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Sample records for acid mature protein

  1. Enamel proteins mitigate mechanical and structural degradations in mature human enamel during acid attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, Gennady V.; Lemoine, Patrick; Meenan, Brian J.; Deb, Sanjukta; Mutreja, Isha; Carolan, Patrick; Petkov, Nikolay

    2014-04-01

    A hydrazine deproteination process was used to investigate the role of enamel proteins in the acid erosion of mature human dental enamel. Bright field high resolution transmission electron micrographs and x-ray diffraction analysis show no crystallographic changes after the hydrazine treatment with similar nanoscale hydroxyapatite crystallite size and orientation for sound and de-proteinated enamel. However, the presence of enamel proteins reduces the erosion depth, the loss of hardness and the loss of structural order in enamel, following exposure to citric acid. Nanoindentation creep is larger for sound enamel than for deproteinated enamel but it reduces in sound enamel after acid attack. These novel results are consistent with calcium ion-mediated visco-elasticty in enamel matrix proteins as described previously for nacre, bone and dental proteins. They are also in good agreement with a previous double layer force spectroscopy study by the authors which found that the proteins electrochemically buffer enamel against acid attack. Finally, this suggests that acid attack, and more specifically dental erosion, is influenced by ionic permeation through the enamel layer and that it is mitigated by the enamel protein matrix.

  2. A nine-country study of the protein content and amino acid composition of mature human milk

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ping; Gao, Ming; Burgher, Anita; Zhou, Tian Hui; Pramuk, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have evaluated protein and amino acid levels in human milk. However, research in this area has been limited by small sample sizes and study populations with little ethnic or racial diversity. Objective Evaluate the protein and amino acid composition of mature (≥30 days) human milk samples collected from a large, multinational study using highly standardized methods for sample collection, storage, and analysis. Design Using a single, centralized laboratory, human milk samples from 220 women (30–188 days postpartum) from nine countries were analyzed for amino acid composition using Waters AccQ-Tag high-performance liquid chromatography and total nitrogen content using the LECO FP-528 nitrogen analyzer. Total protein was calculated as total nitrogen×6.25. True protein, which includes protein, free amino acids, and peptides, was calculated from the total amino acids. Results Mean total protein from individual countries (standard deviation [SD]) ranged from 1,133 (125.5) to 1,366 (341.4) mg/dL; the mean across all countries (SD) was 1,192 (200.9) mg/dL. Total protein, true protein, and amino acid composition were not significantly different across countries except Chile, which had higher total and true protein. Amino acid profiles (percent of total amino acids) did not differ across countries. Total and true protein concentrations and 16 of 18 amino acid concentrations declined with the stage of lactation. Conclusions Total protein, true protein, and individual amino acid concentrations in human milk steadily decline from 30 to 151 days of lactation, and are significantly higher in the second month of lactation compared with the following 4 months. There is a high level of consistency in the protein content and amino acid composition of human milk across geographic locations. The size and diversity of the study population and highly standardized procedures for the collection, storage, and analysis of human milk support the validity and

  3. Role of arachidonic acid and protein kinase C during maturation-inducing hormone-dependent meiotic resumption and ovulation in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Yoshizaki, G.; Bolamba, D.; Thomas, P.

    2003-01-01

    The roles of arachidonic acid (AA) and protein kinase C (PKC) during in vitro maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-dependent meiotic resumption (maturation) and ovulation were studied in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). The requirement for cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites of AA was examined using a nonspecific COX inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), as well as two COX products, prostaglandin (PG) F2?? and PGE2, whereas the role of lipoxygenase (LOX) was investigated using a specific LOX inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). The involvement of PKC was examined using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, as well as GF109203X (GF), a specific inhibitor of PKC and 1-(5-isoquin- olinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), nonspecific inhibitor of protein kinases. Genomic mechanisms were examined with the transcription-inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) and the functionality of heterologous (oocyte-granulosa) gap junctions (GJ) with a dye transfer assay. The AA (100 ??M) and PGF2?? (5 ??M) did not induce maturation, and NDGA (10 ??M) did not affect MIH-dependent maturation. However, IM (100 ??M) partially inhibited MIH-dependent maturation. Conversely, AA and both PGs induced, and IM and NDGA inhibited, MIH-dependent ovulation in matured follicles. The PMA (1 ??g/ml) did not induce maturation but caused ovulation in matured follicles, whereas PKC inhibitors (GF, 5 ??M; H7, 50??M) did not affect MIH-dependent maturation but inhibited MIH- and PMA-dependent ovulation. The PMA-dependent ovulation was inhibited by IM but not by NDGA. In addition, ActD (5 ??M) blocked MIH-dependent, but not PMA-dependent, ovulation, and PGF2?? restored MIH-dependent ovulation in ActD-blocked follicles. The AA and PGs did not induce, and GF did not inhibit, MIH-dependent heterologous GJ uncoupling. In conclusion, AA and PKC mediate MIH-dependent ovulation but not meiotic resumption or heterologous GJ uncoupling in croaker follicles, but a permissive role

  4. Salicylic acid signaling controls the maturation and localization of the arabidopsis defense protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongqin; Shrestha, Jay; Tateda, Chika; Greenberg, Jean T

    2014-08-01

    ACCELERATED CELL DEATH6 (ACD6) is a multipass membrane protein with an ankyrin domain that acts in a positive feedback loop with the defense signal salicylic acid (SA). This study implemented biochemical approaches to infer changes in ACD6 complexes and localization. In addition to forming endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and plasma membrane (PM)-localized complexes, ACD6 forms soluble complexes, where it is bound to cytosolic HSP70, ubiquitinated, and degraded via the proteasome. Thus, ACD6 constitutively undergoes ER-associated degradation. During SA signaling, the soluble ACD6 pool decreases, whereas the PM pool increases. Similarly, ACD6-1, an activated version of ACD6 that induces SA, is present at low levels in the soluble fraction and high levels in the PM. However, ACD6 variants with amino acid substitutions in the ankyrin domain form aberrant, inactive complexes, are induced by a SA agonist, but show no PM localization. SA signaling also increases the PM pools of FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (BAK1). FLS2 forms complexes ACD6; both FLS2 and BAK1 require ACD6 for maximal accumulation at the PM in response to SA signaling. A plausible scenario is that SA increases the efficiency of productive folding and/or complex formation in the ER, such that ACD6, together with FLS2 and BAK1, reaches the cell surface to more effectively promote immune responses. PMID:24923602

  5. Protein syntehsis during soybean seed maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, L.A.; Rinne, R.W.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previous work has demonstrated that physiological and biochemical changes specifically associated with soybean seed maturation can be separated from events associated with seed development. The objective of this study was to determine if soybean seed metabolism is altered during maturation drying at the level of protein synthesis. Seed harvested 35 days after flowering (0% seedling growth) were induced to mature (100% seedling growth) through controlled dehydration. Proteins labeled with (/sup 35/S)-methionine were extracted and analyzed by 1-D PAGE coupled with autoradiography and densitometry. Results show a 31 kD and 128 kD polypeptide synthesized de novo during dehydration and precocious maturation. The same two polypeptides are synthesized during natural dehydration and maturation (>60 days after flowering). Furthermore, these polypeptides persist during rehydration and germination of both precociously and naturally matured seed, but specifically disappear during early seedling growth. The authors are currently investigating the role of protein synthesis during soybean seed maturation and if it is required for establishment of a soybean seedling.

  6. A Novel Mechanism of Lysosomal Acid Sphingomyelinase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Russell W.; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Simbari, Fabio; Canals, Daniel; Roddy, Patrick; Riner, Clarke D.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2011-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin (SM) to form the bioactive lipid ceramide (Cer). Notably, aSMase exists in two forms: a zinc (Zn2+)-independent lysosomal aSMase (L-SMase) and a Zn2+-dependent secreted aSMase (S-SMase) that arise from alternative trafficking of a single protein precursor. Despite extensive investigation into the maturation and trafficking of aSMase, the exact identity of mature L-SMase has remained unclear. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of aSMase maturation involving C-terminal proteolytic processing within, or in close proximity to, endolysosomes. Using two different C-terminal-tagged constructs of aSMase (V5, DsRed), we demonstrate that aSMase is processed from a 75-kDa, Zn2+-activated proenzyme to a mature 65 kDa, Zn2+-independent L-SMase. L-SMase is recognized by a polyclonal Ab to aSMase, but not by anti-V5 or anti-DsRed antibodies, suggesting that the C-terminal tag is lost during maturation. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that mature L-SMase colocalized with the lysosomal marker LAMP1, whereas V5-aSMase localized to the Golgi secretory pathway. Moreover, V5-aSMase possessed Zn2+-dependent activity suggesting it may represent the common protein precursor of S-SMase and L-SMase. Importantly, the 65-kDa L-SMase, but not V5-aSMase, was sensitive to the lysosomotropic inhibitor desipramine, co-fractionated with lysosomes, and migrated at the same Mr as partially purified human aSMase. Finally, three aSMase mutants containing C-terminal Niemann-Pick mutations (R600H, R600P, ΔR608) exhibited defective proteolytic maturation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that mature L-SMase arises from C-terminal proteolytic processing of pro-aSMase and suggest that impaired C-terminal proteolysis may lead to severe defects in L-SMase function. PMID:21098024

  7. Changes in physicochemical characteristics and free amino acids of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida) fruits during maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Qin; Hu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-15

    In this study, changes in physicochemical characteristics associated with fruit quality and free amino acids were investigated during maturation of hawthorn fruits. Significant differences in these parameters were found during maturation. The color turned progressively from mature green to semi-red, to reach bright red; the shape changed gradually from oval to round or approached round; the size, weight, and edible part (flesh/core ratio) of hawthorns increased while the density of intact fruits did not change. The content of moisture, total soluble sugars, soluble pectin, reduced ascorbic acid, total ascorbic acid, fructose, and sucrose increased while crude protein content decreased significantly. The levels of starch, sucrose, titratable acidity, protopectin, pectin, total free amino acids, and total essential amino acids initially increased and then decreased gradually during maturation. The outcomes of this study provide additional and useful information for fresh consumption and processing as well as utilization of dropped unripe hawthorn fruits. PMID:25577050

  8. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  9. Evolution of green coffee protein profiles with maturation and relationship to coffee cup quality.

    PubMed

    Montavon, Philippe; Duruz, Eliane; Rumo, Gilbert; Pratz, Gudrun

    2003-04-01

    Coffee flavor is the product of a complex chain of chemical transformations. The green bean has only a faint odor that is not at all reminiscent of coffee aroma. It contains, however, all of the necessary precursors to generate the unmistakable coffee flavor during roasting. The levels and biochemical status of these precursors may vary in relation to genetic traits, environmental factors, maturation level, postharvest treatment, and storage. To improve our understanding of coffee flavor generation, the sensory and biochemical impact of maturation was assessed. Maturation clearly favored the development of high-quality flavor in the coffee brew. A specific subclass of green coffee beans, however, generated high-quality coffee flavor irrespective of maturation. Biochemical aspects were examined using a dynamic system: immature and mature green coffee suspensions were incubated under air or argon. On the analytical side, a specific pool of flavor precursors was monitored: chlorogenic acids, green coffee proteins, and free amino acids. A link between maturation, the redox behavior of green coffee suspensions, and their sensory scores was identified. Compared to ripe beans, unripe beans were found to be more sensitive to oxidation of chlorogenic acids. Aerobic incubation also triggered the fragmentation or digestion of the 11S seed storage protein and the release of free amino acids. PMID:12670177

  10. Role of hyaluronic acid in maturation and further early embryo development of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Marei, W F; Ghafari, F; Fouladi-Nashta, A A

    2012-08-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), an important component of the extracellular matrix, plays a crucial role for cumulus cell expansion. Genes and proteins involved in HA synthesis and its receptor CD44 are expressed in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) in different animal species and increase during maturation. Hyaluronidase enzymes (Hyal) degrade HA into smaller biologically active HA fragments. To investigate the effects of the molecular size and concentration of HA on oocyte maturation and further embryo development, bovine oocytes were matured in vitro in the presence or absence of HA, Hyal-2 or 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU); an HA synthesis inhibitor. The rates of oocyte nuclear maturation to metaphase II stage and development of embryos to blastocyst stage and blastocyst quality were recorded. Hyal-2 inhibited cumulus cell expansion without affecting oocyte maturation and further embryo development. Whereas, 4-MU at 1 mm reduced cumulus cell expansion, oocyte maturation rate and further embryo development; an effect which was partially abrogated by exogenous HA supplementation. These data suggest that HA production by cumulus cells during maturation is essential not only for cumulus cell expansion, but also for oocyte maturation and further embryo development. This effect is not affected by HA-degradation by Hyal-2. PMID:22541325

  11. Protein Composition of the Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Hixson, Kim K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-02-05

    The protein content of vaccinia virus mature virions, purified by rate zonal and isopycnic centrifugation and solubilized by SDS or a solution of urea and thiourea, was determined by the accurate mass and time tag technology which uses both tandem mass spectrometry and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to detect tryptic peptides separated by high-resolution liquid chromatography. Eighty vaccinia virus-encoded proteins representing 37% of the 218 genes annotated in the complete genome sequence were detected in at least three analyses. Ten proteins accounted for approximately 80% of the mass, while the least abundant proteins made up 1% or less of the mass. Thirteen identified proteins were not previously reported as components of virions. On the other hand, 8 previously described virion proteins were not detected here, presumably due to technical reasons including small size and hydrophobicity. In addition to vaccinia virus-encoded proteins, 24 host proteins omitting isoforms were detected. The most abundant of these were cytoskeletal proteins, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in translation.

  12. Recovery and identification of mature enamel proteins in ancient teeth.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel M; Laure, Helen J; Tykot, Robert H; de Sousa, Frederico B; Rosa, Jose C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2011-12-01

    Proteins in mineralized tissues provide a window to the past, and dental enamel is peculiar in being highly resistant to diagenesis and providing information on a very narrow window of time, such as the developing period; however, to date, complete proteins have not been extracted successfully from ancient teeth. In this work we tested the ability of a whole-crown micro-etch technique to obtain enamel protein samples from mature enamel of recently extracted (n = 2) and ancient (n = 2; ad 800 to 1100) third molars. Samples were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry, and the resulting spectra were searched against the Swiss-Prot protein database using the Mascot software for protein identification. In our protocol, the separation of proteins in gel is not necessary. Successful identification of specific enamel proteins was obtained after whole-crown superficial enamel etching with 10% HCl. Most protein fragments recovered from dry teeth and mummy teeth contained amino-terminal amelogenin peptides. Only one peptide specific for the amelogenin X-isoform was identified. In conclusion, the reported techniques allowed the successful recovery of proteins specific to dental enamel from samples obtained in a very conservative manner, which may also be important in forensic and/or archeological science. PMID:22243232

  13. A requirement for fatty acid oxidation in the hormone-induced meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa; Downs, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is required for AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA)-induced maturation in vitro. In the present study, we have further investigated the role of this metabolic pathway in hormone-induced meiotic maturation. Incorporating an assay with (3)H-palmitic acid as the substrate, we first examined the effect of PRKA activators on FAO levels. There was a significant stimulation of FAO in cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and RSVA405. In denuded oocytes (DO), AICAR stimulated FAO only in the presence of carnitine, the molecule that facilitates fatty acyl CoA entry into the mitochondria. The carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activator C75 successfully stimulated FAO in CEO. All three of these activators trigger germinal vesicle breakdown. Meiotic resumption induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or amphiregulin was completely inhibited by the FAO inhibitors etomoxir, mercaptoacetate, and malonyl CoA. Importantly, FAO was increased in CEO stimulated by FSH and epidermal growth factor, and this increase was blocked by FAO inhibitors. Moreover, compound C, a PRKA inhibitor, prevented the FSH-induced increase in FAO. Both carnitine and palmitic acid augmented hormonal induction of maturation. In a more physiological setting, etomoxir eliminated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced maturation in follicle-enclosed oocytes. In addition, CEO and DO from hCG-treated mice displayed an etomoxir-sensitive increase in FAO, indicating that this pathway was stimulated during in vivo meiotic resumption. Taken together, our data indicate that hormone-induced maturation in mice requires a PRKA-dependent increase in FAO. PMID:23863407

  14. Increasing abscisic acid levels by immunomodulation in barley grains induces precocious maturation without changing grain composition.

    PubMed

    Staroske, Nicole; Conrad, Udo; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hensel, Götz; Radchuk, Ruslana; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Weschke, Winfriede; Weber, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates in seeds during the transition to the seed filling phase. ABA triggers seed maturation, storage activity, and stress signalling and tolerance. Immunomodulation was used to alter the ABA status in barley grains, with the resulting transgenic caryopses responding to the anti-ABA antibody gene expression with increased accumulation of ABA. Calculation of free versus antibody-bound ABA reveals large excess of free ABA, increasing signficantly in caryopses from 10 days after fertilization. Metabolite and transcript profiling in anti-ABA grains expose triggered and enhanced ABA-functions such as transcriptional up-regulation of sucrose-to-starch metabolism, storage protein synthesis and ABA-related signal transduction. Thus, enhanced ABA during transition phases induces precocious maturation but negatively interferes with growth and development. Anti-ABA grains display broad constitutive gene induction related to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of these genes are ABA- and/or stress-inducible, including alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, peroxidases, chaperones, glutathione-S-transferase, drought- and salt-inducible proteins. Conclusively, ABA immunomodulation results in precocious ABA accumulation that generates an integrated response of stress and maturation. Repression of ABA signalling, occurring in anti-ABA grains, potentially antagonizes effects caused by overshooting production. Finally, mature grain weight and composition are unchanged in anti-ABA plants, although germination is somewhat delayed. This indicates that anti-ABA caryopses induce specific mechanisms to desensitize ABA signalling efficiently, which finally yields mature grains with nearly unchanged dry weight and composition. Such compensation implicates the enormous physiological and metabolic flexibilities of barley grains to adjust effects of unnaturally high ABA amounts in order to ensure and maintain proper grain development. PMID:26951372

  15. Increasing abscisic acid levels by immunomodulation in barley grains induces precocious maturation without changing grain composition

    PubMed Central

    Staroske, Nicole; Conrad, Udo; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hensel, Götz; Radchuk, Ruslana; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Weschke, Winfriede; Weber, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates in seeds during the transition to the seed filling phase. ABA triggers seed maturation, storage activity, and stress signalling and tolerance. Immunomodulation was used to alter the ABA status in barley grains, with the resulting transgenic caryopses responding to the anti-ABA antibody gene expression with increased accumulation of ABA. Calculation of free versus antibody-bound ABA reveals large excess of free ABA, increasing signficantly in caryopses from 10 days after fertilization. Metabolite and transcript profiling in anti-ABA grains expose triggered and enhanced ABA-functions such as transcriptional up-regulation of sucrose-to-starch metabolism, storage protein synthesis and ABA-related signal transduction. Thus, enhanced ABA during transition phases induces precocious maturation but negatively interferes with growth and development. Anti-ABA grains display broad constitutive gene induction related to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of these genes are ABA- and/or stress-inducible, including alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, peroxidases, chaperones, glutathione-S-transferase, drought- and salt-inducible proteins. Conclusively, ABA immunomodulation results in precocious ABA accumulation that generates an integrated response of stress and maturation. Repression of ABA signalling, occurring in anti-ABA grains, potentially antagonizes effects caused by overshooting production. Finally, mature grain weight and composition are unchanged in anti-ABA plants, although germination is somewhat delayed. This indicates that anti-ABA caryopses induce specific mechanisms to desensitize ABA signalling efficiently, which finally yields mature grains with nearly unchanged dry weight and composition. Such compensation implicates the enormous physiological and metabolic flexibilities of barley grains to adjust effects of unnaturally high ABA amounts in order to ensure and maintain proper grain development. PMID:26951372

  16. The Native Form and Maturation Process of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Wakita, Takaji; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Funahashi, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Masumi; Kajita, Tadahiro; Moradpour, Darius; Wands, Jack R.; Kohara, Michinori

    1998-01-01

    The maturation and subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein were investigated with both a vaccinia virus expression system and CHO cell lines stably transformed with HCV cDNA. Two HCV core proteins, with molecular sizes of 21 kDa (p21) and 23 kDa (p23), were identified. The C-terminal end of p23 is amino acid 191 of the HCV polyprotein, and p21 is produced as a result of processing between amino acids 174 and 191. The subcellular localization of the HCV core protein was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although HCV core protein resided predominantly in the cytoplasm, it was also found in the nucleus and had the same molecular size as p21 in both locations, as determined by subcellular fractionation. The HCV core proteins had different immunoreactivities to a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Antibody 5E3 stained core protein in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, C7-50 stained core protein only in the cytoplasm, and 499S stained core protein only in the nucleus. These results clearly indicate that the p23 form of HCV core protein is processed to p21 in the cytoplasm and that the core protein in the nucleus has a higher-order structure different from that of p21 in the cytoplasm. HCV core protein in sera of patients with HCV infection was analyzed in order to determine the molecular size of genuinely processed HCV core protein. HCV core protein in sera was found to have exactly the same molecular weight as the p21 protein. These results suggest that p21 core protein is a component of native viral particles. PMID:9621068

  17. Oligodendroglial maturation is dependent on intracellular protein shuttling.

    PubMed

    Göttle, Peter; Sabo, Jennifer K; Heinen, André; Venables, Gene; Torres, Klintsy; Tzekova, Nevena; Parras, Carlos M; Kremer, David; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Cate, Holly S; Küry, Patrick

    2015-01-21

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the CNS resulting in degeneration of myelin sheaths and loss of oligodendrocytes, which means that protection and electrical insulation of axons and rapid signal propagation are impaired, leading to axonal damage and permanent disabilities. Partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and remyelination can occur as a result of activation and recruitment of resident oligodendroglial precursor cells. However, the overall remyelination capacity remains inefficient because precursor cells often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes. Increasing evidence points to the existence of several molecular inhibitors that act on these cells and interfere with their cellular maturation. The p57kip2 gene encodes one such potent inhibitor of oligodendroglial differentiation and this study sheds light on the underlying mode of action. We found that subcellular distribution of the p57kip2 protein changed during differentiation of rat, mouse, and human oligodendroglial cells both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear export of p57kip2 was correlated with promoted myelin expression, higher morphological phenotypes, and enhanced myelination in vitro. In contrast, nuclear accumulation of p57kip2 resulted in blocked oligodendroglial differentiation. Experimental evidence suggests that the inhibitory role of p57kip2 depends on specific interactions with binding proteins such as LIMK-1, CDK2, Mash1, and Hes5 either by controlling their site of action or their activity. Because functional restoration in demyelinating diseases critically depends on the successful generation of oligodendroglial cells, a therapeutic need that is currently unmet, the regulatory mechanism described here might be of particular interest for identifying suitable drug targets and devising novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25609610

  18. Effects of maturation, diet, and estradiol on indices of protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation in salmonids requires mobilization of proteins from muscle tissue as evidenced by increased expression of proteolytic genes and decreased muscle protein content. However, it is unknown how ration level affects this proteolytic response. Female diploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus ...

  19. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  20. Protein deubiquitination during oocyte maturation influences sperm function during fertilisation, antipolyspermy defense and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Song, Won-Hee; Sutovsky, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Ubiquitination is a covalent post-translational modification of proteins by the chaperone protein ubiquitin. Upon docking to the 26S proteasome, ubiquitin is released from the substrate protein by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). We hypothesised that specific inhibitors of two closely related oocyte DUBs, namely inhibitors of the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCH) UCHL1 (L1 inhibitor) and UCHL3 (L3 inhibitor), would alter porcine oocyte maturation and influence sperm function and embryo development. Aberrant cortical granule (CG) migration and meiotic spindle defects were observed in oocytes matured with the L1 or L3 inhibitor. Embryo development was delayed or blocked in oocytes matured with the general DUB inhibitor PR-619. Aggresomes, the cellular stress-inducible aggregates of ubiquitinated proteins, formed in oocytes matured with L1 inhibitor or PR-619, a likely consequence of impaired protein turnover. Proteomic analysis identified the major vault protein (MVP) as the most prominent protein accumulated in oocytes matured with PR-619, suggesting that the inhibition of deubiquitination altered the turnover of MVP. The mitophagy/autophagy of sperm-contributed mitochondria inside the fertilised oocytes was hindered by DUB inhibitors. It is concluded that DUB inhibitors alter porcine oocyte maturation, fertilisation and preimplantation embryo development. By regulating the turnover of oocyte proteins and mono-ubiquitin regeneration, the DUBs may promote the acquisition of developmental competence during oocyte maturation. PMID:24848520

  1. Characterization of maturation-dependent extrinsic proteins of the rat sperm surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rifkin, J.M.; Olson, G.E.

    1985-05-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa must mature in the epididymis before they can fertilize an egg. It is known that modification of the protein composition of the sperm surface is an important part of the maturation process. In this paper, the authors present data on two related glycoproteins that can be extracted from mature but not immature spermatozoa. Cell surface radioiodination has shown that these proteins are on the sperm surface, and immunofluorescence microscopy, by use of monospecific antibodies to the proteins, has indicated that their localization is restricted to the periacrosomal region of the sperm head. The authors have also shown that in vitro, these proteins will bind to the identical region of immature sperm. Immunohistochemical localization of the proteins in the epididymis shows that they are produced and secreted by the cauda region. The significance of the addition of these proteins to the sperm surface in both maturation and fertilization is discussed.

  2. Dickkopf-Related Protein 1 Inhibits the WNT Signaling Pathway and Improves Pig Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Spate, Lee D.; Brown, Alana N.; Redel, Bethany K.; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Prather, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to mature oocytes in vitro provides a tool for creating embryos by parthenogenesis, fertilization, and cloning. Unfortunately the quality of oocytes matured in vitro falls behind that of in vivo matured oocytes. To address this difference, transcriptional profiling by deep sequencing was conducted on pig oocytes that were either matured in vitro or in vivo. Alignment of over 18 million reads identified 1,316 transcripts that were differentially represented. One pathway that was overrepresented in the oocytes matured in vitro was for Wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT) signaling. In an attempt to inhibit the WNT pathway, Dickkopf-related protein 1 was added to the in vitro maturation medium. Addition of Dickkopf-related protein 1 improved the percentage of oocytes that matured to the metaphase II stage, increased the number of nuclei in the resulting blastocyst stage embryos, and reduced the amount of disheveled segment polarity protein 1 protein in oocytes. It is concluded that transcriptional profiling is a powerful method for detecting differences between in vitro and in vivo matured oocytes, and that the WNT signaling pathway is important for proper oocyte maturation. PMID:24739947

  3. Neonatal skin maturation--vernix caseosa and free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O; Utturkar, Radhika; Pickens, William L; LaRuffa, Angela A; Robinson, Marisa; Wickett, R Randell; Narendran, Vivek; Hoath, Steven B

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal skin hydration decreases rapidly postnatally and then increases, indicating adaptive changes in stratum corneum water handling properties. Transition from high to low humidity at birth may initiate filaggrin proteolysis to free amino acids. Neonatal skin with vernix caseosa retained is more hydrated than skin with vernix removed. This study examines the potential roles of free amino acids and vernix in postnatal adaptation of infant stratum corneum in vivo. Specifically, the ontogeny of free amino acid generation in neonatal stratum corneum and the role of vernix caseosa in postnatal adaptation were examined using high performance liquid chromatography. Free amino acids were quantified for infant skin samples collected at (i) birth and 1 month and (ii) birth and 24 hours after vernix caseosa retention or removal and compared to neonatal foreskin, vernix caseosa, and adult stratum corneum using t-tests, analysis of variance, or univariate procedures. Free amino acids were extremely low at birth, significantly higher 1 month later but lower than in adults. Vernix caseosa retention led to significantly higher free amino acids 24 hours after birth compared to infants with vernix caseosa removed, and it paralleled the higher stratum corneum hydration of vernix caseosa-retained skin. Vernix caseosa contained free amino acids, with glutamic acid and histidine levels higher than in infants. Free amino acids in vernix caseosa-retained skin appear to originate from vernix caseosa. Free amino acids were lower in neonatal foreskin than adult forearm stratum corneum. Arginine was higher than citrulline at birth, but levels were comparable in older infants. The free amino acid increase at 1 month may be initiated by the humidity transition at birth and supports results in animals. The findings have implications for infant skin care practices. PMID:21504444

  4. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in the Pro-Mature Complex Form Enhances Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence

    PubMed Central

    Sudiman, Jaqueline; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; White, Melissa A.; Mottershead, David G.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Gilchrist, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental competence of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes needs to be improved and this can potentially be achieved by adding recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) or growth differentiation factor (GDF9) to IVM. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a purified pro-mature complex form of recombinant human BMP15 versus the commercially available bioactive forms of BMP15 and GDF9 (both isolated mature regions) during IVM on bovine embryo development and metabolic activity. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro in control medium or treated with 100 ng/ml pro-mature BMP15, mature BMP15 or mature GDF9 +/− FSH. Metabolic measures of glucose uptake and lactate production from COCs and autofluorescence of NAD(P)H, FAD and GSH were measured in oocytes after IVM. Following in vitro fertilisation and embryo culture, day 8 blastocysts were stained for cell numbers. COCs matured in medium +/− FSH containing pro-mature BMP15 displayed significantly improved blastocyst development (57.7±3.9%, 43.5±4.2%) compared to controls (43.3±2.4%, 28.9±3.7%) and to mature GDF9+FSH (36.1±3.0%). The mature form of BMP15 produced intermediate levels of blastocyst development; not significantly different to control or pro-mature BMP15 levels. Pro-mature BMP15 increased intra-oocyte NAD(P)H, and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were increased by both forms of BMP15 in the absence of FSH. Exogenous BMP15 in its pro-mature form during IVM provides a functional source of oocyte-secreted factors to improve bovine blastocyst development. This form of BMP15 may prove useful for improving cattle and human artificial reproductive technologies. PMID:25058588

  5. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein

    PubMed Central

    He, Lihua; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Tim; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Riordan, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis is caused by the deletion of a single amino acid (F508) from CFTR and the resulting misfolding and destabilization of the protein. Compounds identified by high-throughput screening to improve ΔF508 CFTR maturation have already entered clinical trials, and it is important to understand their mechanisms of action to further improve their efficacy. Here, we showed that several of these compounds, including the investigational drug VX-809, caused a much greater increase (5- to 10-fold) in maturation at 27 than at 37°C (<2-fold), and the mature product remained short-lived (T1/2∼4.5 h) and thermally unstable, even though its overall conformational state was similar to wild type, as judged by resistance to proteolysis and interdomain cross-linking. Consistent with its inability to restore thermodynamic stability, VX-809 stimulated maturation 2–5-fold beyond that caused by several different stabilizing modifications of NBD1 and the NBD1/CL4 interface. The compound also promoted maturation of several disease-associated processing mutants on the CL4 side of this interface. Although these effects may reflect an interaction of VX-809 with this interface, an interpretation supported by computational docking, it also rescued maturation of mutants in other cytoplasmic loops, either by allosteric effects or via additional sites of action. In addition to revealing the capabilities and some of the limitations of this important investigational drug, these findings clearly demonstrate that ΔF508 CFTR can be completely assembled and evade cellular quality control systems, while remaining thermodynamically unstable. He, L., Kota, P., Aleksandrov, A. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T., Dokholyan, N. V., Riordan, J. R. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein. PMID:23104983

  6. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Tim; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2013-02-01

    Most cystic fibrosis is caused by the deletion of a single amino acid (F508) from CFTR and the resulting misfolding and destabilization of the protein. Compounds identified by high-throughput screening to improve ΔF508 CFTR maturation have already entered clinical trials, and it is important to understand their mechanisms of action to further improve their efficacy. Here, we showed that several of these compounds, including the investigational drug VX-809, caused a much greater increase (5- to 10-fold) in maturation at 27 than at 37°C (<2-fold), and the mature product remained short-lived (T(1/2)∼4.5 h) and thermally unstable, even though its overall conformational state was similar to wild type, as judged by resistance to proteolysis and interdomain cross-linking. Consistent with its inability to restore thermodynamic stability, VX-809 stimulated maturation 2-5-fold beyond that caused by several different stabilizing modifications of NBD1 and the NBD1/CL4 interface. The compound also promoted maturation of several disease-associated processing mutants on the CL4 side of this interface. Although these effects may reflect an interaction of VX-809 with this interface, an interpretation supported by computational docking, it also rescued maturation of mutants in other cytoplasmic loops, either by allosteric effects or via additional sites of action. In addition to revealing the capabilities and some of the limitations of this important investigational drug, these findings clearly demonstrate that ΔF508 CFTR can be completely assembled and evade cellular quality control systems, while remaining thermodynamically unstable. He, L., Kota, P., Aleksandrov, A. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T., Dokholyan, N. V., Riordan, J. R. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein. PMID:23104983

  7. Identification of proteins derived from Listeria monocytogenes inducing human dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Reza; Saei, Azad; Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Azarian, Bahareh; Jalili, Ahmad; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Vaziri, Behrouz; Hadjati, Jamshid

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that can promote antitumor immunity when pulsed with tumor antigens and then matured by stimulatory agents. Despite apparent progress in DC-based cancer immunotherapy, some discrepancies were reported in generating potent DCs. Listeria monocytogenes as an intracellular microorganism is able to effectively activate DCs through engaging pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). This study aimed to find the most potent components derived from L. monocytogenes inducing DC maturation. The preliminary results demonstrated that the ability of protein components is higher than DNA components to promote DC maturation and activation. Protein lysate fractionation demonstrated that fraction 2 HIC (obtained by hydrophobic interaction chromatography) was able to efficiently mature DCs. F2HIC-matured DCs are able to induce allogeneic CD8(+) T cells proliferation better than LPS-matured DCs and induce IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells. Mass spectrometry results showed that F2HIC contains 109 proteins. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for these 109 proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) could be considered as a PRR ligand for stimulating DC maturation. PMID:26886282

  8. ACID AIR AND AEROBIOLOGY RELATED TO THE MATURING HUMAN LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of 'acid air' on human health was studied by considering the effects of hygroscopicity upon aerosol deposition in the lung as a function of human subject age. Children are a critical sub-population to be incorporated into health effects analyses following ambient expos...

  9. Mitochondrial protein synthesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) heart is enhanced in sexually mature males but impaired by low temperature

    PubMed

    West; Driedzic

    1999-09-01

    Throughout the life cycle of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the heart exhibits periods of enhanced growth. Two such instances are cardiac enlargement associated with sexual maturity in males and heart growth at seasonally low environmental temperatures. Heart growth includes a parallel increase in the number of mitochondria. These natural models of heart growth have been exploited to study protein synthesis directed by the mitochondrial genome. Methods were developed to assess protein synthesis in mitochondria isolated from the heart of rainbow trout. Protein synthesis was assessed by tracking the incorporation of l-[2,6-(3)H]phenylalanine into trichloracetic-acid-precipitable protein. Amino acid incorporation into mitochondrial protein was linear with respect to time and was inhibited by chloramphenicol. Radiolabel was selectively enhanced in molecular mass fractions over the same size range as polypeptides known to be encoded by the mitochondrial genome. Protein synthesis was measured in mitochondria isolated from sexually mature animals and from animals subjected to different thermal regimes. The relative ventricular mass of sexually mature male rainbow trout was significantly greater than that of sexually mature females (0. 104+/-0.004 versus 0.087+/-0.002; mean +/- s.e.m.). Mitochondria isolated from the heart of males synthesized protein at a faster rate than mitochondria isolated from the heart of females (0.22+/-0. 02 versus 0.11+/-0.02 pmol phenylalanine mg(-)(1 )protein min(-)(1)). That is, 'male' mitochondria are inherently predisposed to synthesize protein at faster rates. We speculate that the difference may result from higher levels of mitochondrial RNA in males than in females. Mitochondria isolated from the heart of sexually immature rainbow trout acclimated to 13 degrees C synthesized protein at the same rate at 25 degrees C (0.456+/-0.075 pmolphenylalanine mg(-)(1 )protein min(-)(1)) and 15 degrees C (0.455+/-0.027 pmol phenylalanine mg

  10. The intriguing realm of protein biogenesis: Facing the green co-translational protein maturation networks.

    PubMed

    Breiman, Adina; Fieulaine, Sonia; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2016-05-01

    The ribosome is the cell's protein-making factory, a huge protein-RNA complex, that is essential to life. Determining the high-resolution structures of the stable "core" of this factory was among the major breakthroughs of the past decades, and was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2009. Now that the mysteries of the ribosome appear to be more traceable, detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate protein synthesis includes not only the well-known steps of initiation, elongation, and termination but also the less comprehended features of the co-translational events associated with the maturation of the nascent chains. The ribosome is a platform for co-translational events affecting the nascent polypeptide, including protein modifications, folding, targeting to various cellular compartments for integration into membrane or translocation, and proteolysis. These events are orchestrated by ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors (RPBs), a group of a dozen or more factors that act as the "welcoming committee" for the nascent chain as it emerges from the ribosome. In plants these factors have evolved to fit the specificity of different cellular compartments: cytoplasm, mitochondria and chloroplast. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge of these factors and their interaction around the exit tunnel of dedicated ribosomes. Particular attention has been accorded to the plant system, highlighting the similarities and differences with other organisms. PMID:26555180

  11. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  12. Proteomic analysis and candidate allergenic proteins in Populus deltoides CL. "2KEN8" mature pollen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wu, Li-Shuan; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Jia, Hui-Xia; Li, Yu; Yin, Ya-Fang; Hu, Jian-Jun; Lu, Meng-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analysis was used to generate a map of Populus deltoides CL. "2KEN8" mature pollen proteins. By applying 2-D electrophoresis, we resolved 403 protein spots from mature pollen. Using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry method, we identified 178 distinct proteins from 218 protein spots expressed in mature pollen. Moreover, out of these, 28 proteins were identified as putative allergens. The expression patterns of these putative allergen genes indicate that several of these genes are highly expressed in pollen. In addition, the members of profilin allergen family were analyzed and their expression patterns were compared with their homologous genes in Arabidopsis and rice. Knowledge of these identified allergens has the potential to improve specific diagnosis and allergen immunotherapy treatment for patients with poplar pollen allergy. PMID:26284084

  13. Opportunistic proteolytic processing of carbonic anhydrase 1 from Chlamydomonas in Arabidopsis reveals a novel route for protein maturation.

    PubMed

    Juvale, Parijat S; Wagner, Ryan L; Spalding, Martin H

    2016-04-01

    Proteolytic processing of secretory proteins to yield an active form generally involves specific proteolytic cleavage of a pre-protein. Multiple specific proteases have been identified that target specific pre-protein processing sites in animals. However, characterization of site-specific proteolysis of plant pre-proteins is still evolving. In this study, we characterized proteolytic processing of Chlamydomonas periplasmic carbonic anhydrase 1 (CAH1) in Arabidopsis. CAH1 pre-protein undergoes extensive post-translational modification in the endomembrane system, including glycosylation, disulfide bond formation and proteolytic removal of a peptide 'spacer' region, resulting in a mature, heterotetrameric enzyme with two large and two small subunits. We generated a series of small-scale and large-scale modifications to the spacer and flanking regions to identify potential protease target motifs. Surprisingly, we found that the endoproteolytic removal of the spacer from the CAH1 pre-protein proceeded via an opportunistic process apparently followed by further maturation via amino and carboxy peptidases. We also discovered that the spacer itself is not required for processing, which appears to be dependent only on the number of amino acids separating two key disulfide-bond-forming cysteines. Our data suggest a novel, opportunistic route for pre-protein processing of CAH1. PMID:26917556

  14. Opportunistic proteolytic processing of carbonic anhydrase 1 from Chlamydomonas in Arabidopsis reveals a novel route for protein maturation

    PubMed Central

    Juvale, Parijat S.; Wagner, Ryan L.; Spalding, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of secretory proteins to yield an active form generally involves specific proteolytic cleavage of a pre-protein. Multiple specific proteases have been identified that target specific pre-protein processing sites in animals. However, characterization of site-specific proteolysis of plant pre-proteins is still evolving. In this study, we characterized proteolytic processing of Chlamydomonas periplasmic carbonic anhydrase 1 (CAH1) in Arabidopsis. CAH1 pre-protein undergoes extensive post-translational modification in the endomembrane system, including glycosylation, disulfide bond formation and proteolytic removal of a peptide ‘spacer’ region, resulting in a mature, heterotetrameric enzyme with two large and two small subunits. We generated a series of small-scale and large-scale modifications to the spacer and flanking regions to identify potential protease target motifs. Surprisingly, we found that the endoproteolytic removal of the spacer from the CAH1 pre-protein proceeded via an opportunistic process apparently followed by further maturation via amino and carboxy peptidases. We also discovered that the spacer itself is not required for processing, which appears to be dependent only on the number of amino acids separating two key disulfide-bond-forming cysteines. Our data suggest a novel, opportunistic route for pre-protein processing of CAH1. PMID:26917556

  15. Properties of proteins and the glassy matrix in maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wolkers, W F; Alberda, M; Koornneef, M; Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; Hoekstra, F A

    1998-10-01

    In situ Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used to study the heat stability of proteins and hydrogen bonding interactions in dry maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana. alpha-Helical, turn and beta-sheet conformations were the major protein secondary structures in all of these seeds. On heating, intermolecular extended beta-sheet structures, typical of protein denaturation, were formed in abscisic acid-insensitive (abi3) and leafy cotyledon (lec) mutant seeds. Proteins in dry wild-type seeds did not denature up to 150 degrees C, but those in dry desiccation-sensitive, lec1-1, lec1-3 and abi3-5 seeds did at 68, 89 and 87 degrees C, respectively. In the desiccation-tolerant abi3-7 and abi3-1 seeds, denaturation commenced above 120 and 135 degrees C, respectively. Seeds of the aba1-1 abi3-1 double mutant showed signs of denaturation already upon drying. The molecular packing in the seeds was studied by observing the shift in the position of the OH-stretching vibration band with temperature. The maximal rate of change of this band with temperature was much higher in the desiccation-sensitive abi3-5, aba1-1 abi3-1, lec1-1, and lec1-3 mutant seeds than in the desiccation-tolerant wild-type, abi3-1, abi3-7, and lec2-1 seeds. We interpret this to mean that the molecular packing density is higher in dry desiccation-tolerant than in dry desiccation-sensitive seeds, which is associated with a higher or lower protein denaturation temperature, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological and biochemical characteristics of these mutant seeds. PMID:9839460

  16. Hermes RNA-binding protein targets RNAs-encoding proteins involved in meiotic maturation, early cleavage, and germline development.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye-Won; Cauffman, Karen; Chan, Agnes P; Zhou, Yi; King, Mary Lou; Etkin, Laurence D; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2007-07-01

    The early development of metazoans is mainly regulated by differential translation and localization of maternal mRNAs in the embryo. In general, these processes are orchestrated by RNA-binding proteins interacting with specific sequence motifs in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of their target RNAs. Hermes is an RNA-binding protein, which contains a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) and is found in various vertebrate species from fish to human. In Xenopus laevis, Hermes mRNA and protein are localized in the vegetal region of oocytes. A subpopulation of Hermes protein is concentrated in a specific structure in the vegetal cortex, called the germ plasm (believed to contain determinants of the germ cell fate) where Hermes protein co-localizes with Xcat2 and RINGO/Spy mRNAs. The level of total Hermes protein decreases during maturation. The precocious depletion of Hermes protein by injection of Hermes antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (HE-MO) accelerates the process of maturation and results in cleavage defects in vegetal blastomeres of the embryo. It is known that several maternal mRNAs including RINGO/Spy and Mos are regulated at the translational level during meiotic maturation and early cleavage in Xenopus. The ectopic expression of RINGO/Spy or Mos causes resumption of meiotic maturation and cleavage arrests, which resemble the loss of Hermes phenotypes. We found that the injection of HE-MO enhances the acceleration of maturation caused by the injection of RINGO/Spy mRNA, and that Hermes protein is present as mRNP complex containing RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs in vivo. We propose that as an RNA-binding protein, Hermes may be involved in maturation, cleavage events at the vegetal pole and germ cell development by negatively regulating the expression of RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs. PMID:17309605

  17. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guohua; Liu, Xingzhao; Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types. PMID:23626790

  18. Response of Soil Respiration to Acid Rain in Forests of Different Maturity in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types. PMID:23626790

  19. Inhibition of proteolytic processing of adenoviral proteins by epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum in adenovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Nosach, Lidiya; Dyachenko, Nataliya; Zhovnovataya, Valentina; Lozinskiy, Miron; Lozitsky, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Maturation of adenovirus particles is markedly affected by proteolytic processing. The possibility for blocking the conversion of precursor structural core protein (preVII) into mature structure protein VII by officinal drugs epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum has been demonstrated in Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus. Proteolytic processing may be regarded as one of the targets for inhibiting adenovirus reproduction. PMID:12545207

  20. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  1. Requirement of enhanced Survival Motoneuron protein imposed during neuromuscular junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Shingo; Obis, Teresa; Garone, Caterina; Akay, Turgay; Sera, Fusako; Iwata, Shinichi; Homma, Shunichi; Monani, Umrao R.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common motor neuron disease caused by low survival motoneuron (SMN), a key protein in the proper splicing of genes. Restoring the protein is therefore a promising therapeutic strategy. Implementation of this strategy, however, depends on defining the temporal requirements for SMN. Here, we used controlled knockdown of SMN in transgenic mice to determine the precise postnatal stage requirements for this protein. Reducing SMN in neonatal mice resulted in a classic SMA-like phenotype. Unexpectedly, depletion of SMN in adults had relatively little effect. Insensitivity to low SMN emerged abruptly at postnatal day 17, which coincided with establishment of the fully mature neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Mature animals depleted of SMN eventually exhibited evidence of selective neuromuscular pathology that was made worse by traumatic injury. The ability to regenerate the mature NMJ in aged or injured SMN-depleted mice was grossly impaired, a likely consequence of the inability to meet the surge in demand for motoneuronal SMN that was seen in controls. Our results demonstrate that relative maturity of the NMJ determines the temporal requirement for the SMN protein. These observations suggest that the use of potent but potentially deleterious SMN-enhancing agents could be tapered in human patients once the neuromuscular system matures and reintroduced as needed to enhance SMN for remodeling aged or injured NMJs. PMID:24463453

  2. Two regions of mature periplasmic maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli involved in secretion.

    PubMed

    Duplay, P; Hofnung, M

    1988-10-01

    Six mutations in malE, the structural gene for the periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) from Escherichia coli, prevent growth on maltose as a carbon source, as well as release of the mutant proteins by the cold osmotic-shock procedure. These mutations correspond to insertion of an oligonucleotide linker, concomitant with a deletion. One of the mutations (malE127) affects the N-terminal extension (the signal peptide), whereas the five others lie within the mature protein. As expected, the export of protein MalE127 is blocked at an early stage. This protein is neither processed to maturity nor sensitive to proteinase K in spheroplasts. In contrast, in the five other mutants, the signal peptide is cleaved and the protein is accessible to proteinase K added to spheroplasts. This indicates that the five mutant proteins are, at least in part, exported through the inner membrane. We propose that the corresponding mutations define two regions of the mature protein (between residues 18 and 42 and between residues 280 and 306), which are important for release of the protein from the inner membrane into the periplasm. We discuss the results in terms of possible conformational changes at this late step of export to the periplasm. PMID:3049532

  3. Expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism during maturation in diploid and triploid female rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study effects of sexual maturation on fatty acid metabolism in fish on a high nutritional plane, expression of thirty-five genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was determined in sexually maturing diploid (2N; fertile) and triploid (3N; sterile) female rainbow trout. Gene expression was assesse...

  4. Recovery of Red Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Maturation Deficiency through Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew M.; Oteng-Pabi, Samuel K.; Pandelieva, Antonia T.; Mayo, Stephen L.; Chica, Roberto A.

    2012-01-01

    Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) derived from organisms in the class Anthozoa have found widespread application as imaging tools in biological research. For most imaging experiments, RFPs that mature quickly to the red chromophore and produce little or no green chromophore are most useful. In this study, we used rational design to convert a yellow fluorescent mPlum mutant to a red-emitting RFP without reverting any of the mutations causing the maturation deficiency and without altering the red chromophore’s covalent structure. We also created an optimized mPlum mutant (mPlum-E16P) that matures almost exclusively to the red chromophore. Analysis of the structure/function relationships in these proteins revealed two structural characteristics that are important for efficient red chromophore maturation in DsRed-derived RFPs. The first is the presence of a lysine residue at position 70 that is able to interact directly with the chromophore. The second is an absence of non-bonding interactions limiting the conformational flexibility at the peptide backbone that is oxidized during red chromophore formation. Satisfying or improving these structural features in other maturation-deficient RFPs may result in RFPs with faster and more complete maturation to the red chromophore. PMID:23285050

  5. NLRP9B protein is dispensable for oocyte maturation and early embryonic development in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    PENG, Hui; LIN, Xiujiao; LIU, Fang; WANG, Cheng; ZHANG, Wenchang

    2015-01-01

    Nlrp9a, Nlrp9b and Nlrp9c are preferentially expressed in oocytes and early embryos in the mouse. Simultaneous genetic ablation of Nlrp9a and Nlrp9c does not affect early embryonic development, but the function of Nlrp9b in the process of oocyte maturation and embryonic development has not been elucidated. Here we show that both Nlrp9b mRNA and its protein are expressed in ovaries and the small intestine. Moreover, the NLRP9B protein was restricted to oocytes in the ovary and declined with oocyte aging. After ovulation and fertilization, NLRP9B protein was found in preimplantation embryos. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that it was mainly localized in the cytoplasm in the oocytes and blastomeres. Thus, this protein might play a role in oocyte maturation and early embryonic development. However, knockdown of Nlrp9b expression in GV-stage oocytes using RNA interference did not affect oocyte maturation or subsequent parthenogenetic development after Nlrp9b-deficient oocytes were activated. Furthermore, Nlrp9b knockdown zygotes could reach the blastocyst stage after being cultured for 3.5 days in vitro. These results provide the first evidence that the NLRP9B protein is dispensable for oocyte maturation and early embryonic development in the mouse. PMID:26411641

  6. Linoleic acid stimulates neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets of maturing bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Carro, M; Buschiazzo, J; Ríos, G L; Oresti, G M; Alberio, R H

    2013-03-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in high concentrations in bovine follicular fluid; when added to maturation culture media, it affects oocyte competence (depending on the type and concentration of LA used). To date, little is known about the effective level of incorporation of LA and there is apparently no information regarding its esterification into various lipid fractions of the oocyte and its effect on neutral lipid storage. Therefore, the objective was to assess the uptake and subcellular lipid distribution of LA by analyzing incorporation of radiolabeled LA into oocyte polar and neutral lipid classes. The effects of various concentrations of LA on the nuclear status and cytoplasmic lipid content of bovine oocytes matured in vitro was also analyzed, with particular emphasis on intermediate concentrations of LA. Neutral lipids stored in lipid droplets were quantified with a fluorescence approach. Linoleic acid at 9 and 43 μM did not affect the nuclear status of oocytes matured in vitro, and 100 μM LA inhibited germinal vesicle breakdown, resulting in a higher percentage of oocytes arrested at the germinal state (43.5 vs. 3.0 in controls; P < 0.05). Bovine oocytes actively incorporated LA from the maturation medium (83.4 pmol LA per 100 oocytes at 22 hours of incubation; P < 0.05) and metabolized it mainly into major lipid classes, e.g., triacylglycerols and phospholipids (61.1% and 29.3%, respectively). Supplementation of the maturation medium with LA increased triacylglycerol accumulation in cytoplasmic lipid droplets at all concentrations assayed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, LA added to a defined maturation medium at concentrations that did not alter the nuclear status of bovine oocytes matured in vitro (9 and 43 μM) improved their quality by increasing the content of neutral lipids stored in lipid droplets. By directing the free fatty acid (LA) to triacylglycerol synthesis pathways and increasing the degree of unsaturation of

  7. The Flavivirus Precursor Membrane-Envelope Protein Complex: Structure and Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Lok, Shee-Mei; Yu, I-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Kuhn, Richard J.; Chen, Jue; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-09-17

    Many viruses go through a maturation step in the final stages of assembly before being transmitted to another host. The maturation process of flaviviruses is directed by the proteolytic cleavage of the precursor membrane protein (prM), turning inert virus into infectious particles. We have determined the 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structure of a recombinant protein in which the dengue virus prM is linked to the envelope glycoprotein E. The structure represents the prM-E heterodimer and fits well into the cryo-electron microscopy density of immature virus at neutral pH. The pr peptide {beta}-barrel structure covers the fusion loop in E, preventing fusion with host cell membranes. The structure provides a basis for identifying the stages of its pH-directed conformational metamorphosis during maturation, ending with release of pr when budding from the host.

  8. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc-/- tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc-/- tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  9. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  10. Protein synthesis inhibitors prevent both spontaneous and hormone-dependent maturation of isolated mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, S.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein synthesis in mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. In the first part of this study, the effects of cycloheximide (CX) were tested on spontaneous meiotic maturation when oocytes were cultured in inhibitor-free medium. CX reversibly suppressed maturation of oocytes as long as maturation was either initially prevented by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), or delayed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In the second part of this study, the actions of protein synthesis inhibitors were tested on hormone-induced maturation. CEO were maintained in meiotic arrest for 21-22 h with hypoxanthine, and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) was induced with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Three different protein synthesis inhibitors (CX, emetine (EM), and puromycin (PUR)) each prevented the stimulatory action of FSH on GVB in a dose-dependent fashion. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent suppression of 3H-leucine incorporation by oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. The action of these inhibitors on FSH- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced GVB was next compared. All three drugs lowered the frequency of GVB in the FSH-treated groups, below even that of the controls (drug + hypoxanthine); the drugs maintained meiotic arrest at the control frequencies in the EGF-treated groups. Puromycin aminonucleoside, an analog of PUR with no inhibitory action on protein synthesis, had no effect. The three inhibitors also suppressed the stimulatory action of FSH on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained with the cAMP analog, dbcAMP.

  11. Elevated non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during bovine oocyte maturation compromise early embryo physiology.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Veerle; Sturmey, Roger G; Bermejo-Alvarez, Pablo; Rizos, Dimitrios; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Leese, Henry J; Bols, Peter E J; Leroy, Jo L M R

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), associated with maternal disorders such as obesity and type II diabetes, alter the ovarian follicular micro-environment and have been associated with subfertility arising from reduced oocyte developmental competence. We have asked whether elevated NEFA concentrations during oocyte maturation affect the development and physiology of zygotes formed from such oocytes, using the cow as a model. The zygotes were grown to blastocysts, which were evaluated for their quality in terms of cell number, apoptosis, expression of key genes, amino acid turnover and oxidative metabolism. Oocyte maturation under elevated NEFA concentrations resulted in blastocysts with significantly lower cell number, increased apoptotic cell ratio and altered mRNA abundance of DNMT3A, IGF2R and SLC2A1. In addition, the blastocysts displayed reduced oxygen, pyruvate and glucose consumption, up-regulated lactate consumption and higher amino acid metabolism. These data indicate that exposure of maturing oocytes to elevated NEFA concentrations has a negative impact on fertility not only through a reduction in oocyte developmental capacity but through compromised early embryo quality, viability and metabolism. PMID:21858021

  12. Laminin γ2 knockout mice rescued with the human protein exhibit enamel maturation defects.

    PubMed

    Wazen, Rima M; Viegas-Costa, Luiz C; Fouillen, Aurélien; Moffatt, Pierre; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L; Senior, Robert M; Nanci, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial ameloblasts are separated from the maturing enamel by an atypical basement membrane (BM) that is enriched in laminin 332 (LM-332). This heterotrimeric protein (α3, ß3 and γ2 chains) provides structural integrity to BMs and influences various epithelial cell processes including cell adhesion and differentiation. Mouse models that lack expression of individual LM-332 chains die shortly after birth. The lethal phenotype of laminin γ2 knockout mice can be rescued by human laminin γ2 (LAMC2) expressed using a doxycycline-inducible (Tet-on) cytokeratin 14 promoter-rtTA. These otherwise normal-looking rescued mice exhibit white spot lesions on incisors. We therefore investigated the effect of rescue with human LAMC2 on enamel maturation and structuring of the atypical BM. The maturation stage enamel organ in transgenic mice was severely altered as compared to wild type controls, a structured BM was no longer discernible, dystrophic matrix appeared in the maturing enamel layer, and there was residual enamel matrix late into the maturation stage. Microtomographic scans revealed excessive wear of occlusal surfaces on molars, chipping of enamel on incisor tips, and hypomineralization of the enamel layer. No structural alterations were observed at other epithelial sites, such as skin, palate and tongue. These results indicate that while this humanized mouse model is capable of rescue in various epithelial tissues, it is unable to sustain structuring of a proper BM at the interface between ameloblasts and maturing enamel. This failure may be related to the atypical composition of the BM in the maturation stage and reaffirms that the atypical BM is essential for enamel maturation. PMID:26956061

  13. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  14. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  15. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Differential Expression of Vitreous Proteins in Young and Mature New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Dufresne, Craig P.; Semba, Richard D.; Edward, Deepak P.

    2016-01-01

    Different anatomical regions have been defined in the vitreous humor including central vitreous, basal vitreous, vitreous cortex, vitreoretinal interface and zonule. In this study we sought to characterize changes in the proteome of vitreous humor (VH) related to compartments or age in New Zealand white rabbits (NZW). Vitreous humor was cryo-collected from young and mature New Zealand white rabbit eyes, and dissected into anterior and posterior compartments. All samples were divided into 4 groups: Young Anterior (YA), Young Posterior (YP), Mature Anterior (MA) and Mature Posterior (MP) vitreous. Tryptic digests of total proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Spectral count was used to determine the relative protein abundances and identify proteins with statistical differences between compartment and age groups. Western blotting was performed to validate some of the differentially expressed proteins. Our results showed that 231, 375, 273 and 353 proteins were identified in the YA, YP, MA and MP respectively. Fifteen proteins were significantly differentially expressed between YA and YP, and 11 between MA and MP. Carbonic anhydrase III, lambda crystallin, alpha crystallin A and B, beta crystallin B1 and B2 were more abundant in the anterior region, whereas vimentin was less abundant in the anterior region. For comparisons between age groups, 4 proteins were differentially expressed in both YA relative to MA and YP relative to MP. Western blotting confirmed the differential expression of carbonic anhydrase III, alpha crystallin B and beta crystallin B2. The protein profiles of the vitreous humor showed age- and compartment-related differences. This differential protein profile provides a baseline for understanding the vitreous compartmentalization in the rabbit and suggests that further studies profiling proteins in different compartments of the vitreous in other species may be warranted. PMID:27089221

  17. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  18. Role for a Novel Usher Protein Complex in Hair Cell Synaptic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Meehan, Daniel T.; Delimont, Duane; Rutledge, Joseph; Gratton, Michael Anne; Flannery, John; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying hair cell synaptic maturation are not well understood. Cadherin-23 (CDH23), protocadherin-15 (PCDH15) and the very large G-protein coupled receptor 1 (VLGR1) have been implicated in the development of cochlear hair cell stereocilia, while clarin-1 has been suggested to also play a role in synaptogenesis. Mutations in CDH23, PCDH15, VLGR1 and clarin-1 cause Usher syndrome, characterized by congenital deafness, vestibular dysfunction and retinitis pigmentosa. Here we show developmental expression of these Usher proteins in afferent spiral ganglion neurons and hair cell synapses. We identify a novel synaptic Usher complex comprised of clarin-1 and specific isoforms of CDH23, PCDH15 and VLGR1. To establish the in vivo relevance of this complex, we performed morphological and quantitative analysis of the neuronal fibers and their synapses in the Clrn1−/− mouse, which was generated by incomplete deletion of the gene. These mice showed a delay in neuronal/synaptic maturation by both immunostaining and electron microscopy. Analysis of the ribbon synapses in Ames waltzerav3J mice also suggests a delay in hair cell synaptogenesis. Collectively, these results show that, in addition to the well documented role for Usher proteins in stereocilia development, Usher protein complexes comprised of specific protein isoforms likely function in synaptic maturation as well. PMID:22363448

  19. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin B5 is an acidic endo- and exopeptidase of the immature and mature parasite.

    PubMed

    Siricoon, Sinee; Vichasri Grams, Suksiri; Lertwongvisarn, Kittisak; Abdullohfakeeyah, Muntana; Smooker, Peter M; Grams, Rudi

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine proteases of the liver fluke Fasciola have been described as essential molecules in the infection process of the mammalian host. Destinct cathepsin Bs, which are already expressed in the metacercarial stage and released by the newly excysted juvenile are major actors in this process. Following infection their expression is stopped and the proteins will not be detectable any longer after the first month of development. On the contrary, the novel cathepsin B5 of Fasciola gigantica (FgCB5) described in this work was also found expressed in later juvenile stages and the mature worm. Like all previously described Fasciola family members it was located in the cecal epithelium of the parasite. Western blot analysis of adult antigen preparations detected procathepsin B5 in crude worm extract and in small amounts in the ES product. In support of these data, the sera of infected rabbits and mice were reactive with recombinant FgCB5 in Western blot and ELISA. Biochemical analysis of yeast-expressed FgCB5 revealed that it has properties of a lysosomal hydrolase optimized for activity at acid pH and that it is able to efficiently digest a broad spectrum of host proteins. Unlike previously characterized Fasciola family members FgCB5 carries a histidine doublet in the occluding loop equivalent to residues His110 and His111 of human mature cathepsin B and consequently showed substantial carboxydipeptidyl activity which depends on these two residues. PMID:26453811

  20. G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) inhibits final oocyte maturation in common carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Suravi; Das, Sumana; Moulik, Sujata Roy; Mallick, Buddhadev; Pal, Puja; Mukherjee, Dilip

    2015-01-15

    GPR-30, now named as GPER (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor) was first identified as an orphan receptor and subsequently shown to be required for estrogen-mediated signaling in certain cancer cells. Later studies demonstrated that GPER has the characteristics of a high affinity estrogen membrane receptor on Atlantic croaker and zebra fish oocytes and mediates estrogen inhibition of oocyte maturation in these two distantly related teleost. To determine the broad application of these findings to other teleost, expression of GPER mRNA and its involvement in 17β-estradiol mediated inhibition of oocyte maturation in other cyprinid, Cyprinus carpio was investigated. Carp oocytes at pre-vitellogenic, late-vitellogenic and post-vitellogenic stages of development contained GPER mRNA and its transcribed protein with a maximum at late-vitellogenic oocytes. Ovarian follicular cells did not express GPER mRNA. Carp oocytes GPER mRNA was essentially identical to that found in other perciformes and cyprinid fish oocytes. Both spontaneous and 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20β-P)-induced oocyte maturation in carp was significantly decreased when they were incubated with either E2, or GPER agonist G-1. On the other hand spontaneous oocyte maturation was significantly increased when carp ovarian follicles were incubated with an aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, GPER antagonist, G-15 and enzymatic removal of the ovarian follicle cell layers. This increase in oocyte maturation was partially reversed by co-treatment with E2. Consistent with previous findings with human and fish GPR30, E2 treatment in carp oocytes caused increase in cAMP production and simultaneously decrease in oocyte maturation, which was inhibited by the addition of 17,20β-P. The results suggest that E2 and GPER play a critical role in regulating re-entry in to meiotic cell cycle in carp oocytes. PMID:25485460

  1. Selection of dietary protein and carbohydrate by rats: Changes with maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Theall, Cynthia L.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Weaning (21-day-old; 40-50 g) male rats given simultaneous access to foods, containing 18 percent casein and 15 or 70 percent carbohydrate (dextrin), tended to consume only 29-35 percent as much protein as carbohydrate (i.e., protein/carbohydrate ratios were 0.29-0.35). With maturation, when animals weighed 100 g or more, about half continued this pattern of nutrient choice, but the others abruptly began to consume considerably larger proportions of protein, exhibiting protein/carbohydrate ratios as high as 0.80-1.00. Each adult animal's protein/carbohydrate ratio tended to vary only slightly (s.e. = 3 percent of means). Adult protein/carbohydrate ratios were not correlated with fasting brain 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels. These marked differences among rats in eating behavior would not be observed when--as is usually the case--animals are given access to only one diet.

  2. Membrane Binding Properties and Terminal Residues of the Mature Hepatitis C Virus Capsid Protein in Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Tomoaki; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Kohara, Michinori; Nomoto, Akio

    2004-01-01

    The immature core protein (p23, residues 1 to 191) of hepatitis C virus undergoes posttranslational modifications including intramembranous proteolysis within its C-terminal signal sequence by signal peptide peptidase to generate the mature form (p21). In this study, we analyzed the cleavage site and other amino acid modifications that occur on the core protein. To produce the posttranslationally modified core protein, we used a baculovirus-insect cell expression model system. As previously reported, p23 is processed to form p21 in insect as well as in mammalian cells. p21 was found to be associated with the cytoplasmic membrane, and its significant portion behaved as an integral membrane protein. The protein was purified from the membrane by a simple and unique procedure on the basis of its membrane-binding properties and solubility in detergents. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis of purified p21 showed that the average molecular mass (m/z 19,307) of its single-charged ion differs by m/z 1,457 from that calculated for p23. To determine the posttranslational modifications, tryptic p21 peptides were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. We found three peptides that did not match the theoretically derived peptides of p23. Analysis of these peptides by MALDI-TOF tandem MS revealed that they correspond to N-terminal peptides (residues 2 to 9 and 2 to 10) starting with α-N-acetylserine and C-terminal peptide (residues 150 to 177) ending with phenylalanine. These results suggest that the mature core protein (molecular mass of 19,306 Da) includes residues 2 to 177 and that its N terminus is blocked with an acetyl group. PMID:15479818

  3. Identification of Maturation-Specific Proteins by Single-Cell Proteomics of Human Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Virant-Klun, Irma; Leicht, Stefan; Hughes, Christopher; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    Oocytes undergo a range of complex processes via oogenesis, maturation, fertilization, and early embryonic development, eventually giving rise to a fully functioning organism. To understand proteome composition and diversity during maturation of human oocytes, here we have addressed crucial aspects of oocyte collection and proteome analysis, resulting in the first proteome and secretome maps of human oocytes. Starting from 100 oocytes collected via a novel serum-free hanging drop culture system, we identified 2,154 proteins, whose function indicate that oocytes are largely resting cells with a proteome that is tailored for homeostasis, cellular attachment, and interaction with its environment via secretory factors. In addition, we have identified 158 oocyte-enriched proteins (such as ECAT1, PIWIL3, NLRP7)(1) not observed in high-coverage proteomics studies of other human cell lines or tissues. Exploiting SP3, a novel technology for proteomic sample preparation using magnetic beads, we scaled down proteome analysis to single cells. Despite the low protein content of only ∼100 ng per cell, we consistently identified ∼450 proteins from individual oocytes. When comparing individual oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) and metaphase II (MII) stage, we found that the Tudor and KH domain-containing protein (TDRKH) is preferentially expressed in immature oocytes, while Wee2, PCNA, and DNMT1 were enriched in mature cells, collectively indicating that maintenance of genome integrity is crucial during oocyte maturation. This study demonstrates that an innovative proteomics workflow facilitates analysis of single human oocytes to investigate human oocyte biology and preimplantation development. The approach presented here paves the way for quantitative proteomics in other quantity-limited tissues and cell types. Data associated with this study are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004142. PMID:27215607

  4. Allopregnanolone increases mature excitatory synapses along dendrites via protein kinase A signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Ishizuka, Y; Yamazaki, H; Shirao, T

    2015-10-01

    Allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one) is synthesized in both the periphery and central nervous system and is known to be a potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor. Because APα was suggested to improve the symptoms of depression and Alzheimer's disease (AD), which involve synaptic dysfunction and loss, we examined whether APα affects excitatory synapses. Drebrin, which is an actin-binding protein, forms a unique stable actin structure in dendritic spines, and drebrin levels correlate positively with cognitive levels in AD and mild cognitive impairment. We investigated whether APα increases excitatory synapse density along dendrites of mature hippocampal neurons using drebrin-imaging-based evaluation of mature synapses. We prepared primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and either transfected them with GFP or immunostained them against drebrin. Morphological analysis of GFP-transfected neurons revealed that a 24-h exposure to 0.3 or 1 μM APα significantly increased dendritic spine density without any morphological changes to spines. Drebrin cluster density was also increased by 0.3 and 1 μM APα. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 inhibited the APα-induced increase in drebrin cluster density. These data demonstrate that APα increases mature excitatory synapses via activation of PKA. Therefore, the PKA-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling pathway is likely to be involved in the APα-induced increase of mature excitatory synapses. Another possibility is that the PKA-dependent increase in AMPA receptors at dendritic spines mediates the APα function. In conclusion, our study indicates that APα may improve neuropsychiatric disorder outcomes via increasing the numbers of mature excitatory synapses. PMID:26241343

  5. The mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxin S15 is essential for iron-sulfur protein maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Moseler, Anna; Aller, Isabel; Wagner, Stephan; Nietzel, Thomas; Przybyla-Toscano, Jonathan; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Berndt, Carsten; Rouhier, Nicolas; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.

    2015-01-01

    The iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) is an ancient and essential cofactor of many proteins involved in electron transfer and metabolic reactions. In Arabidopsis, three pathways exist for the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins in the cytosol, plastids, and mitochondria. We functionally characterized the role of mitochondrial glutaredoxin S15 (GRXS15) in biogenesis of ISC containing aconitase through a combination of genetic, physiological, and biochemical approaches. Two Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants were identified as null mutants with early embryonic lethal phenotypes that could be rescued by GRXS15. Furthermore, we showed that recombinant GRXS15 is able to coordinate and transfer an ISC and that this coordination depends on reduced glutathione (GSH). We found the Arabidopsis GRXS15 able to complement growth defects based on disturbed ISC protein assembly of a yeast Δgrx5 mutant. Modeling of GRXS15 onto the crystal structures of related nonplant proteins highlighted amino acid residues that after mutation diminished GSH and subsequently ISC coordination, as well as the ability to rescue the yeast mutant. When used for plant complementation, one of these mutant variants, GRXS15K83/A, led to severe developmental delay and a pronounced decrease in aconitase activity by approximately 65%. These results indicate that mitochondrial GRXS15 is an essential protein in Arabidopsis, required for full activity of iron-sulfur proteins. PMID:26483494

  6. Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (ePAB) phosphorylation is required for Xenopus oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Friend, Kyle; Brook, Matthew; Bezirci, F Betül; Sheets, Michael D; Gray, Nicola K; Seli, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Oocyte maturation and early embryonic development require the cytoplasmic polyadenylation and concomitant translational activation of stored maternal mRNAs. ePAB [embryonic poly(A)-binding protein, also known as ePABP and PABPc1-like] is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator that binds to poly(A) tails. In the present study we find that ePAB is a dynamically modified phosphoprotein in Xenopus laevis oocytes and show by mutation that phosphorylation at a four residue cluster is required for oocyte maturation. We further demonstrate that these phosphorylations are critical for cytoplasmic polyadenylation, but not for ePAB's inherent ability to promote translation. Our results provide the first insight into the role of post-translational modifications in regulating PABP protein activity in vivo. PMID:22497250

  7. Effects of heat shock protein gp96 on human dendritic cell maturation and CTL expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Zan, Yanlu; Shan, Ming; Liu, Changmei; Shi, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhixin; Liu, Na; Wang, Fusheng; Zhong, Weidong; Liao, Fulian; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2006-06-01

    We reported previously that heat shock protein gp96 and its N-terminal fragment were able to stimulate CTL expansion specific for a HBV peptide (SYVNTNMGL) in BALB/c mice. Here we characterized the adjuvant effects of gp96 on human HLA-A2 restricted T cells. Full-length gp96 isolated from healthy human liver and recombinant fragments both from prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells were analyzed for their ability to stimulate maturation of human dendritic cells. It was found that in vitro these proteins were capable of maturating human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) isolated from healthy donors as well as from HBV-positive, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice, gp96 and the recombinant fragments were found to augment CTL response specific for the HBcAg(18-27) FLPSDFFPSV peptide of hepatitis B virus. PMID:16630554

  8. Branched-chain amino acid transport regulation in mutants blocked in tRNA maturation and transcriptional termination.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Lawther, R P; Hatfield, G W; Oxender, D L

    1978-01-01

    The regulation of branched-chain amino acid transport and binding protein biosynthesis was studied in Escherichia coli strains containing hisT (the structural gene for pseudouridine synthetase) and rho (the structural gene for the mRNA transcriptional termination factor rho) mutations. The results indicate that the hisT strain cannot be fully derepressed for transport and that the hisT rho double mutant is partially derepressed under excess leucine conditions, but cannot be further derepressed by leucine deprivation. These data are consistent with a model in which fully mature tRNALeu is required for derepression and in which rho interacts with tRNALeu in regulating transport by terminating transcription, especially in excess-leucine growth conditions. PMID:350834

  9. Maturation of steroid receptors: an example of functional cooperation among molecular chaperones and their associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimmins, S; MacRae, T H

    2000-04-01

    The selective modulation of transcription exerted by steroids depends upon recognition of signalling molecules by properly folded cytoplasmic receptors and their subsequent translocation into the nucleus. These events require a sequential and dynamic series of protein-protein interactions in order to fashion receptors that bind stably to steroids. Central to receptor maturation, therefore, are several molecular chaperones and their accessory proteins; Hsp70, Hsp40, and hip modulate the 3-dimensional conformation of steroid receptors, permitting reaction via hop with Hsp90, arguably the central protein in the process. Binding to Hsp90 leads to dissociation of some proteins from the receptor complex while others are recruited. Notably, p23 stabilizes receptors in a steroid binding state, and the immunophilins, principally CyP40 and Hsp56, arrive late in receptor complex assembly. In this review, the functions of molecular chaperones during steroid receptor maturation are explored, leading to a general mechanistic model indicative of chaperone cooperation in protein folding. PMID:11147968

  10. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, Javier; Ceriani, Juan E.; Patino, Cristina; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2007-11-25

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-{delta}E) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E{sup +} cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-{delta}E infected BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-{delta}E virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-{delta}E subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E{sup -} cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation.

  11. Growth response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings and mature tree branches to acid rain and ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Helms, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada in California have been subjected to chronic damage by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants for the past several decades. Until recently, pollutant exposure of northern Sierra Nevada forests has been mild but increasing population and changes in land use throughout the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada foothills may lead to increased pollutant damage in these forests. Although, better documented in other regions of the United States, little is known regarding the potential for acidic precipitation damage to Sierra Nevada forests. Only recently have studies directed towards understanding the potential interactive effects of ozone and acidic precipitation been undertaken. A key issue in resolving potential regional impacts of pollutants on forests is the extent to which research results can be scaled across genotypes and life-stages. Most of the pollution research to date has been performed using seedlings with varying degrees of genetic control. It is important to determine if the results obtained in such studies can be extrapolated to mature trees and to different genetic sources. In this paper, we present results from a one-year study examining the interactive effects of foliar exposure to acidic rain and ozone on the growth of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a conifer known to be sensitive to ozone. The response to pollutants is characterized for both seedlings and mature tree branches of three genotypes grown in a common environment.

  12. Cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation and connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 and FSH receptor mRNA expression in equine cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured in vitro in the presence of FSH and precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Caillaud, Maud; Maritato, Filippo; Martoriati, Alain; Gérard, Nadine; Aiudi, Giulio; Minoia, Paolo; Goudet, Ghylène

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation and expression of connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 and FSH receptor transcripts in equine cumuli oophori during in vivo and in vitro maturation in the presence of equine FSH (eFSH) and precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Equine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were cultured in a control defined medium supplemented with eFSH (0 to 5 micrograms/ml), Fetal Calf Serum (FCS), precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis or glutamine according to the experiments. After in vitro maturation, the cumulus expansion rate was increased with 1 microgram/ml eFSH, and was the highest with 20% FCS. It was not influenced by precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis or glutamine. The expression of transcripts related to cumulus expansion was analyzed in equine cumulus cells before maturation, and after in vivo and in vitro maturation, by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers. Connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and FSH receptor (FSHr) mRNA were detected in equine cumulus cells before and after maturation. Their level did not vary during in vivo or in vitro maturation and was influenced neither by FSH nor by precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Results indicate that previously reported regulation of connexin 43 and COX-2 proteins during equine COC maturation may involve post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:15212696

  13. Role of gap junctions and protein kinase A during the development of oocyte maturational competence in Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshizaki, G.; Takeuchi, T.; Soyano, K.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic resumption in teleost oocytes is induced by a maturation-inducing hormone (MIH). The sensitivity of oocytes to MIH, also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is induced by LH via mechanisms that are not fully understood. A previous study of Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) showed the presence of functional heterologous gap junctions (GJs) between oocytes and their surrounding granulosa cells. The objectives of this study were to determine the role of ovarian GJs and of protein kinase A (PKA) during the acquisition of OMC. We examined the effects of the specific GJ inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) and 18??-glycyrrhetinic acid (??-GA) on the LH-(hCG)-dependent acquisition of OMC and on MIH-(17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one)-dependent meiotic resumption; measured the cAMP content of ovarian follicles during the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC; and determined the effects of PK activators and inhibitors on hCG-dependent OMC. Production of follicular cAMP increased during the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC. Both GJ inhibitors and the PKA inhibitor H8-dihydrochloride, but not the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, suppressed the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC in a dose-dependent manner. The PKA activator forskolin induced OMC with a similar potency to hCG. Unlike previous observations with teleosts where disruption of heterologous GJ either blocks or stimulates meiotic resumption, treatment with GJ inhibitors did not affect MIH-dependent meiotic resumption in maturationally competent follicles of Ayu. These observations suggest that ovarian GJs are essential for LH-dependent acquisition of OMC but not for MIH-dependent meiotic resumption, and that the stimulation of OMC by LH is mediated by cAMP-dependent PKA. They are also consistent with the view that a precise balance between GJ-mediated signals (positive or negative) and oocyte maturational readiness is required for hormonally regulated meiotic resumption. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatty Acid Composition of Developing Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) Berry and the Transcriptome of the Mature Seed

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Tahira; Snyder, Crystal L.; Schroeder, William R.; Cram, Dustin; Datla, Raju; Wishart, David; Weselake, Randall J.; Krishna, Priti

    2012-01-01

    Background Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) is a hardy, fruit-producing plant known historically for its medicinal and nutraceutical properties. The most recognized product of sea buckthorn is its fruit oil, composed of seed oil that is rich in essential fatty acids, linoleic (18∶2ω-6) and α-linolenic (18∶3ω-3) acids, and pulp oil that contains high levels of monounsaturated palmitoleic acid (16∶1ω-7). Sea buckthorn is fast gaining popularity as a source of functional food and nutraceuticals, but currently has few genomic resources; therefore, we explored the fatty acid composition of Canadian-grown cultivars (ssp. mongolica) and the sea buckthorn seed transcriptome using the 454 GS FLX sequencing technology. Results GC-MS profiling of fatty acids in seeds and pulp of berries indicated that the seed oil contained linoleic and α-linolenic acids at 33–36% and 30–36%, respectively, while the pulp oil contained palmitoleic acid at 32–42%. 454 sequencing of sea buckthorn cDNA collections from mature seeds yielded 500,392 sequence reads, which identified 89,141 putative unigenes represented by 37,482 contigs and 51,659 singletons. Functional annotation by Gene Ontology and computational prediction of metabolic pathways indicated that primary metabolism (protein>nucleic acid>carbohydrate>lipid) and fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis pathways were highly represented categories. Sea buckthorn sequences related to fatty acid biosynthesis genes in Arabidopsis were identified, and a subset of these was examined for transcript expression at four developing stages of the berry. Conclusion This study provides the first comprehensive genomic resources represented by expressed sequences for sea buckthorn, and demonstrates that the seed oil of Canadian-grown sea buckthorn cultivars contains high levels of linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid in a close to 1∶1 ratio, which is beneficial for human health. These data provide the foundation for further studies on

  15. Unh1, an Ustilago maydis Ndt80-like protein, controls completion of tumor maturation, teliospore development, and meiosis.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Colleen E; Kitty Cheung, H Y; Spence, Kelsey L; Saville, Barry J

    2016-09-01

    In this study, Ustilago maydis Ndt80 homolog one, unh1, of the obligate sexual pathogen U. maydis,is described. Unh1 is the sole Ndt80-like DNA-binding protein inU. maydis. In this model basidiomycete, Unh1 plays a role in sexual development, influencing tumor maturation, teliospore development and subsequent meiotic completion. Teliospore formation was reduced in deletion mutants, and those that did form had unpigmented, hyaline cell walls, and germinated without completing meiosis. Constitutively expressing unh1 in haploid cells resulted in abnormal pigmentation, when grown in both potato dextrose broth and minimal medium, suggesting that pigmentation may be triggered by unh1 in U. maydis. The function of Unh1 in sexual development and pigment production depends on the presence of the Ndt80-like DNA-binding domain, identified within Unh1. In the absence of this domain, or when the binding domain was altered with targeted amino acid changes, ectopic expression of Unh1 failed to complement the unh1 deletion with regards to pigment production and sexual development. An investigation of U. maydis genes with upstream motifs similar to Ndt80 recognition sequences revealed that some have altered transcript levels in Δunh1 strains. We propose that the first characterized Ndt80-like DNA-binding protein in a basidiomycete, Unh1, acts as a transcription factor that is required for teliospore maturation and the completion of meiosis in U. maydis. PMID:27397931

  16. Effect of In Vitro Maturation Technique and Alpha Lipoic Acid Supplementation on Oocyte Maturation Rate: Focus on Oxidative Status of Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zavareh, Saeed; Karimi, Isaac; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Rahnama, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic potential of in vitro maturation (IVM) in infertility is growing with great promise. Although significant progress is obtained in recent years, existing IVM protocols are far from favorable results. The first aim of this study was to investigate whether two step IVM manner change reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total anti- oxidant capacity (TAC) levels. The second aim was to find the effect of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) supplementation on oocyte maturation rate and on ROS/TAC levels during IVM. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, mouse germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes divided into cumulus denuded oocytes (DOs) and cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) groups. GVs were matured in vitro in the presence or absence of ALA only for 18 hours (control) or with pre-culture of forskolin plus cilostamide for an additional 18 hours. Matured oocytes obtained following 18 and 36 hours based on experimental design. In parallel, the ROS and TAC levels were measured at different time (0, 18 and 36 hours) by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH) probe and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, respectively. Results Maturation rate of COCs was significantly higher than DOs in control group (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between COCs and DOs when were pre-cultured with forskolin plus cilostamide. ROS and TAC levels was increased and decreased respectively in DOs after 18 hours while in COCs did not change at 18 hours and showed a significant increase and decrease respectively at 36 hours (P<0.05). ROS and TAC levels in the presence of ALA were significantly decreased and increased respectively after 36 hours (P<0.05) whereas, maturation rates of COCs and DOs were similar to their corresponding control groups. Conclusion ALA decreased ROS and increased TAC but could not affect maturation rate of both COCs and DOs in one or two step IVM manner. PMID:26985332

  17. Thermal stability of ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid oxidase in african cowpea leaves ( Vigna unguiculata ) of different maturities.

    PubMed

    Wawire, Michael; Oey, Indrawati; Mathooko, Francis; Njoroge, Charles; Shitanda, Douglas; Hendrickx, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Cowpea, an African leafy vegetable ( Vigna unguiculata ), contains a high level of vitamin C. The leaves harvested at 4-9 weeks are highly prone to vitamin C losses during handling and processing. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to study the effect of thermal treatment on the stability of ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO), total vitamin C content (l-ascorbic acid, l-AA), and dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) and l-AA/DHAA ratio in cowpea leaves harvested at different maturities (4, 6, and 8 weeks old). The results showed that AAO activity, total vitamin C content, and l-AA/DHAA ratio in cowpea leaves increased with increasing maturity (up to 8 weeks). Eight-week-old leaves were the best source of total vitamin C and showed a high ratio of l-AA/DHAA (4:1). Thermal inactivation of AAO followed first-order reaction kinetics. Heating at temperatures above 90 °C for short times resulted in a complete AAO inactivation, resulting in a protective effect of l-AA toward enzyme-catalyzed oxidation. Total vitamin C in young leaves (harvested at 4 and 6 weeks) was predominantly in the form of DHAA, and therefore temperature treatment at 30-90 °C for 10 min decreased the total vitamin C content, whereas total vitamin C in 8-week-old cowpea leaves was more than 80% in the form of l-AA, so that a high retention of the total vitamin C can be obtained even after heating and/or reheating (30-90 °C for 10 min) before consumption. The results indicated that the stability of total vitamin C in situ was strongly dependent on the plant maturity stage and the processing conditions applied. PMID:21309563

  18. Active Site Inhibitors Protect Protein Kinase C from Dephosphorylation and Stabilize Its Mature Form*

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Christine M.; Antal, Corina E.; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T.; Adams, Ryan A.; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2011-01-01

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C. PMID:21715334

  19. The HIV-1 protein Vpr impairs phagosome maturation by controlling microtubule-dependent trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Audrey; Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Herit, Floriane; Mazzolini, Julie; Guilbert, Thomas; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Russell, David G; Benichou, Serge; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Niedergang, Florence

    2015-10-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) impairs major functions of macrophages but the molecular basis for this defect remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that macrophages infected with HIV-1 were unable to respond efficiently to phagocytic triggers and to clear bacteria. The maturation of phagosomes, defined by the presence of late endocytic markers, hydrolases, and reactive oxygen species, was perturbed in HIV-1-infected macrophages. We showed that maturation arrest occurred at the level of the EHD3/MICAL-L1 endosomal sorting machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that the regulatory viral protein (Vpr) was crucial to perturb phagosome maturation. Our data reveal that Vpr interacted with EB1, p150(Glued), and dynein heavy chain and was sufficient to critically alter the microtubule plus end localization of EB1 and p150(Glued), hence altering the centripetal movement of phagosomes and their maturation. Thus, we identify Vpr as a modulator of the microtubule-dependent endocytic trafficking in HIV-1-infected macrophages, leading to strong alterations in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:26504171

  20. The HIV-1 protein Vpr impairs phagosome maturation by controlling microtubule-dependent trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Audrey; Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Herit, Floriane; Mazzolini, Julie; Guilbert, Thomas; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Russell, David G.; Benichou, Serge; Zahraoui, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) impairs major functions of macrophages but the molecular basis for this defect remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that macrophages infected with HIV-1 were unable to respond efficiently to phagocytic triggers and to clear bacteria. The maturation of phagosomes, defined by the presence of late endocytic markers, hydrolases, and reactive oxygen species, was perturbed in HIV-1–infected macrophages. We showed that maturation arrest occurred at the level of the EHD3/MICAL-L1 endosomal sorting machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that the regulatory viral protein (Vpr) was crucial to perturb phagosome maturation. Our data reveal that Vpr interacted with EB1, p150Glued, and dynein heavy chain and was sufficient to critically alter the microtubule plus end localization of EB1 and p150Glued, hence altering the centripetal movement of phagosomes and their maturation. Thus, we identify Vpr as a modulator of the microtubule-dependent endocytic trafficking in HIV-1–infected macrophages, leading to strong alterations in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:26504171

  1. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  2. Effect of fatty acids isolated from edible oils like mustard, linseed or coconut on astrocytes maturation.

    PubMed

    Joardar, Anindita; Das, Sumantra

    2007-12-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) has been previously shown to facilitate some of the vital functions of astrocytes. Since some dietary oils contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), which is a precursor of DHA, we examined their effect on astrocyte development. Fatty acids (FAs) were isolated from commonly used oils and their compositions were determined by GLC. FAs from three oils, viz. coconut, mustard and linseed were studied for their effect on astrocyte morphology. Parallel studies were conducted with FAs from the same oils after heating for 72 h. Unlike coconut oil, FAs from mustard and linseed, both heated and raw, caused significant morphogenesis of astrocytes in culture. ss-AR binding was also substantially increased in astrocytes treated with FAs from raw mustard and linseed oils as compared to astrocytes grown in normal medium. The expression profile of the isoforms of GFAP showed that astrocyte maturation by FAs of mustard and linseed oil was associated with appearance of acidic variants of GFAP and disappearance of some neutral isoforms similar to that observed in cultures grown in serum containing medium or in the presence of DHA. Taken together, the study highlights the contribution of specific dietary oils in facilitating astrocyte development that can have potential impact on human health. PMID:17823864

  3. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. PMID:26657252

  4. Resistance to benzalkonium chloride, peracetic acid and nisin during formation of mature biofilms by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Saá Ibusquiza, P; Herrera, J J R; Cabo, M L

    2011-05-01

    Increase of resistance to the application of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), peracetic acid (PA) and nisin during biofilm formation at 25 °C by three strains of Listeria monocytogenes (CECT 911, CECT 4032, CECT 5873 and BAC-adapted CECT 5873) in different scenarios was compared. For this purpose, resistance after 4 and 11-days of biofilm formation was quantified in terms of lethal dose 90% values (LD(90)), determined according with a dose-response logistic mathematical model. Microscopic analyses after 4 and 11-days of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation were also carried out. Results demonstrated a relation between the microscopic structure and the resistance to the assayed biocides in matured biofilms. The worst cases being biofilms formed by the strain 4032 (in both stainless steel and polypropylene), which showed a complex "cloud-type" structure that correlates with the highest resistance of this strain against the three biocides during biofilm maturation. However, that increase in resistance and complexity appeared not to be dependent on initial bacterial adherence, thus indicating mature biofilms rather than planctonic cells or early-stage biofilms must be considered when disinfection protocols have to be optimized. PA seemed to be the most effective of the three disinfectants used for biofilms. We hypothesized both its high oxidizing capacity and low molecular size could suppose an advantage for its penetration inside the biofilm. We also demonstrated that organic material counteract with the biocides, thus indicating the importance of improving cleaning protocols. Finally, by comparing strains 5873 and 5873 adapted to BAC, several adaptative cross-responses between BAC and nisin or peracetic acid were identified. PMID:21356446

  5. The Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Adapter Protein B (SHB) Regulates Mouse Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Calounova, Gabriela; Livera, Gabriel; Zhang, Xiao-Qun; Liu, Kui; Gosden, Roger G.; Welsh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    SHB (Src homology 2 domain-containing adapter protein B) is involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Mice deficient in the Shb gene have been found to exhibit a transmission ratio distortion with respect to inheritance of the Shb null allele among offspring and this phenomenon was linked to female gamete production. Consequently, we postulated that Shb plays a role for oocyte biology and thus decided to investigate oocyte formation, meiotic maturation, and early embryo development in relation to absence of the Shb gene. Oogenesis was apparently accelerated judging from the stages of oocyte development on fetal day 18.5 and one week postnatally in Shb −/− mice; but in adulthood ovarian follicle maturation was impaired in these mice. Completion of meiosis I (first polar body extrusion) was less synchronized, with a fraction of oocytes showing premature polar body extrusion in the absence of Shb. In vitro fertilization of mature oocytes isolated from Shb +/+, +/− and −/− mice revealed impaired early embryo development in the −/− embryos. Moreover, the absence of Shb enhanced ERK (extracellular-signal regulated kinase) and RSK (ribosomal S6 kinase) signaling in oocytes and these effects were paralleled by an increased ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation and activation. It is concluded that SHB regulates normal oocyte and follicle development and that perturbation of SHB signaling causes defective meiosis I and early embryo development. PMID:20585392

  6. Oligosaccharide structure and amino acid sequence of the major glycopeptides of mature human. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dowd, B.F.; Cumming, D.A.; Gravel, R.A.; Mahuran, D.

    1988-07-12

    Human ..beta..-hexosaminidase is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes terminal N-acetylhexosamines from GM/sub 2/ ganglioside, oligosaccharides, and other carbohydrate-containing macromolecules. There are two major forms of hexosaminidase: hexosaminidase A, with the structure ..cap alpha..(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/), and hexosaminidase B, 2(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/). Like other lysosomal proteins, hexosaminidase is targeted to its destination via glycosylation and processing in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Phosphorylation of specific mannose residues allows binding of the protein to the phosphomannosyl receptor and transfer to the lysosome. In order to define the structure and placement of the oligosaccharides in mature hexosaminidase and thus identify candidate mannose 6-phosphate recipient sites, the major tryptic/chymotryptic glycopeptides from each isozyme were purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two major concanavalin A binding glycopeptides, localized to the ..beta../sub b/f chain, and one non concanavalin A binding glycopeptide, localized to the ..beta../sub a/ chain, were found associated with the ..beta..-subunit in both hexosaminidase A and hexosaminidase B. The oligosaccharide structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The unique glycopeptide associated with the ..beta../sub a/ chain contained a single GlcNAc residue. Thus all three mature polypeptides comprising the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of hexosaminidase contain carbohydrate, the structures of which have the appearance of being partially degraded in the lysosome. In the ..cap alpha.. chain they found only one possible site for in vivo phosphorylation. In the ..beta.. it is unclear if only one or all three of the sites could have contained phosphate. However, mature placental hexosaminidase A and B can be rephosphorylated in vitro. This requires the presence of an oligosaccharide containing an ..cap

  7. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed. PMID:25297544

  8. Stem growth reduction in mature Sitka spruce trees exposed to acid mist.

    PubMed

    Crossley, A; Sheppard, L J; Cape, J N; Smith, R I; Harvey, F J

    1997-01-01

    An eighteen-year-old clone of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr) growing in the field was used to evaluate the whole tree response of 'mature' Sitka spruce to acid mist treatment. The mist, an equimolar mixture of H(2)SO(4) and NH(4)NO(3) at pH 2.5 with or without particles (soda glass ballotini < 20 microm diameter), was applied twice weekly (equivalent to 4 mm precipitation week(-1)) throughout the growing season, May-November 1990-1992. The annual dose of S, N, H applied as mist (at 51, 48 and 3.3 kg ha(-1), respectively) was 2.5 times that measured in the Scottish uplands. Throughout the experiment there was no evidence of visible injury symptoms, yet there was a highly significant reduction (p < 0.02) in the stem-area increment relative to the stem area at the start, measured using vernier dendrometer bands. There was no significant difference between the (acid mist + particle) and the acid mist only treatments. The mean relative stem-area increment over two complete growing seasons (1991-1992) was 65% for control trees, but only 53% for acid-misted trees. PMID:15093418

  9. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on protein synthesis and collagen hydroxylation by mature periodontal tissues maintained in organ cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Edwin H. K.; Sodek, Jaro; Melcher, Antony H.

    1979-01-01

    Mature periodontal tissues from adult-mouse first mandibular molars were cultured in a continuous-flow organ-culture system which allowed the regulation of both ascorbic acid concentration and pO2 (oxygen partial pressure). Protein synthesis was measured by analysing the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenous and non-collagenous proteins during the last 24h of a 2-day culture. At low pO2 [16.0kPa (approx. 120mmHg)] approx. 60% of protein-incorporated [3H]proline was found in collagenous proteins. However, it was evident that this collagen was considerably underhydroxylated. At high pO2 [56.0kPa (approx. 420mmHg)], both the amount of collagen deposited in the tissues and the degree of hydroxylation were increased considerably. In contrast, no significant effect on non-collagenous protein was observed. Tissues cultured at low pO2 for the first 48h were unable to respond to a subsequent increase in pO2 during the last 24h. Analysis of pepsin-solubilized collagen α-chains labelled with [14C]glycine demonstrated the synthesis of both type-I and type-III collagens by explants cultured for 48h at high pO2. Type-III collagen comprised 20–30% of the radioactivity in α-chains in both the periodontal ligament and the tissues of the alveolar process. The pattern of protein synthesis in the alveolar tissues at high pO2 was similar to that observed in these tissues in vivo. However, in the cultured periodontal ligament the proportions of non-collagenous proteins and type-III collagens were increased in comparison with the tissue in vivo. PMID:454369

  10. 9-cis Retinoic acid inhibits cumulus cell apoptosis during the maturation of bovine cumulus-oocyte-complexes.

    PubMed

    Deb, G K; Dey, S R; Bang, J I; Lee, J G; Kong, I K

    2012-06-01

    Cumulus cell (CC) apoptosis is inversely correlated with embryonic development in vitro. Therefore, inhibition of CC apoptosis is important for proper embryonic development and quality. Retinoic acids (all-transRA and 9-cisRA) are natural components of retinoids, and 9-cisRA is the physiologically active metabolite of retinoic acid in vitro. During in vitro maturation, 9-cisRA enhances oocyte competence through multiple mechanisms affecting the oocyte and preimplantation embryo; however, the effect of 9-cisRA on CC apoptosis has yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 9-cisRA on CC apoptosis and to identify the molecular mechanism underlying that effect. Bovine slaughterhouse cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were matured in vitro in the absence or presence of 5 nM 9-cisRA. Cumulus cells were collected from immature and matured COC for the detection of apoptosis and gene expression analysis. Results showed that 9-cisRA reduced the number of apoptotic CC by about 2.7 fold (P < 0.023), compared with control. However, apoptosis is rare in CC of immature COC (0.01% ± 0.001). Transcripts involved in the caspase cascade were down-regulated upon exposure to 9-cisRA, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, 11.1 fold, P < 0.001), tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor 1 (TNFR1, 2.3 fold, P < 0.01), caspase 9 (CASP9, 2.0 fold, P < 0.031), caspase 8 (CASP8, 2.2 fold, P < 0.012), and caspase 3 (CASP3, 2.1 fold, P < 0.006), while antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) transcript was increased (3.1 fold, P < 0.004), compared with control. In addition, 9-cisRA inhibited mitogen activated protein kinase mRNA expression in CC, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1, 2.7 fold, P < 0.02; ERK2, 2.7 fold, P < 0.03), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, 1.6 fold, P < 0.044), as well as the activator protein-1 (AP1) family members c-jun (1.6 fold, P < 0.041) and c-fos (2.0 fold, P < 0.06). The transcript abundances of TNF

  11. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  12. C-3 benzoic acid derivatives of C-3 deoxybetulinic acid and deoxybetulin as HIV-1 maturation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Swidorski, Jacob J; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Terry, Brian; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Samanta, Himadri; Zhang, Sharon; Li, Zhufang; Parker, Dawn D; Rahematpura, Sandhya; Jenkins, Susan; Beno, Brett R; Krystal, Mark; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Dicker, Ira B; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia

    2016-04-15

    A series of C-3 phenyl- and heterocycle-substituted derivatives of C-3 deoxybetulinic acid and C-3 deoxybetulin was designed and synthesized as HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) and evaluated for their antiviral activity and cytotoxicity in cell culture. A 4-subsituted benzoic acid moiety was identified as an advantageous replacement for the 3'3'-dimethylsuccinate moiety present in previously disclosed MIs that illuminates new aspects of the topography of the pharmacophore. The new analogs exhibit excellent in vitro antiviral activity against wild-type (wt) virus and a lower serum shift when compared with the prototypical HIV-1 MI bevirimat (1, BVM), the first MI to be evaluated in clinical studies. Compound 9a exhibits comparable cell culture potency toward wt virus as 1 (WT EC50=16nM for 9a compared to 10nM for 1). However, the potency of 9a is less affected by the presence of human serum, while the compound displays a similar pharmacokinetic profile in rats to 1. Hence 9a, the 4-benzoic acid derivative of deoxybetulinic acid, represents a new starting point from which to explore the design of a 2nd generation MI. PMID:26968652

  13. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  14. Streptococcus mutans wall-associated protein A promotes TLR4-induced dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, D

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses, which are central to establishing efficient responses to vaccination. Wall-associated protein A (WapA) of Streptococcus mutans was previously used as a vaccine in animal studies for immunization against dental caries. However, as a cell surface protein, whether WapA activates innate immune responses and the effects of WapA on DCs remain unclear. In this study, WapA was cloned into the GST fusion vector pEBG, which can be expressed efficiently in mammalian cells. We found that when added before stimulation with LPS, purified WapA-GST protein increased TLR4-induced NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathway activation. Pretreatment with WapA-GST also increased LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by DCs, including IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, expression of the DC maturation markers CD80/86, CD40 and MHC II was also increased by WapA pretreatment. These data indicate that WapA is recognized by DCs and promotes DC maturation. PMID:24846569

  15. Thioglycolic acid inhibits mouse oocyte maturation and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration.

    PubMed

    Hou, S Y; Zhang, L; Wu, K; Xia, L

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that thioglycolic acid (TGA) leads to potential reproductive toxicology. To clarify the exact effects of this compound on reproduction, mice oocytes were treated with different TGA doses. At the end of the culture period, the nuclear status of mice oocytes was assessed under an inverted microscope. After immunofluorescence staining, the chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration of oocytes were evaluated. The results indicated that TGA decreases the percentage of first polar body formation but does not influence that of germinal vesicle breakdown. TGA induces abnormal chromosomal arrangement and spindle elongation. In conclusion, TGA inhibits in-vitro maturation of mice oocytes and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration. Furthermore, it probably interferes with biochemical changes that occur during meiosis, resulting in aberrant development. PMID:19022875

  16. Proteomic analysis and candidate allergenic proteins in Populus deltoides CL. “2KEN8” mature pollen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Wu, Li-Shuan; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Jia, Hui-Xia; Li, Yu; Yin, Ya-Fang; Hu, Jian-Jun; Lu, Meng-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analysis was used to generate a map of Populus deltoides CL. “2KEN8” mature pollen proteins. By applying 2-D electrophoresis, we resolved 403 protein spots from mature pollen. Using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry method, we identified 178 distinct proteins from 218 protein spots expressed in mature pollen. Moreover, out of these, 28 proteins were identified as putative allergens. The expression patterns of these putative allergen genes indicate that several of these genes are highly expressed in pollen. In addition, the members of profilin allergen family were analyzed and their expression patterns were compared with their homologous genes in Arabidopsis and rice. Knowledge of these identified allergens has the potential to improve specific diagnosis and allergen immunotherapy treatment for patients with poplar pollen allergy. PMID:26284084

  17. Evidence for a role of protein kinase C zeta subspecies in maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, I; Diaz-Meco, M T; Municio, M M; Berra, E; García de Herreros, A; Cornet, M E; Sanz, L; Moscat, J

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated the activation of phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC-PLC) both by growth factors and by the product of the ras oncogene, p21ras. Evidence has been presented indicating that the stimulation of this phospholipid degradative pathway is sufficient to activate mitogenesis in fibroblasts as well as that it is sufficient and necessary for induction of maturation in Xenopus laevis oocytes. However, the mechanism whereby PC-PLC transduces mitogenic signals triggered by growth factors or oncogenes remains to be elucidated. In this study, data are presented that show the involvement of protein kinase C zeta subspecies in the channelling of the mitogenic signal activated by insulin-p21ras-PC-PLC in Xenopus oocytes as well as the lack of a critical role of protein kinase C isotypes alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon in these pathways. Images PMID:1508183

  18. Formation and Maturation of Phase-Separated Liquid Droplets by RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Protter, David S W; Rosen, Michael K; Parker, Roy

    2015-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells possess numerous dynamic membrane-less organelles, RNP granules, enriched in RNA and RNA-binding proteins containing disordered regions. We demonstrate that the disordered regions of key RNP granule components and the full-length granule protein hnRNPA1 can phase separate in vitro, producing dynamic liquid droplets. Phase separation is promoted by low salt concentrations or RNA. Over time, the droplets mature to more stable states, as assessed by slowed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and resistance to salt. Maturation often coincides with formation of fibrous structures. Different disordered domains can co-assemble into phase-separated droplets. These biophysical properties demonstrate a plausible mechanism by which interactions between disordered regions, coupled with RNA binding, could contribute to RNP granule assembly in vivo through promoting phase separation. Progression from dynamic liquids to stable fibers may be regulated to produce cellular structures with diverse physiochemical properties and functions. Misregulation could contribute to diseases involving aberrant RNA granules. PMID:26412307

  19. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  20. Protein and amino Acid supplementation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Armsey, Thomas D; Grime, Todd E

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid supplementation is practiced by numerous individuals with the hope of increasing muscle mass and function by increasing available proteins. Theoretically, this makes a great deal of sense; the scientific facts, however, fail to conclusively prove that ingesting more than the recommended dietary allowance of protein has any effect on otherwise healthy adults. Athletes may be the exception to this rule. This review examines the most current literature pertaining to amino acid supplementation, and reports on the potential benefits and risks of this common practice. PMID:12831703

  1. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  2. Mature adipocyte proteome reveals differentially altered protein abundances between lean, overweight and morbidly obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Masood, Afshan; Almidani, Ghaith M; Alsadhan, Abdulmajeed A; Bassas, Abdulelah F; Duncan, Mark W; Alfadda, Assim A

    2015-02-01

    Overweight (OW) and obese individuals are considered to be graded parts of the scale having increasing weight as a common feature. They may not, however, be part of the same continuum and may differ metabolically. In this study we applied an untargeted proteomic approach to compare protein abundances in mature adipocytes derived from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight and morbidly obese female subjects to those of lean age matched controls. Mature adipocytes were isolated from liposuction samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue collected from both lean (L; n = 7, 23.3 ± 0.4 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD), overweight (OW; n = 8, 27.9 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) and morbidly obese (MOB; n = 7, 44.8 ± 3.8 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) individuals. Total protein extracts were then compared by two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE). One hundred and ten differentially expressed protein spots (i.e., fitting the statistical criteria ANOVA test, p < 0.05; fold-change ≥1.5) were detected, and of these, 89 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Of these, 66 protein spots were common to both groups whereas 23 were unique to the MOB group. Significant differences were evident in the abundances of key proteins involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, energy regulation, cytoskeletal structure and redox control signaling pathways. Differences in the abundance of some chaperones were also evident. The differentially abundant proteins were investigated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to establish their associations with known biological functions. The network identified in the OW group with the highest score relates to-: cell-to-cell signaling and interaction; in contrast, in the MOB group the major interacting pathways are associated with lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and cancer. The differences in abundance of the differentially regulated proteins were validated by

  3. Glucose Regulated Protein 78 Phosphorylation in Sperm Undergoes Dynamic Changes during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Vivian; Rao, Parimala; Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kulkarni, Vijay; Parte, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    GRP78, a resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone involved in protein transport, folding and assembly, has been reported in sperm. It is shown to be localized in the neck region of human sperm. We have previously reported GRP78 to be less phosphorylated in asthenozoosperm.The present study aimed to determine whether sperm GRP78 undergoes phosphorylation changes during epididymal maturation and whether there are any differences in GRP78 phosphoforms in asthenozoosperm vis-à-vis normozoosperm. Testicular- and cauda epididymal- sperm from adult male Holtzman rats, and semen ejaculates collected from normal and asthenozoospermic individuals were investigated. DIGE carried out to determine phosphorylation of GRP78 in asthenozoosperm and normal sperm reveals a shift in the location of GRP78 of asthenozoosperm towards the alkaline pH, indicative of reduced GRP78 phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation studies using antibodies specific to GRP78, serine-, threonine-, and tyrosine phosphorylation and Pan phospho antibody demonstrates GRP78 to be phosphorylated at all three residues in rat spermatozoa. Phosphatase assays using Calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase and Lambda protein phosphatase followed by nanofluidic proteomic immunoassay (NIA) show that in rat, GP4.96, GP4.94 and GP4.85 are the three phosphoforms in mature (caudal) sperm as against two phosphoforms GP4.96and GP4.94in immature (testicular) sperm. In mature human sperm GP5.04, GP4.96, and GP4.94were the 3 phosphoforms observed. GP4.94[P = 0.014]andGP5.04 [P = 0.02] are significantly reduced in asthenozoosperm. Ours is the first report indicating GRP78 in sperm to be phosphorylated at serine, threonine and tyrosine residues contrary to published literature reporting GRP78 not to be tyrosine phosphorylated. We report the presence of GRP78 phosphoforms in rat- and human- sperm and our data suggest that GRP78 phosphorylation in sperm undergoes spatial reorganization during epididymal maturation. Significant

  4. Bile acid-FXRα pathways regulate male sexual maturation in mice.

    PubMed

    Baptissart, Marine; Martinot, Emmanuelle; Vega, Aurélie; Sédes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Schoonjans, Kristina; Caira, Françoise; Volle, David H

    2016-04-12

    The bile acid receptor Farnesol-X-Receptor alpha (FRXα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. FRXα is expressed in the interstitial compartment of the adult testes, which contain the Leydig cells. In adult, short term treatment (12 hours) with FRXα agonist inhibits the expression of steroidogenic genes via the induction of the Small heterodimer partner (SHP). However the consequences of FRXα activation on testicular pathophysiology have never been evaluated. We demonstrate here that mice fed a diet supplemented with bile acid during pubertal age show increased incidence of infertility. This is associated with altered differentiation and increase apoptosis of germ cells due to lower testosterone levels. At the molecular level, next to the repression of basal steroidogenesis via the induction expression of Shp and Dax-1, two repressors of steroidogenesis, the main action of the BA-FRXα signaling is through lowering the Leydig cell sensitivity to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, the main regulator of testicular endocrine function. In conclusion, BA-FRXα signaling is a critical actor during sexual maturation. PMID:26848619

  5. Bile acid-FXRα pathways regulate male sexual maturation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Aurélie; Sédes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Schoonjans, Kristina; Caira, Françoise; Volle, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid receptor Farnesol-X-Receptor alpha (FRXα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. FRXα is expressed in the interstitial compartment of the adult testes, which contain the Leydig cells. In adult, short term treatment (12 hours) with FRXα agonist inhibits the expression of steroidogenic genes via the induction of the Small heterodimer partner (SHP). However the consequences of FRXα activation on testicular pathophysiology have never been evaluated. We demonstrate here that mice fed a diet supplemented with bile acid during pubertal age show increased incidence of infertility. This is associated with altered differentiation and increase apoptosis of germ cells due to lower testosterone levels. At the molecular level, next to the repression of basal steroidogenesis via the induction expression of Shp and Dax-1, two repressors of steroidogenesis, the main action of the BA-FRXα signaling is through lowering the Leydig cell sensitivity to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, the main regulator of testicular endocrine function. In conclusion, BA-FRXα signaling is a critical actor during sexual maturation. PMID:26848619

  6. Effects of feeding level and sexual maturation on carcass and fillet characteristics and indices of protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation in many species of fish including salmonids requires mobilization of energy and nutrient resources to support gonad growth. During sexual maturation, particularly vitellogenesis, proteins are mobilized from muscle tissue, which is evidenced by increased expression of proteolytic g...

  7. Dihydrolipoic acid reduces cytochrome b561 proteins.

    PubMed

    Bérczi, Alajos; Zimányi, László; Asard, Han

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome b561 (Cyt-b561) proteins constitute a family of trans-membrane proteins that are present in a wide variety of organisms. Two of their characteristic properties are the reducibility by ascorbate (ASC) and the presence of two distinct b-type hemes localized on two opposite sides of the membrane. Here we show that the tonoplast-localized and the putative tumor suppressor Cyt-b561 proteins can be reduced by other reductants than ASC and dithionite. A detailed spectral analysis of the ASC-dependent and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA)-dependent reduction of these two Cyt-b561 proteins is also presented. Our results are discussed in relation to the known antioxidant capability of DHLA as well as its role in the regeneration of other antioxidant compounds of cells. These results allow us to speculate on new biological functions for the trans-membrane Cyt-b561 proteins. PMID:22526465

  8. Engineering protein therapeutics: predictive performances of a structure-based virtual affinity maturation protocol.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Michael; Kroemer, Romano; Mikol, Vincent; Minoux, Hervé; Tastan, Erdogan; Baurin, Nicolas

    2012-08-27

    The implementation of a structure based virtual affinity maturation protocol and evaluation of its predictivity are presented. The in silico protocol is based on conformational sampling of the interface residues (using the Dead End Elimination/A* algorithm), followed by the estimation of the change of free energy of binding due to a point mutation, applying MM/PBSA calculations. Several implementations of the protocol have been evaluated for 173 mutations in 7 different protein complexes for which experimental data were available: the use of the Boltzamnn averaged predictor based on the free energy of binding (ΔΔG(*)) combined with the one based on its polar component only (ΔΔE(pol*)) led to the proposal of a subset of mutations out of which 45% would have successfully enhanced the binding. When focusing on those mutations that are less likely to be introduced by natural in vivo maturation methods (99 mutations with at least two base changes in the codon), the success rate is increased to 63%. In another evaluation, focusing on 56 alanine scanning mutations, the in silico protocol was able to detect 89% of the hot-spots. PMID:22788756

  9. Role of protein haptenation in triggering maturation events in the dendritic cell surrogate cell line THP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Megherbi, Rym; Kiorpelidou, Evanthia; Foster, Brian; Rowe, Cliff; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Goldring, Christopher E.; Park, B. Kevin

    2009-07-15

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation in response to contact sensitizers is a crucial step in the induction of sensitization reactions; however the underlying mechanism of activation remains unknown. To test whether the extent of protein haptenation is a determinant in DC maturation, we tested the effect of five dinitrophenyl (DNP) analogues of different reactivity, on maturation markers in the cell line, THP-1. The potencies of the test compounds in upregulating CD54 levels, inducing IL-8 release and triggering p38 MAPK phosphorylation did not correlate with their ability to deplete intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels or cause cell toxicity. However, the compounds' potency at inducing p38 phosphorylation was significantly associated with the amount of intracellular protein adducts formed (p < 0.05). Inhibition experiments show that, at least for DNFB, p38 MAP kinase signalling controls compound-specific changes in CD54 expression and IL-8 release. 2D-PAGE analysis revealed that all the DNP analogues appeared to bind similar proteins. The analogues failed to activate NFkB, however, they activated Nrf2, which was used as a marker of oxidative stress. Neither GSH depletion, by use of buthionine sulfoximine, nor treatment with the strongly lysine-reactive hapten penicillin elicited maturation. We conclude that protein haptenation, probably through reactive cysteine residues may be a trigger for maturation events in this in vitro model and that p38 activation may be a discriminatory marker for the classification of potency of chemical sensitizers.

  10. The Exchangeability of Amino Acids in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Lev Y.; Stoltzfus, Arlin

    2005-01-01

    The comparative analysis of protein sequences depends crucially on measures of amino acid similarity or distance. Many such measures exist, yet it is not known how well these measures reflect the operational exchangeability of amino acids in proteins, since most are derived by methods that confound a variety of effects, including effects of mutation. In pursuit of a pure measure of exchangeability, we present (1) a compilation of data on the effects of 9671 amino acid exchanges engineered and assayed in a set of 12 proteins; (2) a statistical procedure to combine results from diverse assays of exchange effects; (3) a matrix of “experimental exchangeability” values EXij derived from applying this procedure to the compiled data; and (4) a set of three tests designed to evaluate the power of an exchangeability measure to (i) predict the effects of amino acid exchanges in the laboratory, (ii) account for the disease-causing potential of missense mutations in the human population, and (iii) model the probability of fixation of missense mutations in evolution. EX not only captures useful information on exchangeability while remaining free of other effects, but also outperforms all measures tested except for the best-performing alignment scoring matrix, which is comparable in performance. PMID:15944362

  11. Effect of linoleic acid supplementation on in vitro maturation, embryo development and apoptotic related gene expression in ovine

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ebrahim; Asadpour, Reza; Roshangar, Leila; Jafari-Joozani, Razi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Linoleic acid (LA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in high concentrations in follicular fluid, when added to maturation culture media, it affects oocyte competence. Objective: In the present study, we investigated effect of linoleic acid supplementation on in vitro maturation, embryo development and apoptotic related gene expression in ovine Materials and Methods: The experiments conducted on 450 ovine Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with homogenous ooplasm and more than two compact layers of cumulus cells. For in vitro maturation COCs were randomly allocated into four treatment groups for 24 hr period. Treatment groups were as follow: control maturation media, 0 µM LA, 50 µM LA, 100 µM LA and 200 µM LA. The cumulus cell expansion and blastocysts rates were recorded. Total RNA was isolated from embryo pools, reverse transcribed into cDNA, and subjected to apoptotic gene expression by real-time PCR. Results: Highest concentration (200 µM/mL) of LA significantly decreased the rate of fully expanded cumulus cells 24 hr after in vitro maturation (IVM) and the percentage of blastocyste rate compared with the control (p<0.05). These inhibitory effects were associated with an increased in relative mRNA expression of Bax (Bcl-2- associated X) gene compared with controls. Conclusion: Data obtained in present study suggest that low concentration of LA used for maturation had no deleterious effect on subsequent embryonic development compared to high concentration of LA. Relative expression of Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) and Bax in embryos seems to be associated with LA concentration. PMID:27351027

  12. Protein and Amino Acid Requirements during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O

    2016-07-01

    Protein forms an essential component of a healthy diet in humans to support both growth and maintenance. During pregnancy, an exceptional stage of life defined by rapid growth and development, adequate dietary protein is crucial to ensure a healthy outcome. Protein deposition in maternal and fetal tissues increases throughout pregnancy, with most occurring during the third trimester. Dietary protein intake recommendations are based on factorial estimates because the traditional method of determining protein requirements, nitrogen balance, is invasive and undesirable during pregnancy. The current Estimated Average Requirement and RDA recommendations of 0.88 and 1.1 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), respectively, are for all stages of pregnancy. The single recommendation does not take into account the changing needs during different stages of pregnancy. Recently, with the use of the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation method, we defined the requirements to be, on average, 1.2 and 1.52 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) during early (∼16 wk) and late (∼36 wk) stages of pregnancy, respectively. Although the requirements are substantially higher than current recommendations, our values are ∼14-18% of total energy and fit within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range. Using swine as an animal model we showed that the requirements for several indispensable amino acids increase dramatically during late gestation compared with early gestation. Additional studies should be conducted during pregnancy to confirm the newly determined protein requirements and to determine the indispensable amino acid requirements during pregnancy in humans. PMID:27422521

  13. Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Cockell, Kevin A; Sepehr, Estatira

    2005-01-01

    can reduce protein and amino acid digestibilities by up to 10%. D-amino acids and LAL formed during alkaline/heat treatment of proteins such as casein, lactalbumin, soy protein isolate, or wheat proteins are poorly digestible (less than 40%), and their presence can reduce protein digestibility by up to 28% in rats and pigs. A comparison of the protein digestibility determination in young (5-week) versus old (20-month) rats suggests greater susceptibility to the adverse effects of antinutritional factors in old rats than in young rats. Therefore, the inclusion of protein digestibility data obtained with young rats, as the recommended animal model, in the calculation of PDCAAS (Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score) may overestimate protein digestibility and quality of products, especially those containing antinutritional factors, for the elderly. For products specifically intended for the elderly, protein digestibility should be determined using more mature rats. PMID:16001874

  14. The regulator of MAT2 (ROM2) protein binds to early maturation promoters and represses PvALF-activated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Chern, M S; Bobb, A J; Bustos, M M

    1996-01-01

    The regulation of maturation (MAT)- and late embryogenesis (LEA)-specific gene expression in dicots involves factors related to ABI3, a seed-specific component of the abscisic acid signal transduction pathways from Arabidopsis. In French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), the ABI3-like factor, PvALF, activates transcription from MAT promoters of phytohemagglutinin (DLEC2) and beta-phaseolin (PHS beta) genes. We describe the regulator of MAT2 (ROM2) as a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding protein that recognizes motifs with symmetric (ACGT) and asymmetric (ACCT) core elements present in both MAT promoters. ROM2 antagonizes trans-activation of the DLEC2 promoter by PvALF in transient expression assays. Repression was abolished by mutations that prevented binding of ROM2 to the DLEC2 seed enhancer region. Moreover, a hybrid protein composed of a PvALF activation domain and the DNA binding and dimerization domain of ROM2 activated gene expression, indicating that ROM2 recognizes the DLEC2 enhancer in vivo; consequently, ROM2 functions as a DNA binding site-dependent repressor. Supershift analysis of nuclear proteins, using a ROM2-specific antibody, revealed an increase in ROM2 DNA binding activity during seed desiccation. A corresponding increase in ROM2 mRNA coincided with the period when DLEC2 mRNA levels declined in embryos. These results demonstrate developmental regulation of the ROM2 repressor and point to a role for this factor in silencing DLEC2 transcription during late embryogenesis. PMID:8742714

  15. Nfu facilitates the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins and participates in virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mashruwala, Ameya A.; Pang, Yun Y.; Rosario-Cruz, Zuelay; Chahal, Harsimranjit K.; Benson, Meredith A.; Anzaldi-Mike, Laura L.; Skaar, Eric P.; Torres, Victor J.; Nauseef, William M.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The acquisition and metabolism of iron (Fe) by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is critical for disease progression. S. aureus requires Fe to synthesize inorganic cofactors called iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters, which are required for functional Fe-S proteins. In this study we investigated the mechanisms utilized by S. aureus to metabolize Fe-S clusters. We identified that S. aureus utilizes the Suf biosynthetic system to synthesize Fe-S clusters and we provide genetic evidence suggesting that the sufU and sufB gene products are essential. Additional biochemical and genetic analyses identified Nfu as a Fe-S cluster carrier, which aids in the maturation of Fe-S proteins. We find that deletion of the nfu gene negatively impacts staphylococcal physiology and pathogenicity. A nfu mutant accumulates both increased intracellular non-incorporated Fe and endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in DNA damage. In addition, a strain lacking Nfu is sensitive to exogenously supplied ROS and reactive nitrogen species. Congruous with ex vivo findings, a nfu mutant strain is more susceptible to oxidative killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and displays decreased tissue colonization in a murine model of infection. We conclude that Nfu is necessary for staphylococcal pathogenesis and establish Fe-S cluster metabolism as an attractive antimicrobial target. PMID:25388433

  16. Epididymal protein Rnase10 is required for post-testicular sperm maturation and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Krutskikh, Anton; Poliandri, Ariel; Cabrera-Sharp, Victoria; Dacheux, Jean Louis; Poutanen, Matti; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2012-10-01

    Eutherian spermatozoa are dependent on the environment of the proximal epididymis to complete their maturation; however, no specific epididymal factors that mediate this process have so far been identified. Here, we show that targeted disruption of the novel gene Rnase10 encoding a secreted proximal epididymal protein in the mouse results in a binding defect in spermatozoa and their inability to pass through the uterotubal junction in the female. The failure to gain the site of fertilization in the knockout spermatozoa is associated with a gradual loss of ADAM3 and ADAM6 proteins during epididymal transit. In the distal epididymis, these spermatozoa appear to lack calcium-dependent associations with the immobilizing glutinous extracellular material and are released as single, vigorously motile cells that display no tendency for head-to-head agglutination and lack affinity to the oviductal epithelium. In sperm-egg binding assay, they are unable to establish a tenacious association with the zona pellucida, yet they are capable of fertilization. Furthermore, these sperm show accelerated capacitation resulting in an overall in vitro fertilizing ability superior to that of wild-type sperm. We conclude that the physiological role of sperm adhesiveness is in the mechanism of restricted sperm entry into the oviduct rather than in sperm-egg interaction. PMID:22750516

  17. Targeted inhibition of oncogenic miR-21 maturation with designed RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Yang, Fan; Zubovic, Lorena; Pavelitz, Tom; Yang, Wen; Godin, Katherine; Walker, Matthew; Zheng, Suxin; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    The RNA recognition motif (RRM) is the largest family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins. Engineered RRMs with well-defined specificity would provide valuable tools and an exacting test of the current understanding of specificity. We have redesigned the specificity of an RRM using rational methods and demonstrated retargeting of its activity in cells. We engineered the conserved RRM of human Rbfox proteins to specifically bind to the terminal loop of a microRNA precursor (pre-miR-21) with high affinity and inhibit its processing by Drosha and Dicer. We further engineered Giardia Dicer by replacing its PAZ domain with the designed RRM. The reprogrammed enzyme degrades pre-miR-21 specifically in vitro and suppresses mature miR-21 levels in cells, which results in increased expression of the tumor suppressor PDCD4 and significantly decreased viability for cancer cells. The results demonstrate the feasibility of rationally engineering the sequence-specificity of RRMs and of using this ubiquitous platform for diverse biological applications. PMID:27428511

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of SOX9 protein in immature, mature, and neoplastic canine Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Banco, Barbara; Palmieri, Chiara; Sironi, Giuseppe; Fantinato, Eleonora; Veronesi, Maria C; Groppetti, Debora; Giudice, Chiara; Martignoni, Benedetta; Grieco, Valeria

    2016-05-01

    Sex-determining region Y box9 gene (SOX9) protein plays a pivotal role in male sexual development. It regulates the transcription of the anti-Müllerian hormone gene promoting development of testis cords, multiplication, and maturation of Sertoli cells (SCs) and maintenance of spermatogenesis in adult testis. The immunohistochemical expression of SOX9 in normal testes has been reported in humans, mice, and rats. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of SOX9 in canine SCs during testicular maturation and neoplastic transformation. Canine testicular samples derived from three fetuses, four newborns, four prepubertal puppies, five adult dogs, 31 Sertoli cell tumors (SCTs) (one metastasizing), and five Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) were selected from departmental archive and tested immunohistochemically with a polyclonal antibody against SOX9 (1:150). All SCs from fetal, neonatal, and adult testes had a strong and exclusively nuclear labeling for SOX9. In SCs from prepubertal testes, SOX9 staining was highly variable with one negative sample (one of four), two samples with exclusively nuclear staining (two of four), and one with both nuclear and cytoplasmic labeling (one of four). Leydig cells (LCs) and LCTs were always negative. All 31 SCTs were positive for SOX9. The expression of SOX9 was nuclear, nuclear and cytoplasmic, and exclusively cytoplasmic in 18 of 31, 11 of 31, and two of 31 SCTs, respectively. This first report on the immunohistochemical expression of SOX9 in canine testes reports that in normal SCs from fetal, neonatal, and adult testes SOX9 labeled the nucleus, as in humans and laboratory animals. The cytoplasmic labeling observed in one prepubertal pairs of testes and in 11 SCTs could reflect SC immaturity or dedifferentiation, paralleling results observed in rat testes. The expression of SOX9 in SCs and SCTs and its absence in LCs and LCTs suggests that SOX9 is a reliable diagnostic marker for both normal and neoplastic SCs. PMID:26777558

  19. Proteomic comparison between maturation drying and prematurely imposed drying of Zea mays seeds reveals a potential role of maturation drying in preparing proteins for seed germination, seedling vigor, and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Ye, Jian-Qing; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wojdyla, Katarzyna I; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2014-02-01

    We have studied the role(s) of maturation drying in the acquisition of germinability, seedling vigor and pathogen resistance by comparing the proteome changes in maize embryo and endosperm during mature and prematurely imposed drying. Prematurely imposed dried seeds at 40 days after pollination (DAP) germinated almost as well as mature seeds (at 65 DAP), but their seedling growth was slower and they were seriously infected by fungi. A total of 80 and 114 proteins were identified to change at least two-fold (p < 0.05) in abundance during maturation drying in embryo and endosperm, respectively. Fewer proteins (48 and 59 in embryo and endosperm, respectively) changed in abundance during prematurely imposed drying. A number of proteins, 33 and 38 in embryo and endosperm, respectively, changed similarly in abundance during both maturation and prematurely imposed drying. Storage proteins were abundant in this group and may contribute to the acquisition of seed germinability. However, a relatively large number of proteins changed in the embryo (47 spots) and endosperm (76 spots) specifically during maturation drying. Among these proteins, storage proteins in the embryo and defense proteins in the endosperm may be particularly important for seedling vigor and resistance to fungal infection, respectively. PMID:24341390

  20. Effect of Maturity on Phenolics (Phenolic Acids and Flavonoids) Profile of Strawberry Cultivars and Mulberry Species from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Tahir; Anwar, Farooq; Abbas, Mateen; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how the extent of ripeness affects the yield of extract, total phenolics, total flavonoids, individual flavonols and phenolic acids in strawberry and mulberry cultivars from Pakistan. In strawberry, the yield of extract (%), total phenolics (TPC) and total flavonoids (TFC) ranged from 8.5–53.3%, 491–1884 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g DW and 83–327 mg catechin equivalents (CE)/100 g DW, respectively. For the different species of mulberry the yield of extract (%), total phenolics and total flavonoids of 6.9–54.0%, 201–2287 mg GAE/100 g DW and 110–1021 mg CE/100 g DW, respectively, varied significantly as fruit maturity progressed. The amounts of individual flavonols and phenolic acid in selected berry fruits were analyzed by RP-HPLC. Among the flavonols, the content of myricetin was found to be high in Morus alba (88 mg/100 g DW), the amount of quercetin as high in Morus laevigata (145 mg/100 g DW) while kaempferol was highest in the Korona strawberry (98 mg/100 g DW) at fully ripened stage. Of the six phenolic acids detected, p-hydroxybenzoic and p-coumaric acid were the major compounds in the strawberry. M. laevigata and M. nigra contained p-coumaric acid and vanillic acid while M. macroura and M. alba contained p-hydroxy-benzoic acid and chlorogenic acid as the major phenolic acids. Overall, a trend to an increase in the percentage of extraction yield, TPC, TFC, flavonols and phenolic acids was observed as maturity progressed from un-ripened to fully-ripened stages. PMID:22605997

  1. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Non-Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Mature Cheddar Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, N. A.; Cogan, T. M.; Condon, S.; Beresford, T.

    1999-01-01

    Non-starter lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 14 premium-quality and 3 sensorially defective mature Irish Cheddar cheeses, obtained from six manufacturers. From countable plates of Lactobacillus-selective agar, 20 single isolated colonies were randomly picked per cheese. All 331 viable isolates were biochemically characterized as mesophilic (i.e., group II) Lactobacillus spp. Phenotypically, the isolates comprised 96.4% L. paracasei, 2.1% L. plantarum, 0.3% L. curvatus, 0.3% L. brevis, and 0.9% unidentified species. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was used to rapidly identify the dominant strain groups in nine cheeses from three of the factories, and through clustering by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages, an average of seven strains were found per cheese. In general, strains isolated from cheese produced at the same factory clustered together. The majority of isolates associated with premium-quality cheese grouped together and apart from clusters of strains from defective-quality cheese. No correlation was found between the isomer of lactate produced and RAPD profiles, although isolates which did not ferment ribose clustered together. The phenotypic and genotypic methods employed were validated with a selection of 31 type and reference strains of mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. commonly found in Cheddar cheese. RAPD analysis was found to be a useful and rapid method for identifying isolates to the species level. The low homology exhibited between RAPD banding profiles for cheese isolates and collection strains demonstrated the heterogeneity of the L. paracasei complex. PMID:10427029

  2. Proteomic Analysis of the Protein Expression Profile in the Mature Nigella sativa (Black Seed).

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Ibrahim O; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Alfadda, Assim A; AlYahya, Sami A; Alghamdi, Waleed M; Aljohi, Hasan A; Almalik, Abdulaziz; Masood, Afshan

    2016-08-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seed has been used as an important nutritional flavoring agent and in traditional medicine for treating many illnesses since ancient times. Understanding the proteomic component of the seed may lead to enhance the understanding of its structural and biological functional complexity. In this study, we have analyzed its proteome profile based on gel-based proteome mapping technique that includes one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry strategy. We have not come across any such studies that have been performed in N. sativa seeds up to date. A total of 277 proteins were identified, and their functional, metabolic, and location-wise annotations were carried out using the UniProt database. The majority of proteins identified in the proteome dataset based on their function were those involved in enzyme catalytic activity, nucleotide binding, and protein binding while the major cellular processes included regulation of biological process followed by regulation of secondary biological process, cell organization and biogenesis, protein metabolism, and transport. The identified proteome was localized mainly to the nucleus then to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, mitochondria, plastid, and others. A majority of the proteins were involved in biochemical pathways involving carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid and shikimate pathway, lipid metabolism, nucleotide, cell organization and biogenesis, transport, and defense processes. The identified proteins in the dataset help to improve our understanding of the pathways involved in N. sativa seed metabolism and its biochemical features and detail out useful information that may help to utilize these proteins. This study could thus pave a way for future further high-throughput studies using a more targeted proteomic approach. PMID:27020565

  3. The Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and Proteasome Maturation Protein Axis Mediate Bortezomib Resistance in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingzong; Fu, Jinxiang; Chen, Ping; Ge, Xueping; Li, Yali; Kuiatse, Isere; Wang, Hua; Wang, Huihan; Zhang, Xingding; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2015-12-11

    Resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is an emerging clinical problem whose mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We considered the possibility that this could be associated with enhanced proteasome activity in part through the action of the proteasome maturation protein (POMP). Bortezomib-resistant myeloma models were used to examine the correlation between POMP expression and bortezomib sensitivity. POMP expression was then modulated using genetic and pharmacologic approaches to determine the effects on proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in cell lines and in vivo models. Resistant cell lines were found to overexpress POMP, and while its suppression in cell lines enhanced bortezomib sensitivity, POMP overexpression in drug-naive cells conferred resistance. Overexpression of POMP was associated with increased levels of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like (NRF2), and NRF2 was found to bind to and activate the POMP promoter. Knockdown of NRF2 in bortezomib-resistant cells reduced POMP levels and proteasome activity, whereas its overexpression in drug-naive cells increased POMP and proteasome activity. The NRF2 inhibitor all-trans-retinoic acid reduced cellular NRF2 levels and increased the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of bortezomib in resistant cells, while decreasing proteasome capacity. Finally, the combination of all-trans-retinoic acid with bortezomib showed enhanced activity against primary patient samples and in a murine model of bortezomib-resistant myeloma. Taken together, these studies validate a role for the NRF2/POMP axis in bortezomib resistance and identify NRF2 and POMP as potentially attractive targets for chemosensitization to this proteasome inhibitor. PMID:26483548

  4. Role of perinatal long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in cortical circuit maturation: Mechanisms and implications for psychopathology.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Vannest, Jennifer J; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-03-22

    Accumulating translational evidence suggests that the long-chain omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plays a role in the maturation and stability of cortical circuits that are impaired in different recurrent psychiatric disorders. Specifically, rodent and cell culture studies find that DHA preferentially accumulates in synaptic and growth cone membranes and promotes neurite outgrowth, dendritic spine stability, and synaptogenesis. Additional evidence suggests that DHA may play a role in microglia-mediated synaptic pruning, as well as myelin development and resilience. In non-human primates n-3 fatty acid insufficiency during perinatal development leads to widespread deficits in functional connectivity in adult frontal cortical networks compared to primates raised on DHA-fortified diet. Preterm delivery in non-human primates and humans is associated with early deficits in cortical DHA accrual. Human preterm birth is associated with long-standing deficits in myelin integrity and cortical circuit connectivity and increased risk for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood, and psychotic disorders. In general, ADHD and mood and psychotic disorders initially emerge during rapid periods of cortical circuit maturation and are characterized by DHA deficits, myelin pathology, and impaired cortical circuit connectivity. Together these associations suggest that early and uncorrected deficits in fetal brain DHA accrual may represent a modifiable risk factor for cortical circuit maturation deficits in psychiatric disorders, and could therefore have significant implications for informing early intervention and prevention strategies. PMID:25815252

  5. Role of perinatal long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in cortical circuit maturation: Mechanisms and implications for psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K; Vannest, Jennifer J; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating translational evidence suggests that the long-chain omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plays a role in the maturation and stability of cortical circuits that are impaired in different recurrent psychiatric disorders. Specifically, rodent and cell culture studies find that DHA preferentially accumulates in synaptic and growth cone membranes and promotes neurite outgrowth, dendritic spine stability, and synaptogenesis. Additional evidence suggests that DHA may play a role in microglia-mediated synaptic pruning, as well as myelin development and resilience. In non-human primates n-3 fatty acid insufficiency during perinatal development leads to widespread deficits in functional connectivity in adult frontal cortical networks compared to primates raised on DHA-fortified diet. Preterm delivery in non-human primates and humans is associated with early deficits in cortical DHA accrual. Human preterm birth is associated with long-standing deficits in myelin integrity and cortical circuit connectivity and increased risk for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood, and psychotic disorders. In general, ADHD and mood and psychotic disorders initially emerge during rapid periods of cortical circuit maturation and are characterized by DHA deficits, myelin pathology, and impaired cortical circuit connectivity. Together these associations suggest that early and uncorrected deficits in fetal brain DHA accrual may represent a modifiable risk factor for cortical circuit maturation deficits in psychiatric disorders, and could therefore have significant implications for informing early intervention and prevention strategies. PMID:25815252

  6. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. PMID:27115345

  7. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16299.001 PMID:27115345

  8. The Protein Dendrite Arborization and Synapse Maturation 1 (Dasm-1) Is Dispensable for Dendrite Arborization▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Archana; Knerr, Boris; Paixão, Sónia; Kramer, Edgar R.; Klein, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    The development of a highly branched dendritic tree is essential for the establishment of functional neuronal connections. The evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin superfamily member, the protein dendrite arborization and synapse maturation 1 (Dasm-1) is thought to play a critical role in dendrite formation of dissociated hippocampal neurons. RNA interference-mediated Dasm-1 knockdown was previously shown to impair dendrite, but not axonal, outgrowth and branching (S. H. Shi, D. N. Cox, D. Wang, L. Y. Jan, and Y. N. Jan, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:13341-13345, 2004). Here, we report the generation and analysis of Dasm-1 null mice. We find that genetic ablation of Dasm-1 does not interfere with hippocampal dendrite growth and branching in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the absence of Dasm-1 does not affect the modulation of dendritic outgrowth induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Importantly, the previously observed impairment in dendrite growth after Dasm-1 knockdown is also observed when the Dasm-1 knockdown is performed in cultured hippocampal neurons from Dasm-1 null mice. These findings indicate that the dendrite arborization phenotype was caused by off-target effects and that Dasm-1 is dispensable for hippocampal dendrite arborization. PMID:18268009

  9. Outer membrane protein OmpQ of Bordetella bronchiseptica is required for mature biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Natalia; Villalba, María Inés; Parisi, Gustavo; Arnal, Laura; Serra, Diego Omar; Aguilar, Mario; Yantorno, Osvaldo

    2016-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica, an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of colonizing the respiratory tract of diverse animals and chronically persists inside the hosts by forming biofilm. Most known virulence factors in Bordetella species are regulated by the BvgAS two-component transduction system. The Bvg-activated proteins play a critical role during host infection. OmpQ is an outer membrane porin protein which is expressed under BvgAS control. Here, we studied the contribution of OmpQ to the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica. We found that the lack of expression of OmpQ did not affect the growth kinetics and final biomass of B. bronchiseptica under planktonic growth conditions. The ΔompQ mutant strain displayed no differences in attachment level and in early steps of biofilm formation. However, deletion of the ompQ gene attenuated the ability of B. bronchiseptica to form a mature biofilm. Analysis of ompQ gene expression during the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica showed a dynamic expression pattern, with an increase of biofilm culture at 48 h. Moreover, we demonstrated that the addition of serum anti-OmpQ had the potential to reduce the biofilm biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we showed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, evidence of the contribution of OmpQ to a process of importance for B. bronchiseptica pathobiology. Our results indicate that OmpQ plays a role during the biofilm development process, particularly at later stages of development, and that this porin could be a potential target for strategies of biofilm formation inhibition. PMID:26673448

  10. Whey protein processing influences formula-induced gut maturation in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Østergaard, Mette V; Jiang, Pingping; Chatterton, Dereck E W; Thymann, Thomas; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Sangild, Per T

    2013-12-01

    Immaturity of the gut predisposes preterm infants to nutritional challenges potentially leading to clinical complications such as necrotizing enterocolitis. Feeding milk formulas is associated with greater risk than fresh colostrum or milk, probably due to loss of bioactive proteins (e.g., immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-β) during industrial processing (e.g., pasteurization, filtration, spray-drying). We hypothesized that the processing method for whey protein concentrate (WPC) would affect gut maturation in formula-fed preterm pigs used as a model for preterm infants. Fifty-five caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were distributed into 4 groups given 1 of 4 isoenergetic diets: formula containing conventional WPC (filtration, multi-pasteurization, standard spray-drying) (CF); formula containing gently treated WPC (reduced filtration and pasteurization, gentle spray-drying) (GF); formula containing minimally treated WPC (rennet precipitation, reduced filtration, heat treatment <40°C, freeze-drying) (MF); and bovine colostrum (used as a positive reference group) (BC). Relative to CF, GF, and MF pigs, BC pigs had greater villus heights, lactose digestion, and absorption and lower gut permeability (P < 0.05). MF and BC pigs had greater plasma citrulline concentrations than CF and GF pigs and intestinal interleukin-8 was lower in BC pigs than in the other groups (P < 0.05). MF pigs had lower concentrations of intestinal claudin-4, cleaved caspase-3, and phosphorylated c-Jun than CF pigs (P < 0.05). The conventional and gently treated WPCs had similar efficacy in stimulating proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that processing of WPC affects intestinal structure, function, and integrity when included in formulas for preterm pigs. Optimization of WPC processing technology may be important to preserve the bioactivity and nutritional value of formulas for sensitive newborns. PMID:24047702

  11. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  12. Transport of proteins into chloroplasts. Import and maturation of precursors to the 33-, 23-, and 16-kDa proteins of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    James, H E; Bartling, D; Musgrove, J E; Kirwin, P M; Herrmann, R G; Robinson, C

    1989-11-25

    The 33-, 23-, and 16-kDa proteins of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and transported into the thylakoid lumen of higher plant chloroplasts. In this report we have analyzed the import and maturation of these precursors, using reconstituted protein import assays and partially purified preparations of the processing peptidases involved. Precursors of the 33- and 23-kDa proteins from Spinacia and Triticum aestivum are processed by a stromal peptidase to intermediate forms; polypeptides of similar size are observed during the transport of these precursors and possibly that of the 16-kDa protein, into isolated chloroplasts. Complete maturation of the 33- and 23-kDa proteins is carried out by a thylakoidal peptidase shown previously to be involved in plastocyanin biogenesis. The data support an import mechanism involving successive cleavages by the stromal and thylakoidal processing peptidases. PMID:2684958

  13. Sensitive and Quantitative Three-Color Protein Imaging in Fission Yeast Using Spectrally Diverse, Recoded Fluorescent Proteins with Experimentally-Characterized In Vivo Maturation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sady, Bassem; Greenstein, Rachel A.; El-Samad, Hana J.; Braun, Sigurd; Madhani, Hiten D.

    2016-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an outstanding model organism for cell biological investigations, yet the range of useful and well-characterized fluorescent proteins (XFPs) is limited. We generated and characterized three recoded fluorescent proteins for 3-color analysis in S.pombe, Super-folder GFP, monomeric Kusabira Orange 2 and E2Crimson. Upon optimization and expression in S. pombe, the three proteins enabled sensitive simultaneous 3-color detection capability. Furthermore, we describe a strategy that combines a pulse-chase approach and mathematical modeling to quantify the maturation kinetics of these proteins in vivo. We observed maturation kinetics in S. pombe that are expected from those described for these proteins in vitro and/or in other cell types, but also unpredicted behaviors. Our studies provide a kinetically-characterized, integrated three-color XFP toolbox for S. pombe. PMID:27479698

  14. Effect of Maturation Degree on Composition of Fatty Acids and Tocopherols of Fruit Oil from Pistacia atlantica Growing Wild in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Guenane, Hamid; Bombarda, Isabelle; OuldElhadj, Mohamed Didi; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Pistacia atlantica fruit oil has been used for a long time by local populations for culinary and medicinal purposes. In this study, the fatty acid composition and tocopherol content were determined in twelve samples of P. atlantica fruit oil at three stages of maturation (immature, intermediate maturity and mature) collected in three different sites from the region of Laghouat. The results indicated a significant difference between the oil of mature fruits (green and black) and the immature ones (light red), which were distinguished by richness in unsaturated fatty acids and tocopherols. The oil from fruits of intermediate maturity (dark red) seems to combine these properties with those of the mature group, including oil yields. Such data emphasize the value of this oil, which needs further investigation. PMID:26669112

  15. Effect of foliar and soil application of potassium fertilizer on soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of soil and foliar application of potassium (K) on leaf and seed mineral concentration levels, and seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and minerals). Soybean cultivar (Pioneer 95470) of maturity group 5.7 was grown in a repeat...

  16. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  17. Fluorinated amino acids: compatibility with native protein structures and effects on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Salwiczek, Mario; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Gerling, Ulla I M; Ye, Shijie; Koksch, Beate

    2012-03-21

    Fluorinated analogues of the canonical α-L-amino acids have gained widespread attention as building blocks that may endow peptides and proteins with advantageous biophysical, chemical and biological properties. This critical review covers the literature dealing with investigations of peptides and proteins containing fluorinated analogues of the canonical amino acids published over the course of the past decade including the late nineties. It focuses on side-chain fluorinated amino acids, the carbon backbone of which is identical to their natural analogues. Each class of amino acids--aliphatic, aromatic, charged and polar as well as proline--is presented in a separate section. General effects of fluorine on essential properties such as hydrophobicity, acidity/basicity and conformation of the specific side chains and the impact of these altered properties on stability, folding kinetics and activity of peptides and proteins are discussed (245 references). PMID:22130572

  18. Optimal concentration of hyaluronan and plant protein in different culture systems for in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Opiela, Jolanta; Latasiewicz, Ewa; Smorag, Zdzisław

    2012-12-01

    With a view to search for optimal concentration of hyaluronan (HA) and plant protein (PP) in different culture systems for in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro in 2 culture systems (first co-cultured with granulose cells and estrus calf serum (ECS) in 2 mL volume, second without co-culture where ECS was replaced by exogenous hormones and BSA or PP in 100 microL dose under mineral oil). Seven types of media were used; 3 in first system and 4 in second system. To evaluate HA and PP effect on oocytes after in vitro culture an estimation of meiosis stage and a level of DNA fragmentation was performed by TUNEL staining. The highest meiotic maturation (84%) was observed in oocytes cultured in medium enriched with ECS in co-culture with granulose cells (1st system). The lowest meiotic maturation was noted in medium with addition of BSA (43%). The addition of HA in the medium enriched with BSA significantly increased the rate of matured oocytes (67%) and also didn't affect the chromatin quality of individual oocytes. The addition of HA to the culture medium supplemented with a PP decreased the rate of matured oocytes to 54% but no statistical differences were noted. The results of the present study showed that HA supplementation didn't have a detrimental impact on oocyte chromatin integrity and improved bovine oocytes' meiotic maturation in medium supplemented only with BSA without co-culture of granulose cells. PMID:23986966

  19. Maturation and fertilisation of sheep oocytes cultured in serum-free medium containing silk protein sericin.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Cut; Otoi, Takeshige; Setiadi, Mohamad Agus; Karja, Ni Wayan Kurniani

    2015-03-01

    Sericin is a water-soluble component of silk and has been used as a biomaterial due to its antibacterial and ultraviolet radiation-resistant properties. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of sericin supplementation in a maturation medium on the meiotic competence and fertilisability of sheep oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured in TCM199 supplemented with sericin at various concentrations of 0 (control), 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5%, either with or without bovine serum albumin (BSA). When the COCs were matured without BSA, the supplementation of 0.1% sericin significantly increased the rates of maturation to metaphase II and the total fertilisation of oocytes compared with the other concentrations of sericin. When the COCs were matured with BSA, the beneficial effects of 0.1% sericin supplementation on the maturation and fertilisation of oocytes were not observed. Our findings indicate that supplementation with 0.1% sericin during maturation culture may improve the nuclear maturation and fertilisability of sheep oocytes. Moreover, it may be possible to replace BSA with sericin in chemically defined media without the risk of disease transmission. PMID:25655418

  20. Olfactory marker protein is critical for functional maturation of olfactory sensory neurons and development of mother preference

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anderson C.; He, Jiwei; Ma, Minghong

    2011-01-01

    Survival of many altricial animals critically depends on the sense of smell. Curiously, the olfactory system is rather immature at birth and undergoes a maturation process, which is poorly understood. Using patch clamp technique on mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) with a defined odorant receptor (OR), we demonstrate that OSNs exhibit functional maturation during the first month of postnatal life by developing faster response kinetics, higher sensitivity, and most intriguingly, higher selectivity. OSNs expressing the receptor MOR23 are relatively broadly tuned in neonates and become selective detectors for the cognate odorant within two weeks. Remarkably, these changes are prevented by genetic ablation of olfactory marker protein (OMP), which is exclusively expressed in mature OSNs. Biochemical and pharmacological evidence supports that alteration in odorant-induced phosphorylation of signaling proteins underlie some of the OMP−/− phenotypes. Furthermore, in a novel behavioral assay in which the mouse pups are given a choice between the biological mother and another unfamiliar lactating female, wild-type pups prefer the biological mother, while OMP knockout pups fail to show preference. These results reveal that OSNs undergo an OMP-dependant functional maturation process that coincides with early development of the smell function, which is essential for pups to form preference for their mother. PMID:21414919

  1. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  2. Activation of Protein Kinase A in Mature Osteoblasts Promotes a Major Bone Anabolic Response.

    PubMed

    Tascau, Liana; Gardner, Thomas; Anan, Hussein; Yongpravat, Charlie; Cardozo, Christopher P; Bauman, William A; Lee, Francis Y; Oh, Daniel S; Tawfeek, Hesham A

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) regulates osteoblast cell function in vitro and is activated by important bone mass modulating agents. We determined whether PKA activation in osteoblasts is sufficient to mediate a bone anabolic response. Thus, a mouse model conditionally expressing a constitutively active PKA (CA-PKA) in osteoblasts (CA-PKA-OB mouse) was developed by crossing a 2.3-kb α1 (I)-collagen promoter-Cre mouse with a floxed-CA-PKA mouse. Primary osteoblasts from the CA-PKA-OB mice exhibited higher basal PKA activity than those from control mice. Microcomputed tomographic analysis revealed that CA-PKA-OB female mice had an 8.6-fold increase in femoral but only 1.16-fold increase in lumbar 5 vertebral bone volume/total volume. Femur cortical thickness and volume were also higher in the CA-PKA-OB mice. In contrast, alterations in many femoral microcomputed tomographic parameters in male CA-PKA-OB mice were modest. Interestingly, the 3-dimensional structure model index was substantially lower both in femur and lumbar 5 of male and female CA-PKA-OB mice, reflecting an increase in the plate to rod-like structure ratio. In agreement, femurs from female CA-PKA-OB mice had greater load to failure and were stiffer compared with those of control mice. Furthermore, the CA-PKA-OB mice had higher levels of serum bone turnover markers and increased osteoblast and osteoclast numbers per total tissue area compared with control animals. In summary, constitutive activation of PKA in osteoblasts is sufficient to increase bone mass and favorably modify bone architecture and improve mechanical properties. PKA activation in mature osteoblasts is, therefore, an important target for designing anabolic drugs for treating diseases with bone loss. PMID:26488807

  3. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  4. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  5. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  6. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  7. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Effects of threonine supplementation on whole-body protein synthesis and plasma metabolites in growing and mature horses.

    PubMed

    Mastellar, S L; Moffet, A; Harris, P A; Urschel, K L

    2016-01-01

    Current equine threonine requirement estimates do not account for probable use of threonine to maintain gut health and mucin synthesis. The objective of this study was to determine if threonine supplementation (+Thr) would increase whole-body protein synthesis (WBPS) in weanling colts (Study 1) and adult mares (Study 2). Both studies used a crossover design, where each of six animals was studied twice while receiving the isonitrogenous diets. The basal diets contained lower threonine levels (Basal) than the threonine (+Thr) supplemented diets. Threonine intakes in mg/kg BW/day were as follows: 79 (Basal) and 162 (+Thr) for Study 1 and 58 (Basal) and 119 (+Thr) for Study 2, in comparison to the NRC estimated requirements of 81 and 33 mg/kg BW/day for weanling and mature horses, respectively. Following 5 days of adaptation, blood samples were taken before and 90 min after the morning concentrate meal. The next day, whole-body phenylalanine kinetics were determined using a 2 h primed, constant infusion of [(13)C]sodium bicarbonate followed by a 4 h primed, constant infusion of [1-(13)C]phenylalanine. Most plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations were elevated post-feeding (P < 0.01). Lysine and valine plasma concentrations were lower (P <0.10), while methionine, threonine, and glycine plasma concentrations were greater (P <0.10) 90 min post concentrate meal feeding with +Thr in both studies. Phenylalanine flux, intake, oxidation and non-oxidative disposal were similar between treatments (P > 0.05). These findings suggest that supplementation of a single AA can affect the metabolism of several AAs and threonine was not a limiting AA in these diets. PMID:26670331

  9. Information for targeting to the chloroplastic inner envelope membrane is contained in the mature region of the maize Bt1-encoded protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.M.; Sullivan, T.D.; Keegstra, K.

    1992-09-15

    Based on the protein sequence deduced from a cDNA clone, it has been proposed that the maize Bt1 locus encodes an amyloplast membrane metabolite translocator protein. The present work provides further evidence for this hypothesis by showing that the gene product of Bt1 could be imported into chloroplasts in vitro and processed to lower molecular weight mature proteins. More importantly, the imported mature proteins were localized to the inner envelope membrane, where metabolite tranlocators are located in plastids. In addition, the location of information for targeting to the inner membrane was investigated by constructing and analyzing the import of chimeric precursor proteins. A chimeric protein with the transit peptide of the precursor to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase fused to the mature region of the Bt1-encoded protein was targeted to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. Moreover, a chimeric protein with the transit peptide of the Bt1-encoded protein fused to the mature protein of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein was targeted to the thylakoid. These results indicate that the transit peptide of the Bt1-encoded protein functions primarily as a stromal targeting sequence. The information for targeting to the chloroplastic inner envelope membrane is contained in the mature region of the protein.

  10. Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) Signaling Up-regulates Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 to Suppress Chondrocyte Maturation via the Akt Protein Signaling Pathway as a Negative Feedback Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Kakoi, Hironori; Maeda, Shingo; Shinohara, Naohiro; Matsuyama, Kanehiro; Imamura, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Ichiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Takao; Yokouchi, Masahiro; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-01-01

    Although bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling promotes chondrogenesis, it is not clear whether BMP-induced chondrocyte maturation is cell-autonomously terminated. Loss of function of Smpd3 in mice results in an increase in mature hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we report that in chondrocytes the Runx2-dependent expression of Smpd3 was increased by BMP-2 stimulation. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), encoded by the Smpd3 gene, was detected both in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes of mouse embryo bone cartilage. An siRNA for Smpd3, as well as the nSMase inhibitor GW4869, significantly enhanced BMP-2-induced differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes. Conversely, overexpression of Smpd3 or C2-ceramide, which mimics the function of nSMase2, inhibited chondrogenesis. Upon induction of Smpd3 siRNA or GW4869, phosphorylation of both Akt and S6 proteins was increased. The accelerated chondrogenesis induced by Smpd3 silencing was negated by application of the Akt inhibitor MK2206 or the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, in mouse bone culture, GW4869 treatment significantly promoted BMP-2-induced hypertrophic maturation and calcification of chondrocytes, which subsequently was eliminated by C2-ceramide. Smpd3 knockdown decreased the apoptosis of terminally matured ATDC5 chondrocytes, probably as a result of decreased ceramide production. In addition, we found that expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2) was elevated by a loss of Smpd3, which was restored by MK2206. Indeed, expression of Has2 protein decreased in nSMase2-positive hypertrophic chondrocytes in the bones of mouse embryos. Our data suggest that the Smpd3/nSMase2-ceramide-Akt signaling axis negatively regulates BMP-induced chondrocyte maturation and Has2 expression to control the rate of endochondral ossification as a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:24505141

  11. Fundamental differences between the nucleic acid chaperone activities of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and Gag or Gag-derived proteins: Biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tiyun; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Levin, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag polyprotein precursor has multiple domains including nucleocapsid (NC). Although mature NC and NC embedded in Gag are nucleic acid chaperones (proteins that remodel nucleic acid structure), few studies include detailed analysis of the chaperone activity of partially processed Gag proteins and comparison with NC and Gag. Here we address this issue by using a reconstituted minus-strand transfer system. NC and NC-containing Gag proteins exhibited annealing and duplex destabilizing activities required for strand transfer. Surprisingly, unlike NC, with increasing concentrations, Gag proteins drastically inhibited the DNA elongation step. This result is consistent with “nucleic acid-driven multimerization” of Gag and the reported slow dissociation of Gag from bound nucleic acid, which prevent reverse transcriptase from traversing the template (“roadblock” mechanism). Our findings illustrate one reason why NC (and not Gag) has evolved as a critical cofactor in reverse transcription, a paradigm that might also extend to other retrovirus systems. PMID:20655566

  12. Dynamic expression of TrkB receptor protein on proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, presumably via its primary receptor, TrkB, but controversy exists about how BDNF affects neurogenesis (e.g. proliferation vs. survival/differentiation). This controversy arises, in part, due to the lack of information about if and when TrkB is expressed on adult neural precursors in vivo. Using multiple methods to analyze proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse subgranular zone (SGZ), we find that the proportion of proliferating cells that are TrkB-IR is low and it remains low for at least one week following BrdU labeling, but increases as neuroblasts mature. Use of the nestin-GFP transgenic mouse revealed the likelihood of being TrkB-IR increased with presumed maturity of the cell type. Stem-like cells, which rarely divide, were likely to express TrkB. However, early progenitors and late progenitors, which are still in the cell cycle had rare TrkB expression. Immature neuroblasts, however, were more likely to express TrkB, especially as their morphology became more mature. Taken together, these findings emphasize that expression of TrkB protein is closely linked to progression towards neuronal maturity. This provides evidence that maturing cells but not proliferating cells in the adult mouse SGZ have the molecular machinery necessary to respond directly to BDNF. Furthermore, these findings lay critical groundwork for further exploration of the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:18240316

  13. The Arabidopsis Chloroplast Stromal N-Terminome: Complexities of Amino-Terminal Protein Maturation and Stability1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Elden; Kim, Jitae; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein amino (N) termini are prone to modifications and are major determinants of protein stability in bacteria, eukaryotes, and perhaps also in chloroplasts. Most chloroplast proteins undergo N-terminal maturation, but this is poorly understood due to insufficient experimental information. Consequently, N termini of mature chloroplast proteins cannot be accurately predicted. This motivated an extensive characterization of chloroplast protein N termini in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates and mass spectrometry, generating nearly 14,000 tandem mass spectrometry spectra matching to protein N termini. Many nucleus-encoded plastid proteins accumulated with two or three different N termini; we evaluated the significance of these different proteoforms. Alanine, valine, threonine (often in N-α-acetylated form), and serine were by far the most observed N-terminal residues, even after normalization for their frequency in the plastid proteome, while other residues were absent or highly underrepresented. Plastid-encoded proteins showed a comparable distribution of N-terminal residues, but with a higher frequency of methionine. Infrequent residues (e.g. isoleucine, arginine, cysteine, proline, aspartate, and glutamate) were observed for several abundant proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins 70 and 90, Rubisco large subunit, and ferredoxin-glutamate synthase), likely reflecting functional regulation through their N termini. In contrast, the thylakoid lumenal proteome showed a wide diversity of N-terminal residues, including those typically associated with instability (aspartate, glutamate, leucine, and phenylalanine). We propose that, after cleavage of the chloroplast transit peptide by stromal processing peptidase, additional processing by unidentified peptidases occurs to avoid unstable or otherwise unfavorable N-terminal residues. The possibility of a chloroplast N-end rule is discussed. PMID:26371235

  14. The effect of whey acidic protein fractions on bone loss in the ovariectomised rat.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Marlena C; Plimmer, Gabrielle G; Schollum, Linda M; Haggarty, Neill; Ram, Satyendra; Palmano, Kate

    2005-08-01

    Bovine milk has been shown to contain bioactive components with bone-protective properties. Earlier studies on bovine milk whey protein showed that it suppressed bone resorption in the female ovariectomised rat. A new osteotropic component was subsequently identified in the whey basic protein fraction, but bone bioactivity may also be associated with other whey fractions. In the present study, we investigated whether acidic protein fractions isolated from bovine milk whey could prevent bone loss in mature ovariectomised female rats. Six-month-old female rats were ovariectomised (OVX) or left intact (sham). The OVX rats were randomised into four groups. One group remained the control (OVX), whereas three groups were fed various whey acidic protein fractions from milk whey as 3 g/kg diet for 4 months. Outcomes were bone mineral density, bone biomechanics and markers of bone turnover. Bone mineral density of the femurs indicated that one of the whey AF over time caused a recovery of bone lost from OVX. Plasma C-telopeptide of type I collagen decreased significantly in all groups except OVX control over time, indicating an anti-resorptive effect of whey acidic protein. Biomechanical data showed that the AF may affect bone architecture as elasticity was increased by one of the whey AF. The femurs of AF-supplemented rats all showed an increase in organic matter. This is the first report of an acidic whey protein fraction isolated from milk whey that may support the recovery of bone loss in vivo. PMID:16115359

  15. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis.

    PubMed

    Conti, C J; Giménez, I B; Cabrini, R L

    1976-03-01

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. PMID:1258094

  16. Relatedness of acyl carrier proteins shown by amino acid compositions.

    PubMed

    Walker, T A; Ernst-Fonberg, M L

    1982-01-01

    1. Relatedness among the following carrier proteins was assessed on the basis of amino acid compositions: eight acyl carrier proteins (ACP's) associated with fatty acid synthesis, ACP's associated with citrate lyase and citramalate lyase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein and cytochrome 552. Two independent indices of amino acid composition were used. 2. The fatty acid synthesis-associated ACP's of many organisms and the lyase-associated ACP's show a high degree of relatedness among one another. 3. The ACP's show no relatedness to biotin carboxyl carrier protein or cytochrome 552. PMID:7128903

  17. Some things get better with age: differences in salicylic acid accumulation and defense signaling in young and mature Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Carella, Philip; Wilson, Daniel C.; Cameron, Robin K.

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, much of what we know about the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and its role in plant defense comes from experiments using young plants. We are interested in understanding why young plants are susceptible to virulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae, while mature plants exhibit a robust defense response known as age-related resistance (ARR). SA-mediated signaling is important for defense in young plants, however, ARR occurs independently of the defense regulators NPR1 and WHY1. Furthermore, intercellular SA accumulation is an important component of ARR, and intercellular washing fluids from ARR-competent plants exhibit antibacterial activity, suggesting that SA acts as an antimicrobial agent in the intercellular space. Young plants accumulate both intracellular and intercellular SA during PAMP- and effector-triggered immunity, however, virulent P. syringae promotes susceptibility by suppressing SA accumulation using the phytotoxin coronatine. Here we outline the hypothesis that mature, ARR-competent Arabidopsis alleviates coronatine-mediated suppression of SA accumulation. We also explore the role of SA in other mature-plant processes such as flowering and senescence, and discuss their potential impact on ARR. PMID:25620972

  18. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Huo, Li-Jun; Meng, Xiao-Qian; Zhong, Zhi-Sheng; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2003-11-01

    Calcium signal is important for the regulation of meiotic cell cycle in oocytes, but its downstream mechanism is not well known. The functional roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes were studied by drug treatment, Western blot analysis, kinase activity assay, indirect immunostaining, and confocal microscopy. The results indicated that meiotic resumption of both cumulus-enclosed and denuded oocytes was prevented by CaMKII inhibitor KN-93, Ant-AIP-II, or CaM antagonist W7 in a dose-dependent manner, but only germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of denuded oocytes was inhibited by membrane permeable Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. When the oocytes were treated with KN-93, W7, or BAPTA-AM after GVBD, the first polar body emission was inhibited. A quick elevation of CaMKII activity was detected after electrical activation of mature pig oocytes, which could be prevented by the pretreatment of CaMKII inhibitors. Treatment of oocytes with KN-93 or W7 resulted in the inhibition of pronuclear formation. The possible regulation of CaMKII on maturation promoting factor (MPF), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and ribosome S6 protein kinase (p90rsk) during meiotic cell cycles of pig oocytes was also studied. KN-93 and W7 prevented the accumulation of cyclin B and the full phosphorylation of MAPK and p90rsk during meiotic maturation. When CaMKII activity was inhibited during parthenogenetic activation, cyclin B, the regulatory subunit of MPF, failed to be degraded, but MAPK and p90rsk were quickly dephosphorylated and degraded. Confocal microscopy revealed that CaM and CaMKII were localized to the nucleus and the periphery of the GV stage oocytes. Both proteins were concentrated to the condensed chromosomes after GVBD. In oocytes at the meiotic metaphase MI or MII stage, CaM distributed on the whole spindle, but CaMKII was localized only on the spindle poles. After transition into anaphase, both proteins

  19. Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is required for oocyte maturation and female fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Lalioti, Maria D; Aydiner, Fulya; Sasson, Isaac; Ilbay, Orkan; Sakkas, Denny; Lowther, Katie M; Mehlmann, Lisa M; Seli, Emre

    2012-08-15

    Gene expression during oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis up to zygotic genome activation requires translational activation of maternally-derived mRNAs. EPAB [embryonic poly(A)-binding protein] is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein during this period in Xenopus, mouse and human. In Xenopus oocytes, ePAB stabilizes maternal mRNAs and promotes their translation. To assess the role of EPAB in mammalian reproduction, we generated Epab-knockout mice. Although Epab(-/-) males and Epab(+/-) of both sexes were fertile, Epab(-/-) female mice were infertile, and could not generate embryos or mature oocytes in vivo or in vitro. Epab(-/-) oocytes failed to achieve translational activation of maternally-stored mRNAs upon stimulation of oocyte maturation, including Ccnb1 (cyclin B1) and Dazl (deleted in azoospermia-like) mRNAs. Microinjection of Epab mRNA into Epab(-/-) germinal vesicle stage oocytes did not rescue maturation, suggesting that EPAB is also required for earlier stages of oogenesis. In addition, late antral follicles in the ovaries of Epab(-/-) mice exhibited impaired cumulus expansion, and a 8-fold decrease in ovulation, associated with a significant down-regulation of mRNAs encoding the EGF (epidermal growth factor)-like growth factors Areg (amphiregulin), Ereg (epiregulin) and Btc (betacellulin), and their downstream regulators, Ptgs2 (prostaglandin synthase 2), Has2 (hyaluronan synthase 2) and Tnfaip6 (tumour necrosis factor α-induced protein 6). The findings from the present study indicate that EPAB is necessary for oogenesis, folliculogenesis and female fertility in mice. PMID:22621333

  20. Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is required for oocyte maturation and female fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Lalioti, Maria D.; Aydiner, Fulya; Sasson, Isaac; Ilbay, Orkan; Sakkas, Denny; Lowther, Katie M.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.; Seli, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression during oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis up to zygotic genome activation requires translational activation of maternally-derived mRNAs. EPAB [embryonic poly(A)-binding protein] is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein during this period in Xenopus, mouse and human. In Xenopus oocytes, ePAB stabilizes maternal mRNAs and promotes their translation. To assess the role of EPAB in mammalian reproduction, we generated Epab-knockout mice. Although Epab−/− males and Epab+/− of both sexes were fertile, Epab−/− female mice were infertile, and could not generate embryos or mature oocytes in vivo or in vitro. Epab−/− oocytes failed to achieve translational activation of maternally-stored mRNAs upon stimulation of oocyte maturation, including Ccnb1 (cyclin B1) and Dazl (deleted in azoospermia-like) mRNAs. Microinjection of Epab mRNA into Epab−/− germinal vesicle stage oocytes did not rescue maturation, suggesting that EPAB is also required for earlier stages of oogenesis. In addition, late antral follicles in the ovaries of Epab−/− mice exhibited impaired cumulus expansion, and a 8-fold decrease in ovulation, associated with a significant down-regulation of mRNAs encoding the EGF (epidermal growth factor)-like growth factors Areg (amphiregulin), Ereg (epiregulin) and Btc (betacellulin), and their downstream regulators, Ptgs2 (prostaglandin synthase 2), Has2 (hyaluronan synthase 2) and Tnfaip6 (tumour necrosis factor α-induced protein 6). The findings from the present study indicate that EPAB is necessary for oogenesis, folliculogenesis and female fertility in mice. PMID:22621333

  1. Strained cycloalkynes as new protein sulfenic acid traps.

    PubMed

    Poole, Thomas H; Reisz, Julie A; Zhao, Weiling; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; King, S Bruce

    2014-04-30

    Protein sulfenic acids are formed by the reaction of biologically relevant reactive oxygen species with protein thiols. Sulfenic acid formation modulates the function of enzymes and transcription factors either directly or through the subsequent formation of protein disulfide bonds. Identifying the site, timing, and conditions of protein sulfenic acid formation remains crucial to understanding cellular redox regulation. Current methods for trapping and analyzing sulfenic acids involve the use of dimedone and other nucleophilic 1,3-dicarbonyl probes that form covalent adducts with cysteine-derived protein sulfenic acids. As a mechanistic alternative, the present study describes highly strained bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne (BCN) derivatives as concerted traps of sulfenic acids. These strained cycloalkynes react efficiently with sulfenic acids in proteins and small molecules yielding stable alkenyl sulfoxide products at rates more than 100× greater than 1,3-dicarbonyl reagents enabling kinetic competition with physiological sulfur chemistry. Similar to the 1,3-dicarbonyl reagents, the BCN compounds distinguish the sulfenic acid oxoform from the thiol, disulfide, sulfinic acid, and S-nitrosated forms of cysteine while displaying an acceptable cell toxicity profile. The enhanced rates demonstrated by these strained alkynes identify them as new bioorthogonal probes that should facilitate the discovery of previously unknown sulfenic acid sites and their parent proteins. PMID:24724926

  2. Cloning and characterization of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid encoding haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Tsuchida, J; Tanaka, H; Koga, M; Nishina, Y; Nozaki, M; Yoshinaga, K; Toshimori, K; Matsumiya, K; Okuyama, A; Nishimune, Y

    2000-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a germ cell-specific protein from an expression cDNA library prepared from the mouse testis using testis-specific polyclonal antibodies. Northern blot analysis showed a transcript of 1.1 kilobases exclusively expressed in haploid germ cells of the testis. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed one long open reading frame consisting of 238 deduced amino acids, rich in basic amino acids in the N-terminal one-third that also contained the nuclear localization signal, and rich in acidic amino acids, including two type of acidic alanine-rich repeats, in the rest of the deduced protein. The protein having a molecular weight of approximately 55 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 4.3-4.7 was also exclusively detected in the testis by Western blot analysis. As the cDNA was located on chromosome-X, Halap-X (haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X) was proposed for the name of the protein encoded by the cDNA. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the Halap-X protein was predominantly present in the nucleoplasm of round spermatids but gradually decreased as spermatids matured, followed by the subsequent appearance in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. Thus, the Halap-X protein was transferred from the nuclei to the cytoplasm during the spermatid maturation when the chromatin condensation and transformation of the nuclei occurred. The Halap-X may facilitate specific association of nuclear DNA with some basic chromosomal proteins and play important roles in the process of chromatin condensation. PMID:10993819

  3. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes. PMID:26873273

  4. Immunomodulatory Effects of Four Leishmania infantum Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins on Human Dendritic Cells Differentiation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Drini, Sima; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania parasites and some molecules they secrete are known to modulate innate immune responses through effects on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here, we characterized four Leishmania infantum potentially excreted/secreted recombinant proteins (LipESP) identified in our laboratory: Elongation Factor 1 alpha (LiEF-1α), a proteasome regulatory ATPase (LiAAA-ATPase) and two novel proteins with unknown functions, which we termed LiP15 and LiP23, by investigating their effect on in vitro differentiation and maturation of human DCs and on cytokine production by DCs and monocytes. During DCs differentiation, LipESP led to a significant decrease in CD1a. LiP23 and LiEF-1α, induced a decrease of HLA-DR and an increase of CD86 surface expression, respectively. During maturation, an up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD80 was found in response to LiP15, LiP23 and LiAAA-ATPase, while an increase of CD40 expression was only observed in response to LiP15. All LipESP induced an over-expression of CD86 with significant differences between proteins. These proteins also induced significant IL-12p70 levels in immature DCs but not in monocytes. The LipESP-induced IL-12p70 production was significantly enhanced by a co-treatment with IFN-γ in both cell populations. TNF-α and IL-10 were induced in DCs and monocytes with higher levels observed for LiP15 and LiAAA-ATPase. However, LPS-induced cytokine production during DC maturation or in monocyte cultures was significantly down regulated by LipESP co-treatment. Our findings suggest that LipESP strongly interfere with DCs differentiation suggesting a possible involvement in mechanisms established by the parasite for its survival. These proteins also induce DCs maturation by up-regulating several costimulatory molecules and by inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which is a prerequisite for T cell activation. However, the reduced ability of LipESP-stimulated DCs and monocytes to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects of Four Leishmania infantum Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins on Human Dendritic Cells Differentiation and Maturation.

    PubMed

    Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Drini, Sima; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania parasites and some molecules they secrete are known to modulate innate immune responses through effects on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here, we characterized four Leishmania infantum potentially excreted/secreted recombinant proteins (LipESP) identified in our laboratory: Elongation Factor 1 alpha (LiEF-1α), a proteasome regulatory ATPase (LiAAA-ATPase) and two novel proteins with unknown functions, which we termed LiP15 and LiP23, by investigating their effect on in vitro differentiation and maturation of human DCs and on cytokine production by DCs and monocytes. During DCs differentiation, LipESP led to a significant decrease in CD1a. LiP23 and LiEF-1α, induced a decrease of HLA-DR and an increase of CD86 surface expression, respectively. During maturation, an up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD80 was found in response to LiP15, LiP23 and LiAAA-ATPase, while an increase of CD40 expression was only observed in response to LiP15. All LipESP induced an over-expression of CD86 with significant differences between proteins. These proteins also induced significant IL-12p70 levels in immature DCs but not in monocytes. The LipESP-induced IL-12p70 production was significantly enhanced by a co-treatment with IFN-γ in both cell populations. TNF-α and IL-10 were induced in DCs and monocytes with higher levels observed for LiP15 and LiAAA-ATPase. However, LPS-induced cytokine production during DC maturation or in monocyte cultures was significantly down regulated by LipESP co-treatment. Our findings suggest that LipESP strongly interfere with DCs differentiation suggesting a possible involvement in mechanisms established by the parasite for its survival. These proteins also induce DCs maturation by up-regulating several costimulatory molecules and by inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which is a prerequisite for T cell activation. However, the reduced ability of LipESP-stimulated DCs and monocytes to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS

  6. Truncation of a Protein Disulfide Isomerase, PDIL2-1, Delays Embryo Sac Maturation and Disrupts Pollen Tube Guidance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollen tubes navigate through different female tissues and deliver the sperm to the embryo sac for fertilization. Protein disulfide isomerases play important roles in the maturation of secreted or plasma membrane proteins. Here we show that truncated versions of a protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), ...

  7. Extended neocortical maturation time encompasses speciation, fatty acid and lateralization theories of the evolution of schizophrenia and creativity.

    PubMed

    Seldon, H Lee

    2007-01-01

    I suggest that the extended maturation time of some regions of the human neocortex is the uniquely human factor which allows the development of language, creativity and madness. The genetic event or events which contribute to the long delay to final maturation occurred at or after the speciation of Homo sapiens sapiens. Neocortical growth may follow the previously detailed "balloon model", which suggests that intra- and subcortical myelin production during development physically stretches each local area of the cortex tangentially to the pial surface, thereby causing neuronal columns to become more disjoint and more functionally independent, thereby increasing the functional capacity of the area [Seldon HL. Does brain white matter growth expand the cortex like a balloon? Hypothesis and consequences. Laterality 2005;10(1):81-95]. This occurs in addition to Hebbian synaptic modeling. Therefore, the size and functional capacity of each cytoarchitectonic area of each individual adult neocortex are the outcomes of partly deterministic (e.g., genetic) and partly statistical growth processes with numerous factors including environmental stimuli and fatty acid content in diets. The possible functional capacity and variation among growth outcomes increase with the length of time allowed to "finalize" synaptic weights, myelination and other plastic processes. For example, acquisition of quite differing linguistic skills becomes possible only in Homo sapiens because of the extended, decades-long plasticity of temporal lobe areas; in contrast, tactile skills vary little among human races and cultures, or even among higher primates, because of the faster maturation of the somatomotor areas. Some of the statistically extreme variations of the neocortical growth processes lead to abnormal cognition and behavior called "madness" or "genius". This maturation hypothesis overcomes some problems with those based purely on fatty acid metabolism or on functional asymmetry (non

  8. Proteomic analysis of the mature Brassica stigma reveals proteins with diverse roles in vegetative and reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S

    2016-09-01

    The stigma, the specialized apex of the Brassicaceae gynoecium, plays a role in pollen capture, discrimination, hydration, germination, and guidance. Despite this crucial role in reproduction, the global proteome underlying Brassicaceae stigma development and function remains largely unknown. As a contribution towards the characterization of the Brassicaceae dry stigma global proteome, more than 2500 Brassica napus mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based proteomics approaches. Most stigma proteins participated in Metabolic Processes, Responses to Stimulus or Stress, Cellular or Developmental Processes, and Transport. The stigma was found to express a wide variety of proteins with demonstrated roles in cellular and organ development including proteins known to be involved in cellular expansion and morphogenesis, embryo development, as well as gynoecium and stigma development. Comparisons to a corresponding proteome from a very morphologically different Poaceae dry stigma showed a very similar distribution of proteins among different functional categories, but also revealed evident distinctions in protein composition especially in glucosinolate and carotenoid metabolism, photosynthesis, and self-incompatibility. To our knowledge, this study reports the largest Brassicaceae stigma protein dataset described to date. PMID:27457983

  9. Photoaffinity labeling of retinoic acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, P S; Choi, S Y; Ho, Y C; Rando, R R

    1995-01-01

    Retinoid-binding proteins are essential mediators of vitamin A function in vertebrate organisms. They solubilize and stabilize retinoids, and they direct the intercellular and intracellular trafficking, transport, and metabolic function of vitamin A compounds in vision and in growth and development. Although many soluble retinoid-binding proteins and receptors have been purified and extensively characterized, relatively few membrane-associated enzymes and other proteins that interact with retinoids have been isolated and studied, due primarily to their inherent instabilities during purification. In an effort to identify and purify previously uncharacterized retinoid-binding proteins, it is shown that radioactively labeled all-trans-retinoic acid can be used as a photoaffinity labeling reagent to specifically tag two known retinoic acid-binding proteins, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and albumin, in complex mixtures of cytosolic proteins. Additionally, a number of other soluble and membrane-associated proteins that bind all-trans-[11,12-3H]retinoic acid with high specificity are labeled utilizing the same photoaffinity techniques. Most of these labeled proteins have molecular weights that do not correspond to any known retinoid-binding proteins. Thus, photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-retinoic acid and related photoactivatable retinoids is a method that should prove extremely useful in the identification and purification of novel soluble and membrane-associated retinoid-binding proteins from ocular and nonocular tissues. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846032

  10. Mitsugumin 56 (hedgehog acyltransferase-like) is a sarcoplasmic reticulum-resident protein essential for postnatal muscle maturation.

    PubMed

    Van, Bo; Nishi, Miyuki; Komazaki, Shinji; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Kakizawa, Sho; Nakanaga, Keita; Aoki, Junken; Park, Ki-Ho; Ma, Jianjie; Ueyama, Tomomi; Ogata, Takehiro; Maruyama, Naoki; Takeshima, Hiroshi

    2015-04-28

    Mitsugumin 56 (MG56), also known as the membrane-bound O-acyl-transferase family member hedgehog acyltransferase-like, was identified as a new sarcoplasmic reticulum component in striated muscle. Mg56-knockout mice grew normally for a week after birth, but shortly thereafter exhibited a suckling defect and died under starvation conditions. In the knockout skeletal muscle, regular contractile features were largely preserved, but sarcoplasmic reticulum elements swelled and further developed enormous vacuoles. In parallel, the unfolded protein response was severely activated in the knockout muscle, and presumably disrupted muscle development leading to the suckling failure. Therefore, MG56 seems essential for postnatal skeletal muscle maturation. PMID:25841338

  11. Developmental patterns of free and protein-bound biotin during maturation and germination of seeds of Pisum sativum: characterization of a novel seed-specific biotinylated protein.

    PubMed

    Duval, M; Job, C; Alban, C; Douce, R; Job, D

    1994-04-01

    Mature dry pea seeds contain three major biotinylated proteins. Two of these of subunit molecular mass about 75 kDa and 200 kDa are associated with 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.4) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities (EC 6.4.1.2) respectively. The third does not exhibit any of the biotin-dependent carboxylase activities found in higher organisms and represents the major part of the total protein-bound biotin in the seeds. This novel protein has been purified from a whole pea seed extract. Because in SDS/polyacrylamide gels the protein migrates with an apparent molecular mass of about 65 kDa, it is referred to as SBP65, for 65 kDa seed biotinylated protein. The molecular mass of native SBP65 is greater than 400 kDa, suggesting that the native protein assumes a polymeric structure, resulting from the association of six to eight identical subunits. The results of CNBr cleavage experiments suggest that biotin is covalently bound to the protein. The stoichiometry is 1 mol of biotin per 1 mol of 65 kDa polypeptide. The temporal and spatial pattern of expression of SBP65 is described. SBP65 is specifically expressed in the seeds, being absent from leaf, root, stem, pod and flower tissues of pea plants. The level of SBP65 increases dramatically during seed development. The protein is not detectable in very young seeds. Its accumulation pattern parallels that for storage proteins, being maximally expressed in the mature dry seeds. SBP65 disappears at a very high rate during seed germination. The level of free biotin has also been evaluated for various organs of pea plants. In all proliferating tissues examined (young developing seeds, leaf, root, stem, pod and flower tissues), free biotin is in excess of protein-bound biotin. Only in the mature dry seeds is protein-bound biotin (i.e. that bound to SBP65) in excess of free biotin. These temporal expression patterns, and the strict organ specificity for expression of SBP65, are discussed with regard to the

  12. Newly synthesized protein(s) must associate with p34cdc2 to activate MAP kinase and MPF during progesterone-induced maturation of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nebreda, A R; Gannon, J V; Hunt, T

    1995-01-01

    The meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes triggered by progesterone requires new protein synthesis to activate both maturation-promoting factor (MPF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Injection of mRNA encoding mutant p34cdc2 (K33R) that can bind cyclins but lacks protein kinase activity strongly inhibited progesterone-induced activation of both MPF and MAP kinase in Xenopus oocytes. Similar results were obtained by injection of GST-p34cdc2 K33R protein or by injection of a monoclonal antibody (A17) against p34cdc2 that blocks its activation by cyclins. Both the dominant-negative p34cdc2 and monoclonal antibody A17 blocked the accumulation of p39mos and activation of MAP kinase in response to progesterone, as well as blocking the appearance of MPF, although they did not inhibit the translation of p39mos mRNA. These results suggest that: (i) activation of free p34cdc2 by newly made proteins, probably cyclin(s), is normally required for the activation of both MPF and MAP kinase by progesterone in Xenopus oocytes; (ii) the activation of translation of cyclin mRNA normally precedes, and does not require either MPF or MAP kinase activity; and (iii) de novo synthesis and accumulation of p39mos is probably both necessary and sufficient for the activation of MAP kinase in response to progesterone. Images PMID:8521817

  13. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  14. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  15. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  16. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  17. Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) Inhibition during Porcine In Vitro Maturation Modifies Oocyte Protein S-Nitrosylation and In Vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aguirregomezcorta, Jon; Santa, Ángela Patricia; García-Vázquez, Francisco Alberto; Coy, Pilar; Matás, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule involved in many reproductive processes. Its importance during oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) has been demonstrated in various species although sometimes with contradictory results. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of NO during IVM of cumulus oocyte complexes and its subsequent impact on gamete interaction in porcine species. For this purpose, IVM media were supplemented with three NOS inhibitors: NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and aminoguanidine (AG). A NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), was also used. The effects on the cumulus cell expansion, meiotic resumption, zona pellucida digestion time (ZPdt) and, finally, on in vitro fertilization (IVF) parameters were evaluated. The oocyte S-nitrosoproteins were also studied by in situ nitrosylation. The results showed that after 42 h of IVM, AG, L-NAME and L-NMMA had an inhibitory effect on cumulus cell expansion. Meiotic resumption was suppressed only when AG was added, with 78.7% of the oocytes arrested at the germinal vesicle state (P<0.05). Supplementation of the IVM medium with NOS inhibitors or NO donor did not enhance the efficiency of IVF, but revealed the importance of NO in maturation and subsequent fertilization. Furthermore, protein S-nitrosylation is reported for the first time as a pathway through which NO exerts its effect on porcine IVM; therefore, it would be important to determine which proteins are nitrosylated in the oocyte and their functions, in order to throw light on the mechanism of action of NO in oocyte maturation and subsequent fertilization. PMID:25542028

  18. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample. PMID:25640894

  19. The RNA-binding protein Arrest (Bruno) regulates alternative splicing to enable myofibril maturation in Drosophila flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Spletter, Maria L; Barz, Christiane; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Schönbauer, Cornelia; Ferreira, Irene R S; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Daniel; Stark, Alexander; Habermann, Bianca H; Schnorrer, Frank

    2015-02-01

    In Drosophila, fibrillar flight muscles (IFMs) enable flight, while tubular muscles mediate other body movements. Here, we use RNA-sequencing and isoform-specific reporters to show that spalt major (salm) determines fibrillar muscle physiology by regulating transcription and alternative splicing of a large set of sarcomeric proteins. We identify the RNA-binding protein Arrest (Aret, Bruno) as downstream of salm. Aret shuttles between the cytoplasm and nuclei and is essential for myofibril maturation and sarcomere growth of IFMs. Molecularly, Aret regulates IFM-specific splicing of various salm-dependent sarcomeric targets, including Stretchin and wupA (TnI), and thus maintains muscle fiber integrity. As Aret and its sarcomeric targets are evolutionarily conserved, similar principles may regulate mammalian muscle morphogenesis. PMID:25532219

  20. The RNA-binding protein Arrest (Bruno) regulates alternative splicing to enable myofibril maturation in Drosophila flight muscle

    PubMed Central

    Spletter, Maria L; Barz, Christiane; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Schönbauer, Cornelia; Ferreira, Irene R S; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Daniel; Stark, Alexander; Habermann, Bianca H; Schnorrer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, fibrillar flight muscles (IFMs) enable flight, while tubular muscles mediate other body movements. Here, we use RNA-sequencing and isoform-specific reporters to show that spalt major (salm) determines fibrillar muscle physiology by regulating transcription and alternative splicing of a large set of sarcomeric proteins. We identify the RNA-binding protein Arrest (Aret, Bruno) as downstream of salm. Aret shuttles between the cytoplasm and nuclei and is essential for myofibril maturation and sarcomere growth of IFMs. Molecularly, Aret regulates IFM-specific splicing of various salm-dependent sarcomeric targets, including Stretchin and wupA (TnI), and thus maintains muscle fiber integrity. As Aret and its sarcomeric targets are evolutionarily conserved, similar principles may regulate mammalian muscle morphogenesis. PMID:25532219

  1. Characterization of megakaryocyte GATA1-interacting proteins: the corepressor ETO2 and GATA1 interact to regulate terminal megakaryocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Hamlett, Isla; Draper, Julia; Strouboulis, John; Iborra, Francisco; Porcher, Catherine; Vyas, Paresh

    2008-10-01

    The transcription factor GATA1 coordinates timely activation and repression of megakaryocyte gene expression. Loss of GATA1 function results in excessive megakaryocyte proliferation and disordered terminal platelet maturation, leading to thrombocytopenia and leukemia in patients. The mechanisms by which GATA1 does this are unclear. We have used in vivo biotinylated GATA1 to isolate megakaryocyte GATA1-partner proteins. Here, several independent approaches show that GATA1 interacts with several proteins in the megakaryocyte cell line L8057 and in primary megakaryocytes. They include FOG1, the NURD complex, the pentameric complex containing SCL/TAL-1, the zinc-finger regulators GFI1B and ZFP143, and the corepressor ETO2. Knockdown of ETO2 expression promotes megakaryocyte differentiation and enhances expression of select genes expressed in terminal megakaryocyte maturation, eg, platelet factor 4 (Pf4). ETO2-dependent direct repression of the Pf4 proximal promoter is mediated by GATA-binding sites and an E-Box motif. Consistent with this, endogenous ETO2, GATA1, and the SCL pentameric complex all specifically bind the promoter in vivo. Finally, as ETO2 expression is restricted to immature megakaryocytes, these data suggest that ETO2 directly represses inappropriate early expression of a subset of terminally expressed megakaryocyte genes by binding to GATA1 and SCL. PMID:18625887

  2. Ribosomal protein L11 is related to brain maturation during the adult phase in Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fei; Lu, Wenjing; Yu, Feifei; Kang, Mingjiang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2012-05-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) play pivotal roles in developmental regulation. The loss or mutation of ribosomal protein L11 ( RPL11) induces various developmental defects. However, few RPs have been functionally characterized in Apis cerana cerana. In this study, we isolated a single copy gene, AccRPL11, and characterized its connection to brain maturation. AccRPL11 expression was highly concentrated in the adult brain and was significantly induced by abiotic stresses such as pesticides and heavy metals. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that AccRPL11 was localized to the medulla, lobula and surrounding tissues of esophagus in the brain. The post-transcriptional knockdown of AccRPL11 gene expression resulted in a severe decrease in adult brain than in other tissues. The expression levels of other brain development-related genes, p38, ERK2, CacyBP and CREB, were also reduced. Immunofluorescence signal attenuation was also observed in AccRPL11-rich regions of the brain in ds AccRPL11-injected honeybees. Taken together, these results suggest that AccRPL11 may be functional in brain maturation in honeybee adults.

  3. Downregulation of protein 4.1R, a mature centriole protein, disrupts centrosomes, alters cell cycle progression, and perturbs mitotic spindles and anaphase.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I M; Go, Minjoung M; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J

    2008-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G(1) accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  4. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R, a Mature Centriole Protein, Disrupts Centrosomes, Alters Cell Cycle Progression, and Perturbs Mitotic Spindles and Anaphase▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Spence, Jeffrey R.; Bahmanyar, Shirin; Barth, Angela I. M.; Go, Minjoung M.; Czerwinski, Debra; Meyer, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase microtubules and are instrumental in mitotic bipolar spindle assembly, ensuring orderly cell cycle progression with accurate chromosome segregation. We report that the multifunctional structural protein 4.1R localizes at centrosomes to distal/subdistal regions of mature centrioles in a cell cycle-dependent pattern. Significantly, 4.1R-specific depletion mediated by RNA interference perturbs subdistal appendage proteins ninein and outer dense fiber 2/cenexin at mature centrosomes and concomitantly reduces interphase microtubule anchoring and organization. 4.1R depletion causes G1 accumulation in p53-proficient cells, similar to depletion of many other proteins that compromise centrosome integrity. In p53-deficient cells, 4.1R depletion delays S phase, but aberrant ninein distribution is not dependent on the S-phase delay. In 4.1R-depleted mitotic cells, efficient centrosome separation is reduced, resulting in monopolar spindle formation. Multipolar spindles and bipolar spindles with misaligned chromatin are also induced by 4.1R depletion. Notably, all types of defective spindles have mislocalized NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein), a 4.1R binding partner essential for spindle pole focusing. These disruptions contribute to lagging chromosomes and aberrant microtubule bridges during anaphase/telophase. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makes crucial contributions to the structural integrity of centrosomes and mitotic spindles which normally enable mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinated precision required to avoid pathological events. PMID:18212055

  5. VPS33B regulates protein sorting into and maturation of α-granule progenitor organelles in mouse megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Bem, Danai; Smith, Holly; Banushi, Blerida; Burden, Jemima J; White, Ian J; Hanley, Joanna; Jeremiah, Nadia; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Bettels, Ruth; Ariceta, Gema; Mumford, Andrew D; Thomas, Steven G; Watson, Steve P; Gissen, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is caused by deficiencies in the trafficking proteins VPS33B or VIPAR, and is associated with a bleeding diathesis and a marked reduction in platelet α-granules. We generated a tamoxifen-inducible mouse model of VPS33B deficiency, Vps33b(fl/fl)-ER(T2), and studied the platelet phenotype and α-granule biogenesis. Ultrastructural analysis of Vps33b(fl/fl)-ER(T2) platelets identified a marked reduction in α-granule count and the presence of small granule-like structures in agreement with the platelet phenotype observed in ARC patients. A reduction of ∼65% to 75% was observed in the α-granule proteins von Willebrand factor and P-selectin. Although platelet aggregation responses were not affected, a defect in δ-granule secretion was observed. Under arteriolar shear conditions, Vps33b(fl/fl)-ER(T2) platelets were unable to form stable aggregates, and tail-bleeding measurement revealed a bleeding diathesis. Analysis of bone marrow-derived megakaryocytes (MKs) by conventional and immuno-electron microscopy from Vps33b(fl/fl)-ER(T2) mice revealed a reduction in mature type-II multivesicular bodies (MVB II) and an accumulation of large vacuoles. Proteins that are normally stored in α-granules were underrepresented in MVB II and proplatelet extensions. These results demonstrate that abnormal protein trafficking and impairment in MVB maturation in MKs underlie the α-granule deficiency in Vps33b(fl/fl)-ER(T2) mouse and ARC patients. PMID:25947942

  6. VPS33B regulates protein sorting into and maturation of α-granule progenitor organelles in mouse megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Danai; Smith, Holly; Banushi, Blerida; Burden, Jemima J.; White, Ian J.; Hanley, Joanna; Jeremiah, Nadia; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Bettels, Ruth; Ariceta, Gema; Mumford, Andrew D.; Thomas, Steven G.; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is caused by deficiencies in the trafficking proteins VPS33B or VIPAR, and is associated with a bleeding diathesis and a marked reduction in platelet α-granules. We generated a tamoxifen-inducible mouse model of VPS33B deficiency, Vps33bfl/fl-ERT2, and studied the platelet phenotype and α-granule biogenesis. Ultrastructural analysis of Vps33bfl/fl-ERT2 platelets identified a marked reduction in α-granule count and the presence of small granule-like structures in agreement with the platelet phenotype observed in ARC patients. A reduction of ∼65% to 75% was observed in the α-granule proteins von Willebrand factor and P-selectin. Although platelet aggregation responses were not affected, a defect in δ-granule secretion was observed. Under arteriolar shear conditions, Vps33bfl/fl-ERT2 platelets were unable to form stable aggregates, and tail-bleeding measurement revealed a bleeding diathesis. Analysis of bone marrow-derived megakaryocytes (MKs) by conventional and immuno-electron microscopy from Vps33bfl/fl-ERT2 mice revealed a reduction in mature type-II multivesicular bodies (MVB II) and an accumulation of large vacuoles. Proteins that are normally stored in α-granules were underrepresented in MVB II and proplatelet extensions. These results demonstrate that abnormal protein trafficking and impairment in MVB maturation in MKs underlie the α-granule deficiency in Vps33bfl/fl-ERT2 mouse and ARC patients. PMID:25947942

  7. Effects of sexual maturation and feeding level on fatty acid metabolism gene expression in muscle, liver, and visceral adipose tissue of diploid and triploid rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Manor, Meghan L; Cleveland, Beth M; Weber, Gregory M; Kenney, P Brett

    2015-01-01

    In many cultured fish species, such as salmonids, gonadal development occurs at the expense of stored energy and nutrients, including lipids. However, mechanisms regulating nutrient repartitioning during sexual maturation are not well understood. This study compared sexually maturing diploid (2N) and sterile triploid (3N) female rainbow trout to investigate effects of sexual maturation on expression of 35 genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, including genes within fatty acid synthesis, β-oxidation, and cofactors of the mTOR and PPAR signaling pathways, in liver, white muscle, and visceral adipose tissue. Diploid fish were fed at different rations (0.25% and 0.50% tank biomass, and satiation) to determine effects of ration on gene expression. Gene expression was affected by ration level only in white muscle; erk and acat2 had higher expression in fish fed higher rations. On the other hand, sexual maturation affected gene expression across all three tissue types. Data indicate 2N fish have higher expression of β-oxidation genes within white muscle and within visceral adipose tissue. These findings support enhanced fatty acid mobilization within these tissues during sexual maturation. Higher expression of fatty acid synthesis genes in 3N female liver is associated with higher expression of mTOR cofactors and pparγ, which reflects continued deposition of lipids in these fish. Furthermore, greater expression of genes involved in β-oxidation pathways across ration levels in 2N females suggests that sexual maturation and the associated maturation-related signals are stronger regulators of lipid metabolism-related genes rather the rations applied in the current study. PMID:25242626

  8. Differential regulation of phagosome maturation in macrophages and dendritic cells mediated by Rho GTPases and ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Erwig, Lars-Peter; McPhilips, Kathleen A.; Wynes, Murray W.; Ivetic, Alexander; Ridley, Anne J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Deletion of apoptotic cells from tissues involves their phagocytosis by macrophages, dendritic cells, and tissue cells. Although much attention has been focused on the participating ligands, receptors, and mechanisms of uptake, little is known of the disposition of the ingested cell within the phagosome. Here we show that uptake of apoptotic cells by macrophages or fibroblasts results in rapid phagosome maturation, whereas macrophage phagosomes containing Ig-opsonized target cells mature at a slower rate. The early maturation was shown to depend on activation of Rho acting through Rho kinase on ezrin–radixin–moesin proteins. Blockade of Rho signaling or inhibition of moesin both delayed maturation rates to those seen with opsonized targets. By contrast, phagosome maturation in dendritic cells was slower, similar between apoptotic and opsonized target cells, and unaffected by Rho inhibition. These observations have direct implications for the clearance of dying cells and the roles played by different phagocytes in antigen digestion and presentation. PMID:16908865

  9. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production. PMID:26129953

  10. Proteomics analysis in mature seed of four peanut cultivars using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis reveals distinct differential expression of storage, anti-nutritive, and allergenic proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein profiles of total seed proteins isolated from mature seeds of four peanut cultivars, New Mexico Valencia C (NM Valencia C), Tamspan 90, Georgia Green, and NC-7, were studied using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with nano electrospray ionization liquid chromatography tandem mass ...

  11. Non-protein amino acids and neurodegeneration: the enemy within.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    Animals, in common with plants and microorganisms, synthesise proteins from a pool of 20 protein amino acids (plus selenocysteine and pyrolysine) (Hendrickson et al., 2004). This represents a small proportion (~2%) of the total number of amino acids known to exist in nature (Bell, 2003). Many 'non-protein' amino acids are synthesised by plants, and in some cases constitute part of their chemical armoury against pathogens, predators or other species competing for the same resources (Fowden et al., 1967). Microorganisms can also use selectively toxic amino acids to gain advantage over competing organisms (Nunn et al., 2010). Since non-protein amino acids (and imino acids) are present in legumes, fruits, seeds and nuts, they are ubiquitous in the diets of human populations around the world. Toxicity to humans is unlikely to have been the selective force for their evolution, but they have the clear potential to adversely affect human health. In this review we explore the links between exposure to non-protein amino acids and neurodegenerative disorders in humans. Environmental factors play a major role in these complex disorders which are predominantly sporadic (Coppede et al., 2006). The discovery of new genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, many of which code for aggregation-prone proteins, continues at a spectacular pace but little progress is being made in identifying the environmental factors that impact on these disorders. We make the case that insidious entry of non-protein amino acids into the human food chain and their incorporation into protein might be contributing significantly to neurodegenerative damage. PMID:24374297

  12. Heat capacities of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Makhatadze, G I

    1998-04-20

    The heat capacity is one of the fundamental parameters describing thermodynamic properties of a system. It has wide applications in a number of areas such as polymer chemistry, protein folding and DNA stability. To aid the scientific community in the analysis of such data, I have compiled a database on the experimentally measured heat capacities of amino acids, polyamino acids, peptides, and proteins in solid state and in aqueous solutions. PMID:9648205

  13. Phthalic acid chemical probes synthesized for protein-protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Wei-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chou, Chi-Hsien; Wu, Chin-Jen; Wang, Hui-Min

    2013-01-01

    Plasticizers are additives that are used to increase the flexibility of plastic during manufacturing. However, in injection molding processes, plasticizers cannot be generated with monomers because they can peel off from the plastics into the surrounding environment, water, or food, or become attached to skin. Among the various plasticizers that are used, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (phthalic acid) is a typical precursor to generate phthalates. In addition, phthalic acid is a metabolite of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). According to Gene_Ontology gene/protein database, phthalates can cause genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, etc. In this study, a silanized linker (3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane, APTES) was deposited on silicon dioxides (SiO2) particles and phthalate chemical probes were manufactured from phthalic acid and APTES-SiO2. These probes could be used for detecting proteins that targeted phthalic acid and for protein-protein interactions. The phthalic acid chemical probes we produced were incubated with epithelioid cell lysates of normal rat kidney (NRK-52E cells) to detect the interactions between phthalic acid and NRK-52E extracted proteins. These chemical probes interacted with a number of chaperones such as protein disulfide-isomerase A6, heat shock proteins, and Serpin H1. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software showed that these chemical probes were a practical technique for protein-protein interaction analysis. PMID:23797655

  14. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Deletion in Efferent Olivocochlear Neurons Perturbs Afferent Synaptic Maturation and Reduces the Dynamic Range of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Tyler T.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Normal hearing requires proper differentiation of afferent ribbon synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that carry acoustic information to the brain. Within individual IHCs, presynaptic ribbons show a size gradient with larger ribbons on the modiolar face and smaller ribbons on the pillar face. This structural gradient is associated with a gradient of spontaneous rates and threshold sensitivity, which is essential for a wide dynamic range of hearing. Despite their importance for hearing, mechanisms that direct ribbon differentiation are poorly defined. We recently identified adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) as a key regulator of interneuronal synapse maturation. Here, we show that APC is required for ribbon size heterogeneity and normal cochlear function. Compared with wild-type littermates, APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit decreased auditory brainstem responses. The IHC ribbon size gradient is also perturbed. Whereas the normal-developing IHCs display ribbon size gradients before hearing onset, ribbon sizes are aberrant in APC cKOs from neonatal ages on. Reporter expression studies show that the CaMKII-Cre used to delete the floxed APC gene is present in efferent olivocochlear (OC) neurons, not IHCs or SGNs. APC loss led to increased volumes and numbers of OC inhibitory dopaminergic boutons on neonatal SGN fibers. Our findings identify APC in efferent OC neurons as essential for regulating ribbon heterogeneity, dopaminergic terminal differentiation, and cochlear sensitivity. This APC effect on auditory epithelial cell synapses resembles interneuronal and nerve–muscle synapses, thereby defining a global role for APC in synaptic maturation in diverse cell types. Significance Statement This study identifies novel molecules and cellular interactions that are essential for the proper maturation of afferent ribbon synapses in sensory cells of the inner ear, and for normal hearing. PMID:26085645

  15. HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. MR Blanton and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Sponsor: JM Rogers.
    Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) formed during the disinfection process are present in drin...

  16. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  17. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  18. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H(+) transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties 'Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)' and an early maturing mutant 'Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)'. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  19. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold. PMID:24862193

  20. ARC Syndrome-Linked Vps33B Protein Is Required for Inflammatory Endosomal Maturation and Signal Termination.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Mandraju, Rajakumar; Tracy, Charles; Hu, Wei; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Krämer, Helmut

    2016-08-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) sense microbial ligands and initiate signaling to induce inflammatory responses. Although the quality of inflammatory responses is influenced by internalization of TLRs, the role of endosomal maturation in clearing receptors and terminating inflammatory responses is not well understood. Here, we report that Drosophila and mammalian Vps33B proteins play critical roles in the maturation of phagosomes and endosomes following microbial recognition. Vps33B was necessary for clearance of endosomes containing internalized PRRs, failure of which resulted in enhanced signaling and expression of inflammatory mediators. Lack of Vps33B had no effect on trafficking of endosomes containing non-microbial cargo. These findings indicate that Vps33B function is critical for determining the fate of signaling endosomes formed following PRR activation. Exaggerated inflammatory responses dictated by persistence of receptors in aberrant endosomal compartments could therefore contribute to symptoms of ARC syndrome, a disease linked to loss of Vps33B. PMID:27496733

  1. PRL-3 mediates the protein maturation of ULBP2 by regulating the tyrosine phosphorylation of HSP60

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wai-Hang; Vong, Queenie P.; Lin, Wenwei; Bouck, David; Wendt, Susanne; Sullivan, Erin; Li, Ying; Bari, Rafijul; Chen, Taosheng; Leung, Wing

    2015-01-01

    Many malignant cells release the NKG2D ligand ULBP2 from their cell surface to evade immunosurveillance by natural killer cells and CD8 T cells. Although the shedding mechanism remains unclear, various inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases have been shown to efficiently block the release of soluble ULBP2. The clinical use of these inhibitors however is limited because of adverse side effects. Using high throughput screening technique, we identified a specific inhibitor of phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) that could reduce the level of soluble ULBP2 in the culture supernatant of various cancer cell lines. Inhibition or gene knockdown of PRL-3 did not reduce ULBP2 shedding but rather suppressed post-translational maturation of ULBP2, resulting in intracellular retention of immature ULBP2. We then found that ULBP2 was constitutively associated with heat shock protein HSP60. Complete maturation of ULBP2 required tyrosine phosphorylation of HSP60 which was mediated by PRL-3. PMID:25687758

  2. A Soluble, Folded Protein without Charged Amino Acid Residues.

    PubMed

    Højgaard, Casper; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall; Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Villa, Mara; Willemoës, Martin; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Teilum, Kaare; Winther, Jakob R

    2016-07-19

    Charges are considered an integral part of protein structure and function, enhancing solubility and providing specificity in molecular interactions. We wished to investigate whether charged amino acids are indeed required for protein biogenesis and whether a protein completely free of titratable side chains can maintain solubility, stability, and function. As a model, we used a cellulose-binding domain from Cellulomonas fimi, which, among proteins of more than 100 amino acids, presently is the least charged in the Protein Data Bank, with a total of only four titratable residues. We find that the protein shows a surprising resilience toward extremes of pH, demonstrating stability and function (cellulose binding) in the pH range from 2 to 11. To ask whether the four charged residues present were required for these properties of this protein, we altered them to nontitratable ones. Remarkably, this chargeless protein is produced reasonably well in Escherichia coli, retains its stable three-dimensional structure, and is still capable of strong cellulose binding. To further deprive this protein of charges, we removed the N-terminal charge by acetylation and studied the protein at pH 2, where the C-terminus is effectively protonated. Under these conditions, the protein retains its function and proved to be both soluble and have a reversible folding-unfolding transition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a soluble, functional protein with no titratable side chains has been produced. PMID:27307139

  3. BTB-ZF Protein Znf131 Regulates Cell Growth of Developing and Mature T Cells.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Tomohiro; Aoki, Kazuhisa; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Taoka, Masato; Taya, Choji; Yoshitani, Hiroshi; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Koiwai, Osamu; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Masai, Hisao; Miyatake, Shoichiro

    2015-08-01

    Many members of the BTB-ZF family have been shown to play important roles in lymphocyte development and function. The role of zinc finger Znf131 (also known as Zbtb35) in T cell lineage was elucidated through the production of mice with floxed allele to disrupt at different stages of development. In this article, we present that Znf131 is critical for T cell development during double-negative to double-positive stage, with which significant cell expansion triggered by the pre-TCR signal is coupled. In mature T cells, Znf131 is required for the activation of effector genes, as well as robust proliferation induced upon TCR signal. One of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(Cip1) encoded by cdkn1a gene, is one of the targets of Znf131. The regulation of T cell proliferation by Znf131 is in part attributed to its suppression on the expression of p21(Cip1). PMID:26136427

  4. A comparison of the use of BrimA versus soluble solids/titratable acidity ratio as a maturity standard for navel oranges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity and time of harvest for California navel oranges is primarily determined by the ratio of the soluble solids concentration (SSC) to titratable acidity (TA). This standard has been used in the industry for decades but its usefulness and relationship to flavor have often been questioned. In re...

  5. Effects of feeding level and sexual maturation on fatty acid composition of energy stores in diploid and triploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation is an energy demanding, physiological process that alters growth efficiency and compromises muscle quality in many food-fish species. Lipid mobilization supplies energy required for this process. To study the effect of ration level on fatty acid mobilization, diploid (2N) rainbow t...

  6. Nonfeed application of rendered animal proteins for microbial production of eicosapentaenoic acid by the fungus Pythium irregulare.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Garcia, Rafael A; Piazza, George J; Wen, Zhiyou

    2011-11-23

    Rendered animal proteins are well suited for animal nutrition applications, but the market is maturing, and there is a need to develop new uses for these products. The objective of this study is to explore the possibility of using animal proteins as a nutrient source for microbial production of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by the microalga Schizochytrium limacinum and the fungus Pythium irregulare. To be absorbed by the microorganisms, the proteins needed to be hydrolyzed into small peptides and free amino acids. The utility of the protein hydrolysates for microorganisms depended on the hydrolysis method used and the type of microorganism. The enzymatic hydrolysates supported better cell growth performance than the alkali hydrolysates did. P. irregulare displayed better overall growth performance on the experimental hydrolysates compared to S. limacinum. When P. irregulare was grown in medium containing 10 g/L enzymatic hydrolysate derived from meat and bone meal or feather meal, the performance of cell growth, lipid synthesis, and omega-3 fatty acid production was comparable to the that of culture using commercial yeast extract. The fungal biomass derived from the animal proteins had 26-29% lipid, 32-34% protein, 34-39% carbohydrate, and <2% ash content. The results show that it is possible to develop a nonfeed application for rendered animal protein by hydrolysis of the protein and feeding to industrial microorganisms which can produce omega-3 fatty acids for making omega-3-fortified foods or feeds. PMID:22010831

  7. The mature portion of Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) determines the dependence of MBP on SecB for export.

    PubMed

    Gannon, P M; Li, P; Kumamoto, C A

    1989-02-01

    The product of the secB gene is required for export of a subset of secreted proteins to the outer membrane and periplasm of Escherichia coli. Precursor maltose-binding protein (MBP) accumulates in the cytoplasm of secB-carrying mutants, but export of alkaline phosphatase is only minimally affected by secB mutations. When export of MBP-alkaline phosphatase hybrid proteins was analyzed in wild-type and secB-carrying mutant strains, the first third of mature MBP was sufficient to render export of the hybrid proteins dependent on SecB. Substitution of a signal sequence from a SecB-independent protein had no effect on SecB-dependent export. These findings show that the first third of mature MBP is capable of conferring export incompetence on an otherwise competent protein. PMID:2644237

  8. Manipulating Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Microalgae for Biofuel through Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Blatti, Jillian L.; Beld, Joris; Behnke, Craig A.; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels, and algal metabolic engineering can lead to crop improvement, thus accelerating the development of commercially viable biodiesel production from algae biomass. We demonstrate that protein-protein interactions between the fatty acid acyl carrier protein (ACP) and thioesterase (TE) govern fatty acid hydrolysis within the algal chloroplast. Using green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) as a model, a structural simulation of docking CrACP to CrTE identifies a protein-protein recognition surface between the two domains. A virtual screen reveals plant TEs with similar in silico binding to CrACP. Employing an activity-based crosslinking probe designed to selectively trap transient protein-protein interactions between the TE and ACP, we demonstrate in vitro that CrTE must functionally interact with CrACP to release fatty acids, while TEs of vascular plants show no mechanistic crosslinking to CrACP. This is recapitulated in vivo, where overproduction of the endogenous CrTE increased levels of short-chain fatty acids and engineering plant TEs into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast did not alter the fatty acid profile. These findings highlight the critical role of protein-protein interactions in manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis for algae biofuel engineering as illuminated by activity-based probes. PMID:23028438

  9. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  10. IR-UV photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, J.; Edwards, G.

    1995-12-31

    UV light has often been used to induce the formation of covalent bonds between DNA (or RNA) and tightly-bound protein molecules. However, the internal photoreactions of nucleic acids and proteins limit the yield and complicate the analysis of intermolecular crosslinks. In an ongoing search for improved reaction specificity or new photoreactions in these systems, we have employed UV photons from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser and mid-IR photons from the Vanderbilt FEL. Having crosslinked several protein-nucleic acid systems with nanosecond UV laser pulses, we are currently studying the effect of various IR wavelengths on a model system (gene 32 protein and poly[dT]). We have found that irradiation with sufficiently intense FEL macropulses creates an altered form of gene 32 protein which was not observed with UV-only irradiation. The electrophoretic nobility of the product is consistent with the formation of a specific protein-protein crosslink. No evidence of the non-specific protein damage typically induced by UV light is found. The yield of the new photoproduct is apparently enhanced by exposure to FEL macropulses which are synchronized with UV laser pulses. With ideal exposure parameters, the two-color reaction effectively competes with UV-only reactions. Experiments designed to determine the reaction mechanism and to demonstrate FEL-induced reactions in other protein-nucleic acid systems are currently underway.

  11. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  12. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    PubMed Central

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts. PMID:10639127

  13. Yeast Ribosomal Protein L40 Assembles Late into Precursor 60 S Ribosomes and Is Required for Their Cytoplasmic Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we have examined the contribution of the essential ribosomal protein L40 in these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of either the RPL40A or RPL40B gene and in vivo depletion of L40 impair 60 S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome profile analyses reveal the accumulation of half-mers and a moderate reduction in free 60 S ribosomal subunits. Pulse-chase, Northern blotting, and primer extension analyses in the L40-depleted strain clearly indicate that L40 is not strictly required for the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing reactions but contributes to optimal 27 SB pre-rRNA maturation. Moreover, depletion of L40 hinders the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Importantly, all these defects most likely appear as the direct consequence of impaired Nmd3 and Rlp24 release from cytoplasmic pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and their inefficient recycling back into the nucle(ol)us. In agreement, we show that hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A assembles in the cytoplasm into almost mature pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Finally, we have identified that the hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A confers resistance to sordarin, a translation inhibitor that impairs the function of eukaryotic elongation factor 2, whereas the rpl40a and rpl40b null mutants are hypersensitive to this antibiotic. We conclude that L40 is assembled at a very late stage into pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and that its incorporation into 60 S ribosomal subunits is a prerequisite for subunit joining and may ensure proper functioning of the translocation process. PMID:22995916

  14. New Insights on the Mechanism of Cyclization in Chromophore Maturation of Wild-Type Green Fluorescence Protein: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingying; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Qiao; Smith, Sean C

    2016-06-23

    Cyclization is the first step in the chromophore maturation process of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). In our previous paper [J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 1426-1436], the results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested the possibility that the amide nitrogen atom of Gly67 attacks the carbonyl carbon of Ser65 directly to complete the cyclization process (one-step mechanism). In this paper, density functional theory (DFT) and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were undertaken to study this step reaction in detail. Three cluster model systems (model A, model B, and model C) and large protein system were set up to investigate the cyclization process. Our results indicate that the one-step mechanism only exists in the two minimum models. However, in model C and the large protein system, the cyclization mechanism involves two steps: the first step is proton of Gly67 amide nitrogen transferring to carbonyl oxygen of Ser65, generating protonated amide, which is stabilized by a hydrogen bond interaction with a crystallographic water molecule, and the second step is Gly67 amide nitrogen attacking the carbonyl carbon of Ser65. Arg96 plays an important role in promoting the cyclization. The energy of cyclized product relative to reactant is about 10.0 kcal/mol endothermic, which is in line with the experimental results. PMID:27232642

  15. Effects of Thioglycolic Acid on in vivo Oocytes Maturation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; Wang, Zhuoran

    2011-01-01

    Background Thioglycolic acid (TGA) is widely used in the hairdressing industry, which mostly caters to women. Recently, TGA has been reported to impair several organs, especially reproductive ones such as testes and ovaries. The reproductive toxicity of TGA on females has become an issue that cannot be neglected. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, superovulated female mice were percutaneously treated with different doses of TGA (37.81, 75.62, and 151.25 mg/kg). The mice were sacrificed to collect ovulated oocytes, whose numbers were counted and compared. Immunofluorescence-stained oocytes were observed under a confocal microscope to investigate the effects of TGA on spindle morphology, distribution of cortical granules (CGs), and parthenogenetic activation. The number of ovulated oocytes was decreased by TGA. The ovulated oocytes in the 151.25 mg/kg TGA group were significantly less than in the control and in the 37.81 mg/kg TGA groups. The ovulated oocytes in the 75.62 mg/kg TGA group were less than in the 37.81 mg/kg dose group. Abnormal spindle configuration in vivo was also induced by TGA. The spindle areas in the 75.62 and 151.25 mg/kg TGA groups were significantly larger than in the control and 37.81 mg/kg TGA groups. The parthenogenetic activation of ovulated oocytes in vitro was inhibited as well. The percentage of activated oocytes in the 75.62 and 151.25 mg/kg TGA groups was significantly lower than in the control and 37.81 mg/kg TGA groups. The percentage in the 151.25 mg/kg TGA group was also less than in the 75.62 mg/kg group. CG distribution was not affected by TGA. Conclusion Mice were percutaneously treated with TGA. Consequently, the number of ovulated oocytes decreased, abnormal spindle configurations were induced, and the parthenogenetic activation of ovulated oocytes was inhibited. CG distribution was not affected. PMID:21909408

  16. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower as compared to adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile, and adult and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  17. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-02-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker, residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN, levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower than adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunoreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile and adult, and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  18. Lipid remodelling during epididymal maturation of rat spermatozoa. Enrichment in plasmenylcholines containing long-chain polyenoic fatty acids of the n-9 series.

    PubMed Central

    Aveldaño, M I; Rotstein, N P; Vermouth, N T

    1992-01-01

    In their transit from the caput to the cauda segments of the epididymis, rat spermatozoa undergo significant modifications in lipid content and composition. The amount of lipid phosphorus per cell decreases, and most lipid classes show specific changes in their constituent fatty acids. A depletion of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, concomitant with a virtually unchanged amount of the corresponding plasmalogens, are the major alterations, plasmenylcholine thereby becoming the major phospholipid. Diphosphatidylglycerol, sphingomyelin and the phosphoinositides decrease to a lesser extent or do not change at all, also resulting in relative increases with sperm maturation. Concerning the fatty acids, the proportions of oleate (C18:1, n-9) and linoleate (C18:2, n-6) in most lipids decrease on movement of sperm from caput to cauda, augmenting in turn the proportions of longer-chain (C20 to C24) and more unsaturated fatty acids. Docosapentaenoate (C22:5, n-6) is a major acyl chain present in all lipids at both stages, but uncommon long-chain polyenoic fatty acids of the n-9 series are also present, being almost exclusively found in the choline glycerophospholipids. These fatty acids are found to undergo the most significant changes during sperm maturation. They are minor components of plasmenylcholine in immature spermatozoa, but increase severalfold on maturation, representing more than half of the acyl chains of this major lipid in cells from the cauda. The high concentration of n-9 polyenes in mature sperm plasmenylcholine raises intriguing questions on the possible role epididymal cells may play in providing spermatozoa with such an unusual phospholipid. These plasmenylcholines could contribute to the characteristic lipid domain organization of the mature spermatozoa plasma membrane. PMID:1567371

  19. Lipid remodelling during epididymal maturation of rat spermatozoa. Enrichment in plasmenylcholines containing long-chain polyenoic fatty acids of the n-9 series.

    PubMed

    Aveldaño, M I; Rotstein, N P; Vermouth, N T

    1992-04-01

    In their transit from the caput to the cauda segments of the epididymis, rat spermatozoa undergo significant modifications in lipid content and composition. The amount of lipid phosphorus per cell decreases, and most lipid classes show specific changes in their constituent fatty acids. A depletion of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, concomitant with a virtually unchanged amount of the corresponding plasmalogens, are the major alterations, plasmenylcholine thereby becoming the major phospholipid. Diphosphatidylglycerol, sphingomyelin and the phosphoinositides decrease to a lesser extent or do not change at all, also resulting in relative increases with sperm maturation. Concerning the fatty acids, the proportions of oleate (C18:1, n-9) and linoleate (C18:2, n-6) in most lipids decrease on movement of sperm from caput to cauda, augmenting in turn the proportions of longer-chain (C20 to C24) and more unsaturated fatty acids. Docosapentaenoate (C22:5, n-6) is a major acyl chain present in all lipids at both stages, but uncommon long-chain polyenoic fatty acids of the n-9 series are also present, being almost exclusively found in the choline glycerophospholipids. These fatty acids are found to undergo the most significant changes during sperm maturation. They are minor components of plasmenylcholine in immature spermatozoa, but increase severalfold on maturation, representing more than half of the acyl chains of this major lipid in cells from the cauda. The high concentration of n-9 polyenes in mature sperm plasmenylcholine raises intriguing questions on the possible role epididymal cells may play in providing spermatozoa with such an unusual phospholipid. These plasmenylcholines could contribute to the characteristic lipid domain organization of the mature spermatozoa plasma membrane. PMID:1567371

  20. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    PubMed

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  1. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K.; Kline, Douglas W.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  2. [Amino acid composition of rice grain proteins].

    PubMed

    Peruanskiĭ, Iu V; Savich, I M

    1976-01-01

    The composition of the major reserve proteins of rice grain--globulins, prolamines and glutelins--was examined in four rice varieties (Dubovsky 129, Kuban 3, Alakul, Ushtobinsky). Globulins proved to be most heterogeneous whereas glutelins appeared to be least heterogeneous. In regards to the ratio of components globulins showed high variability and glutelins displayed high stability. PMID:1005365

  3. Real-time Measurements of Amino Acid and Protein Hydroperoxides Using Coumarin Boronic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Radoslaw; Zielonka, Jacek; Gapys, Ewa; Marcinek, Andrzej; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2014-01-01

    Hydroperoxides of amino acid and amino acid residues (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, and histidine) in proteins are formed during oxidative modification induced by reactive oxygen species. Amino acid hydroperoxides are unstable intermediates that can further propagate oxidative damage in proteins. The existing assays (oxidation of ferrous cation and iodometric assays) cannot be used in real-time measurements. In this study, we show that the profluorescent coumarin boronic acid (CBA) probe reacts with amino acid and protein hydroperoxides to form the corresponding fluorescent product, 7-hydroxycoumarin. 7-Hydroxycoumarin formation was catalase-independent. Based on this observation, we have developed a fluorometric, real-time assay that is adapted to a multiwell plate format. This is the first report showing real-time monitoring of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides using the CBA-based assay. This approach was used to detect protein hydroperoxides in cell lysates obtained from macrophages exposed to visible light and photosensitizer (rose bengal). We also measured the rate constants for the reaction between amino acid hydroperoxides (tyrosyl, tryptophan, and histidine hydroperoxides) and CBA, and these values (7–23 m−1 s−1) were significantly higher than that measured for H2O2 (1.5 m−1 s−1). Using the CBA-based competition kinetics approach, the rate constants for amino acid hydroperoxides with ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic, were also determined, and the values were within the range of 1.1–1.5 × 103 m−1 s−1. Both ebselen and boronates may be used as small molecule scavengers of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides. Here we also show formation of tryptophan hydroperoxide from tryptophan exposed to co-generated fluxes of nitric oxide and superoxide. This observation reveals a new mechanism for amino acid and protein hydroperoxide formation in biological systems. PMID:24928516

  4. Uncovering RNA binding proteins associated with age and gender during liver maturation

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Praneet; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Arif, Waqar; Kalsotra, Auinash; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we perform an association analysis focusing on the expression changes of 1344 RNA Binding proteins (RBPs) as a function of age and gender in human liver. We identify 88 and 45 RBPs to be significantly associated with age and gender respectively. Experimental verification of several of the predicted associations in mice confirmed our findings. Our results suggest that a small fraction of the gender-associated RBPs (~40%) are expressed higher in males than females. Altogether, these observations show that several of these RBPs are important and conserved regulators in maintaining liver function. Further analysis of the protein interaction network of RBPs associated with age and gender based on the centrality measures like degree, betweenness and closeness revealed that several of these RBPs might be prominent players in aging liver and impart gender specific alterations in gene expression via the formation of protein complexes. Indeed, both age and gender-associated RBPs in liver were found to show significantly higher clustering coefficients and network centrality measures compared to non-associated RBPs. The compendium of RBPs and this study will help us gain insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulatory molecules in aging and gender specific expression of genes. PMID:25824884

  5. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  6. Role of Endoproteolytic Dibasic Proprotein Processing in Maturation of Secretory Proteins in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Goller, Sabine P.; Schoisswohl, Doris; Baron, Michel; Parriche, Martine; Kubicek, Christian P.

    1998-01-01

    Cell extracts of Trichoderma reesei exhibited dibasic endopeptidase activity toward the carboxylic side of KR, RR, and PR sequences. This activity was stimulated by the presence of Ca2+ ions and localized in vesicles of low bouyant density; it therefore exhibited some similarity to yeast Kex2. Analytical chromatofocusing revealed a single peak of activity. The dibasic endopeptidase activity was strongly and irreversibly inhibited in vitro as well as in vivo by 1 mM p-amidinophenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (pAPMSF) but not by PMSF at concentrations up to 5 mM. We therefore used pAPMSF to study the role of the dibasic endopeptidase in the secretion of protein by T. reesei. Secretion of xylanase I (proprotein processing sequence -R-R-↓-R-↓-A-) and xylanase II (-K-R-↓-Q-) was strongly inhibited by 1 mM pAPMSF, and a larger, unprocessed enzyme form was detected intracellularly under these conditions. Secretion of cellobiohydrolase II (CBH II; -E-R-↓-Q-) was only slightly inhibited by pAPMSF, and no accumulation of unprocessed precursors was detected. In contrast, secretion of CBH I (-R-A-↓-Q-) was stimulated by pAPMSF addition, and a simultaneous decrease in the concentration of intracellular CBH I was detected. Similar experiments were also carried out with a single heterologous protein, ShBLE, the phleomycin-binding protein from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus, fused to a series of model proprotein-processing sequences downstream of the expression signals of the Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter. Consistent with the results obtained with homologous proteins, pAPMSF inhibited the secretion of ShBLE with fusions containing dibasic (RK and KR) target sequences, but it even stimulated secretion in fusions to LR, NHA, and EHA target sequences. Addition of 5 mM PMSF, a nonspecific inhibitor of serine protease, nonspecifically inhibited the secretion of heterologous proteins from fusions bearing the NHA and LR targets. These data point to the existence of different

  7. California Hass Avocado: Profiling of Carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-01-01

    The California Hass avocado (Persea Americana) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July and September 2008 from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego), and analyzed fortotal fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with total fat content (r=0.99, p<0.001) demonstrating a remarkable degree of constancy of carotenoid intake per gram of fat content in the California Hass avocado.. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes. PMID:19813713

  8. California Hass avocado: profiling of carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-11-11

    The California Hass avocado ( Persea americana ) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore, in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July, and September, 2008, from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside, and San Diego) and analyzed for total fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids, and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with the total fat content (r = 0.99, p < 0.001) demonstrating a remarkable degree of constancy of carotenoid intake per gram of fat content in the California Hass avocado. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area, and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes. PMID:19813713

  9. Isolation and properties of the acid site-specific endonuclease from mature eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, Yu.T.; Konechnyi, A.A.; Rasskazov, V.A.

    1986-01-10

    An acid site-specific endonuclease has been detected in mature sea urchin eggs and cells of embryos at early stages of differentiation. Fractionation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromatography on columns with DEAE, phosphocellulose, and hydroxyapatite resulted in an 18,000-fold purification. The molecular weight of the enzyme was determined at approx. 29,000, the optimum pH 5.5. The activity of the enzyme does not depend on divalent metal ions, EDTA, ATP, and tRNA, but it is modulated to a substantial degree by NaCl. The maximum rate of cleavage of the DNA supercoil (form I) is observed at 100 mM NaCl. Increasing the NaCl concentration to 350 mM only slightly lowers the rate of cleavage of form I, yielding form II, but entirely suppresses the accumulation of form III. Restriction analysis of the products of enzymatic hydrolysis of Co1E1 and pBR322 DNA showed that at the early stages of hydrolysis the enzyme exhibits pronounced specificity for definite sites, the number of which is 12 for Co1 E1 DNA and 8 sites for pBR322 DNA.

  10. Grain Development Mutants of Barley ([alpha]-Amylase Production during Grain Maturation and Its Relation to Endogenous Gibberellic Acid Content).

    PubMed Central

    Green, L. S.; Faergestad, E. M.; Poole, A.; Chandler, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Himalaya) mutants with altered grain morphology were isolated to investigate whether defects in grain development, possibly involving gibberellins (GAs) and abscisic acid, would lead to altered patterns of [alpha]-amylase gene expression. Following treatment with sodium azide, 75 mutants, typically showing grain shriveling, were identified. At grain maturity 15 of the 75 mutants had higher [alpha]-amylase activities in shriveled grains compared with either phenotypically normal grains that developed on the same heterozygous plant or with grains of cv Himalaya. Studies of four of these mutants demonstrated increased levels of both high- and low-isoelectric point [alpha]-amylase isozymes midway through grain development. This category of mutant has been designated pga, for premature grain [alpha]-amylase. One such mutant (M326) showed an endosperm-determined inheritance pattern. When crossed into a (GA-deficient) dwarfing background there was a 10- to 20-fold reduction in [alpha]-amylase activity, suggesting a requirement for GA biosynthesis. Endogenous GAs and abscisic acid were quantified by combined gas chromatography-specific ion monitoring in normal and mutant grains of heterozygous M326 plants during the period of [alpha]-amylase accumulation. Mutant grains had significantly higher (5.8-fold) levels of the bioactive GA1 compared with normal grains but much lower (approximately 10-fold) levels of the 2[beta]-hydroxylated ("inactive") GAs, typical of developing barley grains (e.g. GA8, GA34, GA48). We propose that a reduced extent of 2[beta]-hydroxylation in the mutant grains results in an increased level of GA1, which is responsible for premature [alpha]-amylase gene expression. PMID:12223700

  11. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. ); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. )

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  12. FLU, an amino acid substitution model for influenza proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amino acid substitution model is the core component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Although several general amino acid substitution models have been estimated from large and diverse protein databases, they remain inappropriate for analyzing specific species, e.g., viruses. Emerging epidemics of influenza viruses raise the need for comprehensive studies of these dangerous viruses. We propose an influenza-specific amino acid substitution model to enhance the understanding of the evolution of influenza viruses. Results A maximum likelihood approach was applied to estimate an amino acid substitution model (FLU) from ~113, 000 influenza protein sequences, consisting of ~20 million residues. FLU outperforms 14 widely used models in constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees for the majority of influenza protein alignments. On average, FLU gains ~42 log likelihood points with an alignment of 300 sites. Moreover, topologies of trees constructed using FLU and other models are frequently different. FLU does indeed have an impact on likelihood improvement as well as tree topologies. It was implemented in PhyML and can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/1000genomes/lsq/FLU or included in PhyML 3.0 server at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/phyml/. Conclusions FLU should be useful for any influenza protein analysis system which requires an accurate description of amino acid substitutions. PMID:20384985

  13. Acid Cleavable Surface enhanced Raman Tagging for Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongmao; Vangala, Karthikeshwar; Li, Shaoyong; Yanney, Michael; Xia, Hao; Zou, Sige; Sygula, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Dye conjugation is a common strategy improving the surface enhanced Raman detection sensitivity of biomolecules. Reported is a proof-of-concept study of a novel surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic tagging strategy termed as acid-cleavable SERS tag (ACST) method. Using Rhodamine B as the starting material, we prepared the first ACST prototype that consisted of, from the distal end, a SERS tag moiety (STM), an acid-cleavable linker, and a protein reactive moiety. Complete acid cleavage of the ACST tags was achieved at a very mild condition that is 1.5% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) aqueous solution at room temperature. SERS detection of this ACST tagged protein was demonstrated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the model protein. While the SERS spectrum of intact ACST-BSA was entirely dominated by the fluorescent signal of STM, quality SERS spectra can be readily obtained with the acid cleaved ACST-BSA conjugates. Separation of the acid cleaved STM from protein further enhances the SERS sensitivity. Current SERS detection sensitivity, achieved with the acid cleaved ACST-BSA conjugate is ~5 nM in terms of the BSA concentration and ~1.5 nM in ACST content. The linear dynamic range of the cleaved ACST-BSA conjugate spans four orders of magnitudes from ~10 nM to ~100 μM in protein concentrations. Further improvement in the SERS sensitivity can be achieved with resonance Raman acquisition. This cleavable tagging strategy may also be used for elimination of protein interference in fluorescence based biomolecule detection. PMID:21109888

  14. The Repeat Region of the Circumsporozoite Protein is Critical for Sporozoite Formation and Maturation in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Wall, Richard J.; Hopp, Christine S.; Poulin, Benoit; Mohmmed, Asif; Malhotra, Pawan; Coppi, Alida; Sinnis, Photini; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is the major surface protein of the sporozoite stage of malaria parasites and has multiple functions as the parasite develops and then migrates from the mosquito midgut to the mammalian liver. The overall structure of CSP is conserved among Plasmodium species, consisting of a species-specific central tandem repeat region flanked by two conserved domains: the NH2-terminus and the thrombospondin repeat (TSR) at the COOH-terminus. Although the central repeat region is an immunodominant B-cell epitope and the basis of the only candidate malaria vaccine in Phase III clinical trials, little is known about its functional role(s). We used the rodent malaria model Plasmodium berghei to investigate the role of the CSP tandem repeat region during sporozoite development. Here we describe two mutant parasite lines, one lacking the tandem repeat region (ΔRep) and the other lacking the NH2-terminus as well as the repeat region (ΔNΔRep). We show that in both mutant lines oocyst formation is unaffected but sporozoite development is defective. PMID:25438048

  15. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  16. The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Induce Mouse Dendritic Cells Maturation but Reduce T-Cell Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Johan A.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Östman, Sofia M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might regulate T-cell activation and lineage commitment. Here, we measured the effects of omega-3 (n-3), n-6 and n-9 fatty acids on the interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and naïve T cells. Spleen DCs from BALB/c mice were cultured in vitro with ovalbumin (OVA) with 50 μM fatty acids; α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid or oleic acid and thereafter OVA-specific DO11.10 T cells were added to the cultures. Fatty acids were taken up by the DCs, as shown by gas chromatography analysis. After culture with arachidonic acid or DHA CD11c+ CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD11bneg DCs expressed more CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and PDL-1, while IAd remained unchanged. However, fewer T cells co-cultured with these DCs proliferated (CellTrace Violetlow) and expressed CD69 or CD25, while more were necrotic (7AAD+). We noted an increased proportion of T cells with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, i.e., when gating on CD4+ FoxP3+ CTLA-4+, CD4+ FoxP3+ Helios+ or CD4+ FoxP3+ PD-1+, in co-cultures with arachidonic acid- or DHA-primed DCs relative to control cultures. The proportion of putative Tregs was inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation, indicating a suppressive function of these cells. With arachidonic acid DCs produced higher levels of prostaglandin E2 while T cells produced lower amounts of IL-10 and IFNγ. In conclusion arachidonic acid and DHA induced up-regulation of activation markers on DCs. However arachidonic acid- and DHA-primed DCs reduced T-cell proliferation and increased the proportion of T cells expressing FoxP3, indicating that these fatty acids can promote induction of regulatory T cells. PMID:26619195

  17. Fatty acid induced remodeling within the human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-09-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against LFABP. PMID:21757748

  18. Germinal Center B-Cell-Associated Nuclear Protein (GANP) Involved in RNA Metabolism for B Cell Maturation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, N; Maeda, K

    2016-01-01

    Germinal center B-cell-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is upregulated in germinal center B cells against T-cell-dependent antigens in mice and humans. In mice, GANP depletion in B cells impairs antibody affinity maturation. Conversely, its transgenic overexpression augments the generation of high-affinity antigen-specific B cells. GANP associates with AID in the cytoplasm, shepherds AID into the nucleus, and augments its access to the rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region of the genome in B cells, thereby precipitating the somatic hypermutation of V region genes. GANP is also upregulated in human CD4(+) T cells and is associated with APOBEC3G (A3G). GANP interacts with A3G and escorts it to the virion cores to potentiate its antiretroviral activity by inactivating HIV-1 genomic cDNA. Thus, GANP is characterized as a cofactor associated with AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminase family molecules in generating diversity of the IgV region of the genome and genetic alterations of exogenously introduced viral targets. GANP, encoded by human chromosome 21, as well as its mouse equivalent on chromosome 10, contains a region homologous to Saccharomyces Sac3 that was characterized as a component of the transcription/export 2 (TREX-2) complex and was predicted to be involved in RNA export and metabolism in mammalian cells. The metabolism of RNA during its maturation, from the transcription site at the chromosome within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translation apparatus, needs to be elaborated with regard to acquired and innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on GANP as a component of TREX-2 in mammalian cells. PMID:27235683

  19. Identification of a small, very acidic constitutive nucleolar protein (NO29) as a member of the nucleoplasmin family

    PubMed Central

    Zirwes, Rudolf F.; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion S.; Franke, Werner W.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery and molecular characterization of a small and very acidic nucleolar protein of an SDS/PAGE mobility corresponding to Mr 29,000 (NO29). The cDNA-deduced sequence of the Xenopus laevis protein defines a polypeptide of a calculated molecular mass of 20,121 and a pI of 3.75, with an extended acidic region near its C terminus, and is related to the major nucleolar protein, NO38, and the histone-binding protein, nucleoplasmin. This member of the nucleoplasmin family of proteins was immunolocalized to nucleoli in Xenopus oocytes and diverse somatic cells. Protein NO29 is associated with nuclear particles from Xenopus oocytes, partly complexed with protein NO38, and occurs in preribosomes but not in mature ribosomes. The location and the enormously high content of negatively charged amino acids lead to the hypothesis that NO29 might be involved in the nuclear and nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins and the coordinated assembly of pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:9326619

  20. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  1. Centrosomal protein CP110 controls maturation of the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sharda Prasad; Sharma, Neel Kamal; Liu, Chunqiao; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in cilia centrosomal genes cause pleiotropic clinical phenotypes, collectively called ciliopathies. Cilia biogenesis is initiated by the interaction of positive and negative regulators. Centriolar coiled coil protein 110 (CP110) caps the distal end of the mother centriole and is known to act as a suppressor to control the timing of ciliogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that CP110 promotes cilia formation in vivo, in contrast to findings in cultured cells. Cp110−/− mice die shortly after birth owing to organogenesis defects as in ciliopathies. Shh signaling is impaired in null embryos and primary cilia are reduced in multiple tissues. We show that CP110 is required for anchoring of basal bodies to the membrane during cilia formation. CP110 loss resulted in an abnormal distribution of core components of subdistal appendages (SDAs) and of recycling endosomes, which may be associated with premature extension of axonemal microtubules. Our data implicate CP110 in SDA assembly and ciliary vesicle docking, two requisite early steps in cilia formation. We suggest that CP110 has unique context-dependent functions, acting as both a suppressor and a promoter of ciliogenesis. PMID:26965371

  2. An investigation of the effects of simulated acid rain and elevated ozone on the physiology of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedlings and mature trees

    SciTech Connect

    Momen, B.

    1993-12-31

    This study investigated the combined effects of simulated acid rain and ozone on foliar water relations, carbon and nitrogen contents, gas exchange, and respiration of ponderosa pine seedlings and mature trees grown in the field at the USDA Forest Service Tree Improvement Center in Chico, California. Acid rain levels (pH 5.1 and 3) were applied weekly on foliage only, from January to April, 1992. Plants were exposed to ozone levels (ambient and twice ambient) during the day only, from August to December, 1990, and from September to November, 1992. Results suggested that elevated ozone, particularly in combination with strong acid, caused osmotic adjustment that may benefit plants during drought. The observed effects of pollutants are similar to the reported effects of drought on plant water relations. Elevated ozone decreased foliar nitrogen content and thus increased the C:N ratio, particularly in seedlings. Stomatal conductance was not affected by pollutants but net photosynthesis was decreased by elevated ozone, especially in mature trees. The greater sensitivity of net photosynthesis of mature trees to elevated ozone was contrary to all other plant characteristics investigated. Elevated ozone increased seedling respiration. Under controlled, temperature, light, and vapor pressure deficit conditions, net photosynthesis responded positively to increases in plant age, light intensity, and rain pH, but negatively to increases in tissue age, heat, and ozone concentration. Overall results indicated that acid rain and elevated ozone declined the carbon pool of ponderosa pine due to increased respiration and decreased net photosynthesis. Pollutant effects were more profound in mid-summer when ozone concentrations were highest. On many occasions the effects of acid rain and ozone levels interacted. Seedlings were more sensitive to pollutants than mature trees.

  3. A macromolecular delivery vehicle for protein-based vaccines: Acid-degradable protein-loaded microgels

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Niren; Xu, Mingcheng; Schuck, Stephany; Kunisawa, Jun; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of protein-based vaccines remains a major challenge in the fields of immunology and drug delivery. Although numerous protein antigens have been identified that can generate immunity to infectious pathogens, the development of vaccines based on protein antigens has had limited success because of delivery issues. In this article, an acid-sensitive microgel material is synthesized for the development of protein-based vaccines. The chemical design of these microgels is such that they degrade under the mildly acidic conditions found in the phagosomes of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The rapid cleavage of the microgels leads to phagosomal disruption through a colloid osmotic mechanism, releasing protein antigens into the APC cytoplasm for class I antigen presentation. Ovalbumin was encapsulated in microgel particles, 200–500 nm in diameter, prepared by inverse emulsion polymerization with a synthesized acid-degradable crosslinker. Ovalbumin is released from the acid-degradable microgels in a pH-dependent manner; for example, microgels containing ovalbumin release 80% of their encapsulated proteins after 5 h at pH 5.0, but release only 10% at pH 7.4. APCs that phagocytosed the acid-degradable microgels containing ovalbumin were capable of activating ovalbumin-specific cytoxic T lymphocytes. The acid-degradable microgels developed in this article should therefore find applications as delivery vehicles for vaccines targeted against viruses and tumors, where the activation of cytoxic T lymphocytes is required for the development of immunity. PMID:12704236

  4. Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array: A Just-In-Time Multiplexed Protein Expression and Purification Platform

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally. PMID:21943897

  5. Amino acid repeats and the structure and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Albà, M M; Tompa, P; Veitia, R A

    2007-01-01

    Many proteins have repeats or runs of single amino acids. The pathogenicity of some repeat expansions has fueled proteomic, genomic and structural explorations of homopolymeric runs not only in human but in a wide variety of other organisms. Other types of amino acid repetitive structures exhibit more complex patterns than homopeptides. Irrespective of their precise organization, repetitive sequences are defined as low complexity or simple sequences, as one or a few residues are particularly abundant. Prokaryotes show a relatively low frequency of simple sequences compared to eukaryotes. In the latter the percentage of proteins containing homopolymeric runs varies greatly from one group to another. For instance, within vertebrates, amino acid repeat frequency is much higher in mammals than in amphibians, birds or fishes. For some repeats, this is correlated with the GC-richness of the regions containing the corresponding genes. Homopeptides tend to occur in disordered regions of transcription factors or developmental proteins. They can trigger the formation of protein aggregates, particularly in 'disease' proteins. Simple sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than the rest of the protein/gene and may have a functional impact. Therefore, they are good candidates to promote rapid evolutionary changes. All these diverse facets of homopolymeric runs are explored in this review. PMID:18753788

  6. (-)-Hydroxycitric Acid Nourishes Protein Synthesis via Altering Metabolic Directions of Amino Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ningning; Li, Longlong; Peng, Mengling; Ma, Haitian

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major active ingredient of Garcinia Cambogia extracts, had shown to suppress body weight gain and fat accumulation in animals and humans. While, the underlying mechanism of (-)-HCA has not fully understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplement with (-)-HCA on body weight gain and variances of amino acid content in rats. Results showed that (-)-HCA treatment reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio in rats. The content of hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen, and serum T4 , T3 , insulin, and Leptin were increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Protein content in liver and muscle were significantly increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Amino acid profile analysis indicated that most of amino acid contents in serum and liver, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were higher in (-)-HCA treatment groups. However, most of the amino acid contents in muscle, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were reduced in (-)-HCA treatment groups. These results indicated that (-)-HCA treatment could reduce body weight gain through promoting energy expenditure via regulation of thyroid hormone levels. In addition, (-)-HCA treatment could promote protein synthesis by altering the metabolic directions of amino acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145492

  7. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  8. Structural Assessment of the Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions on Protein Stability and Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shaolei; Wang, Liangjiang; Srivastava, Anand K.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    A structure-based approach is described for predicting the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein function. Structures were predicted using a homology modelling method. Folding and binding energy differences between wild-type and mutant structures were computed to quantitatively assess the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein stability and protein–protein interaction, respectively. We demonstrated that pathogenic mutations at the interaction interface could affect binding energy and destabilise protein complex, whereas mutations at the non-interface might reduce folding energy and destabilise monomer structure. The results suggest that the structure-based analysis can provide useful information for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases. PMID:21297231

  9. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  10. P22 coat protein structures reveal a novel mechanism for capsid maturation: Stability without auxiliary proteins or chemical cross-links

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Khayat, Reza; Tu, Long H.; Suhanovsky, Margaret M.; Cortines, Juliana R.; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Johnson, John E.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Viral capsid assembly and stability in tailed, dsDNA phage and Herpesviridae are achieved by various means including chemical cross-links (unique to HK97), or auxiliary proteins (lambda, T4, ϕ29, and herpesviruses). All these viruses have coat proteins (CP) with a conserved, HK97-like core structure. We used a combination of trypsin digestion, gold-labeling, cryo-electron microscopy, 3D image reconstruction, and comparative modeling to derive two independent, pseudo-atomic models of bacteriophage P22 CP: before and after maturation. P22 capsid stabilization results from inter-subunit interactions among N-terminal helices and an extensive “P-loop”, which obviate the need for cross-links or auxiliary proteins. P22 CP also has a telokin-like, Ig domain that stabilizes the monomer fold so that assembly may proceed via individual subunit addition rather than via preformed capsomers as occurs in HK97. Hence, the P22 CP structure may be a paradigm for understanding how monomers assemble in viruses like ϕ29 and HSV-1. PMID:20223221

  11. INCAP studies of energy, amino acids, and protein.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Fernando E

    2010-03-01

    This Special Issue summarizes the results of several studies aimed at providing information on a series of questions related to the adequate protein and energy intakes that allow adequate growth and function in children and work performance and productivity in adults. The effect of different sources of protein on nitrogen balance and the requirements of essential amino acids in young children were also explored in fully recovered, previously malnourished children housed in the Metabolic Ward of the Biomedical Division of INCAP. The following are the main results of these investigations: Animal experiments and studies in children recovering from protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) strongly suggest that even when requirements of all nutrients are satisfied, inactivity reduces the rate of linear growth and physical activity improves it as well as lean body mass repletion. The effects of different energy intakes on nitrogen balance demonstrated how energy intake modifies the need to ingest different amounts of protein to satisfy protein requirements. Insensible nitrogen losses in preschool children and their relation to protein intake was demonstrated. The quality of even "good protein sources" modifies the amount needed to satisfy nitrogen requirements, and corn and bean-based diets can satisfy protein needs for health and even growth of young children. Essential amino acid requirements of 2-year-old children was assessed by diverse measurements of nitrogen metabolism and amino acid levels in blood, and were found lower than those recommended by FAO-WHO. In rural adult populations the relationship between energy and protein intake, productivity and body composition, and the impact of environmental hygiene on nitrogen balance was demonstrated and measured. PMID:20461903

  12. Adaptor Protein Complex 2 (AP-2) Mediated, Clathrin Dependent Endocytosis, And Related Gene Activities, Are A Prominent Feature During Maturation Stage Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    LACRUZ, Rodrigo S.; BROOKES, Steven J.; WEN, Xin; JIMENEZ, Jaime M.; VIKMAN, Susanna; HU, Ping; WHITE, Shane N.; LYNGSTADAAS, S. Petter; OKAMOTO, Curtis T.; SMITH, Charles E.; PAINE, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular events defining enamel matrix removal during amelogenesis are poorly understood. Early reports have suggested that adaptor proteins (AP) participate in ameloblast-mediated endocytosis. Enamel formation involves the secretory and maturation stages, with an increase in resorptive function during the latter. Here, using real time PCR, we show that the expression of clathrin and adaptor protein subunits are up-regulated in maturation stage rodent enamel organ cells. AP-2 is the most up-regulated of the four distinct adaptor protein complexes. Immunolocalization confirms the presence of AP-2 and clathrin in ameloblasts with strongest reactivity at the apical pole. These data suggest that the resorptive functions of enamel cells involve AP-2 mediated, clathrin dependent endocytosis, thus implying the likelihood of a specific membrane-bound receptor(s) of enamel matrix protein debris. The mRNA expression of other endocytosis-related gene products is also up-regulated during maturation including: lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (Lamp1), cluster of differentiation 63 and 68 (Cd63 and Cd68), ATPase, H+ transporting, lysosomal V0 subunit D2 (Atp6v0d2), ATPase, H+ transporting, lysosomal V1 subunit B2 (Atp6v1b2), chloride channel, voltage-sensitive 7 (Clcn7) and cathepsin K (Ctsk). Immunohistological data confirms the expression of a number of these proteins in maturation stage ameloblasts. The enamel of Cd63-null mice was also examined. Despite increased mRNA and protein expression in the enamel organ during maturation, the enamel of Cd63-null mice appeared normal. This may suggest inherent functional redundancies between Cd63 and related gene products, such as Lamp1 and Cd68. Ameloblast-like LS8 cells treated with the enamel matrix protein complex Emdogain® showed up-regulation of AP-2 and clathrin subunits, further supporting the existence of a membrane-bound receptor regulated pathway for the endocytosis of enamel matrix proteins. These data together

  13. Studies on fatty acid-binding proteins. The diurnal variation shown by rat liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, T C; Wilton, D C

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of fatty acid-binding protein in rat liver was examined by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, by Western blotting and by quantifying the fluorescence enhancement achieved on the binding of the fluorescent probe 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid. A 2-3-fold increase in the concentration of this protein produced by treatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator tiadenol was readily detected; however, only a small variation in the concentration of the protein due to a diurnal rhythm was observed. This result contradicts the 7-10-fold variation previously reported for this protein [Hargis, Olson, Clarke & Dempsey (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1988-1991]. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:3593284

  14. Alcohol-induced decrease in muscle protein synthesis associated with increased binding of mTOR and raptor: Comparable effects in young and mature rats

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Charles H; Pruznak, Anne M; Nystrom, Gerald J; Vary, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute alcohol (EtOH) intoxication decreases muscle protein synthesis via inhibition of mTOR-dependent translation initiation. However, these studies have been performed in relatively young rapidly growing rats in which muscle protein accretion is more sensitive to growth factor and nutrient stimulation. Furthermore, some in vivo-produced effects of EtOH vary in an age-dependent manner. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that young rats will show a more pronounced decrement in muscle protein synthesis than older mature rats in response to acute EtOH intoxication. Methods Male F344 rats were studied at approximately 3 (young) or 12 (mature) months of age. Young rats were injected intraperitoneally with 75 mmol/kg of EtOH, and mature rats injected with either 75 or 90 mmol/kg EtOH. Time-matched saline-injected control rats were included for both age groups. Gastrocnemius protein synthesis and the activity of the mTOR pathway were assessed 2.5 h after EtOH using [3H]-labeled phenylalanine and the phosphorylation of various protein factors known to regulate peptide-chain initiation. Results Blood alcohol levels (BALs) were lower in mature rats compared to young rats after administration of 75 mmol/kg EtOH (154 ± 23 vs 265 ± 24 mg/dL). However, injection of 90 mmol/kg EtOH in mature rats produced BALs comparable to that of young rats (281 ± 33 mg/dL). EtOH decreased muscle protein synthesis similarly in both young and high-dose EtOH-treated mature rats. The EtOH-induced changes in both groups were associated with a concomitant reduction in 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and redistribution of eIF4E between the active eIF4E·eIF4G and inactive eIF4E·4EBP1 complex. Moreover, EtOH increased the binding of mTOR with raptor in a manner which appeared to be AMPK- and TSC-independent. In contrast, although muscle protein synthesis was unchanged in mature rats given low-dose EtOH, compared to control values, the phosphorylation of rpS6 and eIF4G was decreased

  15. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, ...

  16. Impact of the Type I Interferon Receptor on the Global Gene Expression Program During the Course of Dendritic Cell Maturation Induced by Polyinosinic Polycytidylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Olex, Amy L; Turkett, William H; Brzoza-Lewis, Kristina L; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation involves widespread changes in cellular function and gene expression. The regulatory role of IFNAR in the program of DC maturation remains incompletely defined. Thus, the time evolution impact of IFNAR on this process was evaluated. Changes in DC phenotype, function, and gene expression induced by poly I:C were measured in wild-type and IFNAR(-/-) DC at 9 time points over 24 h. Temporal gene expression profiles were filtered on consistency and response magnitude across replicates. The number of genes whose expression was altered by poly I:C treatment was greatly reduced in IFNAR(-/-) DC, including the majority of the downregulated gene expression program previously observed in wild-type (WT) DC. Furthermore, the number of genes upregulated was almost equal between WT and IFNAR(-/-) DC, yet the identities of those genes were distinct. Integrating these data with protein-protein interaction data revealed several novel subnetworks active during maturation, including nucleotide synthesis, metabolism, and repair. A subnetwork associated with redox activity was uniquely identified in IFNAR(-/-) DC. Overall, temporal gene expression and network analyses identified many genes regulated by the type I interferon response and revealed previously unidentified aspects of the DC maturation process. PMID:27035059

  17. Distinct nucleic acid interaction properties of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein precursor NCp15 explain reduced viral infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Naiyer, Nada; Mitra, Mithun; Li, Jialin; Williams, Mark C.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Gorelick, Robert J.; Wu, Zhengrong; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2014-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation, three different forms of nucleocapsid (NC) protein—NCp15 (p9 + p6), NCp9 (p7 + SP2) and NCp7—appear successively. A mutant virus expressing NCp15 shows greatly reduced infectivity. Mature NCp7 is a chaperone protein that facilitates remodeling of nucleic acids (NAs) during reverse transcription. To understand the strict requirement for NCp15 processing, we compared the chaperone function of the three forms of NC. NCp15 anneals tRNA to the primer-binding site at a similar rate as NCp7, whereas NCp9 is the most efficient annealing protein. Assays to measure NA destabilization show a similar trend. Dynamic light scattering studies reveal that NCp15 forms much smaller aggregates relative to those formed by NCp7 and NCp9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that the acidic p6 domain of HIV-1 NCp15 folds back and interacts with the basic zinc fingers. Neutralizing the acidic residues in p6 improves the annealing and aggregation activity of NCp15 to the level of NCp9 and increases the protein–NA aggregate size. Slower NCp15 dissociation kinetics is observed by single-molecule DNA stretching, consistent with the formation of electrostatic inter-protein contacts, which likely contribute to the distinct aggregate morphology, irregular HIV-1 core formation and non-infectious virus. PMID:24813443

  18. Nucleic acid-protein interactions: Wedding for love or circumstances?

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Christophe; Buckle, Malcolm

    2009-08-01

    The sixth Figeac meeting on nucleic acid-protein interactions was held in Figeac, France, from September 26th to October 1st, 2008. It was organized by the working group "nucleic acid-protein interactions and gene expression" from the French Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This report briefly summarizes the presentations by 40 speakers during the four plenary sessions, which were organised as follows: (1) nucleic acids: targets and tools, (2) RNA superstar, (3) nuclear structure and dynamics, and (4) new concepts - new approaches. A total of 22 plenary lectures, 18 oral communications and 40 posters were presented over the 5 days, providing a highly stimulating environment for scientific exchange between the approximately 80 participants (biochemists, physicists, bio-informaticians and molecular and cellular biologists). PMID:19422875

  19. Bioinformatic evidence for a widely distributed, ribosomally produced electron carrier precursor, its maturation proteins, and its nicotinoprotein redox partners

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Enzymes in the radical SAM (rSAM) domain family serve in a wide variety of biological processes, including RNA modification, enzyme activation, bacteriocin core peptide maturation, and cofactor biosynthesis. Evolutionary pressures and relationships to other cellular constituents impose recognizable grammars on each class of rSAM-containing system, shaping patterns in results obtained through various comparative genomics analyses. Results An uncharacterized gene cluster found in many Actinobacteria and sporadically in Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Deltaproteobacteria, and one Archaeal plasmid contains a PqqE-like rSAM protein family that includes Rv0693 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Members occur clustered with a strikingly well-conserved small polypeptide we designate "mycofactocin," similar in size to bacteriocins and PqqA, precursor of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). Partial Phylogenetic Profiling (PPP) based on the distribution of these markers identifies the mycofactocin cluster, but also a second tier of high-scoring proteins. This tier, strikingly, is filled with up to thirty-one members per genome from three variant subfamilies that occur, one each, in three unrelated classes of nicotinoproteins. The pattern suggests these variant enzymes require not only NAD(P), but also the novel gene cluster. Further study was conducted using SIMBAL, a PPP-like tool, to search these nicotinoproteins for subsequences best correlated across multiple genomes to the presence of mycofactocin. For both the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) and iron-containing dehydrogenase families, aligning SIMBAL's top-scoring sequences to homologous solved crystal structures shows signals centered over NAD(P)-binding sites rather than over substrate-binding or active site residues. Previous studies on some of these proteins have revealed a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor, such that enzymatic activity in vitro requires an artificial electron acceptor such as N,N-dimethyl-4

  20. Phosphorylation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae La protein does not appear to be required for its functions in tRNA maturation and nascent RNA stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Long, K S; Cedervall, T; Walch-Solimena, C; Noe, D A; Huddleston, M J; Annan, R S; Wolin, S L

    2001-01-01

    An abundant nuclear phosphoprotein, the La autoantigen, is the first protein to bind all newly synthesized RNA polymerase III transcripts. Binding by the La protein to the 3' ends of these RNAs stabilizes the nascent transcripts from exonucleolytic degradation. In the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the La protein is required for the normal pathway of tRNA maturation. Experiments in which the human protein was expressed in S. pombe have suggested that phosphorylation of the La protein regulates tRNA maturation. To dissect the role of phosphorylation in La protein function, we used mass spectrometry to identify three sites of serine phosphorylation in the S. cerevisiae La protein Lhp1p. Mutant versions of Lhp1p, in which each of the serines was mutated to alanine, were expressed in yeast cells lacking Lhp1p. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we determined that we had identified and mutated all major sites of phosphorylation in Lhp1p. Lhp1p lacking all three phosphorylation sites was functional in several yeast strains that require Lhp1p for growth. Northern blotting revealed no effects of Lhp1p phosphorylation status on either pre-tRNA maturation or stabilization of nascent RNAs. Both wild-type and mutant Lhp1 proteins localized to both nucleoplasm and nucleoli, demonstrating that phosphorylation does not affect subcellular location. Thus, although La proteins from yeast to humans are phosphoproteins, phosphorylation does not appear to be required for any of the identified functions of the S. cerevisiae protein. PMID:11720288

  1. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  2. Interference of N-hydroxysuccinimide with bicinchoninic acid protein assay.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Dixit, Chandra Kumar

    2011-07-29

    We report here substantial interference from N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay. NHS is one of the most commonly used crosslinking agents in bioanalytical sciences, which can lead to serious potential errors in the BCA protein assay based protein estimation if it is present in the protein analyte solution. It was identified to be a reducing substance, which interferes with the BCA protein assay by reducing Cu(2+) in the BCA working reagent. The absorbance peak and absorbance signal of NHS were very similar to those of bovine serum albumin (BSA), thereby indicating a similar BCA reaction mechanism for NHS and protein. However, the combined absorbance of NHS and BSA was not additive. The time-response measurements of the BCA protein assay showed consistent single-phase kinetics for NHS and gradually decreasing kinetics for BSA. The error in protein estimation due to the presence of NHS was counteracted effectively by plotting additional BCA standard curve for BSA with a fixed concentration of NHS. The difference between the absorbance values of BSA and BSA with a fixed NHS concentration provided the absorbance contributed by NHS, which was then subtracted from the total absorbance of analyte sample to determine the actual absorbance of protein in the analyte sample. PMID:21762678

  3. Induction of starfish oocyte maturation by the beta gamma subunit of starfish G protein and possible existence of the subsequent effector in cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, K; Kontani, K; Tadenuma, H; Katada, T; Hoshi, M

    1993-01-01

    beta gamma subunits of G proteins were purified from starfish oocytes, and their role in the induction of oocyte maturation by 1-methyladenine was investigated. When injected into starfish oocytes, the purified beta gamma subunit of the starfish G protein induced germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) faster than that of bovine brain G protein. Injection of the starfish beta gamma into cytoplasm near the germinal vesicle (GV) induced GVBD earlier than when injected into the GV or the cytoplasm near the plasma membrane. Fluorescent-labeled beta gamma was retained in the injected area even after GVBD. Injected beta gamma also induced the formation of maturation-promoting factor as well as an increase of histone H1 kinase activity. These results suggest that beta gamma dissociates from alpha-subunit by the stimulation of 1-methyladenine and interacts with a cytoplasmic effector, which results in formation of active cdc2 kinase. Images PMID:8298189

  4. Ultrastructural and biochemical evidence for the presence of mature steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the cytoplasm of human luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, Walter D; Kohen, Paulina; Castro, Olga; Muñoz, Alex; Strauss, Jerome F; Devoto, Luigi

    2005-10-20

    The distribution of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) inside thecal and granulosa-lutein cells of human corpus luteum (CL) was assessed by immunoelectron microscopy. We found greater levels of StAR immunolabeling in steroidogenic cells from early- and mid-than in late luteal phase CL and lower levels in cells from women treated with a GnRH antagonist in the mid-luteal phase. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed significant levels of StAR antigen in the mitochondria and in the cytoplasm of luteal cells. The 30 kDa mature StAR protein was present in both mitochondria and cytosol (post-mitochondrial) fractions from homogenates of CL at different ages, whereas cytochrome c and mitochondrial HSP70 were detected only in the mitochondrial fraction. Therefore, we hypothesized that either appreciable processing of StAR 37 kDa pre-protein occurs outside the mitochondria, or mature StAR protein is selectively released into the cytoplasm after mitochondrial processing. The presence of mature StAR in the cytoplasm is consonant with the notion that StAR acts on the outer mitochondrial membrane to effect sterol import, and that StAR may interact with other cytoplasmic proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, including hormone sensitive lipase. PMID:16162390

  5. The Effects of cAMP-elevating Agents and Alpha Lipoic Acid on In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Germinal Vesicle Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Ali; Zavareh, Saeed; Ghorbanian, Mohammad Taghi; Karimi, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Background In spite of extensive efforts to improve in vitro oocyte maturation, the obtained results are not very efficient. This study was conducted to assess impacts of cAMP elevating agents and alpha lipoic acid (ALA) on in vitro oocyte maturation and fertilization. Methods Mouse germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes were categorized into cumulus denuded oocytes (DOs; n=896) and cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs; n=1077) groups. GV oocytes were matured in vitro with or without ALA; (I) without the meiotic inhibitors; (II) supplemented with cilostamide; (III) supplemented with forskolin and (IV) supplemented with Forskolin plus cilostamide. The obtained metaphase II (MII) oocytes were subjected to in vitro fertilization. Independent-samples t-testand ANOVA were used for data analysis. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The COCs maturation, fertilization and two cell embryo rates were higher than those of DOs in the control group, while no significant difference was observed between relevant COCs and DOs when they were cultured with cilostamide meiotic inhibitors in two step manner. Combined treatment of cilostamide and forskolin significantly elevated the developmental rates in both COCs and DOs as compared to other groups. The developmental rates of COCs and DOs in the presence of ALA were similar to their respective groups without ALA. Conclusion cAMP elevating agents were more effective on DOs than COCs with regard to rates of maturation and fertilization. However, ALA did not affect the developmental rates of both COCs and DOs in in vitro maturation in one or two step manner. PMID:24551571

  6. Protein quality and utilization of timothy, oat-supplemented timothy, and alfalfa at differing harvest maturities in exercised Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Woodward, A D; Nielsen, B D; Liesman, J; Lavin, T; Trottier, N L

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the protein quality and postgut N utilization of full-bloom timothy hay, oat-supplemented timothy-hay diets, and alfalfa hay harvested at different maturities, apparent whole tract N digestibility, urinary N excretion, and serum AA profiles were determined in light to moderately exercised Arabian horses. Six Arabian geldings (16.0 ± 0.3 yr; 467 ± 11 kg of BW) were randomly allocated to a 6 × 6 Latin square design. Diets included full-bloom timothy grass hay (G), G + 0.2% BW oat (G1), G + 0.4% BW oat (G2), mid-bloom alfalfa (A1), early-bloom alfalfa (A2), and early-bud alfalfa hay (A3). Forages were fed at 1.6% of the BW of the horse (as-fed). Each period consisted of an 11-d adaptation period followed by total collection of feces and urine for 3 d. Blood samples were taken on d 11 for analysis of serum AA concentrations. During the 3-d collection period, urine and feces were collected every 8 h and measured and weighed, respectively. Approximately 10% of the total urine volume and fecal weight per period was retained for N analyses. Fecal DM output was less (P < 0.05) in A1, A2, or A3 compared with G, G1, or G2. Apparent whole tract N digestibility was greater (P < 0.01) in A1, A2, and A3 compared with G, G1, or G2, and was greater (P < 0.05) in G1 and G2 compared with G. Nitrogen retention was not different from zero, and there were no differences (P > 0.05) in N retention among diets. Urinary N excretion and total N excretion were greater (P < 0.05) in A1, A2, and A3 compared with G, G1, or G2. Plasma concentrations for the majority of AA increased curvilinearly in response to feeding G, A1, A2, and A3 (quadratic, P < 0.05), with values appearing to maximize 2-h postfeeding. Although alfalfa N digestibility increased with decreasing harvest maturity, N retention did not differ and urinary volume and N excretion increased, indicating that postabsorptive N utilization decreased. In contrast, inclusion of oats at either 0.2 or 0.4% of the BW of the

  7. A comparison for acid production, proteolysis, autolysis and inhibitory properties of lactic acid bacteria from fresh and mature Feta PDO Greek cheese, made at three different mountainous areas.

    PubMed

    Bozoudi, Despina; Kotzamanidis, Charalambos; Hatzikamari, Magdalini; Tzanetakis, Nikolaos; Menexes, George; Litopoulou-Tzanetaki, Evanthia

    2015-05-01

    Isolates of NSLAB were obtained from fresh (58 isolates) and mature (38) Feta cheese made at household level in three different mountainous areas, in order to study the effect of the area of production on NSLAB composition and their technological characteristics. Results obtained by SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins indicated that the microflora of the fresh cheese was composed of either lactococci (areas 1, 2), or lactococci and enterococci (area 3). The NSLAB microflora of mature cheese was composed almost entirely of lactobacilli species, differing according to the area of production. Species allocation by the SDS-PAGE method was confirmed by sequencing representative strains. Lactococci of cheese made in area 1 exhibited a narrow spectrum of antibacterial activity compared to isolates from areas 2 and 3, while for lactobacilli from all three areas a similar spectrum was noticed. Lactococci from area 2 exhibited higher (P<0.05) mean acidifying activity than lactococci from area 1. The isolates from the three areas also differed in respect of their caseinolytic activity, with preferences towards β-CN (areas 1 and 2) or αs-CN (area 3). Mean proteolytic activity of lactococci from area 1 was stronger (P<0.05) than that of lactococci from area 2 and the same was observed for their mean aminopeptidase activity, as well as their extent of autolysis at pH5.1. Mean acidifying activity of lactobacilli after 6h was for strains of area 3>2=1. The strains from areas 1 and 3 degraded preferentially αs-CN, while a clear preference towards β-CN was noticed for strains of area 2; their mean proteolytic activity was for strains of area 1 higher (P<0.05) than strains from area 3. The above results suggest that cheeses from the three areas differ in species composition of NSLAB and their technological properties. Principal component analysis of results on acidifying and proteolytic activities as well as autolysis allowed the distinction of lactococci according to their

  8. Acid extraction and purification of recombinant spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Mello, Charlene M; Soares, Jason W; Arcidiacono, Steven; Butler, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for the isolation of recombinant spider silk proteins based upon their unique stability and solubilization characteristics. Three recombinant silk proteins, (SpI)7, NcDS, and [(SpI)4/(SpII)1]4, were purified by extraction with organic acids followed by affinity or ion exchange chromatography resulting in 90-95% pure silk solutions. The protein yield of NcDS (15 mg/L culture) and (SpI)7 (35 mg/L) increased 4- and 5-fold, respectively, from previously reported values presumably due to a more complete solubilization of the expressed recombinant protein. [(SpI)4/(SpII)1]4, a hybrid protein based on the repeat sequences of spidroin I and spidroin II, had a yield of 12.4 mg/L. This method is an effective, reproducible technique that has broad applicability for a variety of silk proteins as well as other acid stable biopolymers. PMID:15360297

  9. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. PMID:27080133

  10. Buffer interference with protein dynamics: a case study on human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-02-18

    Selection of suitable buffer types is often a crucial step for generating appropriate protein samples for NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies. Although the possible interaction between MES buffer (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and proteins has been discussed previously, the interaction is usually thought to have no significant effects on the structures of proteins. In this study, we demonstrate the direct, albeit weak, interaction between MES and human liver fatty acid binding protein (hLFABP). Rather than affecting the structure of hLFABP, we found that the dynamics of hLFABP, which were previously proposed to be relevant to its functions, were significantly affected by the binding of hLFABP with MES. Buffer interference with protein dynamics was also demonstrated with Bis-Tris buffer, which is quite different from MES and fatty acids in terms of their molecular structures and properties. This result, to our knowledge, is the first published report on buffer interference with protein dynamics on a microsecond to millisecond timescale and could represent a generic problem in the studies of functionally relevant protein dynamics. Although being a fortuity, our finding of buffer-induced changes in protein dynamics offers a clue to how hLFABP accommodates its ligands. PMID:19217864

  11. Advances in protein-amino acid nutrition of poultry.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2009-05-01

    The ideal protein concept has allowed progress in defining requirements as well as the limiting order of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, and a corn-soybean meal mixture for growth of young chicks. Recent evidence suggests that glycine (or serine) is a key limiting amino acid in reduced protein [23% crude protein (CP) reduced to 16% CP] corn-soybean meal diets for broiler chicks. Research with sulfur amino acids has revealed that small excesses of cysteine are growth depressing in chicks fed methionine-deficient diets. Moreover, high ratios of cysteine:methionine impair utilization of the hydroxy analog of methionine, but not of methionine itself. A high level of dietary L: -cysteine (2.5% or higher) is lethal for young chicks, but a similar level of DL: -methionine, L: -cystine or N-acetyl-L: -cysteine causes no mortality. A supplemental dietary level of 3.0% L: -cysteine (7x requirement) causes acute metabolic acidosis that is characterized by a striking increase in plasma sulfate and decrease in plasma bicarbonate. S-Methylmethionine, an analog of S-adenosylmethionine, has been shown to have choline-sparing activity, but it only spares methionine when diets are deficient in choline and(or) betaine. Creatine, or its precursor guanidinoacetic acid, can spare dietary arginine in chicks. PMID:19009229

  12. Interaction of Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit with nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Dynan, W S; Yoo, S

    1998-01-01

    The Ku protein-DNA-dependent protein kinase system is one of the major pathways by which cells of higher eukaryotes respond to double-strand DNA breaks. The components of the system are evolutionarily conserved and homologs are known from a number of organisms. The Ku protein component binds directly to DNA ends and may help align them for ligation. Binding of Ku protein to DNA also nucleates formation of an active enzyme complex containing the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). The interaction between Ku protein, DNA-PKcs and nucleic acids has been extensively investigated. This review summarizes the results of these biochemical investigations and relates them to recent molecular genetic studies that reveal highly characteristic repair and recombination defects in mutant cells lacking Ku protein or DNA-PKcs. PMID:9512523

  13. Cholesterol-lowering effect of rice bran protein containing bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jilite; Shimada, Masaya; Kato, Yukina; Kusada, Mio; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Dietary plant protein is well known to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Rice bran is a by-product of rice milling and is a good source of protein. The present study examined whether feeding rats a high-cholesterol diet containing 10% rice bran protein (RBP) for 10 d affected cholesterol metabolism. Rats fed dietary RBP had lower serum total cholesterol levels and increased excretion of fecal steroids, such as cholesterol and bile acids, than those fed dietary casein. In vitro assays showed that RBP strongly bound to taurocholate, and inhibited the micellar solubility of cholesterol, compared with casein. Moreover, the bile acid-binding proteins of the RBP were eluted by a chromatographic column conjugated with cholic acid, and one of them was identified as hypothetical protein OsJ_13801 (NCBI accession No. EAZ29742) using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic action of the RBP may be caused by the bile acid-binding proteins. PMID:25374002

  14. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  15. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  16. Vector-encoded Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein promotes maturation of dendritic cells with Th1 polarization and improved migration.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Jin, Chuan; Yu, Di; Eriksson, Fredrik; Essand, Magnus

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. Both HP-NAP protein and oncolytic viruses encoding HP-NAP have been suggested as immunotherapeutic anticancer agents and adjuvants for vaccination but with little known about its mode of action to activate adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses, and in this study we aim to evaluate the effect of HP-NAP on DC maturation, migration, and induction of adaptive immune response. Maturation markers CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, CD40, and CCR7 were upregulated on human DCs after treatment with supernatants from HP-NAP adenovirus-infected cells. HP-NAP-activated DCs had a Th1 cytokine secretion profile, with high IL-12 and relatively low IL-10 secretion, and migrated toward CCL19. Ag-specific T cells were efficiently expanded by Ag-presenting HP-NAP-activated DCs, which is an important property of functionally mature DCs. Furthermore, intradermal injections of HP-NAP-encoding adenovirus in C57BL/6 mice enhanced resident DC migration to draining lymph nodes, which was verified by imaging lymph nodes by two-photon microscopy and by phenotyping migrating cells by flow cytometry. In conclusion, therapeutic effects of HP-NAP are mediated by maturation of DCs and subsequent activation of Ag-specific T cells in addition to provoking innate immunity. PMID:25049358

  17. Ablation of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, specifically on follicular dendritic cells has no effect on their maturation or function.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Laura; Brown, Karen L; Mabbott, Neil A

    2013-03-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are situated in the primary follicles of lymphoid tissues where they maintain the structural integrity of the B-lymphocyte follicle, and help to drive immunoglobulin class-switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation during the germinal centre response. FDC can also provide a reservoir for pathogens that infect germinal centres including HIV and prions. FDC express high levels of the normal cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C) ), which makes them susceptible to prion infection. The function of PrP(C) is uncertain and it is not known why FDC require such high levels of expression of a protein that is found mainly on cells of the central nervous system. In this study, the function of FDC was assessed in mice that had PrP(C) ablated specifically in their FDC. In mice with FDC-specific PrP(C) ablation, our analysis revealed no observable deficits in lymphoid follicle microarchitecture and FDC status. No effects on FDC ability to trap immune complexes or drive antigen-specific antibody responses and affinity maturation in B lymphocytes were observed. These data clearly demonstrate that PrP(C) expression is dispensable for the functional maturation of FDC and their ability to maintain antigen-specific antibody responses and affinity maturation. PMID:23121447

  18. Alteration of energy metabolism gene expression in cumulus cells affects oocyte maturation via MOS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in dairy cows with an unfavorable "Fertil-" haplotype of one female fertility quantitative trait locus.

    PubMed

    Brisard, Daphné; Desmarchais, Alice; Touzé, Jean-Luc; Lardic, Lionel; Freret, Sandrine; Elis, Sebastien; Nuttinck, Fabienne; Camous, Sylvaine; Dupont, Joelle; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2014-03-01

    Prim'Holstein heifers selected for the "Fertil-" homozygous haplotype of QTL-Female-Fert ility-BTA3 showed a greater rate of early pregnancy failure and slower embryo development after IVM suggesting lower oocyte quality than those selected for "Fertile+". We aimed to ascertain intrafollicular factors related to lower oocyte quality in "Fertil-" cows. Analysis of individual oocytes showed meiotic progression delay in "Fertil-" compared with "Fertil+" dairy cows after in vivo maturation and IVM (P < 0.05). Expression of several genes localized to QTL-F-Fert-BTA3 or related to meiosis and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was analyzed in individual metaphase-II oocytes using reverse transcription- real-time polymerase chain reaction. Energy metabolism, apoptosis, extracellular matrix, and QTL-F-Fert-BTA3 genes were analyzed in surrounding cumulus cells (CC). In vivo, a significant decrease in prostaglandin synthase PTGES1 and PTGS2 expression coupled with lower PTGS2 protein abundance in CC and reduced expression of MOS in enclosed metaphase-II oocytes from "Fertil-" cows was observed. IVM strongly deregulated gene expression in CC and in oocytes compared with in vivo; nevertheless, differential expression of several genes including PEX19, NAMPT and MOS was observed between the two haplotypes. During IVM, PTGS2 activity inhibitor NS398 (50 μM) led to lower expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) in CC and of MOS in treated metaphase-II oocytes. Using immunofluorescence, MOS protein was localized to a midbody-like contractile ring separating the polar body from the ooplasm, suggesting a role in the terminal stage of oocyte maturation. Our results suggest that factors involved in prostaglandin synthesis and lipid metabolism in CC could impair oocyte maturation, and might be involved in the reduced fertility of "Fertil-" cows. PMID:24377862

  19. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences. PMID:18397498

  20. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C.; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H+ transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties ‘Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)’ and an early maturing mutant ‘Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)’. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  1. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  2. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: Sequence Analysis and Comparative Modeling of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Client Proteins Suggest Protein-Nucleic Acid Binding Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A. Bruce; Payne, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins—Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins—has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules. PMID:23956788

  3. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26340984

  4. Hyperdimensional analysis of amino acid pair distributions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Svend B; Mortensen, Rasmus J; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik M; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Arnason, Omar; Söring, Jón; Petersen, Steffen B

    2011-01-01

    Our manuscript presents a novel approach to protein structure analyses. We have organized an 8-dimensional data cube with protein 3D-structural information from 8706 high-resolution non-redundant protein-chains with the aim of identifying packing rules at the amino acid pair level. The cube contains information about amino acid type, solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence distance, secondary structure and sequence length. We are able to pose structural queries to the data cube using program ProPack. The response is a 1, 2 or 3D graph. Whereas the response is of a statistical nature, the user can obtain an instant list of all PDB-structures where such pair is found. The user may select a particular structure, which is displayed highlighting the pair in question. The user may pose millions of different queries and for each one he will receive the answer in a few seconds. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the data cube as well as the programs, we have selected well known structural features, disulphide bridges and salt bridges, where we illustrate how the queries are posed, and how answers are given. Motifs involving cysteines such as disulphide bridges, zinc-fingers and iron-sulfur clusters are clearly identified and differentiated. ProPack also reveals that whereas pairs of Lys residues virtually never appear in close spatial proximity, pairs of Arg are abundant and appear at close spatial distance, contrasting the belief that electrostatic repulsion would prevent this juxtaposition and that Arg-Lys is perceived as a conservative mutation. The presented programs can find and visualize novel packing preferences in proteins structures allowing the user to unravel correlations between pairs of amino acids. The new tools allow the user to view statistical information and visualize instantly the structures that underpin the statistical information, which is far from trivial with most other SW tools for protein structure analysis. PMID:22174733

  5. Probing interactions between plant virus movement proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tzfira, Tzvi; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    Most plant viruses move between plant cells with the help of their movement proteins (MPs). MPs are multifunctional proteins, and one of their functions is almost invariably binding to nucleic acids. Presumably, the MP-nucleic acid interaction is directly involved in formation of nucleoprotein complexes that function as intermediates in the cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses. Thus, when studying a viral MP, it is important to determine whether or not it binds nucleic acids, and to characterize the hallmark parameters of such binding, i.e., preference for single- or double-stranded nucleic acids and binding cooperativity and sequence specificity. Here, we present two major experimental approaches, native gel mobility shift assay and ultra violet (UV) light cross-linking, for detection and characterization of MP binding to DNA and RNA molecules. We also describe protocols for purification of recombinant viral MPs over-expressed in bacteria and production of different DNA and RNA probes for these binding assays. PMID:18370264

  6. Fatty acids exacerbate tubulointerstitial injury in protein-overload proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark E; Harris, Kevin P G; Walls, John; Furness, Peter N; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2002-10-01

    The role of the albumin-carried fatty acids in the induction of tubulointerstitial injury was studied in protein-overload proteinuria. Rats were injected with fatty acid-carrying BSA [FA(+)BSA], fatty acid-depleted BSA [FA(-)BSA], or saline. Macrophage infiltration was measured by immunohistochemical staining, apoptotic cells were detected by in situ end labeling, and proliferating cells were identified by in situ hybridization for histone mRNA. Macrophage infiltration was significantly greater in the FA(+)BSA group than in the FA(-)BSA and saline groups. The infiltrate was largely restricted to the outer cortex. Apoptosis was greater in the FA(+)BSA group than in the FA(-)BSA and saline groups. Compared with the saline group, apoptosis was significantly increased in the FA(+)BSA group but not in the FA(-)BSA group. Cortical cells proliferated significantly more in the FA(+)BSA and FA(-)BSA groups than in the saline group. FA(+)BSA is therefore a more potent inducer of macrophage infiltration and cell death than FA(-)BSA. The fatty acids carried on albumin may be the chief instigators of tubulointerstitial injury in protein-overload proteinuria. PMID:12217854

  7. The biological activities of protein/oleic acid complexes reside in the fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Angelo; Spolaore, Barbara; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia

    2013-06-01

    A complex formed by human α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and oleic acid (OA), named HAMLET, has been shown to have an apoptotic activity leading to the selective death of tumor cells. In numerous publications it has been reported that in the complex α-LA is monomeric and adopts a partly folded or "molten globule" state, leading to the idea that partly folded proteins can have "beneficial effects". The protein/OA molar ratio initially has been reported to be 1:1, while recent data have indicated that the OA-complex is given by an oligomeric protein capable of binding numerous OA molecules per protein monomer. Proteolytic fragments of α-LA, as well as other proteins unrelated to α-LA, can form OA-complexes with biological activities similar to those of HAMLET, thus indicating that a generic protein can form a cytotoxic complex under suitable experimental conditions. Moreover, even the selective tumoricidal activity of HAMLET-like complexes has been questioned. There is recent evidence that the biological activity of long chain unsaturated fatty acids, including OA, can be ascribed to their effect of perturbing the structure of biological membranes and consequently the function of membrane-bound proteins. In general, it has been observed that the cytotoxic effects exerted by HAMLET-like complexes are similar to those reported for OA alone. Overall, these findings can be interpreted by considering that the protein moiety does not have a toxic effect on its own, but merely acts as a solubilising agent for the inherently toxic fatty acid. PMID:23499846

  8. Inhibitors of HIV-1 maturation: Development of structure-activity relationship for C-28 amides based on C-3 benzoic acid-modified triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Swidorski, Jacob J; Liu, Zheng; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Venables, Brian L; Parker, Dawn D; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Terry, Brian J; Protack, Tricia; Rahematpura, Sandhya; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Jenkins, Susan; Krystal, Mark; Dicker, Ira B; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia

    2016-04-15

    We have recently reported on the discovery of a C-3 benzoic acid (1) as a suitable replacement for the dimethyl succinate side chain of bevirimat (2), an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor that reached Phase II clinical trials before being discontinued. Recent SAR studies aimed at improving the antiviral properties of 2 have shown that the benzoic acid moiety conferred topographical constraint to the pharmacophore and was associated with a lower shift in potency in the presence of human serum albumin. In this manuscript, we describe efforts to improve the polymorphic coverage of the C-3 benzoic acid chemotype through modifications at the C-28 position of the triterpenoid core. The dimethylaminoethyl amides 17 and 23 delivered improved potency toward bevirimat-resistant viruses while increasing C24 in rat oral PK studies. PMID:26988305

  9. Controlled expression of nif and isc iron-sulfur protein maturation components reveals target specificity and limited functional replacement between the two systems.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Patricia C; Johnson, Deborah C; Ragle, Brook E; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Dean, Dennis R

    2007-04-01

    The nitrogen-fixing organism Azotobacter vinelandii contains at least two systems that catalyze formation of [Fe-S] clusters. One of these systems is encoded by nif genes, whose products supply [Fe-S] clusters required for maturation of nitrogenase. The other system is encoded by isc genes, whose products are required for maturation of [Fe-S] proteins that participate in general metabolic processes. The two systems are similar in that they include an enzyme for the mobilization of sulfur (NifS or IscS) and an assembly scaffold (NifU or IscU) upon which [Fe-S] clusters are formed. Normal cellular levels of the Nif system, which supplies [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase, cannot also supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of other cellular [Fe-S] proteins. Conversely, when produced at the normal physiological levels, the Isc system cannot supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase. In the present work we found that such target specificity for IscU can be overcome by elevated production of NifU. We also found that NifU, when expressed at normal levels, is able to partially replace the function of IscU if cells are cultured under low-oxygen-availability conditions. In contrast to the situation with IscU, we could not establish conditions in which the function of IscS could be replaced by NifS. We also found that elevated expression of the Isc components, as a result of deletion of the regulatory iscR gene, improved the capacity for nitrogen-fixing growth of strains deficient in either NifU or NifS. PMID:17237162

  10. The acid tolerance response of Salmonella typhimurium involves transient synthesis of key acid shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, J W

    1993-01-01

    Although Salmonella typhimurium prefers neutral-pH environments, it can adapt to survive conditions of severe low-pH stress (pH 3.3). The process, termed the acid tolerance response (ATR), includes two distinct stages. The first stage, called pre-acid shock, is induced at pH 5.8 and involves the production of an inducible pH homeostasis system functional at external pH values below 4.0. The second stage occurs following an acid shock shift to pH 4.5 or below and is called the post-acid shock stage. During this stage of the ATR, 43 acid shock proteins (ASPs) are synthesized. The present data reveal that several ASPs important for pH 3.3 acid tolerance are only transiently produced. Their disappearance after 30 to 40 min of pH 4.4 acid shock coincides with an inability to survive subsequent pH 3.3 acid challenge. Clearly, an essential feature of inducible acid tolerance is an ability to synthesize these key ASPs. The pre-acid shock stage, with its inducible pH homeostasis system, offers the cell an enhanced ability to synthesize ASPs following rapid shifts to conditions below pH 4.0, an external pH that normally prevents ASP synthesis. The data also address possible signals for ASP synthesis. The inducing signal for 22 ASPs appears to be internal acidification, while external pH serves to induce 13 others. Of the 14 transient ASPs, 10 are induced in response to changes in internal pH. Mutations in the fur (ferric uptake regulator) locus that produce an Atr- acid-sensitive phenotype also eliminate induction of six transiently induced ASPs. Images PMID:8458840

  11. Perturbations in maturation of secretory proteins and their association with endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in a cell culture model for epithelial ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, G; Bush, K T; Zhang, P L; Nigam, S K

    1996-01-01

    The effects of ischemia on the maturation of secretory proteins are not well understood. Among several events that occur during ischemia-reperfusion are a rapid and extensive decrease in ATP levels and an alteration of cellular oxidative state. Since the normal folding and assembly of secretory proteins are mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones, the function of which depends on ATP and maintenance of an appropriate redox environment, ischemia might be expected to perturb folding of secretory proteins. In this study, whole animal and cultured cell models for the epithelial ischemic state were used to examine this possibility. After acute kidney ischemia, marked increases in the mRNA levels of the ER chaperones glucose-regulated protein (grp)78/immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP), grp94, and ER protein (ERp)72 were noted. Likewise, when cellular ATP was depleted to less than 10% of control with antimycin A, mRNA levels of BiP, ERp72, and grp94 were increased in kidney and thyroid epithelial cell culture models. Since the signal for the up-regulation of these stress proteins is believed to be the accumulation of misfolded/misassembled secretory proteins in the ER, their induction after ischemia in vivo and antimycin treatment of cultured cells suggests that maturation of secretory proteins in the ER lumen might indeed be perturbed. To analyze the effects of antimycin A on the maturation of secretory proteins, we studied the fate of thyroglobulin (Tg), a large oligomeric secretory glycoprotein, the folding and assembly of which seems to require a variety of ER chaperones. Treatment of cultured thyroid epithelial cells with antimycin A greatly inhibited ( > 90%) the secretion of Tg. Sucrose density gradient analysis revealed that in antimycin A-treated cells Tg associates into large macromolecular complexes which, by immunofluorescence, appeared to localize to the ER. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation studies after antimycin A treatment

  12. Combining Amine-Reactive Cross-Linkers and Photo-Reactive Amino Acids for 3D-Structure Analysis of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lössl, Philip; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the combination of chemical cross-linking and high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has matured into an alternative approach for analyzing 3D-structures of proteins and protein complexes. Using the distance constraints imposed by the cross-links, models of the protein or protein complex under investigation can be created. The majority of cross-linking studies are currently conducted with homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linkers. We extend this "traditional" cross-linking/MS strategy by adding complementary photo-cross-linking data. For this, the diazirine-containing unnatural amino acids photo-leucine and photo-methionine are incorporated into the proteins and cross-link formation is induced by UV-A irradiation. The advantage of the photo-cross-linking strategy is that it is not restricted to lysine residues and that hydrophobic regions in proteins can be targeted, which is advantageous for investigating membrane proteins. We consider the strategy of combining cross-linkers with orthogonal reactivities and distances to be ideally suited for maximizing the amount of structural information that can be gained from a cross-linking experiment. PMID:26700045

  13. Effect of Ethionine on the Ribonucleic Acid, Deoxyribonucleic Acid, and Protein Content of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert C.; Salmon, W. D.

    1965-01-01

    Smith, Robert C. (Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.), and W. D. Salmon. Effect of ethionine on the ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, and protein content of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 89:687–692. 1965.—The addition of ethionine to cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 W6, a methionine-requiring auxotroph, led to inhibition of the rate of increase in optical density when the ratio of ethionine to methionine was 200:1. When the ratio was 600:1, the increase in optical density became linear. When ethionine was substituted for methionine in the medium, the optical density of the culture increased, and there was a parallel increase in protein content. There was no cell division in these cultures. The rate of synthesis of ribonucleic acid (RNA) in a culture containing ethionine was similar to that of a culture deprived of methionine, but the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid in a culture with ethionine was about twice that of a culture deprived of methionine. No detectable radioactivity from ethionine-ethyl-1-C14 was incorporated into RNA. Ethionine-ethyl-1-C14 was readily incorporated into the protein fraction. PMID:14273646

  14. Epidermal growth factor-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase3/1 pathway is conducive to in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hemin; Sheng, Xihui; Cui, Xu; Gu, Meichao; Liu, Yunhai; Qi, Xiaolong; Xing, Shuhan; Guo, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to facilitate the in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes, and enhance embryo's capability for further development. However, such kind of molecular mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EGF-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases 3 and 1 (MAPK3/1) pathway on in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes. U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK kinase), was added into the maturation culture medium to block the EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 pathway with different doses. Then, the nuclear maturation of sheep oocytes was examined. Additionally, the effect of EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 on cytoplasmic maturation was examined though in vitro fertilization and embryonic development. The rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) after 6 h of culture with 10⁻⁴ mol/l of U0126 (50.4%) was significantly decreased compared with control (67.2%, p < 0.05), and the first polation body (PB1) extrusion rate after 22 h of culture in drug treatment was also significantly inhibited compared with control (28.6% vs. 48.4%, p < 0.05). However, 10-6 mol/l U0126 had slight effect on oocyte nuclear maturation. The normal distribution rate of α-tubulin in the oocytes after 22 h of in vitro maturation was significantly decreased in the 10⁻⁴ mol/l U0126 group (54%) compared with control (68%, p < 0.05). After in vitro fertilization, the cleavage rate in drug treatments (56.8% in 10⁻⁶ mol/l U0126 group and 42.6% in 10⁻⁴ mol/l U0126 group) was significantly decreased compared with control (72.3%, p < 0.01). The blastocyst rate in 10⁻⁴ mol/l U0126 group (17.6%) was also significantly decreased compared with control (29.9%, p < 0.05). Collectively, these results suggest that EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 pathway is conducive to in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes. PMID:25799554

  15. Epidermal Growth Factor-Mediated Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3/1 Pathway Is Conducive to In Vitro Maturation of Sheep Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xu; Gu, Meichao; Liu, Yunhai; Qi, Xiaolong; Xing, Shuhan; Guo, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to facilitate the in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes, and enhance embryo’s capability for further development. However, such kind of molecular mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EGF-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases 3 and 1 (MAPK3/1) pathway on in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes. U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK kinase), was added into the maturation culture medium to block the EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 pathway with different doses. Then, the nuclear maturation of sheep oocytes was examined. Additionally, the effect of EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 on cytoplasmic maturation was examined though in vitro fertilization and embryonic development. The rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) after 6 h of culture with 10−4 mol/l of U0126 (50.4%) was significantly decreased compared with control (67.2%, p < 0.05), and the first polation body (PB1) extrusion rate after 22 h of culture in drug treatment was also significantly inhibited compared with control (28.6% vs. 48.4%, p < 0.05). However, 10−6 mol/l U0126 had slight effect on oocyte nuclear maturation. The normal distribution rate of α-tubulin in the oocytes after 22 h of in vitro maturation was significantly decreased in the 10−4 mol/l U0126 group (54%) compared with control (68%, p < 0.05). After in vitro fertilization, the cleavage rate in drug treatments (56.8% in 10−6 mol/l U0126 group and 42.6% in 10−4 mol/l U0126 group) was significantly decreased compared with control (72.3%, p < 0.01). The blastocyst rate in 10−4 mol/l U0126 group (17.6%) was also significantly decreased compared with control (29.9%, p < 0.05). Collectively, these results suggest that EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 pathway is conducive to in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes. PMID:25799554

  16. Pod removal responsive change in phytohormones and its impact on protein degradation and amino acid transport in source leaves of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bok-Rye; Zhang, Qian; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the hormonal regulation of nitrogen remobilization from source to pod filling in Brassica napus, the hormonal level, proteolytic process, and amino acid transport were assessed in mature leaves of pod-removed or control at the early pod-filling stage. Pod (sink) removal decreased salicylic acid (SA), and significantly increased jasmonic acid (JA). The SA/JA ratio decreased with pod removal, accompanied by low degradation of foliar proteins and Rubisco content. A significant decrease in protease activity was observed in pod-removed leaves, confirmed by in-gel staining of protease. Pod removal reduced the expression of four amino acid transporter genes (BnAAP1, BnAAP2, BnAAP4, and BnAAP6) in mature leaves and reduced amino acid loading into phloem. These results indicated that a decrease in SA resulting from pod removal down-regulated nitrogen remobilization accompanied by a decrease in proteolytic activity and amino acid transport in mature leaves at the pod-filling stage. PMID:27161582

  17. The requirements of protein & amino acid during acute & chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Anura V

    2006-08-01

    Nutrition and infection interact with each other in a synergistic vicious cycle, leading to an adverse nutritional status and increased susceptibility to infection. Infectious episodes result in hypermetabolism and a negative nitrogen balance which is modulated by hormones, cytokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators, and is compounded by a reduced food intake. The extent of the negative nitrogen balance varies with the type of infection and its duration; however, it is reasonable to suggest that the loss of body protein could be minimized by the provision of dietary nitrogen, although anorexia will limit this. Further, distinctions need to be made about the provision of nutrients or protein during the catabolic and anabolic or recovery phase of the infection, since the capacity of the body to retain protein is enhanced in the anabolic recovery phase. Meeting the increased requirement for protein (and other nutrients) in infection does not imply a complete therapeutic strategy. Infections need to be treated appropriately, with nutrition as an adjunct to the treatment. Prior undernutrition could also impair the body's response to infection, although the weight of the evidence would suggest that this happens more particularly in oedematous undernutrition. In general, the amount of extra protein that would appear to be needed is of the order of 20-25 per cent of the recommended intake, for most infections. In acute infections, this is particularly relevant during the convalescence period. Community trials have suggested that lysine supplementation to the level required for normal daily nutriture, in predominantly wheat eating or potentially lysine deficient communities, improves immune function among other functional nutritional parameters; however, there is as yet insufficient evidence to suggest a specific requirement for amino acids in infections over and above the normal daily requirement as based on recent evidence. Some clinical studies that have showed

  18. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation. PMID:6283503

  19. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  20. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  1. Amino acid profiles and digestible indispensable amino acid scores of proteins from the prioritized key foods in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Nazma; Islam, Saiful; Munmun, Sarah; Mohiduzzaman, Md; Longvah, Thingnganing

    2016-12-15

    Concentrations of standard amino acids were determined in the composite samples (representing 30 agro-ecological zones of Bangladesh) of six prioritized key dietary protein sources: Oryza sativa (rice), Triticum aestivum (wheat flour), Lens culinaris (lentils), Pangusius pangusius (pangas), Labeo rohita (rohu) and Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia). Digestible indispensable amino acid scores (DIAAS) was calculated using published data on amino acids' digestibility to evaluate the protein quality of these foods. Indispensable amino acid (IAA) contents (mg IAA/g protein), found to be highest in pangas (430) and lowest in wheat (336), of all these analyzed foods exceeded the FAO recommended daily allowance (277mg IAA/g protein) and contributed on average 40% to total amino acid contents. Untruncated DIAAS values ranged from 51% (lysine) in wheat to 106% (histidine) in pangas and distinguished pangas, rohu, and tilapia containing 'excellent quality' protein (DIAAS>100%) with potential to complement lower quality protein of cereals, fruits, and vegetables. PMID:27451158

  2. Studies on fatty acid-binding proteins. The detection and quantification of the protein from rat liver by using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, T C; Wilton, D C

    1986-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding protein from rat liver is shown to bind the fluorescent fatty acid probe dansyl undecanoic acid. Binding is accompanied by a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum from 550 nm to 500 nm and a 60-fold fluorescence enhancement at 500 nm. These spectral properties have allowed the use of this probe to detect and quantify microgram amounts of liver fatty acid-binding protein during purification procedures. In conjunction with h.p.l.c. the method allows the rapid estimation of liver fatty acid-binding protein in biological samples. The validity of the method is demonstrated by measuring the concentration of fatty acid-binding protein in livers from control and hypolipidaemic-drug-treated rats. The dramatic diurnal rhythm previously reported for this protein [Dempsey (1984) Curr. Top. Cell. Regul. 24, 63-86] was not observed with this method. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3800946

  3. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  4. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-02-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 "prebiotic" α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a "foldable set"--that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two "primitive" versions of an extant protein fold (the β-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment. PMID:23341608

  5. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M.; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 “prebiotic” α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a “foldable set”—that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two “primitive” versions of an extant protein fold (the β-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment. PMID:23341608

  6. Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa reverses acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis through blocking sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 maturation.

    PubMed

    Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Song, Shun-Zong; Wan, Ying; Xie, Wen-Xue; Li, Xin; Bai, Ting; Ouyang, Bing-Qing; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2010-12-22

    This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) on acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Mice were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg of body weight) by gavage every 12 h for a total of three doses to induce acute fatty liver. Methanol extract of GM (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) or silymarin (100 mg/kg) was gavaged simultaneously with ethanol for three doses. GM administration significantly reduced the increases in serum ALT and AST levels, the serum and hepatic triglyceride levels, at 4 h after the last ethanol administration. GM was also found to prevent ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and necrosis, as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Additionally, GM suppressed the elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, restored the glutathione (GSH) levels, and enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The concurrent administration of GM efficaciously abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. Moreover, GM significantly reduced the nuclear translocation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (nSREBP-1) in ethanol-treated mice. These data indicated that GM possessed the ability to prevent ethanol-induced acute liver steatosis, possibly through blocking CYP2E1-mediated free radical scavenging effects and SREBP-1-regulated fatty acid synthesis. Especially, GM may be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for ethanol-induced oxidative damage in liver. PMID:21105651

  7. A Catalog of Proteins Expressed in the AG Secreted Fluid during the Mature Phase of the Chinese Mitten Crabs (Eriocheir sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin; Li, Qing; Liu, Lihua; Wang, Yuanli; Xie, Jing; Yang, Hongdan; Wang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    The accessory gland (AG) is an important component of the male reproductive system of arthropods, its secretions enhance fertility, some AG proteins bind to the spermatozoa and affect its function and properties. Here we report the first comprehensive catalog of the AG secreted fluid during the mature phase of the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis). AG proteins were separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Altogether, the mass spectra of 1173 peptides were detected (1067 without decoy and contaminants) which allowed for the identification of 486 different proteins annotated upon the NCBI database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and our transcritptome dataset. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited at the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000700. An extensive description of the AG proteome will help provide the basis for a better understanding of a number of reproductive mechanisms, including potentially spermatophore breakdown, dynamic functional and morphological changes in sperm cells and sperm acrosin enzyme vitality. Thus, the comprehensive catalog of proteins presented here can serve as a valuable reference for future studies of sperm maturation and regulatory mechanisms involved in crustacean reproduction. PMID:26305468

  8. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B adaptor-proteins differentially regulate neuronal early endosome maturation via the Rab5/Vps34-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Candiello, Ermes; Kratzke, Manuel; Wenzel, Dirk; Cassel, Dan; Schu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The σ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin-coated-vesicle adaptor-protein complex is expressed as three isoforms. Tissues express σ1A and one of the σ1B and σ1C isoforms. Brain is the tissue with the highest σ1A and σ1B expression. σ1B-deficiency leads to severe mental retardation, accumulation of early endosomes in synapses and fewer synaptic vesicles, whose recycling is slowed down. AP-1/σ1A and AP-1/σ1B regulate maturation of these early endosomes into multivesicular body late endosomes, thereby controlling synaptic vesicle protein transport into a degradative pathway. σ1A binds ArfGAP1, and with higher affinity brain-specific ArfGAP1, which bind Rabex-5. AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complex formation leads to more endosomal Rabex-5 and enhanced, Rab5GTP-stimulated Vps34 PI3-kinase activity, which is essential for multivesicular body endosome formation. Formation of AP-1/σ1A-ArfGAP1-Rabex-5 complexes is prevented by σ1B binding of Rabex-5 and the amount of endosomal Rabex-5 is reduced. AP-1 complexes differentially regulate endosome maturation and coordinate protein recycling and degradation, revealing a novel molecular mechanism by which they regulate protein transport besides their established function in clathrin-coated-vesicle formation. PMID:27411398

  9. Photolabeling of brain membrane proteins by lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A C; Hartig, P R

    1982-04-01

    3H-Lysergic acid diethylamide (3H-LSD) is irreversibly incorporated into bovine caudate membranes during ultraviolet light illumination. The incorporated radioligand apparently forms a covalent bond with a subpopulation of the membrane proteins. Although the photolabeling pattern differs significantly from the Coomassie blue staining pattern on SDS gels, the photolabeling is apparently not specific for LSD binding sites associated with neurotransmitter receptors. 3H-LSD photolabeling can occur during prolonged exposure of membrane samples to room lighting and thus may introduce artifacts into receptor binding assays. PMID:7087658

  10. Photolabeling of brain membrane proteins by lysergic acid diethylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, A.C.; Hartig, P.R.

    1982-04-05

    /sup 3/H-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 3/H-LSD) is irreversibly incorporated into bovine caudate membranes during ultraviolet light illumination. The incorporated radioligand apparently forms a covalent bond with a sub-population of the membrane proteins. Although the photolabeling pattern differs significantly from the Coomassie blue staining pattern on SDS gels, the photolabeling is apparently not specific for LSD binding sites associated with neurotransmitter receptors. /sup 3/H-LSD photolabeling can occur during prolonged exposure of membrane samples to room lighting and thus may introduce artifacts into receptor binding assays.

  11. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  12. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  13. DNA binding proteins that alter nucleic acid flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Micah; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. J., III; Williams, Mark C.

    2007-09-01

    Dual - beam optical tweezers experiments subject single molecules of DNA to high forces (~ 300 pN) with 0.1 pN accuracy, probing the energy and specificity of nucleic acid - ligand structures. Stretching phage λ-DNA reveals an increase in the applied force up to a critical force known as the overstretching transition. In this region, base pairing and stacking are disrupted as double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is melted. Proteins that bind to the double strand will tend to stabilize dsDNA, and melting will occur at higher forces. Proteins that bind to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) destabilize melting, provided that the rate of association is comparable to the pulling rate of the experiment. Many proteins, however, exhibit some affinity for both dsDNA and ssDNA. We describe experiments upon DNA + HMGB2 (box A), a nuclear protein that is believed to facilitate transcription. By characterizing changes in the structure of dsDNA with a polymer model of elasticity, we have determined the equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to be K ds = 0.15 +/- 0.7 10 9 M -1 for dsDNA binding. Analysis of the melting transition reveals an equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to ssDNA to be K ss = 0.039 +/- 0.019 10 9 M -1 for ssDNA binding.

  14. Salicylic acid interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytic protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunlong; Tejos, Ricardo; Beck, Martina; Himschoot, Ellie; Li, Hongjiang; Robatzek, Silke; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jirí

    2013-05-01

    Removal of cargos from the cell surface via endocytosis is an efficient mechanism to regulate activities of plasma membrane (PM)-resident proteins, such as receptors or transporters. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that is traditionally associated with pathogen defense. Here, we describe an unanticipated effect of SA on subcellular endocytic cycling of proteins. Both exogenous treatments and endogenously enhanced SA levels repressed endocytosis of different PM proteins. The SA effect on endocytosis did not involve transcription or known components of the SA signaling pathway for transcriptional regulation. SA likely targets an endocytic mechanism that involves the coat protein clathrin, because SA interfered with the clathrin incidence at the PM and clathrin-deficient mutants were less sensitive to the impact of SA on the auxin distribution and root bending during the gravitropic response. By contrast, SA did not affect the ligand-induced endocytosis of the flagellin sensing2 (FLS2) receptor during pathogen responses. Our data suggest that the established SA impact on transcription in plant immunity and the nontranscriptional effect of SA on clathrin-mediated endocytosis are independent mechanisms by which SA regulates distinct aspects of plant physiology. PMID:23613581

  15. cis9, trans11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Differentiates Mouse 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes into Mature Small Adipocytes through Induction of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Satoru; Nishioka, Yuki; Imanishi, Ryohta; Nishikawa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Hirotada; Fujisawa, Junji; Wada, Koichiro; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2010-09-01

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been reported to exhibit a number of therapeutic effects in animal models and patients, such as anti-hypertensive, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-arteriosclerotic, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-diabetic effects. However, the underlying mechanism is not well-characterized. In the present study, the effects of cis(c)9, trans(t)11-CLA on the differentiation of mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into mature adipocytes were examined. Treatment with c9, t11-CLA in the presence of insulin, dexamethasone, and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (differentiation cocktail) significantly stimulated the accumulation of triacylglycerol. The microscopic observation of cells stained by Oil Red O demonstrated that c9, t11-CLA increases the amount and proportion of small mature adipocytes secreting adiponectin, a benign adipocytokine, when compared to the differentiation cocktail alone. Furthermore, c9, t11-CLA increased bioactive peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) levels in a nuclear extract of 3T3-L1 cells, suggesting the enhancing effect of this fatty acid on the nuclear transmission of PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, in 3T3-L1 cells. These results suggest that the therapeutic effects of c9, t11-CLA on lifestyle-related diseases are partially due to the enhanced formation of small adipocytes from preadipocytes via PPARγ stimulation. PMID:20838573

  16. Dependence of intestinal amino acid uptake on dietary protein or amino acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Solberg, D.H.; Diamond, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    To understand how intestinal amino acid (AA) transport is regulated by dietary substrate levels, the authors measured uptake of seven radioactively-labelled AAs and glucose across the jejunal brush-border membrane of mice kept on one of three isocaloric rations differing in nitrogen content. In the high-protein ration, uptake increased by 77-81% for the nonessential, less toxic AAs, proline, and aspartate but only by 32-61% for the more toxic essential AAs tested. In the nitrogen-deficient ration, uptake decreased for the nonessential aspartate and proline but stayed constant or increased for essential AAs and for the nonessential alanine. These patterns imply independent regulation of the intestine's various AA transporters. With decreasing dietary AA (or protein), the imino acid and acidic AA private transporters are repressed, while activities of the basic AA transporter and the neutral AA public transporter decrease to an asymptote or else go through a minimum. These regulatory patterns can be understood as a compromise among conflicting constraints imposed by protein's multiple roles as a source of calories, nitrogen, and essential AAs and by the toxicity of essential AAs at high concentrations.

  17. Ribonucleic Acid Regulation in Permeabilized Cells of Escherichia coli Capable of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    A cell permeabilization procedure is described that reduces viability less than 10% and does not significantly reduce the rates of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis when appropriately supplemented. Permeabilization abolishes the normal stringent coupling of protein and ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4364330

  18. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding. PMID:25096519

  19. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  20. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Richard B

    2002-03-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma. PMID:11906839

  1. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  2. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  3. Mutagenesis Mapping of the Protein-Protein Interaction Underlying FusB-Type Fusidic Acid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    FusB-type proteins represent the predominant mechanism of resistance to fusidic acid in staphylococci and act by binding to and modulating the function of the drug target (elongation factor G [EF-G]). To gain further insight into this antibiotic resistance mechanism, we sought to identify residues important for the interaction of FusB with EF-G and thereby delineate the binding interface within the FusB–EF-G complex. Replacement with alanine of any one of four conserved residues within the C-terminal domain of FusB (F156, K184, Y187, and F208) abrogated the ability of the protein to confer resistance to fusidic acid; the purified mutant proteins also lost the ability to bind S. aureus EF-G in vitro. E. coli EF-G, which is not ordinarily able to bind FusB-type proteins, was rendered competent for binding to FusB following deletion of a 3-residue tract (529SNP531) from domain IV of the protein. This study has identified key regions of both FusB and EF-G that are important for the interaction between the proteins, findings which corroborate our previous in silico prediction for the architecture of the complex formed between the resistance protein and the drug target (G. Cox, G. S. Thompson, H. T. Jenkins, F. Peske, A. Savelsbergh, M. V. Rodnina, W. Wintermeyer, S. W. Homans, T. A. Edwards, and A. J. O'Neill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:2102-2107, 2012). PMID:23836182

  4. Mutagenesis mapping of the protein-protein interaction underlying FusB-type fusidic acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2013-10-01

    FusB-type proteins represent the predominant mechanism of resistance to fusidic acid in staphylococci and act by binding to and modulating the function of the drug target (elongation factor G [EF-G]). To gain further insight into this antibiotic resistance mechanism, we sought to identify residues important for the interaction of FusB with EF-G and thereby delineate the binding interface within the FusB-EF-G complex. Replacement with alanine of any one of four conserved residues within the C-terminal domain of FusB (F156, K184, Y187, and F208) abrogated the ability of the protein to confer resistance to fusidic acid; the purified mutant proteins also lost the ability to bind S. aureus EF-G in vitro. E. coli EF-G, which is not ordinarily able to bind FusB-type proteins, was rendered competent for binding to FusB following deletion of a 3-residue tract (529SNP531) from domain IV of the protein. This study has identified key regions of both FusB and EF-G that are important for the interaction between the proteins, findings which corroborate our previous in silico prediction for the architecture of the complex formed between the resistance protein and the drug target (G. Cox, G. S. Thompson, H. T. Jenkins, F. Peske, A. Savelsbergh, M. V. Rodnina, W. Wintermeyer, S. W. Homans, T. A. Edwards, and A. J. O'Neill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:2102-2107, 2012). PMID:23836182

  5. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  6. Quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, and fatty acid content among several Hibiscus sabdariffa accession calyces based on maturity in a greenhouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonols including quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, and fatty acids in plants have many useful health attributes including antioxidants, cholesterol lowering, and cancer prevention. Six accessions of roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces were evaluated for quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin conte...

  7. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Core Protein of West Nile Virus Increases Resistance to Acidotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Shi, Pei-Yong; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a worldwide distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus that naturally cycles between birds and mosquitoes, although it can infect multiple vertebrate hosts including horses and humans. This virus is responsible for recurrent epidemics of febrile illness and encephalitis, and has recently become a global concern. WNV requires to transit through intracellular acidic compartments at two different steps to complete its infectious cycle. These include fusion between the viral envelope and the membrane of endosomes during viral entry, and virus maturation in the trans-Golgi network. In this study, we followed a genetic approach to study the connections between viral components and acidic pH. A WNV mutant with increased resistance to the acidotropic compound NH4Cl, which blocks organelle acidification and inhibits WNV infection, was selected. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that this mutant displayed a single amino acid substitution (Lys 3 to Glu) on the highly basic internal capsid or core (C) protein. The functional role of this replacement was confirmed by its introduction into a WNV infectious clone. This single amino acid substitution also increased resistance to other acidification inhibitor (concanamycin A) and induced a reduction of the neurovirulence in mice. Interestingly, a naturally occurring accompanying mutation found on prM protein abolished the resistant phenotype, supporting the idea of a genetic crosstalk between the internal C protein and the external glycoproteins of the virion. The findings here reported unveil a non-previously assessed connection between the C viral protein and the acidic pH necessary for entry and proper exit of flaviviruses. PMID:23874963

  8. Compositional Variation in Sugars and Organic Acids at Different Maturity Stages in Selected Small Fruits from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Tahir; Anwar, Farooq; Abbas, Mateen; Boyce, Mary C.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    Selected soluble sugars and organic acids were analyzed in strawberry, sweet cherry, and mulberry fruits at different ripening stages by HPLC. The amounts of fructose, glucose and sucrose were found to be: strawberry (1.79–2.86, 1.79–2.25 and 0.01–0.25 g/100 g FW), sweet cherry (0.76–2.35, 0.22–3.39 and 0.03–0.13 g/100 g) and mulberry (3.07–9.41, 1.53–4.95 and 0.01–0.25 g/100 g) at un-ripened to fully-ripened stages, respectively. The strawberry, sweet cherry and mulberry mainly contained tartaric, citric and ascorbic acids in the range of 16–55, 70–1934 and 11–132 mg/100 g; 2–8, 2–10 and 10–17 mg/100 g; 2–118, 139–987 and 2–305 mg/100 g at un-ripened to fully-ripened stages, respectively. Fructose and glucose were established to be the major sugars in all the tested fruit while citric and ascorbic acid were the predominant organic acids in strawberry and mulberry while tartaric acid was mainly present in sweet cherry. The tested fruits mostly showed an increase in the concentration of sugars and organic acids with ripening. PMID:22408396

  9. Prediction of protein-protein interactions with clustered amino acids and weighted sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein-protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  10. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  11. Loss of Retinoschisin (RS1) Cell Surface Protein in Maturing Mouse Rod Photoreceptors Elevates the Luminance Threshold for Light-Driven Translocation of Transducin But Not Arrestin

    PubMed Central

    Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of retinoschisin (RS1) in Rs1 knock-out (Rs1–KO) retina produces a post-photoreceptor phenotype similar to X-linked retinoschisis in young males. However, Rs1 is expressed strongly in photoreceptors, and Rs1–KO mice have early reduction in the electroretinogram a-wave. We examined light-activated transducin and arrestin translocation in young Rs1–KO mice as a marker for functional abnormalities in maturing rod photoreceptors. We found a progressive reduction in luminance threshold for transducin translocation in wild-type (WT) retinas between postnatal days P18 and P60. At P21, the threshold in Rs1–KO retinas was 10-fold higher than WT, but it decreased to <2.5-fold higher by P60. Light-activated arrestin translocation and re-translocation of transducin in the dark were not affected. Rs1–KO rod outer segment (ROS) length was significantly shorter than WT at P21 but was comparable with WT at P60. These findings suggested a delay in the structural and functional maturation of Rs1–KO ROS. Consistent with this, transcription factors CRX and NRL, which are fundamental to maturation of rod protein expression, were reduced in ROS of Rs1–KO mice at P21 but not at P60. Expression of transducin was 15–30% lower in P21 Rs1–KO ROS and transducin GTPase hydrolysis was nearly twofold faster, reflecting a 1.7- to 2.5-fold increase in RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signaling) level. Transduction protein expression and activity levels were similar to WT at P60. Transducin translocation threshold elevation indicates photoreceptor functional abnormalities in young Rs1–KO mice. Rapid reduction in threshold coupled with age-related changes in transduction protein levels and transcription factor expression are consistent with delayed maturation of Rs1–KO photoreceptors. PMID:22993419

  12. Thermophysical properties of starch and whey protein composite prepared in presence of organic acid and esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we prepared starch and protein composite by reactive mixing in presence of various organic acids and found that use of these acid esters resulted in composites with good mechanical properties. In this study, concentration (% w/w) of acid citrates in the starch-protein composites were var...

  13. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  14. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  15. Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Goruk, Susan; Monckton, Elizabeth A.; Richard, Caroline; Brun, Miranda; Emara, Marwan; Field, Catherine J.; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) brain accretion is essential for brain development. The impact of DHA-rich maternal diets on offspring brain fatty acid composition has previously been studied up to the weanling stage; however, there has been no follow-up at later stages. Here, we examine the impact of DHA-rich maternal and weaning diets on brain fatty acid composition at weaning and three weeks post-weaning. We report that DHA supplementation during lactation maintains high DHA levels in the brains of pups even when they are fed a DHA-deficient diet for three weeks after weaning. We show that boosting dietary DHA levels for three weeks after weaning compensates for a maternal DHA-deficient diet during lactation. Finally, our data indicate that brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7), a marker of neural stem cells, is down-regulated in the brains of six-week pups with a high DHA:AA ratio. We propose that elevated levels of DHA in developing brain accelerate brain maturation relative to DHA-deficient brains. PMID:26506385

  16. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk samples through iTRAQ labeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Cong, Min; Peng, Xiuming; Wu, Junrui; Wu, Rina; Liu, Biao; Ye, Wenhui; Yue, Xiqing

    2016-05-18

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins have many functions. To explore the different proteomics of human and bovine MFGM, MFGM proteins were separated from human and bovine colostrum and mature milk, and analyzed by the iTRAQ proteomic approach. A total of 411 proteins were recognized and quantified. Among these, 232 kinds of differentially expressed proteins were identified. These differentially expressed proteins were analyzed based on multivariate analysis, gene ontology (GO) annotation and KEGG pathway. Biological processes involved were response to stimulus, localization, establishment of localization, and the immune system process. Cellular components engaged were the extracellular space, extracellular region parts, cell fractions, and vesicles. Molecular functions touched upon were protein binding, nucleotide binding, and enzyme inhibitor activity. The KEGG pathway analysis showed several pathways, including regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, neurotrophin signaling pathway, leukocyte transendothelial migration, tight junction, complement and coagulation cascades, vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway, and adherens junction. These results enhance our understanding of different proteomes of human and bovine MFGM across different lactation phases, which could provide important information and potential directions for the infant milk powder and functional food industries. PMID:27159491

  1. Pretreatment of cultured preadipocytes with arachidonic acid during the differentiation phase without a cAMP-elevating agent enhances fat storage after the maturation phase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ferdous; Syeda, Pinky Karim; Nartey, Michael Nii N; Rahman, Mohammad Shahidur; Islam, Mohammad Safiqul; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Shono, Fumiaki; Yokota, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and the related prostanoids exert complex effects on the adipocyte differentiation depending on the culture conditions and life stages. Here, we investigated the effect of the pretreatment of cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with exogenous AA during the differentiation phase without 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a cAMP-elevating agent, on the storage of fats after the maturation phase. This pretreatment with AA stimulated appreciably adipogenesis after the maturation phase as evident with the up-regulated gene expression of adipogenic markers. The stimulatory effect of the pretreatment with AA was attenuated by the co-incubation with each of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors. Among exogenous prostanoids and related compounds, the pretreatment with MRE-269, a selective agonist of the IP receptor for prostaglandin (PG) I2, strikingly stimulated the storage of fats in adipocytes. The gene expression analysis of arachidonate COX pathway revealed that the transcript levels of inducible COX-2, membrane-bound PGE synthase-1, and PGF synthase declined more greatly in cultured preadipocytes treated with AA. By contrast, the expression levels of COX-1, cytosolic PGE synthase, and PGI synthase remained constitutive. The treatment of cultured preadipocytes with AA resulted in the decreased synthesis of PGE2 and PGF2α serving as anti-adipogenic PGs although the biosynthesis of pro-adipogenic PGI2 was up-regulated during the differentiation phase. Moreover, the gene expression levels of EP4 and FP, the respective prostanoid receptors for PGE2 and PGF2α, were gradually suppressed by the supplementation with AA, whereas that of IP for PGI2 remained relatively constant. Collectively, these results suggest the predominant role of endogenous PGI2 in the stimulatory effect of the pretreatment of cultured preadipoccytes with AA during the differentiation phase without IBMX on adipogenesis after the maturation phase. PMID:26928048

  2. Branched Fatty Acid Esters of Hydroxy Fatty Acids Are Preferred Substrates of the MODY8 Protein Carboxyl Ester Lipase.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Matthew J; Kamat, Siddhesh S; Parsons, William H; Homan, Edwin A; Maher, Tim; Peroni, Odile D; Syed, Ismail; Fjeld, Karianne; Molven, Anders; Kahn, Barbara B; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saghatelian, Alan

    2016-08-23

    A recently discovered class of endogenous mammalian lipids, branched fatty acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids (FAHFAs), possesses anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we identified and validated carboxyl ester lipase (CEL), a pancreatic enzyme hydrolyzing cholesteryl esters and other dietary lipids, as a FAHFA hydrolase. Variants of CEL have been linked to maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 8 (MODY8), and to chronic pancreatitis. We tested the FAHFA hydrolysis activity of the CEL MODY8 variant and found a modest increase in activity as compared with that of the normal enzyme. Together, the data suggest that CEL might break down dietary FAHFAs. PMID:27509211

  3. Human odontoblasts express transient receptor protein and acid-sensing ion channel mechanosensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Solé-Magdalena, Antonio; Revuelta, Enrique G; Menénez-Díaz, Ivan; Calavia, Marta G; Cobo, Teresa; García-Suárez, Olivia; Pérez-Piñera, Pablo; De Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Juan; Vega, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Diverse proteins of the denegerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENa(+) C) superfamily, in particular those belonging to the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family, as well as some members of the transient receptor protein (TRP) channel, function as mechanosensors or may be required for mechanosensation in a diverse range of species and cell types. Therefore, we investigated the putative mechanosensitive function of human odontoblasts using immunohistochemistry to detect ENa(+) C subunits (α, β, and γ) and ASIC (1, 2, 3, and 4) proteins, as well as TRPV4, in these cells. Positive and specific immunoreactivity in the odontoblast soma and/or processes was detected for all proteins studied except α-ENa(+) C. The intensity of immunostaining was high for β-ENa(+) C and ASIC2, whereas it was low for ASIC1, ASIC3, γ-ENa(+) C, and TRPV4, being absent for α-ENa(+) C and ASIC4. These results suggest that human odontoblasts in situ express proteins related to mechanosensitive channels that probably participate in the mechanisms involved in teeth sensory transmission. PMID:20836083

  4. Constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB activity preserves homeostasis of quiescent mature lymphocytes and granulocytes by controlling the expression of distinct Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Fabrice; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Jaspar, Fabrice; Minner, Frédéric; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre; Merville, Marie-Paule; Bours, Vincent; Lekeux, Pierre

    2002-05-15

    Constitutive nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity protects quiescent mature immune cells from spontaneous apoptosis. Here, we examined whether NF-kappaB exerts its antiapoptotic function in these cells through the control of Bcl-2 family proteins. Specific pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-kappaB were used to achieve total NF-kappaB inactivation in quiescent human blood lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes. NF-kappaB inhibition induced drastic lymphocyte and granulocyte apoptosis, but only moderate monocyte apoptosis. T- and B-cell apoptosis was slow and associated with a gradual down-regulation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2, respectively. By contrast, granulocyte apoptosis was fast and accompanied by a rapid cellular accumulation of Bcl-x(S), the proapoptotic Bcl-x isoform that is generated from alternative splicing of the bcl-x pre-mRNA. Finally, antisense bcl-x(L) and bcl-2 knockdown in T and B cells, respectively, and induction of Bcl-x(S) expression in granulocytes through antisense oligonucleotide-mediated redirection of bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing were sufficient to induce significant apoptosis in these cells. Taken together, these results reveal that basal NF-kappaB activity preserves homeostasis of quiescent mature lymphocytes and granulocytes through regulation of distinct members of the Bcl-2 family. This study sheds light on the constitutive mechanisms by which NF-kappaB maintains defense integrity. PMID:11986224

  5. DBBP: database of binding pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction of proteins with other molecules plays an important role in many biological activities. As many structures of protein-DNA complexes and protein-RNA complexes have been determined in the past years, several databases have been constructed to provide structure data of the complexes. However, the information on the binding sites between proteins and nucleic acids is not readily available from the structure data since the data consists mostly of the three-dimensional coordinates of the atoms in the complexes. Results We analyzed the huge amount of structure data for the hydrogen bonding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids and developed a database called DBBP (DataBase of Binding Pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions, http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/dbbp). DBBP contains 44,955 hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) of protein-DNA interactions and 77,947 H-bonds of protein-RNA interactions. Conclusions Analysis of the huge amount of structure data of protein-nucleic acid complexes is labor-intensive, yet provides useful information for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. DBBP provides the detailed information of hydrogen-bonding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids at various levels from the atomic level to the residue level. The binding information can be used as a valuable resource for developing a computational method aiming at predicting new binding sites in proteins or nucleic acids. PMID:25474259

  6. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  7. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE25/PPE41 protein complex induces activation and maturation of dendritic cells and drives Th2-biased immune responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Bao, Yige; Chen, Xuerong; Burton, Jeremy; Gong, Xueli; Gu, Dongqing; Mi, Youjun; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades innate host immune responses by parasitizing macrophages and causes significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A mycobacterial antigen that can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and elicit effective host innate immune responses will be vital to the development of an effective TB vaccine. The M. tuberculosis genes PE25/PPE41 encode proteins which have been associated with evasion of the host immune response. We constructed a PE25/PPE41 complex gene via splicing by overlapping extension and expressed it successfully in E. coli. We investigated whether this protein complex could interact with DCs to induce effective host immune responses. The PE25/PPE41 protein complex induced maturation of isolated mouse DCs in vitro, increasing expression of cell surface markers (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II), thereby promoting Th2 polarization via secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. In addition, PE25/PPE41 protein complex-activated DCs induced proliferation of mouse CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and a strong humoral response in immunized mice. The sera of five TB patients were also highly reactive to this antigen. These findings suggest that interaction of the PE25/PPE41 protein complex with DCs may be of great immunological significance. PMID:26318856

  9. Preparation of the cortical reaction: maturation-dependent migration of SNARE proteins, clathrin, and complexin to the porcine oocyte's surface blocks membrane traffic until fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; van Haeften, Theo; Gadella, Bart M

    2011-02-01

    The cortical reaction is a calcium-dependent exocytotic process in which the content of secretory granules is released into the perivitellin space immediately after fertilization, which serves to prevent polyspermic fertilization. In this study, we investigated the involvement and the organization of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins in the docking and fusion of the cortical granule membrane with the oolemma in porcine oocytes. During meiotic maturation, secretory vesicles that were labeled with a granule-specific binding lectin, peanut agglutinin (PNA), migrated toward the oocyte's surface. This surface-orientated redistribution behavior was also observed for the oocyte-specific SNARE proteins SNAP23 and VAMP1 that colocalized with the PNA-labeled structures in the cortex area just under the oolemma and with the exclusive localization area of complexin (a trans-SNARE complex-stabilizing protein). The coming together of these proteins serves to prevent the spontaneous secretion of the docked cortical granules and to prepare the oocyte's surface for the cortical reaction, which should probably be immediately compensated for by a clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In vitro fertilization resulted in the secretion of the cortical granule content and the concomitant release of complexin and clathrin into the oocyte's cytosol, and this is considered to stimulate the observed endocytosis of SNARE-containing membrane vesicles. PMID:20944080

  10. Coffee bean arabinogalactans: acidic polymers covalently linked to protein.

    PubMed

    Redgwell, Robert J; Curti, Delphine; Fischer, Monica; Nicolas, Pierre; Fay, Laurent B

    2002-02-11

    The arabinogalactan content of green coffee beans (Coffea arabica var. Yellow Caturra) was released by a combination of chemical extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis of the mannan-cellulose component of the wall. Several arabinogalactan fractions were isolated, purified by gel-permeation and ion-exchange chromatography and characterised by compositional and linkage analysis. The AG fractions contained between 6 and 8% glucuronic acid, and gave a positive test for the beta-glucosyl-Yariv reagent, a stain specific for arabinogalactan-proteins. The protein component accounted for between 0.5 and 2.0% of the AGPs and contained between 7 and 12% hydroxyproline. The AG moieties displayed considerable heterogeneity with regard to their degree of arabinosylation and the extent and composition of their side-chains. They possessed a MW average of 650 kDa which ranged between 150 and 2000 kDa. An investigation of the structural features of the major AG fraction, released following enzymatic hydrolysis of the mannan-cellulose polymers, allowed a partial structure of coffee arabinogalactan to be proposed. PMID:11844494

  11. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  12. Crystal growth of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses in gels.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Bernard; Sauter, Claude; Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Moreno, Abel; Schellenberger, Pascale; Robert, Marie-Claire; Capelle, Bernard; Sanglier, Sarah; Potier, Noëlle; Giegé, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Medium-sized single crystals with perfect habits and no defect producing intense and well-resolved diffraction patterns are the dream of every protein crystallographer. Crystals of biological macromolecules possessing these characteristics can be prepared within a medium in which mass transport is restricted to diffusion. Chemical gels (like polysiloxane) and physical gels (such as agarose) provide such an environment and are therefore suitable for the crystallisation of biological macromolecules. Instructions for the preparation of each type of gel are given to urge crystal growers to apply diffusive media for enhancing crystallographic quality of their crystals. Examples of quality enhancement achieved with silica and agarose gels are given. Results obtained with other substances forming gel-like media (such as lipidic phases and cellulose derivatives) are presented. Finally, the use of gels in combination with capillary tubes for counter-diffusion experiments is discussed. Methods and techniques implemented with proteins can also be applied to nucleic acids and nucleoprotein assemblies such as viruses. PMID:20005247

  13. Latency, duration and dose response relationships of amino acid effects on human muscle protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Michael J; Bohé, Julien; Wolfe, Robert R

    2002-10-01

    The components of the stimulatory effect of food on net deposition of protein are beginning to be identified and separated. One of the most important of these appears to be the effect of amino acids per se in stimulating muscle anabolism. Amino acids appear to have a linear stimulatory effect within the range of normal diurnal plasma concentrations from postabsorptive to postprandial. Within this range, muscle protein synthesis (measured by incorporation of stable isotope tracers of amino acids into biopsied muscle protein) appears to be stimulated approximately twofold; however, little further increase occurs when very high concentrations of amino acids (>2.5 times the normal postabsorptive plasma concentration) are made available. Amino acids provided in surfeit of the ability of the system to synthesize protein are disposed of by oxidation, ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The stimulatory effect of amino acids appears to be time dependent; a square wave increase in the availability of amino acids causes muscle protein synthesis to be stimulated and to fall back to basal values, despite continued amino acid availability. The relationship between muscle protein synthesis and insulin availability suggests that most of the stimulatory effects occur at low insulin concentrations, with large increases having no effect. These findings may have implications for our understanding of the body's requirements for protein. The maximal capacity for storage of amino acids as muscle protein probably sets an upper value on the extent to which amino acids can be stored after a single meal. PMID:12368422

  14. Effects of maturity stage and lactic acid bacteria on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of Siberian wildrye silage.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Bai, Shiqie; You, Minghong; Shen, Yixin

    2016-09-01

    It is difficult to make good quality of silage from alpine gramineous from the Qinghai Tibetan plateau. The effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of Siberian wildrye silage were studied in southeast of the Qinghai Tibetan plateau. Siberian wildrye materials were freshly cut at the sprouting stage, flowering stage, and milky stage. Silage was prepared by using a small-scale silage fermentation system (bag silos). Lactobacillus plantarum (LP, 5 × 10(8) cfu/kg FM), Lactobacillus buchneri (LB, 5 × 10(8) cfu/kg FM) and their mixture (LP+LB, 5 × 10(8) cfu/kg FM) as silage additives were separately added to ensiled forages, and no additive served as control (CK). These bag silos were kept at room temperature (<15°C), and the silage qualities were analyzed after 60 days of ensiling. The number of indigenous LAB on fresh materials was less than that of yeasts and molds, and LAB species showed specification adapted to low temperature. LAB inoculated silages had lower (P < 0.05) pH value, NH 3-N/TN and butyric acid content compared with control silage. Silage treated with LB had higher contents of acetic acid, propionic acid, WSC and CP. However, the aerobic stability of silages inoculated with LAB did not differ significantly between stages (P > 0.05). When fermentation characteristics, chemical composition, and aerobic stability were considered, treatment with L. plantarum resulted in high quality of Siberian wildrye silage harvested at the flowering stage in the alpine region. PMID:27625768

  15. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Padmanabhan, Meenu S; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N

    2016-05-10

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa-interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread. PMID:27118842

  16. Fatty acid binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tizhong; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues regulate metabolism, reproduction, and life span. The development and growth of adipose tissue are due to increases of both adipocyte cell size and cell number; the latter is mediated by adipocyte progenitors. Various markers have been used to identify either adipocyte progenitors or mature adipocytes. The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), commonly known as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), has been extensively used as a marker for differentiated adipocytes. However, whether aP2 is expressed in adipogenic progenitors is controversial. Using Cre/LoxP-based cell lineage tracing in mice, we have identified a population of aP2-expressing progenitors in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of both white and brown adipose tissues. The aP2-lineage progenitors reside in the adipose stem cell niche and express adipocyte progenitor markers, including CD34, Sca1, Dlk1, and PDGFRα. When isolated and grown in culture, the aP2-expressing SVF cells proliferate and differentiate into adipocytes upon induction. Conversely, ablation of the aP2 lineage greatly reduces the adipogenic potential of SVF cells. When grafted into wild-type mice, the aP2-lineage progenitors give rise to adipose depots in recipient mice. Therefore, the expression of aP2 is not limited to mature adipocytes, but also marks a pool of undifferentiated progenitors associated with the vasculature of adipose tissues. Our finding adds to the repertoire of adipose progenitor markers and points to a new regulator of adipose plasticity.—Shan, T., Liu, W., Kuang, S. Fatty acid-binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues. PMID:23047894

  17. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS) Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Bhatt, Shiven; Poudel, Saroj; Boyd, Eric S; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s) of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins. PMID:27517714

  18. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS) Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shiven; Poudel, Saroj; Boyd, Eric S.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s) of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins. PMID:27517714

  19. Reducing protein adsorption with polymer-grafted hyaluronic acid coatings.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed H; Prata, Joseph E; Karácsony, Orsolya; Dunér, Gunnar; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-07-01

    We report a thermoresponsive chemical modification strategy of hyaluronic acid (HA) for coating onto a broad range of biomaterials without relying on chemical functionalization of the surface. Poly(di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PMEO2MA), a polymer with a lower critical solution temperature of 26 °C in water, was grafted onto HA to allow facile formation of biopolymer coatings. While the mechanism for film formation appears to involve a complex combination of homogeneous nucleation followed by heterogeneous film growth, we demonstrate that it resulted in hydrophilic coatings that significantly reduce protein adsorption despite the high fraction of hydrophobic (PMEO2MA). Structural characterization was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), which showed the formation of a dense, continuous coating based on 200 nm domains that were stable in protein solutions for at least 15 days. The coatings had a water contact angle of 16°, suggesting the formation of hydrophilic but not fully wetting films. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) as well as biolayer interferometry (BLI) techniques were used to measure adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen (Fbg), and human immunoglobulin (IgG), with results indicating that HA-PMEO2MA-coated surfaces effectively inhibited adsorption of all three serum proteins. These results are consistent with previous studies demonstrating that this degree of hydrophilicity is sufficient to generate an effectively nonfouling surface and suggest that segregation during the solubility transition resulted in a surface that presented the hydrophilic HA component of the hybrid biopolymer. We conclude that PMEO2MA-grafted HA is a versatile platform for the passivation of hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces without need for substrate functionalization. PMID:24892924

  20. ASSESSMENT OF NEUROTOXICITY: USE OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diverse neurotoxic insults results in proliferation and hypertrophy of astrocytes. he hallmark of this response is enhanced expression of the major intermediate filament protein of astrocytes, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). hese observations suggest that GFAP may be a us...

  1. SEED PROTEIN QUANTITIES OF FIELD-GROWN SOYBEANS EXPOSED TO SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of seeds harvested from field-grown soybeans demonstrated that simulated acidic rainfalls from two experimental protocols can significantly decrease total protein contents of soybeans. Statistically significant differences in protein content per seed mass were obtained i...

  2. Solvent accessible surface area-based hot-spot detection methods for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Pimenta, António C; Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Melo, André; Cordeiro, Maria N D S; Moreira, Irina S

    2015-05-26

    Due to the importance of hot-spots (HS) detection and the efficiency of computational methodologies, several HS detecting approaches have been developed. The current paper presents new models to predict HS for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions with better statistics compared with the ones currently reported in literature. These models are based on solvent accessible surface area (SASA) and genetic conservation features subjected to simple Bayes networks (protein-protein systems) and a more complex multi-objective genetic algorithm-support vector machine algorithms (protein-nucleic acid systems). The best models for these interactions have been implemented in two free Web tools. PMID:25845030

  3. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  4. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle (pre- and post-transcriptional maturation) and protein turnover: implications in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, and due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004). Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia, etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic; Cajigas et al., 2010). This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation, and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition, and behavior (Cajigas et al., 2010). Thus a regulatory switch, which controls the lifespan, maturation, and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at (1) the pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and (2) the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins and RNA binding proteins in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione anti-oxidant levels (Lertratanangkoon et al., 1997), the redox status of

  5. Role of a Redox-Based Methylation Switch in mRNA Life Cycle (Pre- and Post-Transcriptional Maturation) and Protein Turnover: Implications in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav S.; Deth, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, and due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004). Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia, etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic; Cajigas et al., 2010). This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation, and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition, and behavior (Cajigas et al., 2010). Thus a regulatory switch, which controls the lifespan, maturation, and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at (1) the pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and (2) the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins and RNA binding proteins in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione anti-oxidant levels (Lertratanangkoon et al., 1997), the redox status of

  6. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  7. In Silico Survey of the Mitochondrial Protein Uptake and Maturation Systems in the Brown Alga Ectocarpus siliculosus

    PubMed Central

    Delage, Ludovic; Leblanc, Catherine; Nyvall Collén, Pi; Gschloessl, Bernhard; Oudot, Marie-Pierre; Sterck, Lieven; Poulain, Julie; Aury, Jean-Marc; Cock, J. Mark

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of mitochondria was a key event in eukaryote evolution. The aim of this study was to identify homologues of the components of the mitochondrial protein import machinery in the brown alga Ectocarpus and to use this information to investigate the evolutionary history of this fundamental cellular process. Detailed searches were carried out both for components of the protein import system and for related peptidases. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses were used to investigate the evolution of mitochondrial proteins during eukaryote diversification. Key observations include phylogenetic evidence for very ancient origins for many protein import components (Tim21, Tim50, for example) and indications of differences between the outer membrane receptors that recognize the mitochondrial targeting signals, suggesting replacement, rearrangement and/or emergence of new components across the major eukaryotic lineages. Overall, the mitochondrial protein import components analysed in this study confirmed a high level of conservation during evolution, indicating that most are derived from very ancient, ancestral proteins. Several of the protein import components identified in Ectocarpus, such as Tim21, Tim50 and metaxin, have also been found in other stramenopiles and this study suggests an early origin during the evolution of the eukaryotes. PMID:21611166

  8. Internalization of a GFP-tetanus toxin C-terminal fragment fusion protein at mature mouse neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Sylvie; Colasante, Cesare; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Barbier, Julien; Curie, Thomas; Girard, Emmanuelle; Molgó, Jordi; Brûlet, Philippe

    2005-09-01

    The distribution, dynamics, internalization, and retrograde axonal traffic of a fusion protein composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the atoxic C-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin (TTC) were studied after its in vivo injection. Confocal microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy revealed that the fusion protein (GFP-TTC) rapidly clustered in motor nerve terminals of the neuromuscular junction. Clathrin-coated pits, and axolemma infoldings located between active zones appeared to be involved in the internalization of the fusion protein. Biochemical analysis of detergent-extracted neuromuscular preparations showed that the GFP-TTC fusion protein was associated with lipid microdomains. We suggest that GFP-TTC clustering in these lipid microdomains favors the recruitment of other proteins involved in its endocytosis and internalization in motor nerve terminals. During its retrograde trafficking, GFP-TTC accumulated in different axonal compartments than those used by cholera toxin B-subunit suggesting that these two proteins are transported by different pathways and cargos. PMID:16023367

  9. Internalization of a GFP-tetanus toxin C-terminal fragment fusion protein at mature mouse neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Sylvie; Colasante, Cesare; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Barbier, Julien; Curie, Thomas; Girard, Emmanuelle; Molgó, Jordi; Brûlet, Philippe

    2005-12-01

    The distribution, dynamics, internalization, and retrograde axonal traffic of a fusion protein composed of green fluorescent protein (GFP)and the atoxic C-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin (TTC) were studied after its in vivo injection. Confocal microscopy and immuno-gold electron microscopy revealed that the fusion protein (GFP-TTC) rapidly clustered in motor nerve terminals of the neuromuscular junction. Clathrin-coated pits, and axolemma infoldings located between active zones appeared to be involved in the internalization of the fusion protein. Biochemical analysis of detergent-extracted neuromuscular preparations showed that the GFP-TTC fusion protein was associated with lipid microdomains. We suggest that GFP-TTC clustering in these lipid microdomains favors the recruitment of other proteins involved in its endocytosis and internalization in motor nerve terminals. During its retrograde trafficking, GFP-TTC accumulated indifferent axonal compartments than those used by cholera toxin B-subunit suggesting that these two proteins are transported by different pathways and cargos. PMID:16456925

  10. Fatty acid transport protein 1 can compensate for fatty acid transport protein 4 in the developing mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2015-02-01

    Fatty acid transport protein (FATP) 4 is one of a family of six FATPs that facilitate long- and very-long-chain fatty acid uptake. Mice lacking FATP4 are born with tight, thick skin and a defective barrier; they die neonatally because of dehydration and restricted movements. Mutations in SLC27A4, the gene encoding FATP4, cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), characterized by premature birth, respiratory distress, and edematous skin with severe ichthyotic scaling. Symptoms of surviving patients become mild, although atopic manifestations are common. We previously showed that suprabasal keratinocyte expression of a Fatp4 transgene in Fatp4 mutant skin rescues the lethality and ameliorates the skin phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that FATP1, the closest FATP4 homolog, can compensate for the lack of FATP4 in our mouse model of IPS, as it might do postnatally in IPS patients. Transgenic expression of FATP1 in suprabasal keratinocytes rescued the phenotype of Fatp4 mutants, and FATP1 sorted to the same intracellular organelles as endogenous FATP4. Thus, FATP1 and FATP4 likely have overlapping substrate specificities, enzymatic activities, and biological functions. These results suggest that increasing expression of FATP1 in suprabasal keratinocytes could normalize the skin of IPS patients and perhaps prevent the atopic manifestations. PMID:25184958

  11. Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.

    PubMed

    Sarwar Gilani, G; Wu Xiao, Chao; Cockell, Kevin A

    2012-08-01

    Dietary antinutritional factors have been reported to adversely affect the digestibility of protein, bioavailability of amino acids and protein quality of foods. Published data on these negative effects of major dietary antinutritional factors are summarized in this manuscript. Digestibility and the quality of mixed diets in developing countries are considerably lower than of those in developed regions. For example, the digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94 %). Poor digestibility of protein in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, is due to the presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fibre, and/or high concentrations of antinutritional factors present endogenously or formed during processing. Examples of naturally occurring antinutritional factors include glucosinolates in mustard and canola protein products, trypsin inhibitors and haemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, gossypol in cottonseed protein products, and uricogenic nucleobases in yeast protein products. Heat/alkaline treatments of protein products may yield Maillard reaction compounds, oxidized forms of sulphur amino acids, D-amino acids and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural nephrotoxic amino acid derivative). Among common food and feed protein products, soyabeans are the most concentrated source of trypsin inhibitors. The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soyabeans, kidney beans or other grain legumes have been reported to cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibility (up to 50 %) and protein quality (up to 100 %) in rats and/or pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in sorghum and other cereals, fababean and other grain legumes can cause

  12. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  13. Gene Activation in Eukaryotes: Are Nuclear Acidic Proteins the Cause or the Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear acidic proteins have been implicated in the positive control of gene transcription in eukaryotes. This hypothesis was examined in greater detail by analysis of these proteins during experimental gene activation by a technique for fractionating nuclei into chromatin and the ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous nuclear RNA. When synthesis of rat-liver heterogeneous nuclear RNA was stimulated by administration of hydrocortisone, there was a parallel increase in the labeling of acidic proteins in ribonucleoprotein particles. However, there was no detectable effect on the labeling of either acidic chromatin proteins or histones. Thus, the nuclear acidic proteins that respond to the hormone are concerned with a post-transcriptional event, namely the assembly and processing of ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous RNA, rather than with direct gene activation. Increases in synthesis of “chromatin” acidic proteins during gene activation observed by others may reflect the presence of these ribonucleoprotein particles in crude chromatin preparations. Images PMID:4522777

  14. The N-terminal region of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase can direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, S; Azzariti, A; Marra, E; Quagliariello, E

    1994-06-30

    Two fused genes were constructed which encode for two chimeric proteins in which either 10 or 191 N-terminal amino acids of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase had been attached to the entire polypeptide chain of cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase. The precursor and mature form of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, dihydrofolate reductase and both chimeric proteins were synthesized in vitro and their import into isolated mitochondria was studied. Both chimeric proteins were taken up by isolated organelles, where they became protease resistant, thus indicating the ability of the N-terminal portion of the mature moiety of the precursor of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria. PMID:8024546

  15. Changes over lactation in breast milk serum proteins involved in the maturation of immune and digestive system of the infant

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; de Waard, Marita; Verheijen, Hester; Boeren, Sjef; Hageman, Jos A.; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide data from shot-gun proteomics, using filtered-aided sample preparation (FASP), dimethyl labeling and LC–MS/MS, to quantify the changes in the repertoire of human milk proteins over lactation. Milk serum proteins were analyzed at week 1, 2, 3 4, 8, 16, and 24 in milk from four individual mothers. A total of 247 proteins were identified, of which 200 proteins were quantified. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication (Zhang et al., 2006) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2016) [2] via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD003465. PMID:26977438

  16. Changes over lactation in breast milk serum proteins involved in the maturation of immune and digestive system of the infant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; de Waard, Marita; Verheijen, Hester; Boeren, Sjef; Hageman, Jos A; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-06-01

    Here we provide data from shot-gun proteomics, using filtered-aided sample preparation (FASP), dimethyl labeling and LC-MS/MS, to quantify the changes in the repertoire of human milk proteins over lactation. Milk serum proteins were analyzed at week 1, 2, 3 4, 8, 16, and 24 in milk from four individual mothers. A total of 247 proteins were identified, of which 200 proteins were quantified. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication (Zhang et al., 2006) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2016) [2] via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD003465. PMID:26977438

  17. Synthesis of alanyl nucleobase amino acids and their incorporation into proteins.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Poulami; Dedkova, Larisa M; Ellington, Andrew D; Yakovchuk, Petro; Lim, Jaebum; Anslyn, Eric V; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-09-15

    Proteins which bind to nucleic acids and regulate their structure and functions are numerous and exceptionally important. Such proteins employ a variety of strategies for recognition of the relevant structural elements in their nucleic acid substrates, some of which have been shown to involve rather subtle interactions which might have been difficult to design from first principles. In the present study, we have explored the preparation of proteins containing unnatural amino acids having nucleobase side chains. In principle, the introduction of multiple nucleobase amino acids into the nucleic acid binding domain of a protein should enable these modified proteins to interact with their nucleic acid substrates using Watson-Crick and other base pairing interactions. We describe the synthesis of five alanyl nucleobase amino acids protected in a fashion which enabled their attachment to a suppressor tRNA, and their incorporation into each of two proteins with acceptable efficiencies. The nucleobases studied included cytosine, uracil, thymine, adenine and guanine, i.e. the major nucleobase constituents of DNA and RNA. Dihydrofolate reductase was chosen as one model protein to enable direct comparison of the facility of incorporation of the nucleobase amino acids with numerous other unnatural amino acids studied previously. The Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I was chosen as a representative DNA binding protein whose mode of action has been studied in detail. PMID:27452282

  18. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  19. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Molecular characterization, quantification in plasma, liver and ovary, and maturational proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Prat, Francisco; Ibáñez, A Jose; Köksoy, Sadi; Amano, Haruna; Sullivan, Craig V

    2016-01-01

    Three complete vitellogenin (Vtg) polypeptides of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), an acanthomorph teleost spawning pelagic eggs in seawater, were deduced from cDNA and identified as VtgAa, VtgAb and VtgC based on current Vtg nomenclature and phylogeny. Label free quantitative mass spectrometry verified the presence of the three sea bass Vtgs or their product yolk proteins (YPs) in liver, plasma and ovary of postvitellogenic females. As evidenced by normalized spectral counts, VtgAb-derived protein was 2- to 5-fold more abundant, depending on sample type, than for VtgAa, while VtgC-derived protein was less abundant, albeit only 3-fold lower than for VtgAb in the ovary. Western blotting with Vtg type-specific antisera raised against corresponding gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins (Lvs) detected all three types of sea bass Vtg in the blood plasma of gravid females and/or estrogenized males and showed that all three forms of sea bass Lv undergo limited partial degradation during oocyte maturation. The comparatively high levels of VtgC-derived YPs in fully-grown oocytes and the maturational proteolysis of all three types of Lv differ from what has been reported for other teleosts spawning pelagic eggs in seawater but are similar to recent findings for two species of North American Moronidae, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana), which spawn pelagic and demersal eggs, respectively in fresh water. Together with the high Vtg sequence homologies and virtually identical structural features of each type of Vtg between species, these findings indicate that the moronid multiple Vtg systems do not substantially vary with reproductive environment. PMID:26643259

  20. An Essential Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Facilitates 5′ Maturation and Translation Initiation of rps3 mRNA in Maize Mitochondria[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Manavski, Nikolay; Guyon, Virginie; Meurer, Jörg; Wienand, Udo; Brettschneider, Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are members of one of the largest nucleus-encoded protein families in plants. Here, we describe the previously uncharacterized maize (Zea mays) PPR gene, MPPR6, which was isolated from a Mutator-induced collection of maize kernel mutants by a cDNA-based forward genetic approach. Identification of a second mutant allele and cosegregation analysis confirmed correlation with the mutant phenotype. Histological investigations revealed that the mutation coincides with abnormities in the transfer cell layer, retardation of embryo development, and a considerable reduction of starch level. The function of MPPR6 is conserved across a wide phylogenetic distance as revealed by heterologous complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant in the orthologous APPR6 gene. MPPR6 appeared to be exclusively present in mitochondria. RNA coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding studies revealed a specific physical interaction of MPPR6 with the 5′ untranslated region of ribosomal protein S3 (rps3) mRNA. Mapping of transcript termini showed specifically extended rps3 5′ ends in the mppr6 mutant. Considerable reduction of mitochondrial translation was observed, indicating loss of RPS3 function. This is consistent with the appearance of truncated RPS3 protein lacking the N terminus in mppr6. Our results suggest that MPPR6 is directly involved in 5′ maturation and translation initiation of rps3 mRNA. PMID:22773745

  1. Loss of the Sec1/Munc18-family proteins VPS-33.2 and VPS-33.1 bypasses a block in endosome maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Solinger, Jachen A.; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The end of the life of a transport vesicle requires a complex series of tethering, docking, and fusion events. Tethering complexes play a crucial role in the recognition of membrane entities and bringing them into close opposition, thereby coordinating and controlling cellular trafficking events. Here we provide a comprehensive RNA interference analysis of the CORVET and HOPS tethering complexes in metazoans. Knockdown of CORVET components promoted RAB-7 recruitment to subapical membranes, whereas in HOPS knockdowns, RAB-5 was found also on membrane structures close to the cell center, indicating the RAB conversion might be impaired in the absence of these tethering complexes. Unlike in yeast, metazoans have two VPS33 homologues, which are Sec1/Munc18 (SM)-family proteins involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. We assume that in wild type, each tethering complex contains a specific SM protein but that they may be able to substitute for each other in case of absence of the other. Of importance, knockdown of both SM proteins allowed bypass of the endosome maturation block in sand-1 mutants. We propose a model in which the SM proteins in tethering complexes are required for coordinated flux of material through the endosomal system. PMID:25273556

  2. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  3. Comparison of phosphoprotein isolated from mature and immature human tooth roots.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, S P; Clarkson, B H; Feagin, F F

    1992-12-01

    Mature (average patient age = 29.5 yr, closed apical foramen) and immature (average patient age = 17.5 yr, open apical foramen) root shards were placed in dialysis tubing and demineralized to completion using either 10% disodium EDTA plus protease inhibitors or 0.6 N HCl. The demineralized shards were re-extracted (five times) with 0.05 M tris-HCl, 1.0 M NaCl and then collagenase digested. No major differences were observed in chromatograms of extracts, re-extracts or collagenase digests from root shards demineralized in either way. In contrast, chromatograms of immature and mature roots showed qualitative differences. Chromatograms of mature roots demineralized in either way showed broader protein peaks and less organic phosphorus than those from immature tooth roots. A distinct band amid degraded phosphoprotein (150 K) was found in SDS-PAGE gels (7.5%) from EDTA-extracted immature tooth roots but not from mature tooth roots. Electroelution of this band revealed a typical phosphoprotein amino-acid profile containing increased aspartic acid and serine residues. Comparison of the total phosphoprotein and amino acid composition of extracts, re-extracts and collagenase digests revealed that phosphoprotein, serine and to a lesser extent aspartic acid were recovered in greater quantities from immature roots than mature tooth roots. These data suggest that the degree of maturation is crucial to the isolation of an intact phosphoprotein and provides additional evidence that human dentine phosphoprotein undergoes amino acid compositional changes during maturation. PMID:1471954

  4. BILE ACIDS REGULATE THE ONTOGENIC EXPRESSION OF ILEAL BILE ACID BINDING PROTEIN IN THE RAT VIA THE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the rat, an increase in ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) expression occurs during the third postnatal week. In vitro studies suggest that bile acids (BAs) increase IBABP transcription by activating the BA receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Thus, we investigated the role of BAs on the on...

  5. [Effect of proteolysis inhibitors on the incorporation of labelled amino acids into proteins].

    PubMed

    Konikova, A S; Korotkina, R N

    1975-01-01

    Role of peptide bond breaks in the incorporation of amino acids into proteins in a "protein--amino acid" system is investigated. For this purpose the incorporation of labelled amino acids into trypsin under the inhibition of its autolysis by a specific inhibitor from soybean and epsilon-amino-caproic acid is studied. The trypsin inhibitor from soybean is found to suppress considerably the incorporation of 14C-glycine, 14C-lysine and 14C-methionine into crystal trypsin and not to affect the incorporation of labelled amino acids into chomotrypsin, papain and carboxypeptidase. Epsilon-Aminocaproic acid inhibited 14C-glycine incorporation into crystal trypsin by 40% and did not change its incorporation level into serum albumin. The dependency of amino acid incorporation level into trypsin on the activity of autolysis in the "protein--amino acid" system is demonstrated. PMID:1212456

  6. Retinoic acid-binding protein, rhombomeres and the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Maden, M; Hunt, P; Eriksson, U; Kuroiwa, A; Krumlauf, R; Summerbell, D

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated by immunocytochemistry the spatial and temporal distribution of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) in the developing nervous system of the chick embryo in order to answer two specific questions: do neural crest cells contain CRABP and where and when do CRABP-positive neuroblasts first arise in the neural tube? With regard to the neural crest, we have compared CRABP staining with HNK-1 staining (a marker of migrating neural crest) and found that they do indeed co-localise, but cephalic and trunk crest behave slightly differently. In the cephalic region in tissues such as the frontonasal mass and branchial arches, HNK-1 immunoreactivity is intense at early stages, but it disappears as CRABP immunoreactivity appears. Thus the two staining patterns do not overlap, but are complementary. In the trunk, HNK-1 and CRABP stain the same cell populations at the same time, such as those migrating through the anterior halves of the somites. In the neural tube, CRABP-positive neuroblasts first appear in the rhombencephalon just after the neural folds close and then a particular pattern of immunoreactivity appears within the rhombomeres of the hindbrain. Labelled cells are present in the future spinal cord, the posterior rhombencephalon up to rhombomere 6 and in rhombomere 4 thus producing a single stripe pattern. This pattern is dynamic and gradually changes as anterior rhombomeres begin to label. The similarity of this initial pattern to the arrangement of certain homeobox genes in the mouse stimulated us to examine the expression of the chicken Hox-2.9 gene. We show that at stage 15 the pattern of expression of this gene is closely related to that of CRABP. The relationship between retinoic acid, CRABP and homeobox genes is discussed. PMID:1707786

  7. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities. PMID:4029488

  8. Changes of Phosphatidylcholine and Fatty Acids in Germ Cells during Testicular Maturation in Three Developmental Male Morphotypes of Macrobrachium rosenbergii Revealed by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Siangcham, Tanapan; Chansela, Piyachat; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Sroyraya, Morakot; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Suwansa-ard, Saowaros; Engsusophon, Attakorn; Hanna, Peter J.; Sobhon, Prasert; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Testis maturation, germ cell development and function of sperm, are related to lipid composition. Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) play a key role in the structure and function of testes. As well, increases of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA), especially arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are essential for male fertility. This study is the first report to show the composition and distribution of PCs and total fatty acids (FAs) in three groups of seminiferous tubules (STs) classified by cellular associations [i.e., A (STs with mostly early germ cells), B (STs with mostly spermatids), and C (STs with spermatozoa)], in three morphotypes of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, [i.e., small male (SM), orange claw male (OC), and blue claw male (BC)]. Thin layer chromatography exhibited levels of PCs reaching maxima in STs of group B. Imaging mass spectrometry showed remarkably high signals corresponding to PC (16:0/18:1), PC (18:0/18:2), PC (18:2/20:5), and PC (16:0/22:6) in STs of groups A and B. Moreover, most signals were detected in the early developing cells and the intertubular area, but not at the area containing spermatozoa. Finally, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated that the major FAs present in the testes were composed of 14:0, 16:0, 17:0, 18:0, 16:1, 18:1, 18:2, 20:1, 20:2, 20:4, 20:5, and 22:6. The testes of OC contained the greatest amounts of these FAs while the testes of BC contained the least amounts of these FAs, and there was more EPA (20:5) in the testes of SM and OC than those in the BC. The increasing amounts of FAs in the SM and OC indicate that they are important for spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. This knowledge will be useful in formulating diets containing PUFA and HUFA for prawn broodstocks in order to improve testis development, and lead to increased male fecundity. PMID:25781176

  9. Maturation of Rhizobium leguminosarum Hydrogenase in the Presence of Oxygen Requires the Interaction of the Chaperone HypC and the Scaffolding Protein HupK*

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, Marta; Pacios, Luis F.; Manyani, Hamid; Rey, Luis; Brito, Belén; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are key enzymes for the energy and redox metabolisms of different microorganisms. Synthesis of these metalloenzymes involves a complex series of biochemical reactions catalyzed by a plethora of accessory proteins, many of them required to synthesize and insert the unique NiFe(CN)2CO cofactor. HypC is an accessory protein conserved in all [NiFe] hydrogenase systems and involved in the synthesis and transfer of the Fe(CN)2CO cofactor precursor. Hydrogenase accessory proteins from bacteria-synthesizing hydrogenase in the presence of oxygen include HupK, a scaffolding protein with a moderate sequence similarity to the hydrogenase large subunit and proposed to participate as an intermediate chaperone in the synthesis of the NiFe cofactor. The endosymbiotic bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum contains a single hydrogenase system that can be expressed under two different physiological conditions: free-living microaerobic cells (∼12 μm O2) and bacteroids from legume nodules (∼10–100 nm O2). We have used bioinformatic tools to model HupK structure and interaction of this protein with HypC. Site-directed mutagenesis at positions predicted as critical by the structural analysis have allowed the identification of HupK and HypC residues relevant for the maturation of hydrogenase. Mutant proteins altered in some of these residues show a different phenotype depending on the physiological condition tested. Modeling of HypC also predicts the existence of a stable HypC dimer whose presence was also demonstrated by immunoblot analysis. This study widens our understanding on the mechanisms for metalloenzyme biosynthesis in the presence of oxygen. PMID:24942742

  10. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field. PMID:23257901

  11. Longitudinal in vivo maturational changes of metabolites in the prefrontal cortex of rats exposed to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid in utero.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Anthony C; So, Po-Wah; Lythgoe, David J; Chege, Winfred; Cooper, Jonathan D; Williams, Steven C R; Kapur, Shitij

    2015-12-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) studies in schizophrenia patients generally report decreased levels of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), glutamate and glutathione, particularly in frontal cortex. However, these data are inconsistent in part due to confounds associated with clinical samples. The lack of validated diagnostic biomarkers also hampers analysis of the neurodevelopmental trajectory of neurochemical abnormalities. Rodent models are powerful tools to address these issues, particularly when combined with (1)H MRS (clinically comparable technology). We investigated the trajectory of metabolic changes in the prefrontal cortex during brain maturation from adolescence to adulthood in vivo using (1)H MRS in rats exposed prenatally to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (POL), a rodent model of maternal immune activation (MIA), an epidemiological risk factor for several psychiatric disorders with a neurodevelopmental origin. Longitudinal in vivo (1)H MRS revealed a significant decrease in PFC levels of GSH and taurine in adult, but not adolescent rats. Significant age×MIA interactions for PFC levels of NAA were also observed. These data replicate some deficits observed in the PFC of patients with schizophrenia. There were no significant changes in the levels of glutamate or any other metabolite. These data suggest prenatal exposure to POL leads to subtle metabolic perturbations of the normal maturing PFC, which may be related to subsequent behavioural abnormalities. Further work is however required to examine any potential confound of shipping stress on the presumed imbalances in PFC metabolites in POL-exposed offspring. Testing the interactions between MIA with stress or genetic risk variants will also be an important advance. PMID:26475576

  12. Amino acid repletion does not decrease muscle protein catabolism during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dominic S C; Adeniyi, Oladipo; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Boivin, Michel A; McClelland, Sandra; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Morgan, Nancy; Gonzales, Lawrence; Wolfe, Robert; Ferrando, Arny

    2007-06-01

    Intradialytic protein catabolism is attributed to loss of amino acids in the dialysate. We investigated the effect of amino acid infusion during hemodialysis (HD) on muscle protein turnover and amino acid transport kinetics by using stable isotopes of phenylalanine, leucine, and lysine in eight patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subjects were studied at baseline (pre-HD), 2 h of HD without amino acid infusion (HD-O), and 2 h of HD with amino acid infusion (HD+AA). Amino acid depletion during HD-O augmented the outward transport of amino acids from muscle into the vein. Increased delivery of amino acids to the leg during HD+AA facilitated the transport of amino acids from the artery into the intracellular compartment. Increase in muscle protein breakdown was more than the increase in synthesis during HD-O (46.7 vs. 22.3%, P < 0.001). Net balance (nmol.min(-1).100 ml (-1)) was more negative during HD-O compared with pre-HD (-33.7 +/- 1.5 vs. -6.0 +/- 2.3, P < 0.001). Despite an abundant supply of amino acids, the net balance (-16.9 +/- 1.8) did not switch from net release to net uptake. HD+AA induced a proportional increase in muscle protein synthesis and catabolism. Branched chain amino acid catabolism increased significantly from baseline during HD-O and did not decrease during HD+AA. Protein synthesis efficiency, the fraction of amino acid in the intracellular pool that is utilized for muscle protein synthesis decreased from 42.1% pre-HD to 33.7 and 32.6% during HD-O and HD+AA, respectively (P < 0.01). Thus amino acid repletion during HD increased muscle protein synthesis but did not decrease muscle protein breakdown. PMID:17264222

  13. Experimentally Testing the Hypothesis of a Limited Amino Acid Repertoire in Primitive Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanuma, S.; Nakajima, Y.; Yokobori, S.; Yamagishi, A.

    2013-11-01

    It has been argued that a fewer amino acids were used in primitive proteins and later the repertoire increased up to 20. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we restricted the amino acid usage of a reconstructed, ancestral protein to reduced sets.

  14. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  15. An acidic peptide sequence of nucleolin-related protein can mediate the attachment of calcium oxalate to renal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Elena A; Wesson, Jeffrey A; Kleinman, Jack G

    2004-08-01

    Crystals that form in tubular fluid must be retained in the kidney to become stones. Nucleolin-related protein (NRP) is found on the surface of inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells in culture (cIMCD) and selectively adsorbs to calcium oxalate (CaOx). We proposed that NRP mediates attachment to the renal tubular epithelium of Ca stone crystals through an electrostatic interaction with a highly acidic region (acidic fragment [AF]) similar to those of other proteins that have been reported to affect urinary crystal formation. The current studies demonstrate that nucleolin is expressed on both apical and basolateral cell surfaces of cIMCD, reaching a peak in the late stages of mitosis and gradually declining to undetectable levels with maturation of the polarized epithelium. Scraping areas of mature monolayers stimulated the cells surrounding the defects to migrate and proliferate so as to repair them, and these areas demonstrate surface NRP expression and enhanced attachment of CaOx monohydrate crystals. Surface expression of the NRP AF was produced by cloning the NRP AF into a display vector. Transfected cIMCD demonstrating copious surface expression of AF enhanced CaOx attachment 6.7-fold compared with control cIMCD, whereas cells transfected with a vector without the AF did not differ from control. AF was also cloned into a replication-deficient adenovirus and expressed in 293 cells, resulting in AF secretion into the nutrient medium. This medium inhibited CaOx attachment to cIMCD, compared with conditioned medium from cells infected with wild-type virus. These results demonstrate that surface-bound AF can mediate CaOx attachment and that secreted AF can inhibit attachment. These results support the notion that surface-associated NRP could mediate attachment of CaOx to the renal tubule epithelium, thereby causing retention of crystals that might eventually become kidney stones. PMID:15284292

  16. Interaction of perfluoroalkyl acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Nan; Li, Juan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Aiqian; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent and bioaccumulative, resulting in their broad distribution in humans and the environment. The liver is an important target for PFAAs, but the mechanisms behind PFAAs interaction with hepatocyte proteins remain poorly understood. We characterized the binding of PFAAs to human liver fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) and identified critical structural features in their interaction. The binding interaction of PFAAs with hL-FABP was determined by fluorescence displacement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay. Molecular simulation was conducted to define interactions at the binding sites. ITC measurement revealed that PFOA/PFNA displayed a moderate affinity for hL-FABP at a 1:1 molar ratio, a weak binding affinity for PFHxS and no binding for PFHxA. Moreover, the interaction was mainly mediated by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. Substitution of Asn111 with Asp caused loss of binding affinity to PFAA, indicating its crucial role for the initial PFAA binding to the outer binding site. Substitution of Arg122 with Gly caused only one molecule of PFAA to bind to hL-FABP. Molecular simulation showed that substitution of Arg122 increased the volume of the outer binding pocket, making it impossible to form intensive hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonds with PFOA, and highlighting its crucial role in the binding process. The binding affinity of PFAAs increased significantly with their carbon number. Arg122 and Asn111 played a pivotal role in these interactions. Our findings may help understand the distribution pattern, bioaccumulation, elimination, and toxicity of PFAAs in humans. PMID:25370009

  17. Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Bermuda Grass During Water Stress 12

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, N. M.; Naylor, A. W.

    1966-01-01

    The ability of Arizona Common and Coastal Bermuda grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] to synthesize amino acids and proteins during water stress was investigated. Amino acids were continually synthesized during the water stress treatments, but protein synthesis was inhibited and protein levels decreased. Water stress induced a 10- to 100-fold accumulation of free proline in shoots and a 2- to 6-fold accumulation of free asparagine, both of which are characteristic responses of water-stressed plants. Valine levels increased, and glutamic acid and alanine levels decreased. 14C labeling experiments showed that free proline turns over more slowly than any other free amino acid during water stress. This proline is readily synthesized and accumulated from glutamic acid. It is suggested that during water stress free proline functions as a storage compound. No significant differences were found in the amino acid and protein metabolism of the 2 varieties of Bermuda grass. PMID:16656387

  18. Snake venom. The amino acid sequence of protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, D J

    1980-12-01

    Protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom comprises 81 amino acids, including ten half-cystine residues. The complete primary structures of protein A and its variant A' were elucidated. The sequences of proteins A and A', which differ in a single position, show no homology with various neurotoxins and non-neurotoxic proteins and represent a new type of elapid venom protein. PMID:7461607

  19. STRUCTURES AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF STARCH FROM IMMATURE SEEDS OF SOYBEAN VARIETIES (GLYCINE MAX (L.) MERR.) EXHIBITING NORMAL, LOW-LINOLENIC OR LOW-SATURATED FATTY ACID OIL PROFILES AT MATURITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean variety exhibiting at maturity, normal (NM), low-linolenic (LL) or low-saturate (LS) fatty acid seed oil composition had starch structure and functional properties studied from seeds collected 20 days prior to harvest. Soybean starch had small granules (0.4-4.5 micrometers diameter), and CB...

  20. Phenotypic Stability, Matrix Elaboration, and Functional Maturation of Nucleus Pulposus Cells Encapsulated in Photocrosslinkable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwa; Martin, John T.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of the nucleus pulposus (NP) is an early hallmark of intervertebral disc degeneration. The capacity for endogenous regeneration in the NP is limited due to the low cellularity and poor nutrient supply of this avascular tissue. Towards restoring the NP, a number of biomaterials have been explored for cell delivery. These materials must support the NP cell phenotype while promoting the elaboration of an NP-like extracellular matrix in the shortest possible time. Our previous work with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that hydrogels based on hyaluronic acid (HA) are effective at promoting matrix production and the development of functional material properties. However, this material has not been evaluated in the context of NP cells. Therefore, to test this material for NP regeneration, bovine NP cells were encapsulated in 1% w/vol HA hydrogels at either a low seeding density (20 × 106 cells/ml) or a high seeding density (60 × 106 cells/ml), and constructs were cultured over an 8 week period. These engineered NP cell-laden HA hydrogels showed functional matrix accumulation, with increasing matrix content and mechanical properties with time in culture at both seeding densities. Furthermore, encapsulated cells showed NP-specific gene expression profiles that were significantly higher than expanded NP cells prior to encapsulation, suggesting a restoration of phenotype. Interestingly, these levels were higher at the lower seeding density compared to the higher seeding density. These findings support the use of HA-based hydrogels for NP tissue engineering and cellular therapies directed at restoration or replacement of the endogenous NP. PMID:25448344

  1. Differential transcriptional regulation of L-ascorbic acid content in peel and pulp of citrus fruits during development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, María J; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Citrus fruits are an important source of ascorbic acid (AsA) for human nutrition, but the main pathways involved in its biosynthesis and their regulation are still not fully characterized. To study the transcriptional regulation of AsA accumulation, expression levels of 13 genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, 5 in recycling and 5 in degradation were analyzed in peel and pulp of fruit of two varieties with different AsA concentration: Navel orange (Citrus sinensis) and Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu). AsA accumulation in peel and pulp correlated with the transcriptional profiling of the L-galactose pathway genes, and the myo-inositol pathway appeared to be also relevant in the peel of immature-green orange. Differences in AsA content between varieties were associated with differential gene expression of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), myo-inositol oxygenase in peel, and GGP and GPP in pulp. Relative expressions of monodehydroascorbate reductase 3 (MDHAR3) and dehydroascorbate reductase1 (DHAR1) correlated with AsA accumulation during development and ripening in peel and pulp, respectively, and were more highly expressed in the variety with higher AsA contents. Collectively, results indicated a differential regulation of AsA concentration in peel and pulp of citrus fruits that may change during the different stages of fruit development. The L-galactose pathway appears to be predominant in both tissues, but AsA concentration is regulated by complex mechanisms in which degradation and recycling also play important roles. PMID:24567029

  2. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  3. Studies on the high-sulphur proteins of reduced Merino wool. Amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4

    PubMed Central

    Swart, L. S.; Haylett, T.

    1971-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 is presented. It is closely related to the sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB3 (Haylett, Swart & Parris, 1971) differing in only four positions. The peptic and thermolysin peptides of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 were analysed by the dansyl–Edman method (Gray, 1967) and by tritium-labelling of C-terminal residues (Matsuo, Fujimoto & Tatsuno, 1966). This protein is the third member of a group of high-sulphur wool proteins with molecular weight of about 11400. It consists of 98 residues and has acetylalanine and carboxymethylcysteine as N- and C-terminal residues respectively. PMID:4942536

  4. LEUCINE STIMULATION OF SKELETAL MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS DURING PROLONGED LEUCINE INFUSION IS DEPENDENT ON AMINO ACID AVAILABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine stimulates protein synthesis in cultured cells, mature rats and neonatal pigs. We have reported that leucine infusion increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs during a 60-min infusion. When leucine infusion was prolonged for 120 min, however, protein synthesis was no...

  5. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  6. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  7. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  8. L Particles Transmit Viral Proteins from Herpes Simplex Virus 1-Infected Mature Dendritic Cells to Uninfected Bystander Cells, Inducing CD83 Downmodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Mirko; Mühl-Zürbes, Petra; Drassner, Christina; Daniel, Christoph; Klewer, Monika; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mature dendritic cells (mDCs) are known as the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) since they are also able to prime/induce naive T cells. Thus, mDCs play a pivotal role during the induction of antiviral immune responses. Remarkably, the cell surface molecule CD83, which was shown to have costimulatory properties, is targeted by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for viral immune escape. Infection of mDCs with HSV-1 results in downmodulation of CD83, resulting in reduced T cell stimulation. In this study, we report that not only infected mDCs but also uninfected bystander cells in an infected culture show a significant CD83 reduction. We demonstrate that this effect is independent of phagocytosis and transmissible from infected to uninfected mDCs. The presence of specific viral proteins found in these uninfected bystander cells led to the hypothesis that viral proteins are transferred from infected to uninfected cells via L particles. These L particles are generated during lytic replication in parallel with full virions, called H particles. L particles contain viral proteins but lack the viral capsid and DNA. Therefore, these particles are not infectious but are able to transfer several viral proteins. Incubation of mDCs with L particles indeed reduced CD83 expression on uninfected bystander DCs, providing for the first time evidence that functional viral proteins are transmitted via L particles from infected mDCs to uninfected bystander cells, thereby inducing CD83 downmodulation. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 has evolved a number of strategies to evade the host's immune system. Among others, HSV-1 infection of mDCs results in an inhibited T cell activation caused by degradation of CD83. Interestingly, CD83 is lost not only from HSV-1-infected mDCs but also from uninfected bystander cells. The release of so-called L particles, which contain several viral proteins but lack capsid and DNA, during infection is a common phenomenon observed among several viruses, such

  9. The "Jekyll and Hyde" Actions of Nucleic Acids on the Prion-like Aggregation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jerson L; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2016-07-22

    Protein misfolding results in devastating degenerative diseases and cancer. Among the culprits involved in these illnesses are prions and prion-like proteins, which can propagate by converting normal proteins to the wrong conformation. For spongiform encephalopathies, a real prion can be transmitted among individuals. In other disorders, the bona fide prion characteristics are still under investigation. Besides inducing misfolding of native proteins, prions bind nucleic acids and other polyanions. Here, we discuss how nucleic acid binding might influence protein misfolding for both disease-related and benign, functional prions and why the line between bad and good amyloids might be more subtle than previously thought. PMID:27288413

  10. Biophysical and computational methods to analyze amino acid interaction networks in proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Gorman, Scott D; Boehr, David D

    2016-01-01

    Globular proteins are held together by interacting networks of amino acid residues. A number of different structural and computational methods have been developed to interrogate these amino acid networks. In this review, we describe some of these methods, including analyses of X-ray crystallographic data and structures, computer simulations, NMR data, and covariation among protein sequences, and indicate the critical insights that such methods provide into protein function. This information can be leveraged towards the design of new allosteric drugs, and the engineering of new protein function and protein regulation strategies. PMID:27441044

  11. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-07-10

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  12. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-07

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  13. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  14. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  15. AMINO ACIDS AUGMENT MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN NEONATAL PIGS DURING ENDOTOXEMIA BY MODULATING TRANSLATION INITIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adults, sepsis reduces protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by restraining translation. The effect of sepsis on amino acid-stimulated muscle protein synthesis has not been determined in neonates, a population who is highly anabolic and whose muscle protein synthesis rates are uniquely sensitive ...

  16. Improved method for simultaneous isolation of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chey, Soroth; Claus, Claudia; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2011-04-01

    Guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction (GTPC extraction) is widely used in molecular biology for isolating DNA, RNA, and proteins. Protein isolation by commercially available GTPC solutions is time consuming and the resulting pellets are only incompletely soluble. In this study ethanol-bromochloropropane-water was used for precipitation of proteins from the phenol-ethanol phase after GTPC extraction of RNA and DNA. The precipitated proteins can be readily dissolved in 4% SDS for subsequent analysis. This technique allows a fast (30min) and efficient (with a protein recovery of up to 95%) extraction of proteins for the study of transcriptional and posttranscriptional events from the same sample. PMID:21094121

  17. Novel humic acid-bonded magnetite nanoparticles for protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Bayrakci, Mevlut; Gezici, Orhan; Bas, Salih Zeki; Ozmen, Mustafa; Maltas, Esra

    2014-09-01

    The present paper is the first report that introduces (i) a useful methodology for chemical immobilization of humic acid (HA) to aminopropyltriethoxysilane-functionalized magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles (APS-MNPs) and (ii) human serum albumin (HSA) binding to the obtained material (HA-APS-MNPs). The newly prepared magnetite nanoparticle was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Results indicated that surface modification of the bare magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and HA was successfully performed. The protein binding studies that were evaluated in batch mode exhibited that HA-APS-MNPs could be efficiently used as a substrate for the binding of HSA from aqueous solutions. Usually, recovery values higher than 90% were found to be feasible by HA-APS-MNPs, while that value was around 2% and 70% in the cases of MNPs and APS-MNPs, respectively. Hence, the capacity of MNPs was found to be significantly improved by immobilization of HA. Furthermore, thermal degradation of HA-APS-MNPs and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs was evaluated in terms of the Horowitz-Metzger equation in order to determine kinetic parameters for thermal decomposition. Activation energies calculated for HA-APS-MNPs (20.74 kJmol(-1)) and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs (33.42 kJmol(-1)) implied chemical immobilization of HA to APS-MNPs, and tight interactions between HA and HA-APS-MNPs. PMID:25063152

  18. Expression of liver fatty acid binding protein in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Ferrell, Linda D; Gill, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Loss of expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) by immunohistochemistry has been shown to be characteristic of a subset of hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs) in which HNF1A is inactivated. Transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma is thought to be a very rare phenomenon in the HNF1A-inactivated variant of HCA. However, we recently observed 2 cases at our institution, 1 definite hepatocellular carcinoma and 1 possible hepatocellular carcinoma, with loss of LFABP staining, raising the possibility that LFABP down-regulation may be associated with hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Our aim was to evaluate hepatocellular carcinomas arising in various backgrounds and with varying degrees of differentiation for loss of LFABP staining. Twenty total cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were examined. Thirteen cases arose in a background of cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (n = 8) or steatohepatitis (n = 5); 7 cases arose in a noncirrhotic background, with 2 cases arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA and 2 cases arising within inflammatory variant HCA. Complete loss of expression of LFABP was seen in 6 of 20 cases, including 2 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma arising within HNF1A-inactivated variant HCA. Thus, loss of staining for LFABP appears to be common in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be seen in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, LFABP loss should not be interpreted as evidence for hepatocellular adenoma over carcinoma, when other features support a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The findings raise consideration for a role of HNF1A inactivation in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, particularly in less differentiated tumors. PMID:26997447

  19. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  20. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  1. Development of myoglobin concentration and acid buffering capacity in harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals from birth to maturity.

    PubMed

    Lestyk, Keri C; Folkow, L P; Blix, A S; Hammill, M O; Burns, J M

    2009-11-01

    Pinnipeds rely on muscle oxygen stores to help support aerobic diving, therefore muscle maturation may influence the behavioral ecology of young pinnipeds. To investigate the pattern of muscle development, myoglobin concentration ([Mb]) and acid buffering ability (beta) was measured in ten muscles from 23 harp and 40 hooded seals of various ages. Adult [Mb] ranged from 28-97 to 35-104 mg g tissue(-1) in harp and hooded seals, respectively, with values increasing from the cervical, non-swimming muscles to the main swimming muscles of the lumbar region. Neonatal and weaned pup muscles exhibited lower (approximately 30% adult values) and less variable [Mb] across the body than adults. In contrast, adult beta showed little regional variation (60-90 slykes), while high pup values (approximately 75% adult values) indicate significant in utero development. These findings suggest that intra-uterine conditions are sufficiently hypoxic to stimulate prenatal beta development, but that [Mb] development requires additional postnatal signal such as exercise, and/or growth factors. However, because of limited development in both beta and [Mb] during the nursing period, pups are weaned with muscles with lower aerobic and anaerobic capacities than those of adults. PMID:19565249

  2. Effects of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1A and -4A on pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein and C-reactive protein gene expression: implications for maturity-onset diabetes of the young

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a significant clinical overlap between patients with hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1A and HNF4A maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), two forms of monogenic diabetes. HNF1A and HNF4A are transcription factors that control common and partly overlapping sets of target genes. We have previously shown that elevated serum pancreatic stone protein / regenerating protein A (PSP/reg1A) levels can be detected in subjects with HNF1A-MODY. In this study, we investigated whether PSP/reg is differentially regulated by HNF1A and HNF4A. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting were used to validate gene and protein expression in cellular models of HNF1A- and HNF4A-MODY. Serum PSP/reg1A levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured by ELISA in 31 HNF1A- and 9 HNF4A-MODY subjects. The two groups were matched for age, body mass index, diabetes duration, blood pressure, lipid profile and aspirin and statin use. Results Inducible repression of HNF1A and HNF4A function in INS-1 cells suggested that PSP/reg induction required HNF4A, but not HNF1A. In contrast, crp gene expression was significantly reduced by repression of HNF1A, but not HNF4A function. PSP/reg levels were significantly lower in HNF4A subjects when compared to HNF1A subjects [9.25 (7.85-12.85) ng/ml vs. 12.5 (10.61-17.87) ng/ml, U-test P = 0.025]. hsCRP levels were significantly lower in HNF1A-MODY [0.22 (0.17-0.35) mg/L] compared to HNF4A-MODY group [0.81 (0.38-1.41) mg/L, U-test P = 0.002], Parallel measurements of serum PSP/reg1A and hsCRP levels were able to discriminate HNF1A- and HNF4A-MODY subjects. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that two distinct target genes, PSP/reg and crp, are differentially regulated by HNF1A and HNF4A, and provides clinical proof-of-concept that serum PSP/reg1A and hsCRP levels may distinguish HNF1A-MODY from HNF4A-MODY subjects. PMID:23803251

  3. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  4. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  5. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) for Detecting Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, Lance M.; Fried, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) is used to detect protein complexes with nucleic acids. It is the core technology underlying a wide range of qualitative and quantitative analyses for the characterization of interacting systems. In the classical assay, solutions of protein and nucleic acid are combined and the resulting mixtures are subjected to electrophoresis under native conditions through polyacrylamide or agarose gel. After electrophoresis, the distribution of species containing nucleic acid is determined, usually by autoradiography of 32P-labeled nucleic acid. In general, protein-nucleic acid complexes migrate more slowly than the corresponding free nucleic acid. In this article, we identify the most important factors that determine the stabilities and electrophoretic mobilities of complexes under assay conditions. A representative protocol is provided and commonly used variants are discussed. Expected outcomes are briefly described. References to extensions of the method and a troubleshooting guide are provided. PMID:17703195

  6. Effect of liver fatty acid binding protein on fatty acid movement between liposomes and rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, M; Brecher, P

    1987-01-01

    Although movement of fatty acids between bilayers can occur spontaneously, it has been postulated that intracellular movement is facilitated by a class of proteins named fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). In this study we have incorporated long chain fatty acids into multilamellar liposomes made of phosphatidylcholine, incubated them with rat liver microsomes containing an active acyl-CoA synthetase, and measured formation of acyl-CoA in the absence or presence of FABP purified from rat liver. FABP increased about 2-fold the accumulation of acyl-CoA when liposomes were the fatty acid donor. Using fatty acid incorporated into liposomes made either of egg yolk lecithin or of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, it was found that the temperature dependence of acyl-CoA accumulation in the presence of FABP correlated with both the physical state of phospholipid molecules in the liposomes and the binding of fatty acid to FABP, suggesting that fatty acid must first desorb from the liposomes before FABP can have an effect. An FABP-fatty acid complex incubated with microsomes, in the absence of liposomes, resulted in greater acyl-CoA formation than when liposomes were present, suggesting that desorption of fatty acid from the membrane is rate-limiting in the accumulation of acyl-CoA by this system. Finally, an equilibrium dialysis cell separating liposomes from microsomes on opposite sides of a Nuclepore filter was used to show that liver FABP was required for the movement and activation of fatty acid between the compartments. These studies show that liver FABP interacts with fatty acid that desorbs from phospholipid bilayers, and promotes movement to a membrane-bound enzyme, suggesting that FABP may act intracellularly by increasing net desorption of fatty acid from cell membranes. PMID:3446187

  7. Fatty acid binding protein 4 is a target of VEGF and a regulator of cell proliferation in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Elmasri, Harun; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Teper, Yaroslav; Ghelfi, Elisa; Weng, MeiQian; Ince, Tan A.; Kozakewich, Harry; Bischoff, Joyce; Cataltepe, Sule

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) plays an important role in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis. FABP4 has been primarily regarded as an adipocyte- and macrophage-specific protein, but recent studies suggest that it may be more widely expressed. We found strong FABP4 expression in the endothelial cells (ECs) of capillaries and small veins in several mouse and human tissues, including the heart and kidney. FABP4 was also detected in the ECs of mature human placental vessels and infantile hemangiomas, the most common tumor of infancy and ECs. In most of these cases, FABP4 was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. FABP4 mRNA and protein levels were significantly induced in cultured ECs by VEGF-A and bFGF treatment. The effect of VEGF-A on FABP4 expression was inhibited by chemical inhibition or short-hairpin (sh) RNA-mediated knockdown of VEGF-receptor-2 (R2), whereas the VEGFR1 agonists, placental growth factors 1 and 2, had no effect on FABP4 expression. Knockdown of FABP4 in ECs significantly reduced proliferation both under baseline conditions and in response to VEGF and bFGF. Thus, FABP4 emerged as a novel target of the VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway and a positive regulator of cell proliferation in ECs.—Elmasri, H., Karaaslan, C., Teper, Y., Ghelfi, E., Weng, M., Ince, T. A., Kozakewich, H., Bischoff, J., Cataltepe, S. Fatty acid binding protein 4 is a target of VEGF and a regulator of cell proliferation in endothelial cells. PMID:19625659

  8. Low Density Lipoprotein-Receptor Related Protein 1 Is Differentially Expressed by Neuronal and Glial Populations in the Developing and Mature Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Auderset, Loic; Cullen, Carlie L.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein-receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic cell surface receptor that is known to interact with a variety of ligands, intracellular adaptor proteins and other cell surface receptors to regulate cellular behaviours ranging from proliferation to cell fate specification, migration, axon guidance, and lipid metabolism. A number of studies have demonstrated that LRP1 is expressed in the brain, yet it is unclear which central nervous system cell types express LRP1 during development and in adulthood. Herein we undertake a detailed study of LRP1 expression within the mouse brain and spinal cord, examining a number of developmental stages ranging from embryonic day 13.5 to postnatal day 60. We report that LRP1 expression in the brain peaks during postnatal development. On a cellular level, LRP1 is expressed by radial glia, neuroblasts, microglia, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), astrocytes and neurons, with the exception of parvalbumin+ interneurons in the cortex. Most cell populations exhibit stable expression of LRP1 throughout development; however, the proportion of OPCs that express LRP1 increases significantly from ~69% at E15.5 to ~99% in adulthood. We also report that LRP1 expression is rapidly lost as OPCs differentiate, and is absent from all oligodendrocytes, including newborn oligodendrocytes. While LRP1 function has been primarily examined in mature neurons, these expression data suggest it plays a more critical role in glial cell regulation–where expression levels are much higher. PMID:27280679

  9. Low Density Lipoprotein-Receptor Related Protein 1 Is Differentially Expressed by Neuronal and Glial Populations in the Developing and Mature Mouse Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Auderset, Loic; Cullen, Carlie L; Young, Kaylene M

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein-receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic cell surface receptor that is known to interact with a variety of ligands, intracellular adaptor proteins and other cell surface receptors to regulate cellular behaviours ranging from proliferation to cell fate specification, migration, axon guidance, and lipid metabolism. A number of studies have demonstrated that LRP1 is expressed in the brain, yet it is unclear which central nervous system cell types express LRP1 during development and in adulthood. Herein we undertake a detailed study of LRP1 expression within the mouse brain and spinal cord, examining a number of developmental stages ranging from embryonic day 13.5 to postnatal day 60. We report that LRP1 expression in the brain peaks during postnatal development. On a cellular level, LRP1 is expressed by radial glia, neuroblasts, microglia, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), astrocytes and neurons, with the exception of parvalbumin+ interneurons in the cortex. Most cell populations exhibit stable expression of LRP1 throughout development; however, the proportion of OPCs that express LRP1 increases significantly from ~69% at E15.5 to ~99% in adulthood. We also report that LRP1 expression is rapidly lost as OPCs differentiate, and is absent from all oligodendrocytes, including newborn oligodendrocytes. While LRP1 function has been primarily examined in mature neurons, these expression data suggest it plays a more critical role in glial cell regulation-where expression levels are much higher. PMID:27280679

  10. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yotsui, Izumi; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Saruhashi, Masashi; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Quatrano, Ralph S; Sakata, Yoichi

    2016-03-18

    Desiccation tolerance is an ancestral feature of land plants and is still retained in non-vascular plants such as bryophytes and some vascular plants. However, except for seeds and spores, this trait is absent in vegetative tissues of vascular plants. Although many studies have focused on understanding the molecular basis underlying desiccation tolerance using transcriptome and proteome approaches, the critical molecular differences between desiccation tolerant plants and non-desiccation plants are still not clear. The moss Physcomitrella patens cannot survive rapid desiccation under laboratory conditions, but if cells of the protonemata are treated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) prior to desiccation, it can survive 24 h exposure to desiccation and regrow after rehydration. The desiccation tolerance induced by ABA (AiDT) is specific to this hormone, but also depends on a plant transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3). Here we report the comparative proteomic analysis of AiDT between wild type and ABI3 deleted mutant (Δabi3) of P. patens using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification). From a total of 1980 unique proteins that we identified, only 16 proteins are significantly altered in Δabi3 compared to wild type after desiccation following ABA treatment. Among this group, three of the four proteins that were severely affected in Δabi3 tissue were Arabidopsis orthologous genes, which were expressed in maturing seeds under the regulation of ABI3. These included a Group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, a short-chain dehydrogenase, and a desiccation-related protein. Our results suggest that at least three of these proteins expressed in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and the moss are very likely to play important roles in acquisition of desiccation tolerance in land plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the regulatory machinery of ABA- and ABI3-mediated gene expression for desiccation

  11. Tsetse Salivary Gland Proteins 1 and 2 Are High Affinity Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins with Residual Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Ridder, Karin De; Stijlemans, Benoît; Coosemans, Marc; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans) saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2) display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with KD values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents. PMID:23110062

  12. Enhanced Bio-hydrogen Production from Protein Wastewater by Altering Protein Structure and Amino Acids Acidification Type

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Naidong; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Aihui; Feng, Leiyu

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced bio-hydrogen production from protein wastewater by altering protein structure and amino acids acidification type via pH control was investigated. The hydrogen production reached 205.2 mL/g-protein when protein wastewater was pretreated at pH 12 and then fermented at pH 10. The mechanism studies showed that pH 12 pretreatment significantly enhanced protein bio-hydrolysis during the subsequent fermentation stage as it caused the unfolding of protein, damaged the protein hydrogen bonding networks, and destroyed the disulfide bridges, which increased the susceptibility of protein to protease. Moreover, pH 10 fermentation produced more acetic but less propionic acid during the anaerobic fermentation of amino acids, which was consistent with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Further analyses of the critical enzymes, genes, and microorganisms indicated that the activity and abundance of hydrogen producing bacteria in the pH 10 fermentation reactor were greater than those in the control. PMID:24495932

  13. Enhanced Bio-hydrogen Production from Protein Wastewater by Altering Protein Structure and Amino Acids Acidification Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Naidong; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Aihui; Feng, Leiyu

    2014-02-01

    Enhanced bio-hydrogen production from protein wastewater by altering protein structure and amino acids acidification type via pH control was investigated. The hydrogen production reached 205.2 mL/g-protein when protein wastewater was pretreated at pH 12 and then fermented at pH 10. The mechanism studies showed that pH 12 pretreatment significantly enhanced protein bio-hydrolysis during the subsequent fermentation stage as it caused the unfolding of protein, damaged the protein hydrogen bonding networks, and destroyed the disulfide bridges, which increased the susceptibility of protein to protease. Moreover, pH 10 fermentation produced more acetic but less propionic acid during the anaerobic fermentation of amino acids, which was consistent with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Further analyses of the critical enzymes, genes, and microorganisms indicated that the activity and abundance of hydrogen producing bacteria in the pH 10 fermentation reactor were greater than those in the control.

  14. Embryonic Corneal Schwann Cells Express Some Schwann Cell Marker mRNAs, but No Mature Schwann Cell Marker Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Abigail H.; Albrecht, Michael; Pettit-Scott, Maya; Conrad, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Embryonic chick nerves encircle the cornea in pericorneal tissue until embryonic day (E)9, then penetrate the anterior corneal stroma, invade the epithelium, and branch over the corneal surface through E20. Adult corneal nerves, cut during transplantation or LASIK, never fully regenerate. Schwann cells (SCs) protect nerve fibers and augment nerve repair. This study evaluates SC differentiation in embryonic chick corneas. Methods Fertile chicken eggs were incubated from E0 at 38°C, 45% humidity. Dissected permeabilized corneas plus pericorneal tissue were immunostained for SC marker proteins. Other corneas were paraffin embedded, sectioned, and processed by in situ hybridization for corneal-, nerve-related, and SC marker gene expression. E9 to E20 corneas, dissected from pericorneal tissue, were assessed by real-time PCR (QPCR) for mRNA expression. Results QPCR revealed unchanging low to moderate SLIT2/ROBO and NTN/UNC5 family, BACE1, and CADM3/CADM4 expressions, but high NEO1 expression. EGR2 and POU3F1 expressions never surpassed PAX3 expression. ITGNA6/IT-GNB4 expressions increased 20-fold; ITGNB1 expression was high. SC marker S100 and MBP expressions increased; MAG, GFAP, and SCMP expressions were very low. Antibodies against the MPZ, MAG, S100, and SCMP proteins immunostained along pericorneal nerves, but not along corneal nerves. In the cornea, SLIT2 and SOX10 mRNAs were expressed in anterior stroma and epithelium, whereas PAX3, S100, MBP, and MPZL1 mRNAs were expressed only in corneal epithelium. Conclusions Embryonic chick corneas contain SCs, as defined by SOX10 and PAX3 transcription, which remain immature, at least in part because of stromal transcriptional and epithelial translational regulation of some SC marker gene expression. PMID:19387082

  15. Fatty acid binding protein 4 is a target of VEGF and a regulator of cell proliferation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elmasri, Harun; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Teper, Yaroslav; Ghelfi, Elisa; Weng, Meiqian; Ince, Tan A; Kozakewich, Harry; Bischoff, Joyce; Cataltepe, Sule

    2009-11-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) plays an important role in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis. FABP4 has been primarily regarded as an adipocyte- and macrophage-specific protein, but recent studies suggest that it may be more widely expressed. We found strong FABP4 expression in the endothelial cells (ECs) of capillaries and small veins in several mouse and human tissues, including the heart and kidney. FABP4 was also detected in the ECs of mature human placental vessels and infantile hemangiomas, the most common tumor of infancy and ECs. In most of these cases, FABP4 was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. FABP4 mRNA and protein levels were significantly induced in cultured ECs by VEGF-A and bFGF treatment. The effect of VEGF-A on FABP4 expression was inhibited by chemical inhibition or short-hairpin (sh) RNA-mediated knockdown of VEGF-receptor-2 (R2), whereas the VEGFR1 agonists, placental growth factors 1 and 2, had no effect on FABP4 expression. Knockdown of FABP4 in ECs significantly reduced proliferation both under baseline conditions and in response to VEGF and bFGF. Thus, FABP4 emerged as a novel target of the VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway and a positive regulator of cell proliferation in ECs. PMID:19625659

  16. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as "junk" sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in shaping

  17. Bioconjugation of therapeutic proteins and enzymes using the expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed striking progress in the development of bioorthogonal reactions that are strictly directed towards intended sites in biomolecules while avoiding interference by a number of physical and chemical factors in biological environment. Efforts to exploit bioorthogonal reactions in protein conjugation have led to the evolution of protein translational machineries and the expansion of genetic codes that systematically incorporate a range of non-natural amino acids containing bioorthogonal groups into recombinant proteins in a site-specific manner. Chemoselective conjugation of proteins has begun to find valuable applications to previously inaccessible problems. In this review, we describe bioorthogonal reactions useful for protein conjugation, and biosynthetic methods that produce proteins amenable to those reactions through an expanded genetic code. We then provide key examples in which novel protein conjugates, generated by the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and the chemoselective reactions, address unmet needs in protein therapeutics and enzyme engineering. PMID:26036278

  18. Proximity-enabled protein crosslinking through genetically encoding haloalkane unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Lacey, Vanessa K; Ren, Haiyan; Xu, Jing; Burban, David J; Jennings, Patricia A; Wang, Lei

    2014-02-17

    The selective generation of covalent bonds between and within proteins would provide new avenues for studying protein function and engineering proteins with new properties. New covalent bonds were genetically introduced into proteins by enabling an unnatural amino acid (Uaa) to selectively react with a proximal natural residue. This proximity-enabled bioreactivity was expanded to a series of haloalkane Uaas. Orthogonal tRNA/synthetase pairs were evolved to incorporate these Uaas, which only form a covalent thioether bond with cysteine when positioned in close proximity. By using the Uaa and cysteine, spontaneous covalent bond formation was demonstrated between an affibody and its substrate Z protein, thereby leading to irreversible binding, and within the affibody to increase its thermostability. This strategy of proximity-enabled protein crosslinking (PEPC) may be generally expanded to target different natural amino acids, thus providing diversity and flexibility in covalent bond formation for protein research and protein engineering. PMID:24449339

  19. Cellular retinol-binding protein and retinoic acid-binding protein in rat testes: effect of retinol depletion.

    PubMed

    Ong, D E; Tsai, C H; Chytil, F

    1976-02-01

    Testes of rats contain two cellular binding proteins of interest in vitamin A metabolism. One protein binds retinoic acid with high specificity; the other binds retinol with high specificity. When the cellular retinol-binding protein was partially purified from rat testes, it exhibited fluorescence excitation and emission spectra similar to that of all-trans-retinol in hexane. Exposure of this preparation to UV light destroyed this fluorescence but spectra identical to the original were obtained after addition of retinol. Hexane extracts of the binding protein had fluorescence spectra identical to all-trans-retinol, suggesting that this compound is bound to the protein in vivo. Extracts of testes from retinol depleted rats were submitted to gel filtration but failed to show a retinol-like fluorescence at the elution position of retinol binding protein. This fluorescence was observed in the preparations from pair fed control animals. However, after addition of all-trans-retinol to the extracts from the depleted rats, fluorescence at that elution position was observed. This indicates that in testes of retinol depleted rats the cellular retinol binding protein is present but without bound retinol, in contrast to the non-depleted rats where 30-43% of the binding protein had bound retinol. The amounts of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid binding protein in testes, as determined by sucrose gradient centrifugation, were found to be similar for retinol depleted and pair fed control rats. PMID:942996

  20. Possible involvement of lipoic acid in binding protein-dependent transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Richarme, G

    1985-04-01

    We describe the properties of the binding protein dependent-transport of ribose, galactose, and maltose and of the lactose permease, and the phosphoenolpyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase transport systems in a strain of Escherichia coli which is deficient in the synthesis of lipoic acid, a cofactor involved in alpha-keto acid dehydrogenation. Such a strain can grow in the absence of lipoic acid in minimal medium supplemented with acetate and succinate. Although the lactose permease and the phosphoenolypyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase are not affected by lipoic acid deprivation, the binding protein-dependent transports are reduced by 70% in conditions of lipoic acid deprivation when compared with their activity in conditions of lipoic acid supply. The remaining transport is not affected by arsenate but is inhibited by the uncoupler carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone; however the lipoic acid-dependent transport is completely inhibited by arsenate and only weakly inhibited by carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone. The known inhibitor of alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases, 5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, completely inhibits all binding protein-dependent transports whether in conditions of lipoic supply or deprivation; the results suggest a possible relation between binding protein-dependent transport and alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases and shed light on the inhibition of these transports by arsenicals and uncouplers. PMID:3920206

  1. Maize Brittle stalk2 encodes a COBRA-like protein expressed in early organ development but required for tissue flexibility at maturity.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Anoop; Langewisch, Tiffany; Olek, Anna; Multani, Dilbag S; McCann, Maureen C; Vermerris, Wilfred; Carpita, Nicholas C; Johal, Gurmukh

    2007-12-01

    The maize (Zea mays) brittle stalk2 (bk2) is a recessive mutant, the aerial parts of which are easily broken. The bk2 phenotype is developmentally regulated and appears 4 weeks after planting, at about the fifth-leaf stage. Before this time, mutants are indistinguishable from wild-type siblings. Afterward, all organs of the bk2 mutants turn brittle, even the preexisting ones, and they remain brittle throughout the life of the plant. Leaf tension assays and bend tests of the internodes show that the brittle phenotype does not result from loss of tensile strength but from loss in flexibility that causes the tissues to snap instead of bend. The Bk2 gene was cloned by a combination of transposon tagging and a candidate gene approach and found to encode a COBRA-like protein similar to rice (Oryza sativa) BC1 and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) COBRA-LIKE4. The outer periphery of the stalk has fewer vascular bundles, and the sclerids underlying the epidermis possess thinner secondary walls. Relative cellulose content is not strictly correlated with the brittle phenotype. Cellulose content in mature zones of bk2 mature stems is lowered by 40% but is about the same as wild type in developing stems. Although relative cellulose content is lowered in leaves after the onset of the brittle phenotype, total wall mass as a proportion of dry mass is either unchanged or slightly increased, indicating a compensatory increase in noncellulosic carbohydrate mass. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated an increase in phenolic ester content in the walls of bk2 leaves and stems. Total content of lignin is unaffected in bk2 juvenile leaves before or after appearance of the brittle phenotype, but bk2 mature and developing stems are markedly enriched in lignin compared to wild-type stems. Despite increased lignin in bk2 stems, loss of staining with phloroglucinol and ultraviolet autofluorescence is observed in vascular bundles and sclerid layers. Consistent with the infrared

  2. Influence of thyroid hormones on maturation of rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Jimena; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2007-05-01

    Thyroid hormone influences brain maturation through interaction with nuclear receptors and regulation of gene expression. Their role on astrocyte maturation remains unclear. We have analyzed the role of thyroid hormone in rat cerebellar astrocyte maturation by comparing the sequential patterns of intermediate filament expression in normal and hypothyroid animals. During normal development astroglial cells sequentially express nestin, vimentin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Differentiated astrocytes appeared in the superior medullary vellum by postnatal day 2 and reached the white mater and internal granular layer by postnatal day 4. Intermediate filament marker expression was transiently lost from postnatal days 6 to 8 in anterior lobes, without an increased apoptosis. Vimentin expression was replaced by glial fibrillary acidic protein between postnatal days 10 and 32. The differentiated astrocytes were evenly distributed throughout the cerebellar slices, including the internal granular layer. Differences between normal and hypothyroid rats were observed starting from postnatal day 4, with lack of differentiated astrocytes in the internal granular layer. The transient decrease of astrocyte markers immunoreactivity in the anterior lobe did not take place in hypothyroid rats. The vimentin-glial fibrillary acidic protein transition was delayed and most differentiated astrocytes remained confined to the white matter. The results indicate that thyroid hormone deficiency induces a delay and a partial arrest of astrocyte differentiation. Astrocytes express thyroid hormone receptor alpha and beta subtypes suggesting that astrocytes are direct target cells of thyroid hormones. PMID:17408906

  3. Imperfect DNA mirror repeats in the gag gene of HIV-1 (HXB2) identify key functional domains and coincide with protein structural elements in each of the mature proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Dorothy M

    2007-01-01

    Background A DNA mirror repeat is a sequence segment delimited on the basis of its containing a center of symmetry on a single strand, e.g. 5'-GCATGGTACG-3'. It is most frequently described in association with a functionally significant site in a genomic sequence, and its occurrence is regarded as noteworthy, if not unusual. However, imperfect mirror repeats (IMRs) having ≥ 50% symmetry are common in the protein coding DNA of monomeric proteins and their distribution has been found to coincide with protein structural elements – helices, β sheets and turns. In this study, the distribution of IMRs is evaluated in a polyprotein – to determine whether IMRs may be related to the position or order of protein cleavage or other hierarchal aspects of protein function. The gag gene of HIV-1 [GenBank:K03455] was selected for the study because its protein motifs and structural components are well documented. Results There is a highly specific relationship between IMRs and structural and functional aspects of the Gag polyprotein. The five longest IMRs in the polyprotein translate a key functional segment in each of the five cleavage products. Throughout the protein, IMRs coincide with functionally significant segments of the protein. A detailed annotation of the protein, which combines structural, functional and IMR data illustrates these associations. There is a significant statistical correlation between the ends of IMRs and the ends of PSEs in each of the mature proteins. Weakly symmetric IMRs (≥ 33%) are related to cleavage positions and processes. Conclusion The frequency and distribution of IMRs in HIV-1 Gag indicates that DNA symmetry is a fundamental property of protein coding DNA and that different levels of symmetry are associated with different functional aspects of the gene and its protein. The interaction between IMRs and protein structure and function is precise and interwoven over the entire length of the polyprotein. The distribution of IMRs and their

  4. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  5. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  6. AFAL: a web service for profiling amino acids surrounding ligands in proteins.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Ortega-Salazar, Samuel; Gonzales-Nilo, Fernando; Pohl, Ehmke; Holmes, David S; Quatrini, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    With advancements in crystallographic technology and the increasing wealth of information populating structural databases, there is an increasing need for prediction tools based on spatial information that will support the characterization of proteins and protein-ligand interactions. Herein, a new web service is presented termed amino acid frequency around ligand (AFAL) for determining amino acids type and frequencies surrounding ligands within proteins deposited in the Protein Data Bank and for assessing the atoms and atom-ligand distances involved in each interaction (availability: http://structuralbio.utalca.cl/AFAL/index.html ). AFAL allows the user to define a wide variety of filtering criteria (protein family, source organism, resolution, sequence redundancy and distance) in order to uncover trends and evolutionary differences in amino acid preferences that define interactions with particular ligands. Results obtained from AFAL provide valuable statistical information about amino acids that may be responsible for establishing particular ligand-protein interactions. The analysis will enable investigators to compare ligand-binding sites of different proteins and to uncover general as well as specific interaction patterns from existing data. Such patterns can be used subsequently to predict ligand binding in proteins that currently have no structural information and to refine the interpretation of existing protein models. The application of AFAL is illustrated by the analysis of proteins interacting with adenosine-5'-triphosphate. PMID:25085083

  7. Effect of sexual maturation and polyploidy on chemical composition and fatty acid content of energy stores in female rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation is an energy and nutrient demanding physiological process that alters growth efficiency and compromises muscle quality in many food fish species. Lipid mobilization supplies energy required for this process. To study the effect of sexual maturation on lipid mobilization in female r...

  8. Effect of sexual maturation and polyploidy on chemical composition and fatty acid content of energy stores in female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation is an energy and nutrient demanding physiological process that alters growth efficiency and compromises muscle quality in many fish species. Lipid mobilization from fat stores supplies energy required for this process. To study the effect of sexual maturation on lipid mobilization ...

  9. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  10. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  11. Late-stage maturation of the Rieske Fe/S protein: Mzm1 stabilizes Rip1 but does not facilitate its translocation by the AAA ATPase Bcs1.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tie-Zhong; Smith, Pamela M; Fox, Jennifer L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-11-01

    The final step in the assembly of the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase or bc(1) complex involves the insertion of the Rieske Fe/S cluster protein, Rip1. Maturation of Rip1 occurs within the mitochondrial matrix prior to its translocation across the inner membrane (IM) in a process mediated by the Bcs1 ATPase and subsequent insertion into the bc(1) complex. Here we show that the matrix protein Mzm1 functions as a Rip1 chaperone, stabilizing Rip1 prior to the translocation step. In the absence of Mzm1, Rip1 is prone to either proteolytic degradation or temperature-induced aggregation. A series of Rip1 truncations were engineered to probe motifs necessary for Mzm1 interaction and Bcs1-mediated translocation of Rip1. The Mzm1 interaction with Rip1 persists in Rip1 variants lacking its transmembrane domain or containing only its C-terminal globular Fe/S domain. Replacement of the globular domain of Rip1 with that of the heterologous folded protein Grx3 abrogated Mzm1 interaction; however, appending the C-terminal 30 residues of Rip1 to the Rip1-Grx3 chimera restored Mzm1 interaction. The Rip1-Grx3 chimera and a Rip1 truncation containing only the N-terminal 92 residues each induced stabilization of the bc(1):cytochrome oxidase supercomplex in a Bcs1-dependent manner. However, the Rip1 variants were not stably associated with the supercomplex. The induced supercomplex stabilization by the Rip1 N terminus was independent of Mzm1. PMID:22927643

  12. Structure of [NiFe] Hydrogenase Maturation Protein HypE from Escherichia coli and its Interaction with HypF

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Asinas, A.; Proteau, A.; Munger, C.; Baardsnes, j.; Iannuzzi, P.; Matte, A.; Cygler, m.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes involved in hydrogen metabolism, utilizing H2 as an electron source. [NiFe] hydrogenases are heterodimeric Fe-S proteins, with a large subunit containing the reaction center involving Fe and Ni metal ions and a small subunit containing one or more Fe-S clusters. Maturation of the [NiFe] hydrogenase involves assembly of nonproteinaceous ligands on the large subunit by accessory proteins encoded by the hyp operon. HypE is an essential accessory protein and participates in the synthesis of two cyano groups found in the large subunit. We report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli HypE at 2.0- Angstroms resolution. HypE exhibits a fold similar to that of PurM and ThiL and forms dimers. The C-terminal catalytically essential Cys336 is internalized at the dimer interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. A mechanism for dehydration of the thiocarbamate to the thiocyanate is proposed, involving Asp83 and Glu272. The interactions of HypE and HypF were characterized in detail by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry, revealing a Kd (dissociation constant) of {approx}400 nM. The stoichiometry and molecular weights of the complex were verified by size exclusion chromatography and gel scanning densitometry. These experiments reveal that HypE and HypF associate to form a stoichiometric, hetero-oligomeric complex predominantly consisting of a [EF]2 heterotetramer which exists in a dynamic equilibrium with the EF heterodimer. The surface plasmon resonance results indicate that a conformational change occurs upon heterodimerization which facilitates formation of a productive complex as part of the carbamate transfer reaction.

  13. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions. PMID:26862880

  14. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-03-12

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel sythetases molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lapidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  15. Reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton during maturation division in the Tubifex egg: possible involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T

    1997-08-01

    Tubifex eggs undergo a drastic reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton during metaphase of the second meiosis. At the end of the first meiosis, the egg cortex displays only scattered actin filaments and tiny dots of F-actin; during the following 90 min, cortical F-actin gradually increases in amount, becomes organized into foci that are interlinked by actin bundles, and generates a geodesic dome-like organization. In this study, we have characterized this reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In living eggs injected with rhodamine-phalloidin at the beginning of the second meiosis, cortical actin assembly (i.e., formation of actin foci and bundles) proceeds normally, but labeled F-actin is not found to be included significantly in the formed cortical actin network, suggesting that the increase in cortical F-actin is not simply ascribable to the recruitment of preexisting actin filaments. Cortical actin assembly can be induced precociously not only by calcium ionophore A23187 but also by a phorbol ester PMA, an agonist of protein kinase C (PKC). Conversely, the formation of actin foci and bundles is inhibited by PKC antagonists, although cortical F-actin increases to some extent in the presence of these inhibitors. Similar inhibition of the cortical reorganization is elicited in eggs whose intracellular free calcium level ([Ca2+]i) has been clamped low by microinjection of a calcium chelator BAPTA. The treatment of BAPTA-injected eggs with PMA results in the formation of actin foci and bundles. An experiment with eggs injected with fluo-3 shows that [Ca2+]i increases during metaphase of the second meiosis. These results suggest that the reorganization of cortical actin during metaphase of the second meiosis requires activation of PKC, which depends on increases in [Ca2+]i. PMID:9245516

  16. Proteomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 sclerotia maturation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Sang; Kim, Sang Gon; Chung, Woo Sik; Bae, Hanhong; Jeong, Sung Woo; Shin, Sung Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Park, Soo-Chul; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Bae, Dong-Won; Lee, Yong Bok

    2014-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani), a soil-borne necrotrophic pathogen, causes various plant diseases. Rhizoctonia solani is a mitosporic fungus, the sclerotium of which is the primary inoculum and ensures survival of the fungus during the offseason of the host crop. Since the fungus does not produce any asexual or sexual spores, understanding the biology of sclerotia is important to examine pathogen ecology and develop more efficient methods for crop protection. Here, one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE and 2-DE, respectively) were used to examine protein regulation during the maturation of fungal sclerotia. A total of 75 proteins (20 proteins from 1-DE using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and 55 proteins from 2-DE using MALDI-TOF MS or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) were differentially expressed during sclerotial maturation. The identified proteins were classified into ten categories based on their biological functions, including genetic information processing, carbohydrate metabolism, cell defense, amino acid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, cellular processes, pathogenicity and mycotoxin production, and hypothetical or unknown functions. Interestingly, two vacuole function-related proteins were highly up-regulated throughout sclerotial maturation, which was confirmed at the transcript level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. These findings contribute to our understanding of the biology of R. solani sclerotia. PMID:24863472

  17. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  18. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  19. Fish protein hydrolysates: proximate composition, amino acid composition, antioxidant activities and applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Chalamaiah, M; Dinesh Kumar, B; Hemalatha, R; Jyothirmayi, T

    2012-12-15

    The fish processing industry produces more than 60% by-products as waste, which includes skin, head, viscera, trimmings, liver, frames, bones, and roes. These by-product wastes contain good amount of protein rich material that are normally processed into low market-value products, such as animal feed, fish meal and fertilizer. In view of utilizing these fish industry wastes, and for increasing the value to several underutilised fish species, protein hydrolysates from fish proteins are being prepared by several researchers all over the world. Fish protein hydrolysates are breakdown products of enzymatic conversion of fish proteins into smaller peptides, which normally contain 2-20 amino acids. In recent years, fish protein hydrolysates have at