded motif. Based on the stoichiometry, crystal structure, and UV and IR spectroscopic shifts, we propose that the 3:1 complex has four hydrogen bonds and the carboxylic acid transfers a proton to pyridine. The resulting pyridinium carboxylate N+H-O- hydrogen bond is accompanied

  14. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  15. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  16. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  17. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  18. Control of gastric acid secretion. Histamine H2-receptor antagonists and H+K(+)-ATPase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shamburek, R D; Schubert, M L

    1992-09-01

    Gastric acid secretion is regulated by an intricate interplay of neural (acetylcholine), hormonal (gastrin), and paracrine (histamine, somatostatin) mechanisms. Receptors for each of these agents and the signal transduction pathways to which these receptors are coupled have been identified on the parietal cell. The stimulatory effect of acetylcholine and gastrin is mediated by an increase in cytosolic calcium, whereas that of histamine is mediated by activation of adenylate cyclase and generation of cAMP. Strong potentiation between histamine and either gastrin or acetylcholine reflects postreceptor interaction between the distinct pathways as well as the ability of acetylcholine and gastrin to release histamine from mucosal ECL cells. The inhibitory effects of somatostatin on acid secretion are mediated by receptors coupled by guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. All the pathways converge on and modulate the activity of the luminal enzyme, H+K(+)-ATPase, the proton pump of the parietal cell. Precise information on the mechanisms involved in gastric acid secretion has led to the development of potent drugs capable of inhibiting acid secretion. These include competitive antagonists that interact with stimulatory receptors (e.g., histamine H2-receptor antagonists) as well as noncompetitive inhibitors of H+K(+)-ATPase (e.g., omeprazole). The histamine H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine, and nizatidine) continue as first-line therapy for peptic ulcer disease and are effective in preventing relapse. Although they are generally well tolerated, histamine H2-receptor antagonists may cause untoward CNS, cardiac, and endocrine effects as well as interference with the absorption, metabolism, and elimination of various drugs. Omeprazole is a weak base that reaches the parietal cell through the bloodstream, diffuses through the cytoplasm, and becomes activated and trapped as a sulfenamide in the acidic

  19. Bile acids inhibit duodenal secretin expression via orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP).

    PubMed

    Lam, Ian P Y; Lee, Leo T O; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Alpini, Gianfranco; Chow, Billy K C

    2009-07-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is an orphan nuclear receptor in which gene expression can be upregulated by bile acids. It regulates its target genes by repressing the transcriptional activities of other nuclear receptors including NeuroD, which has been shown to regulate secretin gene expression. Here, we evaluated the regulation on duodenal secretin gene expression by SHP and selected bile acids, cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). In vitro treatment of CDCA or fexaramine elevated the SHP transcript level and occupancy on secretin promoter. The increase in the SHP level, induced by bile acid treatment or overexpression, reduced secretin gene expression, whereas this gene inhibitory effect was reversed by silencing of endogenous SHP. In in vivo studies, double-immunofluorescence staining demonstrated the coexpression of secretin and SHP in mouse duodenum. Feeding mice with 1% CA-enriched rodent chow resulted in upregulation of SHP and a concomitant decrease in secretin transcript and protein levels in duodenum compared with the control group fed with normal chow. A diet enriched with 5% cholestyramine led to a decrease in SHP level and a corresponding increase in secretin expression. Overall, this study showed that bile acids via SHP inhibit duodenal secretin gene expression. Because secretin is a key hormone that stimulates bile flow in cholangiocytes, this pathway thus provides a novel means to modulate secretin-stimulated choleresis in response to intraduodenal bile acids. PMID:19372104

  20. The gep proto-oncogene Gα13 Mediates Lysophosphatidic acid-mediated Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jacob A; Ha, Ji Hee; Jayaraman, Muralidharan; Dhanasekaran, Danny N.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Tumor microenvironment, defined by a variety of growth factors including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), whose levels are increased in pancreatic cancer patients, plays a major role in the genesis and progression of pancreatic cancer. Since the gep proto-oncogenes, Gα12 and Gα13, are implicated in LPA-stimulated oncogenic signaling, this study is focused on evaluating the role of these proto-oncogenes in LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS Effect of LPA on the migration and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells was assessed using BxPC3, Dan-G, MDAPanc-28, Panc-1, and PaCa-2 cell-lines. The role of Gα13 in the migration of pancreatic cancer cells was interrogated by disrupting LPAR-Gα13 interaction using CT13, a dominant negative mutant of Gα13, and by silencing the expression of Gα13. RESULTS Results indicate that LPA stimulates the migration of pancreatic cancer cells and such LPA-stimulated migratory response is mediated by Gα13. Furthermore, the results establish that the silencing of Gα13, but not Gα12, abrogates LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. CONCLUSION These results report for the first time a critical role for Gα13 in LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. These findings identify LPA-LPAR-Gα13 signaling node as a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment and control. PMID:23508014

  1. Evidence for impaired retinoic acid receptor-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2 cofactor activity in human lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moghal, N; Neel, B G

    1995-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is required for normal airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. One of the earliest events following the exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to RA is the strong induction of RA receptor beta (RAR beta) mRNA. Previous work established that many lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors display abnormal RAR beta mRNA expression, most often absence or weak expression of the RAR beta 2 isoform, even after RA treatment. Restoration of RAR beta 2 into RAR beta-negative lung cancer cell lines has been reported to inhibit tumorigenicity. Since RAR beta 2 inactivation may contribute to lung cancer, we have investigated the molecular mechanism of defective RAR beta 2 expression. Nuclear run-on assays and transient transfections with RAR beta 2 promoter constructs indicate the presence of trans-acting transcriptional defects in most lung cancer cell lines, which map to the RA response element (RARE). These defects cannot be complemented by RAR-retinoid X receptor cotransfection and can be separated into two types: (i) one affecting transcription from direct repeat RAREs, but not palindromic RAREs, and (ii) another affecting transcription from both types of RARE. Studies using chimeras between RAR alpha, TR alpha, and other transcription factors suggest the existence of novel RAR-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2-specific cofactors, which are necessary for high levels of transcription. Furthermore, these factors may be frequently inactivated in human lung cancer. PMID:7791800

  2. Signaling through retinoic acid receptors in cardiac development: Doing the right things at the right times.

    PubMed

    Xavier-Neto, José; Sousa Costa, Ângela M; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; Amaral, Fabio Neves do; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinical and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signaling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signaling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signaling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signaling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signaling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development. PMID:25134739

  3. Detection of nucleic acid-nuclear hormone receptor complexes with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Bovet, Cédric; Rochel, Natacha; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Panagiotidis, Andreas; Nazabal, Alexis; Moras, Dino; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear receptors, such as the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) or the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR), interact not only with their ligands but also with other types of receptors and with DNA. Here, two complementary mass spectrometry (MS) methods were used to study the interactions between retinoic receptors (RXR/RAR) and DNA: non-denaturing nano-electrospray (nanoESI MS), and high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI MS) combined with chemical cross-linking. The RAR x RXR heterodimer was studied in the presence of a specific DNA sequence (DR5), and a specific RAR x RXR x DNA complex was detected with both MS techniques. RAR by itself showed no significant homodimerization. A complex between RAR and the double stranded DR5 was detected with nanoESI. After cross-linking, high-mass MALDI mass spectra showed that the RAR binds the single stranded DR5, and the RAR dimer binds both single and double stranded DR5. Moreover, the MALDI mass spectrum shows a larger RAR dimer signal in the presence of DNA. These results suggest that a gene-regulatory site on DNA can induce quaternary structural changes in a transcription factor such as RAR. PMID:20097575

  4. Retinoic acid affects the expression of nuclear retinoic acid receptors in tissues of retinol-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Haq, R; Pfahl, M; Chytil, F

    1991-01-01

    The multitude of biological effects of the vitamin A metabolite, retinoic acid, are mediated by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which are members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. RAR-alpha, -beta, and -gamma are encoded by three genes from which multiple isoforms can be generated. Recent studies suggest that the expression of at least some RAR isoforms can be regulated by retinoic acid in certain cell lines. Here we examined regulation of RAR expression in the adult animal. RARs were analyzed by Northern blots from lung, liver, and testes of retinol-deficient rats. Retinol deficiency caused a 65-70% decrease in the mRNA levels of lung and liver RAR-beta, whereas no change was observed in RAR-alpha and -gamma mRNA levels in these organs. In the testes of retinol-deficient animals, two transcripts, RAR-alpha 1 (3.7 kb) and RAR-alpha 2 (2.8 kb), were detected as compared with one RAR-alpha 1 (3.7 kb) transcript in retinol-sufficient testes. When retinol-deficient rats were orally administered 1 dose of retinoic acid (100 micrograms per rat), lung RAR-beta mRNA levels started to increase after 1 hr and reached a 16-fold higher level after 4 hr; after 4 hr these retinoic acid-fed rats also showed a 7-fold increase in liver RAR-beta mRNA levels as compared with levels in the retinol-deficient rats. In contrast, liver, lung, and testes RAR-alpha transcripts remained either unchanged or showed only a slight increase in response to retinoic acid. RAR-gamma was constitutively expressed in lung, and its mRNA levels were induced 2-fold by retinoic acid. These results show tissue diversity in the rapid induction of RAR-beta and RAR-gamma by retinoic acid in the adult animal and suggest distinct roles for the various receptor isoforms in the control of the retinoid response. Images PMID:1654565

  5. Guanidino acids act as rho1 GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, Mary; Gavande, Navnath; Wong, Kit Yee; Park, Anna; Premoli, Isabella; Mewett, Kenneth N; Allan, Robin D; Duke, Rujee K; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2009-10-01

    GABA(C) receptors play a role in myopia, memory-related disorders and circadian rhythms signifying a need to develop potent and selective agents for this class of receptors. Guanidino analogs related to glycine, beta-alanine and taurine were evaluated at human rho(1)GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using 2-electrode voltage clamp methods. Of the 12 analogs tested, 8 analogs were active as antagonists and the remaining were inactive. (S)-2-guanidinopropionic acid (IC(50) = 2.2 microM) and guanidinoacetic acid (IC(50) = 5.4 microM; K (B) = 7.75 microM [pK (B) = 5.11 +/- 0.06]) were the most potent being competitive antagonists at this receptor. In contrast, the beta-alanine and GABA guanidino analogs showed reduced activity, indicating the distance between the carboxyl carbon and terminal nitrogen of the guanidino group is critical for activity. Substituting the C2-position of guanidinoacetic acid with various alkyl groups reduced activity indicating that steric effects may impact on activity. The results of this study contribute to the structure-activity-relationship profile required in developing novel therapeutic agents. PMID:19387831

  6. Metabolism meets immunity: The role of free fatty acid receptors in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-08-15

    There are significant numbers of nutrient sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be found in cells of the immune system and in tissues that are involved in metabolic function, such as the pancreas or the intestinal epithelium. The family of free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1-4, GPR84), plus a few other metabolite sensing receptors (GPR109A, GPR91, GPR35) have been for this reason the focus of studies linking the effects of nutrients with immunological responses. A number of the beneficial anti-inflammatory effects credited to dietary fats such as omega-3 fatty acids are attributed to their actions on FFAR4.This might play an important protective role in the development of obesity, insulin resistance or asthma. The role of the short-chain fatty acids resulting from fermentation of fibre by the intestinal microbiota in regulating acute inflammatory responses is also discussed. Finally we assess the therapeutic potential of this family of receptors to treat pathologies where inflammation is a major factor such as type 2 diabetes, whether by the use of novel synthetic molecules or by the modulation of the individual's diet. PMID:27002183

  7. Computer-aided design of a novel ligand for retinoic acid receptor in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos H. T. P.; Leopoldino, Andreia M.; Silva, Eloiza H. T.; Espinoza, V. A. A.; Taft, C. A.

    The isotypes of RAR and RXR are retinoic acid and retinoid X acid receptors, respectively, whose ligand-binding domain contains the ligand-dependent activation function, with distinct pharmacological targets for retinoids, involved in the treatment of various cancers and skin diseases. Due to the major challenge which cancer treatment and cure still imposes after many decades to the international scientific community, there is actually considerable interest in new ligands with increased bioactivity. We have focused on the retinoid acid receptor, which is considered an interesting target for drug design. In this work, we carried out density functional geometry optimizations and different docking procedures. We performed screening in a large database (hundreds of thousands of molecules which we optimized at the AM1 level) yielding a set of potential bioactive ligands. A new ligand was selected and optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. A flexible docking program was used to investigate the interactions between the receptor and the new ligand. The result of this work is compared with several crystallographic ligands of RAR. Our theoretically more bioactive new ligand indicates stronger and more hydrogen bonds as well as hydrophobic interactions with the receptor.

  8. Dynamic changes of excitatory amino acid receptors in the rat hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Westerberg, E.; Monaghan, D.T.; Kalimo, H.; Cotman, C.W.; Wieloch, T.W.

    1989-03-01

    The changes in excitatory amino acid receptor ligand binding induced by transient cerebral ischemia were studied in the rat hippocampal subfields. Ten minutes of ischemia was induced by common carotid artery occlusion combined with hypotension, and the animals were allowed variable periods of recovery ranging from 1 day to 4 weeks. The binding of 3H-AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) to quisqualate receptors, 3H-kainic acid (KA) to kainate receptors, and 3H-glutamate to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors as determined by quantitative autoradiography. One week following ischemia the CA1 region of the hippocampus displayed a severe (90%) dendrosomatic lesion with preservation of presynaptic terminals. This was associated with a 60% decrease in AMPA binding and a 25% decrease in glutamate binding to NMDA receptors. At 4 weeks postischemia, both AMPA and NMDA sites were greatly reduced. Although the dentate gyrus granule cells are resistant to an ischemic insult of this magnitude, this region showed marked changes in receptor binding. One week following ischemia, the AMPA and NMDA binding decreased by approximately 40 and 20%, respectively. Following 2 weeks of recovery, the NMDA binding was not significantly different from control level, while the AMPA binding remained depressed up to 4 weeks postischemia. The high density of KA binding sites in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus was unaffected by the ischemic insult, despite an extensive degeneration of cells in the hilus of dentate gyrus which projects glutamatergic afferents to this area.

  9. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Binding by a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    J Fleming; J Wojciak; M Campbell; T Huxford

    2011-12-31

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a common product of glycerophospholipid metabolism and an important mediator of signal transduction. Aberrantly high LPA concentrations accompany multiple disease states. One potential approach for treatment of these diseases, therefore, is the therapeutic application of antibodies that recognize and bind LPA as their antigen. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of an anti-LPA antibody (LT3015) Fab fragment in its antigen-free form to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution and in complex with two LPA isotypes (14:0 and 18:2) to resolutions of 1.98 and 2.51 {angstrom}, respectively. The variable CDR (complementarity-determining region) loops at the antigen binding site adopt nearly identical conformations in the free and antigen-bound crystal structures. The crystallographic models reveal that the LT3015 antibody employs both heavy- and light-chain CDR loops to create a network of eight hydrogen bonds with the glycerophosphate head group of its LPA antigen. The head group is almost completely excluded from contact with solvent, while the hydrocarbon tail is partially solvent-exposed. In general, mutation of amino acid residues at the antigen binding site disrupts LPA binding. However, the introduction of particular mutations chosen strategically on the basis of the structures can positively influence LPA binding affinity. Finally, these structures elucidate the exquisite specificity demonstrated by an anti-lipid antibody for binding a structurally simple and seemingly unconstrained target molecule.

  10. QSAR studies on benzodiazepine receptor binding of purines and amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saha, R N; Meera, J; Agrawal, N; Gupta, S P

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies are reported on the benzodiazepine receptor binding of a series of substituted 9-benzyl-6-dimethylamino-9H-purines and N-(indol-3-ylglyoxylyl)amino acid derivatives. The nitrogen of the five membered heterocyclic ring and the polar substituent in the aromatic ring, present in both series of compounds, form important centres in the binding interaction. We conclude that the receptor must possess a strong nucleophilic centre and a polar site, and that a hydrophobic pocket exists to accommodate hydrophobic moieties. PMID:1654919

  11. Consequences of a subtle sialic acid modification on the murine polyomavirus receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M; von der Lieth, C W; Stehling, P; Reutter, W; Pawlita, M

    1997-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are small, nonenveloped DNA tumor viruses with restricted host ranges. Virus binding to cell surface receptors is one determinant of viral tropism. Although murine polyomavirus is among the best characterized viruses, little is known about the sialic acid-containing receptor and its interaction with viral particles. By using nonradioactive virus binding assays as recently described for the B-lymphotropic papovavirus, murine polyomavirus particles were found to bind in a saturable and noncooperative manner to 25,000 receptors per 3T6 mouse fibroblast. The virus-receptor interaction at 4 degrees C was of high affinity (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-11) M), very fast (k1 = 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)), and stable (half-life = 38 min). Elongation of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid by biosynthetic modulation with synthetic precursor analogs has been shown for other polyomaviruses to influence both sialic acid-dependent binding and infection (O. T. Keppler, P. Stehling, M. Herrmann, H. Kayser, D. Grunow, W. Reutter, and M. Pawlita, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1308-1314, 1995). In 3T6 cells in which about one-third of the sialic acids were modified, infection and binding of polyomavirus particles were significantly reduced. The number of receptors per cell was decreased to 18,000, with the remaining receptors displaying the same affinity as in untreated cells. Molecular modeling studies based on the three-dimensional structure of a mouse polyomavirus-sialyllactose complex recently solved by T. Stehle and coworkers (T. Stehle, Y. W. Yan, T. L. Benjamin, and S. C. Harrison, Nature 369:160-163, 1994) were performed. They suggest that the elongation of the N-acyl side chain by a single methylene group leads to steric hinderence, with the peptide backbone of a loop walling the tip of the shallow sialic acid binding groove. This collision appears to be incompatible with functional binding. The data are taken as a basis to discuss possible features of the organization and topology of

  12. Nuclear receptors, bile acids and cholesterol homeostasis series - bile acids and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Papacleovoulou, Georgia; Williamson, Catherine

    2013-04-10

    Bile acids have been traditionally thought of as having an important role in fat emulsification. It is now emerging that they act as important signalling molecules that not only autoregulate their own synthesis but also influence lipid and glucose metabolism. Although, the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of bile acid homeostasis have been well characterised in normal physiology, the impact of pregnancy on bile acid regulation is still poorly understood. This review summarises the main regulatory mechanisms underlying bile acid homeostasis and discusses how pregnancy, a unique physiological state, can modify them. The fetoplacental adaptations that protect against fetal bile acid toxicity are reviewed. We highlight the importance of bile acid regulation during gestation by discussing the liver disease of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and how genetic, endocrine and environmental factors contribute to the disease aetiology at a cellular and molecular level. PMID:23159988

  13. Identification of a Binding Site for Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nurr1.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Giri, Pankaj K; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Brust, Richard; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Shang, Jinsai; Campbell, Sean; Wilson, Henry D; Granados, Juan; Gardner, William J; Creamer, Trevor P; Solt, Laura A; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2016-07-15

    Nurr1/NR4A2 is an orphan nuclear receptor, and currently there are no known natural ligands that bind Nurr1. A recent metabolomics study identified unsaturated fatty acids, including arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that interact with the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a related orphan receptor, Nur77/NR4A1. However, the binding location and whether these ligands bind other NR4A receptors were not defined. Here, we show that unsaturated fatty acids also interact with the Nurr1 LBD, and solution NMR spectroscopy reveals the binding epitope of DHA at its putative ligand-binding pocket. Biochemical assays reveal that DHA-bound Nurr1 interacts with high affinity with a peptide derived from PIASγ, a protein that interacts with Nurr1 in cellular extracts, and DHA also affects cellular Nurr1 transactivation. This work is the first structural report of a natural ligand binding to a canonical NR4A ligand-binding pocket and indicates a natural ligand can bind and affect Nurr1 function. PMID:27128111

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and retinoic acid receptors differentially control the interactions of retinoid X receptor heterodimers with ligands, coactivators, and corepressors.

    PubMed Central

    DiRenzo, J; Söderstrom, M; Kurokawa, R; Ogliastro, M H; Ricote, M; Ingrey, S; Hörlein, A; Rosenfeld, M G; Glass, C K

    1997-01-01

    As the obligate member of most nuclear receptor heterodimers, retinoid X receptors (RXRs) can potentially perform two functions: cooperative binding to hormone response elements and coordinate regulation of target genes by RXR ligands. In this paper we describe allosteric interactions between RXR and two heterodimeric partners, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs); RARs and PPARs prevent and permit activation by RXR-specific ligands, respectively. By competing for dimerization with RXR on response elements consisting of direct-repeat half-sites spaced by 1 bp (DR1 elements), the relative abundance of RAR and PPAR determines whether the RXR signaling pathway will be functional. In contrast to RAR, which prevents the binding of RXR ligands and recruits the nuclear receptor corepressor N-CoR, PPAR permits the binding of SRC-1 in response to both RXR and PPAR ligands. Overexpression of SRC-1 markedly potentiates ligand-dependent transcription by PPARgamma, suggesting that SRC-1 serves as a coactivator in vivo. Remarkably, the ability of RAR to both block the binding of ligands to RXR and interact with corepressors requires the CoR box, a structural motif residing in the N-terminal region of the RAR ligand binding domain. Mutations in the CoR box convert RAR from a nonpermissive to a permissive partner of RXR signaling on DR1 elements. We suggest that the differential recruitment of coactivators and corepressors by RAR-RXR and PPAR-RXR heterodimers provides the basis for a transcriptional switch that may be important in controlling complex programs of gene expression, such as adipocyte differentiation. PMID:9121466

  15. Spontaneous curvature of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Chupin, Vladimir; Fuller, Nola L; Kozlov, Michael M; de Kruijff, Ben; Burger, Koert N J; Rand, Peter R

    2005-02-15

    The formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) from lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), diacylglycerol, or phosphatidylcholine plays a key role in the regulation of intracellular membrane fission events, but the underlying molecular mechanism has not been resolved. A likely possibility is that PA affects local membrane curvature facilitating membrane bending and fission. To examine this possibility, we determined the spontaneous radius of curvature (R(0p)) of PA and LPA, carrying oleoyl fatty acids, using well-established X-ray diffraction methods. We found that, under physiological conditions of pH and salt concentration (pH 7.0, 150 mM NaCl), the R(0p) values of PA and LPA were -46 A and +20 A, respectively. Thus PA has considerable negative spontaneous curvature while LPA has the most positive spontaneous curvature of any membrane lipid measured to date. The further addition of Ca(2+) did not significantly affect lipid spontaneous curvature; however, omitting NaCl from the hydration buffer greatly reduced the spontaneous curvature of PA, turning it into a cylindrically shaped lipid molecule (R(0p) of -1.3 x 10(2) A). Our quantitative data on the spontaneous radius of curvature of PA and LPA at a physiological pH and salt concentration will be instrumental in developing future models of biomembrane fission. PMID:15697235

  16. Mercaptoacetate blocks fatty acid-induced GLP-1 secretion in male rats by directly antagonizing GPR40 fatty acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Dinh, Thu T; Simasko, Steve M; Ritter, Sue

    2016-04-15

    Mercaptoacetate (MA) is an orexigenic agent reported to block fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Recently, however, we reported evidence from isolated nodose ganglion neurons that MA antagonizes the G protein-coupled long- and medium-chain FA receptor GPR40. GPR40 mediates FA-induced secretion of the satietogenic incretin peptide glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), by enteroendocrine L cells, as well as FA-induced enhancement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our results in cultured nodose neurons suggest that MA would also block GPR40 in enteroendocrine cells controlling GLP-1 secretion. If so, this would suggest an alternative mechanism by which MA increases food intake. We tested the hypothesis that MA blocks FA-induced GLP-1 secretion in vitro using cultured STC-1 cells (a murine enteroendocrine cell line) and in vivo in adult male rats. In vitro, MA blocked the increase in both cytosolic Ca(2+)and GLP-1 release stimulated by FAs and also reduced (but less effectively) the response of STC-1 cells to grifolic acid, a partial agonist of the GPR120 FA receptor. In vivo, MA reduced GLP-1 secretion following olive oil gavage while also increasing glucose and decreasing insulin levels. The carnitine palmatoyltransferase 1 antagonist etomoxir did not alter these responses. Results indicate that MA's actions, including its orexigenic effect, are mediated by GPR40 (and possibly GPR120) receptor antagonism and not by blockade of fat oxidation, as previously believed. Analysis of MA's interaction with GPR40 may facilitate understanding of the multiple functions of this receptor and the manner in which FAs participate in the control of hunger and satiety. PMID:26791830

  17. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RARβ, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  18. OX1 orexin/hypocretin receptor signaling through arachidonic acid and endocannabinoid release.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Pauli M; Jäntti, Maria H; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2012-08-01

    We showed previously that OX(1) orexin receptor stimulation produced a strong (3)H overflow response from [(3)H]arachidonic acid (AA)-labeled cells. Here we addressed this issue with a novel set of tools and methods, to distinguish the enzyme pathways responsible for this response. CHO-K1 cells heterologously expressing human OX(1) receptors were used as a model system. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors, we showed that, in orexin-A-stimulated cells, the AA-derived radioactivity was released as two distinct components, i.e., free AA and the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG). Two orexin-activated enzymatic cascades are responsible for this response: cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) and diacylglycerol lipase; the former cascade is responsible for part of the AA release, whereas the latter is responsible for all of the 2-AG release and part of the AA release. Essentially only diacylglycerol released by phospholipase C but not by phospholipase D was implicated as a substrate for 2-AG production, although both phospholipases were strongly activated. The 2-AG released acted as a potent paracrine messenger through cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in an artificial cell-cell communication assay that was developed. The cPLA(2) cascade, in contrast, was involved in the activation of orexin receptor-operated Ca(2+) influx. 2-AG was also released upon OX(1) receptor stimulation in recombinant HEK-293 and neuro-2a cells. The results directly show, for the first time, that orexin receptors are able to generate potent endocannabinoid signals in addition to arachidonic acid signals, which may explain the proposed orexin-cannabinoid interactions (e.g., in neurons). PMID:22550093

  19. Retinoids increase human apolipoprotein A-11 expression through activation of the retinoid X receptor but not the retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Vu-Dac, N; Schoonjans, K; Kosykh, V; Dallongeville, J; Heyman, R A; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    Considering the link between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and a protective effect against coronary artery disease as well as the suggested beneficial effects of retinoids on the production of the major HDL apolipoprotein (apo), apo A-I, the goal of this study was to analyze the influence of retinoids on the expression of apo A-II, the other major HDL protein. Retinoic acid (RA) derivatives have a direct effect on hepatic apo A-II production, since all-trans (at) RA induces apo A-II mRNA levels and apo A-II secretion in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. In the HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cell line, both at-RA and 9-cis RA as well as the retinoid X receptor (RXR)-specific agonist LGD 1069, but not the RA receptor (RAR) agonist ethyl-p-[(E)-2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthyl)-l-pro penyl]-benzoic acid (TTNPB), induce apo A-II mRNA levels. Transient-transfection experiments with a reporter construct driven by the human apo A-II gene promoter indicated that 9-cis RA and at-RA, as well as the RXR agonists LGD 1069 and LG 100268, induced apo A-II gene expression at the transcriptional level. Only minimal effects of the RAR agonist TTNPB were observed on the apo A-II promoter reporter construct. Unilateral deletions and site-directed mutagenesis identified the J site of the apo A-II promoter mediating the responsiveness to RA. This element contains two imperfect half-sites spaced by 1 oligonucleotide. Cotransfection assays in combination with the use of RXR or RAR agonists showed that RXR but not RAR transactivates the apo A-II promoter through this element. By contrast, RAR inhibits the inductive effects of RXR on the apo A-II J site in a dose-dependent fashion. Gel retardation assays demonstrated that RXR homodimers bind, although with a lower affinity than RAR-RXR heterodimers, to the AH-RXR response element. In conclusion, retinoids induce hepatic apo A-II production at the transcriptional level via the interaction of

  20. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  1. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-03-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  2. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signalling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signalling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signalling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signalling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. PMID:25134739

  3. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  4. Co-detection of PTH/PTHrP receptor and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Gay, Carol V; Zheng, Betty; Gilman, Virginia R

    2003-08-01

    Serial sections of rat metaphyses were prepared from paraffin embedded tissue blocks and analyzed in sets of three. The central section was stained for tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in order to identify osteoclasts, one adjacent section was immunostained with an affinity purified antibody to a 15 amino acid sequence unique to rat PTH/PTHrP receptor, and the other adjacent section in the set served as an immunostaining control. This allowed each of the 110 osteoclasts examined to be identified by TRAP and to be tested for the presence or absence of PTH/PTHrP receptor. All antibody solutions and rinses contained 1% donkey serum and 0.5% Tween 20 to ensure antibody integrity and good rinsing procedure. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate fluorescence intensity of the immunostained osteoclasts. Pixel intensities of 58 osteoclasts from young (4 month) rats and 52 osteoclasts from old (15 month) rats were obtained. Pixel intensities were similar (P = 0.89) for both young and old animals. However, the number of PTH/PTHrP receptor deficient osteoclasts was greater for the older animals (14.29% vs. 7.24%). This provides direct evidence of PTH/PTHrP receptors in osteoclasts. PMID:12874824

  5. The myeloperoxidase product hypochlorous acid generates irreversible high-density lipoprotein receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Veronika; Ljubojevic, Senka; Haybaeck, Johannes; Holzer, Michael; El-Gamal, Dalia; Schicho, Rudolf; Pieske, Burkert; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been described in several chronic inflammatory diseases, like chronic renal insufficiency, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Recent findings revealed that AOPPs are inhibitors of the major high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, scavenger receptor class B, type 1 (SR-BI). Here we investigated what oxidation induced structural alterations convert plasma albumin into an HDL-receptor inhibitor. Approach and Results Exposure of albumin to the physiological oxidant, hypochlorous acid, generated high affinity SR-BI ligands. Protection of albumin lysine-residues prior exposure to hypochlorous acid as well as regeneration of N-chloramines after oxidation of albumin completely prevented binding of oxidized albumin to SR-BI, indicating that modification of albumin lysine-residues is required to generate SR-BI ligands. Of particular interest, N-chloramines within oxidized albumin promoted irreversible binding to SR-BI, resulting in permanent receptor blockade. We observed that the SR-BI inhibitory activity of albumin isolated from chronic kidney disease patients correlated with the content of the myeloperoxidase-specific oxidation product 3-chlorotyrosine and was associated with alterations in the composition of HDL. Conclusion Given that several potential atheroprotective activities of HDL are mediated by SR-BI, the present results raise the possibility that oxidized plasma albumin, through permanent SR-BI blockade, contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23493288

  6. Conjugated bile acids activate the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in primary rodent hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Studer, Elaine; Zhou, Xiqiao; Zhao, Renping; Wang, Yun; Takabe, Kazuaki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Pandak, William M; Dent, Paul; Spiegel, Sarah; Shi, Ruihua; Xu, Weiren; Liu, Xuyuan; Bohdan, Pat; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Huiping; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids have been shown to be important regulatory molecules for cells in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. They can activate various cell signaling pathways including extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) membrane-type bile acid receptor (TGR5/M-BAR). Activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways by conjugated bile acids has been reported to be sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX) and dominant-negative Gα(i) in primary rodent hepatocytes. However, the GPCRs responsible for activation of these pathways have not been identified. Screening GPCRs in the lipid-activated phylogenetic family (expressed in HEK293 cells) identified sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P(2) ) as being activated by taurocholate (TCA). TCA, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), and S1P-induced activation of ERK1/2 and AKT were significantly inhibited by JTE-013, a S1P(2) antagonist, in primary rat hepatocytes. JTE-013 significantly inhibited hepatic ERK1/2 and AKT activation as well as short heterodimeric partner (SHP) mRNA induction by TCA in the chronic bile fistula rat. Knockdown of the expression of S1P(2) by a recombinant lentivirus encoding S1P(2) shRNA markedly inhibited the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT by TCA and S1P in rat primary hepatocytes. Primary hepatocytes prepared from S1P(2) knock out (S1P(2) (-/-) ) mice were significantly blunted in the activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways by TCA. Structural modeling of the S1P receptors indicated that only S1P(2) can accommodate TCA binding. In summary, all these data support the hypothesis that conjugated bile acids activate the ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways primarily through S1P(2) in primary rodent hepatocytes. PMID:21932398

  7. The evolution of bat nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Zepeda-Mendoza, M Lisandra; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid-sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is overall congruent with the species tree, consistent with the evolution of many other mammalian nuclear genes. However, the chiropteran TLRs exhibited unique mutations fixed in ligand-binding sites, some of which involved nonconservative amino acid changes and/or targets of positive selection. Such changes could potentially modify protein function and ligand-binding properties, as some changes were predicted to alter nucleic acid binding motifs in TLR 9. Moreover, evidence for episodic diversifying selection acting specifically upon the bat lineage and sublineages was detected. Thus, the long-term adaptation of chiropterans to a wide variety of environments and ecological niches with different pathogen profiles is likely to have shaped the evolution of the bat TLRs in an order-specific manner. The observed evolutionary patterns provide evidence for potential functional differences between bat and other mammalian TLRs in terms of resistance to specific pathogens or recognition of nucleic acids in general. PMID:26503258

  8. The fate of P2Y-related orphan receptors: GPR80/99 and GPR91 are receptors of dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Nathalie Suarez; Communi, Didier; Hannedouche, Sébastien; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Several orphan G protein-coupled receptors are structurally close to the family of P2Y nucleotide receptors: GPR80/99 and GPR91 are close to P2Y(1/2/4/6/11) receptors, whereas GPR87, H963 and GPR34 are close to P2Y(12/13/14). Over the years, several laboratories have attempted without success to identify the ligands of those receptors. In early 2004, two papers have been published: One claiming that GPR80/99 is an AMP receptor, called P2Y(15), and the other one showing that GPR80/99 is a receptor for alpha-ketoglutarate, while GPR91 is a succinate receptor. The accompanying paper by Qi et al. entirely supports that GPR80/99 is an alpha-ketoglutarate receptor and not an AMP receptor. The closeness of dicarboxylic acid and P2Y nucleotide receptors might be linked to the negative charges of both types of ligands and the involvement of conserved Arg residues in their neutralization. PMID:18404396

  9. A substantial fraction of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) low phytic acid mutations have little or no effect on yield across diverse production environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential benefits of the low phytic acid (lpa) seed trait for human and animal nutrition, and for phosphorus management in non-ruminant animal production, are well documented. However, in many cases the lpa trait is associated with impaired seed or plant performance, resulting in reduced yield....

  10. Bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Eric; Li, Yunzhou; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping

    2015-03-01

    The liver is the central organ involved in lipid metabolism. Dyslipidemia and its related disorders, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), obesity and other metabolic diseases, are of increasing public health concern due to their increasing prevalence in the population. Besides their well-characterized functions in cholesterol homoeostasis and nutrient absorption, bile acids are also important metabolic regulators and function as signaling hormones by activating specific nuclear receptors, G-protein coupled receptors, and multiple signaling pathways. Recent studies identified a new signaling pathway by which conjugated bile acids (CBA) activate the extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway via sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2). CBA-induced activation of S1PR2 is a key regulator of sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2) and hepatic gene expression. This review focuses on recent findings related to the role of bile acids/S1PR2-mediated signaling pathways in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26579441

  11. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  12. Agrochemical control of plant water use using engineered abscisic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Youl; Peterson, Francis C; Mosquna, Assaf; Yao, Jin; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R

    2015-04-23

    Rising temperatures and lessening fresh water supplies are threatening agricultural productivity and have motivated efforts to improve plant water use and drought tolerance. During water deficit, plants produce elevated levels of abscisic acid (ABA), which improves water consumption and stress tolerance by controlling guard cell aperture and other protective responses. One attractive strategy for controlling water use is to develop compounds that activate ABA receptors, but agonists approved for use have yet to be developed. In principle, an engineered ABA receptor that can be activated by an existing agrochemical could achieve this goal. Here we describe a variant of the ABA receptor PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE 1 (PYR1) that possesses nanomolar sensitivity to the agrochemical mandipropamid and demonstrate its efficacy for controlling ABA responses and drought tolerance in transgenic plants. Furthermore, crystallographic studies provide a mechanistic basis for its activity and demonstrate the relative ease with which the PYR1 ligand-binding pocket can be altered to accommodate new ligands. Thus, we have successfully repurposed an agrochemical for a new application using receptor engineering. We anticipate that this strategy will be applied to other plant receptors and represents a new avenue for crop improvement. PMID:25652827

  13. Aldose Reductase acts as a Selective Derepressor of PPARγ and Retinoic Acid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Devi; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Zhang, Jinghua; O’Shea, Karen M.; Quadri, Nosirudeen; Li, Qing; Sas, Kelli; Jing, Xiao; Rosario, Rosa; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Summary Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a chromatin modifying enzyme, requires association with the deacetylase containing domain (DAD) of the nuclear receptor co-repressors NCOR1 and SMRT for its stability and activity. Here we show that aldose reductase (AR), the rate-limiting enzyme of the polyol pathway, competes with HDAC3 to bind the NCOR1/SMRT DAD. Increased AR expression leads to HDAC3 degradation followed by increased PPARγ signaling resulting in lipid accumulation in the heart. AR also downregulates expression of nuclear corepressor complex cofactors including Gps2 and Tblr1, thus affecting activity of the nuclear corepressor complex itself. Though AR reduces HDAC3-corepressor complex formation, it specifically de-represses the retinoic acid receptor (RAR), but not other nuclear receptors such as the thyroid receptor (TR) and liver X receptor (LXR). In summary, this work defines a distinct role for AR in lipid and retinoid metabolism through HDAC3 regulation and consequent de-repression of PPARγ and RAR. PMID:27052179

  14. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors. PMID:27523384

  15. Molecular size of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor purified from mammalian cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mamalaki, C; Barnard, E A; Stephenson, F A

    1989-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of both the soluble and purified gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor of bovine or rat cerebral cortex has been investigated in solution in Triton X-100 or in 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulphonate (CHAPS). In all the hydrodynamic separations made, it was found that the binding activities for GABA, benzodiazepine, and (where detectable) t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate comigrated. Conditions were established for gel exclusion chromatography and for sucrose density gradient velocity sedimentation that maintain the GABAA receptor in a nonaggregated form. Using these conditions, the molecular weight of the bovine GABAA receptor in the above-mentioned detergents was calculated using the H2O/2H2O method. A value of Mr 230,000-240,000 was calculated for the bovine pure GABAA receptor purified in sodium deoxycholate/Triton X-100 media. A value of Mr 284,000-290,000 was calculated for the nonaggregated bovine or rat cortex receptor in CHAPS, but the Stokes radius is smaller in the latter than in the former medium and the detergent binding in CHAPS is underestimated. Thus the deduced Mr, 240,000, is the best estimate by this method. PMID:2535707

  16. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    PubMed Central

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation. PMID:26567894

  17. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation.

  18. Changes in HDL-cholesterol and lipoprotein Lp(a) after 6-month treatment with finasteride in males affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Denti, L; Pasolini, G; Cortellini, P; Sanfelici, L; Benedetti, R; Cecchetti, A; Ferretti, S; Bruschieri, L; Ablondi, F; Valenti, G

    2000-09-01

    Androgen effects on lipoproteins, mainly high density lipoprotein (HDL), could be exerted by a direct interaction of testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) with liver androgen receptors. To assess if T needs to be converted into DHT to affect lipid metabolism, 13 patients were studied, affected with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and treated with an inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase (finasteride). They were compared with 15 untreated controls. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of therapy, each patient was evaluated as for lipoprotein and hormone concentrations, as well as for nutritional status. Body composition was assessed by anthropometry and bio-impedance analysis (BIA). Treatment was associated with a significant increase of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), mainly HDL3 subclass, and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), as well as a decline of DHT, whereas no significant changes were apparent for T, estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding hormone (SHBG) and body composition indexes. However, no significant associations between DHT and lipid relative changes were apparent at bivariate correlation analysis. This finding was confirmed by comparing patient subsets identified by cluster analysis, according to HDL subclass individual responses. Rather, a slight association with E2 for HDL2 (positive) and HDL3 (negative) was found. In conclusion, finasteride can modify HDL and Lp(a) concentrations. However, by the data, these effects cannot be definitively attributed to the changes in DHT synthesis induced by finasteride, since a direct and non-specific interference of the drug on liver metabolism cannot be excluded. PMID:10996351

  19. Monitoring of the retinoic acid receptor-retinoid X receptor dimerization upon DNA binding by native mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huynh, Nha-Thi; Osz, Judit; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Rochel, Natacha; Potier, Noëlle; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    Identifying protein-DNA interactions is essential to understand the regulatory networks of cells and their influence on gene expression. In this study, we use native electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to investigate how the heterodimerization of retinoic acid receptor-retinoid X receptor (RAR-RXR) is mediated by DNA sequence. In presence of various RAR response elements (RAREs), three oligomeric states of RAR-RXR DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to RAREs (monomer, homo- or heterodimers) were detected and individually monitored to follow subunit assembly and disassembly upon RAREs' abundancy or sequence. In particular, a cooperative heterodimerization was shown with RARb2 DR5 (5 base pair spaced direct repeat) while a high heterogeneity reflecting random complex formation could be observed with the DR0 response elements, in agreement with native gel electrophoresis data or molecular modeling. Such MS information will help to identify the composition of species formed in solution and to define which DR sequence is specific for RAR-RXR heterodimerization. PMID:26558701

  20. Bile acid promotes liver regeneration via farnesoid X receptor signaling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Long; Yang, Yu; Qu, Yikun; Yang, Ting; Wang, Kaifeng; Liu, Weixin; Xia, Weibin

    2015-06-01

    Bile acids, which are synthesized from cholesterol in the hepatocytes of the liver, are amphipathic molecules with a steroid backbone. Studies have shown that bile acid exhibits important effects on liver regeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of bile acid and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) on hepatic regeneration and lipid metabolism. Rats were fed with 0.2% bile acid or glucose for 7 days and then subjected to a 50 or 70% hepatectomy. Hepatic regeneration rate, serum and liver levels of bile acid, and expression of FXR and Caveolin‑1, were detected at 24, 48 or 72 h following hepatectomy. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the liver was measured using immunohistochemistry at the end of the study. Hepatocytes isolated from rats were treated with bile acid, glucose, FXR agonist and FXR antagonist, separately or in combination. Lipid metabolism, the expression of members of the FXR signaling pathway and energy metabolism‑related factors were measured using ELISA kits or western blotting. Bile acid significantly increased the hepatic regeneration rate and the expression of FXR, Caveolin‑1 and PCNA. Levels of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein were increased in bile acid‑ or FXR agonist‑treated hepatocytes in vitro. Levels of triglyceride, low density lipoprotein and free fatty acid were decreased. In addition, bile acid and FXR agonists increased the expression of bile salt export pump and small heterodimer partner, and downregulated the expression of apical sodium‑dependent bile acid transporter, Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and cholesterol 7α‑hydroxylase. These results suggested that physiological concentrations of bile acid may promote liver regeneration via FXR signaling pathways, and may be associated with energy metabolism. PMID:25634785

  1. PTH1 Receptor Is Involved in Mediating Cellular Response to Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2012-01-01

    The molecular pathways by which long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) influence skeletal health remain elusive. Both LCPUFA and parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor (PTH1R) are known to be involved in bone metabolism while any direct link between the two is yet to be established. Here we report that LCPUFA are capable of direct, PTH1R dependent activation of extracellular ligand-regulated kinases (ERK). From a wide range of fatty acids studied, varying in chain length, saturation, and position of double bonds, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic fatty acids (DHA) caused the highest ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, EPA potentiated the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH(1–34)) in a superagonistic manner. EPA or DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by the PTH1R antagonist and by knockdown of PTH1R. Inhibition of PTH1R downstream signaling molecules, protein kinases A (PKA) and C (PKC), reduced EPA and DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation indicating that fatty acids predominantly activate G-protein pathway and not the β-arrestin pathway. Using picosecond time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and a genetically engineered PTH1R sensor (PTH-CC), we detected conformational responses to EPA similar to those caused by PTH(1–34). PTH1R antagonist blocked the EPA induced conformational response of the PTH-CC. Competitive binding studies using fluorescence anisotropy technique showed that EPA and DHA competitively bind to and alter the affinity of PTH1 receptor to PTH(1–34) leading to a superagonistic response. Finally, we showed that EPA stimulates protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation in a PTH1R-dependent manner and affects the osteoblast survival pathway, by inhibiting glucocorticoid-induced cell death. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that LCPUFAs, EPA and DHA, can activate PTH1R receptor at nanomolar concentrations and consequently provide a putative molecular mechanism for the action of fatty acids in bone. PMID:23300710

  2. Identification and Pharmacological Characterization of Multiple Allosteric Binding Sites on the Free Fatty Acid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel C.-H.; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J.; Brown, Sean P.; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  3. Identification and pharmacological characterization of multiple allosteric binding sites on the free fatty acid 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel C-H; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J; Brown, Sean P; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Swaminath, Gayathri

    2012-11-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  4. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects. PMID:25841994

  5. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  6. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  7. Hemodynamic consequences of LPA stenosis in single ventricle stage 2 LPN circulation with automatic registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavazzi, Daniele E.; Kung, Ethan O.; Dorfman, Adam L.; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Baretta, Alessia; Arbia, Gregory; Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-11-01

    Congenital heart diseases such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome annually affect about 3% of births in the US alone. Surgical palliation of single ventricle patients is performed in stages. Consequently to the stage 2 surgical procedure or other previous conditions, a stenosis of the left pulmonary artery (LPA) is often observed, raising the clinical question of whether or not it should be treated. The severity of stenoses are commonly assessed through geometric inspection or catheter in-vivo pressure measurements with limited quantitative information about patient-specific physiology. The present study uses a multiscale CFD approach to provide an assessment of the severity of LPA stenoses. A lumped parameter 0D model is used to simulate stage 2 circulation, and parameters are automatically identified accounting for uncertainty in the clinical data available for a cohort of patients. The importance of the latter parameters, whether alone or in groups, is also ranked using forward uncertainty propagation methods. Various stenosis levels are applied to the three-dimensional SVC-PA junction model using a dual mesh-morphing approach. Traditional assessments methodologies are compared to the results of our findings and critically discussed.

  8. MiR-338* suppresses fibrotic pathogenesis in pulmonary fibrosis through targeting LPA1

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yi; Dai, Jinghong; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xinxiu; Wang, Chunli; Cao, Mengshu; Liu, Yin; Cai, Hourong; Zhang, Deping; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive lung disease involving pulmonary injury associated with tissue repair, dysfunction and fibrosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as gene regulators, are assumed to regulate about one third of genes and thus play important roles in cellular functions including proliferation, growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Recent studies have indicated that some miRNAs may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we found that miR-338*(miR-338-5p), which has been found to be associated with tumor progression, was down-regulated in fibroblasts and TGF-β-induced lung fibrotic tissues. Over-expression of miR-338* can partly prevent the fibrotic process induced by TGF-β. Moreover, LPA1 was proven to be a downstream target of miR-338*. Lentivirus-mediated over-expression of miR-338* can alleviate lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-338* attenuates the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis through targeting LPA1. Thus, miR-338* can be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of IPF. PMID:27508041

  9. MiR-338* suppresses fibrotic pathogenesis in pulmonary fibrosis through targeting LPA1.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yi; Dai, Jinghong; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xinxiu; Wang, Chunli; Cao, Mengshu; Liu, Yin; Cai, Hourong; Zhang, Deping; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive lung disease involving pulmonary injury associated with tissue repair, dysfunction and fibrosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as gene regulators, are assumed to regulate about one third of genes and thus play important roles in cellular functions including proliferation, growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Recent studies have indicated that some miRNAs may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we found that miR-338*(miR-338-5p), which has been found to be associated with tumor progression, was down-regulated in fibroblasts and TGF-β-induced lung fibrotic tissues. Over-expression of miR-338* can partly prevent the fibrotic process induced by TGF-β. Moreover, LPA1 was proven to be a downstream target of miR-338*. Lentivirus-mediated over-expression of miR-338* can alleviate lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-338* attenuates the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis through targeting LPA1. Thus, miR-338* can be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of IPF. PMID:27508041

  10. Transport studies of LPA electron beam towards the FEL amplification at COXINEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojoyan, M.; Briquez, F.; Labat, M.; Loulergue, A.; Marcouillé, O.; Marteau, F.; Sharma, G.; Couprie, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Plasma Acceleration (LPA) [1] is an emerging concept enabling to generate electron beams with high energy, high peak current and small transverse emittance within a very short distance. The use of LPA can be applied to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) [2] case in order to investigate whether it is suitable for the light amplification in the undulator. However, capturing and guiding of such beams to the undulator is very challenging, because of the large divergence and high energy spread of the electron beams at the plasma exit, leading to large chromatic emittances. A specific beam manipulation scheme was recently proposed for the COXINEL (Coherent X-ray source inferred from electrons accelerated by laser) setup, which makes an advantage from the intrinsically large chromatic emittance of such beams [3]. The electron beam transport is studied using two simulation codes: a SOLEIL in-house one and ASTRA [4]. The influence of the collective effects on the electron beam performance is also examined.

  11. Novel Retinoic Acid Receptor Alpha Agonists for Treatment of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Li, Zhengzhe; Chen, Yibang; Evans, Todd; Chuang, Peter; Das, Bhaskar; He, John Cijiang

    2011-01-01

    Development of pharmacologic agents that protect podocytes from injury is a critical strategy for the treatment of kidney glomerular diseases. Retinoic acid reduces proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis in multiple animal models of kidney diseases. However, clinical studies are limited because of significant side effects of retinoic acid. Animal studies suggest that all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) attenuates proteinuria by protecting podocytes from injury. The physiological actions of ATRA are mediated by binding to all three isoforms of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs): RARα, RARβ, and RARγ. We have previously shown that ATRA exerts its renal protective effects mainly through the agonism of RARα. Here, we designed and synthesized a novel boron-containing derivative of the RARα-specific agonist Am580. This new derivative, BD4, binds to RARα receptor specifically and is predicted to have less toxicity based on its structure. We confirmed experimentally that BD4 binds to RARα with a higher affinity and exhibits less cellular toxicity than Am580 and ATRA. BD4 induces the expression of podocyte differentiation markers (synaptopodin, nephrin, and WT-1) in cultured podocytes. Finally, we confirmed that BD4 reduces proteinuria and improves kidney injury in HIV-1 transgenic mice, a model for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Mice treated with BD4 did not develop any obvious toxicity or side effect. Our data suggest that BD4 is a novel RARα agonist, which could be used as a potential therapy for patients with kidney disease such as HIVAN. PMID:22125642

  12. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  13. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J.; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  14. Retinoic acid isomers facilitate apolipoprotein E production and lipidation in astrocytes through the retinoid X receptor/retinoic acid receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Fu, Yuan; Liu, Chia-Chen; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Nielsen, Henrietta M; Dong, Qiang; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2014-04-18

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is the major cholesterol transport protein in the brain. Among the three human APOE alleles (APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4), APOE4 is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) is a central event in AD pathogenesis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that apoE isoforms differentially regulate AD-related pathways through both Aβ-dependent and -independent mechanisms; therefore, modulating apoE secretion, lipidation, and function might be an attractive approach for AD therapy. We performed a drug screen for compounds that modulate apoE production in immortalized astrocytes derived from apoE3-targeted replacement mice. Here, we report that retinoic acid (RA) isomers, including all-trans-RA, 9-cis-RA, and 13-cis-RA, significantly increase apoE secretion to ~4-fold of control through retinoid X receptor (RXR) and RA receptor. These effects on modulating apoE are comparable with the effects recently reported for the RXR agonist bexarotene. Furthermore, all of these compounds increased the expression of the cholesterol transporter ABCA1 and ABCG1 levels and decreased cellular uptake of Aβ in an apoE-dependent manner. Both bexarotene and 9-cis-RA promote the lipidation status of apoE, in which 9-cis-RA promotes a stronger effect and exhibits less cytotoxicity compared with bexarotene. Importantly, we showed that oral administration of bexarotene and 9-cis-RA significantly increases apoE, ABCA1, and ABCG1 levels in mouse brains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RXR/RA receptor agonists, including several RA isomers, are effective modulators of apoE secretion and lipidation and may be explored as potential drugs for AD therapy. PMID:24599963

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinoic acid receptor-alpha in human breast tumors: retinoic acid receptor-alpha expression correlates with proliferative activity.

    PubMed Central

    van der Leede, B. M.; Geertzema, J.; Vroom, T. M.; Décimo, D.; Lutz, Y.; van der Saag, P. T.; van der Burg, B.

    1996-01-01

    Retinoids are known to prevent mammary carcinogenesis in rodents and inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Previously we demonstrated that retinoid inhibition of proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines is largely mediated by retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-alpha. In this study we describe for the first time the histological distribution of RAR-alpha in 33 breast lesion specimens as determined by immunostaining with RAR-alpha antibody. Nuclear staining was observed in tumor tissue and normal portions of the breast samples. Connective tissue exhibited relative uniform staining, whereas a wide range of RAR-alpha expression was found in the epithelial tumor cells. RAR-alpha protein was expressed at significantly higher levels in tumors with greater proliferative activity as determined by immunostaining with Ki-67 antibody. This suggests that RAR-alpha expression may be altered with tumor progression. Although a positive correlation between RAR-alpha mRNA levels and estrogen receptor status of breast tumors has previously been documented, we did not find such a relationship at the protein level. As RAR-alpha plays a major role in retinoid-mediated growth inhibition of human breast cancer cell in vitro, our findings suggest that patients with highly proliferating tumors could be responsive to retinoid independently of their responsiveness to (anti)-estrogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8669476

  16. Experimental absence seizures: potential role of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, R; Lauber, J; Marescaux, C; Vergnes, M; Martin, P; Rubio, V; Leonhardt, T; Reymann, N; Bittiger, H

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated whether the pathogenesis of spontaneous generalized non-convulsive seizures in rats with genetic absence epilepsy is due to an increase in the brain levels of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) or in the rate of its synthesis. Concentrations of GHB or of its precursor gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) were measured with a new GC/MS technique which allows the simultaneous assessment of GHB and GBL. The rate of GHB synthesis was estimated from the increase in GHB levels after inhibition of its catabolism with valproate. The results of this study do not indicate significant differences in GHB or GBL levels, or in their rates of synthesis in rats showing spike-and-wave discharges (SWD) as compared to rats without SWD. Binding data indicate that GHB, but not GBL, has a selective, although weak affinity for GABAB receptors (IC50 = 150 microM). Similar IC50 values were observed in membranes prepared from rats showing SWD and from control rats. The average GHB brain levels of 2.12 +/- 0.23 nmol/g measured in the cortex and of 4.28 +/- 0.90 nmol/g in the thalamus are much lower than the concentrations necessary to occupy a major part of the GABAB receptors. It is unlikely that local accumulations of GHB reach concentrations 30-70-fold higher than the average brain levels. After injection of 3.5 mmol/kg GBL, a dose sufficient to induce SWD, brain concentrations reach 240 +/- 31 nmol/g (Snead, 1991) and GHB could thus stimulate the GABAB receptor. Like the selective and potent GABAB receptor agonist R(-)-baclofen, GHB causes a dose-related decrease in cerebellar cGMP. This decrease and the increase in SWD caused by R(-)-baclofen were completely blocked by the selective and potent GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348, whereas only the increase in the duration of SWD induced by GHB was totally antagonized by CGP 35348. The decrease in cerebellar cGMP levels elicited by GHB was only partially antagonized by CGP 35348. These findings suggest that all effects of R

  17. Differential localization of putative amino acid receptors in taste buds of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Finger, T E; Bryant, B P; Kalinoski, D L; Teeter, J H; Böttger, B; Grosvenor, W; Cagan, R H; Brand, J G

    1996-09-01

    The taste system of catfish, having distinct taste receptor sites for L-alanine and L-arginine, is highly sensitive to amino acids. A previously described monoclonal antibody (G-10), which inhibits L-alanine binding to a partial membrane fraction (P2) derived from catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) taste epithelium, was found in Western blots to recognize a single band, at apparent MW of 113,000 D. This MW differs from the apparent MW for the presumed arginine receptor identified previously by PHA-E lectin affinity. In order to test whether PHA-E lectin actually reacts with the arginine-receptor, reconstituted membrane proteins partially purified by PHA-E affinity were used in artificial lipid bilayers. These reconstituted channels exhibited L-arginine-activated activity similar to that found in taste cell membranes. Accordingly, we utilized the PHA-E lectin and G-10 antibody as probes to differentially localize the L-alanine and L-arginine binding sites on the apical surface of catfish taste buds. Each probe labels numerous, small (0.5-1.0 micron) patches within the taste pore of each taste bud. This observation suggests that each bud is not tuned to a single taste substance, but contains putative receptor sites for both L-arginine and L-alanine. Further, analysis of double-labeled tissue reveals that the PHA-E and G-10 sites tend to be separate within each taste pore. These findings imply that in catfish, individual taste cells preferentially express receptors to either L-arginine or L-alanine. In addition, PHA-E binds to the apices of solitary chemoreceptor cells in the epithelium, indicating that this independent chemoreceptor system may utilize some receptor sites similar to those in taste buds. PMID:8876468

  18. Drug Discovery Opportunities and Challenges at G Protein Coupled Receptors for Long Chain Free Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Nicholas D.; Watson, Sarah-Jane; Brown, Alastair J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids (FFAs), FFA1 (GPR40) and GPR120, has expanded our understanding of these nutrients as signaling molecules. These receptors have emerged as important sensors for FFA levels in the circulation or the gut lumen, based on evidence from in vitro and rodent models, and an increasing number of human studies. Here we consider their promise as therapeutic targets for metabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. FFA1 directly mediates acute FFA-induced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells, while GPR120 and FFA1 trigger release of incretins from intestinal endocrine cells, and so indirectly enhance insulin secretion and promote satiety. GPR120 signaling in adipocytes and macrophages also results in insulin sensitizing and beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. Drug discovery has focused on agonists to replicate acute benefits of FFA receptor signaling, with promising early results for FFA1 agonists in man. Controversy surrounding chronic effects of FFA1 on beta-cells illustrates that long term benefits of antagonists also need exploring. It has proved challenging to generate highly selective potent ligands for FFA1 or GPR120 subtypes, given that both receptors have hydrophobic orthosteric binding sites, which are not completely defined and have modest ligand affinity. Structure activity relationships are also reliant on functional read outs, in the absence of robust binding assays to provide direct affinity estimates. Nevertheless synthetic ligands have already helped dissect specific contributions of FFA1 and GPR120 signaling from the many possible cellular effects of FFAs. Approaches including use of fluorescent ligand binding assays, and targeting allosteric receptor sites, may improve further pre-clinical ligand development at these receptors, to exploit their unique potential to target multiple facets of diabetes. PMID:22649399

  19. A novel bile acid-activated vitamin D receptor signaling in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuxin; Li, Tiangang; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen; Chiang, John Y L

    2010-06-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is activated by natural ligands, 1alpha, 25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-D(3)] and lithocholic acid (LCA). Our previous study shows that VDR is expressed in human hepatocytes, and VDR ligands inhibit bile acid synthesis and transcription of the gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). Primary human hepatocytes were used to study LCA and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-D(3) activation of VDR signaling. Confocal immunofluorescent microscopy imaging and immunoblot analysis showed that LCA and 1alpha, 25(OH)(2)-D(3) induced intracellular translocation of VDR from the cytosol to the nucleus and also plasma membrane where VDR colocalized with caveolin-1. VDR ligands induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and VDR and their interaction. Inhibition of c-Src abrogated VDR ligand-dependent inhibition of CYP7A1 mRNA expression. Kinase assays showed that VDR ligands specifically activated the c-Raf/MEK1/2/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 pathway, which stimulates serine phosphorylation of VDR and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha, and their interaction. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed a VDR ligand-dependent interaction of nuclear receptor corepressor-1 and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid with VDR/retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRalpha). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that an ERK1/2 inhibitor reversed VDR ligand-induced recruitment of VDR, RXRalpha, and corepressors to human CYP7A1 promoter. In conclusion, VDR ligands activate membrane VDR signaling to activate the MEK1/2/ERK1/2 pathway, which stimulates nuclear VDR/RXRalpha recruitment of corepressors to inhibit CYP7A1 gene transcription in human hepatocytes. This membrane VDR-signaling pathway may be activated by bile acids to inhibit bile acid synthesis as a rapid response to protect hepatocytes from cholestatic liver injury. PMID:20371703

  20. Functional Analysis of Free Fatty Acid Receptor GPR120 in Human Eosinophils: Implications in Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system. PMID:25790291

  1. TRIM32 promotes neural differentiation through retinoic acid receptor-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomonobu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kano, Satoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Ariga, Tadashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2011-10-15

    Retinoic acid (RA), a metabolite of vitamin A, plays versatile roles in development, differentiation, cell cycles and regulation of apoptosis by regulating gene transcription through nuclear receptor activation. Ubiquitinylation, which is one of the post-translational modifications, appears to be involved in the transcriptional activity of intranuclear receptors including retinoic acid receptor α (RARα). Mutations in the tripartite motif-containing protein 32 gene (TRIM32; also known as E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase) have been reported to be responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H in humans, and its encoded protein has been shown to interact with several other important proteins. In this study, we found that TRIM32 interacts with RARα and enhances its transcriptional activity in the presence of RA. We also found that overexpression of TRIM32 in mouse neuroblastoma cells and embryonal carcinoma cells promoted stability of RARα, resulting in enhancement of neural differentiation. These findings suggest that TRIM32 functions as one of the co-activators for RARα-mediated transcription, and thereby TRIM32 is a potential therapeutic target for developmental disorders and RA-dependent leukemias. PMID:21984809

  2. Ligand Induction of Retinoic Acid Receptors Alters an Acute Infection by Murine Cytomegalovirus†

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Ana; Chandraratna, Roshantha A. S.; LeBlanc, James F.; Ghazal, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Here we report that administration of retinoids can alter the outcome of an acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. We show that a crucial viral control element, the major immediate-early enhancer, can be activated by retinoic acid (RA) via multiple RA-responsive elements (DR2) that bind retinoid X receptor-retinoic acid receptor (RAR) heterodimers with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 15 to 33 nM. Viral growth is dramatically increased upon RA treatment of infected tissue culture cells. Using synthetic retinoid receptor-specific agonists and antagonists, we provide evidence that RAR activation in cells is required for mediating the response of MCMV to RA. Oral administration of RA to infected immunocompetent mice selectively exacerbates an infection by MCMV, while cotreatment with an RAR antagonist protects against the adverse effects of RA on MCMV infection. In conclusion, these chemical genetic experiments provide evidence that an RAR-mediated pathway can modulate in vitro and in vivo infections by MCMV. PMID:9573222

  3. Recognition and sequestration of ω-fatty acids by a cavitand receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Simone; Ajami, Dariush; Rebek, Julius

    2015-01-01

    One of the largest driving forces for molecular association in aqueous solution is the hydrophobic effect, and many synthetic receptors with hydrophobic interiors have been devised for molecular recognition studies in water. Attempts to create the longer, narrower cavities appropriate for long-chain fatty acids have been thwarted by solvophobic collapse of the synthetic receptors, giving structures that have no internal spaces. The collapse generally involves the stacking of aromatic panels onto themselves. We describe here the synthesis and application of a deep cavitand receptor featuring “prestacked” aromatic panels at the upper rim of the binding pocket. The cavitand remains open and readily sequesters biologically relevant long-chain molecules—unsaturated ω-3, -6, and -9 fatty acids and derivatives such as anandamide—from aqueous media. The cavitand exists in isomeric forms with different stacking geometries and n-alkanes were used to characterize the binding modes and conformational properties. Long alkyl chains are accommodated in inverted J-shaped conformations. An analogous cavitand with electron-rich aromatic walls was prepared and comparative binding experiments indicated the role of intramolecular stacking in the binding properties of these deep container molecules. PMID:26305974

  4. Comparison of the effects of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin on human vanilloid receptors.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Thomas; Roufogalis, Basil; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2013-07-01

    Pelargonic acid vanillylamide is like capsaicin a natural capsaicinoid from chili peppers and commonly used in food additives to create a hot sensation, even in self-defense pepper sprays and as an alternative to capsaicin in medical products for topical treatment of pain. Although the chemical structures of both compounds are similar, preclinical data suggest that capsaicin is the more potent compound. We therefore performed voltage-clamp recordings using cells transfected with the human vanilloid receptor TRPV1 in order to assess the responses of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin at the receptor level. We provide evidence that at the molecular target TRPV1, the concentration-response curves, kinetics of current activation, as well as inhibition by the competitive antagonist capsazepine were not significantly different between the two capsaicinoids. We suggest that the different effects of the two capsaicinoids observed in previous studies may rather be due to different physicochemical or pharmacokinetic properties than to different pharmacological profiles at the receptor level. PMID:22961689

  5. Recognition and sequestration of ω-fatty acids by a cavitand receptor.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Simone; Ajami, Dariush; Rebek, Julius

    2015-09-01

    One of the largest driving forces for molecular association in aqueous solution is the hydrophobic effect, and many synthetic receptors with hydrophobic interiors have been devised for molecular recognition studies in water. Attempts to create the longer, narrower cavities appropriate for long-chain fatty acids have been thwarted by solvophobic collapse of the synthetic receptors, giving structures that have no internal spaces. The collapse generally involves the stacking of aromatic panels onto themselves. We describe here the synthesis and application of a deep cavitand receptor featuring "prestacked" aromatic panels at the upper rim of the binding pocket. The cavitand remains open and readily sequesters biologically relevant long-chain molecules-unsaturated ω-3, -6, and -9 fatty acids and derivatives such as anandamide-from aqueous media. The cavitand exists in isomeric forms with different stacking geometries and n-alkanes were used to characterize the binding modes and conformational properties. Long alkyl chains are accommodated in inverted J-shaped conformations. An analogous cavitand with electron-rich aromatic walls was prepared and comparative binding experiments indicated the role of intramolecular stacking in the binding properties of these deep container molecules. PMID:26305974

  6. Development and Characterization of a Potent Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1) Fluorescent Tracer.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hudson, Brian D; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2016-05-26

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) is a potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although several potent agonists have been described, there remains a strong need for suitable tracers to interrogate ligand binding to this receptor. We address this by exploring fluorophore-tethering to known potent FFA1 agonists. This led to the development of 4, a high affinity FFA1 tracer with favorable and polarity-dependent fluorescent properties. A close to ideal overlap between the emission spectrum of the NanoLuciferase receptor tag and the excitation spectrum of 4 enabled the establishment of a homogeneous BRET-based binding assay suitable for both detailed kinetic studies and high throughput competition binding studies. Using 4 as a tracer demonstrated that the compound acts fully competitively with selected synthetic agonists but not with lauric acid and allowed for the characterization of binding affinities of a diverse selection of known FFA1 agonists, indicating that 4 will be a valuable tool for future studies at FFA1. PMID:27074625

  7. Structural insights into PDZ-mediated interaction of NHERF2 and LPA(2), a cellular event implicated in CFTR channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Joshua; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Guorong; Trescott, Laura; Brunzelle, Joseph; Sirinupong, Nualpun; Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Yang, Zhe

    2014-03-28

    The formation of CFTR-NHERF2-LPA2 macromolecular complex in airway epithelia regulates CFTR channel function and plays an important role in compartmentalized cAMP signaling. We previously have shown that disruption of the PDZ-mediated NHERF2-LPA2 interaction abolishes the LPA inhibitory effect and augments CFTR Cl(-) channel activity in vitro and in vivo. Here we report the first crystal structure of the NHERF2 PDZ1 domain in complex with the C-terminal LPA2 sequence. The structure reveals that the PDZ1-LPA2 binding specificity is achieved by numerous hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts with the last four LPA2 residues contributing to specific interactions. Comparison of the PDZ1-LPA2 structure to the structure of PDZ1 in complex with a different peptide provides insights into the diverse nature of PDZ1 substrate recognition and suggests that the conformational flexibility in the ligand binding pocket is involved in determining the broad substrate specificity of PDZ1. In addition, the structure reveals a small surface pocket adjacent to the ligand-binding site, which may have therapeutic implications. This study provides an understanding of the structural basis for the PDZ-mediated NHERF2-LPA2 interaction that could prove valuable in selective drug design against CFTR-related human diseases. PMID:24613836

  8. Effects of perfluoroalkyl acids on the function of the thyroid hormone and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Long, Manhai; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-11-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are perfluorinated compounds that widely exist in the environment and can elicit adverse effects including endocrine disruption in humans and animals. This study investigated the effect of seven PFAAs on the thyroid hormone (TH) system assessing the proliferation of the 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thryonine (T3)-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cells using the T-screen assay and the effect on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation in the AhR-luciferase reporter gene bioassay. A dose-dependent impact on GH3 cells was observed in the range 1×10(-9)-1×10(-4) M: seven PFAAs (perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA), and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA)) inhibited the GH3 cell growth, and four PFAAs (PFOS, PFHxS, PFNA, and PFUnA) antagonized the T3-induced GH3 cell proliferation. At the highest test concentration, PFHxS showed a further increase of the T3-induced GH3 growth. Among the seven tested PFAAs, only PFDoA and PFDA elicited an activating effect on the AhR. In conclusion, PFAAs possess in vitro endocrine-disrupting potential by interfering with TH and AhR functions, which need to be taken into consideration when assessing the impact on human health. PMID:23539207

  9. Mapping amino acids of the measles virus hemagglutinin responsible for receptor (CD46) downregulation.

    PubMed

    Bartz, R; Brinckmann, U; Dunster, L M; Rima, B; Ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1996-10-01

    We compared the amino acid sequences of groups of receptor (CD46) downregulating and nondownregulating measles virus (MV) hemagglutinins (Hs) and identified seven group-specific differences as candidates for the mediation of the observed differential effects. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mutated the chosen amino acids of the H of MV-strain WTF (WTF-H), a nondownregulating H, and Introduced the corresponding amino acids of Edmonston-H (Edm-H), a downregulating H. We identified four amino acids, 211G, 243R, 451V, and 481Y, which influenced the downregulative function when introduced into WTF-H. The double mutation 451V and 481Y in WTF-H led to a degree of CD46 downregulation comparable to that of Edm-H. Conversely, introducing amino acids 451E and 481N into Edm-H resulted in a loss of the downregulative function. These results indicate that these amino acids play a decisive role in the H-CD46 interaction. PMID:8862431

  10. Nicotinic Acid Activates the Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1 – A Potential Mechanism for Cutaneous Flushing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Mao, Rongrong; Cai, Anping; Jia, Yunfang; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Xu, Lin; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nicotinic acid (a.k.a. niacin or vitamin B3), widely used to treat dyslipidemias, represents an effective and safe means to reduce the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, a substantial fraction of patients discontinue treatment due to a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly termed flushing. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic acid causes flushing partially by activating the capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a polymodal cellular sensor that mediates the flushing response upon consumption of spicy food. Approach and Results We observed that the nicotinic acid-induced increase in blood flow was substantially reduced in Trpv1−/− knockout mice, indicating involvement of the channel in flushing response. Using exogenously expressed TRPV1, we confirmed that nicotinic acid at sub-millimolar to millimolar concentrations directly and potently activates TRPV1 from the intracellular side. Binding of nicotinic acid to TRPV1 lowers its activation threshold for heat, causing channel opening at physiological temperatures. Activation of TRPV1 by voltage or ligands (capsaicin and 2-APB) is also potentiated by nicotinic acid. We further demonstrated that nicotinic acid does not compete directly with capsaicin but may activate TRPV1 through the 2-APB activation pathway. Using live-cell fluorescence imaging, we observed that nicotinic acid can quickly enter the cell through a transporter-mediated pathway to activate TRPV1. Conclusions Direct activation of TRPV1 by nicotinic acid may lead to cutaneous vasodilation that contributes to flushing, suggesting a potential novel pathway to inhibit flushing and improve compliance. PMID:24675661

  11. Expression and distribution of sialic acid influenza virus receptors in wild birds

    PubMed Central

    França, M.; Stallknecht, D. E.; Howerth, E. W.

    2013-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses have been detected in more than 105 wild bird species from 12 different orders but species-related differences in susceptibility to AI viruses exist. Expression of α2,3-linked (avian-type) and α2,6linked (human type) sialic acid (SA) influenza virus receptors in tissues is considered to be one of the determinants of the host range and tissue tropism of influenza viruses. We investigated the expression of these SA receptors in 37 wild bird species from 11 different orders by lectin histochemistry. Two isoforms of Maackia amurensis (MAA) lectin, MAA1 and MAA2, were used to detect α2,3-linked SA and Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectin was used to detect α2,6-linked SA. All species evaluated expressed α2,3-linked and α2,6-linked SA receptors in endothelial cells and renal tubular epithelial cells. Both α2,3-linked and α-2,6-linked SA receptors were expressed in respiratory and intestinal tract tissues of aquatic and terrestrial wild bird species from different taxa, but differences in SA expression and in the predominant isoform of MAA lectin bound were observed. With a few possible exceptions, these observed differences were not generally predictive of reported species susceptibility to AI viruses based on published experimental and field data. PMID:23391183

  12. Ursodeoxycholic acid exerts farnesoid X receptor-antagonistic effects on bile acid and lipid metabolism in morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Michaela; Thorell, Anders; Claudel, Thierry; Jha, Pooja; Koefeler, Harald; Lackner, Carolin; Hoesel, Bastian; Fauler, Guenter; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Einarsson, Curt; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Bile acids (BAs) are major regulators of hepatic BA and lipid metabolism but their mechanisms of action in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are still poorly understood. Here we aimed to explore the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in modulating the cross-talk between liver and visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) regarding BA and cholesterol metabolism and fatty acid/lipid partitioning in morbidly obese NAFLD patients. Methods In this randomized controlled pharmacodynamic study, we analyzed serum, liver and vWAT samples from 40 well-matched morbidly obese patients receiving UDCA (20 mg/kg/day) or no treatment three weeks prior to bariatric surgery. Results Short term UDCA administration stimulated BA synthesis by reducing circulating fibroblast growth factor 19 and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation, resulting in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase induction mirrored by elevated C4 and 7α-hydroxycholesterol. Enhanced BA formation depleted hepatic and LDL-cholesterol with subsequent activation of the key enzyme of cholesterol synthesis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Blunted FXR anti-lipogenic effects induced lipogenic stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in the liver, thereby increasing hepatic triglyceride content. In addition, induced SCD activity in vWAT shifted vWAT lipid metabolism towards generation of less toxic and more lipogenic monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid. Conclusion These data demonstrate that by exerting FXR-antagonistic effects, UDCA treatment in NAFLD patients strongly impacts on cholesterol and BA synthesis and induces neutral lipid accumulation in both liver and vWAT. PMID:25617503

  13. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  14. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  15. Programmable Multivalent Display of Receptor Ligands using Peptide Nucleic Acid Nanoscaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Ethan A.; Wang, Deyun; Fujigaki, Hidetsugu; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Micklitsch, Christopher M.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Martin-Manso, Gema; Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Multivalent effects dictate the binding affinity of multiple ligands on one molecular entity to receptors. Integrins are receptors that mediate cell attachment through multivalent binding to peptide sequences within the extracellular matrix, and overexpression promotes the metastasis of some cancers. Multivalent display of integrin antagonists enhances their efficacy, but current scaffolds have limited ranges and precision for the display of ligands. Here we present an approach to study multivalent effects across wide ranges of ligand number, density, and three-dimensional arrangement. Using L-lysine γ-substituted peptide nucleic acids, the multivalent effects of an integrin antagonist were examined over a range of 1 to 45 ligands. The optimal construct improves the inhibitory activity of the antagonist by two orders of magnitude against the binding of melanoma cells to the extracellular matrix in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22233624

  16. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2.

    PubMed

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  17. The molecular physiology of nuclear retinoic acid receptors. From health to disease.

    PubMed

    Duong, Vanessa; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARα, β and γ) are transcriptional transregulators, which control the expression of specific gene subsets subsequently to ligand binding and to strictly controlled phosphorylation processes. Consequently RARs maintain homeostasis through the control of cell proliferation and differentiation. Today, it is admitted that, analogous to the paradigm established by the hematopoietic system, most adult tissues depict a differentiation hierarchy starting from rare stem cells. Here we highlight that the integrity of RARs is absolutely required for homeostasis in adults. Indeed, strictly controlled levels of RARs are necessary for the correct balance between self-renewal and differentiation of tissue stem cells. In addition, loss, accumulation, mutations or aberrant modifications of a specific RAR lead to uncontrolled proliferation and/or to differentiation block and thereby to cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease. PMID:20970498

  18. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yan; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Hong; Bi, Miao-Miao; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Fungal keratitis (FK) is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids (ATRA) have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid receptor α (RAR α), retinoic acid receptor γ (RAR γ), and retinoid X receptor α (RXR α) are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK. PMID:26309886

  19. D-amino acid oxidase generates agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor from D-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh P; Hsu, Erin L; Chowdhury, Goutam; Dostalek, Miroslav; Guengerich, F Peter; Bradfield, Christopher A

    2009-12-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is well-known for its role in mediating the toxic and adaptive responses to xenobiotic compounds. Recent studies also indicate that AHR ligands are endogenously produced and may be essential for normal development. Previously, we showed that the endogenous enzyme, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), generates the AHR proagonist, indole-3-pyruvic acid (I3P), by deamination of its substrate L-tryptophan. We hypothesized that other enzymatic pathways capable of producing I3P may generate AHR agonists in vivo. We now demonstrate that the enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) catalyzes the production of AHR agonists through the enzymatic conversion of D-tryptophan to I3P. Moreover, we provide evidence that the nonenzymatic oxidation and condensation of I3P is a critical step in the generation of receptor agonists by DAAO and AST. Products of this process include two novel agonists, 1,3-di(1H-indol-3-yl)propan-2-one and 1-(1H-indol-3-yl)-3-(3H-indol-3-ylidene) propan-2-one [characterized in the accompanying paper, Chowdhury et al. ( 2009 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. , DOI: 10.1021/tx9000418 ], both of which can potently activate the AHR at concentrations in the nanomolar range. These results show that endogenous AHR activity can be modulated by I3P production from amino acid precursors through multiple enzymatic pathways, including those catalyzed by DAAO and AST. PMID:19860415

  20. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Stephanie R.; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H.; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R.; Angueira, Anthony R.; Mosser, Rockann E.; Carboneau, Bethany A.; Tersey, Sarah A.; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2−/− mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  1. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival.

    PubMed

    Villa, Stephanie R; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R; Angueira, Anthony R; Mosser, Rockann E; Carboneau, Bethany A; Tersey, Sarah A; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2(-/-) mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  2. Oleanolic acid acrylate elicits antidepressant-like effect mediated by 5-HT1A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fajemiroye, James O.; Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Chaurasiya, Narayan D.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.; Costa, Elson A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new drugs for the treatment of depression is strategic to achieving clinical needs of patients. This study evaluates antidepressant-like effect and neural mechanisms of four oleanolic acid derivatives i.e. acrylate (D1), methacrylate (D2), methyl fumarate (D3) and ethyl fumarate (D4). All derivatives were obtained by simple one-step esterification of oleanolic acid prior to pharmacological screening in the forced swimming (FS) and open field (OF) tests. Pharmacological tools like α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT, catecholamine depletor), p-chlorophenylalanine (serotonin depletor), prazosin (PRAZ, selective α1-receptor antagonist), WAY-100635 (selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) as well as monoamine oxidase (MAO) and functional binding assays were conducted to investigate possible neural mechanisms. In the FS test, D1 showed the most promising antidepressant-like effect without eliciting locomotor incoordination. Unlike group of mice pretreated with AMPT 100 mg/kg, PCPA 100 mg/kg or PRAZ 1 mg/kg, the effect of D1 was attenuated by WAY-100635 0.3 mg/kg pretreatment. D1 demonstrated moderate inhibition of MAO-A (IC50 = 48.848 ± 1.935 μM), potency (pEC50 = 6.1 ± 0.1) and intrinsic activity (Emax = 26 ± 2.0%) on 5-HT1A receptor. In conclusion, our findings showed antidepressant-like effect of D1 and possible involvement of 5-HT1A receptor. PMID:26199018

  3. Adsorption of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to Neuraminic Acid Receptors of Various Cells and Possible Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sobeslavsky, O.; Prescott, B.; Chanock, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Monkey, rat, and chicken tracheal epithelial cells, as well as monkey, rat, guinea pig, and chicken erythrocytes, adsorbed firmly to colonies of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and M. gallisepticum. Colonies of M. pulmonis also adsorbed erythrocytes but with less avidity than M. pneumoniae or M. gallisepticum; unlike the latter organisms, M. pulmonis did not adsorb tracheal epithelial cells. Colonies of M. orale type 1 and M. orale type 3 adsorbed only chicken red cells. Other mycoplasma species tested, including four of human origin and one of animal origin, did not adsorb red cells or epithelial cells. M. pneumoniae and M. gallisepticum appeared to attach to erythrocytes or tracheal epithelial cells by neuraminic acid receptors on these cells, whereas M. orale types 1 and 3 and M. pulmonis seemed to utilize another type or other types of receptors. Pretreatment of red cells or tracheal epithelial cells with receptor-destroying enzyme, neuraminidase, or influenza B virus removed the adsorption receptors for M. pneumoniae. Similarly, pretreatment of M. pneumoniae colonies with neuraminic acid-containing materials prevented adsorption of erythrocytes or respiratory tract cells. The adsorption sites on M. pneumoniae were specifically blocked by homologous but not heterologous antisera. This property made it possible to study the nature of the mycoplasma adsorption sites by testing the capacity of different fractions of the organism to block the action of adsorption-inhibiting antibodies. Such studies suggested that the mycoplasma binding sites were probably lipid or lipoprotein in nature. The glycerophospholipid hapten was implicated as one such site, since this serologically active hapten blocked the action of hemadsorption-inhibiting antibodies in M. pneumoniae rabbit antiserum. The affinity of M. pneumoniae for respiratory tract epithelium, unique among the mycoplasmas that infect man, may play a role in virulence, since this type of attachment provides an unusual

  4. Effect of Serum Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] in Menopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, S K; Sarker, A

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of LP during the menopausal trinities and their relationship with sex hormones and body fat distribution is still unclear. The aim of this case control study was to estimate the serum lipoprotein (a) in postmenopausal women and women in reproductive age group and comparison of the above mention serum lipids between the two groups and was carried out in the Department of Biochemistry, Dhaka Medical College (DMC), Dhaka, in co-operation with the Department of Immunology, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka from July-2005 to June 2006. A total number of 70 women were selected. Selected women were grouped as Group A and Group B. In Group A 30 postmenopausal women were selected with age range 55-70 years. In Group B, 40 women within reproductive age were selected. Group B was again divided into two groups - Group B1 & Group B2 according to their ages. In Group B1 20 women were selected with age range 25-35 years, and in Group B2 another 20 women were selected with age range 36-45 years. Serum lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a) and lipid profile of all groups were measured. Mean sLp(a) concentration were compared between groups by" Mann Whitney U" test. Mean concentrations of every individual components of lipid profile (sTAG, sTc, sLDL & sHDL) were compared with different groups. sLp(a) concentration of Group A compared to Group B1 was found to be significantly higher (p<0.001). In the same way mean serum Lp(a) concentration of Group A compared to Group B2 was also significantly higher (p<0.001). Mean sLp(a) concentration of B1 compared B2 did not differ significantly. Mean values of lipid profiles were slightly elevated in Group A compared to Group B1 and Group B2 except sHDL-c level. Mean concentrations HDL-c was significantly lower in Group A compared to Group B1 and Group B2. Thus the present study has revealed that there is increased Lp(a) in menopause & decreased HDL in menopause

  5. Reduction of sodium deoxycholic acid-induced scratching behaviour by bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Izumi; Majima, Masataka

    1999-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of sodium deoxycholic acid into the anterior of the back of male ddY mice elicited dose-dependent scratching of the injected site with the forepaws and hindpaws.Up to 100 μg of sodium deoxycholic acid induced no significant increase in vascular permeability at the injection site as assessed by a dye leakage method.Bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor antagonists, FR173657 and Hoe140, significantly decreased the frequency of scratching induced by sodium deoxycholic acid.Treatment with aprotinin to inhibit tissue kallikrein reduced the scratching behaviour induced by sodium deoxycholic acid, whereas treatment with soybean trypsin inhibitor to inhibit plasma kallikrein did not.Although injection of kininase II inhibitor, lisinopril together with sodium deoxycholic acid did not alter the scratching behaviour, phosphoramidon, a neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, significantly increased the frequency of scratching.Homogenates of the skin excised from the backs of mice were subjected to gel-filtration column chromatography followed by an assay of kinin release by trypsin from each fraction separated. Less kinin release from the fractions containing kininogen of low molecular weight was observed in the skin injected with sodium deoxycholic acid than in normal skin.The frequency of scratching after the injection of sodium deoxycholic acid in plasma kininogen-deficient Brown Norway Katholiek rats was significantly lower than that in normal rats of the same strain, Brown Norway Kitasato rats.These results indicate that BK released from low-molecular-weight kininogen by tissue kallikrein, but not from high-molecular-weight kininogen by plasma kallikrein, may be involved in the scratching behaviour induced by the injection of sodium deoxycholic acid in the rodent. PMID:10051136

  6. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, andMetSrisk and whether plasma fatty acids,...

  7. A novel antidiabetic therapy: free fatty acid receptors as potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Hasegawa, Sae; Pelisch, Nicolas; Kimura, Ikuo; Ichimura, Atsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Excessive dietary intake of fat is strongly involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Free fatty acids (FFAs), which are provided from dietary fat, are not only important nutrients, but also act as signaling molecules and stimulate key biological functions. Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have shown that several G-protein coupled receptors, such as FFAR1-4, are receptors for FFAs. FFAR1 and FFAR4 are activated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids, whereas FFAR2 and FFAR3 are activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). These FFA receptors (FFARs) mediate various physiological functions, depending on the carbon chain length of the FFAs and the ligand specificity of the FFARs. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs mediate important metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and thereby contribute to energy homeostasis. Since imbalances in energy homeostasis lead to metabolic disorders, such as obesity and T2D, FFARs are considered to be key therapeutic targets in these diseases. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of FFAR1 and FFAR4 improved glucose metabolism and ameliorated systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the biological functions of SCFAs in anti-inflammation and energy metabolism are linked with the activation of FFAR2 and FFAR3. Hence, in this review, we summarize the physiological functions of FFARs and discuss the potential of selective ligands of FFARs for development as drugs to treat metabolic disorders, such as T2D and obesity. PMID:25732031

  8. The short-chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M; Angueira, Anthony R; Brodsky, Michael; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gilbert, Jack A; Lowe, William L; Layden, Brian T

    2015-11-15

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression is higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Together, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis. PMID:26394664

  9. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  10. Anthranilic acid derivatives as nuclear receptor modulators--development of novel PPAR selective and dual PPAR/FXR ligands.

    PubMed

    Merk, Daniel; Lamers, Christina; Weber, Julia; Flesch, Daniel; Gabler, Matthias; Proschak, Ewgenij; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear receptors, especially the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) fulfill crucial roles in metabolic balance. Their activation offers valuable therapeutic potential which has high clinical relevance with the fibrates and glitazones as PPAR agonistic drugs. With growing knowledge about the various functions of nuclear receptors in many disorders, new selective or dual ligands of these pharmaceutical targets are however still required. Here we report the class of anthranilic acid derivatives as novel selective PPAR or dual FXR/PPAR ligands. We identified distinct molecular determinants that govern selectivity for each PPAR subtype or FXR as well as the amplitude of activation of the respective receptors. We thereby discovered several lead compounds for further optimization and developed a highly potent dual PPARα/FXR partial agonist that might have a beneficial synergistic effect on lipid homeostasis by simultaneous activation of two nuclear receptors involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:25583100

  11. Quinolinic acid lesion of nucleus accumbens reduces D sub 1 but not D sub 2 dopamine receptors: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Richards, T.J.; Huff, G.F. ); Wamsley, J.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Information concerning the cellular localization of dopamine receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) was obtained using receptor autoradiographic analysis. Unilateral, stereotaxic injection of the axonsparing neurotoxin, quinolinic acid, into the NAcc resulted in a prominent loss of dopamine D{sub 1} receptors (as labeled by ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390). Contrarily, no appreciable decrement in D{sub 2} receptors (labeled by ({sup 3}H)raclopride) could be identified within the same region of the NAcc. The findings support the view that accumbens D{sub 1} receptors are located postsynaptically on neurons or their processes, while D{sub 2} receptors within this nucleus are primarily located on afferent terminals.

  12. Redox control of retinoic acid receptor activity: a novel mechanism for retinoic acid resistance in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Demary, K; Wong, L; Liou, J S; Faller, D V; Spanjaard, R A

    2001-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) slows growth and induces differentiation of tumor cells through activation of RA receptors (RARs). However, melanoma cell lines display highly variable responsiveness to RA, which is a poorly understood phenomenon. By using Northern and Western blot analyses, we show that RA-resistant A375 and RA-responsive S91 melanoma cells express comparable levels of major components of RAR-signaling pathways. However, A375 cells have substantially higher intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than S91 cells. Lowering ROS levels in A375 cells through hypoxic culture conditions restores RAR-dependent trans-activity, which could be further enhanced by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. Hypoxia also enhances RAR activity in the moderately RA-responsive C32 cells, which have intermediate ROS levels. Conversely, increasing oxidative stress in highly RA-responsive S91 and B16 cells, which have low ROS levels, by treatment with H(2)O(2) impairs RAR activity. Consistent with these observations, RA more potently inhibited the proliferation of hypoxic A375 cells than that of normoxic cells. Oxidative states diminish, whereas reducing conditions enhance, DNA binding of retinoid X receptor/RAR heterodimers in vitro, providing a molecular basis for the observed inverse correlation between RAR activity and ROS levels. The redox state of melanoma cells provides a novel, epigenetic control mechanism of RAR activity and RA resistance. PMID:11356710

  13. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptors (RORs): Regulatory Functions in Immunity, Development, Circadian Rhythm, and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Donald N.; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M.

    2015-01-01

    In this overview, we provide an update on recent progress made in understanding the mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease of retinoic acid related orphan receptors (RORs). We are particularly focusing on their roles in the regulation of adaptive and innate immunity, brain function, retinal development, cancer, glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, metabolic and inflammatory diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. We also summarize the current status of ROR agonists and inverse agonists, including their regulation of ROR activity and their therapeutic potential for management of various diseases in which RORs have been implicated. PMID:26878025

  14. Loss of nuclear receptor SHP impairs but does not eliminate negative feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Thomas A; Saeki, Shigeru; Schneider, Manfred; Schaefer, Karen; Berdy, Sara; Redder, Thadd; Shan, Bei; Russell, David W; Schwarz, Margrit

    2002-06-01

    The in vivo role of the nuclear receptor SHP in feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis was examined. Loss of SHP in mice caused abnormal accumulation and increased synthesis of bile acids due to derepression of rate-limiting CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 hydroxylase enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Dietary bile acids induced liver damage and restored feedback regulation. A synthetic agonist of the nuclear receptor FXR was not hepatotoxic and had no regulatory effects. Reduction of the bile acid pool with cholestyramine enhanced CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. We conclude that input from three negative regulatory pathways controls bile acid synthesis. One is mediated by SHP, and two are SHP independent and invoked by liver damage and changes in bile acid pool size. PMID:12062