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Sample records for acid metabolism genes

  1. Analysis of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway using mutant genes.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, R A

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a fundamental process for plant growth and development. Although a considerable amount of information is available, little is known about the genetic control of enzymatic steps or regulation of several pathways. Much of the information about biochemical pathways has arisen from the use of mutants lacking key enzymes. Although mutants were largely used already in the 60's, by bacterial and fungal geneticists, it took plant research a long time to catch up. The advance in this area was rapid in the 80's, which was followed in the 90's by the development of techniques of plant transformation. In this review we present an overview of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway, the key regulatory enzymes and the mutants and transgenic plants produced for lysine and threonine metabolism. We also discuss and propose a new study of high-lysine mutants.

  2. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  3. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  4. Regulation of the expression of key genes involved in HDL metabolism by unsaturated fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects, and possible mechanisms of action, of unsaturated fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in HDL metabolism in HepG2 cells. The mRNA concentration of target genes was assessed by real time PCR. Protein concentrations were determined by wes...

  5. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F.; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M.; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M.; Agbo, Eddy C.; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo 13C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast. PMID:23898325

  6. Immune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Cordes, Thekla; Ghelfi, Jenny; Pailot, Arnaud; Reiling, Norbert; Goldmann, Oliver; Binz, Tina; Wegner, André; Tallam, Aravind; Rausell, Antonio; Buttini, Manuel; Linster, Carole L; Medina, Eva; Balling, Rudi; Hiller, Karsten

    2013-05-07

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

  7. The Effect of Multiple Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Folic Acid Pathway Genes on Homocysteine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Wang, Huijun; Qian, Yanyan; Ma, Duan; Tian, Weidong; Persaud-Sharma, Vishwani; Yu, Chen; Ren, Yunyun; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, Xiaotian

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the joint effects of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes in the folic acid pathway on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism. Methods. Four hundred women with normal pregnancies were enrolled in this study. SNPs were identified by MassARRAY. Serum folic acid and Hcy concentration were measured. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and support vector machine (SVM) regressions were used to analyze the joint effects of SNPs on the Hcy level. Results. SNPs of MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs3733965) were significantly associated with maternal serum Hcy level. In the different genotypes of MTHFR (rs1801133), SNPs of RFC1 (rs1051266), TCN2 (rs9606756), BHMT (rs3733890), and CBS (rs234713 and rs2851391) were linked with the Hcy level adjusted for folic acid concentration. The integrated SNPs scores were significantly associated with the residual Hcy concentration (RHC) (r = 0.247). The Hcy level was significantly higher in the group with high SNP scores than that in other groups with SNP scores of less than 0.2 (P = 0.000). Moreover, this difference was even more significant in moderate and high levels of folic acid. Conclusion. SNPs of genes in the folic acid pathway possibly affect the Hcy metabolism in the presence of moderate and high levels of folic acid. PMID:24524080

  8. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  9. Yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid: acidic conditions caused by the organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures induce expression of intracellular metal metabolism genes regulated by Aft1p.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2006-09-01

    Using two types of genome-wide analysis to investigate yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid, we found that the acidic condition affects metal metabolism. The first type is an expression analysis using DNA microarrays to investigate 'acid shock response' as the first step to adapt to an acidic condition, and 'acid adaptation' by maintaining integrity in the acidic condition. The other is a functional screening using the nonessential genes deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression analysis showed that genes involved in stress response, such as YGP1, TPS1 and HSP150, were induced under the acid shock response. Genes such as FIT2, ARN1 and ARN2, involved in metal metabolism regulated by Aft1p, were induced under the acid adaptation. AFT1 was induced under acid shock response and under acid adaptation with lactic acid. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-fused Aft1p was localized to the nucleus in cells grown in media containing lactic acid, acetic acid, or hydrochloric acid. Both analyses suggested that the acidic condition affects cell wall architecture. The depletion of cell-wall components encoded by SED1, DSE2, CTS1, EGT2, SCW11, SUN4 and YNL300W and histone acetyltransferase complex proteins encoded by YID21, EAF3, EAF5, EAF6 and YAF9 increased resistance to lactic acid. Depletion of the cell-wall mannoprotein Sed1p provided resistance to lactic acid, although the expression of SED1 was induced by exposure to lactic acid. Depletion of vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase and high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins caused acid sensitivity. Moreover, our quantitative PCR showed that expression of PDR12 increased under acid shock response with lactic acid and decreased under acid adaptation with hydrochloric acid.

  10. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  11. Systematic identification of genes involved in metabolic acid stress resistance in yeast and their potential as cancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Shin, John J.; Aftab, Qurratulain; Austin, Pamela; McQueen, Jennifer A.; Poon, Tak; Li, Shu Chen; Young, Barry P.; Roskelley, Calvin D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark of all primary and metastatic tumours is their high rate of glucose uptake and glycolysis. A consequence of the glycolytic phenotype is the accumulation of metabolic acid; hence, tumour cells experience considerable intracellular acid stress. To compensate, tumour cells upregulate acid pumps, which expel the metabolic acid into the surrounding tumour environment, resulting in alkalization of intracellular pH and acidification of the tumour microenvironment. Nevertheless, we have only a limited understanding of the consequences of altered intracellular pH on cell physiology, or of the genes and pathways that respond to metabolic acid stress. We have used yeast as a genetic model for metabolic acid stress with the rationale that the metabolic changes that occur in cancer that lead to intracellular acid stress are likely fundamental. Using a quantitative systems biology approach we identified 129 genes required for optimal growth under conditions of metabolic acid stress. We identified six highly conserved protein complexes with functions related to oxidative phosphorylation (mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III and IV), mitochondrial tRNA biosynthesis [glutamyl-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase complex], histone methylation (Set1C–COMPASS), lysosome biogenesis (AP-3 adapter complex), and mRNA processing and P-body formation (PAN complex). We tested roles for two of these, AP-3 adapter complex and PAN deadenylase complex, in resistance to acid stress using a myeloid leukaemia-derived human cell line that we determined to be acid stress resistant. Loss of either complex inhibited growth of Hap1 cells at neutral pH and caused sensitivity to acid stress, indicating that AP-3 and PAN complexes are promising new targets in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, our data suggests that tumours may be genetically sensitized to acid stress and hence susceptible to acid stress-directed therapies, as many tumours accumulate mutations in mitochondrial

  12. Retinoic acid regulates several genes in bile acid and lipid metabolism via upregulation of small heterodimer partner in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, Abulkhair; Subauste, Angela; Subauste, Maria C; Subauste, Jose

    2014-10-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) affects multiple aspects of development, embryogenesis and cell differentiation processes. The liver is a major organ that stores RA suggesting that retinoids play an important role in the function of hepatocytes. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated the involvement of small heterodimer partner (SHP) in RA-induced signaling in a non-transformed hepatic cell line AML 12. In the present study, we have identified several critical genes in lipid homeostasis (Apoa1, Apoa2 and ApoF) that are repressed by RA-treatment in a SHP dependent manner, in vitro and also in vivo with the use of the SHP null mice. In a similar manner, RA also represses several critical genes involved in bile acid metabolism (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Mdr2, Bsep, Baat and Ntcp) via upregulation of SHP. Collectively our data suggest that SHP plays a major role in RA-induced potential changes in pathophysiology of metabolic disorders in the liver.

  13. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor γ, RORγ, participates in diurnal transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Kang, Hong Soon; Lih, Fred B.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Blaner, William S.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic circadian clock plays a pivotal role in regulating major aspects of energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. In this study, we show that RORγ robustly regulates the rhythmic expression of several lipid metabolic genes, including the insulin-induced gene 2a, Insig2a, elongation of very long chain fatty acids-like 3, Elovl3 and sterol 12α-hydroxylase, Cyp8b1, by enhancing their expression at ZT20-4. The time-dependent increase in their expression correlates with the rhythmic expression pattern of RORγ. The enhanced recruitment of RORγ to ROREs in their promoter region, increased histone acetylation, and reporter and mutation analysis support the concept that RORγ regulates the transcription of several lipid metabolic genes directly by binding ROREs in their promoter regulatory region. Consistent with the disrupted expression of a number of lipid metabolic genes, loss of RORγ reduced the level of several lipids in liver and blood in a ZT-preferred manner. Particularly the whole-body bile acid pool size was considerably reduced in RORγ−/− mice in part through its regulation of several Cyp genes. Similar observations were made in liver-specific RORγ-deficient mice. Altogether, our study indicates that RORγ functions as an important link between the circadian clock and the transcriptional regulation of several metabolic genes. PMID:25143535

  14. Comparison of amino acid profiles and metabolic gene expression in muskrat scented glands in secretion and non-secretion season

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimeng; Zhang, Tianxiang; Fan, Mengyuan; Zhou, Juntong; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Meishan; Qi, Lei; Lin, Shaobi; Hu, Defu; Liu, Shuqiang

    2017-01-01

    The scented gland is an organ responsible for producing musk in muskrats. During musk secretion season, the metabolism of glandular cells increases in the scented glands and a large amount of musk is synthesised. In this study, we collected scented gland arterial blood from six healthy adult male muskrats during non-secretion season (November). We also obtained scented gland arterial blood, venous blood, and musk from six healthy adult males during secretion season (March). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of free amino acids in blood and musk were performed with an automated amino acid analyzer. Additionally, we employed RNA sequencing technology to study the expression patterns of amino acid metabolic pathways in scented glands. Amino acid profile analysis indicates that scented glands can concentrate amino acids during secretion season, and transcriptome analysis suggests that some amino acid metabolism-related genes undergo significant seasonal changes. In summary, scented gland amino acid metabolism displays seasonal differences. Elevated amino acid metabolic activity during secretion season sustains the glands’ secretory function. PMID:28145478

  15. Comparison of amino acid profiles and metabolic gene expression in muskrat scented glands in secretion and non-secretion season.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimeng; Zhang, Tianxiang; Fan, Mengyuan; Zhou, Juntong; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Meishan; Qi, Lei; Lin, Shaobi; Hu, Defu; Liu, Shuqiang

    2017-02-01

    The scented gland is an organ responsible for producing musk in muskrats. During musk secretion season, the metabolism of glandular cells increases in the scented glands and a large amount of musk is synthesised. In this study, we collected scented gland arterial blood from six healthy adult male muskrats during non-secretion season (November). We also obtained scented gland arterial blood, venous blood, and musk from six healthy adult males during secretion season (March). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of free amino acids in blood and musk were performed with an automated amino acid analyzer. Additionally, we employed RNA sequencing technology to study the expression patterns of amino acid metabolic pathways in scented glands. Amino acid profile analysis indicates that scented glands can concentrate amino acids during secretion season, and transcriptome analysis suggests that some amino acid metabolism-related genes undergo significant seasonal changes. In summary, scented gland amino acid metabolism displays seasonal differences. Elevated amino acid metabolic activity during secretion season sustains the glands' secretory function.

  16. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  17. The rice OsLpa1 gene encodse a novel protein involved in phytic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice low phytic acid 1 (OsLpa1) gene was originally identified using a forward genetics approach. Mutation of this gene resulted in a 45% reduction in rice seed phytic acid with a molar-equivalent increase in inorganic phosphorus; however, the rice lpa1 mutant does not appear to differ significa...

  18. Expression profiles of the genes associated with metabolism and transport of amino acids and their derivatives in rat liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, C S; Chang, C F

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids (AA) are components of protein and precursors of many important biological molecules. To address effects of the genes associated with metabolism and transport of AA and their derivatives during rat liver regeneration (LR), we firstly obtained the above genes by collecting databases data and retrieving related thesis, and then analyzed their expression profiles during LR using Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. The LR-associated genes were identified by comparing the gene expression difference between partial hepatectomy (PH) and sham-operation (SO) rat livers. It was approved that 134 genes associated with metabolism of AA and their derivatives and 26 genes involved in transport of them were LR-associated. The initially and totally expressing number of these genes occurring in initial phase of LR (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction of liver tissue (72-168 h after PH) were respectively 76, 17, 79, 5 and 162, 89, 564, 195, illustrating that these LR-associated genes were initially expressed mainly in initial stage, and functioned in different phases. Frequencies of up-regulation and down-regulation of them being separately 564 and 357 demonstrated that genes up-regulated outnumbered those down-regulated. Categorization of their expression patterns into 22 types implied the diversity of cell physiological and biochemical activities. According to expression changes and patterns of the above-mentioned genes in LR, it was presumed that histidine biosynthesis in the metaphase and anaphase, valine metabolism in the anaphase, and metabolism of glutamate, glutamine, asparate, asparagine, methionine, alanine, leucine and aromatic amino acid almost were enhanced in the whole LR; as for amino acid derivatives, transport of neutral amino acids, urea, gamma-aminobutyric acid, betaine and taurine, metabolism of dopamine, heme, S-adenosylmethionine, thyroxine, and

  19. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-29

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production.

  20. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  1. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC) phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems. PMID:20932325

  2. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  3. Co-mapping studies of QTLs for fruit acidity and candidate genes of organic acid metabolism and proton transport in sweet melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Tzuri, G; Harel-Beja, R; Itkin, M; Portnoy, V; Sa'ar, U; Lev, S; Yeselson, L; Petrikov, M; Rogachev, I; Aharoni, A; Ophir, R; Tadmor, Y; Lewinsohn, E; Burger, Y; Katzir, N; Schaffer, A A

    2012-07-01

    Sweet melon cultivars contain a low level of organic acids and, therefore, the quality and flavor of sweet melon fruit is determined almost exclusively by fruit sugar content. However, genetic variability for fruit acid levels in the Cucumis melo species exists and sour fruit accessions are characterized by acidic fruit pH of <5, compared to the sweet cultivars that are generally characterized by mature fruit pH values of >6. In this paper, we report results from a mapping population based on recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross between the non-sour 'Dulce' variety and the sour PI 414323 accession. Results show that a single major QTL for pH co-localizes with major QTLs for the two predominant organic acids in melon fruit, citric and malic, together with an additional metabolite which we identified as uridine. While the acidic recombinants were characterized by higher citric and malic acid levels, the non-acidic recombinants had a higher uridine content than did the acidic recombinants. Additional minor QTLs for pH, citric acid and malic acid were also identified and for these the increased acidity was unexpectedly contributed by the non-sour parent. To test for co-localization of these QTLs with genes encoding organic acid metabolism and transport, we mapped the genes encoding structural enzymes and proteins involved in organic acid metabolism, transport and vacuolar H+ pumps. None of these genes co-localized with the major pH QTL, indicating that the gene determining melon fruit pH is not one of the candidate genes encoding this primary metabolic pathway. Linked markers were tested in two additional inter-varietal populations and shown to be linked to the pH trait. The presence of the same QTL in such diverse segregating populations suggests that the trait is determined throughout the species by variability in the same gene and is indicative of a major role of the evolution of this gene in determining the important domestication trait of fruit

  4. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants.

  5. Differential influence of distinct fatty acids on cardiomyocyte metabolic gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus increases risk for cardiovascular disease, and exposes the heart to high plasma fatty acid (FA) levels, which induce genes promoting FA oxidation (e.g., malonyl-CoA decarboxylase; mcd), as well as those suppressing carbohydrate oxidation (e.g., pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4; pdk4...

  6. Adipose tissue transcriptional response of lipid metabolism genes in growing Iberian pigs fed oleic acid v. carbohydrate enriched diets.

    PubMed

    Benítez, R; Núñez, Y; Fernández, A; Isabel, B; Rodríguez, C; Daza, A; López-Bote, C; Silió, L; Óvilo, C

    2016-06-01

    Diet influences animal body and tissue composition due to direct deposition and to the nutrients effects on metabolism. The influence of specific nutrients on the molecular regulation of lipogenesis is not well characterized and is known to be influenced by many factors including timing and physiological status. A trial was performed to study the effects of different dietary energy sources on lipogenic genes transcription in ham adipose tissue of Iberian pigs, at different growth periods and on feeding/fasting situations. A total of 27 Iberian male pigs of 28 kg BW were allocated to two separate groups and fed with different isocaloric feeding regimens: standard diet with carbohydrates as energy source (CH) or diet enriched with high oleic sunflower oil (HO). Ham subcutaneous adipose tissue was sampled by biopsy at growing (44 kg mean BW) and finishing (100 kg mean BW) periods. The first sampling was performed on fasted animals, while the last sampling was performed twice, with animals fasted overnight and 3 h after refeeding. Effects of diet, growth period and feeding/fasting status on gene expression were explored quantifying the expression of a panel of key genes implicated in lipogenesis and lipid metabolism processes. Quantitative PCR revealed several differentially expressed genes according to diet, with similar results at both timings: RXRG, LEP and FABP5 genes were upregulated in HO group while ME1, FASN, ACACA and ELOVL6 were upregulated in CH. The diet effect on ME1 gene expression was conditional on feeding/fasting status, with the higher ME1 gene expression in CH than HO groups, observed only in fasting samples. Results are compatible with a higher de novo endogenous synthesis of fatty acids (FA) in the carbohydrate-supplemented group and a higher FA transport in the oleic acid-supplemented group. Growth period significantly affected the expression of most of the studied genes, with all but PPARG showing higher expression in finishing pigs according to

  7. Maternal Factors Are Associated with the Expression of Placental Genes Involved in Amino Acid Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Day, Pricilla E.; Ntani, Georgia; Crozier, Sarah R.; Mahon, Pam A.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Hanson, Mark A.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Cleal, Jane K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maternal environment and lifestyle factors may modify placental function to match the mother’s capacity to support the demands of fetal growth. Much remains to be understood about maternal influences on placental metabolic and amino acid transporter gene expression. We investigated the influences of maternal lifestyle and body composition (e.g. fat and muscle content) on a selection of metabolic and amino acid transporter genes and their associations with fetal growth. Methods RNA was extracted from 102 term Southampton Women’s Survey placental samples. Expression of nine metabolic, seven exchange, eight accumulative and three facilitated transporter genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Increased placental LAT2 (p = 0.01), y+LAT2 (p = 0.03), aspartate aminotransferase 2 (p = 0.02) and decreased aspartate aminotransferase 1 (p = 0.04) mRNA expression associated with pre-pregnancy maternal smoking. Placental mRNA expression of TAT1 (p = 0.01), ASCT1 (p = 0.03), mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (p = 0.02) and glutamine synthetase (p = 0.05) was positively associated with maternal strenuous exercise. Increased glutamine synthetase mRNA expression (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) associated with higher maternal diet quality (prudent dietary pattern) pre-pregnancy. Lower LAT4 (r = -0.25, p = 0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase 2 mRNA expression (r = -0.28, p = 0.01) associated with higher early pregnancy diet quality. Lower placental ASCT1 mRNA expression associated with measures of increased maternal fat mass, including pre-pregnancy BMI (r = -0.26, p = 0.01). Lower placental mRNA expression of alanine aminotransferase 2 associated with greater neonatal adiposity, for example neonatal subscapular skinfold thickness (r = -0.33, p = 0.001). Conclusion A number of maternal influences have been linked with outcomes in childhood, independently of neonatal size; our finding of associations between placental expression of transporter

  8. Deletion of genes involved in glutamate metabolism to improve poly-gamma-glutamic acid production in B. amyloliquefaciens LL3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; He, Yulian; Gao, Weixia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Mingfeng; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2015-02-01

    Here, we attempted to elevate poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production by modifying genes involved in glutamate metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3. Products of rocR, rocG and gudB facilitate the conversion from glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in Bacillus subtillis. The gene odhA is responsible for the synthesis of a component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A. In-frame deletions of these four genes were performed. In shake flask experiments the gudB/rocG double mutant presented enhanced production of γ-PGA, a 38 % increase compared with wild type. When fermented in a 5-L fermenter with pH control, the γ-PGA yield of the rocR mutant was increased to 5.83 g/L from 4.55 g/L for shake flask experiments. The gudB/rocG double mutant produced 5.68 g/L γ-PGA compared with that of 4.03 g/L for the wild type, a 40 % increase. Those results indicated the possibility of improving γ-PGA production by modifying glutamate metabolism, and identified potential genetic targets to improve γ-PGA production.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids partially revert the metabolic gene expression profile induced by long-term calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Cánovas, Ángela; Medrano, Juan F; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Villalba, José Manuel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon J

    2016-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) consistently extends longevity and delays age-related diseases across several animal models. We have previously shown that different dietary fat sources can modulate life span and mitochondrial ultrastructure, function and membrane fatty acid composition in mice maintained on a 40% CR. In particular, animals consuming lard as the main fat source (CR-Lard) lived longer than CR mice consuming diets with soybean oil (CR-Soy) or fish oil (CR-Fish) as the predominant lipid source. In the present work, a transcriptomic analysis in the liver and skeletal muscle was performed in order to elucidate possible mechanisms underlying the changes in energy metabolism and longevity induced by dietary fat in CR mice. After 8 months of CR, transcription downstream of several mediators of inflammation was inhibited in liver. In contrast, proinflammatory signaling was increased in the CR-Fish versus other CR groups. Dietary fish oil induced a gene expression pattern consistent with increased transcriptional regulation by several cytokines (TNF, GM-CSF, TGF-β) and sex hormones when compared to the other CR groups. The CR-Fish also had lower expression of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and increased expression of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation genes than the other CR diet groups. Our data suggest that a diet high in n-3 PUFA, partially reverts CR-related changes in gene expression of key processes, such as inflammation and steroid hormone signaling, and this may mitigate life span extension with CR in mice consuming diets high in fish oil.

  10. Effects of retinoids on iodine metabolism, thyroid peroxidase gene expression, and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in porcine thyroid cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Arai, M; Tsushima, T; Isozaki, O; Shizume, K; Emoto, N; Demura, H; Miyakawa, M; Onoda, N

    1991-12-01

    Effects of retinoids on DNA synthesis, iodine metabolism, and thyroid peroxidase messenger RNA levels were studied in cultured porcine thyroid cells. Retinol (10(-8)-10(-5) M) alone did not affect DNA synthesis but potentiated that induced by epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-I without changes in the number or affinity of receptors for the growth factors, suggesting that retinol stimulates postreceptor events responsible for DNA synthesis. Retinol was an inhibitor of TSH-stimulated iodine metabolism. Iodide uptake and release of organified iodine stimulated by TSH or forskolin were inhibited dose dependently by treatment with retinol. The inhibition was detected at 10(-8) M and was approximately 50% at 10(-6) M. The potency of retinoic acid was comparable to that of retinol. The inhibitory effect of retinol was detected after treatments of thyroid cells for 24 h, and the maximal effect occurred after 48 h incubation. The cAMP accumulation in cultures treated with TSH plus retinol was lower than that of control cultures treated with TSH alone. However, iodide uptake stimulated by 8-bromo-cAMP was also inhibited by retinoids. Retinol reduced TSH- or 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated gene expression of thyroid peroxidase. Thus, the data suggest that retinoids inhibit TSH-stimulated iodine metabolism by reducing cAMP accumulation and also by acting on the steps subsequent to cAMP production.

  11. Mimp/Mtch2, an Obesity Susceptibility Gene, Induces Alteration of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsarfaty, Galia; Kaufman, Dafna; Horev, Judith; Resau, James H.; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic dysfunctions, such as fatty liver, obesity and insulin resistance, are among the most common contemporary diseases worldwide, and their prevalence is continuously rising. Mimp/Mtch2 is a mitochondrial carrier protein homologue, which localizes to the mitochondria and induces mitochondrial depolarization. Mimp/Mtch2 single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with obesity in humans and its loss in mice muscle protects from obesity. Our aim was to study the effects of Mimp/Mtch2 overexpression in vivo. Methods Transgenic mice overexpressing Mimp/Mtch2-GFP were characterized and monitored for lipid accumulation, weight and blood glucose levels. Transgenic mice liver and kidneys were used for gene expression analysis. Results Mimp/Mtch2-GFP transgenic mice express high levels of fatty acid synthase and of β-oxidation genes and develop fatty livers and kidneys. Moreover, high-fat diet–fed Mimp/Mtch2 mice exhibit high blood glucose levels. Our results also show that Mimp/Mtch2 is involved in lipid accumulation and uptake in cells and perhaps in human obesity. Conclusions Mimp/Mtch2 alters lipid metabolism and may play a role in the onset of obesity and development of insulin resistance. PMID:27359329

  12. Construction of efficient Streptococcus zooepidemicus strains for hyaluoronic acid production based on identification of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhen; Wang, Man; Li, Tuanjie; Fu, Lixia; Cao, Wei; Liu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    Biosynthesis of polysaccharide hyaluoronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus is a carbon-intensive process. The carbon flux and factor(s) restricting HA yield were not well understood. Here, we investigated the function of genes involved in sucrose metabolism and identified targets limiting HA yield, which were exploited to construct efficient S. zooepidemicus strains for HA production. The sucrose uptake was addressed by deletion of scrA and scrB, which encodes sucrose-PTS permease and sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase, respectively. We found that scrB was essential for the growth of S. zooepidemicus and HA biosynthesis, and accumulation of sucrose-6-phosphate was toxic. ΔscrB could not grow in THY-sucrose medium, while ΔscrA and ΔscrAΔscrB showed negligible growth defects. Overexpression of scrA significantly reduced biomass and HA production, while overexpression of scrB resulted in 26% increase of biomass and 30% increase of HA yield. We revealed that fructose-6-phosphate for HA biosynthesis mainly originates from glucose-6-phosphate. Deletion of scrK, a gene encoding hexokinase, led to 11% reduction of biomass and 12% decrease of HA yield, while deletion of hasE, a gene encoding phosphoglucoisomerase, resulted in the abolishment of HA biosynthesis and a significantly slow growth. We found that HA biosynthesis could be improved by directing carbon flux to fructose-6-phosphate. Deletion of fruA encoding the EII of fructose-PTS and fruK encoding phosphofructokinase showed no apparent effect on cell growth, but resulted in 22 and 27% increase of HA yield, respectively. Finally, a strain with 55% increase of HA was constructed by overexpression of scrB in ΔfruK. These results provide a solid foundation for further metabolic engineering of S. zooepidemicus for highly efficient HA production.

  13. Retinoic acid metabolic genes, meiosis, and gonadal sex differentiation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Cañestro, Cristian; BreMiller, Ruth A; Catchen, Julian M; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H

    2013-01-01

    To help understand the elusive mechanisms of zebrafish sex determination, we studied the genetic machinery regulating production and breakdown of retinoic acid (RA) during the onset of meiosis in gonadogenesis. Results uncovered unexpected mechanistic differences between zebrafish and mammals. Conserved synteny and expression analyses revealed that cyp26a1 in zebrafish and its paralog Cyp26b1 in tetrapods independently became the primary genes encoding enzymes available for gonadal RA-degradation, showing lineage-specific subfunctionalization of vertebrate genome duplication (VGD) paralogs. Experiments showed that zebrafish express aldh1a2, which encodes an RA-synthesizing enzyme, in the gonad rather than in the mesonephros as in mouse. Germ cells in bipotential gonads of all zebrafish analyzed were labeled by the early meiotic marker sycp3, suggesting that in zebrafish, the onset of meiosis is not sexually dimorphic as it is in mouse and is independent of Stra8, which is required in mouse but was lost in teleosts. Analysis of dead-end knockdown zebrafish depleted of germ cells revealed the germ cell-independent onset and maintenance of gonadal aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 expression. After meiosis initiated, somatic cell expression of cyp26a1 became sexually dimorphic: up-regulated in testes but not ovaries. Meiotic germ cells expressing the synaptonemal complex gene sycp3 occupied islands of somatic cells that lacked cyp26a1 expression, as predicted by the hypothesis that Cyp26a1 acts as a meiosis-inhibiting factor. Consistent with this hypothesis, females up-regulated cyp26a1 in oocytes that entered prophase-I meiotic arrest, and down-regulated cyp26a1 in oocytes resuming meiosis. Co-expression of cyp26a1 and the pluripotent germ cell stem cell marker pou5f1(oct4) in meiotically arrested oocytes was consistent with roles in mouse to promote germ cell survival and to prevent apoptosis, mechanisms that are central for tipping the sexual fate of gonads towards the female

  14. S-adenosylmethionine stimulates fatty acid metabolism-linked gene expression in porcine muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tao; Fang, Qian; Yin, JingDong; Li, DeFa; Li, Wei

    2010-10-01

    Evidence indicates that both S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) metabolism and intramuscular fat are associated with insulin resistance and type II diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether SAMe have effects on intramuscular adipogenesis. The present study investigated the roles of SAMe in the adipogenic differentiation of porcine muscle satellite cells. Cells isolated from neonatal pig muscle were treated with different concentrations of SAMe (0, 0.5 and 1.0 mM) for 24 h, induced for a 9-day adipogenic differentiation and were finally stained by oil red O staining. The adipocyte determination and differentiation factor-1 (ADD1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) mRNA and protein were stimulated by SAMe treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA and protein were enhanced in 1.0 mM treatment group, compared with the control. No significant difference was observed in the intracellular lipid content among treatments. These results provide evidence that SAMe may be associated with intramuscular adipogenesis and indicate a novel action of SAMe in fat metabolism.

  15. Eicosapentaenoic acid regulates brown adipose tissue gene expression and metabolism in high fat fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a thermogenic tissue, a key regulator of energy balance and a potential therapeutic target for obesity. We previously reported that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduced high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice, independent of energy intake. We hy...

  16. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-01-15

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-{alpha} plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-{alpha} activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription.

  17. Rapid effects of essential fatty acid deficiency on growth and development parameters and transcription of key fatty acid metabolism genes in juvenile barramundi (Lates calcarifer).

    PubMed

    Salini, Michael J; Turchini, Giovanni M; Wade, Nicholas M; Glencross, Brett D

    2015-12-14

    Barramundi (Lates calcarifer), a catadromous teleost of significant and growing commercial importance, are reported to have limited fatty acid bioconversion capability and therefore require preformed long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) as dietary essential fatty acid (EFA). In this study, the response of juvenile barramundi (47·0 g/fish initial weight) fed isolipidic and isoenergetic diets with 8·2% added oil was tested. The experimental test diets were either devoid of fish oil (FO), and thus with no n-3 LC-PUFA (FO FREE diet), or with a low inclusion of FO (FO LOW diet). These were compared against a control diet containing only FO (FO CTRL diet) as the added lipid source, over an 8-week period. Interim samples and measurements were taken fortnightly during the trial in order to define the aetiology of the onset and progression of EFA deficiency. After 2 weeks, the fish fed the FO FREE and FO LOW diets had significantly lower live-weights, and after 8 weeks significant differences were detected for all performance parameters. The fish fed the FO FREE diet also had a significantly higher incidence of external abnormalities. The transcription of several genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was affected after 2 weeks of feeding, showing a rapid nutritional regulation. This experiment documents the aetiology of the onset and the progression of EFA deficiency in juvenile barramundi and demonstrates that such deficiencies can be detected within 2 weeks in juvenile fish.

  18. Effect of fulvic acid induction on the physiology, metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis-related gene transcription of Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10.

    PubMed

    Che, Raoqiong; Huang, Li; Xu, Jun-Wei; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Ma, Huixian; Yu, Xuya

    2017-03-01

    Fulvic acid (FA) triggers lipid accumulation in Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10, which can produce biofuels. Therefore, the metabolism shift and gene expression changes influenced by fulvic acid should be investigated. In this study, lipid and protein contents increased rapidly from 44.6% to 54.3% and from 31.4% to 39.7% under FA treatment, respectively. By contrast, carbohydrate content sharply declined from 49.5% to 32.5%. The correlation between lipid content and gene expression was also analyzed. Results revealed that accD, ME, and GPAT genes were significantly correlated with lipid accumulation. These genes could likely influence lipid accumulation and could be selected as modification candidates. These results demonstrated that FA significantly increased microalgal lipid accumulation by changing the intracellular reactive oxygen species, gene expression, and enzyme activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

  19. Added value of next generation gene panel analysis for patients with elevated methylmalonic acid and no clinical diagnosis following functional studies of vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pupavac, Mihaela; Tian, Xia; Chu, Jordan; Wang, Guoli; Feng, Yanming; Chen, Stella; Fenter, Remington; Zhang, Victor W; Wang, Jing; Watkins, David; Wong, Lee-Jun; Rosenblatt, David S

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) based gene panel testing is increasingly available as a molecular diagnostic approach for inborn errors of metabolism. Over the past 40 years patients have been referred to the Vitamin B12 Clinical Research Laboratory at McGill University for diagnosis of inborn errors of cobalamin metabolism by functional studies in cultured fibroblasts. DNA samples from patients in which no diagnosis was made by these studies were tested by a NGS gene panel to determine whether any molecular diagnoses could be made. 131 DNA samples from patients with elevated methylmalonic acid and no diagnosis following functional studies of cobalamin metabolism were analyzed using the 24 gene extended cobalamin metabolism NGS based panel developed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Gene panel testing identified two or more variants in a single gene in 16/131 patients. Eight patients had pathogenic findings, one had a finding of uncertain significance, and seven had benign findings. Of the patients with pathogenic findings, five had mutations in ACSF3, two in SUCLG1 and one in TCN2. Thus, the NGS gene panel allowed for the presumptive diagnosis of 8 additional patients for which a diagnosis was not made by the functional assays.

  20. Effect of vitamin E supplementation or alfalfa grazing on fatty acid composition and expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in lambs.

    PubMed

    González-Calvo, L; Joy, M; Blanco, M; Dervishi, E; Molino, F; Sarto, P; Ripoll, G; Serrano, M; Calvo, J H

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin E (VE) supplementation and alfalfa grazing during fattening on fatty acid composition and mRNA expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in the LM of Rasa Aragonesa light lambs. After weaning, 48 lambs were kept indoors and fed a commercial concentrate and a VE supplemented concentrate (480 mg DL-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg DM) for 0 (control [CON]), 10 (VE10d), 20 (VE20d), and 30 d (VE30d) before slaughtering at 22 to 24 kg. Simultaneously, 8 unweaned lambs grazed in alfalfa (154 mg α-tocopherol/kg DM) paddocks with their dams and supplemented with the commercial concentrate (ALF). Immediately after slaughter, LM was sampled to determine gene expression. After 24 h of cooling at 4°C, LM was extracted to determine intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition. The IMF content did not differ with the dietary treatment ( = 0.212). Unweaned grazing alfalfa lambs had greater concentration of rumenic acid (C18:2 c9,t11; P < 0.001) and lower oleic acid (C18:1 c9; = 0.001) content and PUFA n-6:n-3 ratio (P < 0.001) but similar expression of genes implicated in lipid metabolism compared to the concentrate-fed lambs. Vitamin E supplementation did not modify muscle fatty acid composition; however, it increased the expression of FADS2 and ELOVL6, which are involved in desaturation of long-chain fatty acid and the elongation of SFA and MUFA. The results showed that a short period of VE supplementation, especially 10 (VE10d) and 20 d (VE20d), modified gene expression. Overall, the results showed that VE may be acting as a regulatory factor for transcriptional control of genes related to lipid metabolism in the muscle of Rasa Aragonesa light lambs (22-24 kg live weight and younger than 90 d old).

  1. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  2. Soy protein diet alters expression of hepatic genes regulating fatty acid and thyroid hormone metabolism in the male rat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined effects of soy protein (SPI) and the isoflavone genistein (GEN) on mRNA expression of key lipid metabolism and thyroid hormone system genes in young adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. SPI-fed rats had less retroperitoneal fat and less hepato-steatosis than casein (CAS, control protein)-...

  3. Gene polymorphisms as risk factors for predicting the cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome. Role of folic acid metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Mátyás, Gábor; Szokolai, Viola; Harsányi, Gergely; Szilveszter, Bálint; Odler, Balázs; Pólos, Miklós; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Radovits, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid metabolism enzyme polymorphisms are believed to be responsible for the elevation of homocysteine (HCY) concentration in the blood plasma, correlating with the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. We studied 71 Marfan patients divided into groups based on the severity of cardiovascular involvement: no intervention required (n=27, Group A); mild involvement requiring intervention (n=17, Group B); severe involvement (n=27, Group C) subdivided into aortic dilatation (n=14, Group C1) and aortic dissection (n=13, Group C2), as well as 117 control subjects. We evaluated HCY, folate, vitamin B12 and the polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR;c.665C>T and c.1286A>C), methionine synthase (MTR;c.2756A>G) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR;c.66A>G). Multiple comparisons showed significantly higher levels of HCY in Group C2 compared to Groups A, B, C1 and control group (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). Folate was lower in Group C2 than in Groups A, B, C1 and control subjects (p<0.0001, p=0.02, p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Group C2 had the highest prevalence of homozygotes for all four gene polymorphisms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HCY plasma level was an independent risk factor for severe cardiovascular involvement (Group C; odds ratio [OR] 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-2.67, p=0.001) as well as for aortic dissection (Group C2; OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.30-4.78, p=0.006). In conclusion, severe cardiovascular involvement in Marfan patients, and especially aortic dissection, is associated with higher HCY plasma levels and prevalence of homozygous genotypes of folic acid metabolism enzymes than mild or no cardiovascular involvement. These results suggest that impaired folic acid metabolism has an important role in the development and remodelling of the extracellular matrix of the aorta.

  4. Conserved and Divergent Rhythms of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism-Related and Core Clock Gene Expression in the Cactus Opuntia ficus-indica1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  5. Conserved and divergent rhythms of crassulacean acid metabolism-related and core clock gene expression in the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-08-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  6. Lipoic Acid Metabolism in Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Maroya D.; Prigge, Sean T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Lipoic acid [(R)-5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid] is an enzyme cofactor required for intermediate metabolism in free-living cells. Lipoic acid was discovered nearly 60 years ago and was shown to be covalently attached to proteins in several multicomponent dehydrogenases. Cells can acquire lipoate (the deprotonated charge form of lipoic acid that dominates at physiological pH) through either scavenging or de novo synthesis. Microbial pathogens implement these basic lipoylation strategies with a surprising variety of adaptations which can affect pathogenesis and virulence. Similarly, lipoylated proteins are responsible for effects beyond their classical roles in catalysis. These include roles in oxidative defense, bacterial sporulation, and gene expression. This review surveys the role of lipoate metabolism in bacterial, fungal, and protozoan pathogens and how these organisms have employed this metabolism to adapt to niche environments. PMID:20508247

  7. Effects of rice bran on performance, egg quality, oxidative status, yolk fatty acid composition, and fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression in laying ducks.

    PubMed

    Ruan, D; Lin, Y C; Chen, W; Wang, S; Xia, W G; Fouad, A M; Zheng, C T

    2015-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effects of different dietary levels of rice bran (RB) in laying duck diets on performance, egg quality, oxidation status, egg yolk fatty acid composition, and hepatic expression of fatty acid metabolism-related genes. Longyan females (1080) with similar BW at 19 wk of age were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments, each consisting of 6 replicates of 30 birds. The basal diet (I) was a typical corn-soybean ration while the experimental diets (II to VI) substituted RB for corn and wheat bran and a small reduction of soybean meal. The level of substitution in diets (II to VI) was 6%, 12%, 18%, 24%, and 30%, respectively. The experiment lasted for 12 wks. Average egg weight and daily egg mass decreased linearly as the level of RB inclusion increased (P<0.001) and feed conversion ratio linearly increased (P<0.001). The proportions of C14:0 and C18:0 and total saturated fatty acids (SFA) in egg yolk linearly decreased with increasing RB, and many of the key polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), like C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3, linearly increased (P<0.001), but not those of C20:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3. There were linear decreases (P<0.001) in hepatic abundance of FAS and SREBP1 transcripts, with a substantial reduction to about 30% those of ducks fed the control diet; there were no treatment effects on productive performance, eggshell thickness, strength, Haugh unit, antioxidation status, and egg yolk cholesterol or triglyceride content (P>0.05). In conclusion, the current study suggests that ducks from 19 to 31 wk could be fed diets with up to about 18% RB without effect on the number of eggs produced, egg quality, and oxidative status. Increasing amounts of RB linearly increased egg yolk concentrations of key fatty acids like C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 and decreased the hepatic abundance of FAS and SREBP-1 transcripts.

  8. Gene Therapy for Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Randy J.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene therapy has recently shown great promise as an effective treatment for a number of metabolic diseases caused by genetic defects in both animal models and human clinical trials. Most of the current success has been achieved using a viral mediated gene addition approach, but gene-editing technology has progressed rapidly and gene modification is being actively pursued in clinical trials. This review focuses on viral mediated gene addition approaches, because most of the current clinical trials utilize this approach to treat metabolic diseases. PMID:27853673

  9. Efficient production of L-Lactic acid by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a genome-integrated L-lactate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Nobuhiro; Saitoh, Satoshi; Tokuhiro, Kenro; Nagamori, Eiji; Matsuyama, Takashi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Haruo

    2005-04-01

    We developed a metabolically engineered yeast which produces lactic acid efficiently. In this recombinant strain, the coding region for pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1) on chromosome XII is substituted for that of the l-lactate dehydrogenase gene (LDH) through homologous recombination. The expression of mRNA for the genome-integrated LDH is regulated under the control of the native PDC1 promoter, while PDC1 is completely disrupted. Using this method, we constructed a diploid yeast transformant, with each haploid genome having a single insertion of bovine LDH. Yeast cells expressing LDH were observed to convert glucose to both lactate (55.6 g/liter) and ethanol (16.9 g/liter), with up to 62.2% of the glucose being transformed into lactic acid under neutralizing conditions. This transgenic strain, which expresses bovine LDH under the control of the PDC1 promoter, also showed high lactic acid production (50.2 g/liter) under nonneutralizing conditions. The differences in lactic acid production were compared among four different recombinants expressing a heterologous LDH gene (i.e., either the bovine LDH gene or the Bifidobacterium longum LDH gene): two transgenic strains with 2microm plasmid-based vectors and two genome-integrated strains.

  10. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  11. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... This is an amino acid that helps remove ammonia from the blood. Babies with HCY may need ...

  12. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  13. Regulation of metabolic flux in Lactobacillus casei for lactic acid production by overexpressed ldhL gene with two-stage oxygen supply strategy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Yan; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Long-Yun

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel strategy to regulate the metabolic flux for lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei. The ldhL gene encoding L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) was overexpressed in L. casei, and a two-stage oxygen supply strategy (TOS) that maintained a medium oxygen supply level during the early fermentation phase, and a low oxygen supply level in the later phase was carried out. As a consequence, a maximum L-LDH activity of 95.6 U/ml was obtained in the recombinant strain, which was over 4-fold higher than that of the initial strain. Under the TOS for L. casei (pMG-ldhL), the maximum lactic acid concentration of 159.6 g/l was obtained in 36 h, corresponding to a 62.8% increase. The results presented here provide a novel way to regulate the metabolic flux of L. casei for lactic acid production in different fermentation stages, which is available to enhance organic acid production in other strains.

  14. Transcriptional coordination and abscisic acid mediated regulation of sucrose transport and sucrose-to-starch metabolism related genes during grain filling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shalini; Liu, Aihua; Deol, Kirandeep K; Kulichikhin, Konstanin; Stasolla, Claudio; Brûlé-Babel, Anita; Ayele, Belay T

    2015-11-01

    Combining physiological, molecular and biochemical approaches, this study investigated the transcriptional coordination and abscisic acid (ABA) mediated regulation of genes involved in sucrose import and its conversion to starch during grain filling in wheat. Sucrose import appears to be mediated by seed localized TaSUT1, mainly TaSUT1D, while sucrose cleavage by TaSuSy2. Temporal overlapping of the transcriptional activation of AGPL1 and AGPS1a that encode AGPase with that of the above genes suggests their significance in the synthesis of ADP-glucose; TaAGPL1A and TaAGPL1D contributing the majority of AGPL1 transcripts. ABA induced repressions of TaSUT1, TaSuSy2, TaAGPL1 and TaAGPS1a imply that ABA negatively regulates sucrose import into the endosperm and its subsequent metabolism to ADP-glucose, the substrate for starch synthesis. The formations of amyloses and amylopectin from ADP-glucose appear to be mediated by specific members of GBSS, and SS, SBE and DBE gene families, and the ABA-induced transcriptional change in most of these genes implies that ABA regulates amylose and amylopectin synthesis. The findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordination and ABA mediated regulation of sucrose transport into the developing endosperm and its subsequent metabolism to starch during grain filling in wheat.

  15. Tang-Nai-Kang Alleviates Pre-diabetes and Metabolic Disorders and Induces a Gene Expression Switch toward Fatty Acid Oxidation in SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linyi; Yoshitomi, Hisae; Wei, Ying; Qin, Lingling; Zhou, Jingxin; Xu, Tunhai; Wu, Xinli; Zhou, Tian; Sun, Wen; Guo, Xiangyu; Wu, Lili; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yan; Li, Chunna; Liu, Tonghua; Gao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Increased energy intake and reduced physical activity can lead to obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Transcriptional modulation of metabolic networks has become a focus of current drug discovery research into the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders associated with energy surplus and obesity. Tang-Nai-Kang (TNK), a mixture of five herbal plant extracts, has been shown to improve abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with pre-diabetes. Here, we report the metabolic phenotype of SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr (SHR/cp) rats treated with TNK. Pre-diabetic SHR/cp rats were randomly divided into control, TNK low-dose (1.67 g/kg) and TNK high-dose (3.24 g/kg) groups. After high-dose treatment for 2 weeks, the serum triglycerides and free fatty acids in SHR/cp rats were markedly reduced compared to controls. After 3 weeks of administration, the high dose of TNK significantly reduced the body weight and fat mass of SHR/cp rats without affecting food consumption. Serum fasting glucose and insulin levels in the TNK-treated groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, TNK-treated rats exhibited obvious improvements in glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The improved glucose metabolism may be caused by the substantial reduction in serum lipids and body weight observed in SHR/cp rats starting at 3 weeks of TNK treatment. The mRNA expression of NAD+-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and genes related to fatty acid oxidation was markedly up-regulated in the muscle, liver and adipose tissue after TNK treatment. Furthermore, TNK promoted the deacetylation of two well-established SIRT1 targets, PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and forkhead transcription factor 1 (FOXO1), and induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in different tissues. These observations suggested that TNK may be an alternative treatment for pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome by inducing a gene expression switch toward fat

  16. Tang-Nai-Kang alleviates pre-diabetes and metabolic disorders and induces a gene expression switch toward fatty acid oxidation in SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Linyi; Yoshitomi, Hisae; Wei, Ying; Qin, Lingling; Zhou, Jingxin; Xu, Tunhai; Wu, Xinli; Zhou, Tian; Sun, Wen; Guo, Xiangyu; Wu, Lili; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yan; Li, Chunna; Liu, Tonghua; Gao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Increased energy intake and reduced physical activity can lead to obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Transcriptional modulation of metabolic networks has become a focus of current drug discovery research into the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders associated with energy surplus and obesity. Tang-Nai-Kang (TNK), a mixture of five herbal plant extracts, has been shown to improve abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with pre-diabetes. Here, we report the metabolic phenotype of SHR.Cg-Leprcp/NDmcr (SHR/cp) rats treated with TNK. Pre-diabetic SHR/cp rats were randomly divided into control, TNK low-dose (1.67 g/kg) and TNK high-dose (3.24 g/kg) groups. After high-dose treatment for 2 weeks, the serum triglycerides and free fatty acids in SHR/cp rats were markedly reduced compared to controls. After 3 weeks of administration, the high dose of TNK significantly reduced the body weight and fat mass of SHR/cp rats without affecting food consumption. Serum fasting glucose and insulin levels in the TNK-treated groups decreased after 6 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, TNK-treated rats exhibited obvious improvements in glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The improved glucose metabolism may be caused by the substantial reduction in serum lipids and body weight observed in SHR/cp rats starting at 3 weeks of TNK treatment. The mRNA expression of NAD+-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and genes related to fatty acid oxidation was markedly up-regulated in the muscle, liver and adipose tissue after TNK treatment. Furthermore, TNK promoted the deacetylation of two well-established SIRT1 targets, PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and forkhead transcription factor 1 (FOXO1), and induced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in different tissues. These observations suggested that TNK may be an alternative treatment for pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome by inducing a gene expression switch toward fat

  17. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-12-22

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage.

  18. Matrix-based three-dimensional culture of buffalo mammary epithelial cells showed higher induction of genes related to milk protein and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Umesh K; Sharma, Ankita; Sodhi, Monika; Kapila, Neha; Kishore, Amit; Mohanty, Ashok; Kataria, Ranjit; Malakar, Dhruva; Mukesh, Manishi

    2016-02-01

    Demanding transcriptomic studies in livestock animal species could be replaced by good in vitro models mimicking the function of mammary gland. Mammary epithelial cells (MEC) are the functional unit of the mammary gland. Extracellular matrix is known to be a key factor providing normal homeostasis in three-dimensional (3D) environment as important signals are lost when cells are cultured in two-dimensional (2D) environment. The aims of this study were to establish a buffalo mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) in 3D culture using extracellular matrix and to determine whether such a 3D culture model has different expression pattern than 2D counterpart. The purified MEC generated after several passages were used to establish 3D culture using Geltrex matrix. The expression of milk casein genes viz., alpha S1-casein (CSN1S1), alpha S2-casein (CSN1S2), beta-casein (CSN2), kappa-casein (CSN3); and fatty acid metabolism genes viz., butyrophilin (BTN1A1), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), fatty acid-binding protein 3 (FABP3), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) was assessed in 3D culture in comparison to traditional monolayer culture using qRT-PCR. Notable morphological differences were observed for BMECs grown in 3D culture in comparison to 2D culture. Morphologically, epithelial structures grown in Geltrex matrix (3D) environment showed enhanced functional differentiation in comparison to 2D culture. In 3D culture, lumen and dome-like structures were formed by day 5, whereas polarized acinus-like structure were formed within 15 days of culturing. The expression data showed higher mRNA induction of milk casein and fatty acid metabolism genes in 10-day-old 3D BMECs culture in comparison to 2D monolayer culture. The result suggests that 3D organization of epithelial cells has favorable effect on induction of milk and fatty acid metabolism-related genes. Therefore, matrix-based 3D culture of MEC that recapitulate the structural and functional context of normal tissues

  19. Widespread Inter- and Intra-Domain Horizontal Gene Transfer of d-Amino Acid Metabolism Enzymes in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo-Ortíz, Miguel A.; Brock, Matthias; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the growing number of available fully-sequenced genomes has shown that Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in eukaryotes is more common than previously thought. It has been proposed that genes with certain functions may be more prone to HGT than others, but we still have a very poor understanding of the selective forces driving eukaryotic HGT. Recent work uncovered that d-amino acid racemases have been commonly transferred from bacteria to fungi, but their role in the receiving organisms is currently unknown. Here, we set out to assess whether d-amino acid racemases are commonly transferred to and between eukaryotic groups. For this we performed a global survey that used a novel automated phylogeny-based HGT-detection algorithm (Abaccus). Our results revealed that at least 7.0% of the total eukaryotic racemase repertoire is the result of inter- or intra-domain HGT. These transfers are significantly enriched in plant-associated fungi. For these, we hypothesize a possible role for the acquired racemases allowing to exploit minoritary nitrogen sources in plant biomass, a nitrogen-poor environment. Finally, we performed experiments on a transferred aspartate-glutamate racemase in the fungal human pathogen Candida glabrata, which however revealed no obvious biological role. PMID:28066338

  20. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  1. Mining the bitter melon (momordica charantia l.) seed transcriptome by 454 analysis of non-normalized and normalized cDNA populations for conjugated fatty acid metabolism-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Seeds of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) produce high levels of eleostearic acid, an unusual conjugated fatty acid with industrial value. Deep sequencing of non-normalized and normalized cDNAs from developing bitter melon seeds was conducted to uncover key genes required for biotechnological transfer of conjugated fatty acid production to existing oilseed crops. It is expected that these studies will also provide basic information regarding the metabolism of other high-value novel fatty acids. Results Deep sequencing using 454 technology with non-normalized and normalized cDNA libraries prepared from bitter melon seeds at 18 DAP resulted in the identification of transcripts for the vast majority of known genes involved in fatty acid and triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The non-normalized library provided a transcriptome profile of the early stage in seed development that highlighted the abundance of transcripts for genes encoding seed storage proteins as well as for a number of genes for lipid metabolism-associated polypeptides, including Δ12 oleic acid desaturases and fatty acid conjugases, class 3 lipases, acyl-carrier protein, and acyl-CoA binding protein. Normalization of cDNA by use of a duplex-specific nuclease method not only increased the overall discovery of genes from developing bitter melon seeds, but also resulted in the identification of 345 contigs with homology to 189 known lipid genes in Arabidopsis. These included candidate genes for eleostearic acid metabolism such as diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2, and a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1-related enzyme. Transcripts were also identified for a novel FAD2 gene encoding a functional Δ12 oleic acid desaturase with potential implications for eleostearic acid biosynthesis. Conclusions 454 deep sequencing, particularly with normalized cDNA populations, was an effective method for mining of genes associated with eleostearic acid metabolism in developing bitter melon seeds

  2. Sequence analysis of a gene cluster involved in metabolism of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid by Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Daubaras, D L; Hershberger, C D; Kitano, K; Chakrabarty, A M

    1995-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 utilizes 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) as a sole source of carbon and energy. PT88 is a chromosomal deletion mutant of B. cepacia AC1100 and is unable to grow on 2,4,5-T. The nucleotide sequence of a 5.5-kb chromosomal fragment from B. cepacia AC1100 which complemented PT88 for growth on 2,4,5-T was determined. The sequence revealed the presence of six open reading frames, designated ORF1 to ORF6. Five polypeptides were produced when this DNA region was under control of the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli; however, no polypeptide was produced from the fourth open reading frame, ORF4. Homology searches of protein sequence databases were performed to determine if the proteins involved in 2,4,5-T metabolism were similar to other biodegradative enzymes. In addition, complementation studies were used to determine which genes were essential for the metabolism of 2,4,5-T. The first gene of the cluster, ORF1, encoded a 37-kDa polypeptide which was essential for complementation of PT88 and showed significant homology to putative trans-chlorodienelactone isomerases. The next gene, ORF2, was necessary for complementation and encoded a 47-kDa protein which showed homology to glutathione reductases. ORF3 was not essential for complementation; however, both the 23-kDa protein encoded by ORF3 and the predicted amino acid sequence of ORF4 showed homology to glutathione S-transferases. ORF5, which encoded an 11-kDa polypeptide, was essential for growth on 2,4,5-T, but the amino acid sequence did not show homology to those of any known proteins. The last gene of the cluster, ORF6, was necessary for complementation of PT88, and the 32-kDa protein encoded by this gene showed homology to catechol and chlorocatechol-1,2-dioxygenases. PMID:7538273

  3. Impact of broiler egg storage on the relative expression of selected blastoderm genes associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakst, M R; Welch, G R; Fetterer, R; Miska, K

    2016-06-01

    Cool temperature storage of eggs prior to incubation is a frequent practice by commercial broiler hatcheries. However, continued storage beyond 7 d leads to a progressive increase in the rate of early embryonic mortality. In this study, we examined the relative expression of 31 genes associated with fatty acid metabolism (8), apoptosis (7), and oxidative stress (16) pathways to better understand the basis of embryo mortality during egg storage. A total of 642 broiler eggs in 2 separate trials were subjected to the following egg treatments: stored 4 d (Control 1, C1); stored 21 d but subjected to short periods of incubation during egg storage (SPIDES); stored un-manipulated 21 d (NonSPIDES, NS); and stored 4 d then incubated for 10 h to advance the embryos to the same developmental stages as the SPIDES embryos (Control 2, C2). Hatchability trials (277 eggs) confirmed the efficacy of SPIDES compared to NS treatments in both trials. To determine relative expression of 31 selected genes, 365 blastoderms were isolated, staged, and flash frozen in batches of 5 to 10 blastoderms per vial (7 vials per egg treatment) prior to RNA extractions. Analysis of gene expression was performed using qRT-PCR and the results presented as relative expression normalized to C1. The relative expression of genes in which the SPIDES and C2 treatments were significantly up- or down-regulated in tandem indicated that the stage-specific expression of those genes was maintained by the SPIDES treatment. This study provides the relative gene expressions of blastodermal cells before and after prolonged egg storage as well as insight as to how SPIDES impacts blastodermal cell gene expression.

  4. Regulation of the expression and activity of glucose and lactic acid metabolism-related genes by protein kinase C in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Otake, Sho; Kobayashi, Masaki; Narumi, Katsuya; Sasaki, Shotaro; Kikutani, Yurika; Furugen, Ayako; Watanabe, Meguho; Takahashi, Natsuko; Ogura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Iseki, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulators are very attractive therapeutic targets in cancer. Since most cancer cells display increased glycolysis, elucidations of the effects of PKC activation on glycolysis is necessary for the development of effective medicine. In the present study, to clarify the role of PKC in the regulation of glycolysis, we examined the effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on the expression and activity of glucose and lactic acid metabolism-related genes in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD cells). In parallel to increases in glucose uptake and mRNA levels of glucose transporters (GLUTs) induced by PMA treatment for 6 h, the hexokinase (HK) mRNA level and activity were also significantly increased in RD cells. On the other hand, a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) mRNA level and activity was seen when the cells were incubated with PMA for 24 h, but not for 6 or 12 h, and was associated with lactic acid production. These effects by PMA treatment were markedly suppressed by Bisindolylmaleimide (BIM), a PKC inhibitor. Furthermore, chetomin, a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibitor, completely abrogated the increment of LDH mRNA level and activity as well as monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 4, a lactic acid efflux transporter. In conclusion, we found that HK and LDH activity induced by PKC activation was associated with the glucose uptake and lactic acid level and that LDH and MCT4 are modulated by a common factor, HIF-1.

  5. Partial deficiency of isoleucine impairs root development and alters transcript levels of the genes involved in branched-chain amino acid and glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailan; Zhang, Fengxia; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yule; Liu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isoleucine is one of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) that are essential substrates for protein synthesis in all organisms. Although the metabolic pathway for isoleucine has been well characterized in higher plants, it is not known whether it plays a specific role in plant development. In this study, an Arabidopsis mutant, lib (low isoleucine biosynthesis), that has defects in both cell proliferation and cell expansion processes during root development, was characterized. The lib mutant carries a T-DNA insertion in the last exon of the OMR1 gene that encodes a threonine deaminase/dehydratase (TD). TD catalyses the deamination and dehydration of threonine, which is the first and also the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine. This T-DNA insertion results in a partial deficiency of isoleucine in lib root tissues but it does not affect its total protein content. Application of exogenous isoleucine or introduction of a wild-type OMR1 gene into the lib mutant can completely rescue the mutant phenotypes. These results reveal an important role for isoleucine in plant development. In addition, microarray analysis indicated that the partial deficiency of isoleucine in the lib mutant triggers a decrease in transcript levels of the genes encoding the major enzymes involved in the BCAA degradation pathway; the analysis also indicated that many genes involved in the biosynthesis of methionine-derived glucosinolates are up-regulated.

  6. Delineation of the Caffeine C-8 Oxidation Pathway in Pseudomonas sp. Strain CBB1 via Characterization of a New Trimethyluric Acid Monooxygenase and Genes Involved in Trimethyluric Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sujit Kumar; Yu, Chi-Li; Das, Shuvendu; Louie, Tai Man; Gakhar, Lokesh

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of the ability of bacteria to live on caffeine via the C-8 oxidation pathway is unknown. The first step of this pathway, caffeine to trimethyluric acid (TMU), has been attributed to poorly characterized caffeine oxidases and a novel quinone-dependent caffeine dehydrogenase. Here, we report the detailed characterization of the second enzyme, a novel NADH-dependent trimethyluric acid monooxygenase (TmuM), a flavoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of TMU to 1,3,7-trimethyl-5-hydroxyisourate (TM-HIU). This product spontaneously decomposes to racemic 3,6,8-trimethylallantoin (TMA). TmuM prefers trimethyluric acids and, to a lesser extent, dimethyluric acids as substrates, but it exhibits no activity on uric acid. Homology models of TmuM against uric acid oxidase HpxO (which catalyzes uric acid to 5-hydroxyisourate) reveal a much bigger and hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the larger substrates. Genes involved in the caffeine C-8 oxidation pathway are located in a 25.2-kb genomic DNA fragment of CBB1, including cdhABC (coding for caffeine dehydrogenase) and tmuM (coding for TmuM). Comparison of this gene cluster to the uric acid-metabolizing gene cluster and pathway of Klebsiella pneumoniae revealed two major open reading frames coding for the conversion of TM-HIU to S-(+)-trimethylallantoin [S-(+)-TMA]. The first one, designated tmuH, codes for a putative TM-HIU hydrolase, which catalyzes the conversion of TM-HIU to 3,6,8-trimethyl-2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (TM-OHCU). The second one, designated tmuD, codes for a putative TM-OHCU decarboxylase which catalyzes the conversion of TM-OHCU to S-(+)-TMA. Based on a combination of enzymology and gene-analysis, a new degradative pathway for caffeine has been proposed via TMU, TM-HIU, TM-OHCU to S-(+)-TMA. PMID:22609920

  7. Gene expression and metabolite profiling of developing highbush blueberry fruit indicates transcriptional regulation of flavonoid metabolism and activation of abscisic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Michael; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Zaharia, L Irina; Schernthaner, Johann P; Gesell, Andreas; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kennedy, James A; Constabel, C Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) fruits contain substantial quantities of flavonoids, which are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the flavonoid constituents of ripe blueberries are known, the molecular genetics underlying their biosynthesis, localization, and changes that occur during development have not been investigated. Two expressed sequence tag libraries from ripening blueberry fruit were constructed as a resource for gene identification and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction primer design. Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that flavonoid biosynthetic transcript abundance followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and transcript profiles were consistent with the abundance of the three major classes of flavonoids. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) and corresponding biosynthetic transcripts encoding anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase were most concentrated in young fruit and localized predominantly to the inner fruit tissue containing the seeds and placentae. Mean PA polymer length was seven to 8.5 subunits, linked predominantly via B-type linkages, and was relatively constant throughout development. Flavonol accumulation and localization patterns were similar to those of the PAs, and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern of both was correlated with flavonoid-3'-hydroxylase transcript abundance. By contrast, anthocyanins accumulated late in maturation, which coincided with a peak in flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase and flavonoid-3'5'-hydroxylase transcripts. Transcripts of VcMYBPA1, which likely encodes an R2R3-MYB transcriptional regulator of PA synthesis, were prominent in both phases of development. Furthermore, the initiation of ripening was accompanied by a substantial rise in abscisic acid, a growth regulator that may be an important component of the ripening process and contribute to the regulation of

  8. Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Developing Highbush Blueberry Fruit Indicates Transcriptional Regulation of Flavonoid Metabolism and Activation of Abscisic Acid Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zifkin, Michael; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn A.; Zaharia, L. Irina; Schernthaner, Johann P.; Gesell, Andreas; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Kennedy, James A.; Constabel, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) fruits contain substantial quantities of flavonoids, which are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the flavonoid constituents of ripe blueberries are known, the molecular genetics underlying their biosynthesis, localization, and changes that occur during development have not been investigated. Two expressed sequence tag libraries from ripening blueberry fruit were constructed as a resource for gene identification and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction primer design. Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that flavonoid biosynthetic transcript abundance followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and transcript profiles were consistent with the abundance of the three major classes of flavonoids. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) and corresponding biosynthetic transcripts encoding anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase were most concentrated in young fruit and localized predominantly to the inner fruit tissue containing the seeds and placentae. Mean PA polymer length was seven to 8.5 subunits, linked predominantly via B-type linkages, and was relatively constant throughout development. Flavonol accumulation and localization patterns were similar to those of the PAs, and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern of both was correlated with flavonoid-3′-hydroxylase transcript abundance. By contrast, anthocyanins accumulated late in maturation, which coincided with a peak in flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase and flavonoid-3′5′-hydroxylase transcripts. Transcripts of VcMYBPA1, which likely encodes an R2R3-MYB transcriptional regulator of PA synthesis, were prominent in both phases of development. Furthermore, the initiation of ripening was accompanied by a substantial rise in abscisic acid, a growth regulator that may be an important component of the ripening process and contribute to the regulation

  9. Metabolic engineering of Rhizopus oryzae: Effects of overexpressing pyc and pepc genes on fumaric acid biosynthesis from glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumaric acid, a dicarboxylic acid used as a food acidulant and in manufacturing synthetic resins, can be produced from glucose in fermentation by Rhizopus oryzae. However, the fumaric acid yield is limited by the co-production of ethanol and other byproducts. To increase fumaric acid production, ove...

  10. Altered fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression in liver from morbidly obese women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Porras, José Antonio; Aragonès, Gemma; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2014-12-02

    Lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis and the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to evaluate gene expression of different fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes in morbidly obese (MO) women with NAFLD. Liver expression of key genes related to de novo FA synthesis (LXRα, SREBP1c, ACC1, FAS), FA uptake and transport (PPARγ, CD36, FABP4), FA oxidation (PPARα), and inflammation (IL6, TNFα, CRP, PPARδ) were assessed by RT-qPCR in 127 MO women with normal liver histology (NL, n = 13), simple steatosis (SS, n = 47) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 67). Liver FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MO NAFLD women with both SS and NASH compared to those with NL (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, respectively). Hepatic IL6 and TNFα mRNA expression was higher in NASH than in SS subjects (p = 0.033, p = 0.050, respectively). Interestingly, LXRα, ACC1 and FAS expression had an inverse relation with the grade of steatosis. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. In conclusion, our results indicate that lipogenesis seems to be downregulated in advanced stages of SS, suggesting that, in this type of extreme obesity, the deregulation of the lipogenic pathway might be associated with the severity of steatosis.

  11. Digital Cushion Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Metabolism Gene Network Expression in Holstein Dairy Cows Fed a High-Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zeeshan Muhammad; Akbar, Haji; Hosseini, Afshin; Bichi Ruspoli Forteguerri, Elena; Osorio, Johan S.

    2016-01-01

    The hoof digital cushion is a complex structure composed of adipose tissue beneath the distal phalanx, i.e. axial, middle and abaxial fat pad. The major role of these fat depots is dampening compression of the corium underneath the cushion. The study aimed to determine expression of target genes and fatty acid profiles in the hoof of non-pregnant dry Holstein cows fed low (CON) or high-energy (OVE) diets. The middle fat pad of the hoof digital cushion was collected soon after slaughter. Despite the lack of effect on expression of the transcription regulators SREBF1 and PPARG, the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACACA, FASN, SCD, and DGAT2 was upregulated with OVE. Along with the upregulation of G6PD and IDH1, important for NADPH synthesis during lipogenesis, and the basal glucose transporter SLC2A1, these data indicated a pro-lipogenic response in the digital cushion with OVE. The expression of the lipid droplet-associated protein PLIN2 was upregulated while expression of lipolytic enzymes (ATGL, ABDH5, and LIPE) only tended to be upregulated with OVE. Therefore, OVE induced lipogenesis, lipid droplet formation, and lipolysis, albeit to different extents. Although concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) did not differ, among the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), the concentration of 20:5n3 was lower with OVE. Among the saturated fatty acids, 20:0 concentration was greater with OVE. Although data indicated that the hoof digital cushion metabolic transcriptome is responsive to higher-energy diets, this did not translate into marked differences in the fatty acid composition. The decrease in concentration of PUFA, which could contribute to synthesis of inflammatory molecules, in OVE-fed cows indicated that feeding higher-energy diets might be detrimental for the mediation of inflammation in digital cushion. This effect could be further exacerbated by physiologic and endocrine changes during the peripartal period that favor inflammation. PMID:27441691

  12. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHETIC AND METABOLISM GENES IN LIVERS FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in crop protection and as pharmaceuticals. Triadimefon and propiconazole are hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not. Previous toxicogenomic studies suggest that alteration of the retinoic acid metabolism pathway may play a key event in ...

  13. Identification of hydroxy fatty acid and triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes in lesquerella through seed transcriptome analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Castor oil is the only commercial source of hydroxy fatty acid which has industrial value. The production of castor oil is hampered by the presence of the toxin ricin in its seed. Lesquerella seed also accumulates hydroxy fatty acid and is free of ricin, thus it is being developed as a n...

  14. Changes in Free Amino Acid Concentration in Rye Grain in Response to Nitrogen and Sulfur Availability, and Expression Analysis of Genes Involved in Asparagine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Postles, Jennifer; Curtis, Tanya Y.; Powers, Stephen J.; Elmore, J. S.; Mottram, Donald S.; Halford, Nigel G.

    2016-01-01

    Free asparagine plays a central role in nitrogen storage and transport in many plant species due to its relatively high ratio of nitrogen to carbon. However, it is also a precursor for acrylamide, a Class 2a carcinogen that forms during high-temperature processing and cooking. The concentration of free asparagine was shown to increase by approximately 70% in rye grain in response to severe sulfur deficiency (F-test, p = 0.004), while the concentration of both free asparagine and free glutamine increased (by almost threefold and approximately 62%, respectively) in response to nitrogen application (F-test, p < 0.001 for free asparagine; p = 0.004 for free glutamine). There were also effects of nutrient supply on other free amino acids: The concentration of free proline, for example, showed a significant (F-test, p = 0.019) effect of nitrogen interacting with sulfur, with the highest concentration occurring when the plants were deprived of both nitrogen and sulfur. Polymerase chain reaction products for several genes involved in asparagine metabolism and its regulation were amplified from rye grain cDNA. These genes were asparagine synthetase-1 (ScASN1), glutamine synthetase-1 (ScGS1), potassium-dependent asparaginase (ScASP), aspartate kinase (ScASK), and general control non-derepressible-2 (ScGCN2). The expression of these genes and of a previously described sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase-1 gene (ScSnRK1) was analyzed in flag leaf and developing grain in response to nitrogen and sulfur supply, revealing a significant (F-test, p < 0.05) effect of nitrogen supply on ScGS1 expression in the grain at 21 days post-anthesis. There was also evidence of an effect of sulfur deficiency on ScASN1 gene expression. However, although this effect was large (almost 10-fold) it was only marginally statistically significant (F-test, 0.05 < p < 0.10). The study reinforced the conclusion that nutrient availability can have a profound impact on the concentrations of

  15. Gene therapy for inhereted metabolic disorders in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Brown, Talmage; Chen, Y T

    2009-01-01

    Scientists first described inborn errors of metabolism, also termed inherited disorders of metabolism, early in the 20th century and since then have determined the biochemical and genetic bases of a great number of these disorders both in humans and in an increasing number of companion animals. The availability of metabolic screening tests has advanced the biochemical and genetic characterization in affected breeds of companion animals of inherited metabolic disorders involving amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, and metal metabolism. Advances in gene therapy have led to the development of new treatments for inherited disorders of metabolism, and animal models have played a critical role in this research. For example, glycogen storage disease type Ia in dogs was highly responsive to adeno-associated viral vectormediated gene therapy, which prolonged survival and for more than a year prevented hypoglycemia during fasting. Gene therapy for other glycogen storage diseases and metabolic disorders will also be feasible. The establishment of a breeding colony and the ability to sustain affected animals are critical steps toward evaluating the safety and efficacy of gene therapy with clinically relevant endpoints. The further development of gene therapy for inherited disorders of metabolism could lead to curative therapy for affected humans and animals alike.

  16. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  17. Phosphatidic acid metabolism in rat liver cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Giusto, Norma M

    2013-04-02

    The aim of the present research was to analyze the pathways for phosphatidic acid metabolism in purified nuclei from liver. Lipid phosphate phosphatase, diacylglycerol lipase, monoacylglycerol lipase and PA-phospholipase type A activities were detected. The presence of lysophosphatidic acid significantly reduced DAG production while sphingosine 1-phoshate and ceramide 1-phosphate reduced MAG formation from PA. Using different enzymatic modulators (detergents and ions) an increase in the PA metabolism by phospholipase type A was observed. Our findings evidence an active PA metabolism in purified liver nuclei which generates important lipid second messengers, and which could thus be involved in nuclear processes such as gene transcription.

  18. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H I; León, J; Raskin, I

    1995-01-01

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-beta-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:11607533

  19. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Citric Acid Metabolism in the Bovine Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms rapidly metabolize citric acid to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. The rate of metabolism varied between 0.00008 and 0.76 μmoles per g per min, the rate becoming higher as the citric acid concentration increased. The addition of potassium chloride to rumen contents decreased the rate of utilization. The results indicate that dietary citric acid is unlikely to accumulate in the rumen to a sufficiently high level to be an important factor in hypomagnesemia, except where other factors such as very high potassium levels in the food influence its metabolism. PMID:5549696

  1. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  2. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  3. Bile Acids, Obesity, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huijuan; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are increasingly recognized as key regulators of systemic metabolism. While bile acids have long been known to play important and direct roles in nutrient absorption, bile acids also serve as signaling molecules. Bile acid interactions with the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the membrane receptor G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 (TGR5) can regulate incretin hormone and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) secretion, cholesterol metabolism, and systemic energy expenditure. Bile acid levels and distribution are altered in type 2 diabetes and increased following bariatric procedures, in parallel with reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Thus, modulation of bile acid levels and signaling, using bile acid binding resins, TGR5 agonists, and FXR agonists, may serve as a potent therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other components of the metabolic syndrome in humans. PMID:25194176

  4. Articulation of three core metabolic processes in Arabidopsis: Fatty acid biosynthesis, leucine catabolism and starch metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mentzen, Wieslawa I; Peng, Jianling; Ransom, Nick; Nikolau, Basil J; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2008-01-01

    Background Elucidating metabolic network structures and functions in multicellular organisms is an emerging goal of functional genomics. We describe the co-expression network of three core metabolic processes in the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana: fatty acid biosynthesis, starch metabolism and amino acid (leucine) catabolism. Results These co-expression networks form modules populated by genes coding for enzymes that represent the reactions generally considered to define each pathway. However, the modules also incorporate a wider set of genes that encode transporters, cofactor biosynthetic enzymes, precursor-producing enzymes, and regulatory molecules. We tested experimentally the hypothesis that one of the genes tightly co-expressed with starch metabolism module, a putative kinase AtPERK10, will have a role in this process. Indeed, knockout lines of AtPERK10 have an altered starch accumulation. In addition, the co-expression data define a novel hierarchical transcript-level structure associated with catabolism, in which genes performing smaller, more specific tasks appear to be recruited into higher-order modules with a broader catabolic function. Conclusion Each of these core metabolic pathways is structured as a module of co-expressed transcripts that co-accumulate over a wide range of environmental and genetic perturbations and developmental stages, and represent an expanded set of macromolecules associated with the common task of supporting the functionality of each metabolic pathway. As experimentally demonstrated, co-expression analysis can provide a rich approach towards understanding gene function. PMID:18616834

  5. Regulation of hormone metabolism in Arabidopsis seeds: phytochrome regulation of abscisic acid metabolism and abscisic acid regulation of gibberellin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mitsunori; Hanada, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Endo, Akira; Okamoto, Masanori; Yamauchi, Yukika; North, Helen; Marion-Poll, Annie; Sun, Tai-Ping; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Nambara, Eiji

    2006-11-01

    In a wide range of plant species, seed germination is regulated antagonistically by two plant hormones, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA). In the present study, we have revealed that ABA metabolism (both biosynthesis and inactivation) was phytochrome-regulated in an opposite fashion to GA metabolism during photoreversible seed germination in Arabidopsis. Endogenous ABA levels were decreased by irradiation with a red (R) light pulse in dark-imbibed seeds pre-treated with a far-red (FR) light pulse, and the reduction in ABA levels in response to R light was inhibited in a phytochrome B (PHYB)-deficient mutant. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis gene, AtNCED6, and the inactivation gene, CYP707A2, was regulated in a photoreversible manner, suggesting a key role for the genes in PHYB-mediated regulation of ABA metabolism. Abscisic acid-deficient mutants such as nced6-1, aba2-2 and aao3-4 exhibited an enhanced ability to germinate relative to wild type when imbibed in the dark after irradiation with an FR light pulse. In addition, the ability to synthesize GA was improved in the aba2-2 mutant compared with wild type during dark-imbibition after an FR light pulse. Activation of GA biosynthesis in the aba2-2 mutant was also observed during seed development. These data indicate that ABA is involved in the suppression of GA biosynthesis in both imbibed and developing seeds. Spatial expression patterns of the AtABA2 and AAO3 genes, responsible for last two steps of ABA biosynthesis, were distinct from that of the GA biosynthesis gene, AtGA3ox2, in both imbibed and developing seeds, suggesting that biosynthesis of ABA and GA in seeds occurs in different cell types.

  6. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  7. Metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids.

    PubMed

    Cattoor, Ko; Dresel, Michael; De Bock, Lies; Boussery, Koen; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Keukeleire, Denis; Deforce, Dieter; Hofmann, Thomas; Heyerick, Arne

    2013-08-21

    In this study, in vitro metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids was investigated. Besides their well-known use as bitter compounds in beer, in several studies, bioactive properties have been related to these types of molecules. However, scientific data on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion aspects of these compounds are limited. More specific, in this study, α-acids, β-acids, and iso-α-acids were incubated with rabbit microsomes, and fractions were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for identification of oxidative biotransformation products. Metabolism of β-acids was mainly characterized by conversion into hulupones and the formation of a series of tricyclic oxygenated products. The most important metabolites of α-acids were identified as humulinones and hulupones. Iso-α-acids were found to be primarly metabolized into cis- and trans-humulinic acids, next to oxidized alloiso-α-acids. Interestingly, the phase I metabolites were highly similar to the oxidative degradation products in beer. These findings show a first insight into the metabolites of hop-derived bitter acids and could have important practical implications in the bioavailability aspects of these compounds, following ingestion of hop-based food products and nutraceuticals.

  8. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  9. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  10. Branched-chain amino acid ratios in low-protein diets regulate the free amino acid profile and the expression of hepatic fatty acid metabolism-related genes in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y H; Li, F N; Wen, C Y; Wang, W L; Guo, Q P; Li, Y H; Yin, Y L

    2017-03-06

    Liver metabolism is affected by nutrients. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of low-protein diets (17% crude protein, CP) supplemented with branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), including leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val), on hepatic amino acid profile and lipid metabolism in growing pigs. The ratio of Leu : Ile : Val in all groups was 1 : 0.51 : 0.63 (20% crude protein, CP), 1 : 1 : 1 (17% CP), 1 : 0.75 : 0.75 (17% CP), 1 : 0.51 : 0.63 (17% CP) and 1 : 0.25 : 0.25 (17% CP) respectively. Results revealed that compared to the positive control group (1 : 0.51 : 0.63, 20% CP), the low-protein diets significantly augmented the concentrations of most essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids (p < .05), with the greatest values observed in the 1 : 0.25 : 0.25 group. Moreover, relative to the control, the low-protein diets with the Leu : Ile : Val ratio ranging from 1 : 0.75 : 0.75 to 1 : 0.25 : 0.25 markedly downregulated the mRNA abundance of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP-4) (p < .05), and upregulated the mRNA expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) and liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (L-CPT-1) (p < .05). Therefore, our data suggest that protein-restricted diets supplemented with optimal BCAA ratio, that is, 1 : 0.75 : 0.75-1 : 0.25 : 0.25, induce a shift from fatty acid synthesis to fatty acid oxidation in the liver of growing pigs. These effects may be associated with increased mitochondrial biogenesis.

  11. Metabolic and inflammatory genes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chase, Kayla A; Rosen, Cherise; Gin, Hannah; Bjorkquist, Olivia; Feiner, Benjamin; Marvin, Robert; Conrin, Sean; Sharma, Rajiv P

    2015-01-30

    Energy metabolism and immunity are characterized as abnormal in schizophrenia. Because these two systems are highly coordinated, we measured expression of prototypic obesogenic and immunogenic genes in freshly harvested PBMC from controls and participants with schizophrenia. We report significant increases in PPARγ, SREBP1, IL-6 and TNFα, and decreases in PPARα and C/EPBα and mRNA levels from patients with schizophrenia, with additional BMI interactions, characterizing dysregulation of genes relating to metabolic-inflammation in schizophrenia.

  12. Metabolism and Residues of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid in DAS-40278-9 Maize (Zea mays) Transformed with Aryloxyalkanoate Dioxygenase-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Rotondaro, Sandra L; Ma, Mingming; Rosser, Steve W; Olberding, Ed L; Wendelburg, Brian M; Adelfinskaya, Yelena A; Balcer, Jesse L; Blewett, T Craig; Clements, Bruce

    2016-10-12

    DAS-40278-9 maize, which is developed by Dow AgroSciences, has been genetically modified to express the aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-1 (AAD-1) protein and is tolerant to phenoxy auxin herbicides, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). To understand the metabolic route and residue distribution of 2,4-D in DAS-40278-9 maize, a metabolism study was conducted with (14)C-radiolabeled 2,4-D applied at the maximum seasonal rate. Plants were grown in boxes outdoors. Forage and mature grain, cobs, and stover were collected for analysis. The metabolism study showed that 2,4-D was metabolized to 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), which was then rapidly conjugated with glucose. Field-scale residue studies with 2,4-D applied at the maximum seasonal rate were conducted at 25 sites in the U.S. and Canada to measure the residues of 2,4-D and free and conjugated 2,4-DCP in mature forage, grain, and stover. Residues of 2,4-D were not detectable in the majority of the grain samples and averaged <1.0 and <1.5 μg/g in forage and stover, respectively. Free plus conjugated 2,4-DCP was not observed in grain and averaged <1.0 μg/g in forage and stover.

  13. The effect of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) on growth performance, fatty acid composition and expression of ARA metabolism-related genes in larval half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhui; Li, Songlin; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-05-28

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) on growth performance, fatty acid composition and ARA metabolism-related gene expression in larval half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Larvae (35 d after hatching, 54 (SEM 1) mg) were fed diets with graded concentrations of ARA (0.01, 0.39, 0.70, 1.07, 1.42 and 2.86 % dry weight) five times per d to apparent satiation for 30 d. Results showed that increased dietary ARA concentration caused a significant non-linear rise to a plateau in survival rate, final body weight and thermal growth coefficient, and the maximum values occurred with the 1.42 % ARA treatment. As dietary ARA increased to 1.07 or 1.42 %, activities of trypsin, leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase levels increased, but they decreased with higher ARA concentrations. The fatty acid composition of tongue sole larvae was almost well correlated with their dietary fatty acid profiles, and the EPA content of the larvae decreased with increasing dietary ARA. Meanwhile, the partial sequences of COX-1a (cyclo-oxygenase-1a), COX-1b (cyclo-oxygenase-1b), COX-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), 5-LOX (5-lipoxygenase) and CYP2J6-like (cytochrome P450 2J6-like) were also obtained. Both COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression levels significantly increased to a plateau in an 'L'-shaped manner as dietary ARA increased to 1.07 or 1.42 %, but no significant differences were found in the gene expression of COX-1a, COX-1b or CYP2J6-like. These results suggest that 1.07-1.42 % dietary ARA was beneficial to the growth performance of larval tongue sole, and the regulation of dietary ARA on the growth performance of larvae was probably involved in altering the mRNA expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX.

  14. Extensive Decoupling of Metabolic Genes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Sander, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis requires the re-organization of metabolism to support malignant proliferation. We examine how the altered metabolism of cancer cells is reflected in the rewiring of co-expression patterns among metabolic genes. Focusing on breast and clear-cell kidney tumors, we report the existence of key metabolic genes which act as hubs of differential co-expression, showing significantly different co-regulation patterns between normal and tumor states. We compare our findings to those from classical differential expression analysis, and counterintuitively observe that the extent of a gene's differential co-expression only weakly correlates with its differential expression, suggesting that the two measures probe different features of metabolism. Focusing on this discrepancy, we use changes in co-expression patterns to highlight the apparent loss of regulation by the transcription factor HNF4A in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, despite no differential expression of HNF4A. Finally, we aggregate the results of differential co-expression analysis into a Pan-Cancer analysis across seven distinct cancer types to identify pairs of metabolic genes which may be recurrently dysregulated. Among our results is a cluster of four genes, all components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which show significant loss of co-expression in tumor tissue, pointing to potential mitochondrial dysfunction in these tumor types. PMID:25961905

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans metabolic gene regulatory networks govern the cellular economy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2014-10-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here, we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by miRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators.

  16. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  17. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  18. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling in Cholestasis, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport, and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug, and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport, and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration, and carcinogenesis.

  19. Cellular Metabolism of Unnatural Sialic Acid Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam D.; Fermaintt, Charles S.; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; McCombs, Janet E.; Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in addition to their metabolic functions, serve important roles as receptors, ligands, and structural molecules for diverse biological processes. Insight into carbohydrate biology and mechanisms has been aided by metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE). In MOE, unnatural carbohydrate analogs with novel functional groups are incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and used to probe biological systems. While MOE has expanded knowledge of carbohydrate biology, limited metabolism of unnatural carbohydrate analogs restricts its use. Here we assess metabolism of SiaDAz, a diazirine-modified analog of sialic acid, and its cell-permeable precursor, Ac4ManNDAz. We show that the efficiency of Ac4ManNDAz and SiaDAz metabolism depends on cell type. Our results indicate that different cell lines can have different metabolic roadblocks in the synthesis of cell surface SiaDAz. These findings point to roles for promiscuous intracellular esterases, kinases, and phosphatases during unnatural sugar metabolism and provide guidance for ways to improve MOE. PMID:25957566

  20. Metabolism of Sialic Acid by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Ventura, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria constitute a specific group of commensal bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 has previously been shown to utilize several plant-derived carbohydrates that include cellodextrins, starch, and galactan. In the present study, we investigated the ability of this strain to utilize the mucin- and human milk oligosaccharide (HMO)-derived carbohydrate sialic acid. Using a combination of transcriptomic and functional genomic approaches, we identified a gene cluster dedicated to the uptake and metabolism of sialic acid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. breve UCC2003 can cross feed on sialic acid derived from the metabolism of 3′-sialyllactose, an abundant HMO, by another infant gut bifidobacterial strain, Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. PMID:24814790

  1. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  2. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  3. The metabolism of "surplus" amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bender, David A

    2012-08-01

    For an adult in N balance, apart from small amounts of amino acids required for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, hormones, etc, an amount of amino acids almost equal to that absorbed from the diet can be considered to be "surplus" in that it will be catabolized. The higher diet-induced thermogenesis from protein than from carbohydrate or fat has generally been assumed to be due to increased protein synthesis, which is ATP expensive. To this must be added the ATP cost of protein catabolism through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Amino acid catabolism will add to thermogenesis. Deamination results in net ATP formation except when serine and threonine deaminases are used, but there is the energy cost of synthesizing glutamine in extra-hepatic tissues. The synthesis of urea has a net cost of only 1·5 × ATP when the ATP yield from fumarate metabolism is offset against the ATP cost of the urea cycle, but this offset is thermogenic. In fasting and on a low carbohydrate diet as much of the amino acid carbon as possible will be used for gluconeogenesis - an ATP-expensive, and hence thermogenic, process. Complete oxidation of most amino acid carbon skeletons also involves a number of thermogenic steps in which ATP (or GTP) or reduced coenzymes are utilized. There are no such thermogenic steps in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetyl CoA or acetoacetate, but for amino acids that are metabolized by way of the citric acid cycle intermediates there is thermogenesis ranging from 1 up to 7 × ATP equivalent per mol.

  4. Metabolic glycoengineering: sialic acid and beyond.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Meledeo, M Adam; Wang, Zhiyun; Khanna, Hargun S; Paruchuri, Venkata D P; Yarema, Kevin J

    2009-12-01

    This report provides a perspective on metabolic glycoengineering methodology developed over the past two decades that allows natural sialic acids to be replaced with chemical variants in living cells and animals. Examples are given demonstrating how this technology provides the glycoscientist with chemical tools that are beginning to reproduce Mother Nature's control over complex biological systems - such as the human brain - through subtle modifications in sialic acid chemistry. Several metabolic substrates (e.g., ManNAc, Neu5Ac, and CMP-Neu5Ac analogs) can be used to feed flux into the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway resulting in numerous - and sometime quite unexpected - biological repercussions upon nonnatural sialoside display in cellular glycans. Once on the cell surface, ketone-, azide-, thiol-, or alkyne-modified glycans can be transformed with numerous ligands via bioorthogonal chemoselective ligation reactions, greatly increasing the versatility and potential application of this technology. Recently, sialic acid glycoengineering methodology has been extended to other pathways with analog incorporation now possible in surface-displayed GalNAc and fucose residues as well as nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc-modified proteins. Finally, recent efforts to increase the "druggability" of sugar analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering, which have resulted in unanticipated "scaffold-dependent" activities, are summarized.

  5. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  6. Retinoic acid: its biosynthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1999-01-01

    This article presents a model that integrates the functions of retinoid-binding proteins with retinoid metabolism. One of these proteins, the widely expressed (throughout retinoid target tissues and in all vertebrates) and highly conserved cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), sequesters retinol in an internal binding pocket that segregates it from the intracellular milieu. The CRBP-retinol complex appears to be the quantitatively major form of retinol in vivo, and may protect the promiscuous substrate from nonenzymatic degradation and/or non-specific enzymes. For example, at least seven types of dehydrogenases catalyze retinal synthesis from unbound retinol in vitro (NAD+ vs. NADP+ dependent, cytosolic vs. microsomal, short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases vs. medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases). But only a fraction of these (some of the short-chain de-hydrogenases/reductases) have the fascinating additional ability of catalyzing retinal synthesis from CRBP-bound retinol as well. Similarly, CRBP and/or other retinoid-binding proteins function in the synthesis of retinal esters, the reduction of retinal generated from intestinal beta-carotene metabolism, and retinoic acid metabolism. The discussion details the evidence supporting an integrated model of retinoid-binding protein/metabolism. Also addressed are retinoid-androgen interactions and evidence incompatible with ethanol causing fetal alcohol syndrome by competing directly with retinol dehydrogenation to impair retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  7. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli

  8. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli-type chickpeas, which are

  9. Revealing insect herbivory-induced phenolamide metabolism: from single genes to metabolic network plasticity analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Gulati, Jyotasana; Baldwin, Ian T

    2014-08-01

    The phenylpropanoid metabolic space comprises a network of interconnected metabolic branches that contribute to the biosynthesis of a large array of compounds with functions in plant development and stress adaptation. During biotic challenges, such as insect attack, a major rewiring of gene networks associated with phenylpropanoid metabolism is observed. This rapid reconfiguration of gene expression allows prioritized production of metabolites that help the plant solve ecological problems. Phenolamides are a group of phenolic derivatives that originate from diversion of hydroxycinnamoyl acids from the main phenylpropanoid pathway after N-acyltransferase-dependent conjugation to polyamines or aryl monoamines. These structurally diverse metabolites are abundant in the reproductive organs of many plants, and have recently been shown to play roles as induced defenses in vegetative tissues. In the wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, in which herbivory-induced regulation of these metabolites has been studied, rapid elevations of the levels of phenolamides that function as induced defenses result from a multi-hormonal signaling network that re-shapes connected metabolic pathways. In this review, we summarize recent findings in the regulation of phenolamides obtained by mass spectrometry-based metabolomics profiling, and outline a conceptual framework for gene discovery in this pathway. We also introduce a multifactorial approach that is useful in deciphering metabolic pathway reorganizations among tissues in response to stress.

  10. Revealing insect herbivory-induced phenolamide metabolism: from single genes to metabolic network plasticity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaquerel, Emmanuel; Gulati, Jyotasana; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid metabolic space comprises a network of interconnected metabolic branches that contribute to the biosynthesis of a large array of compounds with functions in plant development and stress adaptation. During biotic challenges, such as insect attack, a major rewiring of gene networks associated with phenylpropanoid metabolism is observed. This rapid reconfiguration of gene expression allows for the prioritized production of metabolites that help the plant solve ecological problems. Phenolamides are a group of phenolic-derivatives that originate from the diversion of hydroxycinnamoyl acids from the main phenylpropanoid pathway after N-acyltransferase-dependent conjugation to polyamines or aryl-monoamines. These structurally diverse metabolites are abundant in reproductive organs of many plants and have recently been shown to play roles as induced defenses in vegetative tissues. In the wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata in which the herbivory-induced regulation of these metabolites has been studied, rapid elevations of phenolamide levels that function as induced defenses result from a multi-hormonal signaling network that reshapes connected metabolic pathways. In this review, we summarize recent findings in the regulation of phenolamides obtained by mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and outline a conceptual framework for gene discovery in this pathway. We finally introduce a multifactorial approach useful in deciphering metabolic pathway reorganizations among different tissues in response to stress. PMID:24617849

  11. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium ‘Hongdeng’), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit. PMID:28245268

  12. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Zhu, Tingting; Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium 'Hongdeng'), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit.

  13. Ferritin couples iron and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bu, Weiming; Liu, Renyu; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Loll, Patrick J; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2012-06-01

    A physiological relationship between iron, oxidative injury, and fatty acid metabolism exists, but transduction mechanisms are unclear. We propose that the iron storage protein ferritin contains fatty acid binding sites whose occupancy modulates iron uptake and release. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we found that arachidonic acid binds ferritin specifically and with 60 μM affinity. Arachidonate binding by ferritin enhanced iron mineralization, decreased iron release, and protected the fatty acid from oxidation. Cocrystals of arachidonic acid and horse spleen apoferritin diffracted to 2.18 Å and revealed specific binding to the 2-fold intersubunit pocket. This pocket shields most of the fatty acid and its double bonds from solvent but allows the arachidonate tail to project well into the ferrihydrite mineralization site on the ferritin L-subunit, a structural feature that we implicate in the effects on mineralization by demonstrating that the much shorter saturated fatty acid, caprylate, has no significant effects on mineralization. These combined effects of arachidonate binding by ferritin are expected to lower both intracellular free iron and free arachidonate, thereby providing a previously unrecognized mechanism for limiting lipid peroxidation, free radical damage, and proinflammatory cascades during times of cellular stress.

  14. Identification of C4 photosynthesis metabolism and regulatory-associated genes in Eleocharis vivipara by SSH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taiyu; Ye, Rongjian; Fan, Xiaolei; Li, Xianghua; Lin, Yongjun

    2011-09-01

    This is the first effort to investigate the candidate genes involved in kranz developmental regulation and C(4) metabolic fluxes in Eleocharis vivipara, which is a leafless freshwater amphibious plant and possesses a distinct culms anatomy structure and photosynthetic pattern in contrasting environments. A terrestrial specific SSH library was constructed to investigate the genes involved in kranz anatomy developmental regulation and C(4) metabolic fluxes. A total of 73 ESTs and 56 unigenes in 384 clones were identified by array hybridization and sequencing. In total, 50 unigenes had homologous genes in the databases of rice and Arabidopsis. The real-time quantitative PCR results showed that most of the genes were accumulated in terrestrial culms and ABA-induced culms. The C(4) marker genes were stably accumulated during the culms development process in terrestrial culms. With respect to C(3) culms, C(4) photosynthesis metabolism consumed much more transporters and translocators related to ion metabolism, organic acids and carbohydrate metabolism, phosphate metabolism, amino acids metabolism, and lipids metabolism. Additionally, ten regulatory genes including five transcription factors, four receptor-like proteins, and one BURP protein were identified. These regulatory genes, which co-accumulated with the culms developmental stages, may play important roles in culms structure developmental regulation, bundle sheath chloroplast maturation, and environmental response. These results shed new light on the C(4) metabolic fluxes, environmental response, and anatomy structure developmental regulation in E. vivipara.

  15. Ultraviolet and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine induced random mutagenesis in Chlorella vulgaris and its impact on fatty acid profile: a new insight on lipid-metabolizing genes and structural characterization of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Josephine; Rangamaran, Vijaya Raghavan; Gopal, Dharani; Shivasankarasubbiah, Kumar T; Thilagam, Mary Leema J; Peter Dhassiah, Magesh; Padinjattayil, Divya Shridhar M; Valsalan, VinithKumar N; Manambrakat, Vijayakumaran; Dakshinamurthy, Sivakumar; Thirunavukkarasu, Sivaraman; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran

    2015-02-01

    The present study was aimed at randomly mutating the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in order to alter its cellular behaviour towards increased lipid production for efficient biodiesel production from algal biomass. Individual mutants from ultraviolet light (UV-1 (30 s exposure), UV-2 (60 s exposure) and UV-3 (90 s exposure)) and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine (5'FDU-1 (0.25 mM) and 5'FDU-2 (0.50 mM)) exposed cells were identified to explore an alternative method for lipid enhancement. A marginally significant decrease in biomass in the UV mutants; marked increase in the lipid content in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 mutants; significant increase in saturated fatty acids level, especially in UV-2 mutant; insignificant increase in lipid production when these mutants were subjected to an additional stress of nitrogen starvation and predominantly enhanced level of unsaturated fatty acids in all the strains except UV-2 were noted. Chloroplast ultrastructural alterations and defective biosynthesis of chloroplast specific lipid constituents were observed in the mutants. Modelling of three-dimensional structures of acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase), omega-6, plastid delta-12 and microsomal delta-12 fatty acid desaturases for the first time and ligand-interaction studies greatly substantiated our findings. A replacement of leucine by a serine residue in the acetyl coA carboxylase gene of UV-2 mutant suggests the reason behind lipid enhancement in UV-2 mutant. Higher activity of ACCase in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 strongly proves the functional consequences of gene mutation to lipid production. In conclusion, algal mutants exhibited significant impact on biodiesel production through structural alterations in the lipid-metabolizing genes, thereby enhancing lipid production and saturated fatty acid levels.

  16. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E; Reiner, Alexander P; Yanek, Lisa R; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Smith, Jennifer A; Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Johnson, Andrew D; Feitosa, Mary F; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Chu, Audrey Y; Nolte, Ilja M; Dastani, Zari; Morris, Andrew; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Sun, Yan V; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Vaez, Ahmad; Lin, Honghuang; Ligthart, Symen; Marullo, Letizia; Rohde, Rebecca; Shao, Yaming; Ziegler, Mark A; Im, Hae Kyung; Schnabel, Renate B; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Stolk, Ronald P; Snieder, Harold; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Ikram, M Arfan; Richards, J Brent; Rotimi, Charles; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie; Ganesh, Santhi K; Nalls, Mike; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Pankow, James S; Coresh, Josef; Tang, Weihong; Linda Kao, W H; Boerwinkle, Eric; Morrison, Alanna C; Ridker, Paul M; Becker, Diane M; Rotter, Jerome I; Kardia, Sharon L R; Loos, Ruth J F; Larson, Martin G; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Province, Michael A; Tracy, Russell; Voight, Benjamin F; Vaidya, Dhananjay; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Benjamin, Emelia J; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Prokopenko, Inga; Meigs, James B; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors, genetic variants exist that influence MetS and inflammatory markers forming a predisposing MetS genetic network. To test this hypothesis a staged approach was undertaken. (a) We analyzed 17 metabolic and inflammatory traits in more than 85,500 participants from 14 large epidemiological studies within the Cross Consortia Pleiotropy Group. Individuals classified with MetS (NCEP definition), versus those without, showed on average significantly different levels for most inflammatory markers studied. (b) Paired average correlations between 8 metabolic traits and 9 inflammatory markers from the same studies as above, estimated with two methods, and factor analyses on large simulated data, helped in identifying 8 combinations of traits for follow-up in meta-analyses, out of 130,305 possible combinations between metabolic traits and inflammatory markers studied. (c) We performed correlated meta-analyses for 8 metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664, PDXDC1, FTO, MC4R and TOMM40. Based on large data evidence, we conclude that inflammation is a feature of MetS and several gene variants show pleiotropic genetic

  17. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kraja, Aldi T.; Chasman, Daniel I.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Johnson, Andrew D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Chu, Audrey Y.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Dastani, Zari; Morris, Andrew; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Sun, Yan V.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Vaez, Ahmad; Lin, Honghuang; Ligthart, Symen; Marullo, Letizia; Rohde, Rebecca; Shao, Yaming; Ziegler, Mark A.; Im, Hae Kyung; Schnabel, Renate B.; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Stolk, Ronald P.; Snieder, Harold; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Richards, J. Brent; Rotimi, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Leslie; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Nalls, Mike; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pankow, James S.; Coresh, Josef; Tang, Weihong; Kao, W.H. Linda; Boerwinkle, Eric; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ridker, Paul M.; Becker, Diane M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Larson, Martin G.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Province, Michael A.; Tracy, Russell; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; O’Donnell, Christopher; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Prokopenko, Inga; Meigs, James B.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors, genetic variants exist that influence MetS and inflammatory markers forming a predisposing MetS genetic network. To test this hypothesis a staged approach was undertaken. (a) We analyzed 17 metabolic and inflammatory traits in more than 85,500 participants from 14 large epidemiological studies within the Cross Consortia Pleiotropy Group. Individuals classified with MetS (NCEP definition), versus those without, showed on average significantly different levels for most inflammatory markers studied. (b) Paired average correlations between 8 metabolic traits and 9 inflammatory markers from the same studies as above, estimated with two methods, and factor analyses on large simulated data, helped in identifying 8 combinations of traits for follow-up in meta-analyses, out of 130,305 possible combinations between metabolic traits and inflammatory markers studied. (c) We performed correlated meta-analyses for 8 metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664, PDXDC1, FTO, MC4R and TOMM40. Based on large data evidence, we conclude that inflammation is a feature of MetS and several gene variants show pleiotropic genetic

  18. Integration of metabolic and gene regulatory networks modulates the C. elegans dietary response.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Arda, H Efsun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2013-03-28

    Expression profiles are tailored according to dietary input. However, the networks that control dietary responses remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine forward and reverse genetic screens to delineate a network of 184 genes that affect the C. elegans dietary response to Comamonas DA1877 bacteria. We find that perturbation of a mitochondrial network composed of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and the TCA cycle affects the dietary response. In humans, mutations in the corresponding genes cause inborn diseases of amino acid metabolism, most of which are treated by dietary intervention. We identify several transcription factors (TFs) that mediate the changes in gene expression upon metabolic network perturbations. Altogether, our findings unveil a transcriptional response system that is poised to sense dietary cues and metabolic imbalances, illustrating extensive communication between metabolic networks in the mitochondria and gene regulatory networks in the nucleus.

  19. D-lactic acid production by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Tomiko; Tokuhiro, Kenro; Nagamori, Eiji; Onishi, Toru; Saitoh, Satoshi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Haruo

    2006-02-01

    Poly D-lactic acid is an important polymer because it improves the thermostability of poly L-lactic acid by the stereo complex formation. We constructed a metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that produces D-lactic acid efficiently. In this recombinant, the coding region of pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1) was completely deleted, and two copies of the D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) gene from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides strain NBRC3426 were introduced into the genome. The D-lactate production reached 61.5 g/l, the amount of glucose being transformed into D-lactic acid being 61.2% under neutralizing conditions. Additionally, the yield of free D-lactic acid was also shown to be 53.0% under non-neutralizing conditions. It was confirmed that D-lactic acid of extremely high optical purity of 99.9% or higher. Our finding obtained the possibility of a new approach for pure d-lactic acid production without a neutralizing process compared with other techniques involving lactic acid bacteria and transgenic Escherichia coli.

  20. Brain amino acid metabolism and ketosis.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, M; Daikhin, Y; Nissim, I; Lazarow, A; Nissim, I

    2001-10-15

    The relationship between ketosis and brain amino acid metabolism was studied in mice that consumed a ketogenic diet (>90% of calories as lipid). After 3 days on the diet the blood concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 5 mmol/l (control = 0.06-0.1 mmol/l). In forebrain and cerebellum the concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 10-fold higher than control. Brain [citrate] and [lactate] were greater in the ketotic animals. The concentration of whole brain free coenzyme A was lower in ketotic mice. Brain [aspartate] was reduced in forebrain and cerebellum, but [glutamate] and [glutamine] were unchanged. When [(15)N]leucine was administered to follow N metabolism, this labeled amino acid accumulated to a greater extent in the blood and brain of ketotic mice. Total brain aspartate ((14)N + (15)N) was reduced in the ketotic group. The [(15)N]aspartate/[(15)N]glutamate ratio was lower in ketotic animals, consistent with a shift in the equilibrium of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction away from aspartate. Label in [(15)N]GABA and total [(15)N]GABA was increased in ketotic animals. When the ketotic animals were injected with glucose, there was a partial blunting of ketoacidemia within 40 min as well as an increase of brain [aspartate], which was similar to control. When [U-(13)C(6)]glucose was injected, the (13)C label appeared rapidly in brain lactate and in amino acids. Label in brain [U-(13)C(3)]lactate was greater in the ketotic group. The ratio of brain (13)C-amino acid/(13)C-lactate, which reflects the fraction of amino acid carbon that is derived from glucose, was much lower in ketosis, indicating that another carbon source, i.e., ketone bodies, were precursor to aspartate, glutamate, glutamine and GABA.

  1. Metabolic Engineering of a Novel Muconic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway via 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-01-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroFFBR, aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  2. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-06-09

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability.

  3. Nitrogen Metabolism Genes from Temperate Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Lipka, Marko; Thürmer, Andrea; Böttcher, Michael E; Friedrich, Michael W

    2017-03-10

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (SK) and Bothnian Bay (BB) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3(-) was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4(+) increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3(-) zone. Steady-state modelling of NO3(-) and NH4(+) porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Bacterial protease and hydratase genes appeared to make up the bulk of total ammonification genes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), denitrification (nir, nor), dissimilatory NO3(-) reduction to NH4(+) (nfr and otr) and in both of the latter two pathways (nar, nap) were also present. Results show ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are similarly abundant in both sediments. Also, denitrification genes appeared more abundant than DNRA genes. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the relative abundance of the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus and Nitrosomonas) appeared less abundant in SK sediments compared to BB sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present, suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3(-) reduction to NO2(-) or NH4(+) as a possible pathway. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, DNRA and denitrification activities in North Sea and Baltic Sea sediments.

  4. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD) 19), neonatal (postnatal day (PND) 7), prepubescent (PND32), middle age (12 months), and old age (18 and 24 months) in the C57BL/6J (C57) mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I), conjugation (Phase II) and excretion (Phase III). In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs w

  5. igr Genes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer C; Miner, Maurine D; Pandey, Amit K; Gill, Wendy P; Harik, Nada S; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-08-01

    Recently, cholesterol was identified as a physiologically important nutrient for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in chronically infected mice. However, it remained unclear precisely when cholesterol is available to the bacterium and what additional bacterial functions are required for its metabolism. Here, we show that the igr locus, which we previously found to be essential for intracellular growth and virulence of M. tuberculosis, is required for cholesterol metabolism. While igr-deficient strains grow identically to the wild type in the presence of short- and long-chain fatty acids, the growth of these bacteria is completely inhibited in the presence of cholesterol. Interestingly, this mutant is still able to respire under cholesterol-dependent growth inhibition, suggesting that the bacteria can metabolize other carbon sources during cholesterol toxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as mutation of the mce4 sterol uptake system partially suppresses this effect. In addition, the Delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout infection.

  6. Genome-wide association studies for fatty acid metabolic traits in five divergent pig populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanchang; Bin Yang; Zhang, Junjie; Cui, Leilei; Ma, Junwu; Chen, Congying; Ai, Huashui; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid composition profiles are important indicators of meat quality and tasting flavor. Metabolic indices of fatty acids are more authentic to reflect meat nutrition and public acceptance. To investigate the genetic mechanism of fatty acid metabolic indices in pork, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 33 fatty acid metabolic traits in five pig populations. We identified a total of 865 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), corresponding to 11 genome-wide significant loci on nine chromosomes and 12 suggestive loci on nine chromosomes. Our findings not only confirmed seven previously reported QTL with stronger association strength, but also revealed four novel population-specific loci, showing that investigations on intermediate phenotypes like the metabolic traits of fatty acids can increase the statistical power of GWAS for end-point phenotypes. We proposed a list of candidate genes at the identified loci, including three novel genes (FADS2, SREBF1 and PLA2G7). Further, we constructed the functional networks involving these candidate genes and deduced the potential fatty acid metabolic pathway. These findings advance our understanding of the genetic basis of fatty acid composition in pigs. The results from European hybrid commercial pigs can be immediately transited into breeding practice for beneficial fatty acid composition. PMID:27097669

  7. Metabolic regulation and gene expression during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2010-01-01

    The biochemical regulation of aestivation, a state of aerobic hypometabolism, achieves actions including strong overall suppression of metabolic rate, reprioritization of energy use by diverse cell functions, and enhancement of defenses such as protein chaperones and antioxidants that aid long-term life extension. This is accomplished by mechanisms that include differential action of intracellular signaling cascades, reversible protein phosphorylation to alter the activity states of multiple enzymes and functional proteins, global suppression of transcription and translation, and selective gene upregulation. Recent advances in understanding the regulation of aestivation are discussed with a particular emphasis on land snail and anuran models.

  8. Pre- and early-postnatal nutrition modify gene and protein expressions of muscle energy metabolism markers and phospholipid Fatty Acid composition in a muscle type specific manner in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Kongsted, Anna H; Ghoreishi, Seyed M; Takhtsabzy, Tasnim K; Friedrichsen, Martin; Hellgren, Lars I; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Vaag, Allan; Nielsen, Mette O

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that undernutrition in late fetal life reduced whole-body insulin sensitivity in adult sheep, irrespective of dietary exposure in early postnatal life. Skeletal muscle may play an important role in control of insulin action. We therefore studied a range of putative key muscle determinants of insulin signalling in two types of skeletal muscles (longissimus dorsi (LD) and biceps femoris (BF)) and in the cardiac muscle (ventriculus sinister cordis (VSC)) of sheep from the same experiment. Twin-bearing ewes were fed either 100% (NORM) or 50% (LOW) of their energy and protein requirements during the last trimester of gestation. From day-3 postpartum to 6-months of age (around puberty), twin offspring received a high-carbohydrate-high-fat (HCHF) or a moderate-conventional (CONV) diet, whereafter all males were slaughtered. Females were subsequently raised on a moderate diet and slaughtered at 2-years of age (young adults). The only long-term consequences of fetal undernutrition observed in adult offspring were lower expressions of the insulin responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1α (PGC1α) mRNA in BF, but increased PGC1α expression in VSC. Interestingly, the HCHF diet in early postnatal life was associated with somewhat paradoxically increased expressions in LD of a range of genes (but not proteins) related to glucose uptake, insulin signalling and fatty acid oxidation. Except for fatty acid oxidation genes, these changes persisted into adulthood. No persistent expression changes were observed in BF and VSC. The HCHF diet increased phospholipid ratios of n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in all muscles, even in adults fed identical diets for 1½ years. In conclusion, early postnatal, but not late gestation, nutrition had long-term consequences for a number of determinants of insulin action and metabolism in LD. Tissues other than muscle may account for reduced whole

  9. Organochloride pesticides modulated gut microbiota and influenced bile acid metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Shao, Wentao; Zhang, Chunlan; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Qihan; Liu, Hui; Sun, Haidong; Jiang, Zhaoyan; Gu, Aihua

    2017-04-06

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) can persistently accumulate in body and threaten human health. Bile acids and intestinal microbial metabolism have emerged as important signaling molecules in the host. However, knowledge on which intestinal microbiota and bile acids are modified by OCPs remains unclear. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p, p'-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) for 8 weeks. The relative abundance and composition of various bacterial species were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bile acid composition was analyzed by metabolomic analysis using UPLC-MS. The expression of genes involved in hepatic and enteric bile acids metabolism was measured by real-time PCR. Expression of genes in bile acids synthesis and transportation were measured in HepG2 cells incubated with p, p'-DDE and β-HCH. Our findings showed OCPs changed relative abundance and composition of intestinal microbiota, especially in enhanced Lactobacillus with bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity. OCPs affected bile acid composition, enhanced hydrophobicity, decreased expression of genes on bile acid reabsorption in the terminal ileum and compensatory increased expression of genes on synthesis of bile acids in the liver. We demonstrated that chronic exposure of OCPs could impair intestinal microbiota; as a result, hepatic and enteric bile acid profiles and metabolism were influenced. The findings in this study draw our attention to the hazards of chronic OCPs exposure in modulating bile acid metabolism that might cause metabolic disorders and their potential to cause related diseases in human.

  10. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  11. Altered Cholesterol and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Block, Robert C.; Dorsey, E. Ray; Beck, Christopher A.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease. PMID:20802793

  12. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  13. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of fumaric acid.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Kim, Dong In; Choi, Sol; Jang, Jae Won; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-07-01

    Fumaric acid is a naturally occurring organic acid that is an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fungal species belonging to Rhizopus have traditionally been employed for the production of fumaric acid. In this study, Escherichia coli was metabolically engineered for the production of fumaric acid under aerobic condition. For the aerobic production of fumaric acid, the iclR gene was deleted to redirect the carbon flux through the glyoxylate shunt. In addition, the fumA, fumB, and fumC genes were also deleted to enhance fumaric acid formation. The resulting strain was able to produce 1.45 g/L of fumaric acid from 15 g/L of glucose in flask culture. Based on in silico flux response analysis, this base strain was further engineered by plasmid-based overexpression of the native ppc gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC), from the strong tac promoter, which resulted in the production of 4.09 g/L of fumaric acid. Additionally, the arcA and ptsG genes were deleted to reinforce the oxidative TCA cycle flux, and the aspA gene was deleted to block the conversion of fumaric acid into L-aspartic acid. Since it is desirable to avoid the use of inducer, the lacI gene was also deleted. To increase glucose uptake rate and fumaric acid productivity, the native promoter of the galP gene was replaced with the strong trc promoter. Fed-batch culture of the final strain CWF812 allowed production of 28.2 g/L fumaric acid in 63 h with the overall yield and productivity of 0.389 g fumaric acid/g glucose and 0.448 g/L/h, respectively. This study demonstrates the possibility for the efficient production of fumaric acid by metabolically engineered E. coli.

  14. Alterations of metabolic genes and metabolites in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric K; Wu, Jing; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue

    2012-06-01

    Altered metabolic regulation has long been observed in human cancer and broadly used in the clinic for tumor detection. Two recent findings--the direct regulation of metabolic enzymes by frequently mutated cancer genes and frequent mutations of several metabolic enzymes themselves in cancer--have renewed interest in cancer metabolism. Supporting a causative role of altered metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis, abnormal levels of several metabolites have been found to play a direct role in cancer development. The alteration of metabolic genes and metabolites offer not only new biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, but also potential new targets for cancer therapy.

  15. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  16. The WWOX Gene Modulates HDL and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iatan, Iulia; Choi, Hong Y.; Ruel, Isabelle; Linga Reddy, M.V. Prasad; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lee, Jaeho; Abu Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Nikkola, Elina; Civelek, Mete; Awan, Zuhier; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Pajukanta, Päivi; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; Genest, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) constitutes a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recent studies from our group reported a genetic association between the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene and HDL-C levels. Here, through next-generation resequencing, in vivo functional studies and gene microarray analyses, we investigated the role of WWOX in HDL and lipid metabolism. Methods and Results Using next-generation resequencing of the WWOX region, we first identified 8 variants significantly associated and perfectly segregating with the low-HDL trait in two multi-generational French Canadian dyslipidemic families. To understand in vivo functions of WWOX, we used liver-specific Wwoxhep−/− and total Wwox−/− mice models, where we found decreased ApoA-I and ABCA1 levels in hepatic tissues. Analyses of lipoprotein profiles in Wwox−/−, but not Wwox hep−/− littermates, also showed marked reductions in serum HDL-C concentrations, concordant with the low-HDL findings observed in families. We next obtained evidence of a gender-specific effect in female Wwoxhep−/− mice, where an increase in plasma triglycerides and altered lipid metabolic pathways by microarray analyses were observed. We further identified a significant reduction in ApoA-I and LPL, and upregulation in Fas, Angptl4 and Lipg, suggesting that the effects of Wwox involve multiple pathways, including cholesterol homeostasis, ApoA-I/ABCA1 pathway, and fatty acid biosynthesis/triglyceride metabolism. Conclusions Our data indicate that WWOX disruption alters HDL and lipoprotein metabolism through several mechanisms and may account for the low-HDL phenotype observed in families expressing the WWOX variants. These findings thus describe a novel gene involved in cellular lipid homeostasis, which effects may impact atherosclerotic disease development. PMID:24871327

  17. Metabolic programming of long-term outcomes due to fatty acid nutrition in early life.

    PubMed

    Innis, Sheila M

    2011-04-01

    Understanding of the importance of dietary fatty acids has grown beyond a simple source of energy to complex roles in regulating gene expression and cell and intracellular communication. This is important because the metabolic and neuroendocrine environment of the fetus and infant plays a key role in guiding the set point of neural receptors that regulate energy homeostasis and expression of genes that control energy storage and oxidation. Early deviations in these pathways have the potential to lead to lasting adaptations, termed metabolic programming, which may combine to increase the risk of metabolic syndrome in later life. The quality of fatty acids in human diets has undergone major changes in the last 50 years, characterized by an increase in ω-6 and decrease in ω-3 fatty acids. Evidence is accumulating to support the concept that the maternal intake of ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids in gestation and lactation, possibly involving both excess ω-6 and inadequate ω-3 fatty acids, can impact the developing infant tissue lipids and neuroendocrine and metabolic pathways relevant to metabolic programming. Further work is needed to understand the needs for different ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids during fetal and infant life, and their roles with respect to development of energy homeostasis and metabolism.

  18. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  19. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  20. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia.

  1. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  2. Microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes regulating lipid metabolism during melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Sumantran, Venil N; Mishra, Pratik; Sudhakar, N

    2015-04-01

    A new hallmark of cancer involves acquisition of a lipogenic phenotype which promotes tumorigenesis. Little is known about lipid metabolism in melanomas. Therefore, we used BRB (Biometrics Research Branch) class comparison tool with multivariate analysis to identify differentially expressed genes in human cutaneous melanomas, compared with benign nevi and normal skin derived from the microarray dataset (GDS1375). The methods were validated by identifying known melanoma biomarkers (CITED1, FGFR2, PTPRF, LICAM, SPP1 and PHACTR1) in our results. Eighteen genes regulating metabolism of fatty acids, lipid second messengers and gangliosides were 2-9 fold upregulated in melanomas of GDS-1375. Out of the 18 genes, 13 were confirmed by KEGG pathway analysis and 10 were also significantly upregulated in human melanoma cell lines of NCI-60 Cell Miner database. Results showed that melanomas upregulated PPARGC1A transcription factor and its target genes regulating synthesis of fatty acids (SCD) and complex lipids (FABP3 and ACSL3). Melanoma also upregulated genes which prevented lipotoxicity (CPT2 and ACOT7) and regulated lipid second messengers, such as phosphatidic acid (AGPAT-4, PLD3) and inositol triphosphate (ITPKB, ITPR3). Genes for synthesis of pro-tumorigenic GM3 and GD3 gangliosides (UGCG, HEXA, ST3GAL5 and ST8SIA1) were also upregulated in melanoma. Overall, the microarray analysis of GDS-1375 dataset indicated that melanomas can become lipogenic by upregulating genes, leading to increase in fatty acid metabolism, metabolism of specific lipid second messengers, and ganglioside synthesis.

  3. Three Conazoles Increase Hepatic Microsomal Retinoic Acid Metabolism and Decrease Mouse Hepatic Retinoic Acid Levels In Vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. In a previous toxicogenomic study of triazole-containing conazoles we found gene expression changes consistent with the alteration of the metabolism of all trans-retinoic acid (atRA), a vitamin A metabolite with...

  4. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  5. Impact of broiler egg storage on the relative expression of selected blastoderm genes associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and fatty acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cool temperature storage of eggs prior to incubation is a frequent practice by commercial broiler hatcheries. However, continued storage beyond 7 days leads to a progressively increase in the rate of early embryonic mortality. In this study, we examined the relative expression of 31 genes associat...

  6. Metabolic engineering as a tool for enhanced lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Bikram P; DeVeaux, Linda C; Christopher, Lew P

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic engineering is a powerful biotechnological tool that finds, among others, increased use in constructing microbial strains for higher lactic acid productivity, lower costs and reduced pollution. Engineering the metabolic pathways has concentrated on improving the lactic acid fermentation parameters, enhancing the acid tolerance of production organisms and their abilities to utilize a broad range of substrates, including fermentable biomass-derived sugars. Recent efforts have focused on metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria as they produce high yields and have a small genome size that facilitates their genetic manipulation. We summarize here the current trends in metabolic engineering techniques and strategies for manipulating lactic acid producing organisms developed to address and overcome major challenges in the lactic acid production process.

  7. Obesity diabetes and the role of bile acids in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bile acids have many activities over and above their primary function in aiding absorption of fat and fat soluble vitamins. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol, and thus are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Bile acids stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) production in the distal small bowel and colon, stimulating insulin secretion, and therefore, are involved in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Bile acids through their insulin sensitising effect play a part in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Bile acid metabolism is altered in obesity and diabetes. Both dietary restriction and weight loss due to bariatric surgery, alter the lipid carbohydrate and bile acid metabolism. Recent research suggests that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO is a central regulator of bile, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism, but conflicting studies mean that our understanding of the complexity is not yet complete. PMID:28191525

  8. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnancy and metabolic syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Poniedzialek-Czajkowska, Elzbieta; Mierzynski, Radzislaw; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This review presents available evidence for possible application of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in pregnant obese women with metabolic syndrome (MS) and focuses on prophylaxis of pregnancy complications associated with MS such as gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. Dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs has recently become popular and their adequate intake during pregnancy and early childhood is of clinical importance. The results of experimental and epidemiological investigations reveal that n-3 PUFAs, especially α- linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. It is believed that n-3 PUFAs affect a multitude of molecular pathways, involving regulation of gene expression, alteration of physical and chemical properties of cellular membranes and modulation of membrane channels and proteins. A large body of evidence focuses on anti-inflammatory properties of PUFAs which seem to be fundamental in prevention and reversing of insulin resistance, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension, thromboembolism and in improving vascular function. Despite the potential PUFAs benefits of decreasing insulin resistance, their application in order to prevent preeclampsia, gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women with MS has not yet been established. Numerous reports have revealed that appropriate fetal development, including neuronal, retinal and immune function depends on EPA and DHA which are crucial also for prevention of preterm birth. Thus the supplementation with EPA and DHA is highly recommended during pregnancy although the optimal dosing and treatment strategies still need to be determined.

  9. Metabolic Fate of Unsaturated Glucuronic/Iduronic Acids from Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Takase, Ryuichi; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans in mammalian extracellular matrices are degraded to their constituents, unsaturated uronic (glucuronic/iduronic) acids and amino sugars, through successive reactions of bacterial polysaccharide lyase and unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase. Genes coding for glycosaminoglycan-acting lyase, unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase, and the phosphotransferase system are assembled into a cluster in the genome of pathogenic bacteria, such as streptococci and clostridia. Here, we studied the streptococcal metabolic pathway of unsaturated uronic acids and the structure/function relationship of its relevant isomerase and dehydrogenase. Two proteins (gbs1892 and gbs1891) of Streptococcus agalactiae strain NEM316 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. 4-Deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate (Dhu) nonenzymatically generated from unsaturated uronic acids was converted to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate via 3-deoxy-d-glycero-2,5-hexodiulosonate through successive reactions of gbs1892 isomerase (DhuI) and gbs1891 NADH-dependent reductase/dehydrogenase (DhuD). DhuI and DhuD enzymatically corresponded to 4-deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate ketol-isomerase (KduI) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate dehydrogenase (KduD), respectively, involved in pectin metabolism, although no or low sequence identity was observed between DhuI and KduI or between DhuD and KduD, respectively. Genes for DhuI and DhuD were found to be included in the streptococcal genetic cluster, whereas KduI and KduD are encoded in clostridia. Tertiary and quaternary structures of DhuI and DhuD were determined by x-ray crystallography. Distinct from KduI β-barrels, DhuI adopts an α/β/α-barrel structure as a basic scaffold similar to that of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase. The structure of DhuD is unable to accommodate the substrate/cofactor, suggesting that conformational changes are essential to trigger enzyme catalysis. This is the first report on the bacterial metabolism of

  10. Glycerol metabolism and bitterness producing lactic acid bacteria in cidermaking.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, G; Ibarburu, I; Berregi, I; Claisse, O; Lonvaud-Funel, A; Irastorza, A; Dueñas, M T

    2008-02-10

    Several lactic acid bacteria were isolated from bitter tasting ciders in which glycerol was partially removed. The degradation of glycerol via glycerol dehydratase pathway was found in 22 out of 67 isolates. The confirmation of glycerol degradation by this pathway was twofold: showing their glycerol dehydratase activity and detecting the presence of the corresponding gene by a PCR method. 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDL) and 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) were the metabolic end-products of glycerol utilization, and the accumulation of the acrolein precursor 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) was also detected in most of them. The strain identification by PCR-DGGE rpoB showed that Lactobacillus collinoides was the predominant species and only 2 belonged to Lactobacillus diolivorans. Environmental conditions conducting to 3-HPA accumulation in cidermaking were studied by varying the fructose concentration, pH and incubation temperature in L. collinoides 17. This strain failed to grow with glycerol as sole carbon source and the addition of fructose enhanced both growth and glycerol degradation. Regarding end-products of glycerol metabolism, 1,3-PDL was always the main end-product in all environmental conditions assayed, the only exception being the culture with 5.55 mM fructose, where equimolar amounts of 1,3-PDL and 3-HP were found. The 3-HPA was transitorily accumulated in the culture medium under almost all culture conditions, the degradation rate being notably slower at 15 degrees C. However, no disappearance of 3-HPA was found at pH 3.6, a usual value in cider making. After sugar exhaustion, L. collinoides 17 oxidated lactic acid and/or mannitol to obtain energy and these oxidations were accompanied by the removal of the toxic 3-HPA increasing the 1,3-PDL, 3-HP and acetic acid contents.

  11. The function of oxalic acid in the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel Stewart

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions in cells which involve oxalic acid are described. It is shown that this compound is required for the formation of uracil and orotic acid. The former is a component of RNA which is common to all cells in the human metabolism. On the basis of the biochemical reactions described a possible treatment to relieve the effects of calcium oxalate renal calculi whose origin is related to the metabolic concentration of oxalic acid is proposed.

  12. Undercover: gene control by metabolites and metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2016-01-01

    To make the appropriate developmental decisions or maintain homeostasis, cells and organisms must coordinate the expression of their genome and metabolic state. However, the molecular mechanisms that relay environmental cues such as nutrient availability to the appropriate gene expression response remain poorly understood. There is a growing awareness that central components of intermediary metabolism are cofactors or cosubstrates of chromatin-modifying enzymes. As such, their concentrations constitute a potential regulatory interface between the metabolic and chromatin states. In addition, there is increasing evidence for a direct involvement of classic metabolic enzymes in gene expression control. These dual-function proteins may provide a direct link between metabolic programing and the control of gene expression. Here, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms connecting metabolism to gene expression and their implications for development and disease. PMID:27881599

  13. Improving Fatty Acid Availability for Bio-Hydrocarbon Production in Escherichia coli by Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fengming; Chen, Yu; Levine, Robert; Lee, Kilho; Yuan, Yingjin; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of producing fatty-acid-derived hydrocarbons in Escherichia coli. However, product titers and yields remain low. In this work, we demonstrate new methods for improving fatty acid production by modifying central carbon metabolism and storing fatty acids in triacylglycerol. Based on suggestions from a computational model, we deleted seven genes involved in aerobic respiration, mixed-acid fermentation, and glyoxylate bypass (in the order of cyoA, nuoA, ndh, adhE, dld, pta, and iclR) to modify the central carbon metabolic/regulatory networks. These gene deletions led to increased total fatty acids, which were the highest in the mutants containing five or six gene knockouts. Additionally, when two key enzymes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway were over-expressed, we observed further increase in strain △cyoA△adhE△nuoA△ndh△pta△dld, leading to 202 mg/g dry cell weight of total fatty acids, ~250% of that in the wild-type strain. Meanwhile, we successfully introduced a triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway into E. coli through heterologous expression of wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) enzymes. The added pathway improved both the amount and fuel quality of the fatty acids. These new metabolic engineering strategies are providing promising directions for future investigation. PMID:24147139

  14. Global Metabolic Reconstruction and Metabolic Gene Evolution in the Cattle Genome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woonsu; Park, Hyesun; Seo, Seongwon

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of cattle genome provided a valuable opportunity to systematically link genetic and metabolic traits of cattle. The objectives of this study were 1) to reconstruct genome-scale cattle-specific metabolic pathways based on the most recent and updated cattle genome build and 2) to identify duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome for better understanding of metabolic adaptations in cattle. A bioinformatic pipeline of an organism for amalgamating genomic annotations from multiple sources was updated. Using this, an amalgamated cattle genome database based on UMD_3.1, was created. The amalgamated cattle genome database is composed of a total of 33,292 genes: 19,123 consensus genes between NCBI and Ensembl databases, 8,410 and 5,493 genes only found in NCBI or Ensembl, respectively, and 266 genes from NCBI scaffolds. A metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome and cattle pathway genome database (PGDB) was also developed using Pathway Tools, followed by an intensive manual curation. The manual curation filled or revised 68 pathway holes, deleted 36 metabolic pathways, and added 23 metabolic pathways. Consequently, the curated cattle PGDB contains 304 metabolic pathways, 2,460 reactions including 2,371 enzymatic reactions, and 4,012 enzymes. Furthermore, this study identified eight duplicated genes in 12 metabolic pathways in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse. Some of these duplicated genes are related with specific hormone biosynthesis and detoxifications. The updated genome-scale metabolic reconstruction is a useful tool for understanding biology and metabolic characteristics in cattle. There has been significant improvements in the quality of cattle genome annotations and the MetaCyc database. The duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse implies evolutionary changes in the cattle genome and provides a useful information for further research on understanding metabolic adaptations of cattle. PMID

  15. Global Metabolic Reconstruction and Metabolic Gene Evolution in the Cattle Genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woonsu; Park, Hyesun; Seo, Seongwon

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of cattle genome provided a valuable opportunity to systematically link genetic and metabolic traits of cattle. The objectives of this study were 1) to reconstruct genome-scale cattle-specific metabolic pathways based on the most recent and updated cattle genome build and 2) to identify duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome for better understanding of metabolic adaptations in cattle. A bioinformatic pipeline of an organism for amalgamating genomic annotations from multiple sources was updated. Using this, an amalgamated cattle genome database based on UMD_3.1, was created. The amalgamated cattle genome database is composed of a total of 33,292 genes: 19,123 consensus genes between NCBI and Ensembl databases, 8,410 and 5,493 genes only found in NCBI or Ensembl, respectively, and 266 genes from NCBI scaffolds. A metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome and cattle pathway genome database (PGDB) was also developed using Pathway Tools, followed by an intensive manual curation. The manual curation filled or revised 68 pathway holes, deleted 36 metabolic pathways, and added 23 metabolic pathways. Consequently, the curated cattle PGDB contains 304 metabolic pathways, 2,460 reactions including 2,371 enzymatic reactions, and 4,012 enzymes. Furthermore, this study identified eight duplicated genes in 12 metabolic pathways in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse. Some of these duplicated genes are related with specific hormone biosynthesis and detoxifications. The updated genome-scale metabolic reconstruction is a useful tool for understanding biology and metabolic characteristics in cattle. There has been significant improvements in the quality of cattle genome annotations and the MetaCyc database. The duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse implies evolutionary changes in the cattle genome and provides a useful information for further research on understanding metabolic adaptations of cattle.

  16. An integrated metabonomics and transcriptomics approach to understanding metabolic pathway disturbance induced by perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Peng, Siyuan; Yan, Lijuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhanlin; Tian, Meiping; Shen, Heqing

    2013-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is one of the most representative perfluorinated compounds and liver is the major organ where PFOA is accumulated. Although the multiple toxicities had been reported, its toxicological profile remained unclear. In this study, a systems toxicology strategy integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and transcriptomics analyses was applied for the first time to investigate the effects of PFOA on a representative Chinese normal human liver cell line L-02, with focusing on the metabolic disturbance. Fifteen potential biomarkers were identified on metabolic level and most observations were consistent with the altered levels of gene expression. Our results showed that PFOA induced the perturbations in various metabolic processes in L-02 cells, especially lipid metabolism-related pathways. The up-stream mitochondrial carnitine metabolism was proved to be influenced by PFOA treatment. The specific transformation from carnitine to acylcarnitines, which showed a dose-dependent effect, and the expression level of key genes involved in this pathway were observed to be altered correspondingly. Furthermore, the down-stream cholesterol biosynthesis was directly confirmed to be up-regulated by both increased cholesterol content and elevated expression level of key genes. The PFOA-induced lipid metabolism-related effects in L-02 cells started from the fatty acid catabolism in cytosol, fluctuated to the processes in mitochondria, extended to the cholesterol biosynthesis. Many other metabolic pathways like amino acid metabolism and tricarboxylic acid cycle might also be disturbed. The findings obtained from the systems biological research provide more details about metabolic disorders induced by PFOA in human liver.

  17. Beyond intestinal soap--bile acids in metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Bloks, Vincent W; Groen, Albert K

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, it has become apparent that bile acids are involved in a host of activities beyond their classic functions in bile formation and fat absorption. The identification of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as a nuclear receptor directly activated by bile acids and the discovery that bile acids are also ligands for the membrane-bound, G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (also known as TGR5) have opened new avenues of research. Both FXR and TGR5 regulate various elements of glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Consequently, a picture has emerged of bile acids acting as modulators of (postprandial) metabolism. Therefore, strategies that interfere with either bile acid metabolism or signalling cascades mediated by bile acids may represent novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Synthetic modulators of FXR have been designed and tested, primarily in animal models. Furthermore, the use of bile acid sequestrants to reduce plasma cholesterol levels has unexpected benefits. For example, treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with sequestrants causes substantial reductions in plasma levels of glucose and HbA1c. This Review aims to provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms by which bile acids modulate glucose and energy metabolism, particularly focusing on the glucose-lowering actions of bile acid sequestrants in insulin resistant states and T2DM.

  18. Effect of the level and type of starchy concentrate on tissue lipid metabolism, gene expression and milk fatty acid secretion in Alpine goats receiving a diet rich in sunflower-seed oil.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Leroux, C; Rouel, J; Bonnet, M; Chilliard, Y

    2012-04-01

    The potential benefits on human health have prompted an interest in developing nutritional strategies for reducing saturated and increasing specific unsaturated fatty acids (FA) in ruminant milk. The impact of the level and type of starchy concentrate added to diets supplemented with sunflower-seed oil on caprine milk FA composition and on mammary, omental and perirenal adipose, and liver lipid metabolism was examined in fourteen Alpine goats in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square with 21 d experimental periods. Treatments were a grass hay-based diet with a high level of forage (F) or a high level of concentrate with either maize grain (CM) or flattened wheat (CW) as source of starch and supplemented with 130 g/d sunflower-seed oil. Milk yield was enhanced (P<0·01) and milk fat content was decreased on the CM and CW diets compared with the F diet, resulting in similar milk fat secretion. Both high-concentrate diets increased (P<0·05) milk yield of 10 : 0-16 : 0 and decreased trans-9,11-18 : 1 and cis-9, trans-11-18 : 2. The CW diet decreased (P<0·05) the output of ΣC18 and Σcis-18 : 1 and increased (P<0·05) the output of trans-10-18 : 1 in milk. The expression and/or activity of fourteen proteins involved in the major lipogenic pathways in mammary tissues and of lipogenic genes in adipose and liver tissues were similar among treatments. In conclusion, high starch concentrates alter milk FA yield via mechanisms independent of changes in mammary, liver or adipose tissue lipogenic gene expression. Furthermore, data provided indications that mammary lipogenic responses to starch-rich diets differ between caprine and bovine ruminants.

  19. Ecophysiology of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM)

    PubMed Central

    LÜTTGE, ULRICH

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Scope Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) as an ecophysiological modification of photosynthetic carbon acquisition has been reviewed extensively before. Cell biology, enzymology and the flow of carbon along various pathways and through various cellular compartments have been well documented and discussed. The present attempt at reviewing CAM once again tries to use a different approach, considering a wide range of inputs, receivers and outputs. • Input Input is given by a network of environmental parameters. Six major ones, CO2, H2O, light, temperature, nutrients and salinity, are considered in detail, which allows discussion of the effects of these factors, and combinations thereof, at the individual plant level (‘physiological aut‐ecology’). • Receivers Receivers of the environmental cues are the plant types genotypes and phenotypes, the latter including morphotypes and physiotypes. CAM genotypes largely remain ‘black boxes’, and research endeavours of genomics, producing mutants and following molecular phylogeny, are just beginning. There is no special development of CAM morphotypes except for a strong tendency for leaf or stem succulence with large cells with big vacuoles and often, but not always, special water storage tissues. Various CAM physiotypes with differing degrees of CAM expression are well characterized. • Output Output is the shaping of habitats, ecosystems and communities by CAM. A number of systems are briefly surveyed, namely aquatic systems, deserts, salinas, savannas, restingas, various types of forests, inselbergs and paramós. • Conclusions While quantitative census data for CAM diversity and biomass are largely missing, intuition suggests that the larger CAM domains are those systems which are governed by a network of interacting stress factors requiring versatile responses and not systems where a single stress factor strongly prevails. CAM is noted to be a strategy for variable, flexible and plastic

  20. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  1. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-10-27

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized.

  2. EFFECTS OF HYDRAZINES ON THE METABOLISM OF CERTAIN AMINES AND AMINO ACIDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMINES, * AMINO ACIDS , *DIAMINE OXIDASE, TOXICITY, METABOLISM, METABOLISM, DIMETHYLHYDRAZINES, GLUTAMIC ACID, ENZYMES, PHARMACOLOGY, TRACER STUDIES, LABELED SUBSTANCES, RESPIRATION, GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM, RATS.

  3. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals. PMID:26426396

  4. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals.

  5. Differential diagnosis of (inherited) amino acid metabolism or transport disorders.

    PubMed

    Blom, W; Huijmans, J G

    1992-02-01

    Disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport are most clearly expressed in urine. Nevertheless the interpretation of abnormalities in urinary amino acid excretion remains difficult. An increase or decrease of almost every amino acid in urine can be due to various etiology. To differentiate between primary and secondary aminoacido-pathies systematic laboratory investigation is necessary. Early diagnosis of disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport is very important, because most of them can be treated, leading to the prevention of (further) clinical abnormalities. In those disorders, which cannot be treated, early diagnosis in an index-patient may prevent the birth of other siblings by means of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.Primary aminoacidopathies can be due to genetically determined transport disorders and enzyme deficiencies in amino acid metabolism or degradation. Secondary aminoacidopathies are the result of abnormal or deficient nutrition, intestinal dysfunction, organ pathology or other metabolic diseases like organic acidurias.A survey of amino acid metabolism and transport abnormalities will be given, illustrated with metabolic pathways and characteristic abnormal amino acid chromatograms.

  6. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-07-01

    The primitive cardiac tube starts beating 6-8 weeks post fertilization in the developing embryo. In order to describe normal cardiac development during late first and early second trimester in human fetuses this study used microarray and pathways analysis and created a corresponding 'normal' database. Fourteen fetal hearts from human fetuses between 10 and 18 weeks of gestational age (GA) were prospectively collected at the time of elective termination of pregnancy. RNA from recovered tissues was used for transcriptome analysis with Affymetrix 1.0 ST microarray chip. From the amassed data we investigated differences in cardiac development within the 10-18 GA period dividing the sample by GA in three groups: 10-12 (H1), 13-15 (H2) and 16-18 (H3) weeks. A fold change of 2 or above adjusted for a false discovery rate of 5% was used as initial cutoff to determine differential gene expression for individual genes. Test for enrichment to identify functional groups was carried out using the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Array analysis correctly identified the cardiac specific genes, and transcripts reported to be differentially expressed were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Single transcript and Ontology analysis showed first trimester heart expression of myosin-related genes to be up-regulated >5-fold compared with second trimester heart. In contrast the second trimester hearts showed further gestation-related increases in many genes involved in energy production and cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, fetal heart development during the first trimester was dominated by heart-specific genes coding for myocardial development and differentiation. During the second trimester, transcripts related to energy generation and cardiomyocyte communication for contractile coordination/proliferation were more dominant. Transcripts related to fatty acid metabolism can be seen as early as 10 weeks and clearly increase as the heart matures. Retinol

  7. EcoCyc: Encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1998-01-01

    The encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of E.coli. The database describes 3030 genes of E.coli , 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 595 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 123 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc can be thought of as an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as a (qualitative) computational model of E.coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc.PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  8. Dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid causes skeletal muscle metabolic abnormalities in Zucker fatty rats through specific modification of fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Ohminami, Hirokazu; Amo, Kikuko; Taketani, Yutaka; Sato, Kazusa; Fukaya, Makiko; Uebanso, Takashi; Arai, Hidekazu; Koganei, Megumi; Sasaki, Hajime; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    A dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid strongly contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in Zucker fatty rats. However, the underlying mechanisms of the metabolic disorders are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the metabolic disorders were triggered at a stage earlier than the 8 weeks we had previously reported. In this study, we investigated early molecular events induced by the sucrose and linoleic acid diet in Zucker fatty rats by comparison with other combinations of carbohydrate (sucrose or palatinose) and fat (linoleic acid or oleic acid). Skeletal muscle arachidonic acid levels were significantly increased in the sucrose and linoleic acid group compared to the other dietary groups at 4 weeks, while there were no obvious differences in the metabolic phenotype between the groups. Expression of genes related to arachidonic acid synthesis was induced in skeletal muscle but not in liver and adipose tissue in sucrose and linoleic acid group rats. In addition, the sucrose and linoleic acid group exhibited a rapid induction in endoplasmic reticulum stress and abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. We concluded that the dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid primarily induces metabolic disorders in skeletal muscle through increases in arachidonic acid and endoplasmic reticulum stress, in advance of systemic metabolic disorders. PMID:25147427

  9. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque.

  10. ccmGDB: a database for cancer cell metabolism genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pora; Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-04

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that rewiring of metabolism in cells is an important hallmark of cancer. The percentage of patients killed by metabolic disorder has been estimated to be 30% of the advanced-stage cancer patients. Thus, a systematic annotation of cancer cell metabolism genes is imperative. Here, we present ccmGDB (Cancer Cell Metabolism Gene DataBase), a comprehensive annotation database for cell metabolism genes in cancer, available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ccmGDB. We assembled, curated, and integrated genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, biological network and functional information for over 2000 cell metabolism genes in more than 30 cancer types. In total, we integrated over 260 000 somatic alterations including non-synonymous mutations, copy number variants and structural variants. We also integrated RNA-Seq data in various primary tumors, gene expression microarray data in over 1000 cancer cell lines and protein expression data. Furthermore, we constructed cancer or tissue type-specific, gene co-expression based protein interaction networks and drug-target interaction networks. Using these systematic annotations, the ccmGDB portal site provides 6 categories: gene summary, phenotypic information, somatic mutations, gene and protein expression, gene co-expression network and drug pharmacological information with a user-friendly interface for browsing and searching. ccmGDB is developed and maintained as a useful resource for the cancer research community.

  11. Mining the bitter melon (momordica charantia l.) seed transcriptome by 454 analysis of non-normalized and normalized cDNA populations for conjugated fatty acid metabolism-related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) produce high levels of eleostearic acid, an unusual conjugated fatty acid with industrial value. Deep sequencing of non-normalized and normalized cDNAs from developing bitter melon seeds was conducted to uncover key genes required for biotechnological tran...

  12. Metabolism of berry anthocyanins to phenolic acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tarja; Mursu, Jaakko; Heinonen, Marina; Nurmi, Anna; Hiltunen, Raimo; Voutilainen, Sari

    2009-03-25

    We studied the metabolism of berry anthocyanins to phenolic acids in six human subjects by giving them bilberry-lingonberry puree with and without oat cereals. Puree + cereals contained 1435 micromol of anthocyanins and 339 micromol of phenolic acids. The urinary excretion of measured 18 phenolic acids increased 241 micromol during the 48 h follow-up after the puree + cereals supplementation. The excretion peak of dietary phenolic acids was observed at 4-6 h after the puree + cereals supplementation and 2 h earlier after the supplementation of the puree alone. Homovanillic and vanillic acids were the most abundant metabolites, and they were partly produced from anthocyanins. No gallic acid, a fragmentation product of delphinidin glycosides, was detected, and only a very low amount of malvidin glycosides was possibly metabolized to syringic acid. Although anthocyanins were partly fragmented to phenolic acids, still a large part of metabolites remained unknown.

  13. CodY in Staphylococcus aureus: a Regulatory Link between Metabolism and Virulence Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Konstanze; Francois, Patrice; Stenz, Ludwig; Schlink, Frank; Geiger, Tobias; Herbert, Silvia; Goerke, Christiane; Schrenzel, Jacques; Wolz, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    The repressor CodY is reported to inhibit metabolic genes mainly involved in nitrogen metabolism. We analyzed codY mutants from three unrelated Staphylococcus aureus strains (Newman, UAMS-1, and RN1HG). The mutants grew more slowly than their parent strains in a chemically defined medium. However, only codY mutants were able to grow in medium lacking threonine. An excess of isoleucine resulted in growth inhibition in the wild type but not in the codY mutants, indicating that isoleucine plays a role in CodY-dependent repression. Prototypic CodY-repressed genes including the virulence regulator agr are repressed after up-shift with isoleucine. The CodY-dependent repression of agr is consistent with the concomitant influence of CodY on typical agr-regulated genes such as cap, spa, fnbA, and coa. However, some of these virulence genes (e.g., cap, fnbA, and spa) were also regulated by CodY in an agr-negative background. Microarray analysis revealed that the large majority of CodY-repressed genes were involved in amino acid metabolism; CodY-activated genes were mainly involved in nucleotide metabolism or virulence. In summary, CodY in S. aureus not only acts as a repressor for genes involved in nitrogen metabolism but also contributes to virulence gene regulation by supporting as well as substituting for agr function. PMID:19251851

  14. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  15. Histone modifications and skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    McGee, Sean L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2010-03-01

    1. Skeletal muscle oxidative function and metabolic gene expression are co-ordinately downregulated in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Altering skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression to favour enhanced energy expenditure is considered a potential therapy to combat these diseases. 2. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are chromatin-remodelling enzymes that repress gene expression. It has been shown that HDAC4 and 5 co-operatively regulate a number of genes involved in various aspects of metabolism. Understanding how HDACs are regulated provides insights into the mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression. 3. Multiple kinases control phosphorylation-dependent nuclear export of HDACs, rendering them unable to repress transcription. We have found a major role for the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in response to energetic stress, yet metabolic gene expression is maintained in the absence of AMPK activity. Preliminary evidence suggests a potential role for protein kinase D, also a Class IIa HDAC kinase, in this response. 4. The HDACs are also regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, although the exact mediators of this process have not been identified. 5. Because HDACs appear to be critical regulators of skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression, HDAC inhibition could be an effective therapy to treat metabolic diseases. 6. Together, these data show that HDAC4 and 5 are critical regulators of metabolic gene expression and that understanding their regulation could provide a number of points of intervention for therapies designed to treat metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

  16. Production of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid by Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 containing cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuewei; He, Qingfang; Peng, Zhenying; Yu, Jinhui; Bian, Fei; Li, Youzhi; Bi, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Genetic modification is useful for improving the nutritional qualities of cyanobacteria. To increase the total unsaturated fatty acid content, along with the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 fatty acids, genetic engineering can be used to modify fatty acid metabolism. Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, a fast-growing cyanobacterium, does not contain a Δ6 desaturase gene and is therefore unable to synthesize γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are important in human health. In this work, we constructed recombinant vectors Syd6D, Syd15D and Syd6Dd15D to express the Δ15 desaturase and Δ6 desaturase genes from Synechocystis PCC6803 in Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, with the aim of expressing polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overexpression of the Δ15 desaturase gene in Synechococcus resulted in 5.4 times greater accumulation of α-linolenic acid compared with the wild-type while Δ6 desaturase gene expression produced both GLA and SDA. Co-expression of the two genes resulted in low-level accumulation of GLA but much larger amounts of SDA, accounting for as much to 11.64% of the total fatty acid content.

  17. The heparan and heparin metabolism pathway is involved in regulation of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Michal, Jennifer J; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; MacNeil, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Six genes involved in the heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism pathway, DSEL (dermatan sulfate epimerase-like), EXTL1 (exostoses (multiple)-like 1), HS6ST1 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 1), HS6ST3 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 3), NDST3 (N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (heparan glucosaminyl) 3), and SULT1A1 (sulfotransferase family, cytosolic, 1A, phenol-preferring, member 1), were investigated for their associations with muscle lipid composition using cattle as a model organism. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/multiple nucleotide length polymorphisms (MNLPs) were identified in five of these six genes. Six of these mutations were then genotyped on 246 Wagyu x Limousin F(2) animals, which were measured for 5 carcass, 6 eating quality and 8 fatty acid composition traits. Association analysis revealed that DSEL, EXTL1 and HS6ST1 significantly affected two stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity indices, the amount of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and the relative amount of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in skeletal muscle (P<0.05). In particular, HS6ST1 joined our previously reported SCD1 and UQCRC1 genes to form a three gene network for one of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity indices. These results provide evidence that genes involved in heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism are also involved in regulation of lipid metabolism in bovine muscle. Whether the SNPs affected heparan sulfate proteoglycan structure is unknown and warrants further investigation.

  18. Metabolic engineering strategies to bio-adipic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kruyer, Nicholas S; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela

    2017-03-30

    Adipic acid is the most industrially important dicarboxylic acid as it is a key monomer in the synthesis of nylon. Today, adipic acid is obtained via a chemical process that relies on petrochemical precursors and releases large quantities of greenhouse gases. In the last two years, significant progress has been made in engineering microbes for the production of adipic acid and its immediate precursors, muconic acid and glucaric acid. Not only have the microbial substrates expanded beyond glucose and glycerol to include lignin monomers and hemicellulose components, but the number of microbial chassis now goes further than Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to include microbes proficient in aromatic degradation, cellulose secretion and degradation of multiple carbon sources. Here, we review the metabolic engineering and nascent protein engineering strategies undertaken in each of these chassis to convert different feedstocks to adipic, muconic and glucaric acid. We also highlight near term prospects and challenges for each of the metabolic routes discussed.

  19. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  20. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation. PMID:22435484

  1. Deregulation of lipid metabolism pathway genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    DAKER, MAELINDA; BHUVANENDRAN, SAATHEEYAVAANE; AHMAD, MUNIRAH; TAKADA, KENZO; KHOO, ALAN SOO-BENG

    2012-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique tumour of epithelial origin with a distinct geographical distribution, closely associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) are small non-polyadenylated RNAs that are abundantly expressed in latent EBV-infected NPC cells. To study the role of EBERs in NPC, we established stable expression of EBERs in HK1, an EBV-negative NPC cell line. Cells expressing EBERs consistently exhibited an increased growth rate. However, EBERs did not confer resistance towards cisplatin-induced apoptosis or promote migration or invasion ability in the cells tested. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified potential candidate genes that were deregulated in NPC cells expressing EBERs. Gene Ontology analysis of the data set revealed that EBERs upregulate the cellular lipid metabolic process. Upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) was observed in EBER-expressing cells. NPC cells exhibited LDL-dependent cell proliferation. In addition, a polyphenolic flavonoid compound, quercetin, known to inhibit FASN, was found to inhibit proliferation of NPC cells. PMID:23292678

  2. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  3. Decreased consumption of branched chain amino acids improves metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Kasza, Ildiko; Schmidt, Brian A.; Cava, Edda; Spelta, Francesco; Tosti, Valeria; Syed, Faizan A.; Baar, Emma L.; Veronese, Nicola; Cottrell, Sara E.; Fenske, Rachel J.; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Brar, Harpreet K.; Pietka, Terri; Bullock, Arnold D.; Figenshau, Robert S.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Merrins, Matthew J.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Kimple, Michelle E.; Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Protein restricted, high carbohydrate diets improve metabolic health in rodents, yet the precise dietary components that are responsible for these effects have not been identified. Further, the applicability of these studies to humans is unclear. Here, we demonstrate in a randomized controlled trial that a moderately protein restricted (PR) diet also improves markers of metabolic health in humans. Intriguingly, we find that feeding mice a diet specifically reduced in branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) is sufficient to improve glucose tolerance and body composition equivalently to a PR diet, via metabolically distinct pathways. Our results highlight a critical role for dietary quality at the level of amino acids in the maintenance of metabolic health, and suggest that diets specifically reduced in BCAAs, or pharmacological interventions in this pathway, may offer a translatable way to achieve many of the metabolic benefits of a PR diet. PMID:27346343

  4. Control of mammalian gene expression by amino acids, especially glutamine.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Lavoinne, Alain; Husson, Annie

    2009-04-01

    Molecular data rapidly accumulating on the regulation of gene expression by amino acids in mammalian cells highlight the large variety of mechanisms that are involved. Transcription factors, such as the basic-leucine zipper factors, activating transcription factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein, as well as specific regulatory sequences, such as amino acid response element and nutrient-sensing response element, have been shown to mediate the inhibitory effect of some amino acids. Moreover, amino acids exert a wide range of effects via the activation of different signalling pathways and various transcription factors, and a number of cis elements distinct from amino acid response element/nutrient-sensing response element sequences were shown to respond to changes in amino acid concentration. Particular attention has been paid to the effects of glutamine, the most abundant amino acid, which at appropriate concentrations enhances a great number of cell functions via the activation of various transcription factors. The glutamine-responsive genes and the transcription factors involved correspond tightly to the specific effects of the amino acid in the inflammatory response, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and metabolic functions. Indeed, in addition to the major role played by nuclear factor-kappaB in the anti-inflammatory action of glutamine, the stimulatory role of activating protein-1 and the inhibitory role of C/EBP homology binding protein in growth-promotion, and the role of c-myc in cell survival, many other transcription factors are also involved in the action of glutamine to regulate apoptosis and intermediary metabolism in different cell types and tissues. The signalling pathways leading to the activation of transcription factors suggest that several kinases are involved, particularly mitogen-activated protein kinases. In most cases, however, the precise pathways from the entrance of the amino acid into the cell to the activation of gene

  5. From hormones to secondary metabolism: the emergence of metabolic gene clusters in plants.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hoi Yee; Wegel, Eva; Osbourn, Anne

    2011-04-01

    Gene clusters for the synthesis of secondary metabolites are a common feature of microbial genomes. Well-known examples include clusters for the synthesis of antibiotics in actinomycetes, and also for the synthesis of antibiotics and toxins in filamentous fungi. Until recently it was thought that genes for plant metabolic pathways were not clustered, and this is certainly true in many cases; however, five plant secondary metabolic gene clusters have now been discovered, all of them implicated in synthesis of defence compounds. An obvious assumption might be that these eukaryotic gene clusters have arisen by horizontal gene transfer from microbes, but there is compelling evidence to indicate that this is not the case. This raises intriguing questions about how widespread such clusters are, what the significance of clustering is, why genes for some metabolic pathways are clustered and those for others are not, and how these clusters form. In answering these questions we may hope to learn more about mechanisms of genome plasticity and adaptive evolution in plants. It is noteworthy that for the five plant secondary metabolic gene clusters reported so far, the enzymes for the first committed steps all appear to have been recruited directly or indirectly from primary metabolic pathways involved in hormone synthesis. This may or may not turn out to be a common feature of plant secondary metabolic gene clusters as new clusters emerge.

  6. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  7. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  8. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Dominic J; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann-Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases.

  9. Metabolic Genes within Cyanophage Genomes: Implications for Diversity and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gao, E-Bin; Huang, Youhua; Ning, Degang

    2016-01-01

    Cyanophages, a group of viruses specifically infecting cyanobacteria, are genetically diverse and extensively abundant in water environments. As a result of selective pressure, cyanophages often acquire a range of metabolic genes from host genomes. The host-derived genes make a significant contribution to the ecological success of cyanophages. In this review, we summarize the host-derived metabolic genes, as well as their origin and roles in cyanophage evolution and important host metabolic pathways, such as the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, nutrient acquisition and nucleotide biosynthesis. We also discuss the suitability of the host-derived metabolic genes as potential diagnostic markers for the detection of genetic diversity of cyanophages in natural environments. PMID:27690109

  10. Effect of sunflower-seed oil and linseed oil on tissue lipid metabolism, gene expression, and milk fatty acid secretion in Alpine goats fed maize silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Bonnet, M; Leroux, C; Shingfield, K J; Chilliard, Y

    2009-12-01

    Lipid in the diet is known to enhance milk fat secretion and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating goats. In the current experiment, the contribution of peripheral tissue and mammary gland lipid metabolism to changes in milk fat composition from plant oils was examined. Fourteen Alpine goats in midlactation were used in a 3 x 3 Latin square design with 28-d experimental periods. Treatments comprised maize silage-based diets containing no additional oil (M), sunflower-seed oil (MSO; 6.1% of diet DM), or linseed oil (MLO; 6.2% of diet DM). Compared with the control, milk yield was greater in goats fed MSO (3.37 and 3.62 kg/d, respectively), whereas MLO enhanced milk fat content (+3.9 g/kg), resulting in a 14% increase in milk fat secretion. Both MSO and MLO increased milk lactose secretion by 12 and 8%, respectively, compared with M. Relative to the control, plant oils decreased C10 to C16 secretion (32 and 24%, respectively, for MSO and MLO) and enhanced C18 output in milk (ca. 110%). Diets MSO and MLO increased cis-9 18:1 secretion in milk by 25 and 31%, respectively, compared with M. The outputs of trans-11 18:1 and cis-9, trans-11 18:2 in milk were increased 8.34- and 6.02-fold for MSO and 5.58- and 3.71-fold for MLO compared with M, and MSO increased trans-10 18:1 and trans-10, cis-12 18:2 secretion. Plant oils decreased milk fat cis-9 14:1/14:0; cis-9 16:1/16:0; cis-9 18:1/18:0; and cis-9, trans-11 18:2/trans-11 18:1 concentration ratios but had no effect on mammary stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA or activity. Furthermore, changes in milk fatty acid secretion were not associated with alterations in mammary acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA and activity, abundance of mRNA encoding for lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid synthase, or malic enzyme and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in mammary tissue. Mammary lipoprotein lipase activity was increased with MSO relative to MLO. Treatments had no effect on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme

  11. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α regulation of bile acid and drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John YL

    2013-01-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a liver-enriched nuclear receptor that plays a critical role in early morphogenesis, fetal liver development, liver differentiation and metabolism. Human HNF4α gene mutations cause maturity on-set diabetes of the young type 1, an autosomal dominant non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. HNF4α is an orphan nuclear receptor because of which the endogenous ligand has not been firmly identified. The trans-activating activity of HNF4α is enhanced by interacting with co-activators and inhibited by corepressors. Recent studies have revealed that HNF4α plays a central role in regulation of bile acid metabolism in the liver. Bile acids are required for biliary excretion of cholesterol and metabolites, and intestinal absorption of fat, nutrients, drug and xenobiotics for transport and distribution to liver and other tissues. Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors to control lipids and drug metabolism in the liver and intestine. Therefore, HNF4α plays a central role in coordinated regulation of bile acid and xenobiotics metabolism. Drugs that specifically activate HNF4α could be developed for treating metabolic diseases such as diabetes, dyslipidemia and cholestasis, as well as drug metabolism and detoxification. PMID:19239393

  12. A Candidate Gene Study of Folate-Associated One Carbon Metabolism Genes and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Levine, A. Joan; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Lee, Won; Conti, David V.; Kennedy, Kathleen; Duggan, David J; Poynter, Jenny N.; Campbell, Peter T.; Newcomb, Polly; Martinez, Maria Elena; Hopper, John L.; Le Marchand, Loic; Baron, John A.; Limburg, Paul J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Haile, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Folate-associated one carbon metabolism (FOCM) may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Variation in FOCM genes may explain some of the underlying risk of colorectal cancer. Methods This study utilized data from 1,805 population-based colorectal cancer cases and 2,878 matched sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (C-CFR). We used a comprehensive tagSNP approach to select 395 tagSNPs in 15 genes involved in folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina GoldenGate or Sequenom platforms. Risk factor and dietary data were collected using self-completed questionnaires. MSI status was determined using standard techniques and tumor subsite was obtained from pathology reports. The association between SNPs and colorectal cancer was assessed using conditional logistic regression with sibships as the matching factor and assuming a log additive or co-dominant model. Results In the log additive model, two linked (r2=0.99) tagSNPs in the DHFR gene (rs1677693 and rs1643659) were associated with a significant decrease in CRC risk after correction for multiple testing (OR=0.87; 95% CI=0.71 – 0.94; P=0.029 and OR=0.87 95% CI=0.71 – 0.95, P=0.034 for rs1677693 and rs1643659 respectively. These two linked (r2=0.99) tagSNPs and one tagSNP in the MTR gene (rs4659744) were significantly associated with reduced CRC risk only among individuals not using multivitamin supplements. Conclusions Overall, we found only moderate evidence that genetic variation in 15 folate pathway genes may affect CRC risk except in non multivitamin users. Impact This study suggests that multivitamin supplement use may modify the association between folate pathway genes and CRC risk in a post folic acid supplemented population. PMID:20615890

  13. KDM4C and ATF4 Cooperate in Transcriptional Control of Amino Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Erhu; Ding, Jane; Xia, Yingfeng; Liu, Mengling; Ye, Bingwei; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Yan, Chunhong; Dong, Zheng; Huang, Shuang; Zha, Yunhong; Yang, Liqun; Cui, Hongjuan; Ding, Han-Fei

    2016-01-26

    The histone lysine demethylase KDM4C is often overexpressed in cancers primarily through gene amplification. The molecular mechanisms of KDM4C action in tumorigenesis are not well defined. Here, we report that KDM4C transcriptionally activates amino acid biosynthesis and transport, leading to a significant increase in intracellular amino acid levels. Examination of the serine-glycine synthesis pathway reveals that KDM4C epigenetically activates the pathway genes under steady-state and serine deprivation conditions by removing the repressive histone modification H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) trimethylation. This action of KDM4C requires ATF4, a transcriptional master regulator of amino acid metabolism and stress responses. KDM4C activates ATF4 transcription and interacts with ATF4 to target serine pathway genes for transcriptional activation. We further present evidence for KDM4C in transcriptional coordination of amino acid metabolism and cell proliferation. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism linking KDM4C-mediated H3K9 demethylation and ATF4-mediated transactivation in reprogramming amino acid metabolism for cancer cell proliferation.

  14. KDM4C and ATF4 Cooperate in Transcriptional Control of Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yingfeng; Liu, Mengling; Ye, Bingwei; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Yan, Chunhong; Dong, Zheng; Huang, Shuang; Zha, Yunhong; Yang, Liqun; Cui, Hongjuan; Ding, Han-Fei

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The histone lysine demethylase KDM4C is often overexpressed in cancers primarily through gene amplification. The molecular mechanisms of KDM4C action in tumorigenesis are not well defined. Here we report that KDM4C transcriptionally activates amino acid biosynthesis and transport, leading to a significant increase in intracellular amino acid levels. Examination of the serine-glycine synthesis pathway reveals that KDM4C epigenetically activates the pathway genes under steady-state and serine deprivation conditions by removing the repressive histone modification H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) trimethylation. This action of KDM4C requires ATF4, a transcriptional master regulator of amino acid metabolism and stress responses. KDM4C activates ATF4 transcription and interacts with ATF4 to target serine pathway genes for transcriptional activation. We further present evidence for KDM4C in transcriptional coordination of amino acid metabolism and cell proliferation. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism linking KDM4C-mediated H3K9 demethylation and ATF4-mediated transactivation in reprogramming amino acid metabolism for cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26774480

  15. Metabolism of amino acids, dipeptides and tetrapeptides by Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Sinz, Quirin; Schwab, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    The microbial degradation of proteins, peptides and amino acids generates volatiles involved in the typical flavor of dry fermented sausage. The ability of three Lactobacillus sakei strains to form aroma compounds was investigated. Whole resting cells were fermented in phosphate buffer with equimolar amounts of substrates consisting of dipeptides, tetrapeptides and free amino acids, respectively. Dipeptides disappeared quickly from the solutions whereas tetrapeptides were only partially degraded. In both approaches the concentration of free amino acids increased in the reaction mixture but did not reach the equimolar amount of the initial substrates. When free amino acids were fed to the bacteria their levels decreased only slightly. Although peptides were more rapidly degraded and/or transported into the cells, free amino acids produced higher amounts of volatiles. It is suggested, that after transport into the cell peptides are only partially hydrolyzed to their amino acids, while the rest is metabolized via alternative metabolic pathways. The three L. sakei strains differed to some extend in their ability to metabolize the substrates to volatile compounds. In a few cases this was due to the position of the amino acids within the peptides. Compared to other starter cultures used for the production of dry fermented sausages, the metabolic impact of the L. sakei strains on the formation of volatiles was very low.

  16. Fatty acid metabolic reprogramming via mTOR-mediated inductions of PPARγ directs early activation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Angela, Mulki; Endo, Yusuke; Asou, Hikari K.; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tumes, Damon J.; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Yokote, Koutaro; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    To fulfil the bioenergetic requirements for increased cell size and clonal expansion, activated T cells reprogramme their metabolic signatures from energetically quiescent to activated. However, the molecular mechanisms and essential components controlling metabolic reprogramming in T cells are not well understood. Here, we show that the mTORC1–PPARγ pathway is crucial for the fatty acid uptake programme in activated CD4+ T cells. This pathway is required for full activation and rapid proliferation of naive and memory CD4+ T cells. PPARγ directly binds and induces genes associated with fatty acid uptake in CD4+ T cells in both mice and humans. The PPARγ-dependent fatty acid uptake programme is critical for metabolic reprogramming. Thus, we provide important mechanistic insights into the metabolic reprogramming mechanisms that govern the expression of key enzymes, fatty acid metabolism and the acquisition of an activated phenotype during CD4+ T cell activation. PMID:27901044

  17. Integrated Transcriptome and Metabolic Analyses Reveals Novel Insights into Free Amino Acid Metabolism in Huangjinya Tea Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qunfeng; Liu, Meiya; Ruan, Jianyun

    2017-01-01

    The chlorotic tea variety Huangjinya, a natural mutant, contains enhanced levels of free amino acids in its leaves, which improves the drinking quality of its brewed tea. Consequently, this chlorotic mutant has a higher economic value than the non-chlorotic varieties. However, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased levels of free amino acids in this mutant are mostly unknown, as are the possible effects of this mutation on the overall metabolome and biosynthetic pathways in tea leaves. To gain further insight into the effects of chlorosis on the global metabolome and biosynthetic pathways in this mutant, Huangjinya plants were grown under normal and reduced sunlight, resulting in chlorotic and non-chlorotic leaves, respectively; their leaves were analyzed using transcriptomics as well as targeted and untargeted metabolomics. Approximately 5,000 genes (8.5% of the total analyzed) and ca. 300 metabolites (14.5% of the total detected) were significantly differentially regulated, thus indicating the occurrence of marked effects of light on the biosynthetic pathways in this mutant plant. Considering primary metabolism, including that of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids, significant changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in both nitrogen (N) and carbon metabolism. The suite of changes not only generated an increase in amino acids, including glutamic acid, glutamine, and theanine, but it also elevated the levels of free ammonium, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate, and lowered the levels of mono- and di-saccharides and of caffeine as compared with the non-chlorotic leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that the increased levels of amino acids in the chlorotic vs. non-chlorotic leaves are likely due to increased protein catabolism and/or decreased glycolysis and diminished biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds other than amino acids, including chlorophyll, purines, nucleotides, and alkaloids. PMID:28321230

  18. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  19. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  20. Computational identification of altered metabolism using gene expression and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hojung; Lee, Jinwon; Lee, Doheon

    2009-07-01

    Understanding altered metabolism is an important issue because altered metabolism is often revealed as a cause or an effect in pathogenesis. It has also been shown to be an important factor in the manipulation of an organism's metabolism in metabolic engineering. Unfortunately, it is not yet possible to measure the concentration levels of all metabolites in the genome-wide scale of a metabolic network; consequently, a method that infers the alteration of metabolism is beneficial. The present study proposes a computational method that identifies genome-wide altered metabolism by analyzing functional units of KEGG pathways. As control of a metabolic pathway is accomplished by altering the activity of at least one rate-determining step enzyme, not all gene expressions of enzymes in the pathway demonstrate significant changes even if the pathway is altered. Therefore, we measure the alteration levels of a metabolic pathway by selectively observing expression levels of significantly changed genes in a pathway. The proposed method was applied to two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression profiles measured in very high-gravity (VHG) fermentation. The method identified altered metabolic pathways whose properties are related to ethanol and osmotic stress responses which had been known to be observed in VHG fermentation because of the high sugar concentration in growth media and high ethanol concentration in fermentation products. With the identified altered pathways, the proposed method achieved best accuracy and sensitivity rates for the Red Star (RS) strain compared to other three related studies (gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA), significance analysis of microarray to gene set (SAM-GS), reporter metabolite), and for the CEN.PK 113-7D (CEN) strain, the proposed method and the GSEA method showed comparably similar performances.

  1. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, andMetSrisk and whether plasma fatty acids,...

  2. Optimization of a yeast RNA interference system for controlling gene expression and enabling rapid metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan C; Schmitz, Alexander C; Alper, Hal S

    2014-05-16

    Reduction of endogenous gene expression is a fundamental operation of metabolic engineering, yet current methods for gene knockdown (i.e., genome editing) remain laborious and slow, especially in yeast. In contrast, RNA interference allows facile and tunable gene knockdown via a simple plasmid transformation step, enabling metabolic engineers to rapidly prototype knockdown strategies in multiple strains before expending significant cost to undertake genome editing. Although RNAi is naturally present in a myriad of eukaryotes, it has only been recently implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous pathway and so has not yet been optimized as a metabolic engineering tool. In this study, we elucidate a set of design principles for the construction of hairpin RNA expression cassettes in yeast and implement RNA interference to quickly identify routes for improvement of itaconic acid production in this organism. The approach developed here enables rapid prototyping of knockdown strategies and thus accelerates and reduces the cost of the design-build-test cycle in yeast.

  3. Can valproic acid be an inducer of clozapine metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisco J.; Eap, Chin B.; Ansermot, Nicolas; Crettol, Severine; Spina, Edoardo; de Leon, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior clozapine studies indicated no effects, mild inhibition or induction of valproic acid (VPA) on clozapine metabolism. The hypotheses that 1) VPA is a net inducer of clozapine metabolism, and 2) smoking modifies this inductive effect were tested in a therapeutic drug monitoring study. Methods After excluding strong inhibitors and inducers, 353 steady-state total clozapine (clozapine plus norclozapine) concentrations provided by 151 patients were analyzed using a random intercept linear model. Results VPA appeared to be an inducer of clozapine metabolism since total plasma clozapine concentrations in subjects taking VPA were significantly lower (27% lower; 95% confidence interval, 14% to 39%) after controlling for confounding variables including smoking (35% lower, 28% to 56%). Discussion Prospective studies are needed to definitively establish that VPA may 1) be an inducer of clozapine metabolism when induction prevails over competitive inhibition, and 2) be an inducer even in smokers who are under the influence of smoking inductive effects on clozapine metabolism. PMID:24764199

  4. Impact of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) on Skeletal Muscle Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Jonggun; Whang, Kwang-Youn; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has garnered special attention as a food bioactive compound that prevents and attenuates obesity. Although most studies on the effects of CLA on obesity have focused on the reduction of body fat, a number of studies have demonstrated that CLA also increases lean body mass and enhances physical performances. It has been suggested that these effects may be due in part to physiological changes in the skeletal muscle, such as changes in the muscle fiber type transformation, alteration of the intracellular signaling pathways in muscle metabolism, or energy metabolism. However, the mode of action for CLA in muscle metabolism is not completely understood. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the effects of CLA on skeletal muscle metabolism. Given that CLA not only reduces body fat, but also improves lean mass, there is great potential for the use of CLA to improve muscle metabolism, which would have a significant health impact.

  5. Organochloride pesticides impaired mitochondrial function in hepatocytes and aggravated disorders of fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Qihan; Xu, Cheng; Shao, Wentao; Zhang, Chunlan; Liu, Hui; Jiang, Zhaoyan; Gu, Aihua

    2017-01-01

    p,p’-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p, p’-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) were two predominant organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) metabolites in human body associated with disorders of fatty acid metabolism. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to low dose of p, p’-DDE and β-HCH for 8 wk. OCPs accumulation in organs, hepatic fatty acid composition, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) metabolites and other metabolite profiles were analyzed. Expression levels of genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis and β-oxidation were measured. Mitochondrial function was evaluated in HepG2 cells exposed to OCPs. High accumulation of p, p’-DDE and β-HCH was found in liver and damaged mitochondria was observed under electron microscopy. Expression of genes in fatty acid synthesis increased and that in mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation decreased in OCPs treatment groups. OCPs changed metabolite profiles in liver tissues, varied hepatic fatty acid compositions and levels of several TCA cycle metabolites. Furthermore, MitoTracker Green fluorescence, ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and OCR decreased in HepG2 cells exposed to OCPs. In conclusion, chronic exposure to OCPs at doses equivalent to internal exposures in humans impaired mitochondrial function, decreased fatty acid β-oxidation and aggravated disorders of fatty acid metabolism.

  6. Metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids and their tartaric acid esters by Brettanomyces and Pediococcus in red wines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric, respectively) are found in wines in varying concentrations. While Brettanomyces and Pediococcus can utilize the free acids, it is not known whether they can metabolize the correspon...

  7. Dataset of the human homologues and orthologues of lipid-metabolic genes identified as DAF-16 targets their roles in lipid and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lavender Yuen-Nam; Saavedra-García, Paula; Lam, Eric Wing-Fai

    2017-04-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the review article entitled 'Unravelling the role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer through the FOXO3-FOXM1 axis' (Saavedra-Garcia et al., 2017) [24]. Here, we have matched the DAF-16/FOXO3 downstream genes with their respective human orthologues and reviewed the roles of these targeted genes in FA metabolism. The list of genes listed in this article are precisely selected from literature reviews based on their functions in mammalian FA metabolism. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans gene orthologues of the genes are obtained from WormBase, the online biological database of C. elegans. This dataset has not been uploaded to a public repository yet.

  8. Higher plant metabolism and energetics in hypogravity: Amino acid metabolism in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazelis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory's investigation into the amino acid metabolism of dwarf marigolds exposed to an environment of simulated hypogravity is summarized. Using both in vivo, and/or in vitro studies, the following effects of hypogravitational stress have been shown: (1) increased proline incorporation into cell wall protein, (2) inhibition of amino acid decarboxylation, (3) decrease in glutamic acid decarboxylase activity; and (4) decrease in the relative amount of a number of soluble amino acids present in deproteinized extracts of marigold leaves. It is concluded from these data there are several rapid, major alterations in amino acid metabolism associated with hypogravitational stress in marigolds. The mechanism(s) and generality of these effects with regard to other species is still unknown.

  9. Mitochondrial function, fatty acid metabolism, and immune system are relevant features of pig adipose tissue development.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Annie; Louveau, Isabelle; Gondret, Florence; Lebret, Bénédicte; Damon, Marie

    2012-11-15

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the genetic control of fat development in humans and livestock species still require characterization. To gain insights on gene expression patterns associated with genetic propensity for adiposity, we compared subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) transcriptomics profiles from two contrasted pig breeds for body fatness. Samples were obtained from Large White (LW; lean phenotype) and Basque pigs (B; low growth and high fat content) at 35 kg (n = 5 per breed) or 145 kg body weight (n = 10 per breed). Using a custom adipose tissue microarray, we found 271 genes to be differentially expressed between the two breeds at both stages, out of which 123 were highly expressed in LW pigs and 148 genes were highly expressed in B pigs. Functional enrichment analysis based on gene ontology (GO) terms highlighted gene groups corresponding to the mitochondrial energy metabolism in LW pigs, whereas immune response was found significantly enriched in B pigs. Genes associated with lipid metabolism, such as ELOVL6, a gene involved in fatty acid elongation, had a lower expression in B compared with LW pigs. Furthermore, despite enlarged adipocyte diameters and higher plasma leptin concentration, B pigs displayed reduced lipogenic enzyme activities compared with LW pigs at 145 kg. Altogether, our results suggest that the development of adiposity was associated with a progressive worsening of the metabolic status, leading to a low-grade inflammatory state, and may thus be of significant interest for both livestock production and human health.

  10. Conjugated linoleic acids influence fatty acid metabolism in ovine ruminal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Masur, F; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Fuhrmann, H; Gäbel, G

    2016-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), particularly cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10c12), are used as feed additives to adapt to constantly increasing demands on the performance of lactating cows. Under these feeding conditions, the rumen wall, and the rumen epithelial cells (REC) in particular, are directly exposed to high amounts of CLA. This study determined the effect of CLA on the fatty acid (FA) metabolism of REC and expression of genes known to be modulated by FA. Cultured REC were incubated with c9t11, t10c12, and the structurally similar FA linoleic acid (LA), oleic acid (OA), and trans-vaccenic acid (TVA) for 48 h at a concentration of 100 µM. Cellular FA levels were determined by gas chromatography. Messenger RNA expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 and 4 were quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Fatty acid evaluation revealed significant effects of CLA, LA, OA, and TVA on the amount of FA metabolites of β-oxidation and elongation and of metabolites related to desaturation by SCD. The observed changes in FA content point (among others) to the ability of REC to synthesize c9t11 from TVA endogenously. The mRNA expression levels of SCD identified a decrease after CLA, LA, OA, or TVA treatment. In line with the changes in mRNA expression, we found reduced amounts of C16:1n-7 cis-9 and C18:1n-9 cis-9, the main products of SCD. The expression of MCT1 mRNA increased after c9t11 and t10c12 treatment, and CLA c9t11 induced an upregulation of MCT4. Application of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α antagonist suggested that activation of PPARα is involved in the changes of MCT1, MCT4, and SCD mRNA expression induced by c9t11. Participation of PPARγ in the changes of MCT1 and SCD mRNA expression was shown by the application of the respective antagonist. The study demonstrates that exposure to CLA affects both FA metabolism and regulatory pathways within REC.

  11. Amino acid metabolism in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, S; Azcón-Bieto, J; López-Soriano, F J; Miralpeix, M; Argilés, J M

    1988-01-01

    Mice bearing the Lewis lung carcinoma showed a high tumour glutaminase activity and significantly higher concentrations of most amino acids than in both the liver and the skeletal muscle of the host. Tumour tissue slices showed a marked preference for glutamine, especially for oxidation of its skeleton to CO2. It is proposed that the metabolism of this particular carcinoma is focused on amino acid degradation, glutamine being its preferred substrate. PMID:3342022

  12. Metabolic Inflexibility with Obesity and the Effects of Fenofibrate on Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kristen E; Friedman, Jacob E; Janssen, Rachel C; Underkofler, Chantal; Houmard, Joseph A; Rasouli, Neda

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate mechanisms of lipid metabolic inflexibility in human obesity and the ability of fenofibrate (FENO) to increase skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in primary human skeletal muscle cell cultures (HSkMC) exhibiting metabolic inflexibility. HSkMC from 10 lean and 10 obese, insulin resistant subjects were treated with excess fatty acid for 24 h (24hFA) to gauge lipid-related metabolic flexibility. Metabolically inflexible HSkMC from obese individuals were then treated with 24hFA in combination with FENO to determine effectiveness for increasing FAO. Mitochondrial enzyme activity and FAO were measured in skeletal muscle from subjects with prediabetes (n=11) before and after 10 weeks of fenofibrate in vivo. 24hFA increased FAO to a greater extent in HSkMC from lean versus obese subjects (+49% vs. +9%, for lean vs. obese, respectively; p<0.05) indicating metabolic inflexibility with obesity. Metabolic inflexibility was not observed for measures of cellular respiration in permeabilized cells using carbohydrate substrate. Fenofibrate co-incubation with 24hFA, increased FAO in a subset of HSkMC from metabolically inflexible, obese subjects (p<0.05), which was eliminated by PPARα antagonist. In vivo, fenofibrate treatment increased skeletal muscle FAO in a subset of subjects with prediabetes but did not affect gene transcription or mitochondrial enzyme activity. Lipid metabolic inflexibility observed in HSkMC from obese subjects is not due to differences in electron transport flux, but rather upstream decrements in lipid metabolism. Fenofibrate increases the capacity for FAO in human skeletal muscle cells, though its role in skeletal muscle metabolism in vivo remains unclear.

  13. Evaluation of endogenous acidic metabolic products associated with carbohydrate metabolism in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Tumor cells have a high tolerance for acidic and hypoxic microenvironments, also producing abundant lactic acid through accelerated glycolysis in the presence or absence of O2. While the accumulation of lactate is thought to be a major contributor to the reduction of pH-circumscribing aggressive tumors, it is not known if other endogenous metabolic products contribute this acidity. Furthermore, anaerobic metabolism in cancer cells bears similarity to homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, however very little is known about an alternative pathway that may drive adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production independent of glycolysis. In this study, we quantify over 40 end-products (amines, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, or ketones) produced by malignant neuroblastoma under accelerated glycolysis (+glucose (GLU) supply 1–10 mM) ± mitochondrial toxin; 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+) to abate aerobic respiration to delineate differences between anaerobic vs. aerobic cell required metabolic pathways. The data show that an acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis prompts an expected reduction in extracellular pH (pHex) from neutral to 6.7±0.006. Diverse metabolic acids associated with this drop in acidity were quantified by ionic exchange liquid chromatography (LC), showing concomitant rise in lactate (Ctrls 7.5±0.5 mM; +GLU 12.35±1.3 mM; +GLU + MPP 18.1±1.8 mM), acetate (Ctrl 0.84±0.13 mM: +GLU 1.3±0.15 mM; +GLU + MPP 2.7±0.4 mM), fumarate, and a-ketoglutarate (<10μM) while a range of other metabolic organic acids remained undetected. Amino acids quantified by o-phthalaldehyde precolumn derivatization/electrochemical detection–LC show accumulation of L-alanine (1.6±.052 mM), L-glutamate (285±9.7μM), L-asparagine (202±2.1μM), and L-aspartate (84.2±4.9μM) produced during routine metabolism, while other amino acids remain undetected. In contrast, the data show no evidence for accumulation of acetaldehyde, aldehydes, or ketones (Purpald/2

  14. Ganoderic Acid A Metabolites and Their Metabolic Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang-Rui; Feng, Li; Ye, Lin-Hu; Wang, Li-Sha; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Tao, Xue; Chang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderic acid A (GAA), a representative active triterpenoid from Ganoderma lucidum, has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidative, cytotoxic, hepatoprotective and anticancer activities. The present study aims (1) to identify GAA metabolites, in vivo by analyzing the bile, plasma and urine after intravenous administration to rats (20 mg/kg), and in vitro by incubating with rat liver microsomes (RLMs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs); (2) to investigate the metabolic kinetics of main GAA metabolites. Using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS techniques, a total of 37 metabolites were tentatively characterized from in vivo samples based on their fragmentation behaviors. The metabolites detected in in vitro samples were similar to those found in vivo. GAA underwent extensive phase I and II metabolism. The main metabolic soft spots of GAA were 3, 7, 11, 15, 23-carbonyl groups (or hydroxyl groups) and 12, 20, 28 (29)-carbon atoms. Ganoderic acid C2 (GAC2) and 7β,15-dihydroxy-3,11,23-trioxo-lanost-26-oic acid were two main reduction metabolites of GAA, and their kinetics followed classical hyperbolic kinetics. The specific isoenzyme responsible for the biotransformation of the two metabolites in RLMs and HLMs was CYP3A. This is the first report on the comprehensive metabolism of GAA, as well as the metabolic kinetics of its main metabolites.

  15. Dynamic modeling of lactic acid fermentation metabolism with Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euhlim; Lu, Mingshou; Park, Changhun; Park, Changhun; Oh, Han Bin; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Jinwon

    2011-02-01

    A dynamic model of lactic acid fermentation using Lactococcus lactis was constructed, and a metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and metabolic control analysis (MCA) were performed to reveal an intensive metabolic understanding of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The parameter estimation was conducted with COPASI software to construct a more accurate metabolic model. The experimental data used in the parameter estimation were obtained from an LC-MS/ MS analysis and time-course simulation study. The MFA results were a reasonable explanation of the experimental data. Through the parameter estimation, the metabolic system of lactic acid bacteria can be thoroughly understood through comparisons with the original parameters. The coefficients derived from the MCA indicated that the reaction rate of L-lactate dehydrogenase was activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and pyruvate, and pyruvate appeared to be a stronger activator of L-lactate dehydrogenase than fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Additionally, pyruvate acted as an inhibitor to pyruvate kinase and the phosphotransferase system. Glucose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate showed activation effects on pyruvate kinase. Hexose transporter was the strongest effector on the flux through L-lactate dehydrogenase. The concentration control coefficient (CCC) showed similar results to the flux control coefficient (FCC).

  16. Ganoderic Acid A Metabolites and Their Metabolic Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang-Rui; Feng, Li; Ye, Lin-Hu; Wang, Li-Sha; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Tao, Xue; Chang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderic acid A (GAA), a representative active triterpenoid from Ganoderma lucidum, has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidative, cytotoxic, hepatoprotective and anticancer activities. The present study aims (1) to identify GAA metabolites, in vivo by analyzing the bile, plasma and urine after intravenous administration to rats (20 mg/kg), and in vitro by incubating with rat liver microsomes (RLMs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs); (2) to investigate the metabolic kinetics of main GAA metabolites. Using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS techniques, a total of 37 metabolites were tentatively characterized from in vivo samples based on their fragmentation behaviors. The metabolites detected in in vitro samples were similar to those found in vivo. GAA underwent extensive phase I and II metabolism. The main metabolic soft spots of GAA were 3, 7, 11, 15, 23-carbonyl groups (or hydroxyl groups) and 12, 20, 28 (29)-carbon atoms. Ganoderic acid C2 (GAC2) and 7β,15-dihydroxy-3,11,23-trioxo-lanost-26-oic acid were two main reduction metabolites of GAA, and their kinetics followed classical hyperbolic kinetics. The specific isoenzyme responsible for the biotransformation of the two metabolites in RLMs and HLMs was CYP3A. This is the first report on the comprehensive metabolism of GAA, as well as the metabolic kinetics of its main metabolites. PMID:28326038

  17. G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor plays a key role in bile acid metabolism and fasting-induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Boehme, Shannon; Li, Feng; Chiang, John Y L

    2017-03-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that play a critical role in regulation of hepatic metabolic homeostasis by activating nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr) and membrane G-protein-coupled receptor (Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5; Tgr5). The role of FXR in regulation of bile acid synthesis and hepatic metabolism has been studied extensively. However, the role of TGR5 in hepatic metabolism has not been explored. The liver plays a central role in lipid metabolism, and impaired response to fasting and feeding contributes to steatosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver and obesity. We have performed a detailed analysis of gallbladder bile acid and lipid metabolism in Tgr5(-/-) mice in both free-fed and fasted conditions. Lipid profiles of serum, liver and adipose tissues, bile acid composition, energy metabolism, and messenger RNA and protein expression of the genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed. Results showed that deficiency of the Tgr5 gene in mice alleviated fasting-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Expression of liver oxysterol 7α-hydroxylase in the alternative bile acid synthesis pathway was reduced. Analysis of gallbladder bile acid composition showed marked increase of taurocholic acid and decrease of tauro-α and β-muricholic acid in Tgr5(-/-) mice. Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation rate and decreased hepatic fatty acid uptake. Interestingly, fasting induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 in liver was attenuated. In addition, fasted Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased activation of hepatic growth hormone-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (GH-Stat5) signaling compared to wild-type mice.

  18. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  19. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  20. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  1. Carnitine is associated with fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Adenier, Hervé; Perrin, Yolande

    2007-12-01

    The finding of acylcarnitines alongside free carnitine in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography shows a link between carnitine and plant fatty acid metabolism. Moreover the occurrence of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines suggests that carnitine is connected to diverse fatty acid metabolic pathways in plant tissues. The carnitine and acylcarnitine contents in plant tissues are respectively a hundred and a thousand times lower than in animal tissues, and acylcarnitines represent less than 2% of the total carnitine pool whereas this percentage reaches 30% in animal tissues. These results suggest that carnitine plays a lesser role in lipid metabolism in plants than it does in animals.

  2. Nicotinamide metabolism in ferns: formation of nicotinic acid glucoside.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide was investigated in 9 fern species, Psilotum nudum, Angiopteris evecta, Lygodium japonicum, Acrostichum aureum, Asplenium antiquum, Diplazium subsinuatum, Thelypteris acuminate, Blechnum orientale and Crytomium fortune. All fern species produce a large quantity of nicotinic acid glucoside from [(14)C]nicotinamide, but trigonelline formation is very low. Increases in the release of (14)CO(2) with incubation time was accompanied by decreases in [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid glucoside. There was slight stimulation of nicotinic acid glucoside formation by 250 mM NaCl in mature leaves of the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum, but it is unlikely that this compound acts as a compatible solute. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid salvage for pyridine nucleotide synthesis was detected in all fern species, although this activity was always less than nicotinic acid glucoside synthesis. Predominant formation of nicotinic acid glucoside is characteristic of nicotinic acid metabolism in ferns. This reaction appears to act as a detoxication mechanism, removing excess nicotinic acid.

  3. Arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, H.; Sato, Y.; Kanoh, H.

    1985-07-01

    The authors attempted to characterize the general features of arachidonate metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes. The cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were stimulated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), ionophore A23187, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). Common to the three substances, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine almost equally served as sources of arachidonate liberated by the action of phospholipase A2. The stimulation of phospholipase A2 action was observed in the order of A23187 greater than FBS greater than TPA. When stimulated by TPA or A23187, the radioactivity released into the extracellular medium was mostly found in prostaglandin (PG) E2. Formation of other PGs and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate (HETE) was extremely limited. In the case of stimulation by FBS, however, the released radioactivity was mainly associated with non-converted arachidonate. FBS also inhibited the TPA- and A23187-induced conversion of arachidonate to PGE2. Phospholipid degradation induced by the three stimulators was similarly dependent on extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The stimulation by FBS and A23187 was suppressed by calmodulin antagonists, though the effect of A23187 was much more sensitive to the antagonists when compared to that of FBS. The authors observed more than additive effects of the three stimulators when tested together.

  4. Transcriptome and Proteome Expression Analysis of the Metabolism of Amino Acids by the Fungus Aspergillus oryzae in Fermented Soy Sauce

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guozhong; Yao, Yunping; Wang, Chunling; Tian, Fengwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Hou, Lihua; Yang, Zhen; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids comprise the majority of the flavor compounds in soy sauce. A portion of these amino acids are formed from the biosynthesis and metabolism of the fungus Aspergillus oryzae; however, the metabolic pathways leading to the formation of these amino acids in A. oryzae remain largely unknown. We sequenced the transcriptomes of A. oryzae 100-8 and A. oryzae 3.042 under similar soy sauce fermentation conditions. 2D gel electrophoresis was also used to find some differences in protein expression. We found that many amino acid hydrolases (endopeptidases, aminopeptidases, and X-pro-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase) were expressed at much higher levels (mostly greater than double) in A. oryzae 100-8 than in A. oryzae 3.042. Our results indicated that glutamate dehydrogenase may activate the metabolism of amino acids. We also found that the expression levels of some genes changed simultaneously in the metabolic pathways of tyrosine and leucine and that these conserved genes may modulate the function of the metabolic pathway. Such variation in the metabolic pathways of amino acids is important as it can significantly alter the flavor of fermented soy sauce. PMID:25945335

  5. Adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health of obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Ma, Lijun; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) exhibit substantial heterogeneity in gluco- and cardio-metabolic heath phenotypes. However, defining genes that underlie the heterogeneity of metabolic features among obese individuals and determining metabolically healthy and unhealthy phenotypes remain challenging. We conducted unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue transcripts from 30 obese men and women ≥40 years old. Despite similar BMIs in all subjects, we found two distinct subgroups, one metabolically healthy (Group 1) and one metabolically unhealthy (Group 2). Subjects in Group 2 showed significantly higher total cholesterol (p=0.005), LDL cholesterol (p=0.006), 2h-Insulin during OGTT (p=0.015) and lower insulin sensitivity (SI, p=0.029) compared to Group 1. We identified significant up-regulation of 141 genes (e.g. MMP9 and SPP1) and down-regulation of 17 genes (e.g. NDRG4 and GINS3) in group 2 subjects. Intriguingly, these differentially expressed transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cardiovascular disease-related processes (p=2.81×10−11–3.74×10−02) and pathways involved in immune and inflammatory response (p=8.32×10−5–0.04). Two down-regulated genes, NDRG4 and GINS3, have been located in a genomic interval associated with cardiac repolarization in published GWASs and zebra fish knockout models. Our study provides evidence that perturbations in the adipose tissue gene expression network are important in defining metabolic health in obese subjects. PMID:25520251

  6. Bioenergetic cues shift FXR splicing towards FXRα2 to modulate hepatic lipolysis and fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Jorge C.; Massart, Julie; de Boer, Jan Freark; Porsmyr-Palmertz, Margareta; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Agudelo, Leandro Z.; Sinha, Indranil; Meierhofer, David; Ribeiro, Vera; Björnholm, Marie; Sauer, Sascha; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zierath, Juleen R.; Groen, Albert K.; Ruas, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a prominent role in hepatic lipid metabolism. The FXR gene encodes four proteins with structural differences suggestive of discrete biological functions about which little is known. Methods We expressed each FXR variant in primary hepatocytes and evaluated global gene expression, lipid profile, and metabolic fluxes. Gene delivery of FXR variants to Fxr−/− mouse liver was performed to evaluate their role in vivo. The effects of fasting and physical exercise on hepatic Fxr splicing were determined. Results We show that FXR splice isoforms regulate largely different gene sets and have specific effects on hepatic metabolism. FXRα2 (but not α1) activates a broad transcriptional program in hepatocytes conducive to lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Consequently, FXRα2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation and improves cellular insulin signaling to AKT. FXRα2 expression in Fxr−/− mouse liver activates a similar gene program and robustly decreases hepatic triglyceride levels. On the other hand, FXRα1 reduces hepatic triglyceride content to a lesser extent and does so through regulation of lipogenic gene expression. Bioenergetic cues, such as fasting and exercise, dynamically regulate Fxr splicing in mouse liver to increase Fxrα2 expression. Conclusions Our results show that the main FXR variants in human liver (α1 and α2) reduce hepatic lipid accumulation through distinct mechanisms and to different degrees. Taking this novel mechanism into account could greatly improve the pharmacological targeting and therapeutic efficacy of FXR agonists. PMID:26909306

  7. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  8. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  9. Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

    2014-10-28

    This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

  10. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan.

  11. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits.

  12. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits. PMID:27551435

  13. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  14. ARISTOLOCHIC ACID I METABOLISM IN THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Priestap, Horacio A.; Torres, M. Cecilia; Rieger, Robert A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Freshwater, Tomoko; Taft, David R.; Barbieri, Manuel A.; Iden, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochic acids are natural nitro-compounds found globally in the plant genus Aristolochia that have been implicated in the severe illness in humans termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Aristolochic acids undergo nitroreduction, among other metabolic reactions, and active intermediates arise that are carcinogenic. Previous experiments with rats showed that aristolochic acid I (AA-I), after oral administration or injection, is subjected to detoxication reactions to give aristolochic acid Ia, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and their glucuronide and sulfate conjugates that can be found in urine and faeces. Results obtained with whole rats do not clearly define the role of liver and kidney in such metabolic transformation. In this study, in order to determine the specific role of the kidney on the renal disposition of AA-I and to study the biotransformations suffered by AA-I in this organ, isolated kidneys of rats were perfused with AA-I. AA-I and metabolite concentrations were determined in perfusates and urines using HPLC procedures. The isolated perfused rat kidney model showed that AA-I distributes rapidly and extensively in kidney tissues by uptake from the peritubular capillaries and the tubules. It was also established that the kidney is able to metabolize AA-I into aristolochic acid Ia, aristolochic acid Ia O-sulfate, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and aristolactam Ia O-glucuronide. Rapid demethylation and sulfation of AA-I in the kidney generate aristolochic acid Ia and its sulfate conjugate that are voided to the urine. Reduction reactions to give the aristolactam metabolites occur to a slower rate. Renal clearances showed that filtered AA-I is reabsorbed at the tubules whereas the metabolites are secreted. The unconjugated metabolites produced in the renal tissues are transported to both urine and perfusate whereas the conjugated metabolites are almost exclusively secreted to the urine. PMID:22118289

  15. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  16. Dynamic optimization of metabolic networks coupled with gene expression.

    PubMed

    Waldherr, Steffen; Oyarzún, Diego A; Bockmayr, Alexander

    2015-01-21

    The regulation of metabolic activity by tuning enzyme expression levels is crucial to sustain cellular growth in changing environments. Metabolic networks are often studied at steady state using constraint-based models and optimization techniques. However, metabolic adaptations driven by changes in gene expression cannot be analyzed by steady state models, as these do not account for temporal changes in biomass composition. Here we present a dynamic optimization framework that integrates the metabolic network with the dynamics of biomass production and composition. An approximation by a timescale separation leads to a coupled model of quasi-steady state constraints on the metabolic reactions, and differential equations for the substrate concentrations and biomass composition. We propose a dynamic optimization approach to determine reaction fluxes for this model, explicitly taking into account enzyme production costs and enzymatic capacity. In contrast to the established dynamic flux balance analysis, our approach allows predicting dynamic changes in both the metabolic fluxes and the biomass composition during metabolic adaptations. Discretization of the optimization problems leads to a linear program that can be efficiently solved. We applied our algorithm in two case studies: a minimal nutrient uptake network, and an abstraction of core metabolic processes in bacteria. In the minimal model, we show that the optimized uptake rates reproduce the empirical Monod growth for bacterial cultures. For the network of core metabolic processes, the dynamic optimization algorithm predicted commonly observed metabolic adaptations, such as a diauxic switch with a preference ranking for different nutrients, re-utilization of waste products after depletion of the original substrate, and metabolic adaptation to an impending nutrient depletion. These examples illustrate how dynamic adaptations of enzyme expression can be predicted solely from an optimization principle.

  17. Gene network analysis identifies rumen epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolic pathways perturbed by diet and correlated with methane production

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ruidong; McNally, Jody; Rowe, Suzanne; Jonker, Arjan; Pinares-Patino, Cesar S.; Oddy, V. Hutton; Vercoe, Phil E.; McEwan, John C.; Dalrymple, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Ruminants obtain nutrients from microbial fermentation of plant material, primarily in their rumen, a multilayered forestomach. How the different layers of the rumen wall respond to diet and influence microbial fermentation, and how these process are regulated, is not well understood. Gene expression correlation networks were constructed from full thickness rumen wall transcriptomes of 24 sheep fed two different amounts and qualities of a forage and measured for methane production. The network contained two major negatively correlated gene sub-networks predominantly representing the epithelial and muscle layers of the rumen wall. Within the epithelium sub-network gene clusters representing lipid/oxo-acid metabolism, general metabolism and proliferating and differentiating cells were identified. The expression of cell cycle and metabolic genes was positively correlated with dry matter intake, ruminal short chain fatty acid concentrations and methane production. A weak correlation between lipid/oxo-acid metabolism genes and methane yield was observed. Feed consumption level explained the majority of gene expression variation, particularly for the cell cycle genes. Many known stratified epithelium transcription factors had significantly enriched targets in the epithelial gene clusters. The expression patterns of the transcription factors and their targets in proliferating and differentiating skin is mirrored in the rumen, suggesting conservation of regulatory systems. PMID:27966600

  18. [Gene networks that regulate secondary metabolism in actinomycetes: pleiotropic regulators].

    PubMed

    Rabyk, M V; Ostash, B O; Fedorenko, V O

    2014-01-01

    Current advances in the research and practical applications of pleiotropic regulatory genes for antibiotic production in actinomycetes are reviewed. The basic regulatory mechanisms found in these bacteria are outlined. Examples described in the review show the importance of the manipulation of regulatory systems that affect the synthesis of antibiotics for the metabolic engineering of the actinomycetes. Also, the study of these genes is the basis for the development of genetic engineering approaches towards the induction of "cryptic" part of the actinomycetes secondary metabolome, which capacity for production of biologically active compounds is much bigger than the diversity of antibiotics underpinned by traditional microbiological screening. Besides the practical problems, the study of regulatory genes for antibiotic biosynthesis will provide insights into the process of evolution of complex regulatory systems that coordinate the expression of gene operons, clusters and regulons, involved in the control of secondary metabolism and morphogenesis of actinomycetes.

  19. Citric acid metabolism in hetero- and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Drinan, D F; Robin, S; Cogan, T M

    1976-01-01

    The effect of citrate on production of diacetyl and acetoin by four strains each of heterofermentative and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria capable of utilizing citrate was studied. Acetoin was quantitatively the more important compound. The heterofermentative bacteria produced no acetoin or diacetyl in the absence of citrate, and two strains produced traces of acetoin in its presence. Citrate stimulated the growth rate of the heterofermentative lactobacilli. Acidification of all heterofermentative cultures with citric acid resulted in acetoin production. Destruction of accumulated acetoin appeared to coincide with the disappearance of citrate. All homofermentative bacteria produced more acetoin and diacetyl in the presence of citrate than in its absence. Citrate utilization was begun immediately by the streptococci but was delayed until at least the middle of the exponential phase in the case of the lactobacilli. PMID:5054

  20. The Contributing Role of Bile Acids to Metabolic Improvements After Obesity and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Farnaz; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Steffen, Kristine J

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and metabolic surgery (OMS) leads to several metabolic improvements, which often occur prior to substantial weight loss. Therefore, other factors in addition to weight loss contribute to the metabolic benefits. This literature review offers an overview of studies investigating bile acids (BAs) and their metabolic effects after OMS. Rearrangement of enterohepatic circulation, changes in BA synthesis, BA conjugation, intestinal reabsorption, and alterations in the gut microbiota are potential mechanisms for altered BA profiles after surgery. Increased BA levels are associated with improved glucose homeostasis and lipid profiles, which are mediated by two major receptors: the Transmembrane G-protein Coupled Receptor and the Farnesoid X Receptor. Therefore, pharmacological manipulation of BAs and their receptors may be viable targets for less invasive obesity treatment.

  1. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  2. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  3. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  4. Folate and One-Carbon Metabolism Gene Polymorphisms and Their Associations With Oral Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Boyles, Abee L.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Taylor, Jack A.; Meyer, Klaus; Fredriksen, Åse; Ueland, Per Magne; Drevon, Christian A.; Vollset, Stein Emil; Lie, Rolv Terje

    2008-01-01

    Folate metabolism plays a critical role in embryonic development. Prenatal folate supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and probably oral facial clefts. Previous studies of related metabolic genes have associated polymorphisms in cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) with cleft risk. We explored associations between genes related to one-carbon metabolism and clefts in a Norwegian population-based study that included 362 families with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and 191 families with cleft palate only (CPO). We previously showed a 39% reduction in risk of CL/P with folic acid supplementation in this population. In the present study we genotyped 12 polymorphisms in nine genes related to one-carbon metabolism and looked for associations of clefting risk with fetal polymorphisms, maternal polymorphisms, as well as parent-of-origin effects, using combined likelihood-ratio tests (LRT). We also stratified by maternal periconceptional intake of folic acid (>400 μg) to explore gene-exposure interactions. We found a reduced risk of CL/P with mothers who carried the CBS C699T variant (rs234706); relative risk was 0.94 with one copy of the T allele (95% CI 0.63-1.4) and 0.50 (95% CI 0.26-0.96) with two copies (P = 0.008). We found no evidence of interaction of this variant with folate status. We saw no evidence of risk from the MTHFR C677T variant (rs1801133) either overall or after stratifying by maternal folate intake. No associations were found between any of the polymorphisms and CPO. Genetic variations in the nine metabolic genes examined here do not confer a substantial degree of risk for clefts. Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.† PMID:18203168

  5. Horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal Amanita.

    PubMed

    Chaib De Mares, Maryam; Hess, Jaqueline; Floudas, Dimitrios; Lipzen, Anna; Choi, Cindy; Kennedy, Megan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Pringle, Anne

    2015-03-01

    The genus Amanita encompasses both symbiotic, ectomycorrhizal fungi and asymbiotic litter decomposers; all species are derived from asymbiotic ancestors. Symbiotic species are no longer able to degrade plant cell walls. The carbohydrate esterases family 1 (CE1s) is a diverse group of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, including decomposition and carbon storage. CE1 genes of the ectomycorrhizal A. muscaria appear diverged from all other fungal homologues, and more similar to CE1s of bacteria, suggesting a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event. In order to test whether AmanitaCE1s were acquired horizontally, we built a phylogeny of CE1s collected from across the tree of life, and describe the evolution of CE1 genes among Amanita and relevant lineages of bacteria. CE1s of symbiotic Amanita were very different from CE1s of asymbiotic Amanita, and are more similar to bacterial CE1s. The protein structure of one CE1 gene of A. muscaria matched a depolymerase that degrades the carbon storage molecule poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Asymbiotic Amanita do not carry sequence or structural homologues of these genes. The CE1s acquired through HGT may enable novel metabolisms, or play roles in signaling or defense. This is the first evidence for the horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  6. Comparative metabolic pathway analysis with special reference to nucleotide metabolism-related genes in chicken primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Lee, Bo Ram; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Young Min; Han, Jae Yong

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism provides energy and nutrients required for the cellular growth, maintenance, and reproduction. When compared with genomics and proteomics, metabolism studies provide novel findings in terms of cellular functions. In this study, we examined significant and differentially expressed genes in primordial germ cells (PGCs), gonadal stromal cells, and chicken embryonic fibroblasts compared with blastoderms using microarray. All upregulated genes (1001, 1118, and 974, respectively) and downregulated genes (504, 627, and 1317, respectively) in three test samples were categorized into functional groups according to gene ontology. Then all selected genes were tested to examine their involvement in metabolic pathways through Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database using overrepresentation analysis. In our results, most of the upregulated and downregulated genes were involved in at least one subcategory of seven major metabolic pathways. The main objective of this study is to compare the PGC expressed genes and their metabolic pathways with blastoderms, gonadal stromal cells, and chicken embryonic fibroblasts. Among the genes involved in metabolic pathways, a higher number of PGC upregulated genes were identified in retinol metabolism, and a higher number of PGC downregulated genes were identified in sphingolipid metabolism. In terms of the fold change, acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 3 (ACSM3), which is involved in butanoate metabolism, and N-acetyltransferase, pineal gland isozyme NAT-10 (PNAT10), which is involved in energy metabolism, showed higher expression in PGCs. To validate these gene changes, the expression of 12 nucleotide metabolism-related genes in chicken PGCs was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of this study provide new information on the expression of genes associated with metabolism function of PGCs and will facilitate more basic research on animal PGC differentiation and function.

  7. Glutaric acid moderately compromises energy metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    da C Ferreira, Gustavo; Viegas, Carolina M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Latini, Alexandra; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2005-12-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of predominantly glutaric acid (GA). Affected patients present frontotemporal hypotrophy, as well as caudate and putamen injury following acute encephalopathic crises. Considering that the underlying mechanisms of basal ganglia damage in this disorder are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of glutaric acid (0.2-5mM) on critical enzyme activities of energy metabolism, namely the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in midbrain of developing rats. Glutaric acid significantly inhibited creatine kinase activity (up to 26%) even at the lowest dose used in the assays (0.2mM). We also observed that CK inhibition was prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of GA was possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex I-III and of succinate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by 20 and 30%, respectively, at the highest glutaric acid concentration tested (5mM). In contrast, complexes II-III and IV activities of the electron transport chain were not affected by the acid. The effect of glutaric acid on the rate of oxygen consumption in intact mitochondria from the rat cerebrum was also investigated. Glutaric acid (1mM) significantly lowered the respiratory control ratio (state III/state IV) up to 40% in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate or succinate. Moreover, state IV respiration linked to NAD and FAD substrates was significantly increased in GA-treated mitochondria while state III was significantly diminished. The results indicate that the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I moderately compromises brain energy metabolism in vitro.

  8. Acid-base metabolism: implications for kidney stones formation.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The physiology and pathophysiology of renal H+ ion excretion and urinary buffer systems are reviewed. The main focus is on the two major conditions related to acid-base metabolism that cause kidney stone formation, i.e., distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and abnormally low urine pH with subsequent uric acid stone formation. Both the entities can be seen on the background of disturbances of the major urinary buffer system, NH3+ <--> NH4+. On the one hand, reduced distal tubular secretion of H+ ions results in an abnormally high urinary pH and either incomplete or complete dRTA. On the other hand, reduced production/availability of NH4+ is the cause of an abnormally low urinary pH, which predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Most recent research indicates that the latter abnormality may be a renal manifestation of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Despite opposite deviations from normal urinary pH values, both the dRTA and uric acid stone formation due to low urinary pH require the same treatment, i.e., alkali. In the dRTA, alkali is needed for improving the body's buffer capacity, whereas the goal of alkali treatment in uric acid stone formers is to increase the urinary pH to 6.2-6.8 in order to minimize uric acid crystallization.

  9. In vivo exposures to particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia or nickel chloride display similar dysregulation of metabolic syndrome genes

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Hernandez, Michelle; Laulicht, Freda; Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) exposures have been linked to mortality, low birth weights, hospital admissions, and diseases associated with metabolic syndrome, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. In a previous in vitro and in vivo study, data demonstrated that PM10µm collected from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (PMSA) altered expression of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism, as well as many other genes associated with metabolic disorders. PMSA contains a relatively high concentration of nickel (Ni), known to be linked to several metabolic disorders. In order to evaluate if Ni and PM exposures induce similar gene expression profiles, mice were exposed to 100µg/50µl PMSA (PM-100), 50µg/50µl nickel chloride (Ni-50), or 100µg/50µl nickel chloride (Ni-100) twice a week for 4 weeks and hepatic gene expression changes determined. Ultimately, 55 of the same genes were altered in all 3 exposures. However, where the two Ni groups differed markedly was in the regulation (up or down) of these genes. Ni-100 and PM-100 groups displayed similar regulations, whereby 104 of the 107 genes were similarly modulated. Many of the 107 genes involved in metabolic syndrome and include ALDH4A1, BCO2, CYP1A, CYP2U, TOP2A. In addition, the top affected pathways such as fatty acid α-oxidation, and lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, are involved in metabolic diseases. Most notably, the top diseased outcome affected by these changes in gene expression was cardiovascular disease. Given these data, it appears that Ni and PMSA exposures display similar gene expression profiles, modulating the expression of genes involved in metabolic disorders. PMID:26692068

  10. HexR Controls Glucose-Responsive Genes and Central Carbon Metabolism in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ana; Golfieri, Giacomo; Ferlicca, Francesca; Giuliani, Marzia M.; Scarlato, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis, an exclusively human pathogen and the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, must adapt to different host niches during human infection. N. meningitidis can utilize a restricted range of carbon sources, including lactate, glucose, and pyruvate, whose concentrations vary in host niches. Microarray analysis of N. meningitidis grown in a chemically defined medium in the presence or absence of glucose allowed us to identify genes regulated by carbon source availability. Most such genes are implicated in energy metabolism and transport, and some are implicated in virulence. In particular, genes involved in glucose catabolism were upregulated, whereas genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were downregulated. Several genes encoding surface-exposed proteins, including the MafA adhesins and Neisseria surface protein A, were upregulated in the presence of glucose. Our microarray analysis led to the identification of a glucose-responsive hexR-like transcriptional regulator that controls genes of the central carbon metabolism of N. meningitidis in response to glucose. We characterized the HexR regulon and showed that the hexR gene is accountable for some of the glucose-responsive regulation; in vitro assays with the purified protein showed that HexR binds to the promoters of the central metabolic operons of the bacterium. Based on DNA sequence alignment of the target sites, we propose a 17-bp pseudopalindromic consensus HexR binding motif. Furthermore, N. meningitidis strains lacking hexR expression were deficient in establishing successful bacteremia in an infant rat model of infection, indicating the importance of this regulator for the survival of this pathogen in vivo. IMPORTANCE Neisseria meningitidis grows on a limited range of nutrients during infection. We analyzed the gene expression of N. meningitidis in response to glucose, the main energy source available in human blood, and we found that glucose regulates many genes

  11. [Gene therapy for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism].

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Jordi

    2014-06-16

    Due to the enzymatic defect in inborn errors of metabolism, there is a blockage in the metabolic pathways and an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Currently available therapies include dietary restriction, empowering of alternative metabolic pathways, and the replacement of the deficient enzyme by cell transplantation, liver transplantation or administration of the purified enzyme. Gene therapy, using the transfer in the body of the correct copy of the altered gene by a vector, is emerging as a promising treatment. However, the difficulty of vectors currently used to cross the blood brain barrier, the immune response, the cellular toxicity and potential oncogenesis are some limitations that could greatly limit its potential clinical application in human beings.

  12. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio.

  13. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  14. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  15. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p < 0.05 for both). Gene expression analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue revealed significant down-regulation of genes related to BCAA catabolism and mitochondrial energy metabolism and up-regulation of several inflammation-related pathways in high HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  16. Cell organelles from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants : II. Compartmentation of enzymes of the crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, C; Groß, D; Burkhard, C; Herbert, M

    1980-02-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes involved in the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) has been studied in Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Crassula lycopodioides Lam. After separation of cell organelles by isopycnic centrifugation, enzymes of the Crassulacean acid metabolism were found in the following cell fractions: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria and in the supernatant; NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the chloroplasts; NADP-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to a minor extent in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to some degree in the mitochondria; and pyruvate; orthophosphate dikinase in the chloroplasts. The activity of the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase was due to three isoenzymes separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization. These isoenzymes represented 17, 78, and 5% of the activity recovered, respectively, in the order of elution. The isoenzyme eluting first was associated with the mitochondria and the second isoenzyme was of cytosolic origin, while the intracellular location of the third isoenzyme was probably the peroxisome. Based on these findings, the metabolic path of Crassulacean acid metabolism within cells of CAM plants is discussed.

  17. Lipid metabolism-related gene expression pattern of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus L.) larvae fed on live prey.

    PubMed

    Betancor, Mónica B; Ortega, Aurelio; de la Gándara, Fernando; Tocher, Douglas R; Mourente, Gabriel

    2016-11-04

    The present study is the first to evaluate lipid metabolism in first-feeding Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABT; Thunnus thynnus L.) larvae fed different live prey including enriched rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and Acartia sp. copepod nauplii from 2 days after hatch. Understanding the molecular basis of lipid metabolism and regulation in ABT will provide insights to optimize diet formulations for this high-value species new to aquaculture. To this end, we investigated the effect of dietary lipid on whole larvae lipid class and fatty acid compositions and the expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism in first feeding ABT larvae fed different live prey. Additionally, the expression of lipid metabolism genes in tissues of adult broodstock ABT was evaluated. Growth and survival data indicated that copepods were the best live prey for first feeding ABT and that differences in growth performance and lipid metabolism observed between larvae from different year classes could be a consequence of broodstock nutrition. In addition, expression patterns of lipid metabolic genes observed in ABT larvae in the trials could reflect differences in lipid class and fatty acid compositions of the live prey. The lipid nutritional requirements, including essential fatty acid requirements of larval ABT during the early feeding stages, are unknown, and the present study represents a first step in addressing these highly relevant issues. However, further studies are required to determine nutritional requirements and understand lipid metabolism during development of ABT larvae and to apply the knowledge to the commercial culture of this iconic species.

  18. Metabolic Conversion of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid in Oxalate-accumulating Plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, J C; Loewus, F A

    1975-08-01

    l-Ascorbic acid-1-(14)C and its oxidation product, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid, produced labeled oxalic acid in oxalate-accumulating plants such as spinach seedlings (Spinacia oleracea) and the detached leaves of woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta and O. oregana), shamrock (Oxalis adenopylla), and begonia (Begonia evansiana). In O. oregana, conversion occurred equally well in the presence or absence of light. This relationship between l-ascorbic acid metabolism and oxalic acid formation must be given careful consideration in attempts to explain oxalic accumulation in plants.

  19. Metabolic Conversion of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid in Oxalate-accumulating Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joan C.; Loewus, Frank A.

    1975-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid-1-14C and its oxidation product, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid, produced labeled oxalic acid in oxalate-accumulating plants such as spinach seedlings (Spinacia oleracea) and the detached leaves of woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta and O. oregana), shamrock (Oxalis adenopylla), and begonia (Begonia evansiana). In O. oregana, conversion occurred equally well in the presence or absence of light. This relationship between l-ascorbic acid metabolism and oxalic acid formation must be given careful consideration in attempts to explain oxalic accumulation in plants. PMID:16659288

  20. Metabolic engineering of Pichia pastoris to produce ricinoleic acid, a hydroxy fatty acid of industrial importance.

    PubMed

    Meesapyodsuk, Dauenpen; Chen, Yan; Ng, Siew Hon; Chen, Jianan; Qiu, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Ricinoleic acid (12-hydroxyoctadec-cis-9-enoic acid) has many specialized uses in bioproduct industries, while castor bean is currently the only commercial source for the fatty acid. This report describes metabolic engineering of a microbial system (Pichia pastoris) to produce ricinoleic acid using a "push" (synthesis) and "pull" (assembly) strategy. CpFAH, a fatty acid hydroxylase from Claviceps purpurea, was used for synthesis of ricinoleic acid, and CpDGAT1, a diacylglycerol acyl transferase for the triacylglycerol synthesis from the same species, was used for assembly of the fatty acid. Coexpression of CpFAH and CpDGAT1 produced higher lipid contents and ricinoleic acid levels than expression of CpFAH alone. Coexpression in a mutant haploid strain defective in the Δ12 desaturase activity resulted in a higher level of ricinoleic acid than that in the diploid strain. Intriguingly, the ricinoleic acid produced was mainly distributed in the neutral lipid fractions, particularly the free fatty acid form, but with little in the polar lipids. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of the metabolic engineering strategy and excellent capacity of the microbial system for production of ricinoleic acid as an alternative to plant sources for industrial uses.

  1. MRNA expression of genes regulating lipid metabolism in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from differently polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Martina Galatea; Rusten, Marte; Goksøyr, Anders; Routti, Heli

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the ability of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to influence lipid metabolism. Although POPs are found at high concentrations in some populations of marine mammals, for example in the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) from the Baltic Sea, little is known about the effects of POPs on their lipid metabolism. An optimal regulation of lipid metabolism is crucial for ringed seals during the fasting/molting season. This is a physiologically stressful period, during which they rely on the energy stored in their fat reserves. The mRNA expression levels for seven genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed in liver and/or blubber tissue from molting ringed seals from the polluted Baltic Sea and a less polluted reference location, Svalbard (Norway). mRNA expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α and γ and their target genes acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) were analyzed in liver. mRNA expression level of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ and their target genes encoding fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) were measured in inner and middle blubber layers. In addition, we evaluated the influence of molting status on hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARs and their target genes in ringed seals from Svalbard. Our results show higher mRNA expression of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ and adipose PPARβ, FABP4, and ADIPOQ in the Baltic seals compared to the Svalbard seals. A positive relationship between mRNA expressions of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ, adipose FABP4, adipose ADIPOQ and ΣPOP concentrations was observed. These findings suggest that lipid metabolism may be affected by contaminant exposure in the Baltic population. mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ, FABP4 and ADIPOQ were similar between the mid and inner adipose layer. Hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARα and PPARγ was higher in the pre

  2. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  3. Oxalic acid production by citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger overexpressing the oxaloacetate hydrolase gene oahA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-05-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used worldwide in the industrial production of citric acid. However, under specific cultivation conditions, citric acid-producing strains of A. niger accumulate oxalic acid as a by-product. Oxalic acid is used as a chelator, detergent, or tanning agent. Here, we sought to develop oxalic acid hyperproducers using A. niger as a host. To generate oxalic acid hyperproducers by metabolic engineering, transformants overexpressing the oahA gene, encoding oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC 3.7.1.1), were constructed in citric acid-producing A. niger WU-2223L as a host. The oxalic acid production capacity of this strain was examined by cultivation of EOAH-1 under conditions appropriate for oxalic acid production with 30 g/l glucose as a carbon source. Under all the cultivation conditions tested, the amount of oxalic acid produced by EOAH-1, a representative oahA-overexpressing transformant, exceeded that produced by A. niger WU-2223L. A. niger WU-2223L and EOAH-1 produced 15.6 and 28.9 g/l oxalic acid, respectively, during the 12-day cultivation period. The yield of oxalic acid for EOAH-1 was 64.2 % of the maximum theoretical yield. Our method for oxalic acid production gave the highest yield of any study reported to date. Therefore, we succeeded in generating oxalic acid hyperproducers by overexpressing a single gene, i.e., oahA, in citric acid-producing A. niger as a host.

  4. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure is one of the unique physiological challenges of human spaceflight that is not encountered on earth. While radiation exposure is known to impart physiological stresses and alter normal function, it is unclear how it specifically affects drug metabolism. A major concern is that the actions of medications used in spaceflight may deviate from the expectations formed from terrestrial use. This concern was investigated at the molecular level by analyzing how gamma radiation exposure affected gene expression in the livers of mice. Three different doses of radiation were administered and after various intervals of recovery time, gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR screening arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair. After examining the results of 192 genes total from each of 72 mice, 65 genes were found to be significantly affected by at least one of the doses of radiation. In general, the genes affected are involved in the metabolism of drugs with lipid or steroid hormone-like structures, as well as the maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage.

  5. Intra-myocellular fatty acid metabolism plays a critical role in mediating responses to dietary restriction in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Katewa, Subhash D.; Demontis, Fabio; Kolipinski, Marysia; Hubbard, Allan; Gill, Matthew S.; Perrimon, Norbert; Melov, Simon; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Summary Changes in fat content have been associated with dietary restriction (DR), but whether they play a causal role in mediating various responses to DR remains unknown. We demonstrate that upon DR, Drosophila melanogaster shift their metabolism towards increasing both fatty acid synthesis and breakdown, which is required for various responses to DR. Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis or oxidation genes specifically in the muscle tissue inhibited lifespan extension upon DR. Furthermore, DR enhances spontaneous activity of flies which was found to be dependent on the enhanced fatty acid metabolism. This increase in activity was found to be at least partially required for the lifespan extension upon DR. Over-expression of adipokinetic hormone (dAKH), the functional ortholog of glucagon, enhances fat metabolism, spontaneous activity and lifespan. Together, these results suggest that enhanced fat metabolism in the muscle and physical activity play a key role in the protective effects of DR. PMID:22768842

  6. Control of immune response by amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Ursula; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The interaction between pathogenic microorganisms and their hosts is regulated by reciprocal survival strategies, including competition for essential nutrients. Though paradoxical, mammalian hosts have learned to take advantage of amino acid catabolism for controlling pathogen invasion and, at the same time, regulating their own immune responses. In this way, ancient catabolic enzymes have acquired novel functions and evolved into new structures with highly specialized functions, which go beyond the struggle for survival. In this review, we analyze the evidence supporting a critical role for the metabolism of various amino acids in regulating different steps of both innate and adaptive immunity.

  7. Metabolism of Cholesterol and Bile Acids by the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host's enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered. PMID:25437605

  8. Metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Philippe

    2013-12-30

    The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host's enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered.

  9. Dietary gut microbial metabolites, short-chain fatty acids, and host metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Kasubuchi, Mayu; Hasegawa, Sae; Hiramatsu, Takero; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Kimura, Ikuo

    2015-04-14

    During feeding, the gut microbiota contributes to the host energy acquisition and metabolic regulation thereby influencing the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, which are produced by gut microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, are recognized as essential host energy sources and act as signal transduction molecules via G-protein coupled receptors (FFAR2, FFAR3, OLFR78, GPR109A) and as epigenetic regulators of gene expression by the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Recent evidence suggests that dietary fiber and the gut microbial-derived SCFAs exert multiple beneficial effects on the host energy metabolism not only by improving the intestinal environment, but also by directly affecting various host peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize the roles of gut microbial SCFAs in the host energy regulation and present an overview of the current understanding of its physiological functions.

  10. Wine lees modulate lipid metabolism and induce fatty acid remodelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Caro, M; Sansone, A; Amezaga, J; Navarro, V; Ferreri, C; Tueros, I

    2017-03-21

    This study investigates the ability of a polyphenolic extract obtained from a wine lees by-product to modulate zebrafish lipid metabolism. Lees from a Spanish winery were collected and the polyphenolic extract was chemically characterised in terms of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and the individual main phenolic compounds. The effects of the extract on lipid metabolism were evaluated using a zebrafish animal model. Lees are rich in polyphenols (42.33 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry matter) with high antioxidant capacity (56.04 mg Trolox equivalent per g dry matter), rutin and quercetin being their main identified polyphenols. The biological effects of lees extract included (i) a reduction in zebrafish embryos' fat reserve (40%), (ii) changes in the expression of lipid metabolism key genes, (iii) remodelling of the fatty acid content in phospholipid and triglyceride fractions of zebrafish embryos and (iv) reduction in the trans fatty acid content. On the whole, wine lees polyphenolic extract was effective at modulating zebrafish lipid metabolism evidencing remodelling effects and antioxidant properties that can be further developed for food innovation.

  11. Lactococcus lactis metabolism and gene expression during growth on plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Golomb, Benjamin L; Marco, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations.

  12. Lactococcus lactis Metabolism and Gene Expression during Growth on Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations. PMID:25384484

  13. Toxicogenomic analysis suggests chemical-induced sexual dimorphism in the expression of metabolic genes in zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Ung, Choong Yong; Lam, Siew Hong; Ma, Jing; Chen, Yu Zong; Zhang, Louxin; Gong, Zhiyuan; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    Differential gene expression in two sexes is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, giving rise to sex-dimorphic gene activities and sex-dependent adaptability to environmental cues, diets, growth and development as well as susceptibility to diseases. Here, we present a study using a toxicogenomic approach to investigate metabolic genes that show sex-dimorphic expression in the zebrafish liver triggered by several chemicals. Our analysis revealed that, besides the known genes for xenobiotic metabolism, many functionally diverse metabolic genes, such as ELOVL fatty acid elongase, DNA-directed RNA polymerase, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, were also sex-dimorphic in their response to chemical treatments. Moreover, sex-dimorphic responses were also observed at the pathway level. Pathways belonging to xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism were enriched with sex-dimorphically expressed genes. We also observed temporal differences of the sex-dimorphic responses, suggesting that both genes and pathways are differently correlated during different periods of chemical perturbation. The ubiquity of sex-dimorphic activities at different biological hierarchies indicate the importance and the need of considering the sex factor in many areas of biological researches, especially in toxicology and pathology.

  14. Metabolic reprogramming by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-lactic acid axis: Linking metabolism and diverse neuropathophysiologies.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that there is a complex interplay between metabolism and chronic disorders in the nervous system. In particular, the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase (PDK)-lactic acid axis is a critical link that connects metabolic reprogramming and the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. PDKs, via regulation of PDH complex activity, orchestrate the conversion of pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA, or anaerobically to lactate. The kinases are also involved in neurometabolic dysregulation under pathological conditions. Lactate, an energy substrate for neurons, is also a recently acknowledged signaling molecule involved in neuronal plasticity, neuron-glia interactions, neuroimmune communication, and nociception. More recently, the PDK-lactic acid axis has been recognized to modulate neuronal and glial phenotypes and activities, contributing to the pathophysiologies of diverse neurological disorders. This review covers the recent advances that implicate the PDK-lactic acid axis as a novel linker of metabolism and diverse neuropathophysiologies. We finally explore the possibilities of employing the PDK-lactic acid axis and its downstream mediators as putative future therapeutic strategies aimed at prevention or treatment of neurological disorders.

  15. Maintenance Carbon Cycle in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, William H.; Severson, Ray F.; Black, Clanton C.

    1985-01-01

    The reciprocal relationship between diurnal changes in organic acid and storage carbohydrate was examined in the leaves of three Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. It was found that depletion of leaf hexoses at night was sufficient to account quantitatively for increase in malate in Ananas comosus but not in Sedum telephium or Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Fructose and to a lesser extent glucose underwent the largest changes. Glucose levels in S. telephium leaves oscillated diurnally but were not reciprocally related to malate fluctuations. Analysis of isolated protoplasts and vacuoles from leaves of A. comosus and S. telephium revealed that vacuoles contain a large percentage (>50%) of the protoplast glucose, fructose and malate, citrate, isocitrate, ascorbate and succinate. Sucrose, a major constituent of intact leaves, was not detectable or was at extremely low levels in protoplasts and vacuoles from both plants. In isolated vacuoles from both A. comosus and S. telephium, hexose levels decreased at night at the same time malate increased. Only in A. comosus, however, could hexose metabolism account for a significant amount of the nocturnal increase in malate. We conclude that, in A. comosus, soluble sugars are part of the daily maintenance carbon cycle and that the vacuole plays a dynamic role in the diurnal carbon assimilation cycle of this Crassulacean acid metabolism plant. PMID:16664005

  16. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment. PMID:27570415

  17. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  18. Light quality modulates metabolic synchronization over the diel phases of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M.; Taybi, Tahar; Frans, Mario; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal compartmentation of carboxylation processes is a defining feature of crassulacean acid metabolism and involves circadian control of key metabolic and transport steps that regulate the supply and demand for carbon over a 24h cycle. Recent insights on the molecular workings of the circadian clock and its connection with environmental inputs raise new questions on the importance of light quality and, by analogy, certain photoreceptors for synchronizing the metabolic components of CAM. The present work tested the hypothesis that optimal coupling of stomatal conductance, net CO2 uptake, and the reciprocal turnover of carbohydrates and organic acids over the diel CAM cycle requires both blue and red light input signals. Contrasting monochromatic wavelengths of blue, green, and red light (i.e. 475, 530, 630nm) with low fluence rates (10 μmol m–2 s–1) were administered for 16 hours each diel cycle for a total treatment time of 48 hours to the obligate CAM bromeliad, Aechmea ‘Maya’. Of the light treatments imposed, low-fluence blue light was a key determinant in regulating stomatal responses, organic acid mobilization from the vacuole, and daytime decarboxylation. However, the reciprocal relationship between starch and organic acid turnover that is typical for CAM was uncoupled under low-fluence blue light. Under low-fluence red or green light, the diel turnover of storage carbohydrates was orchestrated in line with the requirements of CAM, but a consistent delay in acid consumption at dawn compared with plants under white or low-fluence blue light was noted. Consistent with the acknowledged influences of both red and blue light as input signals for the circadian clock, the data stress the importance of both red and blue-light signalling pathways for synchronizing the metabolic and physiological components of CAM over the day/night cycle. PMID:24803500

  19. miR-33a/b contribute to the regulation of fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Smibert, Peter; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Warrier, Nikhil P.; Andreo, Ursula; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Rayner, Katey; Suresh, Uthra; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Esplugues, Enric; Fisher, Edward A.; Penalva, Luiz O. F.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Lai, Eric C.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Cellular imbalances of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism result in pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Recent work from our group and others has shown that the intronic microRNAs hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b are located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 and -1 genes, respectively, and regulate cholesterol homeostasis in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33a and -b also regulate genes involved in fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling. miR-33a and -b target key enzymes involved in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation, including carnitine O-octaniltransferase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), and AMP kinase subunit-α. Moreover, miR-33a and -b also target the insulin receptor substrate 2, an essential component of the insulin-signaling pathway in the liver. Overexpression of miR-33a and -b reduces both fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in hepatic cell lines, whereas inhibition of endogenous miR-33a and -b increases these two metabolic pathways. Together, these data establish that miR-33a and -b regulate pathways controlling three of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, namely levels of HDL, triglycerides, and insulin signaling, and suggest that inhibitors of miR-33a and -b may be useful in the treatment of this growing health concern. PMID:21576456

  20. Trehalose 6-phosphate coordinates organic and amino acid metabolism with carbon availability.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Carlos M; Feil, Regina; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Kölling, Katharina; Krause, Ursula; Höhne, Melanie; Encke, Beatrice; Plaxton, William C; Zeeman, Samuel C; Li, Zhi; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hoefgen, Rainer; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) is an essential signal metabolite in plants, linking growth and development to carbon metabolism. The sucrose-Tre6P nexus model postulates that Tre6P acts as both a signal and negative feedback regulator of sucrose levels. To test this model, short-term metabolic responses to induced increases in Tre6P levels were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing the Escherichia coli Tre6P synthase gene (otsA) under the control of an ethanol-inducible promoter. Increased Tre6P levels led to a transient decrease in sucrose content, post-translational activation of nitrate reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and increased levels of organic and amino acids. Radio-isotope ((14)CO2) and stable isotope ((13)CO2) labelling experiments showed no change in the rates of photoassimilate export in plants with elevated Tre6P, but increased labelling of organic acids. We conclude that high Tre6P levels decrease sucrose levels by stimulating nitrate assimilation and anaplerotic synthesis of organic acids, thereby diverting photoassimilates away from sucrose to generate carbon skeletons and fixed nitrogen for amino acid synthesis. These results are consistent with the sucrose-Tre6P nexus model, and implicate Tre6P in coordinating carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants.

  1. Metabolic engineering of biocatalysts for carboxylic acids production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Jarboe, Laura R.

    2012-01-01

    Fermentation of renewable feedstocks by microbes to produce sustainable fuels and chemicals has the potential to replace petrochemical-based production. For example, carboxylic acids produced by microbial fermentation can be used to generate primary building blocks of industrial chemicals by either enzymatic or chemical catalysis. In order to achieve the titer, yield and productivity values required for economically viable processes, the carboxylic acid-producing microbes need to be robust and well-performing. Traditional strain development methods based on mutagenesis have proven useful in the selection of desirable microbial behavior, such as robustness and carboxylic acid production. On the other hand, rationally-based metabolic engineering, like genetic manipulation for pathway design, has becoming increasingly important to this field and has been used for the production of several organic acids, such as succinic acid, malic acid and lactic acid. This review investigates recent works on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli, as well as the strategies to improve tolerance towards these chemicals. PMID:24688671

  2. Phosphonate Analogs of 2-Oxoglutarate Perturb Metabolism and Gene Expression in Illuminated Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Daloso, Danilo M.; Nimick, Mhairi; Krahnert, Ina; Bunik, Victoria I.; Moorhead, Greg B. G.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the role of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (2-OGDHC) has previously been demonstrated in plant heterotrophic tissues its role in photosynthetically active tissues remains poorly understood. By using a combination of metabolite and transcript profiles we here investigated the function of 2-OGDHC in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana via use of specific phosphonate inhibitors of the enzyme. Incubation of leaf disks with the inhibitors revealed that they produced the anticipated effects on the in situ enzyme activity. In vitro experiments revealed that succinyl phosphonate (SP) and a carboxy ethyl ester of SP are slow-binding inhibitors of the 2-OGDHC. Our results indicate that the reduced respiration rates are associated with changes in the regulation of metabolic and signaling pathways leading to an imbalance in carbon-nitrogen metabolism and cell homeostasis. The inducible alteration of primary metabolism was associated with altered expression of genes belonging to networks of amino acids, plant respiration, and sugar metabolism. In addition, by using isothermal titration calorimetry we excluded the possibility that the changes in gene expression resulted from an effect on 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) binding to the carbon/ATP sensing protein PII. We also demonstrated that the 2OG degradation by the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase strongly influences the distribution of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the GABA shunt. Our results indicate that the TCA cycle activity is clearly working in a non-cyclic manner upon 2-OGDHC inhibition during the light period. PMID:22876250

  3. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, V. E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight. While known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. Three different doses of gamma radiation (50 mGy - 6.05 Gy) and a sham were administered to groups of 6 mice each, and after various intervals of recovery time, liver gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair enzymes. Results indicated approx.65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post-treatment. With 6 Gy exposure, metallothionein expression was 132-fold more than control at the 4 hr time point, and fell at each later time point (11-fold at 24 hrs, and 8-fold at 7 days). In contrast, Cyp17a1 showed a 4-fold elevation at 4 hrs after exposure and remained constant for 7 days.

  4. Acylation and metabolism of (n-6) fatty acids in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, A.C.; Sprecher, H.

    1986-05-01

    Isolated hepatocytes (5 x 10/sup 6/ in 2ml) from chow fed rats were incubated from 20 to 60 min. with increasing concentrations of (1-/sup 14/C) labeled 18:2 (n-6), 18:3 (n-6) or 20:3 (n-6) to define optimum conditions for measuring acylation and metabolism to other (n-6) acids with subsequent incorporation into lipids. The triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PL) contained 157 and 80 nmols of 18:2 (n-6) and 6.0 and 6.1 nmols of other (n-6) acids, respectively, when cells were incubated with 0.3mM (1-/sup 14/C) 18:2 (n-6) for 40 min. When cells were incubated with 0.3mM (1-/sup 14/C) 18:2 (n-6) plus 0.15 to 0.45mM 18:3 (n-6) or 20:3 (n-6), the metabolism of 18:2 (n-6) to other (n-6) acids was inhibited but not totally abolished. These results may suggest that (n-6) acid made from linoleate do not totally equilibrate with exogenous 18:3 (n-6) or 20:3 (n-6).

  5. Maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and risk of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Philip J; Mitchell, Laura E; Canfield, Mark A; Shaw, Gary M; Olshan, Andrew F; Finnell, Richard H; Zhu, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    Single-gene analyses indicate that maternal genes associated with metabolic conditions (e.g., obesity) may influence the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and NTDs. We investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 7 maternal metabolic genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, and TCF7L2) and 2 fetal metabolic genes (SLC2A2 and UCP2). Samples were obtained from 737 NTD case-parent triads included in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study for birth years 1999-2007. We used a 2-step approach to evaluate maternal-fetal gene-gene interactions. First, a case-only approach was applied to screen all potential maternal and fetal interactions (n = 76), as this design provides greater power in the assessment of gene-gene interactions compared to other approaches. Specifically, ordinal logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each maternal-fetal gene-gene interaction, assuming a log-additive model of inheritance. Due to the number of comparisons, we calculated a corrected p-value (q-value) using the false discovery rate. Second, we confirmed all statistically significant interactions (q < 0.05) using a log-linear approach among case-parent triads. In step 1, there were 5 maternal-fetal gene-gene interactions with q < 0.05. The "top hit" was an interaction between maternal ENPP1 rs1044498 and fetal SLC2A2 rs6785233 (interaction OR = 3.65, 95% CI: 2.32-5.74, p = 2.09×10(-8), q=0.001), which was confirmed in step 2 (p = 0.00004). Our findings suggest that maternal metabolic genes associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and fetal metabolic genes involved in glucose homeostasis may interact to increase the risk of NTDs.

  6. Beyond lipids, pharmacological PPARalpha activation has important effects on amino acid metabolism as studied in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kashif; Camejo, Germán; Lanne, Boel; Halvarsson, Torbjörn; Landergren, Marie Rydén; Oakes, Nicholas D

    2007-04-01

    PPARalpha agonists have been characterized largely in terms of their effects on lipids and glucose metabolism, whereas little has been reported about effects on amino acid metabolism. We studied responses to the PPARalpha agonist WY 14,643 (30 micromol x kg(-1) x day(-1) for 4 wk) in rats fed a saturated fat diet. Plasma and urine were analyzed with proton NMR. Plasma amino acids were measured using HPLC, and hepatic gene expression was assessed with DNA arrays. The high-fat diet elevated plasma levels of insulin and triglycerides (TG), and WY 14,643 treatment ameliorated this insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, lowering plasma insulin and TG levels. In addition, treatment decreased body weight gain, without altering cumulative food intake, and increased liver mass. WY 14,643 increased plasma levels of 12 of 22 amino acids, including glucogenic and some ketogenic amino acids, whereas arginine was significantly decreased. There was no alteration in branched-chain amino acid levels. Compared with the fat-fed control animals, WY 14,643-treated animals had raised plasma urea and ammonia levels as well as raised urine levels of N-methylnicotinamide and dimethylglycine. WY 14,643 induced changes in a number of key genes involved in amino acid metabolism in addition to expected effects on hepatic genes involved in lipid catabolism and ketone body formation. In conclusion, the present results suggest that, in rodents, effects of pharmacological PPARalpha activation extend beyond control of lipid metabolism to include important effects on whole body amino acid mobilization and hepatic amino acid metabolism.

  7. Adiponectin regulates expression of hepatic genes critical for glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Yuan, Bingbing; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Patterson, Heide Christine; Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-09-04

    The effects of adiponectin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism at transcriptional level are largely unknown. We profiled hepatic gene expression in adiponectin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice by RNA sequencing. Compared with WT mice, adiponectin KO mice fed a chow diet exhibited decreased mRNA expression of rate-limiting enzymes in several important glucose and lipid metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty-acid activation and synthesis, triglyceride synthesis, and cholesterol synthesis. In addition, binding of the transcription factor Hnf4a to DNAs encoding several key metabolic enzymes was reduced in KO mice, suggesting that adiponectin might regulate hepatic gene expression via Hnf4a. Phenotypically, adiponectin KO mice possessed smaller epididymal fat pads and showed reduced body weight compared with WT mice. When fed a high-fat diet, adiponectin KO mice showed significantly reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. These lipogenic defects are consistent with the down-regulation of lipogenic genes in the KO mice.

  8. Protein Analysis of Sapienic Acid-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis Suggests Differential Regulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Drake, David R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipids endogenous to skin and mucosal surfaces exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Our previous work demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6) against P. gingivalis and found that sapienic acid treatment alters both protein and lipid composition from those in controls. In this study, we further examined whole-cell protein differences between sapienic acid-treated bacteria and untreated controls, and we utilized open-source functional association and annotation programs to explore potential mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of sapienic acid. Our analyses indicated that sapienic acid treatment induces a unique stress response in P. gingivalis resulting in differential expression of proteins involved in a variety of metabolic pathways. This network of differentially regulated proteins was enriched in protein-protein interactions (P = 2.98 × 10−8), including six KEGG pathways (P value ranges, 2.30 × 10−5 to 0.05) and four Gene Ontology (GO) molecular functions (P value ranges, 0.02 to 0.04), with multiple suggestive enriched relationships in KEGG pathways and GO molecular functions. Upregulated metabolic pathways suggest increases in energy production, lipid metabolism, iron acquisition and processing, and respiration. Combined with a suggested preferential metabolism of serine, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, these data support our previous findings that the site of sapienic acid antimicrobial activity is likely at the bacterial membrane. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis is an important opportunistic pathogen implicated in periodontitis. Affecting nearly 50% of the population, periodontitis is treatable, but the resulting damage is irreversible and eventually progresses to tooth loss. There is a great need for natural products that can be used to treat and/or prevent the overgrowth of

  9. RNA-Seq Analysis of Developing Pecan (Carya illinoinensis) Embryos Reveals Parallel Expression Patterns among Allergen and Lipid Metabolism Genes.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Christopher P; Rai, Ruhi; Settlage, Robert E; Hinchliffe, Doug J; Madison, Crista; Bland, John M; Brashear, Suzanne; Graham, Charles J; Tarver, Matthew R; Florane, Christopher; Bechtel, Peter J

    2017-02-22

    The pecan nut is a nutrient-rich part of a healthy diet full of beneficial fatty acids and antioxidants, but can also cause allergic reactions in people suffering from food allergy to the nuts. The transcriptome of a developing pecan nut was characterized to identify the gene expression occurring during the process of nut development and to highlight those genes involved in fatty acid metabolism and those that commonly act as food allergens. Pecan samples were collected at several time points during the embryo development process including the water, gel, dough, and mature nut stages. Library preparation and sequencing were performed using Illumina-based mRNA HiSeq with RNA from four time points during the growing season during August and September 2012. Sequence analysis with Trinotate software following the Trinity protocol identified 133,000 unigenes with 52,267 named transcripts and 45,882 annotated genes. A total of 27,312 genes were defined by GO annotation. Gene expression clustering analysis identified 12 different gene expression profiles, each containing a number of genes. Three pecan seed storage proteins that commonly act as allergens, Car i 1, Car i 2, and Car i 4, were significantly up-regulated during the time course. Up-regulated fatty acid metabolism genes that were identified included acyl-[ACP] desaturase and omega-6 desaturase genes involved in oleic and linoleic acid metabolism. Notably, a few of the up-regulated acyl-[ACP] desaturase and omega-6 desaturase genes that were identified have expression patterns similar to the allergen genes based upon gene expression clustering and qPCR analysis. These findings suggest the possibility of coordinated accumulation of lipids and allergens during pecan nut embryogenesis.

  10. Distinct von Hippel-Lindau gene and hypoxia-regulated alterations in gene and protein expression patterns of renal cell carcinoma and their effects on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Erb, Susanne; Oefner, Peter; Dettmer, Katja; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Stehle, Franziska; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-05-10

    During the last decade the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of the cellular adaption to hypoxia and the function of the "von Hippel Lindau" (VHL) protein in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased, but there exists little information about the overlap and differences in gene/protein expression of both processes. Therefore the aim of this study was to dissect VHL- and hypoxia-regulated alterations in the metabolism of human RCC using ome-based strategies. The effect of the VHL- and hypoxia-regulated altered gene/protein expression pattern on the cellular metabolism was analyzed by determination of glucose uptake, lactate secretion, extracellular pH, lactate dehydrogenase activity, amino acid content and ATP levels. By employing VHL-/VHL(+) RCC cells cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, VHL-dependent, HIF-dependent as well as VHL-/HIF-independent alterations in the gene and protein expression patterns were identified and further validated in other RCC cell lines. The genes/proteins differentially expressed under these distinct conditions were mainly involved in the cellular metabolism, which was accompanied by an altered metabolism as well as changes in the abundance of amino acids in VHL-deficient cells. In conclusion, the study reveals similarities, but also differences in the genes and proteins controlled by VHL functionality and hypoxia thereby demonstrating differences in the metabolic switch of RCC under these conditions.

  11. MUC1-induced alterations in a lipid metabolic gene network predict response of human breast cancers to tamoxifen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pitroda, Sean P.; Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Beckett, Michael A.; Kufe, Donald W.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    The mucin 1 (MUC1) oncoprotein is aberrantly overexpressed in human breast cancers. Although MUC1 modulates the activity of estrogen receptor α (ER), there is no information regarding the effects of MUC1 on global gene expression patterns and the potential role of MUC1-induced genes in predicting outcome for breast cancer patients. We have developed an experimental model of MUC1-induced transformation that has identified the activation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. A 38-gene set of experimentally derived MUC1-induced genes associated with lipid metabolism was applied to the analysis of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. The results obtained from 2 independent databases demonstrate that patients overexpressing MUC1 and the lipid metabolic pathways are at significantly higher risk for death and recurrence/distant metastasis. By contrast, these genes were not predictive in untreated patients. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between expression of the 38-gene set and the ER signaling pathway. These findings indicate that (i) MUC1 regulates cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism, and (ii) activation of these pathways in ER+ breast cancers predicts failure to tamoxifen treatment. PMID:19289846

  12. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  13. Hormone metabolism genes and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Su, Yu-Chen; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Hsu, Chris; Van den Berg, David; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Female steroid hormone levels and exogenous hormone use influence breast cancer risk. We investigated the association between genetic variation in the hormone metabolism and signaling pathway and mammographic density (MD), a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. Methods We genotyped 161 SNPs in 15 hormone metabolism pathway gene regions and evaluated MD in 2,038 Singapore Chinese women. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate SNP-MD association. An overall pathway summary was obtained using the adaptive ranked truncated product test. Results We did not find any of the individually tested SNPs to be associated with MD after a multiple testing correction. There was no evidence of an overall effect on MD of genetic variation in the hormone metabolism pathway. Conclusions In this cross-sectional study, genetic variation in hormone metabolism pathway was not associated with MD in Singapore Chinese women. Impact Consistent with existing data from Caucasian populations, polymorphisms in hormone pathway genes are not likely to be strong predictors of MD in Asian women. PMID:23429186

  14. Jacaric acid is rapidly metabolized to conjugated linoleic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Ryo; Honma, Taro; Ito, Junya; Yamasaki, Masao; Ikezaki, Aya; Motonaga, Chihiro; Nishiyama, Kazuo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that jacaric acid (JA; 8c,10t,12c-18:3), which has a conjugated triene system, has a strong anti-tumor effect. However, the characteristics of absorption and metabolism of JA have yet to be determined in vivo, and the details of absorption and metabolism of JA in the small intestine are particularly unclear. This information is required for effective use of JA in humans. Therefore, in this study we examined absorption and metabolism of JA using cannulation of the thoracic duct in rats. Emulsions of two test oils, jacaranda seed oil and tung oil, which contain JA and α-eleostearic acid (α-ESA; 9c,11t,13t-18:3), respectively, were administered to rats and lymph from the thoracic duct was collected over 24 h. We examined the rate of absorption of JA and possible conversion to a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)containing a conjugated diene system. The positional isomerism of the CLA produced by JA metabolism was determined using gas chromatography-electron impact/mass spectrometry. The rate of absorption and percentage conversion of JA were compared with those of α-ESA. We found that JA is rapidly absorbed and converted to a CLA in rats and that the percentage conversion of JA was lower than that of α-ESA. This is the first report on the absorption and metabolism of JA and this information may be important for application of JA as a functional food.

  15. Fatty acid metabolism during maturation affects glucose uptake and is essential to oocyte competence.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, M; Schoolcraft, W B; Krisher, R L

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) is essential for oocyte maturation in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of etomoxir (a FAO inhibitor; 100 μM), carnitine (1 mM), and palmitic acid (1 or 100 μM) during maturation on metabolism and gene expression of the oocyte and cumulus cells, and subsequent embryo development in the mouse. Carnitine significantly increased embryo development, while there was a decrease in development following maturation with 100 μM palmitic acid or etomoxir (P<0.05) treatment. Glucose consumption per cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) was decreased after treatment with carnitine and increased following etomoxir treatment (P<0.05). Intracellular oocyte lipid content was decreased after carnitine or etomoxir exposure (P<0.05). Abundance of Slc2a1 (Glut1) was increased after etomoxir treatment in the oocyte and cumulus cells (P<0.05), suggesting stimulation of glucose transport and potentially the glycolytic pathway for energy production when FAO is inhibited. Abundance of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2) tended to increase in oocytes (P=0.1) after treatment with 100 μM palmitic acid and in cumulus cells after exposure to 1 μM palmitic acid (P=0.07). Combined with carnitine, 1 μM palmitic acid increased the abundance of Acsl3 (P<0.05) and Cpt2 tended to increase (P=0.07) in cumulus cells, suggesting FAO was increased during maturation in response to stimulators and fatty acids. In conclusion, fatty acid and glucose metabolism are related to the mouse COC, as inhibition of FAO increases glucose consumption. Stimulation of FAO decreases glucose consumption and lipid stores, positively affecting subsequent embryo development, while an overabundance of fatty acid or reduced FAO negatively affects oocyte quality.

  16. Metabolic Relations between Methylxanthines and Methyluric Acids in Coffea L.

    PubMed

    Petermann, J B; Baumann, T W

    1983-12-01

    Metabolism of purine alkaloids in the leaves of Coffea dewevrei De Wild et Durand var excelsa Chev, Coffea liberica Bull ex Hiern and Coffea abeokutae Cramer was studied by analyzing leaf discs collected during vegetative development and by feeding the following radioactive tracers: [(14)C]theobromine, [(14)C]caffeine, and [(14)C]theacrine (1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric acid). Their principal metabolites were quantitatively and qualitatively determined. All three species convert the precursors to the same radioactive products, and proceed through the same four maturity stages characterized by the alkaloid accumulation pattern and by a particular transformation potency: (stage 1) young plant accumulating caffeine, transforms theobromine to caffeine; (stage 2) caffeine is gradually replaced by theacrine, theobromine and caffeine are converted to theacrine; (stage 3) theacrine disappears whereas liberine (O(2), 1,9-thrimethyluric acid) accumulates, theacrine is metabolized to liberine; (stage 4) branched-out plant containing liberine but no theacrine, caffeine is converted rapidly to liberine via theacrine. Methylliberine (O(2),1,7,9-tetramethyluric acid), presumably the direct precursor of liberine, is occasionally found in low concentrations at stage 3 and 4.The collective term ;liberio-excelsoid' introduced by geneticists for the numerous races or species of Pachycoffea is in accordance with the phytochemical equality found in this work.

  17. [Dependence of metabolic fecal amino acids on the amino acid content of the feed. 1. Metabolic fecal amino acids of rats fed with maize].

    PubMed

    Krawielitzki, K; Schadereit, R; Völker, T; Reichel, K

    1981-07-01

    The amount of metabolic fecal amino acids (MFAA) in dependence on the amino acid intake was determined for graded maize rations with 15N-labelled rats and the quota of labelled endogenous amino acids in faeces was calculated according to the isotope dilution method. The excretion of amino acids and MFAA in faeces are described as functions of the amino acid intake for 17 amino acids and regressively calculated. For all 17 amino acids investigated, there was a more or less steep increase of MFAA according to an increasing amino acid intake. In contrast to MFAA in N-free feeding, MFAA in feeding with pure maize (16.5% crude protein) increase to the 2- to 4.5-fold value. The thesis of the constancy of the excretion of MFAA can consequently be no longer maintained. The true digestibility according to the conventional method is, on an average of all amino acids, 7.3 units below the one ascertained according to the 15N-isotope method. For the limiting amino acids lysine and threonine the difference is biggest (23 resp. 17 units). Tryptophane as first limiting amino acid could not be determined. The true digestibility of nearly all amino acids ascertained for maize according to the isotope method is above 90%. For the limiting amino acids the expenditure resp. the loss of endogenous amino acids is biggest.

  18. RNA Sequencing Reveals Xyr1 as a Transcription Factor Regulating Gene Expression beyond Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Zou, Gen; Liu, Rui; Jiang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Xyr1 has been demonstrated to be the main transcription activator of (hemi)cellulases in the well-known cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. This study comprehensively investigates the genes regulated by Xyr1 through RNA sequencing to produce the transcription profiles of T. reesei Rut-C30 and its xyr1 deletion mutant (Δxyr1), cultured on lignocellulose or glucose. xyr1 deletion resulted in 467 differentially expressed genes on inducing medium. Almost all functional genes involved in (hemi)cellulose degradation and many transporters belonging to the sugar porter family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) were downregulated in Δxyr1. By contrast, all differentially expressed protease, lipase, chitinase, some ATP-binding cassette transporters, and heat shock protein-encoding genes were upregulated in Δxyr1. When cultured on glucose, a total of 281 genes were expressed differentially in Δxyr1, most of which were involved in energy, solute transport, lipid, amino acid, and monosaccharide as well as secondary metabolism. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the intracellular β-glucosidase bgl2, the putative nonenzymatic cellulose-attacking gene cip1, the MFS lactose transporter lp, the nmrA-like gene, endo T, the acid protease pepA, and the small heat shock protein hsp23 were probable Xyr1-targets. These results might help elucidate the regulation system for synthesis and secretion of (hemi)cellulases in T. reesei Rut-C30. PMID:28116297

  19. Urinary metabolomics in Fxr-null mice reveals activated adaptive metabolic pathways upon bile acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joo-Youn; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Kang, Dong Wook; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Luecke, Hans; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in synthesis, metabolism, and transport of bile acids and thus plays a major role in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. In this study, metabolomic responses were investigated in urine of wild-type and Fxr-null mice fed cholic acid, an FXR ligand, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Multivariate data analysis between wild-type and Fxr-null mice on a cholic acid diet revealed that the most increased ions were metabolites of p-cresol (4-methylphenol), corticosterone, and cholic acid in Fxr-null mice. The structural identities of the above metabolites were confirmed by chemical synthesis and by comparing retention time (RT) and/or tandem mass fragmentation patterns of the urinary metabolites with the authentic standards. Tauro-3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrol (3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrahydroxy-5beta-cholestan-26-oyltaurine), one of the most increased metabolites in Fxr-null mice on a CA diet, is a marker for efficient hydroxylation of toxic bile acids possibly through induction of Cyp3a11. A cholestatic model induced by lithocholic acid revealed that enhanced expression of Cyp3a11 is the major defense mechanism to detoxify cholestatic bile acids in Fxr-null mice. These results will be useful for identification of biomarkers for cholestasis and for determination of adaptive molecular mechanisms in cholestasis.

  20. Hepatic arachidonic acid metabolism is disrupted after hexachlorobenzene treatment.

    PubMed

    Billi de Catabbi, Silvia C; Faletti, Alicia; Fuentes, Federico; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Cochón, Adriana C

    2005-04-15

    Hexaclorobenzene (HCB), one of the most persistent environmental pollutants, can cause a wide range of toxic effects including cancer in animals, and hepatotoxicity and porphyria both in humans and animals. In the present study, liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, hepatic PGE production, and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activity were investigated in an experimental model of porphyria cutanea tarda induced by HCB. Female Wistar rats were treated with a single daily dose of HCB (100 mg kg(-1) body weight) for 5 days and were sacrificed 3, 10, 17, and 52 days after the last dose. HCB treatment induced the accumulation of hepatic porphyrins from day 17 and increased the activities of liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD), and aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND) from day 3 after the last dose. Liver microsomes from control and HCB-treated rats generated, in the presence of NADPH, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), 11,12-Di HETE, and omega-OH/omega-1-OH AA. HCB treatment caused an increase in total NADPH CYP-dependent AA metabolism, with a higher response at 3 days after the last HCB dose than at the other time points studied. In addition, HCB treatment markedly enhanced PGE production and release in liver slices. This HCB effect was time dependent and reached its highest level after 10 days. At this time cPLA2 activity was shown to be increased. Unexpectedly, HCB produced a significant decrease in cPLA2 activity on the 17th and 52nd day. Our results demonstrated for the first time that HCB induces both the cyclooxygenase and CYP-dependent AA metabolism. The effects of HCB on AA metabolism were previous to the onset of a marked porphyria and might contribute to different aspects of HCB-induced liver toxicity such as alterations of membrane fluidity and membrane-bound protein function. Observations also suggested that a possible role of cPLA2

  1. Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism and Its Control in Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Brice; Polard, Patrice; Ehrlich, Dusko S.; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine and methionine availability influences many processes in the cell. In bacteria, transcription of the specific genes involved in the synthesis of these two amino acids is usually regulated by different mechanisms or regulators. Pathways for the synthesis of cysteine and methionine and their interconversion were experimentally determined for Lactococcus lactis, a lactic acid bacterium commonly found in food. A new gene, yhcE, was shown to be involved in methionine recycling to cysteine. Surprisingly, 18 genes, representing almost all genes of these pathways, are under the control of a LysR-type activator, FhuR, also named CmbR. DNA microarray experiments showed that FhuR targets are restricted to this set of 18 genes clustered in seven transcriptional units, while cysteine starvation modifies the transcription level of several other genes potentially involved in oxidoreduction processes. Purified FhuR binds a 13-bp box centered 46 to 53 bp upstream of the transcriptional starts from the seven regulated promoters, while a second box with the same consensus is present upstream of the first binding box, separated by 8 to 10 bp. O-Acetyl serine increases FhuR binding affinity to its binding boxes. The overall view of sulfur amino acid metabolism and its regulation in L. lactis indicates that CysE could be a master enzyme controlling the activity of FhuR by providing its effector, while other controls at the enzymatic level appear to be necessary to compensate the absence of differential regulation of the genes involved in the interconversion of methionine and cysteine and other biosynthesis genes. PMID:15901700

  2. Evolutionary Rate Heterogeneity of Primary and Secondary Metabolic Pathway Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Dola; Mukherjee, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2015-11-10

    Primary metabolism is essential to plants for growth and development, and secondary metabolism helps plants to interact with the environment. Many plant metabolites are industrially important. These metabolites are produced by plants through complex metabolic pathways. Lack of knowledge about these pathways is hindering the successful breeding practices for these metabolites. For a better knowledge of the metabolism in plants as a whole, evolutionary rate variation of primary and secondary metabolic pathway genes is a prerequisite. In this study, evolutionary rate variation of primary and secondary metabolic pathway genes has been analyzed in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Primary metabolic pathway genes were found to be more conserved than secondary metabolic pathway genes. Several factors such as gene structure, expression level, tissue specificity, multifunctionality, and domain number are the key factors behind this evolutionary rate variation. This study will help to better understand the evolutionary dynamics of plant metabolism.

  3. Study of nucleic acid metabolism in two astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, L. D.; Keresztes, P.; Pallos, J. P.; Csató, E.; Predmerszky, T.

    During the last years data have evidenced that alteration in nucleic acid metabolism, expecially increased urinary excretion of modified nucleosides reflects physiological changes in living organism. In relation with the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6-Soyuz-35 mission in 1980 urinary nucleoside excretion of two astronauts /B.F., V.K./ were traced. Individual daily urine samples were collected for 4 days before starting and 6 days after landing and were analysed with improved analytical procedures /affinity chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography/. Levels of 1-methylinosine, 1-methylguanosine and N,2,2-dimethylguanosine in urine were determined. Thus recorded changes differ considerably at two astronauts. One of the /V.K./ excreted nucleosides normally, another /B.F./ showed increase to 200-400 % levels excretion of above nucleosides on the second day after landing. The peak values disappeared on the 3-6 days after. To interpret this phenomenon extreme factors of space-flight /weightlessness, stress, radiations, etc./ have to be taken into consideration. However, we attach importance to training of astronauts. During the last decade data have evidenced that alterations in the metabolism of nucleic acids especial increased urinary excretion of modified nucleosides reflects physiological and in some cases pathological changes in living organism /1, 2, 3/. In relation with the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6-Soyuz-35 mission urinary excretion of certain modified nucleosides of two astronauts /B.F. and V.K./ were measured. The aim of the measurements was: how the metabolism of transfer ribonucleic acids /tRNAs/ refering to cosmic flight, how it is reflected in urinary excretions of modified nucleosides. For these purposes we studied the excretion of methylguanosine, dimethylguanosine and methylinosine. These nucleosides are the normal minor components of tRNA.

  4. Effects of bioactive fatty acid amide derivatives in zebrafish scale model of bone metabolism and disease.

    PubMed

    Carnovali, M; Ottria, R; Pasqualetti, S; Banfi, G; Ciuffreda, P; Mariotti, M

    2016-02-01

    The endocannabinoid system (which includes fatty acid derivatives, receptors, and metabolizing enzymes) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, including bone metabolism in which it regulates the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, as well as differentiation of their precursors. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides a useful animal model for bone research since zebrafish bones develop rapidly and are anatomically similar to mammalian bones. Putative orthologues and paralogs of endocannabinoid genes have recently been identified in zebrafish, demonstrating the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) receptors with affinity to endocannabinoid ligands. To identify therapeutic molecules potentially useful in bone-related diseases, we evaluated the in vivo effects of exposure to long-chain fatty acid amides in adult zebrafish. Using a well-established zebrafish scale model, we found that anandamide and N-linoleoylethanolamine are able to stimulate bone formation by increasing alkaline phosphatase activity in physiological conditions. In addition, they prevent the alteration of bone markers in a prednisolone-induced osteoporosis model in adult zebrafish scales, whereas their esterified forms do not. These data suggest that long-chain fatty acid amides are involved in regulating bone metabolism in zebrafish scales and that the CB2 receptor is a key mediator in this process.

  5. Regulation of Amino Acid, Nucleotide, and Phosphate Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ljungdahl, Per O.; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the beginning of biochemical analysis, yeast has been a pioneering model for studying the regulation of eukaryotic metabolism. During the last three decades, the combination of powerful yeast genetics and genome-wide approaches has led to a more integrated view of metabolic regulation. Multiple layers of regulation, from suprapathway control to individual gene responses, have been discovered. Constitutive and dedicated systems that are critical in sensing of the intra- and extracellular environment have been identified, and there is a growing awareness of their involvement in the highly regulated intracellular compartmentalization of proteins and metabolites. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of amino acid, nucleotide, and phosphate metabolism and provides illustrative examples of how yeast cells combine a variety of mechanisms to achieve coordinated regulation of multiple metabolic pathways. Importantly, common schemes have emerged, which reveal mechanisms conserved among various pathways, such as those involved in metabolite sensing and transcriptional regulation by noncoding RNAs or by metabolic intermediates. Thanks to the remarkable sophistication offered by the yeast experimental system, a picture of the intimate connections between the metabolomic and the transcriptome is becoming clear. PMID:22419079

  6. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies.

  7. [Use of genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers of Chlorobi Phylum representatives].

    PubMed

    Turova, T P; Kovaleva, O L; Gorlenko, V M; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2014-01-01

    This work examined the feasibility of using certain genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers adequate for studying phylogeny and ecology of green sulfur bacteria (GSB) of the Chlorobi phylum. Primers designed to amplify the genes of ATP citrate lyase (aclB) and citrate synthase (gltA) revealed the respective genes in the genomes of all of the newly studied GSB strains. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on nucleotide sequences of these genes and amino acid sequences of the conceptually translated proteins were on the whole congruent with the 16S rRNA gene tree, with the single exception of GltA of Chloroherpeton thalassium, which formed a separate branch beyond the cluster comprised by other representatives of the Chlorobi phylum. Thus, the aclB genes but not gltA genes proved to be suitable for the design of primers specific to all Chlorobi representatives. Therefore, it was the aclB gene that was further used asa molecular marker to detect GSB in enrichment cultures and environmental samples. AclB phylotypes of GSB were revealed in all of the samples studied, with the exception of environmental samples from soda lakes. The identification of the revealed phylotypes was in agreement with the identification based on the FMO protein gene (fmo), is a well-known Chlorobi-specific molecular marker.

  8. Emerging model systems for functional genomics analysis of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, James; Dever, Louisa V; Boxall, Susanna F

    2016-06-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is one of three main pathways of photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation found in higher plants. It stands out for its ability to underpin dramatic improvements in plant water use efficiency, which in turn has led to a recent renaissance in CAM research. The current ease with which candidate CAM-associated genes and proteins can be identified through high-throughput sequencing has opened up a new horizon for the development of diverse model CAM species that are amenable to genetic manipulations. The adoption of these model CAM species is underpinning rapid advances in our understanding of the complete gene set for CAM. We highlight recent breakthroughs in the functional characterisation of CAM genes that have been achieved through transgenic approaches.

  9. Adipose tissue branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism modulates circulating BCAA levels.

    PubMed

    Herman, Mark A; She, Pengxiang; Peroni, Odile D; Lynch, Christopher J; Kahn, Barbara B

    2010-04-09

    Whereas the role of adipose tissue in glucose and lipid homeostasis is widely recognized, its role in systemic protein and amino acid metabolism is less well-appreciated. In vitro and ex vivo experiments suggest that adipose tissue can metabolize substantial amounts of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). However, the role of adipose tissue in regulating BCAA metabolism in vivo is controversial. Interest in the contribution of adipose tissue to BCAA metabolism has been renewed with recent observations demonstrating down-regulation of BCAA oxidation enzymes in adipose tissue in obese and insulin-resistant humans. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we observe alterations in adipose-tissue BCAA enzyme expression caused by adipose-selective genetic alterations in the GLUT4 glucose-transporter expression. We show that the rate of adipose tissue BCAA oxidation per mg of tissue from normal mice is higher than in skeletal muscle. In mice overexpressing GLUT4 specifically in adipose tissue, we observe coordinate down-regulation of BCAA metabolizing enzymes selectively in adipose tissue. This decreases BCAA oxidation rates in adipose tissue, but not in muscle, in association with increased circulating BCAA levels. To confirm the capacity of adipose tissue to modulate circulating BCAA levels in vivo, we demonstrate that transplantation of normal adipose tissue into mice that are globally defective in peripheral BCAA metabolism reduces circulating BCAA levels by 30% (fasting)-50% (fed state). These results demonstrate for the first time the capacity of adipose tissue to catabolize circulating BCAAs in vivo and that coordinate regulation of adipose-tissue BCAA enzymes may modulate circulating BCAA levels.

  10. Aging elevates metabolic gene expression in brain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Karen A; Kent, Caroline; Personett, David; Lai, Weil R; Park, Peter J; Coleman, Paul; McKinney, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system is selectively vulnerable in human brain diseases, while the cholinergic groups in the upper pons of the brainstem (BS) resist neurodegeneration. Cholinergic neurons (200 per region per animal) were laser-microdissected from five young (8 months) and five aged (24 months) F344 rats from the BF and the BS pontine lateral dorsal tegmental/pedunculopontine nuclei (LDTN/PPN) and their expression profiles were obtained. The bioinformatics program SigPathway was used to identify gene groups and pathways that were selectively affected by aging. In the BF cholinergic system, aging most significantly altered genes involved with a variety of metabolic functions. In contrast, BS cholinergic neuronal age effects included gene groupings related to neuronal plasticity and a broad range of normal cellular functions. Transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPalpha), which controls expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, was more strongly upregulated in the BF cholinergic neurons (+107%) than in the BS cholinergic population (+40%). The results suggest that aging elicits elevates metabolic activity in cholinergic populations and that this occurs to a much greater degree in the BF group than in the BS group.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas fluorescens for the production of vanillin from ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Diana; Luziatelli, Francesca; Negroni, Andrea; Ficca, Anna Grazia; Fava, Fabio; Ruzzi, Maurizio

    2011-12-20

    Vanillin is one of the most important flavors in the food industry and there is great interest in its production through biotechnological processes starting from natural substrates such as ferulic acid. Among bacteria, recombinant Escherichia coli strains are the most efficient vanillin producers, whereas Pseudomonas spp. strains, although possessing a broader metabolic versatility, rapidly metabolize various phenolic compounds including vanillin. In order to develop a robust Pseudomonas strain that can produce vanillin in high yields and at high productivity, the vanillin dehydrogenase (vdh)-encoding gene of Pseudomonas fluorescens BF13 strain was inactivated via targeted mutagenesis. The results demonstrated that engineered derivatives of strain BF13 accumulate vanillin if inactivation of vdh is associated with concurrent expression of structural genes for feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and hydratase/aldolase (ech) from a low-copy plasmid. The conversion of ferulic acid to vanillin was enhanced by optimization of growth conditions, growth phase and parameters of the bioconversion process. The developed strain produced up to 8.41 mM vanillin, which is the highest final titer of vanillin produced by a Pseudomonas strain to date and opens new perspectives in the use of bacterial biocatalysts for biotechnological production of vanillin from agro-industrial wastes which contain ferulic acid.

  12. Genes Involved in Anaerobic Metabolism of Phenol in the Bacterium Thauera aromatica

    PubMed Central

    Breinig, Sabine; Schiltz, Emile; Fuchs, Georg

    2000-01-01

    Genes involved in the anaerobic metabolism of phenol in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica have been studied. The first two committed steps in this metabolism appear to be phosphorylation of phenol to phenylphosphate by an unknown phosphoryl donor (“phenylphosphate synthase”) and subsequent carboxylation of phenylphosphate to 4-hydroxybenzoate under release of phosphate (“phenylphosphate carboxylase”). Both enzyme activities are strictly phenol induced. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of several phenol-induced proteins. Based on N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of such proteins, degenerate oligonucleotides were designed to identify the corresponding genes. A chromosomal DNA segment of about 14 kbp was sequenced which contained 10 genes transcribed in the same direction. These are organized in two adjacent gene clusters and include the genes coding for five identified phenol-induced proteins. Comparison with sequences in the databases revealed the following similarities: the gene products of two open reading frames (ORFs) are each similar to either the central part and N-terminal part of phosphoenolpyruvate synthases. We propose that these ORFs are components of the phenylphosphate synthase system. Three ORFs showed similarity to the ubiD gene product, 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate carboxy lyase; UbiD catalyzes the decarboxylation of a 4-hydroxybenzoate analogue in ubiquinone biosynthesis. Another ORF was similar to the ubiX gene product, an isoenzyme of UbiD. We propose that (some of) these four proteins are involved in the carboxylation of phenylphosphate. A 700-bp PCR product derived from one of these ORFs cross-hybridized with DNA from different Thauera and Azoarcus strains, even from those which have not been reported to grow with phenol. One ORF showed similarity to the mutT gene product, and three ORFs showed no strong similarities to sequences in the databases. Upstream of the first gene cluster, an

  13. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  14. Metabolic interactions between vitamin A and conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Cordeddu, Lina; Ortiz, Berenice; Giordano, Elena; Belury, Martha A; Quadro, Loredana; Banni, Sebastiano

    2014-03-24

    Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4). However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  15. Ascorbate metabolism and the developmental demand for tartaric and oxalic acids in ripening grape berries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Fresh fruits are well accepted as a good source of the dietary antioxidant ascorbic acid (Asc, Vitamin C). However, fruits such as grapes do not accumulate exceptionally high quantities of Asc. Grapes, unlike most other cultivated fruits do however use Asc as a precursor for the synthesis of both oxalic (OA) and tartaric acids (TA). TA is a commercially important product in the wine industry and due to its acidifying effect on crushed juice it can influence the organoleptic properties of the wine. Despite the interest in Asc accumulation in fruits, little is known about the mechanisms whereby Asc concentration is regulated. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into Asc metabolism in wine grapes (Vitis vinifera c.v. Shiraz.) and thus ascertain whether the developmental demand for TA and OA synthesis influences Asc accumulation in the berry. Results We provide evidence for developmentally differentiated up-regulation of Asc biosynthetic pathways and subsequent fluctuations in Asc, TA and OA accumulation. Rapid accumulation of Asc and a low Asc to dehydroascorbate (DHA) ratio in young berries was co-ordinated with up-regulation of three of the primary Asc biosynthetic (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway genes. Immature berries synthesised Asc in-situ from the primary pathway precursors D-mannose and L-galactose. Immature berries also accumulated TA in early berry development in co-ordination with up-regulation of a TA biosynthetic gene. In contrast, ripe berries have up-regulated expression of the alternative Asc biosynthetic pathway gene D-galacturonic acid reductase with only residual expression of Smirnoff-Wheeler Asc biosynthetic pathway genes and of the TA biosynthetic gene. The ripening phase was further associated with up-regulation of Asc recycling genes, a secondary phase of increased accumulation of Asc and an increase in the Asc to DHA ratio. Conclusion We demonstrate strong developmental regulation of Asc biosynthetic, recycling and catabolic

  16. Mapping of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Adler, D.A.; Disteche, C.M.; Grubin, C.E.; Karlsen, A.E.; Lernmark, A.; Foster, D. )

    1993-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the synthesis of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is known as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), but is also present outside the CNS. Recent studies showed that GAD is the major target of autoantibodies associated with the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and of the rare stiff man syndrome. Studies of GAD expression have demonstrated multiple transcripts, suggesting several isoforms of GAD. In this study, three different genes were mapped by in situ hybridization to both human and mouse chromosomes. The GAD1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 2q31 and to mouse chromosome 2D in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. GAD2, previously mapped to human chromosome 10p11.2-p12, was mapped to mouse chromosome 2A2-B, which identifies a new region of conservation between human and mouse chromosomes. A potential GAD3 transcript was mapped to human chromosome 22q13 and to mouse chromosome 15E in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. It is concluded that the GAD genes may form a family with as many as three related members. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  17. A sperm-specific proteome-scale metabolic network model identifies non-glycolytic genes for energy deficiency in asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Arvand; Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Ansari-Pour, Naser

    2017-04-01

    About 15% of couples experience difficulty in conceiving a child, of which half of the cases are thought to be male-related. Asthenozoospermia, or low sperm motility, is one of the frequent types of male infertility. Although energy metabolism is suggested to be central to the etiology of asthenozoospermia, very few attempts have been made to identify its underlying metabolic pathways. Here, we reconstructed SpermNet, the first proteome-scale model of the sperm cell by using whole-proteome data and the mCADRE algorithm. The reconstructed model was then analyzed using the COBRA toolbox. Genes were knocked-out in the model to investigate their effect on ATP production. A total of 78 genes elevated ATP production rate considerably of which most encode components of oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid oxidation, the Krebs cycle, and members of the solute carrier 25 family. Among them, we identified 11 novel genes which have previously not been associated with sperm cell energy metabolism and may thus be implicated in asthenozoospermia. We further examined the reconstructed model by in silico knock out of currently known asthenozoospermia implicated-genes that were not predicted by our model. The pathways affected by knocking out these genes were also related to energy metabolism, confirming previous findings. Therefore, our model not only predicts the known pathways, it also identifies several non-glycolytic genes for deficient energy metabolism in asthenozoospermia. Finally, this model supports the notion that metabolic pathways besides glycolysis such as oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation are essential for sperm energy metabolism and if validated, may form a basis for fertility recovery.

  18. Secondary metabolic gene clusters: evolutionary toolkits for chemical innovation.

    PubMed

    Osbourn, Anne

    2010-10-01

    Microbes and plants produce a huge array of secondary metabolites that have important ecological functions. These molecules have long been exploited in medicine as antibiotics, anticancer and anti-infective agents and for a wide range of other applications. Gene clusters for secondary metabolic pathways are common in bacteria and filamentous fungi, and examples have now been discovered in plants. Here, current knowledge of gene clusters across the kingdoms is evaluated with the aim of trying to understand the rules behind cluster existence and evolution. Such knowledge will be crucial in learning how to activate the enormous number of 'silent' gene clusters being revealed by whole-genome sequencing and hence in making available a wealth of novel compounds for evaluation as drug leads and other bioactives. It could also facilitate the development of crop plants with enhanced pest or disease resistance, improved nutritional qualities and/or elevated levels of high-value products.

  19. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Giudetti, Anna M.; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V.; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  20. Principal transcriptional regulation and genome-wide system interactions of the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid networks of amino acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Less, Hadar; Angelovici, Ruthie; Tzin, Vered; Galili, Gad

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid metabolism is among the most important and best recognized networks within biological systems. In plants, amino acids serve multiple functions associated with growth. Besides their function in protein synthesis, the amino acids are also catabolized into energy-associated metabolites as well we into numerous secondary metabolites, which are essential for plant growth and response to various stresses. Despite the central importance of amino acids in plants growth, elucidation of the regulation of amino acid metabolism within the context of the entire system, particularly transcriptional regulation, is still in its infancy. The different amino acids are synthesized by a number of distinct metabolic networks, which are expected to possess regulatory cross interactions between them for proper coordination of their interactive functions, such as incorporation into proteins. Yet, individual amino acid metabolic networks are also expected to differentially cross interact with various genome-wide gene expression programs and metabolic networks, in respect to their functions as precursors for various metabolites with distinct functions. In the present review, we discuss our recent genomics, metabolic and bioinformatics studies, which were aimed at addressing these questions, focusing mainly on the Asp-family metabolic network as the main example and also comparing it to the aromatic amino acids metabolic network as a second example (Angelovici et al. in Plant Physiol 151:2058-2072, 2009; Less and Galili in BMC Syst Biol 3:14, 2009; Tzin et al. in Plant J 60:156-167, 2009). Our focus on these two networks is because of the followings: (i) both networks are central to plant metabolism and growth and are also precursors for a wide range of primary and secondary metabolites that are indispensable to plant growth; (ii) the amino acids produced by these two networks are also essential to the nutrition and health of human and farm animals; and (iii) both networks contain

  1. Proline Coordination with Fatty Acid Synthesis and Redox Metabolism of Chloroplast and Mitochondria1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Suhas; Villamor, Joji Grace; Lin, Wendar; Verslues, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline (Pro) accumulation is one of the most prominent changes in plant metabolism during drought and low water potential; however, the regulation and function of Pro metabolism remain unclear. We used a combination of forward genetic screening based on a Proline Dehydrogenase1 (PDH1) promoter-luciferase reporter (PDH1pro:LUC2) and RNA sequencing of the Pro synthesis mutant p5cs1-4 to identify multiple loci affecting Pro accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Two mutants having high PDH1pro:LUC2 expression and increased Pro accumulation at low water potential were found to be alleles of Cytochrome P450, Family 86, Subfamily A, Polypeptide2 (CYP86A2) and Long Chain Acyl Synthetase2 (LACS2), which catalyze two successive steps in very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) synthesis. Reverse genetic experiments found additional VLCFA and lipid metabolism-related mutants with increased Pro accumulation. Altered cellular redox status is a key factor in the coordination of Pro and VLCFA metabolism. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) induced high levels of Pro accumulation and strongly repressed PDH1pro:LUC2 expression. cyp86a2 and lacs2 mutants were hypersensitive to diphenyleneiodonium but could be reverted to wild-type Pro and PDH1pro:LUC2 expression by reactive oxygen species scavengers. The coordination of Pro and redox metabolism also was indicated by the altered expression of chloroplast and mitochondria electron transport genes in p5cs1-4. These results show that Pro metabolism is both influenced by and influences cellular redox status via previously unknown coordination with several metabolic pathways. In particular, Pro and VLCFA synthesis share dual roles to help buffer cellular redox status while producing products useful for stress resistance, namely the compatible solute Pro and cuticle lipids. PMID:27512016

  2. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F.; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  3. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism and platelet size in atopic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Audera, C.; Rocklin, R.; Vaillancourt, R.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Deykin, D.

    1988-03-01

    The release and metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in physiologically activated platelets obtained from 11 atopic patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma was compared to that of sex- and age-matched nonatopic controls. Prelabeled (/sup 3/H)AA platelets were stimulated with thrombin or collagen and the amount of free (/sup 3/H)AA and radiolabeled metabolites released were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained indicate that although the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)AA into platelet phospholipids and total release of /sup 3/H-radioactivity upon stimulation were comparable in the two groups, the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released from platelets as free AA was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. The reduction in free (/sup 3/H)AA was accompanied by an increase (P less than 0.01) in the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released as cyclooxygenase products in atopic platelets (compared to nonatopic cells) after stimulation with 10 and 25 micrograms/ml collagen. The amount of platelet lipoxygenase product released was comparable between the two groups. Although the blood platelet counts were similar, the mean platelet volume was statistically higher (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. These results indicate that arachidonic acid metabolism in atopic platelets is altered, the pathophysiological significance of which remains to be clarified.

  4. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  5. Inhibition of expression of the circadian clock gene Period causes metabolic abnormalities including repression of glycometabolism in Bombyx mori cells

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hui; Li, Xue; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Cui, Wen-Zhao; Sima, Yang-Hu; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abnormalities in the circadian clock system are known to affect the body’s metabolic functions, though the molecular mechanisms responsible remain uncertain. In this study, we achieved continuous knockdown of B. mori Period (BmPer) gene expression in the B. mori ovary cell line (BmN), and generated a Per-KD B. mori model with developmental disorders including small individual cells and slow growth. We conducted cell metabolomics assays by gas chromatography/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and showed that knockdown of BmPer gene expression resulted in significant inhibition of glycometabolism. Amino acids that used glucose metabolites as a source were also down-regulated, while lipid metabolism and nucleotide metabolism were significantly up-regulated. Metabolite correlation analysis showed that pyruvate and lactate were closely related to glycometabolism, as well as to metabolites such as aspartate, alanine, and xanthine in other pathways. Further validation experiments showed that the activities of the key enzymes of glucose metabolism, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, and citrate synthase, were significantly decreased and transcription of their encoding genes, as well as that of pyruvate kinase, were also significantly down-regulated. We concluded that inhibition of the circadian clock gene BmPer repressed glycometabolism, and may be associated with changes in cellular amino acid metabolism, and in cell growth and development. PMID:28393918

  6. Allosteric ACTion: the varied ACT domains regulating enzymes of amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lang, Eric J M; Cross, Penelope J; Mittelstädt, Gerd; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2014-12-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzyme activity plays important metabolic roles. Here we review the allostery of enzymes of amino-acid metabolism conferred by a discrete domain known as the ACT domain. This domain of 60-70 residues has a βαββαβ topology leading to a four-stranded β4β1β3β2 antiparallel sheet with two antiparallel helices on one face. Extensive sequence variation requires a combined sequence/structure/function analysis for identification of the ACT domain. Common features include highly varied modes of self-association of ACT domains, ligand binding at domain interfaces, and transmittal of allosteric signals through conformational changes and/or the manipulation of quaternary equilibria. A recent example illustrates the relatively facile adoption of this versatile module of allostery by gene fusion.

  7. Production of free monounsaturated fatty acids by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are the best components for biodiesel when considering the low temperature fluidity and oxidative stability. However, biodiesel derived from vegetable oils or microbial lipids always consists of significant amounts of polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) alkyl esters, which hampers its practical applications. Therefore, the fatty acid composition should be modified to increase MUFA contents as well as enhancing oil and lipid production. Results The model microorganism Escherichia coli was engineered to produce free MUFAs. The fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (AtFatA) and fatty acid desaturase (SSI2) from Arabidopsis thaliana were heterologously expressed in E. coli BL21 star(DE3) to specifically release free unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and convert SFAs to UFAs. In addition, the endogenous fadD gene (encoding acyl-CoA synthetase) was disrupted to block fatty acid catabolism while the native acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) was overexpressed to increase the malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) pool and boost fatty acid biosynthesis. The finally engineered strain BL21ΔfadD/pE-AtFatAssi2&pA-acc produced 82.6 mg/L free fatty acids (FFAs) under shake-flask conditions and FFAs yield on glucose reached about 3.3% of the theoretical yield. Two types of MUFAs, palmitoleate (16:1Δ9) and cis-vaccenate (18:1Δ11) made up more than 75% of the FFA profiles. Fed-batch fermentation of this strain further enhanced FFAs production to a titer of 1.27 g/L without affecting fatty acid compositions. Conclusions This study demonstrated the possibility to regulate fatty acid composition by using metabolic engineering approaches. FFAs produced by the recombinant E. coli strain consisted of high-level MUFAs and biodiesel manufactured from these fatty acids would be more suitable for current diesel engines. PMID:24716602

  8. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAAs) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to postprandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  9. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the overproduction of short branched-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Juwono, Nina Kurniasih Pratomo; Foo, Jee Loon; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2016-03-01

    Short branched-chain fatty acids (SBCFAs, C4-6) are versatile platform intermediates for the production of value-added products in the chemical industry. Currently, SBCFAs are mainly synthesized chemically, which can be costly and may cause environmental pollution. In order to develop an economical and environmentally friendly route for SBCFA production, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic microorganism of industrial significance, for the overproduction of SBCFAs. In particular, we employed a combinatorial metabolic engineering approach to optimize the native Ehrlich pathway in S. cerevisiae. First, chromosome-based combinatorial gene overexpression led to a 28.7-fold increase in the titer of SBCFAs. Second, deletion of key genes in competing pathways improved the production of SBCFAs to 387.4 mg/L, a 31.2-fold increase compared to the wild-type. Third, overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter PDR12 increased the secretion of SBCFAs. Taken together, we demonstrated that the combinatorial metabolic engineering approach used in this study effectively improved SBCFA biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae through the incorporation of a chromosome-based combinatorial gene overexpression strategy, elimination of genes in competitive pathways and overexpression of a native transporter. We envision that this strategy could also be applied to the production of other chemicals in S. cerevisiae and may be extended to other microbes for strain improvement.

  10. A Branch Point of Streptomyces Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism Controls the Production of Albomycin

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Van Lanen, Steven; Zhang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Albomycin (ABM), also known as grisein, is a sulfur-containing metabolite produced by Streptomyces griseus ATCC 700974. Genes predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of ABM and ABM-like molecules are found in the genomes of other actinomycetes. ABM has potent antibacterial activity, and as a result, many attempts have been made to develop ABM into a drug since the last century. Although the productivity of S. griseus can be increased with random mutagenesis methods, understanding of Streptomyces sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism, which supplies a precursor for ABM biosynthesis, could lead to improved and stable production. We previously characterized the gene cluster (abm) in the genome-sequenced S. griseus strain and proposed that the sulfur atom of ABM is derived from either cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy). The gene product, AbmD, appears to be an important link between primary and secondary sulfur metabolic pathways. Here, we show that propargylglycine or iron supplementation in growth media increased ABM production by significantly changing the relative concentrations of intracellular Cys and Hcy. An SAA metabolic network of S. griseus was constructed. Pathways toward increasing Hcy were shown to positively impact ABM production. The abmD gene and five genes that increased the Hcy/Cys ratio were assembled downstream of hrdBp promoter sequences and integrated into the chromosome for overexpression. The ABM titer of one engineered strain, SCAK3, in a chemically defined medium was consistently improved to levels ∼400% of the wild type. Finally, we analyzed the production and growth of SCAK3 in shake flasks for further process development. PMID:26519385

  11. A Branch Point of Streptomyces Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism Controls the Production of Albomycin.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Van Lanen, Steven; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Shawn

    2015-10-30

    Albomycin (ABM), also known as grisein, is a sulfur-containing metabolite produced by Streptomyces griseus ATCC 700974. Genes predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of ABM and ABM-like molecules are found in the genomes of other actinomycetes. ABM has potent antibacterial activity, and as a result, many attempts have been made to develop ABM into a drug since the last century. Although the productivity of S. griseus can be increased with random mutagenesis methods, understanding of Streptomyces sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism, which supplies a precursor for ABM biosynthesis, could lead to improved and stable production. We previously characterized the gene cluster (abm) in the genome-sequenced S. griseus strain and proposed that the sulfur atom of ABM is derived from either cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy). The gene product, AbmD, appears to be an important link between primary and secondary sulfur metabolic pathways. Here, we show that propargylglycine or iron supplementation in growth media increased ABM production by significantly changing the relative concentrations of intracellular Cys and Hcy. An SAA metabolic network of S. griseus was constructed. Pathways toward increasing Hcy were shown to positively impact ABM production. The abmD gene and five genes that increased the Hcy/Cys ratio were assembled downstream of hrdBp promoter sequences and integrated into the chromosome for overexpression. The ABM titer of one engineered strain, SCAK3, in a chemically defined medium was consistently improved to levels ∼400% of the wild type. Finally, we analyzed the production and growth of SCAK3 in shake flasks for further process development.

  12. DIETARY N-6 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID DEPRIVATION INCREASES DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID METABOLISM IN RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deprivation in rodents reduces brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) concentration and 20:4n-6-preferring cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2-IVA) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, while increasing brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) concentration and DHA-selective Ca2+-independent iPLA2-VIA expression. We hypothesized that these changes are accompanied by upregulated brain DHA metabolic rates. Using a fatty acid model, brain DHA concentrations and kinetics were measured in unanesthetized male rats fed, for 15 weeks post-weaning, an n-6 PUFA “adequate” (31.4 wt% linoleic acid) or “deficient” (2.7 wt% linoleic acid) diet, each lacking 20:4n-6 and DHA. [1-14C]DHA was infused intravenously, arterial blood was sampled, and the brain was microwaved at 5 min and analyzed. Rats fed the n-6 PUFA deficient compared with adequate diet had significantly reduced n-6 PUFA concentrations in brain phospholipids but increased eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosapentaenoic acidn-3 (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3) and DHA (by 9.4%) concentrations, particularly in ethanolamine glycerophospholipid. Incorporation rates of unesterified DHA from plasma, which represent DHA metabolic loss from brain, were increased 45% in brain phospholipids, as was DHA turnover. Increased DHA metabolism following dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation may increase brain concentrations of antiinflammatory DHA metabolites, which with a reduced brain n-6 PUFA content, likely promote neuroprotection. (199 words) PMID:22117540

  13. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers: differences in metabolism and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Itziar; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2009-01-01

    The term conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a mixture of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, characterized by having conjugated double bonds, not separated by a methylene group as in linoleic acid. CLA isomers appear as a minor component of the lipid fraction, found mainly in meat and dairy products from cows and sheep. The most abundant isomer is cis-9,trans-11, which represents up to 80% of total CLA in food. These isomers are metabolized in the body through different metabolic pathways, but important differences, that can have physiological consequences, are observed between the two main isomers. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer is more efficiently oxidized than the cis-9,trans-11 isomer, due to the position of its double bounds. Interest in CLA arose in its anticarcinogenic action but there is an increasing amount of specific scientific literature concerning the biological effects and properties of CLA. Numerous biological effects of CLA are due to the separate action of the most studied isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. It is also likely that some effects are induced and/or enhanced by these isomers acting synergistically. Although the cis-9,trans-11 isomer is mainly responsible for the anticarcinogenic effect, the trans-10,cis-12 isomer reduces body fat and it is referred as the most effective isomer affecting blood lipids. As far as insulin function is concerned, both isomers seem to be responsible for insulin resistance in humans. Finally, with regard to the immune system it is not clear whether individual isomers of CLA could act similarly or differently.

  14. Amino acid regulation of mammalian gene expression in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole G; Lavoinne, Alain M; Husson, Annie S

    2010-07-01

    Some amino acids exert a wide range of regulatory effects on gene expression via the activation of different signalling pathways and transcription factors, and a number of cis elements were shown to respond to changes in amino acid concentration. Particular attention has been paid to the effects of glutamine and arginine, which modulate a number of cell functions through the activation of various pathways in different tissues. In the intestine, appropriate concentrations of both arginine and/or glutamine contribute to facilitate cell proliferation, to limit the inflammatory response and apoptosis, and to modulate intermediary metabolism through specific transcription factors. Particularly, besides its role as a major fuel for enterocytes, the regulatory effects of glutamine have been extensively studied and the molecular mechanisms involved appear diversified and complex. Indeed, in addition to a major role of NF-kappaB in its anti-inflammatory action and a stimulatory role of AP-1 in its growth-promoting action and cell survival, the involvement of some other transcription factors, such as PPAR-gamma or HSF-1, was shown to maintain intestinal cell integrity. The signalling pathways leading to the activation of transcription factors imply several kinases, particularly MAP kinases in the effect of glutamine and p70 S6 kinase for those of arginine, but in most cases the precise pathways from the entrance of the aminoacid into the cell to the activation of gene transcription has remained elusive.

  15. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  16. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  17. Gene expression phenotypes for lipid metabolism and intramuscular fat in skeletal muscle of cattle.

    PubMed

    De Jager, N; Hudson, N J; Reverter, A; Barnard, R; Cafe, L M; Greenwood, P L; Dalrymple, B P

    2013-03-01

    Gene expression phenotypes were evaluated for intramuscular fat (IMF) in bovine skeletal muscle as an alternative to traditional estimates of IMF%. Gene expression data from a time course of LM development in high- and low-marbling Bos taurus cattle crosses were compared to identify genes involved in intramuscular adipocyte lipid metabolism with developmentally similar gene expression profiles. Three sets of genes were identified: triacylglyceride (TAG) synthesis and storage, fatty acid (FA) synthesis, and PPARγ-related genes. In an independent analysis in the LM of 48 Bos indicus cattle, TAG and FA gene sets were enriched in the top 100 genes of which expression was most correlated with IMF% (P = 1.2 × 10(-24) and 3.5 × 10(-9), respectively). In general, genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of FA and TAG in the intramuscular adipocytes were present in the top 100 genes. In B. indicus, effects of a steroid hormone growth promotant (HGP), 2 experimental sites [New South Wales (NSW) and Western Australia (WA)], and 3 tenderness genotypes on the expression levels of genes in the TAG gene set and the correlation of gene expression with IMF% were investigated. Although correlation between expression of 12 individual TAG genes and IMF% was observed in HGP-treated animals in both experimental sites (mean r = 0.43), correlation was not observed for untreated animals at the NSW site (mean r = -0.07, P < 3 × 10(-6)). However, TAG genes showed an average 1.6-fold (P < 0.0004) reduction in expression in the LM of HGP-treated cattle relative to untreated cattle, an effect consistent across both experimental sites. Cattle possessing the favored tenderness calpain 1 and 3 and calpastatin alleles exhibited a greater (P = 0.008) reduction in expression in NSW (1.8-fold reduction, P = 0.0002) compared with WA (1.2-fold reduction, P = 0.03). Tenderness genotype had no impact (P > 0.05) on the correlation of TAG genes with IMF%. In general, the interactions among

  18. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  19. Genome-wide identification of gibberellins metabolic enzyme genes and expression profiling analysis during seed germination in maize.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Guo, Baojian; Song, Fangwei; Peng, Huiru; Yao, Yingyin; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2011-08-15

    Gibberellin (GA) is an essential phytohormone that controls many aspects of plant development. To enhance our understanding of GA metabolism in maize, we intensively screened and identified 27 candidate genes encoding the seven GA metabolic enzymes including ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA 20-oxidase (GA20ox), GA 3-oxidase (GA3ox), and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox), using all available public maize databases. The results indicate that maize genome contains three CPS, four KS, two KO and one KAO genes, and most of them are arranged separately on the maize genome, which differs from that in rice. In addition, the enzymes catalyzing the later steps (ZmGA20ox, ZmGA3ox and ZmGA2ox) are also encoded by gene families in maize, but GA3ox enzyme is likely to be encoded by single gene. Expression profiling analysis exhibited that transcripts of 15 GA metabolic genes could be detected during maize seed germination, which provides further evidence for the notion that increased synthesis of active GA in the embryo is required for triggering germination events. Moreover, a variety of temporal genes expression patterns of GA metabolic genes were detected, which revealed the complexity of underlying mechanism for GA regulated seed germination.

  20. Beyond aflatoxin: four distinct expression patterns and functional roles associated with Aspergillus flavus secondary metabolism gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Georgianna, D. Ryan; Fedorova, Natalie D.; Burroughs, James L.; Dolezal, Andrea L.; Bok, J.; Horowitz-Brown, S.; Woloshuk, Charles P.; Yu, Jiujiang; Keller, Nancy P.; Payne, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Species of Aspergillus produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites, and recent genomic analysis predicts that these species have the capacity to synthesize many more compounds. It has been possible to infer the presence of 55 gene clusters associated with secondary metabolism in A. flavus, however, only three metabolic pathways - aflatoxin, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and aflatrem - have been assigned to these clusters. To gain insight into the regulation of, and infer ecological significance for the 55 secondary metabolite gene clusters predicted in A. flavus, we examined their expression over 28 diverse conditions. Variables included culture media and temperature, fungal development, colonization of developing maize seeds, and misexpression of laeA, a global regulator of secondary metabolism. Hierarchical clustering analysis of expression profiles allowed us to categorize the gene clusters into four distinct clades. Gene clusters for the production of aflatoxins, CPA, and seven other unknown compound(s) were identified as belonging to one clade. To further explore the relationships found by gene expression analysis, aflatoxin and CPA production were quantified under five different cell culture environments known to be conducive or non-conducive for aflatoxin biosynthesis and during colonization of developing maize seeds. Results from these studies showed that secondary metabolism gene clusters have distinctive gene expression profiles. Aflatoxin and CPA were found to have unique regulation but are similar enough that they would be expected to co-occur in substrates colonized with A. flavus. PMID:20447271

  1. Clinical aggressiveness of malignant gliomas is linked to augmented metabolism of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, Joseph L.; Lin, Henry J.; Lai, Albert; Hai, Yang; Guo, Xiuqing; Quinn, Michael; Nelson, Stanley F.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Nghiemphu, P. Leia

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine, glutamate, asparagine, and aspartate are involved in an enzyme-network that controls nitrogen metabolism. Branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase-1 (BCAT1) promotes proliferation of gliomas with wild-type IDH1 and is closely connected to the network. We hypothesized that metabolism of asparagine, glutamine, and branched-chain-amino-acids is associated with progression of malignant gliomas. Gene expression for asparagine synthetase (ASNS), glutaminase (GLS), and BCAT1 were analyzed in 164 gliomas from 156 patients [33-anaplastic gliomas (AG) and 131-glioblastomas (GBM), 64 of which were recurrent GBMs]. ASNS and GLS were twofold higher in GBMs versus AGs. BCAT1 was also higher in GBMs. ASNS expression was twofold higher in recurrent versus new GBMs. Five patients had serial samples: 4-showed higher ASNS and 3-higher GLS at recurrence. We analyzed grade and treatment in 4 groups: (1) low ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 (n = 96); (2) low ASNS and GLS, but high BCAT1 (n = 26); (3) high ASNS or GLS, but low BCAT1 (n = 25); and (4) high ASNS or GLS and high BCAT1 (n = 17). Ninety-one % of patients (29/32) with grade-III lesions were in group 1. In contrast, 95 % of patients (62/65) in groups 2–4 had GBMs. Treatment was similar in 4 groups (radiotherapy-80 %; temozolomide-30 %; other chemotherapy-50 %). High expression of ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 were each associated with poor survival in the entire group. The combination of lower ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 levels correlated with better survival for newly diagnosed GBMs (66 patients; P = 0.0039). Only tumors with lower enzymes showed improved outcome with temozolomide. IDH1WT gliomas had higher expression of these genes. Manipulation of amino acid metabolism in malignant gliomas may be further studied for therapeutics development. PMID:26922345

  2. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  3. Gestational Age-Dependent Changes in Gene Expression of Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Diana L.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; MacDonald, James W.; Tsai, Jesse M.; Farin, Frederico M.; Hebert, Mary F.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics can be explained by changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and/or normal physiology. In this study, we determined gestational age-dependent expression profiles for all metabolic enzyme and transporter genes in the maternal liver, kidney, small intestine, and placenta of pregnant mice by microarray analysis. We specifically examined the expression of genes important for xenobiotic, bile acid, and steroid hormone metabolism and disposition, namely, cytochrome P450s (Cyp), UDP-glucuronosyltranserases (Ugt), sulfotransferases (Sult), and ATP-binding cassette (Abc), solute carrier (Slc), and solute carrier organic anion (Slco) transporters. Few Ugt and Sult genes were affected by pregnancy. Cyp17a1 expression in the maternal liver increased 3- to 10-fold during pregnancy, which was the largest observed change in the maternal tissues. Cyp1a2, most Cyp2 isoforms, Cyp3a11, and Cyp3a13 expression in the liver decreased on gestation days (gd) 15 and 19 compared with nonpregnant controls (gd 0). In contrast, Cyp2d40, Cyp3a16, Cyp3a41a, Cyp3a41b, and Cyp3a44 in the liver were induced throughout pregnancy. In the placenta, Cyp expression on gd 10 and 15 was upregulated compared with gd 19. Notable changes were also observed in Abc and Slc transporters. Abcc3 expression in the liver and Abcb1a, Abcc4, and Slco4c1 expression in the kidney were downregulated on gd 15 and 19. In the placenta, Slc22a3 (Oct3) expression on gd 10 was 90% lower than that on gd 15 and 19. This study demonstrates important gestational age-dependent expression of metabolic enzyme and transporter genes, which may have mechanistic relevance to drug disposition in human pregnancy. PMID:23175668

  4. Metabolic rates associated with membrane fatty acids in mice selected for increased maximal metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    Wone, Bernard W. M.; Donovan, Edward R.; Cushman, John C.; Hayes, Jack P.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic metabolism of vertebrates is linked to membrane fatty acid (FA) composition. Although the membrane pacemaker hypothesis posits that desaturation of FAs accounts for variation in resting or basal metabolic rate (BMR), little is known about the FA profiles that underpin variation in maximal metabolic rate (MMR). We examined membrane FA composition of liver and skeletal muscle in mice after seven generations of selection for increased MMR. In both liver and skeletal muscle, unsaturation index did not differ between control and high-MMR mice. We also examined membrane FA composition at the individual-level of variation. In liver, 18:0, 20:3 n-6, 20:4 n-6, and 22:6 n-3 FAs were significant predictors of MMR. In gastrocnemius muscle, 18:2 n-6, 20:4 n-6, and 22:6 n-3 FAs were significant predictors of MMR. In addition, muscle 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-9, and 22:5 n-3 FAs were significant predictors of BMR, whereas no liver FAs were significant predictors of BMR. Our findings indicate that (i) individual variation in MMR and BMR appear to be linked to membrane FA composition in the skeletal muscle and liver, and (ii) FAs that differ between selected and control lines are involved in pathways that can affect MMR or BMR. PMID:23422919

  5. Metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids and esters by Brettanomyces in different red wines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depending on the cultivars and other factors, differing concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids) and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric acid, respectively) are found in red wines. Hydroxycinnamic acids are metabolized by...

  6. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijie; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G.; Silva, Ana Marta; Coombs, Graham H.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts. PMID:26368322

  7. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  8. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Runguphan, Weerawat; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    As the serious effects of global climate change become apparent and access to fossil fuels becomes more limited, metabolic engineers and synthetic biologists are looking towards greener sources for transportation fuels. In recent years, microbial production of high-energy fuels by economically efficient bioprocesses has emerged as an attractive alternative to the traditional production of transportation fuels. Here, we engineered the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals from simple sugars. Specifically, we overexpressed all three fatty acid biosynthesis genes, namely acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1), fatty acid synthase 1 (FAS1) and fatty acid synthase 2 (FAS2), in S. cerevisiae. When coupled to triacylglycerol (TAG) production, the engineered strain accumulated lipid to more than 17% of its dry cell weight, a four-fold improvement over the control strain. Understanding that TAG cannot be used directly as fuels, we also engineered S. cerevisiae to produce drop-in fuels and chemicals. Altering the terminal "converting enzyme" in the engineered strain led to the production of free fatty acids at a titer of approximately 400 mg/L, fatty alcohols at approximately 100mg/L and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel) at approximately 5 mg/L directly from simple sugars. We envision that our approach will provide a scalable, controllable and economic route to this important class of chemicals.

  9. PROTEIN METABOLISM IN REGENERATING WOUND TISSUE: FUNCTION OF THE SULFUR AMINO ACIDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PROTEINS, *TISSUES(BIOLOGY), METABOLISM, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), REGENERATION(ENGINEERING), WOUNDS AND INJURIES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TRACER STUDIES, METHIONINE, COLLAGEN, TYROSINE, BIOSYNTHESIS, AMINO ACIDS .

  10. Human colon cell culture models of different transformation stages to assess conjugated linoleic acid and conjugated linolenic acid metabolism: Challenges and chances.

    PubMed

    Degen, Christian; Habermann, Nina; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Glei, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    Both cellular transformation status and cell culture conditions affect fatty acid metabolism. Hence, the incorporation and metabolism of c9,t11-CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) and other CFAs (conjugated fatty acids) were compared in colon cells (LT-97, adenoma; HT-29, adenocarcinoma). Growth inhibition by CFA in LT-97 cells was assessed via the DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) assay. Basal gene expression of desaturases (Δ5, Δ6 and Δ9) and elongases (1, 2, 5 and 6) was determined in LT-97 using PCR. Analysis of cellular fatty acids revealed a 2-fold higher incorporation of c9,t11-CLA (40 and 80μM) in HT-29 cells compared to LT-97 cells. The β-oxidized and elongated conjugated dienoic (CD) fatty acids differed by 8-fold (CD-C16:2/CD-C20:2; HT-29: 8:1; LT-97: 1:1). Notably, LT-97 cells were shown to convert conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) to CLA. Moreover, LT-97 cells revealed no basal expression of elongase 2. CLnA caused stronger growth inhibition (≤80μM) compared to CLA (200μM). The results indicate that LT-97 cells represent a superior model to carry out elongation and desaturation studies of unsaturated and conjugated fatty acids compared to HT-29 cells. Nevertheless, further in-depth metabolic and transcriptomic analyses are required to confirm this suggestion.

  11. Metabolic gene expression shift by Listeria monocytogenes in coculture biofilms.

    PubMed

    Tirumalai, Prem Saran

    2015-05-01

    Coculture communities of microbes are more realistic and common in nature than in laboratory-grown pure cultures. In a mixed community, when resources with a potential role in growth are shared, conflict (as a consequence of competition) or cooperation is certain. In our study, this situation of conflict and cooperation was explored to understand the population dynamics and community behavior of Listeria monocytogenes. The social behavioral response of L. monocytogenes to the presence of Bacillus subtilis was studied in terms of divergence in gene expression of L. monocytogenes. It is evident from the results that social behavior of L. monocytogenes changes from competition for survival in broth to cooperation and coexistence in biofilm. Furthermore, the gene expression pattern is clearly indicative of L. monocytogenes switching from aerobic to fermentative metabolism in broth and biofilm conditions, respectively.

  12. Enhanced pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by regulating cinnamic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bowen; Cao, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of pinocembrin is of great interest in the area of drug research and human healthcare. Here we found that the accumulation of the pathway intermediate cinnamic acid adversely affected pinocembrin production. Hence, a stepwise metabolic engineering strategy was carried out aimed at eliminating this pathway bottleneck and increasing pinocembrin production. The screening of gene source and the optimization of gene expression was first employed to regulate the synthetic pathway of cinnamic acid, which showed a 3.53-fold increase in pinocembrin production (7.76 mg/L) occurred with the alleviation of cinnamic acid accumulation in the engineered E. coli. Then, the downstream pathway that consuming cinnamic acid was optimized by the site-directed mutagenesis of chalcone synthase and cofactor engineering. S165M mutant of chalcone synthase could efficiently improve the pinocembrin production, and allowed the product titer of pinocembrin increased to 40.05 mg/L coupled with the malonyl-CoA engineering. With a two-phase pH fermentation strategy, the cultivation of the optimized strain resulted in a final pinocembrin titer of 67.81 mg/L. The results and engineering strategies demonstrated here would hold promise for the titer improvement of other flavonoids. PMID:27586788

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid modulates the enterocyte Caco-2 cell expression of microRNAs involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Martin, Roberto; Daimiel, Lidia; Richardson, Kris; Giordano, Elena; Nicod, Nathalie; García-Carrasco, Belén; Soares, Sara M A; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Lasunción, Miguel A; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, Jose M; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of the long-chain ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and greater chemoprevention. However, the mechanisms underlying the biologic effects of DHA remain unknown. It is well known that microRNAs (miRNAs) are versatile regulators of gene expression. Therefore, we aimed to determine if the beneficial effects of DHA may be modulated in part through miRNAs. Loss of dicer 1 ribonuclease type III (DICER) in enterocyte Caco-2 cells supplemented with DHA suggested that several lipid metabolism genes are modulated by miRNAs. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that are differentially modulated by fatty acids. Among the miRNAs modulated by DHA were miR-192 and miR-30c. Overexpression of either miR-192 or miR-30c in enterocyte and hepatocyte cells suggested an effect on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, some of which were confirmed by endogenous inhibition of these miRNAs. Our results show in enterocytes that DHA exerts its biologic effect in part by regulating genes involved in lipid metabolism and cancer. Moreover, this response is mediated through miRNA activity. We validate novel targets of miR-30c and miR-192 related to lipid metabolism and cancer including nuclear receptor corepressor 2, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, DICER, caveolin 1, ATP-binding cassette subfamily G (white) member 4, retinoic acid receptor β, and others. We also present evidence that in enterocytes DHA modulates the expression of regulatory factor X6 through these miRNAs. Alteration of miRNA levels by dietary components in support of their pharmacologic modulation might be valuable in adjunct therapy for dyslipidemia and other related diseases.

  14. Glucose metabolic gene expression in growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Fournier, Jeanne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonids are generally known to be glucose intolerant. However, previous studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon display modified nutritional regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis compared to non-transgenic fish, suggesting the potential for better use of glucose in GH transgenic fish. To examine this in detail, GH transgenic and non-transgenic coho salmon were subjected to glucose tolerance test and subsequent metabolic assessments. After intra-peritoneal injection of 250mg/kg glucose, we analysed post-injection kinetics of glycaemia and expression of several key target genes highly involved in glucose homeostasis in muscle and liver tissues. Our data show no significant differences in plasma glucose levels during peak hyperglycaemia (3-6h after injection), demonstrating a similar glucose tolerance between transgenic and non transgenic. However, and unrelated to the hyperglycaemic episode, GH transgenic fish return to a slightly lower basal glycaemia values 24h after injection. Correspondingly, GH transgenic fish exhibited higher mRNA levels of glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in liver, and glucose transporter (GLUT4) in muscle. These data suggest that these metabolic actors may be involved in different glucose use in GH transgenic fish, which would be expected to influence the glucose challenge response. Overall, our data demonstrate that GH transgenic coho salmon may be a pertinent animal model for further study of glucose metabolism in carnivorous fish.

  15. [Metabolic engineering of wild acid-resistant yeast for L-lactic acid production].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhongyang; Wang, Zhengxiang; Shi, Guiyang

    2011-07-01

    In order to obtain a yeast strain able to produce L-lactic acid under the condition of low pH and high lactate content, one wild acid-resistant yeast strain isolated from natural samples, was found to be able to grow well in YEPD medium (20 g/L glucose, 20 g/L tryptone, 10 g/L yeast extract, adjusted pH 2.5 with lactic acid) without consuming lactic acid. Based on further molecular biological tests, the strain was identified as Candida magnolia. Then, the gene ldhA, encoding a lactate dehydrogenase from Rhizopus oryzae, was cloned into a yeast shuttle vector containing G418 resistance gene. The resultant plasmid pYX212-kanMX-ldhA was introduced into C. magnolia by electroporation method. Subsequently, a recombinant L-lactic acid producing yeast C. magnolia-2 was obtained. The optimum pH of the recombinant yeast is 3.5 for lactic acid production. Moreover, the recombinant strain could grow well and produce lactic acid at pH 2.5. This recombinant yeast strain could be useful for producing L-lactic acid.

  16. Golden Pigment Production and Virulence Gene Expression Are Affected by Metabolisms in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lefu; Cheng, Alice; Dunman, Paul M.; Missiakas, Dominique; He, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections is multifactorial. Golden pigment is an eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that shields the microbe from oxidation-based clearance, an innate host immune response to infection. Here, we screened a collection of S. aureus transposon mutants for pigment production variants. A total of 15 previously unidentified genes were discovered. Notably, disrupting metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, purine biosynthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation yields mutants with enhanced pigmentation. The dramatic effect on pigment production seems to correlate with altered expression of virulence determinants. Microarray analysis further indicates that purine biosynthesis impacts the expression of ∼400 genes involved in a broad spectrum of functions including virulence. The purine biosynthesis mutant and oxidative phosphorylation mutant strains exhibit significantly attenuated virulence in a murine abscess model of infection. Inhibition of purine biosynthesis with a known small-molecule inhibitor results in altered virulence gene expression and virulence attenuation during infection. Taken together, these results suggest an intimate link between metabolic processes and virulence gene expression in S. aureus. This study also establishes the importance of purine biosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation for in vivo survival. PMID:20400547

  17. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies Gene Regulatory Networks Associated with Fatty Acid Composition in Brassica rapa Seed1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Bucher, Johan; Jin, Mina; Boyle, Kerry; Fobert, Pierre; Maliepaard, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids in seeds affect seed germination and seedling vigor, and fatty acid composition determines the quality of seed oil. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of fatty acid and transcript abundance was integrated with gene network analysis to unravel the genetic regulation of seed fatty acid composition in a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population from a cross between a yellow sarson oil type and a black-seeded pak choi. The distribution of major QTLs for fatty acids showed a relationship with the fatty acid types: linkage group A03 for monounsaturated fatty acids, A04 for saturated fatty acids, and A05 for polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using a genetical genomics approach, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) hotspots were found at major fatty acid QTLs on linkage groups A03, A04, A05, and A09. An eQTL-guided gene coexpression network of lipid metabolism-related genes showed major hubs at the genes BrPLA2-ALPHA, BrWD-40, a number of seed storage protein genes, and the transcription factor BrMD-2, suggesting essential roles for these genes in lipid metabolism. Three subnetworks were extracted for the economically important and most abundant fatty acids erucic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. Network analysis, combined with comparison of the genome positions of cis- or trans-eQTLs with fatty acid QTLs, allowed the identification of candidate genes for genetic regulation of these fatty acids. The generated insights in the genetic architecture of fatty acid composition and the underlying complex gene regulatory networks in B. rapa seeds are discussed. PMID:26518343

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  19. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Anne M.; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here, we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic ‘parts list’ required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, daytime decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates. PMID:24559590

  20. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Borland, Anne M; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J; Schlauch, Karen A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2014-05-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency (WUE) is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic 'parts list' required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, diurnal decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates.

  1. How does fish metamorphosis affect aromatic amino acid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pinto, Wilson; Figueira, Luís; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Aragão, Cláudia

    2009-02-01

    Aromatic amino acids (AAs, phenylalanine and tyrosine) may be specifically required during fish metamorphosis, since they are the precursors of thyroid hormones which regulate this process. This project attempted to evaluate aromatic AA metabolism during the ontogenesis of fish species with a marked (Senegalese sole; Solea senegalensis) and a less accentuated metamorphosis (gilthead seabream; Sparus aurata). Fish were tube-fed with three L-[U-14C] AA solutions at pre-metamorphic, metamorphic and post-metamorphic stages of development: controlled AA mixture (Mix), phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr). Results showed a preferential aromatic AA retention during the metamorphosis of Senegalese sole, rather than in gilthead seabream. Senegalese sole's highly accentuated metamorphosis seems to increase aromatic AA physiological requirements, possibly for thyroid hormone production. Thus, Senegalese sole seems to be especially susceptible to dietary aromatic AA deficiencies during the metamorphosis period, and these findings may be important for physiologists, fish nutritionists and the flatfish aquaculture industry.

  2. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-García, Celia; Peláez, Ana I.; Mesa, Victoria; Sánchez, Jesús; Golyshina, Olga V.; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon, and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics-based methodologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and archaea recovered through sterile filtering (herein referred to as filterable fraction) in these environments demand their inclusion in the microbial characterization of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including filterable fraction), and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems, and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far. PMID:26074887

  3. Localization of multiple pleiotropic genes for lipoprotein metabolism in baboonss⃞

    PubMed Central

    Rainwater, David L.; Cox, Laura A.; Rogers, Jeffrey; VandeBerg, John L.; Mahaney, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a novel approach to identify the key loci that harbor genes influencing lipoprotein metabolism in approximately 2,000 pedigreed baboons fed various diets differing in levels of fat and cholesterol. In this study, 126 overlapping traits related to both LDL and HDL metabolism were normalized and subjected to genome-wide linkage screening. As was expected, the traits were highly, but not completely, correlated. We exploited the information in these correlated traits by focusing on those genomic regions harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL) for multiple traits, reasoning that the more influential genes would impact a larger number of traits. This study identified five major QTL clusters (each with at least two significant logarithm of the odds scores >4.7), two of which had not been previously reported in baboons. One of these mapped to the baboon ortholog of human chromosome 1p32-p34 and influenced concentrations of LDL-cholesterol on Basal and high-fat, low-cholesterol diets. The other novel QTL cluster mapped to the baboon ortholog of human chromosome 12q13.13-q14.1 and influenced LDL size properties on high-fat, low-cholesterol and high-fat, high-cholesterol, but not Basal, diets. Confirming the value of this approach, three of the QTL clusters replicated published linkage findings for the same or similar traits. PMID:19270339

  4. Metabolic regulation of the gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, H M; Peng, S S; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    Here, we characterize a cDNA encoding a glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase (ASN1) from Arabidopsis thaliana and assess the effects of metabolic regulation on ASN1 mRNA levels. Sequence analysis shows that the predicted ASN1 peptide contains a purF-type glutamine-binding domain. Southern blot experiments and cDNA clone analysis suggest that ASN1 is the only gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in A. thaliana. The ASN1 gene is expressed predominantly in shoot tissues, where light has a negative effect on its mRNA accumulation. This negative effect of light on ASN1 mRNA levels was shown to be mediated, at least in part, via the photoreceptor phytochrome. We also investigated whether light-induced changes in nitrogen to carbon ratios might exert a metabolic regulation of the ASN1 mRNA accumulation. These experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of ASN1 mRNA in dark-grown plants is strongly repressed by the presence of exogenous sucrose. Moreover, this sucrose repression of ASN1 expression can be partially rescued by supplementation with exogenous amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, and glutamate. These findings suggest that the expression of the ASN1 gene is under the metabolic control of the nitrogen to carbon ratio in cells. This is consistent with the fact that asparagine, synthesized by the ASN1 gene product, is a favored compound for nitrogen storage and nitrogen transport in dark-grown plants. We have put forth a working model suggesting that when nitrogen to carbon ratios are high, the gene product of ASN1 functions to re-direct the flow of nitrogen into asparagine, which acts as a shunt for storage and/or long-distance transport of nitrogen. PMID:7846154

  5. [The retrospection of nucleic acids metabolism research before the 1950s].

    PubMed

    Zhang, He

    2015-09-01

    People found the guanine in the 1840s and the nucleic acid in the 1860s. But they did not know the relationship between them. Later, people found various bases, confirmed the relationship between bases and nucleic acids, and understood the three basic processes of katabolic metabolism of nucleic acids by a number of scientists, especially with Kossel's efforts. In the 1940s, Kalckar isolated and identified some key enzymes of nucleotides metabolism, as well as Buchanan and Greenberg found the two processes of synthesis of nucleotides. The model of DNA double helix came out in 1953. Kornberg proved DNA is self-replicating in 1956. Stahl, Meselson and Vinograd found the semiconservative replication mechanism of DNA in 1958. At the same time, Ochoa found the polynucleotide phosphorylase, the enzyme can catalyze the synthesis of RNA, and synthesized RNA in 1955. Kornberg synthesized DNA on the basis of Ochoa's work in 1956. So far people found the processes of genetic information flow from DNA to RNA. It contributed to the comprehensive recognition and exploration of the pathways of genetic information and made the research of gene expression and regulation possible.

  6. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  7. Vitamin D Metabolic Pathway Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Yu, Kai; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Moy, Kristin; Freedman, Neal D.; Mayne, Susan T.; Albanes, Demetrius; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa; Bamlet, William R.; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Bracci, Paige; Canzian, Federico; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duell, Eric J.; Gallinger, Steve; Giles, Graham G.; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hartge, Patricia; Hassan, Manal; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert; Jacobs, Eric J.; Kamineni, Aruna; Klein, Alison; Klein, Eric; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Li, Donghui; Malats, Núria; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Porta, Miquel; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Maeder, Dennis; Brotzman, Michelle; Risch, Harvey; Sampson, Joshua N.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008–0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:25799011

  8. Acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase influences fertility by regulating lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biogenesis in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenfeng; Shen, Ying; Hao, Juan; Wu, Jianyong; Ke, Liping; Wu, Caiyun; Huang, Kai; Luo, Binglun; Xu, Mingfeng; Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Xueping; Sun, Jie; Xing, Chaozhu; Sun, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important economic crop and there is obvious heterosis in cotton, fertility has played an important role in this heterosis. However, the genes that exhibit critical roles in anther development and fertility are not well understood. Here, we report an acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase (EC2.3; GhACNAT) that plays a key role in anther development and fertility. Suppression of GhACNAT by virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic cotton (G. hirsutum L. cv. C312) resulted in indehiscent anthers that were full of pollen, diminished filaments and stamens, and plant sterility. We found GhACNAT was involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. The genes differentially expressed in GhACNAT-silenced plants and C312 were mainly involved in catalytic activity and transcription regulator activity in lipid metabolism. In GhACNAT-silenced plants, the expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biosynthesis were significantly changed, the amount of JA in leaves and reproductive organs was significantly decreased compared with the amounts in C312. Treatments with exogenous methyl jasmonate rescued anther dehiscence and pollen release in GhACNAT-silenced plants and caused self-fertility. The GhACNAT gene may play an important role in controlling cotton fertility by regulating the pathways of lipid synthesis and JA biogenesis. PMID:26134787

  9. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player

    PubMed Central

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26703429

  10. Relationships between Arachidonic Acid, Uterine Activity and Metabolic Regulation of Placental Lactogen Secretion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    variations and to determine the metabolic role of oPL during gestation. Fasting, which decreased plasma glucose and increased plasma free fatty acid ... fatty acids induced by fasting or to have diabetogenic effects. The intravenous administration of 12.5 or 25 mg of arachidonic acid resulted in a...of hPL is thought to be controlled by the plasma con- centrations of the metabolic substrates; carbohydrate, fat or protein. Plasma free fatty acid

  11. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  12. Genome-Wide Prediction of Metabolic Enzymes, Pathways, and Gene Clusters in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peifen; Kim, Taehyong; Banf, Michael; Chavali, Arvind K.; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Bernard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Plant metabolism underpins many traits of ecological and agronomic importance. Plants produce numerous compounds to cope with their environments but the biosynthetic pathways for most of these compounds have not yet been elucidated. To engineer and improve metabolic traits, we need comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the organization and regulation of plant metabolism at the genome scale. Here, we present a computational pipeline to identify metabolic enzymes, pathways, and gene clusters from a sequenced genome. Using this pipeline, we generated metabolic pathway databases for 22 species and identified metabolic gene clusters from 18 species. This unified resource can be used to conduct a wide array of comparative studies of plant metabolism. Using the resource, we discovered a widespread occurrence of metabolic gene clusters in plants: 11,969 clusters from 18 species. The prevalence of metabolic gene clusters offers an intriguing possibility of an untapped source for uncovering new metabolite biosynthesis pathways. For example, more than 1,700 clusters contain enzymes that could generate a specialized metabolite scaffold (signature enzymes) and enzymes that modify the scaffold (tailoring enzymes). In four species with sufficient gene expression data, we identified 43 highly coexpressed clusters that contain signature and tailoring enzymes, of which eight were characterized previously to be functional pathways. Finally, we identified patterns of genome organization that implicate local gene duplication and, to a lesser extent, single gene transposition as having played roles in the evolution of plant metabolic gene clusters. PMID:28228535

  13. Gene expression levels are correlated with synonymous codon usage, amino acid composition, and gene architecture in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Williford, Anna; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2012-12-01

    Gene expression levels correlate with multiple aspects of gene sequence and gene structure in phylogenetically diverse taxa, suggesting an important role of gene expression levels in the evolution of protein-coding genes. Here we present results of a genome-wide study of the influence of gene expression on synonymous codon usage, amino acid composition, and gene structure in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Consistent with the action of translational selection, we find that synonymous codon usage bias increases with gene expression. However, the correspondence between tRNA gene copy number and optimal codons is weak. At the amino acid level, translational selection is suggested by the positive correlation between tRNA gene numbers and amino acid usage, which is stronger for highly expressed genes. In addition, there is a clear trend for increased use of metabolically cheaper, less complex amino acids as gene expression increases. tRNA gene numbers also correlate negatively with amino acid size/complexity (S/C) score indicating the coupling between translational selection and selection to minimize the use of large/complex amino acids. Interestingly, the analysis of 10 additional genomes suggests that the correlation between tRNA gene numbers and amino acid S/C score is widespread and might be explained by selection against negative consequences of protein misfolding. At the level of gene structure, three major trends are detected: 1) complete coding region length increases across low and intermediate expression levels but decreases in highly expressed genes; 2) the average intron size shows the opposite trend, first decreasing with expression, followed by a slight increase in highly expressed genes; and 3) intron density remains nearly constant across all expression levels. These changes in gene architecture are only in partial agreement with selection favoring reduced cost of biosynthesis.

  14. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hong-mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury. PMID:27006086

  15. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-03-23

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury.

  16. Fatty acid metabolism in lambs fed citrus pulp.

    PubMed

    Lanza, M; Scerra, M; Bognanno, M; Buccioni, A; Cilione, C; Biondi, L; Priolo, A; Luciano, G

    2015-06-01

    (P = 0.09) with increasing level of citrus pulp in the diets. Furthermore, the SA/(SA + VA) ratio tended to be lower (P = 0.10) in the ruminal fluid from lambs fed the CIT35 diet compared with that of the CON group. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that replacing barley with citrus pulp in the diet of growing lambs improves intramuscular fatty acid composition and underline the need for specific studies to clarify the mechanisms by which feeding citrus pulp affects the fatty acid metabolism in ruminants.

  17. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  18. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  19. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxygenated metabolism in atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Guichardant, Michel; Calzada, Catherine; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Lagarde, Michel; Véricel, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials have reported the health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including a lower risk of coronary heart diseases. This review mainly focuses on the effects of alpha-linolenic (ALA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on some risk factors associated with atherothrombosis, including platelet activation, plasma lipid concentrations and oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Special focus is given to the effects of marine PUFA on the formation of eicosanoids and docosanoids, and to the bioactive properties of some oxygenated metabolites of omega-3 PUFA produced by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. The antioxidant effects of marine omega-3 PUFA at low concentrations and the pro-oxidant effects of DHA at high concentrations on the redox status of platelets and LDL are highlighted. Non enzymatic peroxidation end-products deriving from omega-3 PUFA such as hydroxy-hexenals, neuroketals and EPA-derived isoprostanes are also considered in relation to atherosclerosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  20. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and

  1. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  2. Type of fatty acids in maternal diets during pregnancy and/or lactation and metabolic consequences of the offspring.

    PubMed

    Mennitti, Laís V; Oliveira, Juliana L; Morais, Carina A; Estadella, Débora; Oyama, Lila M; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia M; Pisani, Luciana P

    2015-02-01

    During pregnancy and/or lactation, maternal nutrition is related to the adequate development of the fetus, newborn and future adult, likely by modifications in fetal programming and epigenetic regulation. Fetal programming is characterized by adaptive responses to specific environmental conditions during early life stages, which may alter gene expression and permanently affect the structure and function of several organs and tissues, thus influencing the susceptibility to metabolic disorders. Regarding lipid metabolism during the first two trimesters of pregnancy, the maternal body accumulates fat, whereas in late pregnancy, the lipolytic activity in the maternal adipose tissue is increased. However, an excess or deficiency of certain fatty acids may lead to adverse consequences to the fetuses and newborns. Fetal exposure to trans fatty acids appears to promote early deleterious effects in the offspring's health, thereby increasing the individual risk for developing metabolic diseases throughout life. Similarly, the maternal intake of saturated fatty acids seems to trigger alterations in the liver and adipose tissue function associated with insulin resistance and diabetes. The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly long-chain PUFAs (long-chain PUFA-arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), play an important and beneficial physiologic role in the offspring who receive this fatty acid during critical periods of development. Therefore, the maternal nutritional condition and fatty acid intake during pregnancy and/or lactation are critical factors that are strongly associated with normal fetal and postnatal development, which influence the modifications in fetal programming and in the individual risk for developing metabolic diseases throughout life.

  3. Gene regulation of lipid and phospholipid metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Keshuai; Østensen, Mari-Ann; Attramadal, Kari; Winge, Per; Sparstad, Torfinn; Bones, Atle M; Vadstein, Olav; Kjørsvik, Elin; Olsen, Yngvar

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of essentiality of dietary phospholipid (PL) for larval fish is not clear. The main objective of the present study was to determine if the PL requirement of Atlantic cod larvae was due to any genetic impairment caused by functional immaturity. Cod larvae were sampled at 1, 3, 8, 13, 17, 18, 30, 42 and 60 days post hatch (dph) for transcriptome analysis using a recently developed microarray. The fatty acid profile and gene expression levels of cod larvae at 17 dph were compared after feeding differently enriched rotifers, which contained different DHA levels in PL. No significant differences (p<0.05) were found for the two rotifer diets in the overall gene expression level of cod larvae, their growth and survival, and their DHA levels in total lipid and PL fraction. The fatty acid data suggested that dietary EPA was elongated to DPA by cod larvae, and a threshold DHA level in PL to maintain membrane fluidity and other functions may exist. There appeared to be no major effect of development on the expression of key genes of PL biosynthesis suggesting no genetic constrain in early developmental stages. Our overall data suggested that besides the possible limited de novo PC synthesis ability in the intestine, other metabolic constraints should also be considered, especially the possible low input of bile PC as a result of immature liver. Further studies are needed to elucidate the gene expression level and enzyme activity in the PL biosynthesis pathways for specific tissue or cells.

  4. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for the Production of 3-Hydroxypropionic Acid and Malonic Acid through β-Alanine Route.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Kim, Je Woong; Cho, In Jin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-11-18

    Escherichia coli was metabolically engineered to produce industrially important platform chemicals, 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) and malonic acid (MA), through the β-alanine (BA) route. First, various combinations of downstream enzymes were screened and BA pyruvate transaminase (encoded by pa0132) from P. aeruginosa was selected to generate malonic semialdehyde (MSA) from BA. This platform strain was engineered by introducing E. coli MSA reductase (encoded by ydfG) to reduce MSA to 3-HP. Replacement of native promoter of the sdhC gene with the strong trc promoter in the genome increased 3-HP production to 3.69 g/L in flask culture. Introduction of E. coli semialdehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by yneI) into the platform strain resulted in the production of MA, and additional deletion of the ydfG gene increased MA production to 0.450 g/L in flask culture. Fed-batch cultures of final engineered strains resulted in the production of 31.1 g/L 3-HP or 3.60 g/L MA from glucose.

  5. Metabolic and transcriptional analysis of acid stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a focus on the kinetics of lactic acid pools.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P; Voit, Eberhard O; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H(+)-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by (13)C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results.

  6. CO(2)-concentrating: consequences in crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lüttge, Ulrich

    2002-11-01

    The consequences of CO(2)-concentrating in leaf air-spaces of CAM plants during daytime organic acid decarboxylation in Phase III of CAM (crassulacean acid metabolism) are explored. There are mechanistic consequences of internal CO(2) partial pressures, p(i)(CO(2)). These are (i) effects on stomata, i.e. high p(i)(CO(2)) eliciting stomatal closure in Phase III, (ii) regulation of malic acid remobilization from the vacuole, malate decarboxylation and refixation of CO(2) via Rubisco (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), and (iii) internal signalling functions during the transitions between Phases II and III and III and IV, respectively, in the natural day/night cycle and in synchronizing the circadian clocks of individual leaf cells or leaf patches in the free-running endogenous rhythmicity of CAM. There are ecophysiological consequences. Obvious beneficial ecophysiological consequences are (i) CO(2)-acquisition, (ii) increased water-use- efficiency, (iii) suppressed photorespiration, and (iv) reduced oxidative stress by over-energization of the photosynthetic apparatus. However, the general potency of these beneficial effects may be questioned. There are also adverse ecophysiological consequences. These are (i) energetics, (ii) pH effects and (iii) Phase III oxidative stress. A major consequence of CO(2)-concentrating in Phase III is O(2)-concentrating, increased p(i)(CO(2)) is accompanied by increased p(i)(O(2)). Do reversible shifts of C(3)/CAM-intermediate plants between the C(3)-CAM-C(3) modes of photosynthesis indicate that C(3)-photosynthesis provides better protection from irradiance stress? There are many open questions and CAM remains a curiosity.

  7. Obesity and Cancer Progression: Is There a Role of Fatty Acid Metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Seher; Lee, Lisa S.; Schreuder, Mark; Hoy, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression. PMID:25866768

  8. Transcriptome and metabolome analyses of sugar and organic acid metabolism in Ponkan (Citrus reticulata) fruit during fruit maturation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Wang, Chengyang; Dong, Wencheng; Jiang, Qing; Wang, Dengliang; Li, Shaojia; Chen, Ming; Liu, Chunrong; Sun, Chongde; Chen, Kunsong

    2015-01-01

    Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Ponkan) is an important mandarin citrus in China. However, the low ratio of sugars to organic acids makes it less acceptable for consumers. In this work, three stages (S120, early development stage; S195, commercial harvest stage; S205, delayed harvest stage) of Ponkan fruit were selected for study. Among 28 primary metabolites analyzed in fruit, sugars increased while organic acids in general decreased. RNA-Seq analysis was carried out and 19,504 genes were matched to the Citrus clementina genome, with 85 up-regulated and 59 down-regulated genes identified during fruit maturation. A sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene was included in the up-regulated group, and this was supported by the transcript ratio distribution. Expression of two asparagine transferases (AST), and a specific ATP-citrate lyase (ACL) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) members increased during fruit maturation. It is suggested that SPS, AST, ACL and GAD coordinately contribute to sugar accumulation and organic acid degradation during Ponkan fruit maturation. Both the glycolysis pathway and TCA cycle were accelerated during later maturation, indicating the flux change from sucrose metabolism to organic acid metabolism was enhanced, with citrate degradation occurring mainly through the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and acetyl-CoA pathways.

  9. Metabolic pathways regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in association with improved drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to play roles in regulating plant stress responses. This study was conducted to determine metabolites and associated pathways regulated by ABA, SA and GABA that could contribute to drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants were foliar sprayed with ABA (5 μM), GABA (0.5 mM) and SA (10 μM) or water (untreated control) prior to 25 days drought stress in controlled growth chambers. Application of ABA, GABA or SA had similar positive effects on alleviating drought damages, as manifested by the maintenance of lower electrolyte leakage and greater relative water content in leaves of treated plants relative to the untreated control. Metabolic profiling showed that ABA, GABA and SA induced differential metabolic changes under drought stress. ABA mainly promoted the accumulation of organic acids associated with tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and malic acid). SA strongly stimulated the accumulation of amino acids (proline, serine, threonine and alanine) and carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose and cellobiose). GABA enhanced the accumulation of amino acids (GABA, glycine, valine, proline, 5-oxoproline, serine, threonine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and organic acids (malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, malonic acid and ribonic acid). The enhanced drought tolerance could be mainly due to the enhanced respiration metabolism by ABA, amino acids and carbohydrates involved in osmotic adjustment (OA) and energy metabolism by SA, and amino acid metabolism related to OA and stress-defense secondary metabolism by GABA.

  10. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  11. Metabolism of nonesterified and esterified hydroxycinnamic acids in red wines by Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While Brettanomyces can metabolize non–esterified hydroxycinnamic acids found in grape musts/wines (caffeic, p–coumaric, and ferulic acids), it was not known whether this yeast could utilize the corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, p–coutaric, and fertaric acids, respectively). Red wines fr...

  12. Sequence and genetic organization of a Zymomonas mobilis gene cluster that encodes several enzymes of glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Barnell, W.O.; Kyung Cheol Yi; Conway, T. )

    1990-12-01

    The Zymomonas mobilis genes that encode glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (zwf), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (edd), and glucokinase (glk) were cloned independently by genetic complementation of specific defects in Escherichia coli metabolism. The identify of these cloned genes was confirmed by various biochemical means. Nucleotide sequence analysis established that these three genes are clustered on the genome and revealed an additional open reading frame in this region that has significant amino acid identity to the E.coli xylose-proton symporter and the human glucose transporter. On the basis of this evidence and structural analysis of the deduced primary amino acid sequence, this gene is believed to encode the Z. mobilis glucose-facilitated diffusion protein, glf. The four genes in the 6-kb cluster are organized in the order glf, zwf, edd, glk. The glf and zwf genes are separated by 146 bp. The zwf and edd genes overlap by 8 bp, and their expression may be translationally coupled. The edd and glk genes are separated by 203 bp. The glk gene is followed by tandem transcriptional terminators. The four genes appear to be organized in an operon. Such an arrangement of the genes that govern glucose uptake and the first three steps of the Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway provides the organism with a mechanism for carefully regulating the levels of the enzymes that control carbon flux into the pathway.

  13. FGF15/FGFR4 integrates growth factor signaling with hepatic bile acid metabolism and insulin action.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2009-04-24

    The current studies show FGF15 signaling decreases hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) activity through phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation. The bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) activates expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 in the intestine, which acts through hepatic FGFR4 to suppress cholesterol-7alpha hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and limit bile acid production. Because FoxO1 activity and CYP7A1 gene expression are both increased by fasting, we hypothesized CYP7A1 might be a FoxO1 target gene. Consistent with recently reported results, we show CYP7A1 is a direct target of FoxO1. Additionally, we show that the PI 3-kinase pathway is key for both the induction of CYP7A1 by fasting and the suppression by FGF15. FGFR4 is the major hepatic FGF receptor isoform and is responsible for the hepatic effects of FGF15. We also show that expression of FGFR4 in liver was decreased by fasting, increased by insulin, and reduced by streptozotocin-induced diabetes, implicating FGFR4 as a primary target of insulin regulation. Because insulin and FGF both target the PI 3-kinase pathway, these observations suggest FoxO1 is a key node in the convergence of FGF and insulin signaling pathways and functions as a key integrator for the regulation of glucose and bile acid metabolism.

  14. Identification of novel transaminases from a 12-aminododecanoic acid-metabolizing Pseudomonas strain.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Matthew; Walsh, Ellen F A; Dorrian, Susan J; Scott, Colin

    2015-07-01

    A Pseudomonas species [Pseudomonas sp. strain amino alkanoate catabolism (AAC)] was identified that has the capacity to use 12-aminododecanoic acid, the constituent building block of homo-nylon-12, as a sole nitrogen source. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC could also be supported using a range of additional ω-amino alkanoates. This metabolic function was shown to be most probably dependent upon one or more transaminases (TAs). Fourteen genes encoding putative TAs were identified from the genome of Pseudomonas sp. AAC. Each of the 14 genes was cloned, 11 of which were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and tested for activity against 12-aminododecanoic acid. In addition, physiological functions were proposed for 9 of the 14 TAs. Of the 14 proteins, activity was demonstrated in 9, and of note, 3 TAs were shown to be able to catalyse the transfer of the ω-amine from 12-aminododecanoic acid to pyruvate. Based on this study, three enzymes have been identified that are promising biocatalysts for the production of nylon and related polymers.

  15. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  16. Dynamic expression of retinoic acid synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes in the developing mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Romand, Raymond; Kondo, Takako; Fraulob, Valérie; Petkovich, Martin; Dollé, Pascal; Hashino, Eri

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid signaling plays essential roles in morphogenesis and neural development through transcriptional regulation of downstream target genes. It is believed that the balance between the activities of synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes determines the amount of active retinoic acid to which a developing tissue is exposed. In this study, we investigated spatio-temporal expression patterns of four synthesizing enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases 1, 2, 3 and 4 (Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Raldh4) and two metabolizing enzymes (Cyp26A1 and Cyp26B1) in the embryonic and postnatal mouse inner ear using quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blot data revealed that the expression of CYP26s was much higher than that of Raldhs at early embryonic ages, but that Cyp26 expression was down-regulated during embryonic development. Conversely, the expression levels of Raldh2 and -3 increased during development and were significantly higher than the Cyp26 levels at postnatal day 20. At this age, Raldh3 was expressed predominantly in the cochlea, while Raldh2 was present in the vestibular end organ. At early embryonic stages as observed by in situ hybridization, the synthesizing enzymes were expressed only in the dorsoventral epithelium of the otocyst, while the metabolizing enzymes were present mainly in mesenchymal cells surrounding the otic epithelium. At later stages, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Cyp26B1 were confined to the stria vascularis, spiral ganglion and supporting cells in the cochlear and vestibular epithelia, respectively. The downregulation of Cyp26s and the upregulation of Raldhs after birth during inner ear maturation suggests tissue changes in the sensitivity to retinoic acid concentrations. PMID:16615129

  17. Adaptive changes in amino acid metabolism permit normal longevity in mice consuming a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Douris, Nicholas; Melman, Tamar; Pecherer, Jordan M; Pissios, Pavlos; Flier, Jeffrey S; Cantley, Lewis C; Locasale, Jason W; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2015-10-01

    Ingestion of very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) is associated with weight loss, lowering of glucose and insulin levels and improved systemic insulin sensitivity. However, the beneficial effects of long-term feeding have been the subject of debate. We therefore studied the effects of lifelong consumption of this diet in mice. Complete metabolic analyses were performed after 8 and 80weeks on the diet. In addition we performed a serum metabolomic analysis and examined hepatic gene expression. Lifelong consumption of KD had no effect on morbidity or mortality (KD vs. Chow, 676 vs. 630days) despite hepatic steatosis and inflammation in KD mice. The KD fed mice lost weight initially as previously reported (Kennnedy et al., 2007) and remained lighter and had less fat mass; KD consuming mice had higher levels of energy expenditure, improved glucose homeostasis and higher circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides than chow-fed controls. Hepatic expression of the critical metabolic regulators including fibroblast growth factor 21 were also higher in KD-fed mice while expression levels of lipogenic enzymes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 was reduced. Metabolomic analysis revealed compensatory changes in amino acid metabolism, primarily involving down-regulation of catabolic processes, demonstrating that mice eating KD can shift amino acid metabolism to conserve amino acid levels. Long-term KD feeding caused profound and persistent metabolic changes, the majority of which are seen as health promoting, and had no adverse effects on survival in mice.

  18. Adaptive changes in amino acid metabolism permit normal longevity in mice consuming a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Douris, Nicholas; Melman, Tamar; Pecherer, Jordan M.; Pissios, Pavlos; Flier, Jeffrey S.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion of very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) is associated with weight loss, lowering of glucose and insulin levels and improved systemic insulin sensitivity. However, the beneficial effects of long-term feeding have been the subject of debate. We therefore studied the effects of lifelong consumption of this diet in mice. Complete metabolic analyses were performed after 8 and 80 weeks on the diet. In addition we performed a serum metabolomic analysis and examined hepatic gene expression. Lifelong consumption of KD had no effect on morbidity or mortality (KD vs. Chow, 676 vs. 630 days) despite hepatic steatosis and inflammation in KD mice. The KD fed mice lost weight initially as previously reported (Kennnedy et al., 2007) and remained lighter and had less fat mass; KD consuming mice had higher levels of energy expenditure, improved glucose homeostasis and higher circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides than chow-fed controls. Hepatic expression of the critical metabolic regulators including fibroblast growth factor 21 were also higher in KD-fed mice while expression levels of lipogenic enzymes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 was reduced. Metabolomic analysis revealed compensatory changes in amino acid metabolism, primarily involving down-regulation of catabolic processes, demonstrating that mice eating KD can shift amino acid metabolism to conserve amino acid levels. Long-term KD feeding caused profound and persistent metabolic changes, the majority of which are seen as health promoting, and had no adverse effects on survival in mice. PMID:26170063

  19. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  20. Metabolism of Cyclohexane Carboxylic Acid by Alcaligenes Strain W1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David G.; Trudgill, Peter W.

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-three microorganisms capable of growth with cyclohexane carboxylate as the sole source of carbon were isolated from mud, water, and soil samples from the Aberystwyth area. Preliminary screening and whole-cell oxidation studies suggested that, with one exception, all of the strains metabolized the growth substrate by beta-oxidation of the coenzyme A ester. This single distinctive strain, able to oxidize rapidly trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate, 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and protocatechuate when grown with cyclohexane carboxylate, was classified as a strain of Alcaligenes and given the number W1. Enzymes capable of converting cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate were induced by growth with the alicyclic acid and included the first unambiguous specimen of a cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase. Because it is a very fragile protein, attempts to stabilize the cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase so that a purification procedure could be developed have consistently failed. In limited studies with crude cell extracts, we found that hydroxylation occurred at the 4 position, probably yielding the trans isomer of 4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidation, coupled with an assessment of reactant stoichiometry, showed the enzyme to be a mixed-function oxygenase. Mass spectral analysis enabled the conversion of cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate by cell extracts to be established unequivocally, and all of our data were consistent with the pathway: cyclohexane carboxylate → trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate → 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate → p-hydroxybenzoate. The further metabolism of p-hydroxybenzoate proceeded by meta fission and by the oxidative branch of the 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconic semialde-hyde-cleaving pathway. PMID:207665

  1. Metabolism of Fructooligosaccharides in Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III via Differential Gene Transcription and Alteration of Cell Membrane Fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Although fructooligosaccharides (FOS) can selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics and beneficially modulate the balance of intestinal microbiota, knowledge of the molecular mechanism for FOS metabolism by probiotics is still limited. Here a combined transcriptomic and physiological approach was used to survey the global alterations that occurred during the logarithmic growth of Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III using FOS or glucose as the sole carbon source. A total of 363 genes were differentially transcribed; in particular, two gene clusters were induced by FOS. Gene inactivation revealed that both of the clusters participated in the metabolism of FOS, which were transported across the membrane by two phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and were subsequently hydrolyzed by a β-fructofuranosidase (SacA) in the cytoplasm. Combining the measurements of the transcriptome- and membrane-related features, we discovered that the genes involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids (FAs) were repressed in cells grown on FOS; as a result, the FA profiles were altered by shortening of the carbon chains, after which membrane fluidity increased in response to FOS transport and utilization. Furthermore, incremental production of acetate was observed in both the transcriptomic and the metabolic experiments. Our results provided new insights into gene transcription, the production of metabolites, and membrane alterations that could explain FOS metabolism in L. plantarum. PMID:26319882

  2. Transcription analysis of genes involved in lipid metabolism reveals the role of chromium in reducing body fat in animal models.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Najaf Panah, Mohammad Javad; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Emami, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential trace element over 50 years ago and has been accepted as an essential element for over 30 years. The recent studies indicated that the addition of supra nutritional amounts of chromium to the diet can only be considered as having pharmacological effects. However, the precise mechanism through which chromium acts on lipid, carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid metabolism are relatively poor studied. To uncover, at least partially, the role of chromium in lipid metabolism, in this study, we evaluated the expression status of eight important genes, involved in fat biosynthesis and lipid metabolism, in four different tissue types (liver, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat, and longissimus muscle) in domestic goat kids feeding on three different chromium levels. The quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was established for expression analyses with HSP90 gene was used as reference gene. The results showed that supplementation of goats with 1.5mg/day chromium significantly decreases the expression of the ACC1, DGAT1, FABP4, FAS, HSL, LEP genes, but does not affect the expression of the LPL and SCD1 genes in all studied tissues. This study highlights, for the first time, the role of supra nutritional levels of chromium in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism. These findings are of especial importance for improving meat quality in domestic animals.

  3. Gene-Gene Interactions in the Folate Metabolic Pathway and the Risk of Conotruncal Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Philip J.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    Conotruncal and related heart defects (CTRD) are common, complex malformations. Although there are few established risk factors, there is evidence that genetic variation in the folate metabolic pathway influences CTRD risk. This study was undertaken to assess the association between inherited (i.e., case) and maternal gene-gene interactions in this pathway and the risk of CTRD. Case-parent triads (n = 727), ascertained from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, were genotyped for ten functional variants of nine folate metabolic genes. Analyses of inherited genotypes were consistent with the previously reported association between MTHFR A1298C and CTRD (adjusted P = .02), but provided no evidence that CTRD was associated with inherited gene-gene interactions. Analyses of the maternal genotypes provided evidence of a MTHFR C677T/CBS 844ins68 interaction and CTRD risk (unadjusted P = .02). This association is consistent with the effects of this genotype combination on folate-homocysteine biochemistry but remains to be confirmed in independent study populations. PMID:20111745

  4. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, F.A. . Inst. of Biological Chemistry); Seib, P.A. . Dept. of Grain Science and Industry)

    1991-01-01

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  5. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, F.A.; Seib, P.A.

    1991-12-31

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for butanetriol production using bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-11-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (butanetriol) is a useful precursor for the synthesis of the energetic material butanetriol trinitrate and several pharmaceutical compounds. Bacterial synthesis of butanetriol from xylose or arabinose takes place in a pathway that requires four enzymes. To produce butanetriol in plants by expressing bacterial enzymes, we cloned native bacterial or codon optimized synthetic genes under different promoters into a binary vector and stably transformed Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic lines expressing introduced genes were analyzed for the production of butanetriol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Soil-grown transgenic plants expressing these genes produced up to 20 µg/g of butanetriol. To test if an exogenous supply of pentose sugar precursors would enhance the butanetriol level, transgenic plants were grown in a medium supplemented with either xylose or arabinose and the amount of butanetriol was quantified. Plants expressing synthetic genes in the arabinose pathway showed up to a forty-fold increase in butanetriol levels after arabinose was added to the medium. Transgenic plants expressing either bacterial or synthetic xylose pathways, or the arabinose pathway showed toxicity symptoms when xylose or arabinose was added to the medium, suggesting that a by-product in the pathway or butanetriol affected plant growth. Furthermore, the metabolite profile of plants expressing arabinose and xylose pathways was altered. Our results demonstrate that bacterial pathways that produce butanetriol can be engineered into plants to produce this chemical. This proof-of-concept study for phytoproduction of butanetriol paves the way to further manipulate metabolic pathways in plants to enhance the level of butanetriol production.

  7. Rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation produced during the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2001-04-01

    Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were produced in rat liver microsomal suspension incubated with ethacrynic acid (loop diuretic drug) and NADPH. Two oxidative metabolites of ethacrynic acid with dicarboxylic acid and hydroxylated ethyl group, respectively, were formed in the reaction mixture. The oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid was inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors. The formation of TBARS was remarkably depressed by inhibitors like diethyldithiocarbamate and disulfiram. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation occurred in rat liver microsomes through the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

  8. NDRG2 overexpression suppresses hepatoma cells survival during metabolic stress through disturbing the activation of fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Fang; Yan, Guang; Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Zhang, Yao; Wei, Xuehui; Xu, Xinyuan; Shen, Lan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Kaichun; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2017-02-05

    Because of the high nutrient consumption and inadequate vascularization, solid tumor constantly undergoes metabolic stress during tumor development. Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes participated in cancer cells' metabolic reprogramming. N-Myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene, but its function in cancer metabolism, particularly during metabolic stress, remains unclear. In this study, we found that NDRG2 overexpression significantly reduced hepatoma cell proliferation and enhanced cell apoptosis under glucose limitation. Moreover, NDRG2 overexpression aggravated energy imbalance and oxidative stress by decreasing the intracellular ATP and NADPH generation and increasing ROS levels. Strikingly, NDRG2 inhibited the activation of fatty acid oxidation (FAO), which preserves ATP and NADPH purveyance in the absence of glucose. Finally, mechanistic investigation showed that NDRG2 overexpression suppressed the glucose-deprivation induced AMPK/ACC pathway activation in hepatoma cells, whereas the expression of a constitutively active form of AMPK abrogated glucose-deprivation induced AMPK activation and cell apoptosis. Thus, as a negative regulator of AMPK, NDRG2 disturbs the induction of FAO genes by glucose limitation, leading to dysregulation of ATP and NADPH, and thus reduces the tolerance of hepatoma cells to glucose limitation.

  9. Biodegradation of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid by novel identified co-metabolizing degrader Achromobacter sp. f1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Fang; Ning, Li-Qun; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Yang, Zong-Zheng; Cao, Jing-Guo; Sheng, Hong-Jie; Jiang, Xin

    2017-02-02

    Several bacteria have been isolated to degrade 4-chloronitrobenzene. Degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene by Cupriavidus sp. D4 produces 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid as a dead-end by-product, a potential pollutant. To date, no bacterium that degrades 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid has been reported. Strain f1, isolated from a soil polluted by 4-chloronitrobenzene, was able to co-metabolize 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid in the presence of ethanol or other appropriate carbon sources. The strain was identified as Achromobacter sp. based on its physiological, biochemical characteristics, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The organism completely degraded 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1) of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid within 48, 60, and 72 h, respectively. During the degradation of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid, Cl(-) was released. The initial metabolic product of 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid was identified as 6-hydroxy-5-chloro-2-picolinic acid by LC-MS and NMR. Using a mixed culture of Achromobacter sp. f1 and Cupriavidus sp. D4 for degradation of 4-chloronitrobenzen, 5-chloro-2-picolinic acid did not accumulate. Results infer that Achromobacter sp. f1 can be used for complete biodegradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene in remedial applications.

  10. Gene Expression Analysis of Alfalfa Seedlings Response to Acid-Aluminum

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Aimin; Wang, Shengyin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Acid-Aluminum (Al) is toxic to plants and greatly affects crop production worldwide. To understand the responses of plants to acid soils and Aluminum toxicity, we examined global gene expression using microarray data in alfalfa seedlings with the treatment of acid-Aluminum. 3,926 genes that were identified significantly up- or downregulated in response to Al3+ ions with pH 4.5 treatment, 66.33% of which were found in roots. Their functional categories were mainly involved with phytohormone regulation, reactive oxygen species, and transporters. Both gene ontology (GO) enrichment and KEGG analysis indicated that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, and flavonoid biosynthesis played a critical role on defense to Aluminum stress in alfalfa. In addition, we found that transcription factors such as the MYB and WRKY family proteins may be also involved in the regulation of reactive oxygen species reactions and flavonoid biosynthesis. Thus, the finding of global gene expression profile provided insights into the mechanisms of plant defense to acid-Al stress in alfalfa. Understanding the key regulatory genes and pathways would be advantageous for improving crop production not only in alfalfa but also in other crops under acid-Aluminum stress. PMID:28074175

  11. CLOCK genetic variation and metabolic syndrome risk: modulation by monounsaturated fatty acids123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Shen, Jian; Parnell, Laurence D; Arnett, Donna K; Tsai, Michael Y; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the circadian system may be causal for manifestations of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Objective: The objective was to study the associations of 5 CLOCK polymorphisms with MetS features by analyzing fatty acid (FA) composition from dietary and red blood cell (RBC) membrane sources. Design: Participants (n = 1100) in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) study were included. Dietary intake was estimated with a validated questionnaire. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements and genotypes were determined. Postprandial lipids and the FA composition of RBC membranes were analyzed. Results: CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with obesity and individual components of MetS. For single nucleotide polymorphism rs4580704, minor allele carriers had a 46% lower risk of hypertension than did noncarriers. The monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content of RBC membranes, particularly oleic acid, changed according to CLOCK genetic variants (P < 0.05). We identified significant gene-diet interactions associated with MetS at the CLOCK locus. By dichotomizing MUFA intake, we found different effects across rs4580704 genotypes for glucose (P = 0.020) and insulin resistance (P = 0.026). The protective effect of the minor allele on insulin sensitivity was only present when MUFA intake was >13.2% of energy. We also found different effects across CLOCK 3111T→C genotypes for saturated fatty acid intake (% of energy) (P = 0.017). The deleterious effect of gene variants on waist circumference was only found with high saturated fatty acid intakes (>11.8%). Conclusions: CLOCK polymorphisms interact with FAs to modulate MetS traits. The dietary source and membrane content of MUFAs are implicated in the relations between alterations in the circadian system and MetS. PMID:19846548

  12. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase: potential targets for metabolic engineering of microorganism oil.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Hao; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-04-01

    Oleaginous microorganism is becoming one of the most promising oil feedstocks for biodiesel production due to its great advantages in triglyceride (TAG) accumulation. Previous studies have shown that de novo TAG biosynthesis can be divided into two parts: the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (the upstream part which generates acyl-CoAs) and the glycerol-3-phosphate acylation pathway (the downstream part in which three acyl groups are sequentially added onto a glycerol backbone). This review mainly focuses on two enzymes in the G3P pathway, phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). The former catalyzes a dephosphorylation reaction, and the latter catalyzes a subsequent acylation reaction. Genes, functional motifs, transmembrane domains, action mechanism, and new studies of the two enzymes are discussed in detail. Furthermore, this review also covers diacylglycerol kinase, an enzyme that catalyzes the reverse reaction of diacylglycerol formation. In addition, PAP and DGAT are the conjunction points of the G3P pathway, the Kennedy pathway, and the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway (CDP-DAG pathway), and the mutual transformation between TAGs and phospholipids is discussed as well. Given that both the Kennedy and CDP-diacylglycerol pathways are in metabolic interlock (MI) with the G3P pathway, it is suggested that, via metabolic engineering, TAG accumulation can be improved by the two pathways based on the pivotal function of PAP and DGAT.

  13. Efficient odd straight medium chain free fatty acid production by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; San, Ka-Yiu

    2014-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) can be used as precursors for the production of biofuels or chemicals. Different composition of FFAs will be useful for further modification of the biofuel/biochemical quality. Microbial biosynthesis of even chain FFAs can be achieved by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene into E. coli. In this study, odd straight medium chain FFAs production was investigated by using metabolic engineered E. coli carrying acyl-ACP thioesterase (TE, Ricinus communis), propionyl-CoA synthase (Salmonella enterica), and β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (four different sources) with supplement of extracellular propionate. By using these metabolically engineered E. coli, significant quantity of C13 and C15 odd straight-chain FFAs could be produced from glucose and propionate. The highest concentration of total odd straight chain FFAs attained was 1205 mg/L by the strain HWK201 (pXZ18, pBHE2), and 85% of the odd straight chain FFAs was C15. However, the highest percentage of odd straight chain FFAs was achieved by the strain HWK201 (pXZ18, pBHE3) of 83.2% at 48 h. This strategy was also applied successfully in strains carrying different TE, such as the medium length acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from Umbellularia californica. C11 and C13 became the major odd straight-chain FFAs.

  14. Fungal Community Associated with Dactylopius (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Dactylopiidae) and Its Role in Uric Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    We studied fungal species associated with the carmine cochineal Dactylopius coccus and other non-domesticated Dactylopius species using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Thirty seven fungi were isolated in various culture media from insect males and females from different developmental stages and Dactylopius species. 26S rRNA genes and ITS sequences, from cultured fungal isolates revealed different species of Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Debaryomyces, Trametes, and Penicillium, which are genera newly associated with Dactylopius. Uric acid (UA) and uricase activity were detected in tissues extracts from different insect developmental stages. However, accumulation of high UA levels and low uricase activities were found only after antifungal treatments, suggesting an important role of fungal species in its metabolism. Additionally, uricolytic fungal isolates were identified and characterized that presumably are involved in nitrogen recycling metabolism. After metagenomic analyses from D. coccus gut and hemolymph DNA and from two published data sets, we confirmed the presence of fungal genes involved in UA catabolism, suggesting that fungi help in the nitrogen recycling process in Dactylopius by uricolysis. All these results show the importance of fungal communities in scale insects such as Dactylopius. PMID:27446001

  15. Aberrant LPL Expression, Driven by STAT3, Mediates Free Fatty Acid Metabolism in CLL Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rozovski, Uri; Grgurevic, Srdana; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Harris, David M.; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Ji Yuan; Jain, Preetesh; Wierda, William; Burger, Jan; O’Brien, Susan; Jain, Nitin; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    While reviewing chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) bone marrow slides we identified cytoplasmic lipid vacuoles in CLL cells but not in normal B cells. Because lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes hydrolysis of triglycerides into free fatty acids (FFAs), is aberrantly expressed in CLL, we investigated whether LPL regulates the oxidative metabolic capacity of CLL cells. We found that unlike normal B cells, CLL cells metabolize FFAs. Because STAT3 is constitutively activated in CLL cells and because we identified putative STAT3 binding sites in the LPL promoter, we sought to determine whether STAT3 drives the aberrant expression of LPL. Transfection of luciferase reporter gene constructs driven by LPL promoter fragments into MM1 cells revealed that STAT3 activates the LPL promoter. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that STAT3 binds to the LPL promoter. Furthermore, transfection of CLL cells with STAT3-shRNA downregulated LPL transcripts and protein levels, confirming that STAT3 activates the LPL gene. Finally, transfection of CLL cells with LPL-siRNAs decreased the capacity of CLL cells to oxidize FFAs and reduced cell viability. PMID:25733697

  16. Metabolic engineering of Aspergillus oryzae NRRL 3488 for increased production of L-malic acid.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H; Bashkirova, Lena; Berka, Randy; Chandler, Tyler; Doty, Tammy; McCall, Keith; McCulloch, Michael; McFarland, Sarah; Thompson, Sheryl; Yaver, Debbie; Berry, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Malic acid, a petroleum-derived C4-dicarboxylic acid that is used in the food and beverage industries, is also produced by a number of microorganisms that follow a variety of metabolic routes. Several members of the genus Aspergillus utilize a two-step cytosolic pathway from pyruvate to malate known as the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) pathway. This simple and efficient pathway has a maximum theoretical yield of 2 mol malate/mol glucose when the starting pyruvate originates from glycolysis. Production of malic acid by Aspergillus oryzae NRRL 3488 was first improved by overexpression of a native C4-dicarboxylate transporter, leading to a greater than twofold increase in the rate of malate production. Overexpression of the native cytosolic alleles of pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase, comprising the rTCA pathway, in conjunction with the transporter resulted in an additional 27 % increase in malate production rate. A strain overexpressing all three genes achieved a malate titer of 154 g/L in 164 h, corresponding to a production rate of 0.94 g/L/h, with an associated yield on glucose of 1.38 mol/mol (69 % of the theoretical maximum). This rate of malate production is the highest reported for any microbial system.

  17. Role of FADS1 and FADS2 polymorphisms in polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Claudia; Heinrich, Joachim; Koletzko, Berthold

    2010-07-01

    Tissue availability of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) depends on dietary intake and metabolic turnover and has a major impact on human health. Strong associations between variants in the human genes fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1, encoding Delta-5 desaturase) and fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2, encoding Delta-6 desaturase) and blood levels of PUFAs and long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs) have been reported. The most significant associations and the highest proportion of genetically explained variability (28%) were found for arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), the main precursor of eicosanoids. Subjects carrying the minor alleles of several single nucleotide polymorphisms had a lower prevalence of allergic rhinitis and atopic eczema. Therefore, blood levels of PUFAs and LC-PUFAs are influenced not only by diet, but to a large extent also by genetic variants common in a European population. These findings have been replicated in independent populations. Depending on genetic variants, requirements of dietary PUFA or LC-PUFA intakes to achieve comparable biological effects may differ. We recommend including analyses of FADS1 and FADS2 polymorphism in future cohort and intervention studies addressing biological effects of PUFAs and LC-PUFAs.

  18. Metabolic engineering for microbial production of aromatic amino acids and derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Bongaerts, J; Krämer, M; Müller, U; Raeven, L; Wubbolts, M

    2001-10-01

    Metabolic engineering to design and construct microorganisms suitable for the production of aromatic amino acids and derivatives thereof requires control of a complicated network of metabolic reactions that partly act in parallel and frequently are in rapid equilibrium. Engineering the regulatory circuits, the uptake of carbon, the glycolytic pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the common aromatic amino acid pathway as well as amino acid importers and exporters that have all been targeted to effect higher productivities of these compounds are discussed.

  19. How prevalent is crassulacean acid metabolism among vascular epiphytes?

    PubMed

    Zotz, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the epiphyte community of a lowland forest of the Atlantic slope of Panama was investigated. I hypothesized that CAM is mostly found in orchids, of which many species are relatively small and/or rare. Thus, the relative proportion of species with CAM should not be a good indicator for the prevalence of this photosynthetic pathway in a community when expressed on an individual or a biomass basis. In 0.4 ha of forest, 103 species of vascular epiphytes with 13,099 individuals were found. As judged from the C isotope ratios and the absence of Kranz anatomy, CAM was detected in 20 species (19.4% of the total), which were members of the families Orchidaceae, Bromeliaceae, and Cactaceae. As predicted, the contribution of CAM epiphytes to the total number of individuals and to total biomass (69.6 kg ha(-1)) was considerably lower (3.6% or 466 individuals and, respectively, 3.0% or 2.1 kg ha(-1)).

  20. Cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolism in bovine corneal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Masferrer, J.; Schwartzman, M.L.; Abraham, N.G.; Dunn, M.W.; McGiff, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    The presence of the cytochrom P450 system and its involvement in the metabolism of AA was studied in the corneal epithelium. This tissue contains cytochrome P450 as assessed directly by measurement of the carbon monoxide reduced spectrum (specific activity of 161 pmol/10 mg protein) and indirectly by measuring the activity of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) - a cytochrome P450-dependent enzyme (11-39 pmol 3-OH benzopyrene/mg protein/10 min). When corneal epithelial microsomes were incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid, 30-50% of the total radioactivity was converted to two peaks, I and II. Further separation using high performance liquid chromatography has shown that each peak contains two metabolites, A,B and C,D. Metabolite formation was dependent on the addition of NADPH (1 mM) and inhibited by carbon monoxide and SKF-525A (100 ..mu..M) suggesting a cytochrome P450-dependent mechanism. Compound C (5-10 ..mu..M) inhibited the activity of corneal epithelial Na-K-ATPase by 30-60%, being 100-fold more potent than ouabain. Compound D (10-100 ng) induced a dose dependent relaxation of the rat caudal artery. Compound D also inhibited corneal Na-K-ATPase activity but less potently than compound C. These compounds may be important to transport processes of ocular epithelia and participate in the control of the ocular circulation and aqueous humor dynamics.

  1. A single mutation in the GSTe2 gene allows tracking of metabolically based insecticide resistance in a major malaria vector

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic resistance to insecticides is the biggest threat to the continued effectiveness of malaria vector control. However, its underlying molecular basis, crucial for successful resistance management, remains poorly characterized. Results Here, we demonstrate that the single amino acid change L119F in an upregulated glutathione S-transferase gene, GSTe2, confers high levels of metabolic resistance to DDT in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus. Genome-wide transcription analysis revealed that GSTe2 was the most over-expressed detoxification gene in DDT and permethrin-resistant mosquitoes from Benin. Transgenic expression of GSTe2 in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that over-transcription of this gene alone confers DDT resistance and cross-resistance to pyrethroids. Analysis of GSTe2 polymorphism established that the point mutation is tightly associated with metabolic resistance to DDT and its geographical distribution strongly correlates with DDT resistance patterns across Africa. Functional characterization of recombinant GSTe2 further supports the role of the L119F mutation, with the resistant allele being more efficient at metabolizing DDT than the susceptible one. Importantly, we also show that GSTe2 directly metabolizes the pyrethroid permethrin. Structural analysis reveals that the mutation confers resistance by enlarging the GSTe2 DDT-binding cavity, leading to increased DDT access and metabolism. Furthermore, we show that GSTe2 is under strong directional selection in resistant populations, and a restriction of gene flow is observed between African regions, enabling the prediction of the future spread of this resistance. Conclusions This first DNA-based metabolic resistance marker in mosquitoes provides an essential tool to track the evolution of resistance and to design suitable resistance management strategies. PMID:24565444

  2. Natural variation in cardiac metabolism and gene expression in Fundulus heteroclitus

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiak, Marjorie F; Roach, Jennifer L; Crawford, Douglas L

    2006-01-01

    Individual variation in gene expression is important for evolutionary adaptation1,2 and susceptibility to diseases and pathologies3,4. In this study, we address the functional importance of this variation by comparing cardiac metabolism to patterns of mRNA expression using microarrays. There is extensive variation in both cardiac metabolism and the expression of metabolic genes among individuals of the teleost fish Fundulus heteroclitus from natural outbred populations raised in a common environment: metabolism differed among individuals by a factor of more than 2, and expression levels of 94% of genes were significantly different (P < 0.01) between individuals in a population. This unexpectedly high variation in metabolic gene expression explains much of the variation in metabolism, suggesting that it is biologically relevant. The patterns of gene expression that are most important in explaining cardiac metabolism differ between groups of individuals. Apparently, the variation in metabolism seems to be related to different patterns of gene expression in the different groups of individuals. The magnitude of differences in gene expression in these groups is not important; large changes in expression have no greater predictive value than small changes. These data suggest that variation in physiological performance is related to the subtle variation in gene expression and that this relationship differs among individuals. PMID:15568023

  3. Tissue-specific Short Chain Fatty Acid Metabolism and Slow Metabolic Recovery after Ischemia from Hyperpolarized NMR in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Pernille R.; Peitersen, Torben; Karlsson, Magnus; in 't Zandt, René; Gisselsson, Anna; Hansson, Georg; Meier, Sebastian; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanistic details of mammalian metabolism in vivo and dynamic metabolic changes in intact organisms are difficult to monitor because of the lack of spatial, chemical, or temporal resolution when applying traditional analytical tools. These limitations can be addressed by sensitivity enhancement technology for fast in vivo NMR assays of enzymatic fluxes in tissues of interest. We apply this methodology to characterize organ-specific short chain fatty acid metabolism and the changes of carnitine and coenzyme A pools in ischemia reperfusion. This is achieved by assaying acetyl-CoA synthetase and acetyl-carnitine transferase catalyzed transformations in vivo. The fast and predominant flux of acetate and propionate signal into acyl-carnitine pools shows the efficient buffering of free CoA levels. Sizeable acetyl-carnitine formation from exogenous acetate is even found in liver, where acetyl-CoA synthetase and acetyl-carnitine transferase activities have been assumed sequestered in different compartments. In vivo assays of altered acetate metabolism were applied to characterize pathological changes of acetate metabolism upon ischemia. Coenzyme pools in ischemic skeletal muscle are reduced in vivo even 1 h after disturbing muscle perfusion. Impaired mitochondrial metabolism and slow restoration of free CoA are corroborated by assays employing fumarate to show persistently reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity upon ischemia. In the same animal model, anaerobic metabolism of pyruvate and tissue perfusion normalize faster than mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:19861411

  4. Wounding of potato tubers induces increases in ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and alters expression of ABA metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Lulai, Edward C; Huckle, Linda L; Neubauer, Jonathan D

    2013-04-15

    The effects of physical wounding on ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and expression of genes encoding key ABA metabolic enzymes were determined in potato tubers. An increase in ABA and ABA metabolite content was observed 48h after wounding and remained elevated through 96h. Wounding induced dramatic increases in the expression of the ABA metabolic genes encoding zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP), 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), and ABA-8'-hydroxylase. Although the patterns of wound-induced expression of individual genes varied, increased gene expression was observed within 3h of wounding and remained elevated through 96h. An apparent correlation between expression of the gene encoding ZEP and the