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Sample records for acid metabolism lipid

  1. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen.

  2. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  3. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  4. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shengxi; Cao, Jianmei; Feng, Qin; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:24062792

  5. Rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation produced during the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2001-04-01

    Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were produced in rat liver microsomal suspension incubated with ethacrynic acid (loop diuretic drug) and NADPH. Two oxidative metabolites of ethacrynic acid with dicarboxylic acid and hydroxylated ethyl group, respectively, were formed in the reaction mixture. The oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid was inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors. The formation of TBARS was remarkably depressed by inhibitors like diethyldithiocarbamate and disulfiram. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation occurred in rat liver microsomes through the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

  6. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo; Gago, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  7. Wine lees modulate lipid metabolism and induce fatty acid remodelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Caro, M; Sansone, A; Amezaga, J; Navarro, V; Ferreri, C; Tueros, I

    2017-03-21

    This study investigates the ability of a polyphenolic extract obtained from a wine lees by-product to modulate zebrafish lipid metabolism. Lees from a Spanish winery were collected and the polyphenolic extract was chemically characterised in terms of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and the individual main phenolic compounds. The effects of the extract on lipid metabolism were evaluated using a zebrafish animal model. Lees are rich in polyphenols (42.33 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry matter) with high antioxidant capacity (56.04 mg Trolox equivalent per g dry matter), rutin and quercetin being their main identified polyphenols. The biological effects of lees extract included (i) a reduction in zebrafish embryos' fat reserve (40%), (ii) changes in the expression of lipid metabolism key genes, (iii) remodelling of the fatty acid content in phospholipid and triglyceride fractions of zebrafish embryos and (iv) reduction in the trans fatty acid content. On the whole, wine lees polyphenolic extract was effective at modulating zebrafish lipid metabolism evidencing remodelling effects and antioxidant properties that can be further developed for food innovation.

  8. Metabolism of xenobiotic carboxylic acids: focus on coenzyme A conjugation, reactivity, and interference with lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Malin; Weidolf, Lars

    2013-08-19

    While xenobiotic carboxylic acids (XCAs) have been studied extensively with respect to their enzymatic conversion to potentially reactive acyl glucuronides with implications to drug induced hepatotoxicity, the formation of xenobiotic-S-acyl-CoA thioesters (xenobiotic-CoAs) have been much less studied in spite of data indicating that such conjugates may be equally or more reactive than the corresponding acyl glucuronides. This review addresses enzymes and cell organelles involved in the formation of xenobiotic-CoAs, the reactivity of such conjugates toward biological macromolecules, and in vitro and in vivo methodology to assess consequences of such reactivity. Further, the propensity of xenobiotic-CoAs to interfere with endogenous lipid metabolism, e.g., inhibition of β-oxidation or depletion of the CoA or carnitine pools, adds to the complexity of the potential contribution of XCAs to hepatotoxicity by a number of mechanisms in addition to those in common with the corresponding acyl glucuronides. On the basis of our review of the literature on xenobiotic-CoA conjugates, there appear to be a number of gaps in our understanding of the bioactivation of XCA both with respect to the mechanisms involved and the experimental approaches to distinguish between the role of acyl glucuronides and xenobiotic-CoA conjugates. These aspects are focused upon and described in detail in this review.

  9. Perfluorononanoic acid disturbed the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Gao, Guizhen; Zhang, Xingtao; Wang, Haichao

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on the liver toxicity of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are focused on healthy individuals, whereas the effects of PFCs on individuals with diabetes mellitus have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to investigate the acute exposure of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) on the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male diabetic rats were orally dosed by gavage for 7 days with 0, 0.2, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day PFNA. The contents of lipid, the activities of enzyme, the expressions of protein in the liver and the serum parameters were detected. The results indicate that dose-dependent accumulation of triglyceride and total cholesterol occurred in the livers of diabetic rats after PFNA treatment. PFNA increased the activities of lipid synthetase, fatty acid synthease, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased the activity of lipolytic enzyme, hepatic lipase, in the liver of diabetic rats. The changes of the isocitrate dehydrogenase, malicenzyme and lipoprotein lipase were not obvious. The expressions of protein related to lipid homeostasis, liver X receptor α and apolipoprotein E, were decreased after PFNA administration. Exposure to PFNA also increased the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase in diabetic rats. In conclusion, this study discloses that exposure to PFNA impacts on enzymes and proteins related to liver lipid metabolism and lead to obvious accumulation of lipid in the liver of diabetic rats, which may be responsible for hepatotoxicity of this compound in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  10. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  11. Branched short-chain fatty acids modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in primary adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Degerman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid, generated through colonic fermentation of dietary fibers, have been shown to reach the systemic circulation at micromolar concentrations. Moreover, SCFAs have been conferred anti-obesity properties in both animal models and human subjects. Branched SCFAs (BSCFAs), e.g., isobutyric and isovaleric acid, are generated by fermentation of branched amino acids, generated from undigested protein reaching colon. However, BSCFAs have been sparsely investigated when referring to effects on energy metabolism. Here we primarily investigate the effects of isobutyric acid and isovaleric acid on glucose and lipid metabolism in primary rat and human adipocytes. BSCFAs inhibited both cAMP-mediated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis at 10 mM, whereas isobutyric acid potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by all concentrations (1, 3 and 10 mM) in rat adipocytes. For human adipocytes, only SCFAs inhibited lipolysis at 10 mM. In both in vitro models, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, a rate limiting enzyme in lipolysis. In addition, BSCFAs and SCFAs, in contrast to insulin, inhibited lipolysis in the presence of wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor and OPC3911, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor in rat adipocytes. Furthermore, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B. To conclude, BSCFAs have effects on adipocyte lipid and glucose metabolism that can contribute to improved insulin sensitivity in individuals with disturbed metabolism. PMID:27994949

  12. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  13. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:28228470

  14. Medium-chain fatty acids: functional lipids for the prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Koji; Yanagita, Teruyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders, such as abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and impaired fasting glucose, that contribute to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome is complicated and the precise mechanisms have not been elucidated, dietary lipids have been recognized as contributory factors in the development and the prevention of cardiovascular risk clustering. This review explores the physiological functions and molecular actions of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) and medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) in the development of metabolic syndrome. Experimental studies demonstrate that dietary MCFAs/MCTs suppress fat deposition through enhanced thermogenesis and fat oxidation in animal and human subjects. Additionally, several reports suggest that MCFAs/MCTs offer the therapeutic advantage of preserving insulin sensitivity in animal models and patients with type 2 diabetes.

  15. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals the effects of fluoxetine on lipid and amino acid metabolism in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shunjie; Zhou, Chanjuan; Cheng, Pengfei; Fu, Yuying; Fang, Liang; Huang, Wen; Yu, Jia; Shao, Weihua; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Meiling; Zhou, Jingjing; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a prescribed and effective antidepressant and generally used for the treatment of depression. Previous studies have revealed that the antidepressant mechanism of fluoxetine was related to astrocytes. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its mode of action in astrocytes remains largely unclear. In this study, primary astrocytes were exposed to 10 µM fluoxetine; 24 h post-treatment, a high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomic approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metabolic variations of intracellular metabolites. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) score plots of the spectra demonstrated that the fluoxetine-treated astrocytes were significantly distinguished from the untreated controls. In total, 17 differential metabolites were identified to discriminate the two groups. These key metabolites were mainly involved in lipids, lipid metabolism-related molecules and amino acids. This is the first study to indicate that fluoxetine may exert antidepressant action by regulating the astrocyte's lipid and amino acid metabolism. These findings should aid our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying fluoxetine therapy.

  16. Reversible Nuclear-Lipid-Droplet Morphology Induced by Oleic Acid: A Link to Cellular-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lagrutta, Lucía C.; Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Layerenza, Juan P.; Sisti, Martín S.; García de Bravo, Margarita M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutral lipids—involved in many cellular processes—are stored as lipid droplets (LD), those mainly cytosolic (cLD) along with a small nuclear population (nLD). nLD could be involved in nuclear-lipid homeostasis serving as an endonuclear buffering system that would provide or incorporate lipids and proteins involved in signalling pathways as transcription factors and as enzymes of lipid metabolism and nuclear processes. Our aim was to determine if nLD constituted a dynamic domain. Oleic-acid (OA) added to rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells in culture produced cellular-phenotypic LD modifications: increases in TAG, CE, C, and PL content and in cLD and nLD numbers and sizes. LD increments were reversed on exclusion of OA and were prevented by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (with Triacsin C) and thus lipid biosynthesis. Under all conditions, nLD corresponded to a small population (2–10%) of total cellular LD. The anabolism triggered by OA, involving morphologic and size changes within the cLD and nLD populations, was reversed by a net balance of catabolism, upon eliminating OA. These catabolic processes included lipolysis and the mobilization of hydrolyzed FA from the LD to cytosolic-oxidation sites. These results would imply that nLD are actively involved in nuclear processes that include lipids. In conclusion, nLD are a dynamic nuclear domain since they are modified by OA through a reversible mechanism in combination with cLD; this process involves acyl-CoA-synthetase activity; ongoing TAG, CE, and PL biosynthesis. Thus, liver nLD and cLD are both dynamic cellular organelles. PMID:28125673

  17. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  18. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; Roque, Natália R.; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Almeida, Mariana R.; Andrade, Gustavo F. S.; Martins, Jefferson S.; Pinho, Roberto R.; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; D’Avila, Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas’ disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  19. Lipid and fatty acid metabolism in Ralstonia eutropha: relevance for the biotechnological production of value-added products.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Sebastian L; Lu, Jingnan; Stahl, Ulf; Brigham, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    Lipid and fatty acid metabolism has been well studied in model microbial organisms like Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The major precursor of fatty acid biosynthesis is also the major product of fatty acid degradation (β-oxidation), acetyl-CoA, which is a key metabolite for all organisms. Controlling carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis and from β-oxidation allows for the biosynthesis of natural products of biotechnological importance. Ralstonia eutropha can utilize acetyl-CoA from fatty acid metabolism to produce intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). R. eutropha can also be engineered to utilize fatty acid metabolism intermediates to produce different PHA precursors. Metabolism of lipids and fatty acids can be rerouted to convert carbon into other value-added compounds like biofuels. This review discusses the lipid and fatty acid metabolic pathways in R. eutropha and how they can be used to construct reagents for the biosynthesis of products of industrial importance. Specifically, how the use of lipids or fatty acids as the sole carbon source in R. eutropha cultures adds value to these biotechnological products will be discussed here.

  20. Lipid metabolic dose response to dietary alpha-linolenic acid in monk parrot (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, Christina; Heatley, J J; Bailey, Christopher A; Bauer, John E

    2014-03-01

    Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) are susceptible to atherosclerosis, a progressive disease characterized by the formation of plaques in the arteries accompanied by underlying chronic inflammation. The family of n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA), have consistently been shown to reduce atherosclerotic risk factors in humans and other mammals. Some avian species have been observed to convert α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) to EPA and DHA (Htin et al. in Arch Geflugelk 71:258-266, 2007; Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013). Therefore, the metabolic effects of including flaxseed oil, as a source of ALA, in the diet at three different levels (low, medium, and high) on the lipid metabolism of Monk parrots was evaluated through measuring plasma total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), triacylglycerols (TAG), and phospholipid fatty acids. Feed intake, body weight, and body condition score were also assessed. Thus the dose and possible saturation response of increasing dietary ALA at constant linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LNA) concentration on lipid metabolism in Monk parrots (M. monachus) was evaluated. Calculated esterified cholesterol in addition to plasma TC, FC, and TAG were unaltered by increasing dietary ALA. The high ALA group had elevated levels of plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3). The medium and high ALA groups had suppressed plasma phospholipid 20:2n-6 and adrenic acid (22:4n-6, ADA) compared to the low ALA group. When the present data were combined with data from a previous study (Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013) a dose response to dietary ALA was observed when LNA was constant. Plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, DPAn-3, DHA, and total n-3 were positively correlated while 20:2n-6, di-homo-gamma-linoleic acid (20:3n-6Δ7), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), ADA, and total n-6 were inversely correlated with dietary en% ALA.

  1. High fatty acid availability after exercise alters the regulation of muscle lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Newsom, Sean A; Schenk, Simon; Li, Minghua; Everett, Allison C; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2011-06-01

    We previously reported that a single exercise session protects against fatty acid (FA)-induced insulin resistance, perhaps in part through augmented intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) synthesis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of elevated FA availability after exercise on factors regulating IMTG metabolism. After exercise (90 minutes, 65% peak oxygen uptake), 7 healthy women (body mass index, 23 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were infused overnight (16 hours) with either a lipid and heparin solution (LIPID, 0.11 g fat per kilogram per hour) or saline (SALINE). We measured resting FA oxidation (indirect calorimetry) and obtained a skeletal muscle biopsy sample the next morning. The 4-fold increase in overnight plasma FA concentration during LIPID increased IMTG by approximately 30% during LIPID vs SALINE. This was accompanied by an approximately 25% greater membrane-associated abundance of the FA transporter FAT/CD36 (P < .01) and an approximately 8% increase in the activity of the IMTG synthesis enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, P < .01). In contrast, resting FA oxidation was not affected. We also found no difference in the protein abundance of GPAT1 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity, or the abundance of the lipid droplet coat proteins (perilipins 2, 3, 4, and 5) between treatments. Our findings suggest that augmented capacity for FA flux into muscle (ie, via membrane-associated FAT/CD36), perhaps together with a slight yet significant increase in activity of a key IMTG synthesis enzyme (GPAT), may enhance IMTG storage when FA availability is high after exercise. The importance of the absence of a change in perilipin protein abundance despite increased muscle lipid storage remains to be determined.

  2. Nitrooleic Acid Attenuates Lipid Metabolic Disorders and Liver Steatosis in DOCA-Salt Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiping; Sun, Jing; Jia, Zhanjun; Yang, Tianxin; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Bing; Yu, Kezhou; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrooleic acid (OA-NO2) is endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. The present study was aimed at investigating the beneficial effects of OA-NO2 on the lipid metabolism and liver steatosis in deoxycorticosterone acetate- (DOCA-) salt induced hypertensive mice model. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided to receive DOCA-salt plus OA-NO2 or DOCA-salt plus vehicle and another group received neither DOCA-salt nor OA-NO2 (control group). After 3-week treatment with DOCA-salt plus 1% sodium chloride in drinking fluid, the hypertension was noted; however, OA-NO2 had no effect on the hypertension. In DOCA-salt treated mice, the plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were significantly increased compared to control mice, and pretreatment with OA-NO2 significantly reduced these parameters. Further, the histopathology of liver exhibited more lipid distribution together with more serious micro- and macrovesicular steatosis after DOCA-salt treatment and that was consistent with liver tissue triglyceride and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) content. The mice pretreated with OA-NO2 showed reduced liver damage accompanied with low liver lipid content. Moreover, the liver TBARS, together with the expressions of gp91phox and p47phox, were parallelly decreased. These findings indicated that OA-NO2 had the protective effect on liver injury against DOCA-salt administration and the beneficial effect could be attributed to its antihyperlipidemic activities.

  3. Orally Administered Berberine Modulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Altering Microbial Bile Acid Metabolism and the Intestinal FXR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; Kong, Bo; Cao, Bei; Feng, Dong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Ge, Chun; Huang, Jingqiu; Shen, Jianliang; Wang, Pei; Feng, Siqi; Fei, Fei; Guo, Jiahua; He, Jun; Aa, Nan; Chen, Qiang; Pan, Yang; Schumacher, Justin D; Yang, Chung S; Guo, Grace L; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of berberine (BBR) involves actions on the low-density lipoprotein receptor and the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. However, the implication of these mechanisms is unclear because of the low bioavailability of BBR. Because the main action site of BBR is the gut and intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that the effects of BBR on intestinal FXR signaling pathway might account for its pharmacological effectiveness. Using wild type (WT) and intestine-specific FXR knockout (FXR(int-/-)) mice, we found that BBR prevented the development of high-fat-diet-induced obesity and ameliorated triglyceride accumulation in livers of WT, but not FXR(int-/-) mice. BBR increased conjugated bile acids in serum and their excretion in feces. Furthermore, BBR inhibited bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in gut microbiota, and significantly increased the levels of tauro-conjugated bile acids, especially tauro-cholic acid(TCA), in the intestine. Both BBR and TCA treatment activated the intestinal FXR pathway and reduced the expression of fatty-acid translocase Cd36 in the liver. These results indicate that BBR may exert its lipid-lowering effect primarily in the gut by modulating the turnover of bile acids and subsequently the ileal FXR signaling pathway. In summary, we provide the first evidence to suggest a new mechanism of BBR action in the intestine that involves, sequentially, inhibiting BSH, elevating TCA, and activating FXR, which lead to the suppression of hepatic expression of Cd36 that results in reduced uptake of long-chain fatty acids in the liver.

  4. Circulating irisin levels are associated with lipid and uric acid metabolism in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanshan; Zhang, Rong; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Jie; Chen, Miao; Peng, Danfeng; Yan, Jing; Wang, Shiyun; Bao, Yuqian; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping

    2015-06-26

    Irisin is a novel hormone secreted by skeletal muscle after exercise, which may ameliorate insulin resistance. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship between circulating irisin levels and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as well as related metabolic traits in a Chinese population. A total of 203 subjects were recruited. Of these, 68 subjects with NGT, 63 subjects with IGR and 72 subjects with new-onset T2DM. Circulating irisin levels were measured by ELISA. Detailed clinical investigations and biochemistry measurements were carried out in all of the subjects. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between irisin levels and related metabolic characteristics. All subjects were classified into normal weight and overweight/obese subgroups according to body mass index (BMI). No significant differences in circulating irisin levels were identified among the three groups (p=0.9741). After adjusting for covariates, multiple linear regression analysis revealed that serum irisin level was independently and significantly associated with total cholesterol (p=0.0005), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.0014), fasting fatty acids (p=0.0402) and uric acid (p=0.0062). By dividing the serum irisin levels into three tertile group, the values of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting fatty acids and uric acid were all increased significantly with the increase of irisin (p<0.05) . Moreover, serum irisin levels remain closely related to total cholesterol in both normal weight and overweight/obese subgroups. Our study suggests that circulating irisin concentrations are significantly associated with lipid and uric acid metabolism in a Chinese population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Palmitic acid induces central leptin resistance and impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in male mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wu, Yizhen; Wang, Hongqin; Camer, Danielle; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-05-01

    The consumption of diets rich in saturated fat largely contributes to the development of obesity in modern societies. A diet high in saturated fats can induce inflammation and impair leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. However, the role of saturated fatty acids on hypothalamic leptin signaling, and hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism remains largely undiscovered. In this study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), on central leptin sensitivity, hypothalamic leptin signaling, inflammatory molecules and hepatic energy metabolism in C57BL/6J male mice. We found that the icv administration of PA led to central leptin resistance, evidenced by the inhibition of central leptin's suppression of food intake. Central leptin resistance was concomitant with impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling (JAK2-STAT3, PKB/Akt-FOXO1) and a pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL1-β, IL-6 and pIκBa) in the mediobasal hypothalamus and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. Furthermore, the pre-administration of icv PA blunted the effect of leptin-induced decreases in mRNA expression related to gluconeogenesis (G6Pase and PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2) and lipogenesis (FAS and SCD1) in the liver of mice. Therefore, elevated central PA concentrations can induce pro-inflammatory responses and leptin resistance, which are associated with disorders of energy homeostasis in the liver as a result of diet-induced obesity.

  6. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  7. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stäubert, Claudia; Broom, Oliver Jay; Nordström, Anders

    2015-08-14

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them.We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation.We found HCA1 and HCA3 mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid β-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death.Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy.

  8. Bile acid signaling in lipid metabolism: metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of lipid and bile acid markers linked to anti-obesity and anti-diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yunpeng; Jiang, Changtao; Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Li, Tiangang; Ferrell, Jessica M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis is the major pathway for catabolism of cholesterol. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and plays an important role in regulating lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing CYP7A1 (CYP7A1-tg mice) were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, fatty liver, and diabetes. However the mechanism of resistance to HFD-induced obesity of CYP7A1-tg mice has not been determined. In this study, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles of CYP7A1-tg mice were analyzed to explore the metabolic alterations in CYP7A1-tg mice that govern the protection against obesity and insulin resistance by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analyses. Lipidomics analysis identified seven lipid markers including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were significantly decreased in serum of HFD-fed CYP7A1-tg mice. Metabolomics analysis identified 13 metabolites in bile acid synthesis including taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and tauro-β-muricholic acid (T-β-MCA) that differed between CYP7A1-tg and wild-type mice. Notably, T-β-MCA, an antagonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was significantly increased in intestine of CYP7A1-tg mice. This study suggests that reducing 12α-hydroxylated bile acids and increasing intestinal T-β-MCA may reduce high fat diet-induced increase of phospholipids, sphingomyelins and ceramides, and ameliorate diabetes and obesity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  9. Lipids and lipid metabolism in eukaryotic algae.

    PubMed

    Guschina, Irina A; Harwood, John L

    2006-03-01

    Eukaryotic algae are a very diverse group of organisms which inhabit a huge range of ecosystems from the Antarctic to deserts. They account for over half the primary productivity at the base of the food chain. In recent years studies on the lipid biochemistry of algae has shifted from experiments with a few model organisms to encompass a much larger number of, often unusual, algae. This has led to the discovery of new compounds, including major membrane components, as well as the elucidation of lipid signalling pathways. A major drive in recent research have been attempts to discover genes that code for expression of the various proteins involved in the production of very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Such work is described here together with information about how environmental factors, such as light, temperature or minerals, can change algal lipid metabolism and how adaptation may take place.

  10. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor γ, RORγ, participates in diurnal transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Kang, Hong Soon; Lih, Fred B.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Blaner, William S.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic circadian clock plays a pivotal role in regulating major aspects of energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. In this study, we show that RORγ robustly regulates the rhythmic expression of several lipid metabolic genes, including the insulin-induced gene 2a, Insig2a, elongation of very long chain fatty acids-like 3, Elovl3 and sterol 12α-hydroxylase, Cyp8b1, by enhancing their expression at ZT20-4. The time-dependent increase in their expression correlates with the rhythmic expression pattern of RORγ. The enhanced recruitment of RORγ to ROREs in their promoter region, increased histone acetylation, and reporter and mutation analysis support the concept that RORγ regulates the transcription of several lipid metabolic genes directly by binding ROREs in their promoter regulatory region. Consistent with the disrupted expression of a number of lipid metabolic genes, loss of RORγ reduced the level of several lipids in liver and blood in a ZT-preferred manner. Particularly the whole-body bile acid pool size was considerably reduced in RORγ−/− mice in part through its regulation of several Cyp genes. Similar observations were made in liver-specific RORγ-deficient mice. Altogether, our study indicates that RORγ functions as an important link between the circadian clock and the transcriptional regulation of several metabolic genes. PMID:25143535

  11. Caveolin-1 is necessary for hepatic oxidative lipid metabolism: evidence for crosstalk between caveolin-1 and bile acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rojo, Manuel A; Gongora, Milena; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L; Martel, Nick; Martin, Sheree D; Nixon, Susan J; Brooks, Andrew J; Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Martin, Sally; Lo, Harriet P; Myers, Stephen A; Restall, Christina; Ferguson, Charles; Pilch, Paul F; McGee, Sean L; Anderson, Robin L; Waters, Michael J; Hancock, John F; Grimmond, Sean M; Muscat, George E O; Parton, Robert G

    2013-07-25

    Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1) have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1-/- mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1-/- mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1) hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2) nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP) and bile acid signaling.

  12. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. PMID:22121495

  13. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  14. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1: Is It the Link between Sulfur Amino Acids and Lipid Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Poloni, Soraia; Blom, Henk J; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2015-06-03

    An association between sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine, homocysteine and taurine) and lipid metabolism has been described in several experimental and population-based studies. Changes in the metabolism of these amino acids influence serum lipoprotein concentrations, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. However, recent evidence has suggested that the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) may be the link between these two metabolic pathways. SCD-1 is a key enzyme for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Its main substrates C16:0 and C18:0 and products palmitoleic acid (C16:1) and oleic acid (C18:1) are the most abundant fatty acids in triglycerides, cholesterol esters and membrane phospholipids. A significant suppression of SCD-1 has been observed in several animal models with disrupted sulfur amino acid metabolism, and the activity of SCD-1 is also associated with the levels of these amino acids in humans. This enzyme also appears to be involved in the etiology of metabolic syndromes because its suppression results in decreased fat deposits (regardless of food intake), improved insulin sensitivity and higher basal energy expenditure. Interestingly, this anti-obesogenic phenotype has also been described in humans and animals with sulfur amino acid disorders, which is consistent with the hypothesis that SCD-1 activity is influenced by these amino acids, in particularly cysteine, which is a strong and independent predictor of SCD-1 activity and fat storage. In this narrative review, we discuss the evidence linking sulfur amino acids, SCD-1 and lipid metabolism.

  15. Differential Amino Acid, Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Perpetuations Involved in a Subtype of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Chinese Medicine Cold Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongtao; Niu, Xuyan; Gu, Yan; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Yue, Kevin; Zhang, Ge; Pan, Xiaohua; Jiang, Miao; Tan, Yong; Kong, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenli; Xu, Guowang; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Pattern classification is a key approach in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and it is used to classify the patients for intervention selection accordingly. TCM cold and heat patterns, two main patterns of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had been explored with systems biology approaches. Different regulations of apoptosis were found to be involved in cold and heat classification in our previous works. For this study, the metabolic profiling of plasma was explored in RA patients with typical TCM cold or heat patterns by integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platforms in conjunction with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Three main processes of metabolism, including amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid were focused on for function analysis. The results showed that 29 and 19 differential metabolites were found in cold and heat patterns respectively, compared with healthy controls. The perturbation of amino acid metabolism (increased essential amino acids), carbohydrate metabolism (galactose metabolism) and lipid metabolism, were found to be involved in both cold and heat pattern RA. In particular, more metabolic perturbations in protein and collagen breakdown, decreased glycolytic activity and aerobic oxidation, and increased energy utilization associated with RA cold pattern patients. These findings may be useful for obtaining a better understanding of RA pathogenesis and for achieving a better efficacy in RA clinical practice. PMID:27775663

  16. Beyond lipids, pharmacological PPARalpha activation has important effects on amino acid metabolism as studied in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kashif; Camejo, Germán; Lanne, Boel; Halvarsson, Torbjörn; Landergren, Marie Rydén; Oakes, Nicholas D

    2007-04-01

    PPARalpha agonists have been characterized largely in terms of their effects on lipids and glucose metabolism, whereas little has been reported about effects on amino acid metabolism. We studied responses to the PPARalpha agonist WY 14,643 (30 micromol x kg(-1) x day(-1) for 4 wk) in rats fed a saturated fat diet. Plasma and urine were analyzed with proton NMR. Plasma amino acids were measured using HPLC, and hepatic gene expression was assessed with DNA arrays. The high-fat diet elevated plasma levels of insulin and triglycerides (TG), and WY 14,643 treatment ameliorated this insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, lowering plasma insulin and TG levels. In addition, treatment decreased body weight gain, without altering cumulative food intake, and increased liver mass. WY 14,643 increased plasma levels of 12 of 22 amino acids, including glucogenic and some ketogenic amino acids, whereas arginine was significantly decreased. There was no alteration in branched-chain amino acid levels. Compared with the fat-fed control animals, WY 14,643-treated animals had raised plasma urea and ammonia levels as well as raised urine levels of N-methylnicotinamide and dimethylglycine. WY 14,643 induced changes in a number of key genes involved in amino acid metabolism in addition to expected effects on hepatic genes involved in lipid catabolism and ketone body formation. In conclusion, the present results suggest that, in rodents, effects of pharmacological PPARalpha activation extend beyond control of lipid metabolism to include important effects on whole body amino acid mobilization and hepatic amino acid metabolism.

  17. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks. PMID:24944020

  18. Yeast lipid metabolism at a glance.

    PubMed

    Klug, Lisa; Daum, Günther

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, lipids have gained much attention due to their involvement in health and disease. Lipids are required for the formation of membranes and contribute to many different processes such as cell signaling, energy supply, and cell death. Various organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lipid droplets are involved in lipid metabolism. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a reliable model organism to study biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology of lipids. The availability of mutants bearing defects in lipid metabolic pathways and the ease of manipulation by culture conditions facilitated these investigations. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about lipid metabolism in yeast. We grouped this large topic into three sections dealing with (1) fatty acids; (2) membrane lipids; and (3) storage lipids. Fatty acids serve as building blocks for the synthesis of membrane lipids (phospholipids, sphingolipids) and storage lipids (triacylglycerols, steryl esters). Phospholipids, sterols, and sphingolipids are essential components of cellular membranes. Recent investigations addressing lipid synthesis, degradation, and storage as well as regulatory aspects are presented. The role of enzymes governing important steps of the different lipid metabolic pathways is described. Finally, the link between lipid metabolic and dynamic processes is discussed.

  19. Retinoic acid regulates several genes in bile acid and lipid metabolism via upregulation of small heterodimer partner in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, Abulkhair; Subauste, Angela; Subauste, Maria C; Subauste, Jose

    2014-10-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) affects multiple aspects of development, embryogenesis and cell differentiation processes. The liver is a major organ that stores RA suggesting that retinoids play an important role in the function of hepatocytes. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated the involvement of small heterodimer partner (SHP) in RA-induced signaling in a non-transformed hepatic cell line AML 12. In the present study, we have identified several critical genes in lipid homeostasis (Apoa1, Apoa2 and ApoF) that are repressed by RA-treatment in a SHP dependent manner, in vitro and also in vivo with the use of the SHP null mice. In a similar manner, RA also represses several critical genes involved in bile acid metabolism (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Mdr2, Bsep, Baat and Ntcp) via upregulation of SHP. Collectively our data suggest that SHP plays a major role in RA-induced potential changes in pathophysiology of metabolic disorders in the liver.

  20. Nicotinic acid supplementation in diet favored intramuscular fat deposition and lipid metabolism in finishing steers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu-Qing; Bao, Lin-Bin; Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Can-Yu; Zhou, Shan; Wen, Lu-Hua; Fu, Chuan-Bian; Gong, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) acting as the precursor of NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH, participates in many biochemical processes, e.g. lipid metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary NA on carcass traits, meat quality, blood metabolites, and fat deposition in Chinese crossbred finishing steers. Sixteen steers with the similar body weight and at the age of 24 months were randomly allocated into control group (feeding basal diet) and NA group (feeding basal diet + 1000 mg/kg NA). All experimental cattle were fed a 90% concentrate diet and 10% forage straw in a 120-day feeding experiment. The results showed that supplemental NA in diet increased longissimus area, intramuscular fat content (17.14% vs. 9.03%), marbling score (8.08 vs. 4.30), redness (a*), and chroma (C*) values of LD muscle, but reduced carcass fat content (not including imtramuscular fat), pH24 h and moisture content of LD muscle, along with no effect on backfat thickness. Besides, NA supplementation increased serum HDL-C concentration, but decreased the serum levels of LDL-C, triglyceride, non-esterified fatty acid, total cholesterol, and glycated serum protein. In addition, NA supplementation increased G6PDH and ICDH activities of LD muscle. These results suggested that NA supplementation in diet improves the carcass characteristics and beef quality, and regulates the compositions of serum metabolites. Based on the above results, NA should be used as the feed additive in cattle industry. PMID:27048556

  1. Acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase influences fertility by regulating lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biogenesis in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenfeng; Shen, Ying; Hao, Juan; Wu, Jianyong; Ke, Liping; Wu, Caiyun; Huang, Kai; Luo, Binglun; Xu, Mingfeng; Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Xueping; Sun, Jie; Xing, Chaozhu; Sun, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important economic crop and there is obvious heterosis in cotton, fertility has played an important role in this heterosis. However, the genes that exhibit critical roles in anther development and fertility are not well understood. Here, we report an acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase (EC2.3; GhACNAT) that plays a key role in anther development and fertility. Suppression of GhACNAT by virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic cotton (G. hirsutum L. cv. C312) resulted in indehiscent anthers that were full of pollen, diminished filaments and stamens, and plant sterility. We found GhACNAT was involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. The genes differentially expressed in GhACNAT-silenced plants and C312 were mainly involved in catalytic activity and transcription regulator activity in lipid metabolism. In GhACNAT-silenced plants, the expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biosynthesis were significantly changed, the amount of JA in leaves and reproductive organs was significantly decreased compared with the amounts in C312. Treatments with exogenous methyl jasmonate rescued anther dehiscence and pollen release in GhACNAT-silenced plants and caused self-fertility. The GhACNAT gene may play an important role in controlling cotton fertility by regulating the pathways of lipid synthesis and JA biogenesis. PMID:26134787

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid modulates the enterocyte Caco-2 cell expression of microRNAs involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Martin, Roberto; Daimiel, Lidia; Richardson, Kris; Giordano, Elena; Nicod, Nathalie; García-Carrasco, Belén; Soares, Sara M A; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Lasunción, Miguel A; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, Jose M; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of the long-chain ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and greater chemoprevention. However, the mechanisms underlying the biologic effects of DHA remain unknown. It is well known that microRNAs (miRNAs) are versatile regulators of gene expression. Therefore, we aimed to determine if the beneficial effects of DHA may be modulated in part through miRNAs. Loss of dicer 1 ribonuclease type III (DICER) in enterocyte Caco-2 cells supplemented with DHA suggested that several lipid metabolism genes are modulated by miRNAs. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that are differentially modulated by fatty acids. Among the miRNAs modulated by DHA were miR-192 and miR-30c. Overexpression of either miR-192 or miR-30c in enterocyte and hepatocyte cells suggested an effect on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, some of which were confirmed by endogenous inhibition of these miRNAs. Our results show in enterocytes that DHA exerts its biologic effect in part by regulating genes involved in lipid metabolism and cancer. Moreover, this response is mediated through miRNA activity. We validate novel targets of miR-30c and miR-192 related to lipid metabolism and cancer including nuclear receptor corepressor 2, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, DICER, caveolin 1, ATP-binding cassette subfamily G (white) member 4, retinoic acid receptor β, and others. We also present evidence that in enterocytes DHA modulates the expression of regulatory factor X6 through these miRNAs. Alteration of miRNA levels by dietary components in support of their pharmacologic modulation might be valuable in adjunct therapy for dyslipidemia and other related diseases.

  3. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  4. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  5. Modulation of lipid metabolism by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in gestational diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring.

    PubMed

    Soulimane-Mokhtari, Nassima A; Guermouche, Baya; Yessoufou, Akadiri; Saker, Myrieum; Moutairou, Kebirou; Hichami, Aziz; Merzouk, Hafida; Khan, Naim A

    2005-09-01

    The time course of changes in lipid metabolism by dietary n-3 PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acids) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats during pregnancy (days 12 and 21) and their macrosomic offspring at birth (day 0) and through adulthood (days 60 and 90) was studied with respect to adipose tissue, liver and serum lipid concentrations, and fatty acid composition. Glucose and insulin levels were also assessed in order to characterize the diabetic state of macrosomic offspring. Pregnant diabetic and control rats were fed either an Isio-4 or EPAX diet (enriched with n-3 PUFA). The same diets were also consumed by pups at weaning. Compared with control rats, during pregnancy diabetic rats had a significant elevation in liver and serum triacylglycerol (triglyceride) and cholesterol concentrations. At birth, macrosomic pups had higher serum insulin and glucose levels than control pups. The macrosomic rats maintained accelerated postnatal growth combined with high adipose tissue weight and lipid content through the first 12 weeks of age. The macrosomic pups from diabetic rats fed the Isio-4 diet also showed a significant enhancement in liver and serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels at birth and during adulthood. Feeding the EPAX diet to diabetic mothers as well as their macrosomic pups increased serum and liver levels of EPA (eicospentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) with a reduction in arachidonic acid. The EPAX diet induced a significant decrease in liver and serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations in mothers during pregnancy and in their macrosomic pups during adulthood. Since the EPAX diet improves lipid anomalies considerably in diabetic mothers and their macrosomic offspring, it may prevent long-term metabolic abnormalities associated with macrosomia.

  6. Vegetable oil blends with α-linolenic acid rich Garden cress oil modulate lipid metabolism in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Umesha, S S; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2012-12-15

    Vegetable oil blends with modified fatty acid profile are being developed to improve n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) ratio in edible oils. The objective of this study is to develop vegetable oil blends with α-linolenic acid (ALA) rich Garden cress oil (GCO) and assess their modulatory effect on lipid metabolism. Sunflower oil (SFO), Rice bran oil (RBO), Sesame oil (SESO) were blended with GCO at different ratios to obtain n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio of 2.3-2.6. Native and GCO blended oils were fed to Wistar rats at 10% level in the diet for 60 days. Serum and liver lipids showed significant decrease in Total cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), LDL-C levels in GCO and GCO blended oil fed rats compared to native oil fed rats. ALA, EPA, DHA contents were significantly increased while linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA) levels decreased in different tissues of GCO and GCO blended oils fed rats. In conclusion, blending of vegetable oils with GCO increases ALA, decreases n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio and beneficially modulates lipid profile.

  7. The environmental light influences the circulatory levels of retinoic acid and associates with hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenqiang; Li, Chunying; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Shiming; Dong, Wei; Jiang, Pengjiu; Zhang, Jianfa

    2008-12-01

    Environmental light is involved in the regulation of photochemical reaction in mouse retina. It remains unclear whether light-mediated increase in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis in retina will result in altering the circulatory levels of ATRA and regulating downstream gene expression and physiological function. Here we showed circulatory levels of ATRA decreased in mice under constant darkness and elevated by light exposure. Fat gene pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (mPlrp2) and its partner procolipase (mClps), but not hepatic lipase (mHl), activated in livers for responding to lack of light illuminating. Light-triggered alterations in circulatory ATRA levels regulated ecto-5'-nucleotidase gene expression by retinoic acid receptor retinoic acid receptor-alpha and modulated 5'-AMP levels in blood and were associated with mPlrp2 and mClps expression in the livers. Mice deficient in adenosine receptors displayed mPlrp2 and mClps expression in livers under 12-h light, 12-h dark cycles. Caffeine blocked adenosine receptors and induced hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression in wild-type mice. Mice activated in hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression lowered hepatic and serum lipid levels and markedly elevated circulatory levels of all-trans retinol. Our results suggest environmental light influence hepatic lipid homeostasis by light-modulated retinoic acid signaling associated with mPlrp2 and mClps gene expression in livers.

  8. Effect of tachycardia on lipid metabolism and expression of fatty acid transporters in heart ventricles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, B; Harasim, E; Zabielski, P; Chabowski, A; Gorski, J

    2015-10-01

    compartments. Thirty min pacing increased plasmalemmal and reduced microsomal expression of GLUT-4 (glucotransporter 4) in both ventricles. It increased plasmalemmal expression of GLUT-1 (glucotransporter 1) in RV. It returned to normal after 60 min pacing. It is concluded that tachycardia induces numerous changes in metabolism of myocardial lipids as well as expression of fatty acid and glucose transporters in both heart ventricles.

  9. Fatty acid metabolism in L1210 murine leukemia cells: differences in modification of fatty acids incorporated into various lipids.

    PubMed

    Burns, C P; Wei, S P; Spector, A A

    1978-10-01

    L1210 leukemia cells can utilize all of the main fatty acids that normally are present in the ascites fluid in which they grow. This finding is consistent with the view that L1210 cells derive most of their fatty acids from the ascites fluid. From 80--90% of each fatty acid was incorporated into cell lipids without structural modification, suggesting that the lipid composition of these cells can be altered by changing the type of fatty acids to which they are exposed. Most importantly, the palmitate that was subsequently incorporated into total cell phospholipids was elongated and desaturated somewhat more than that incorporated into triglycerides. This difference was due primarily to more extensive modification of the palmitate incorporated into the ethanolamine phosphoglycerides fraction. Although there was no difference between total phospholipids and triglycerides with linoleate, more of the linoleate incorporated into ethanolamine phosphoglycerides was elongated and further desaturated than that incorporated into choline phosphoglycerides and triglycerides. These findings indicate fatty acids incorporated into various cell lipid fractions are not structurally modified to the same extent. There appears to be greater modification of fatty acid used for ethanolamine phosphoglyceride synthesis as compared with triglyceride and choline phosphoglyceride synthesis.

  10. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  11. Computational Modeling of Lipid Metabolism in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schützhold, Vera; Hahn, Jens; Tummler, Katja; Klipp, Edda

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is essential for all major cell functions and has recently gained increasing attention in research and health studies. However, mathematical modeling by means of classical approaches such as stoichiometric networks and ordinary differential equation systems has not yet provided satisfactory insights, due to the complexity of lipid metabolism characterized by many different species with only slight differences and by promiscuous multifunctional enzymes. Here, we present an object-oriented stochastic model approach as a way to cope with the complex lipid metabolic network. While all lipid species are treated objects in the model, they can be modified by the respective converting reactions based on reaction rules, a hybrid method that integrates benefits of agent-based and classical stochastic simulation. This approach allows to follow the dynamics of all lipid species with different fatty acids, different degrees of saturation and different headgroups over time and to analyze the effect of parameter changes, potential mutations in the catalyzing enzymes or provision of different precursors. Applied to yeast metabolism during one cell cycle period, we could analyze the distribution of all lipids to the various membranes in time-dependent manner. The presented approach allows to efficiently treat the complexity of cellular lipid metabolism and to derive conclusions on the time- and location-dependent distributions of lipid species and their properties such as saturation. It is widely applicable, easily extendable and will provide further insights in healthy and diseased states of cell metabolism. PMID:27730126

  12. Computational Modeling of Lipid Metabolism in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Schützhold, Vera; Hahn, Jens; Tummler, Katja; Klipp, Edda

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is essential for all major cell functions and has recently gained increasing attention in research and health studies. However, mathematical modeling by means of classical approaches such as stoichiometric networks and ordinary differential equation systems has not yet provided satisfactory insights, due to the complexity of lipid metabolism characterized by many different species with only slight differences and by promiscuous multifunctional enzymes. Here, we present an object-oriented stochastic model approach as a way to cope with the complex lipid metabolic network. While all lipid species are treated objects in the model, they can be modified by the respective converting reactions based on reaction rules, a hybrid method that integrates benefits of agent-based and classical stochastic simulation. This approach allows to follow the dynamics of all lipid species with different fatty acids, different degrees of saturation and different headgroups over time and to analyze the effect of parameter changes, potential mutations in the catalyzing enzymes or provision of different precursors. Applied to yeast metabolism during one cell cycle period, we could analyze the distribution of all lipids to the various membranes in time-dependent manner. The presented approach allows to efficiently treat the complexity of cellular lipid metabolism and to derive conclusions on the time- and location-dependent distributions of lipid species and their properties such as saturation. It is widely applicable, easily extendable and will provide further insights in healthy and diseased states of cell metabolism.

  13. Diets enriched in trans-11 vaccenic acid alleviate ectopic lipid accumulation in a rat model of NAFLD and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacome-Sosa, M Miriam; Borthwick, Faye; Mangat, Rabban; Uwiera, Richard; Reaney, Martin J; Shen, Jianheng; Quiroga, Ariel D; Jacobs, René L; Lehner, Richard; Proctor, Spencer D; Nelson, Randal C

    2014-07-01

    Trans11-18:1 (vaccenic acid, VA) is one of the most predominant naturally occurring trans fats in our food chain and has recently been shown to exert hypolipidemic effects in animal models. In this study, we reveal new mechanism(s) by which VA can alter body fat distribution, energy utilization and dysfunctional lipid metabolism in an animal model of obesity displaying features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Obese JCR:LA-cp rats were assigned to a control diet that included dairy-derived fat or the control diet supplemented with 1% VA. VA reduced total body fat (-6%), stimulated adipose tissue redistribution [reduced mesenteric fat (-17%) while increasing inguinal fat mass (29%)] and decreased adipocyte size (-44%) versus control rats. VA supplementation also increased metabolic rate (7%) concomitantly with an increased preference for whole-body glucose utilization for oxidation and increased insulin sensitivity [lower HOMA-IR (-59%)]. Further, VA decreased nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores (-34%) and reduced hepatic (-27%) and intestinal (-39%) triglyceride secretion relative to control diet, while exerting differential transcriptional regulation of SREBP1 and FAS amongst other key genes in the liver and the intestine. Adding VA to dairy fat alleviates features of MetS potentially by remodeling adipose tissue and attenuating ectopic lipid accumulation in a rat model of obesity and MetS. Increasing VA content in the diet (naturally or by fortification) may be a useful approach to maximize the health value of dairy-derived fats.

  14. Enhanced GLUT4-Dependent Glucose Transport Relieves Nutrient Stress in Obese Mice Through Changes in Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Jami M; Ilkayeva, Olga; Jackson, Robert M; Griesel, Beth A; White, Phillip; Matsuzaki, Satochi; Qaisar, Rizwan; Van Remmen, Holly; Humphries, Kenneth M; Newgard, Christopher B; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-12-01

    Impaired GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake is a contributing factor in the development of whole-body insulin resistance in obese patients and obese animal models. Previously, we demonstrated that transgenic mice engineered to express the human GLUT4 gene under the control of the human GLUT4 promoter (i.e., transgenic [TG] mice) are resistant to obesity-induced insulin resistance. A likely mechanism underlying increased insulin sensitivity is increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the broader metabolic consequences of enhanced glucose uptake into muscle. We observed that the expression of several nuclear and mitochondrially encoded mitochondrial enzymes was decreased in TG mice but that mitochondrial number, size, and fatty acid respiration rates were unchanged. Interestingly, both pyruvate and glutamate respiration rates were decreased in TG mice. Metabolomics analyses of skeletal muscle samples revealed that increased GLUT4 transgene expression was associated with decreased levels of some tricarboxylic acid intermediates and amino acids, whereas the levels of several glucogenic amino acids were elevated. Furthermore, fasting acyl carnitines in obese TG mice were decreased, indicating that increased GLUT4-dependent glucose flux decreases nutrient stress by altering lipid and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  15. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    PubMed

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects.

  16. Lipid metabolism during fasting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ekberg, K; Landau, B R

    2001-10-01

    These studies were conducted to understand the relationship between measures of systemic free fatty acid (FFA) reesterification and regional FFA, glycerol, and triglyceride metabolism during fasting. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure fatty acid oxidation in six men after a 60-h fast. Systemic and regional (splanchnic, renal, and leg) FFA ([(3)H]palmitate) and glycerol ([(3)H]glycerol) kinetics, as well as splanchnic triglyceride release, were measured. The rate of systemic FFA reesterification was 366 +/- 93 micromol/min, which was greater (P < 0.05) than splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output (64 +/- 6 micromol/min), a measure of VLDL triglyceride fatty acid export. The majority of glycerol uptake occurred in the splanchnic and renal beds, although some leg glycerol uptake was detected. Systemic FFA release was approximately double that usually present in overnight postabsorptive men, yet the regional FFA release rates were of the same proportions previously observed in overnight postabsorptive men. In conclusion, FFA reesterification at rest during fasting far exceeds splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output. This indicates that nonhepatic sites of FFA reesterification are important, and that peripheral reesterification of FFA exceeds the rate of simultaneous intracellular triglyceride fatty acid oxidation.

  17. Effect of fulvic acid induction on the physiology, metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis-related gene transcription of Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10.

    PubMed

    Che, Raoqiong; Huang, Li; Xu, Jun-Wei; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Ma, Huixian; Yu, Xuya

    2017-03-01

    Fulvic acid (FA) triggers lipid accumulation in Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10, which can produce biofuels. Therefore, the metabolism shift and gene expression changes influenced by fulvic acid should be investigated. In this study, lipid and protein contents increased rapidly from 44.6% to 54.3% and from 31.4% to 39.7% under FA treatment, respectively. By contrast, carbohydrate content sharply declined from 49.5% to 32.5%. The correlation between lipid content and gene expression was also analyzed. Results revealed that accD, ME, and GPAT genes were significantly correlated with lipid accumulation. These genes could likely influence lipid accumulation and could be selected as modification candidates. These results demonstrated that FA significantly increased microalgal lipid accumulation by changing the intracellular reactive oxygen species, gene expression, and enzyme activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

  18. Hypercholesterolemia and changes in lipid and bile acid metabolism in male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sandra K; Lear, Steven R; Deane, Sean; Dubrac, Sandrine; Huling, Sandra L; Nguyen, Lien; Bollineni, Jaya S; Shefer, Sarah; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Cohen, David E; Shneider, Benjamin; Sehayek, Ephraim; Ananthanarayanan, Meena; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Suchy, Fredrick J; Batta, Ashok K; Salen, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, has been implicated in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. The gene, CYP7A1, encoding a protein with this activity, is expressed normally only in hepatocytes and is highly regulated. Our cyp7A1 gene knockout mouse colony, as young adults on a chow diet, is hypercholesterolemic. These mice were characterized extensively to understand how cyp7A1 affects lipid and bile acid homeostasis in different tissue compartments and whether gender plays a modifying role. Both male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice had decreased hepatic LDL receptors, unchanged hepatic cholesterol synthesis, increased intestinal cholesterol synthesis and bile acid transporters, and decreased fecal bile acids but increased fecal sterols. In females, cyp7A1 deficiency also caused changes in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, decreased hepatic canalicular bile acid transporter, Bsep, and gallbladder bile composition altered to a lithogenic profile. Taken together, the data suggest that cyp7A1 deficiency results in a proatherogenic phenotype in both genders and leads to a prolithogenic phenotype in females.

  19. Metabolic signatures of extreme longevity in northern Italian centenarians reveal a complex remodeling of lipids, amino acids, and gut microbiota metabolism.

    PubMed

    Collino, Sebastiano; Montoliu, Ivan; Martin, François-Pierre J; Scherer, Max; Mari, Daniela; Salvioli, Stefano; Bucci, Laura; Ostan, Rita; Monti, Daniela; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Rezzi, Serge

    2013-01-01

    The aging phenotype in humans has been thoroughly studied but a detailed metabolic profiling capable of shading light on the underpinning biological processes of longevity is still missing. Here using a combined metabonomics approach compromising holistic (1)H-NMR profiling and targeted MS approaches, we report for the first time the metabolic phenotype of longevity in a well characterized human aging cohort compromising mostly female centenarians, elderly, and young individuals. With increasing age, targeted MS profiling of blood serum displayed a marked decrease in tryptophan concentration, while an unique alteration of specific glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are seen in the longevity phenotype. We hypothesized that the overall lipidome changes specific to longevity putatively reflect centenarians' unique capacity to adapt/respond to the accumulating oxidative and chronic inflammatory conditions characteristic of their extreme aging phenotype. Our data in centenarians support promotion of cellular detoxification mechanisms through specific modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolic cascade as we underpinned increased concentration of 8,9-EpETrE, suggesting enhanced cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity. Such effective mechanism might result in the activation of an anti-oxidative response, as displayed by decreased circulating levels of 9-HODE and 9-oxoODE, markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative products of linoleic acid. Lastly, we also revealed that the longevity process deeply affects the structure and composition of the human gut microbiota as shown by the increased extrection of phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) and p-cresol sulfate (PCS) in urine of centenarians. Together, our novel approach in this representative Italian longevity cohort support the hypothesis that a complex remodeling of lipid, amino acid metabolism, and of gut microbiota functionality are key regulatory processes marking exceptional longevity in humans.

  20. Effects of dietary alpha- and gamma-linolenic acid on lipid metabolism in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y S; Sugano, M

    1988-01-01

    The effect of age on lipid metabolism was studied in rats fed diets containing safflower oil (SFO, 78% linoleic acid), evening primrose oil (EPO, 9.4% gamma-linolenic acid and 70% linoleic acid) or the mixture of safflower and linseed oil (SLO, 10.2% alpha-linolenic acid and 68% linoleic acid). The activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase declined with age in all groups. In adult rats, the reductase activity was high in the EPO group and low in the SLO group. The activity of hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase was independent of the diet or age. Hepatic delta 6-desaturase activity was low in adult rats fed EPO. In liver microsomal phospholipids, the percentage of 22:5 n-6 decreased while that of 22:6 n-3 increased with age. The ratio of linoleate metabolites to linoleate was high in the EPO group and low in the SLO group. Liver and serum cholesterol increased with age only in rats fed the SLO diet. Thus, the results indicated an enhanced susceptibility to dietary fats with age.

  1. Exercise and Regulation of Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Noland, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The increased prevalence of hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and fatty liver disease has provided increasingly negative connotations toward lipids. However, it is important to remember that lipids are essential components supporting life. Lipids are a class of molecules defined by their inherent insolubility in water. In biological systems, lipids are either hydrophobic (containing only polar groups) or amphipathic (possess polar and nonpolar groups). These characteristics lend lipids to be highly diverse with a multitude of functions including hormone and membrane synthesis, involvement in numerous signaling cascades, as well as serving as a source of metabolic fuel supporting energy production. Exercise can induce changes in the lipid composition of membranes that effect fluidity and cellular function, as well as modify the cellular and circulating environment of lipids that regulate signaling cascades. The purpose of this chapter is to focus on lipid utilization as metabolic fuel in response to acute and chronic exercise training. Lipids utilized as an energy source during exercise include circulating fatty acids bound to albumin, triglycerides stored in very-low-density lipoprotein, and intramuscular triglyceride stores. Dynamic changes in these lipid pools during and after exercise are discussed, as well as key factors that may be responsible for regulating changes in fat oxidation in response to varying exercise conditions.

  2. Lipid metabolism is differentially modulated by salicylic acid and heptanoyl salicylic acid during the induction of resistance in wheat against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Christine; Randoux, Béatrice; Bourdon, Natacha; Reignault, Philippe

    2013-12-15

    Heptanoyl salicylic acid (HSA) is a salicylic acid (SA) derivative obtained by esterification of 2-OH benzoic acid with heptanoic acid. In wheat, the protection levels obtained against Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) increased from 50% with SA to 95% with HSA. Using molecular, biochemical and cytological approaches, we investigated here how wheat lipid metabolism is differentially activated by SA and HSA in both infectious and non-infectious conditions, and how Bgt infectious process is altered by both inducers. First, in the absence of Bgt, continuous lipoxygenase (LOX)-encoding gene expression and corresponding activity were specifically induced by HSA. Moreover, compared to SA, HSA treatment resulted in earlier up-regulations of the phospholipase C2-encoding gene expression and it specifically affected the expression of a lipid transfer protein-encoding gene. In infectious context, both HSA and SA sprayings impaired penetration events and therefore haustorium formation, leading to less frequent fungal colonies. While this alteration only slowed down the evolution of Bgt infectious process in SA-sprayed leaves, it completely impaired the establishment of successful infectious events in HSA-sprayed leaves. In addition, HSA induced continuous increases of a LOX-encoding gene expression and of the corresponding LOX activity when compared to SA-sprayed leaves. Lipid metabolism is therefore overall highly responsive to HSA spraying and could represent effective defence mechanism triggered during the induction of resistance in wheat toward Bgt. The concepts of priming and energy costs of the defences induced by SA and HSA are also discussed.

  3. Adipose tissue transcriptional response of lipid metabolism genes in growing Iberian pigs fed oleic acid v. carbohydrate enriched diets.

    PubMed

    Benítez, R; Núñez, Y; Fernández, A; Isabel, B; Rodríguez, C; Daza, A; López-Bote, C; Silió, L; Óvilo, C

    2016-06-01

    Diet influences animal body and tissue composition due to direct deposition and to the nutrients effects on metabolism. The influence of specific nutrients on the molecular regulation of lipogenesis is not well characterized and is known to be influenced by many factors including timing and physiological status. A trial was performed to study the effects of different dietary energy sources on lipogenic genes transcription in ham adipose tissue of Iberian pigs, at different growth periods and on feeding/fasting situations. A total of 27 Iberian male pigs of 28 kg BW were allocated to two separate groups and fed with different isocaloric feeding regimens: standard diet with carbohydrates as energy source (CH) or diet enriched with high oleic sunflower oil (HO). Ham subcutaneous adipose tissue was sampled by biopsy at growing (44 kg mean BW) and finishing (100 kg mean BW) periods. The first sampling was performed on fasted animals, while the last sampling was performed twice, with animals fasted overnight and 3 h after refeeding. Effects of diet, growth period and feeding/fasting status on gene expression were explored quantifying the expression of a panel of key genes implicated in lipogenesis and lipid metabolism processes. Quantitative PCR revealed several differentially expressed genes according to diet, with similar results at both timings: RXRG, LEP and FABP5 genes were upregulated in HO group while ME1, FASN, ACACA and ELOVL6 were upregulated in CH. The diet effect on ME1 gene expression was conditional on feeding/fasting status, with the higher ME1 gene expression in CH than HO groups, observed only in fasting samples. Results are compatible with a higher de novo endogenous synthesis of fatty acids (FA) in the carbohydrate-supplemented group and a higher FA transport in the oleic acid-supplemented group. Growth period significantly affected the expression of most of the studied genes, with all but PPARG showing higher expression in finishing pigs according to

  4. Effects of dietary inulin on bacterial growth, short-chain fatty acid production and hepatic lipid metabolism in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Weitkunat, Karolin; Schumann, Sara; Petzke, Klaus Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    In literature, contradictory effects of dietary fibers and their fermentation products, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), are described: On one hand, they increase satiety, but on the other hand, they provide additional energy and promote obesity development. We aimed to answer this paradox by investigating the effects of fermentable and non-fermentable fibers on obesity induced by high-fat diet in gnotobiotic C3H/HeOuJ mice colonized with a simplified human microbiota. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented either with 10% cellulose (non-fermentable) or inulin (fermentable) for 6 weeks. Feeding the inulin diet resulted in an increased diet digestibility and reduced feces energy, compared to the cellulose diet with no differences in food intake, suggesting an increased intestinal energy extraction from inulin. However, we observed no increase in body fat/weight. The additional energy provided by the inulin diet led to an increased bacterial proliferation in this group. Supplementation of inulin resulted further in significantly elevated concentrations of total SCFA in cecum and portal vein plasma, with a reduced cecal acetate:propionate ratio. Hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Fasn, Gpam) and fatty acid elongation/desaturation (Scd1, Elovl3, Elovl6, Elovl5, Fads1 and Fads2) were decreased in inulin-fed animals. Accordingly, plasma and liver phospholipid composition were changed between the different feeding groups. Concentrations of omega-3 and odd-chain fatty acids were increased in inulin-fed mice, whereas omega-6 fatty acids were reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that, during this short-term feeding, inulin has mainly positive effects on the lipid metabolism, which could cause beneficial effects during obesity development in long-term studies.

  5. Eicosapentaenoic acid regulation of muscle lipid metabolism in vivo and in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega 3 fatty acids exerts potent anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic effects. We previously reported that mice fed high fat diets supplemented with EPA (HF-EPA) were resistant to diet-induced obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Here we further investigate b...

  6. Regulation of lipid metabolism via a connection between the endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka

    2017-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that store and supply lipids to regulate cellular lipid homeostasis. Fatty acids are packaged as triglyceride and cholesterol ester into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes to synthesize LDs. Cytosolic LDs move dynamically and interact with organelles, including other LDs. In this process, functional proteins for metabolism are also transferred to LDs. In this review, I focus on interactions between the ER and LDs related to lipid metabolism.

  7. p-Coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMP-activated protein kinase in L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Kang, Seung-Woo; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-03-22

    p-Coumaric acid (3-[4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-propenoic acid) is a ubiquitous plant metabolite with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether p-coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in L6 skeletal muscle cells. p-Coumaric acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPK in a dose-dependent manner in differentiated L6 skeletal muscle cells. It also increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of CPT-1 mRNA and PPARα, suggesting that it promotes the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Also, it suppressed oleic acid-induced triglyceride accumulation, and enhanced 2-NBDG uptake in differentiated L6 muscle cells. Pretreatment with compound C inhibited AMPK activation, reduced ACC phosphorylation and 2-NBDG uptake, and increased triglyceride accumulation. However, p-coumaric acid counterbalanced the inhibitory effects of compound C. Taken together, these results suggest that p-coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMPK activation in L6 skeletal muscle cells and that it has potentially beneficial effects in improving or treating metabolic disorders.

  8. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-01-15

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-{alpha} plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-{alpha} activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription.

  9. Genome wide identification of microRNAs involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism of Brassica napus by small RNA and degradome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Jingjing; Shi, Wenhui; Zhang, Jinwen

    2017-04-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is an important cash crop considered as the third largest oil crop worldwide. Rapeseed oil contains various saturation or unsaturation fatty acids, these fatty acids, whose could incorporation with TAG form into lipids stored in seeds play various roles in the metabolic activity. The different fatty acids in B. napus seeds determine oil quality, define if the oil is edible or must be used as industrial material. miRNAs are kind of non-coding sRNAs that could regulate gene expressions through post-transcriptional modification to their target transcripts playing important roles in plant metabolic activities. We employed high-throughput sequencing to identify the miRNAs and their target transcripts involved in fatty acids and lipids metabolism in different development of B. napus seeds. As a result, we identified 826 miRNA sequences, including 523 conserved and 303 newly miRNAs. From the degradome sequencing, we found 589 mRNA could be targeted by 236 miRNAs, it includes 49 novel miRNAs and 187 conserved miRNAs. The miRNA-target couple suggests that bna-5p-163957_18, bna-5p-396192_7, miR9563a-p3, miR9563b-p5, miR838-p3, miR156e-p3, miR159c and miR1134 could target PDP, LACS9, MFPA, ADSL1, ACO32, C0401, GDL73, PlCD6, OLEO3 and WSD1. These target transcripts are involving in acetyl-CoA generate and carbon chain desaturase, regulating the levels of very long chain fatty acids, β-oxidation and lipids transport and metabolism process. At the same, we employed the q-PCR to valid the expression of miRNAs and their target transcripts that involve in fatty acid and lipid metabolism, the result suggested that the miRNA and their transcript expression are negative correlation, which in accord with the expression of miRNA and its target transcript. The study findings suggest that the identified miRNA may play important role in the fatty acids and lipids metabolism in seeds of B. napus.

  10. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's ...

  11. Disorders of Lipid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid leads to nerve and retinal damage, spastic movements, and changes in the bone and skin. Treatment involves avoiding eating green fruits and vegetables that contain chlorophyll. Plasmapheresis, in ...

  12. Metabolic engineering of medium-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana plant leaf lipids

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kyle B.; Taylor, Matthew C.; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Vanhercke, Thomas; Wood, Craig C.; Blanchard, Christopher L.; Singh, Surinder P.; Petrie, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Various research groups are investigating the production of oil in non-seed biomass such as leaves. Recently, high levels of oil accumulation have been achieved in plant biomass using a combination of biotechnological approaches which also resulted in significant changes to the fatty acid composition of the leaf oil. In this study, we were interested to determine whether medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) could be accumulated in leaf oil. MCFA are an ideal feedstock for biodiesel and a range of oleochemical products including lubricants, coatings, and detergents. In this study, we explore the synthesis, accumulation, and glycerolipid head-group distribution of MCFA in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana after transient transgenic expression of C12:0-, C14:0-, and C16:0-ACP thioesterase genes. We demonstrate that the production of these MCFA in leaf is increased by the co-expression of the WRINKLED1 (WRI1) transcription factor, with the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) from Cocos nucifera being required for the assembly of tri-MCFA TAG species. We also demonstrate that the newly-produced MCFA are incorporated into the triacylglycerol of leaves in which WRI1 + diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1) genes are co-expressed for increased oil accumulation. PMID:25852716

  13. Yhhu981, a novel compound, stimulates fatty acid oxidation via the activation of AMPK and ameliorates lipid metabolism disorder in ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong-liang; Huang, Su-ling; Xie, Fu-chun; Zeng, Li-min; Hu, You-hong; Leng, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Defects in fatty acid metabolism contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel compound yhhu981 on fatty acid metabolism in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The capacity to stimulate fatty acid oxidation was assessed in C2C12 myotubes. The fatty acid synthesis was studied in HepG2 cells using isotope tracing. The phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) was examined with Western blot analysis. For in vivo experiments, ob/ob mice were orally treated with yhhu981 acutely (300 mg/kg) or chronically (150 or 300 mg·kg−1·d−1 for 22 d). On the last day of treatment, serum and tissue samples were collected for analysis. Results: Yhhu981 (12.5–25 μmol/L) significantly increased fatty acid oxidation and the expression of related genes (Sirt1, Pgc1α and Mcad) in C2C12 myotubes, and inhibited fatty acid synthesis in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, yhhu981 dose-dependently increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC in both C2C12 myotubes and HepG2 cells. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, blocked fatty acid oxidation in yhhu981-treated C2C12 myotubes and fatty acid synthesis decrease in yhhu981-treated HepG2 cells. Acute administration of yhhu981 decreased the respiratory exchange ratio in ob/ob mice, whereas chronic treatment with yhhu981 ameliorated the lipid abnormalities and ectopic lipid deposition in skeletal muscle and liver of ob/ob mice. Conclusion: Yhhu981 is a potent compound that stimulates fatty acid oxidation, and exerts pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism by activating AMPK. PMID:25732571

  14. Effects of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Biopolymer Encapsulation on Lipid Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Sun Jin; Kim, Doo Hwan; Chun, Se Chul; Lee, Si Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Forty mice were randomly divided into four groups on the basis of the diet to be fed as follows: 5% (low) fat diet (T1: LF); 20% (high) fat diet (T2: HF); 20% fat containing 1% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (T3: HFC); and 20% fat containing 1% CLA with 0.5% biopolymers (T4: HFCB). The high-fat with CLA diet groups (HFC and HFCB) and the low-fat diet group (LF) tended to have lower body weights and total adipose tissue weights than those of the high-fat diet group (HF). Serum leptin and triglyceride were significantly lower in the high fat with CLA-fed groups (HFC and HFCB) and the low-fat diet group (LF) than those in the high-fat diet group (HF). It is noteworthy that the high-fat with CLA and biopolymers group (HFCB) showed the lowest serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations. In the high-fat-fed group (HF), voluntary travel distance as a measure of physical activity decreased after three weeks of feeding. However, the CLA-fed groups showed increased physical activity. The groups fed high-fat diets supplemented with CLA alone and with CLA and biopolymers had higher viscosity of small intestinal contents than that in the low- and high-fat dietary groups. PMID:23531540

  15. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin–induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress. PMID:26907958

  16. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-02-24

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress.

  17. Effect of vitamin E supplementation or alfalfa grazing on fatty acid composition and expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in lambs.

    PubMed

    González-Calvo, L; Joy, M; Blanco, M; Dervishi, E; Molino, F; Sarto, P; Ripoll, G; Serrano, M; Calvo, J H

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin E (VE) supplementation and alfalfa grazing during fattening on fatty acid composition and mRNA expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in the LM of Rasa Aragonesa light lambs. After weaning, 48 lambs were kept indoors and fed a commercial concentrate and a VE supplemented concentrate (480 mg DL-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg DM) for 0 (control [CON]), 10 (VE10d), 20 (VE20d), and 30 d (VE30d) before slaughtering at 22 to 24 kg. Simultaneously, 8 unweaned lambs grazed in alfalfa (154 mg α-tocopherol/kg DM) paddocks with their dams and supplemented with the commercial concentrate (ALF). Immediately after slaughter, LM was sampled to determine gene expression. After 24 h of cooling at 4°C, LM was extracted to determine intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition. The IMF content did not differ with the dietary treatment ( = 0.212). Unweaned grazing alfalfa lambs had greater concentration of rumenic acid (C18:2 c9,t11; P < 0.001) and lower oleic acid (C18:1 c9; = 0.001) content and PUFA n-6:n-3 ratio (P < 0.001) but similar expression of genes implicated in lipid metabolism compared to the concentrate-fed lambs. Vitamin E supplementation did not modify muscle fatty acid composition; however, it increased the expression of FADS2 and ELOVL6, which are involved in desaturation of long-chain fatty acid and the elongation of SFA and MUFA. The results showed that a short period of VE supplementation, especially 10 (VE10d) and 20 d (VE20d), modified gene expression. Overall, the results showed that VE may be acting as a regulatory factor for transcriptional control of genes related to lipid metabolism in the muscle of Rasa Aragonesa light lambs (22-24 kg live weight and younger than 90 d old).

  18. Targeting Lipid Metabolic Reprogramming as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and survival, and this metabolic reprogramming has been recognized as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is pivotal in cellular process that converts nutrients into energy, building blocks for membrane biogenesis and the generation of signaling molecules. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells show alterations in different aspects of lipid metabolism. The changes in lipid metabolism of cancer cells can affect numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The potential dependence of cancer cells on the deregulated lipid metabolism suggests that enzymes and regulating factors involved in this process are promising targets for cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on the features associated with the lipid metabolic pathways in cancer, and highlight recent advances on the therapeutic targets of specific lipid metabolic enzymes or regulating factors and target-directed small molecules that can be potentially used as anticancer drugs. PMID:28053954

  19. Enhancement of energy production by black ginger extract containing polymethoxy flavonoids in myocytes through improving glucose, lactic acid and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kazuya; Takeda, Shogo; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Nakamura, Seikou; Matsuda, Hisashi; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Enhancement of muscular energy production is thought to improve locomotive functions and prevent metabolic syndromes including diabetes and lipidemia. Black ginger (Kaempferia parviflora) has been cultivated for traditional medicine in Thailand. Recent studies have shown that black ginger extract (KPE) activated brown adipocytes and lipolysis in white adipose tissue, which may cure obesity-related dysfunction of lipid metabolism. However, the effect of KPE on glucose and lipid utilization in muscle cells has not been examined yet. Hence, we evaluated the effect of KPE and its constituents on energy metabolism in pre-differentiated (p) and differentiated (d) C2C12 myoblasts. KPE (0.1-10 μg/ml) was added to pC2C12 cells in the differentiation process for a week or used to treat dC2C12 cells for 24 h. After culturing, parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis were assessed. In terms of the results, KPE enhanced the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and lactic acid as well as the mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 in both types of cells. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α was enhanced in pC2C12 cells. In addition, KPE enhanced the production of ATP and mitochondrial biogenesis. Polymethoxy flavonoids in KPE including 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone enhanced the expression of GLUT4 and PGC-1α. Moreover, KPE and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone enhanced the phosphorylation of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In conclusion, KPE and its polymethoxy flavonoids were found to enhance energy metabolism in myocytes. KPE may improve the dysfunction of muscle metabolism that leads to metabolic syndrome and locomotive dysfunction.

  20. Metabolomics changes in a rat model of obstructive jaundice: mapping to metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids as well as oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Long, Yue; Dong, Xin; Yuan, Yawei; Huang, Jinqiang; Song, Jiangang; Sun, Yumin; Lu, Zhijie; Yang, Liqun; Yu, Weifeng

    2015-07-01

    The study examined the global metabolic and some biochemical changes in rats with cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Serum samples were collected in male Wistar rats with BDL (n = 8) and sham surgery (n = 8) at day 3 after surgery for metabolomics analysis using a combination of reversed phase chromatography and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS). The serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathion peroxidase (GSH-Px) were measured to estimate the oxidative stress state. Key changes after BDL included increased levels of l-phenylalanine, l-glutamate, l-tyrosine, kynurenine, l-lactic acid, LysoPC(c) (14:0), glycine and succinic acid and decreased levels of l-valine, PC(b) (19:0/0:0), taurine, palmitic acid, l-isoleucine and citric acid metabolism products. And treatment with BDL significantly decreased the levels of GSH, T-AOC as well as SOD, GSH-Px activities, and upregulated MDA levels. The changes could be mapped to metabolism of amino acids and lipids, Krebs cycle and glycolysis, as well as increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant capability. Our study indicated that BDL induces major changes in the metabolism of all 3 major energy substances, as well as oxidative stress.

  1. Modulation of lipid metabolism in glycyrrhizic acid-treated rats fed on a high-calorie diet and exposed to short or long-term stress.

    PubMed

    Yaw, Hui Ping; Ton, So Ha; Chin, Hsien-Fei; Karim, Muhammad Kaiser Abdul; Fernando, Hamish Alexander; Kadir, Khalid Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Stress and high-calorie diets increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) has been shown to improve dyslipidaemia in rats fed on a high-calorie diet. This study aimed to examine the effects of GA on lipid metabolism in rats exposed to short- or long-term stress and on a high-calorie diet. The parameters examined included serum lipid profiles, serum free fatty acids and fatty acid profiles in tissues, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), elongases and desaturases. Within the 14- or 28-day exposure groups, neither stress nor GA affected the lipid profile and serum free fatty acids. Stress did not affect PPAR-α expression in both the 14- and 28-day exposure groups. However, GA-treated rats from the former group had increased PPAR-α expression only in the kidney while all other tissues from the latter group were unaffected. Stress increased PPAR-γ expression in the heart of the 28-day exposure group but its expression was unaffected in all tissues of the 14-day exposure group. GA elevated PPAR-γ expression in the kidney and the skeletal muscles. Neither stress nor GA affected LPL expressions in all tissues from the 14-day exposure group but its expressions were elevated in the QF of the stressed rats and heart of the GA-treated rats of the 28-day exposure group. As for the elongases and desaturases in the liver, stress down-regulated ELOVL5 in the long-term exposure group while up-regulated ELOVL6 in the short-term exposure group while hepatic desaturases were unaffected by stress. Neither elongase nor desaturase expressions in the liver were affected by GA. This research is the first report of GA on lipid metabolism under stress and high-calorie diet conditions and the results gives evidence for the role of GA in ameliorating MetS via site-specific regulation of lipid metabolism gene expressions and modification of fatty acids.

  2. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted.

  3. Fish oil and 3-thia fatty acid have additive effects on lipid metabolism but antagonistic effects on oxidative damage when fed to rats for 50 weeks.

    PubMed

    Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Cacabelos, Daniel; Burri, Lena; Berge, Kjetil; Wergedahl, Hege; Christensen, Bjørn; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Viste, Asgaut; Pamplona, Reinald; Berge, Rolf Kristian; Bjørndal, Bodil

    2012-11-01

    The 3-thia fatty acid tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a synthetic modified fatty acid, which, similar with dietary fish oil (FO), influences the regulation of lipid metabolism, the inflammatory response and redox status. This study was aimed to penetrate the difference in TTA's mode of action compared to FO in a long-term experiment (50 weeks of feeding). Male Wistar rats were fed a control, high-fat (25% w/v) diet or a high-fat diet supplemented with either TTA (0.375% w/v) or FO (10% w/v) or their combination. Plasma fatty acid composition, hepatic lipids and expression of relevant genes in the liver and biomarkers of oxidative damage to protein were assessed at the end point of the experiment. Both supplements given in combination demonstrated an additive effect on the decrease in plasma cholesterol levels. The FO diet alone led to removal of plasma cholesterol and a concurrent cholesterol accumulation in liver; however, with TTA cotreatment, the hepatic cholesterol level was significantly reduced. Dietary FO supplementation led to an increased oxidative damage, as seen by biomarkers of protein oxidation and lipoxidation. Tetradecylthioacetic acid administration reduced the levels of these biomarkers confirming its protective role against lipoxidation and protein oxidative damage. Our findings explore the lipid reducing effects of TTA and FO and demonstrate that these bioactive dietary compounds might act in a different manner. The experiment confirms the antioxidant capacity of TTA, showing an improvement in FO-induced oxidative stress.

  4. A hepatic amino acid/mTOR/S6K-dependent signalling pathway modulates systemic lipid metabolism via neuronal signals

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kenji; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Kaneko, Keizo; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is coordinated among tissues and organs via neuronal signals. Levels of circulating amino acids (AAs), which are elevated in obesity, activate the intracellular target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1)/S6kinase (S6K) pathway in the liver. Here we demonstrate that hepatic AA/mTORC1/S6K signalling modulates systemic lipid metabolism via a mechanism involving neuronal inter-tissue communication. Hepatic expression of an AA transporter, SNAT2, activates the mTORC1/S6K pathway, and markedly elevates serum triglycerides (TGs), while downregulating adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic Rheb or active-S6K expression have similar metabolic effects, whereas hepatic expression of dominant-negative-S6K inhibits TG elevation in SNAT2 mice. Denervation, pharmacological deafferentation and β-blocker administration suppress obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia with adipose LPL upregulation, suggesting that signals are transduced between liver and adipose tissue via a neuronal pathway consisting of afferent vagal and efferent sympathetic nerves. Thus, the neuronal mechanism uncovered here serves to coordinate amino acid and lipid levels and contributes to the development of obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:26268630

  5. Effect of dietary alfalfa on the fatty acid composition and indexes of lipid metabolism of rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, A; Mugnai, C; Roscini, V; Mattioli, S; Ruggeri, S; Castellini, C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse and increase the quality of rabbit meat by increasing the levels of natural bioactive compounds through providing fresh alfalfa to rabbits as complementary feed. At 50 days of age, forty rabbits were divided into two homogeneous groups and fed pelleted feed (control group) or pelleted feed plus fresh alfalfa (alfalfa group). The lipid content of meat was significantly higher in the control group likely due to the higher feed consumption observed in this group. The same trend was observed in the contents of myristic, palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acid. On the contrary, the supplementation of fresh alfalfa increased the stearic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and total polyunsaturated fatty acid contents; also the total monounsaturated fatty acids and the α- and γ-tocopherol content was significantly lower. Moreover, alfalfa ingestion decreased the n-6 content, n-6/n-3 ratio and thrombogenicity index.

  6. Red clover polyphenol oxidase and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, G; Lee, M R F; Fievez, V

    2011-02-01

    Increasing the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of milk is acknowledged to be of benefit to consumer health. Despite the high PUFA content of forages, milk fat contains only about 3% of PUFA and only about 0.5% of n-3 fatty acids. This is mainly due to intensive lipid metabolism in the rumen (lipolysis and biohydrogenation) and during conservation (lipolysis and oxidation) such as drying (hay) and ensiling (silage). In red clover, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been suggested to protect lipids against degradation, both in the silage as well as in the rumen, leading to a higher output of PUFA in ruminant products (meat and milk). PPO mediates the oxidation of phenols and diphenols to quinones, which will readily react with nucleophilic binding sites. Such binding sites can be found on proteins, resulting in the formation of protein-bound phenols. This review summarizes the different methods that have been used to assess PPO activity in red clover, and an overview on the current understanding of PPO activity and activation in red clover. Knowledge on these aspects is of major importance to fully harness PPO's lipid-protecting role. Furthermore, we review the studies that evidence PPO-mediated lipid protection and discuss its possible importance in lab-scale silages and further in an in vitro rumen system. It is demonstrated that high (induction of) PPO activity can lead to lower lipolysis in the silage and lower biohydrogenation in the rumen. There are three hypotheses on its working mechanism: (i) protein-bound phenols could directly bind to enzymes (e.g. lipases) as such inhibiting them; (ii) binding of quinones in and between proteins embedded in a lipid membrane (e.g. in the chloroplast) could lead to encapsulation of the lipids; (iii) direct binding of quinones to nucleophilic sites in polar lipids also could lead to protection. There is no exclusive evidence on which mechanism is most important, although there are strong indications that only lipid

  7. Lipid metabolism during bacterial growth, sporulation, and germination: kinetics of fatty acid and macromolecular synthesis during spore germination and outgrowth of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, K W; De Pinto, J; Bulla, L A

    1975-01-01

    The timing and kinetics of fatty acid synthesis are delineated for Bacillus thuringiensis spore germination and outgrowth by analyzing [U-14C]acetate and [2-3H]glycerol incorporation into chloroform-methanol-extractable and trichloroacetic acid-precipitable lipids. In addition to measurement of pulsed and continuous labeling of fatty acids, monitoring the incorporation of radioactive phenylalanine, thymidine, and uridine from the onset of germination through first cell division provides a profile of biochemical activities related to membrane differentiation and cellular development. Upon germination, ribonucleic acid synthesis is initiated, immediately followed by rapid and extensive fatty acid synthesis that in turn precedes protein, deoxyribonucleic acid and triglyceride synthesis. Significantly, formation of fatty acids from acetate exhibits further developmental periodicity in which a large transient increase in fatty acid synthetic activity coincides with the approach of cell division. Radiorespirometric analyses indicates only slight oxidative decarboxylation of acetate and corroborates the extreme involvement of acetate in specific fatty acid biosynthetic reactions throughout cellular modification. These findings graphically demonstrate an intimate association of fatty acid metabolism with commitment to spore outgrowth and subsequent cell division.

  8. Influence of the dietary protein:lipid ratio and fish oil substitution on fatty acid composition and metabolism of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reared at high water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Karalazos, Vasileios; Bendiksen, Eldar Å; Dick, James R; Tocher, Douglas R; Bell, John Gordon

    2011-04-01

    A factorial, two-way, experimental design was used for this 10-week nutritional trial, aiming to elucidate the interactive effects of decreasing dietary protein:lipid level and substitution of fish oil (FO) with rapeseed oil (RO) on tissue fatty acid (FA) composition and metabolism of large Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) reared at high water temperatures (sub-optimal, summer temperatures: 11·6°C). The six experimental diets were isoenergetic and formulated to include either FO or RO (60 % of the added oil) at three dietary protein:lipid levels, specifically (1) 350 g/kg protein and 350 g/kg lipid, (2) 330 g/kg protein and 360 g/kg lipid, (3) 290 g/kg protein and 380 g/kg lipid. Final weight, specific growth rate and thermal growth coefficient were positively affected by the dietary RO inclusion at the expense of FO, while no significant effects were seen on growth due to the decreasing protein level. The oil source had a significant effect on muscle and liver FA composition. However, the changes in muscle and liver FA indicate selective utilisation or retention of individual FA and moderate reductions in tissue EPA and DHA. Pyloric caeca phospholipid FA composition was significantly affected by the two factors and, in some cases, significant interactions were also revealed. Liver and red muscle β-oxidation capacities were significantly increased due to RO inclusion, while an interactive effect of protein level and oil source was shown for white muscle β-oxidation capacity. The results could explain, at least partially, the better performance that was shown for the RO groups and the enhanced protein-sparing effect.

  9. The Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Choline and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Noriko; Wildes, Flonné; Takagi, Tomoyo; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    An increase of cellular phosphocholine (PC) and total choline (tCho)-containing compounds as well as alterations in lipids have been consistently observed in cancer cells and tissue. These metabolic changes are closely related to malignant transformation, invasion, and metastasis. The study of cancer cells in culture plays an important role in understanding mechanisms leading to altered choline (Cho) and lipid metabolism in cancer, as it provides a carefully controlled environment. However, a solid tumor is a complex system with a unique tumor microenvironment frequently containing hypoxic and acidic regions and areas of nutrient deprivation and necrosis. Cancer cell–stromal cell interactions and the extracellular matrix may also alter Cho and lipid metabolism. Human tumor xenograft models in mice are useful to mimic the growth of human cancers and provide insights into the influence of in vivo conditions on metabolism. Here, we have compared metabolites, obtained with high resolution 1H MRS of extracts from human breast and prostate cancer cells in a 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture and from solid tumor xenografts derived from these cells, as well as the protein expression of enzymes that regulate Cho and lipid metabolism. Our data demonstrate significant differences in Cho and lipid metabolism and protein expression patterns between human breast and prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumors derived from these cells. These data highlight the influence of the tumor microenvironment on Cho and lipid metabolism. PMID:28066718

  10. Sirtuins in glucose and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Li, Meiting; Hou, Tianyun; Gao, Tian; Zhu, Wei-guo; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved protein, serving as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylases or adenosine diphosphate-ribosyltransferases. The mammalian sirtuins family, including SIRT1~7, is involved in many biological processes such as cell survival, proliferation, senescence, stress response, genome stability and metabolism. Evidence accumulated over the past two decades has indicated that sirtuins not only serve as important energy status sensors but also protect cells against metabolic stresses. In this review, we summarize the background of glucose and lipid metabolism concerning sirtuins and discuss the functions of sirtuins in glucose and lipid metabolism. We also seek to highlight the biological roles of certain sirtuins members in cancer metabolism. PMID:27659520

  11. Effects of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation in high-fat fed mice on lipid metabolism and apelin/APJ system in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Chantal; Pignalosa, Angelica; Wanecq, Estelle; Rancoule, Chloé; Batut, Aurélie; Deleruyelle, Simon; Lionetti, Lillà; Valet, Philippe; Castan-Laurell, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Various studies have shown that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has beneficial effects on obesity and associated disorders. Apelin, the ligand of APJ receptor also exerts insulin-sensitizing effects especially by improving muscle metabolism. EPA has been shown to increase apelin production in adipose tissue but its effects in muscle have not been addressed. Thus, the effects of EPA supplementation (36 g/kg EPA) in high-fat diet (HFD) (45% fat, 20% protein, 35% carbohydrate) were studied in mice with focus on muscle lipid metabolism and apelin/APJ expression. Compared with HFD mice, HFD+EPA mice had significantly less weight gain, fat mass, lower blood glucose, insulinemia and hepatic steatosis after 10 weeks of diet. In addition, EPA prevented muscle metabolism alterations since intramuscular triglycerides were decreased and β-oxidation increased. In soleus muscles of HFD+EPA mice, apelin and APJ expression were significantly increased compared to HFD mice. However, plasma apelin concentrations in HFD and HFD+EPA mice were similar. EPA-induced apelin expression was confirmed in differentiated C2C12 myocytes but in this model, apelin secretion was also increased in response to EPA treatment. In conclusion, EPA supplementation in HFD prevents obesity and metabolic alterations in mice, especially in skeletal muscle. Since EPA increases apelin/APJ expression in muscle, apelin may act in a paracrine/autocrine manner to contribute to these benefical effects.

  12. Diurnal regulation of lipid metabolism and applications of circadian lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin

    2014-05-20

    The circadian timing system plays a key role in orchestrating lipid metabolism. In concert with the solar cycle, the circadian system ensures that daily rhythms in lipid absorption, storage, and transport are temporally coordinated with rest-activity and feeding cycles. At the cellular level, genes involved in lipid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by core clock proteins in a tissue-specific manner. Consequently, loss of clock gene function or misalignment of circadian rhythms with feeding cycles (e.g., in shift work) results in impaired lipid homeostasis. Herein, we review recent progress in circadian rhythms research using lipidomics, i.e., large-scale profiling of lipid metabolites, to characterize circadian-regulated lipid pathways in mammals. In mice, novel regulatory circuits involved in fatty acid metabolism have been identified in adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. Extensive diversity in circadian regulation of plasma lipids has also been revealed in humans using lipidomics and other metabolomics approaches. In future studies, lipidomics platforms will be increasingly used to better understand the effects of genetic variation, shift work, food intake, and drugs on circadian-regulated lipid pathways and metabolic health.

  13. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  14. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  15. Digital Cushion Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Metabolism Gene Network Expression in Holstein Dairy Cows Fed a High-Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zeeshan Muhammad; Akbar, Haji; Hosseini, Afshin; Bichi Ruspoli Forteguerri, Elena; Osorio, Johan S.

    2016-01-01

    The hoof digital cushion is a complex structure composed of adipose tissue beneath the distal phalanx, i.e. axial, middle and abaxial fat pad. The major role of these fat depots is dampening compression of the corium underneath the cushion. The study aimed to determine expression of target genes and fatty acid profiles in the hoof of non-pregnant dry Holstein cows fed low (CON) or high-energy (OVE) diets. The middle fat pad of the hoof digital cushion was collected soon after slaughter. Despite the lack of effect on expression of the transcription regulators SREBF1 and PPARG, the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACACA, FASN, SCD, and DGAT2 was upregulated with OVE. Along with the upregulation of G6PD and IDH1, important for NADPH synthesis during lipogenesis, and the basal glucose transporter SLC2A1, these data indicated a pro-lipogenic response in the digital cushion with OVE. The expression of the lipid droplet-associated protein PLIN2 was upregulated while expression of lipolytic enzymes (ATGL, ABDH5, and LIPE) only tended to be upregulated with OVE. Therefore, OVE induced lipogenesis, lipid droplet formation, and lipolysis, albeit to different extents. Although concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) did not differ, among the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), the concentration of 20:5n3 was lower with OVE. Among the saturated fatty acids, 20:0 concentration was greater with OVE. Although data indicated that the hoof digital cushion metabolic transcriptome is responsive to higher-energy diets, this did not translate into marked differences in the fatty acid composition. The decrease in concentration of PUFA, which could contribute to synthesis of inflammatory molecules, in OVE-fed cows indicated that feeding higher-energy diets might be detrimental for the mediation of inflammation in digital cushion. This effect could be further exacerbated by physiologic and endocrine changes during the peripartal period that favor inflammation. PMID:27441691

  16. Increased beta-oxidation in muscle cells enhances insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and protects against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance despite intramyocellular lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, German; Commerford, S Renee; Richard, Ann-Marie T; Adams, Sean H; Corkey, Barbara E; O'Doherty, Robert M; Brown, Nicholas F

    2004-06-25

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance may be aggravated by intramyocellular accumulation of fatty acid-derived metabolites that inhibit insulin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced fatty acid oxidation in myocytes should protect against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance by limiting lipid accumulation. L6 myotubes were transduced with adenoviruses encoding carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) isoforms or beta-galactosidase (control). Two to 3-fold overexpression of L-CPT I, the endogenous isoform in L6 cells, proportionally increased oxidation of the long-chain fatty acids palmitate and oleate and increased insulin stimulation of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen by 60% while enhancing insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Incubation of control cells with 0.2 mm palmitate for 18 h caused accumulation of triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and ceramide (but not long-chain acyl-CoA) and decreased insulin-stimulated [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen (60%), [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (60%), and protein kinase B phosphorylation (20%). In the context of L-CPT I overexpression, palmitate preincubation produced a relative decrease in insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen (60%) and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (40%) but did not inhibit phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Due to the enhancement of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism induced by L-CPT I overexpression itself, net insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake in L-CPT I-transduced, palmitate-treated cells were significantly greater than in palmitate-treated control cells (71 and 75% greater, respectively). However, L-CPT I overexpression failed to decrease intracellular triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, ceramide, or long-chain acyl-CoA. We propose that accelerated beta-oxidation in muscle cells exerts an insulin-sensitizing effect independently of changes in intracellular lipid content.

  17. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  18. Influence of dietary fat on metabolism of (14-14C)erucic acid in the perfused rat liver. Distribution of metabolites in lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Hølmer, G; Rønneberg, R

    1986-06-01

    Two groups of rats were fed diets containing 20% by weight of either partially hydrogenated marine oil supplemented with sunflower seed oil (PHMO) or palm oil (PO) for 8 wk. Using a liver perfusion system, the effect of dietary long chain monoenoic fatty acids on the uptake and metabolism of [14-14C]erucic acid was studied. The perfusion times were 15 and 60 min, respectively. The two groups showed equal ability for erucic acid uptake in the liver but differed in the channeling of the fatty acids into various metabolic pathways. A higher metabolic turnover of 22:1 in the PHMO livers relative to the PO livers was demonstrated by an increased recovery of total [14C]labeling in the triglyceride (TG) and phospholipid (PL) fractions, already evident after 15 min of perfusion. The chain-shortening capacity was highest in the PHMO group, reflected by a higher [14C]18:1 incorporation in both TG and PL, and increasing from 15 to 60 min of perfusion. The amount of [14C]18:1 found in PL and TG after 60 min of perfusion of livers from rats fed PO corresponded to that shown for the PHMO group after 15 min. The PL demonstrated a discrimination against 22:1 compared to TG, and, when available, 18:1 was highly preferred for PL-synthesis. The total fatty acid distribution in the TG, as determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC), reflected the composition of the dietary fats. In the total liver PL, 22:1 and 20:1 were present in negligible amounts, although the PHMO diet contained 12-13% of both 22:1 and 20:1. In the free fatty acid fraction (FFA), the major part of the radioactivity (approximately 80%) was [14-14C]erucic acid, and only small amounts of [14C]18:1 (less than 2%) were present, even after 60 min of perfusion. The shortened-chain 18:1 was readily removed from the FFA pool and preferentially used for lipid esterification.

  19. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli

  20. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli-type chickpeas, which are

  1. Subclinical hypothyroidism, lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Maioli, Margherita; Delitala, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined by elevated serum thyrotropin in presence of normal free thyroid hormones. Lipid metabolism is influenced by thyroid hormone and many reports showed that lipids status worsen along with TSH level. Subclinical hypothyroidism has been also linked to other cardiovascular risk factors such as alteration in blood pressure and increased atherosclerosis. Further evidences suggested that mild dysfunction of thyroid gland is associated with metabolic syndrome and heart failure. Thyrotropin level seems the best predictor of cardiovascular disease, in particular when its levels are above 10mU/L. However, despite these observations, there is no clear evidence that levothyroxine therapy in subjects with milder form of subclinical hypothyroidism could improve lipid status and the other cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, we address the effect of thyroid hormone and cardiovascular risk, with a focus on lipid metabolism.

  2. Lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beloribi-Djefaflia, S; Vasseur, S; Guillaumond, F

    2016-01-01

    Many human diseases, including metabolic, immune and central nervous system disorders, as well as cancer, are the consequence of an alteration in lipid metabolic enzymes and their pathways. This illustrates the fundamental role played by lipids in maintaining membrane homeostasis and normal function in healthy cells. We reviewed the major lipid dysfunctions occurring during tumor development, as determined using systems biology approaches. In it, we provide detailed insight into the essential roles exerted by specific lipids in mediating intracellular oncogenic signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and bidirectional crosstalk between cells of the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Finally, we summarize the advances in ongoing research aimed at exploiting the dependency of cancer cells on lipids to abolish tumor progression. PMID:26807644

  3. Fatty acid binding protein 3 (fabp3) is associated with insulin, lipids and cardiovascular phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome through epigenetic modifications in a northern european family population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) play regulatory roles at the nexus of lipid metabolism and signaling. Dyslipidemia in clinical manifestation frequently co-occurs with obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Animal studies have suggested FABPs play regulatory roles in expressing MetS phenotypes. In our family cohort of Northern European descent, transcript levels in peripheral white blood cells (PWBCs) of a key FABPs, FABP3, is correlated with the MetS leading components. However, evidence supporting the functions of FABPs in humans using genetic approaches has been scarce, suggesting FABPs may be under epigenetic regulation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CpG methylation status of a key regulator of lipid homeostasis, FABP3, is a quantitative trait associated with status of MetS phenotypes in humans. Methods We used a mass-spec based quantitative method, EpiTYPER®, to profile a CpG island that extends from the promoter to the first exon of the FABP3 gene in our family-based cohort of Northern European descent (n=517). We then conducted statistical analysis of the quantitative relationship of CpG methylation and MetS measures following the variance-component association model. Heritability of each methylation and the effect of age and sex on CpG methylation were also assessed in our families. Results We find that methylation levels of individual CpG units and the regional average are heritable and significantly influenced by age and sex. Regional methylation was strongly associated with plasma total cholesterol (p=0.00028) and suggestively associated with LDL-cholesterol (p=0.00495). Methylation at individual units was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity, lipid particle sizing and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.0028, corrected for multiple testing for each trait). Peripheral white blood cell (PWBC) expression of FABP3 in a separate group of subjects (n=128) negatively

  4. Lipid metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terry K.; Bütikofer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei membranes consist of all major eukaryotic glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid classes. These are de novo synthesized from precursors obtained either from the host or from catabolised endocytosed lipids. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterisation of several of these lipid biosynthetic pathways, using gene knockout or RNA interference strategies or by enzymatic characterization of individual reactions. Together with the completed genome, these studies have highlighted several possible differences between mammalian and trypanosome lipid biosynthesis that could be exploited for the development of drugs against the diseases caused by these parasites. PMID:20382188

  5. Effects of dietary α-lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, and sex on antioxidative ability, energy, and lipid metabolism in broilers.

    PubMed

    Jia, R; Bao, Y H; Zhang, Y; Ji, C; Zhao, L H; Zhang, J Y; Gao, C Q; Ma, Q G

    2014-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary α-lipoic acid (LA), acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC), and sex on antioxidative ability, energy, and lipid metabolism in broilers. A total of 972 one-day-old broilers with equal sex were randomly assigned in a 3 × 3 × 2 factorial design using 3 LA, 3 ALC levels, and 2 sexes (6 replications, 9 birds/replication). The LA and ALC levels were 0, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Results showed that increased LA or ALC resulted in increased total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and decreased levels of malondialdehyde in serum and liver of birds (P < 0.05). In addition, with increasing addition of LA or ALC, an increased (P < 0.01) level of insulin (Ins), as well as decreased (P < 0.05) levels of glucose and glucagon (Glu), were observed in serum of broilers. Total cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) levels decreased (P < 0.05) and nonesterified fatty acid, lipoprotein lipase, and lipase levels increased (P < 0.05) in serum with increased administration of LA or ALC. Moreover, a significant (P < 0.05) interaction of LA × ALC was observed for serum and liver SOD, serum GSH-Px, glucose, and TG levels. Birds fed diets containing 50 mg/kg of LA and 50 mg/kg of ALC had higher serum and liver SOD activities and lower serum glucose and TG levels than those fed diets containing 100 mg/kg of LA or ALC alone. The main effect of sex and all interactions among main effects (except LA × ALC) were not significant (P > 0.05) for all of the above parameters. Overall, the present data indicate that LA or ALC supplementation, or both, at low levels (50 or 100 mg/kg) improved antioxidative ability, energy metabolism, and lipid metabolism in broilers, and synergistic effects by the combined supplementation of LA and ALC were indicated by serum and liver SOD activities and serum glucose and TG levels.

  6. Conjugated linoleic acid versus high-oleic acid sunflower oil: effects on energy metabolism, glucose tolerance, blood lipids, appetite and body composition in regularly exercising individuals.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Estelle V; Goedecke, Julia H; Bluett, Kerry; Heggie, Kerry; Claassen, Amanda; Rae, Dale E; West, Sacha; Dugas, Jonathan; Dugas, Lara; Meltzeri, Shelly; Charlton, Karen; Mohede, Inge

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effects of 12 weeks of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation on body composition, RER, RMR, blood lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and appetite in exercising, normal-weight persons. In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, sixty-two non-obese subjects (twenty-five men, thirty-seven women) received either 3.9 g/d CLA or 3.9 g high-oleic acid sunflower oil for 12 weeks. Prior to and after 12 weeks of supplementation, oral glucose tolerance, blood lipid concentrations, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computerised tomography scans), RMR, resting and exercising RER and appetite were measured. There were no significant effects of CLA on body composition or distribution, RMR, RER or appetite. During the oral glucose tolerance tests, mean plasma insulin concentrations (0, 30, 120 min) were significantly lower (P= 0.04) in women who supplemented with CLA (24.3 (SD 9.7) to 20.4 (SD 8.5) microU/ml) compared to high-oleic acid sunflower oil control (23.7 (SD 9.8) to 26.0 (SD 8.8) microU/ml). Serum NEFA levels in response to oral glucose were attenuated in both men and women in the CLA (P=0.001) compared to control group. However, serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased in both groups and HDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased in women over 12 weeks (P=0.001, P=0.02, P=0.02, respectively). In conclusion, mixed-isomer CLA supplementation had a favourable effect on serum insulin and NEFA response to oral glucose in non-obese, regularly exercising women, but there were no CLA-specific effects on body composition, energy expenditure or appetite.

  7. Metabolic engineering of lipid catabolism increases microalgal lipid accumulation without compromising growth.

    PubMed

    Trentacoste, Emily M; Shrestha, Roshan P; Smith, Sarah R; Glé, Corine; Hartmann, Aaron C; Hildebrand, Mark; Gerwick, William H

    2013-12-03

    Biologically derived fuels are viable alternatives to traditional fossil fuels, and microalgae are a particularly promising source, but improvements are required throughout the production process to increase productivity and reduce cost. Metabolic engineering to increase yields of biofuel-relevant lipids in these organisms without compromising growth is an important aspect of advancing economic feasibility. We report that the targeted knockdown of a multifunctional lipase/phospholipase/acyltransferase increased lipid yields without affecting growth in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antisense-expressing knockdown strains 1A6 and 1B1 exhibited wild-type-like growth and increased lipid content under both continuous light and alternating light/dark conditions. Strains 1A6 and 1B1, respectively, contained 2.4- and 3.3-fold higher lipid content than wild-type during exponential growth, and 4.1- and 3.2-fold higher lipid content than wild-type after 40 h of silicon starvation. Analyses of fatty acids, lipid classes, and membrane stability in the transgenic strains suggest a role for this enzyme in membrane lipid turnover and lipid homeostasis. These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase lipid accumulation in eukaryotic microalgae without compromising growth.

  8. Metabolic engineering of lipid catabolism increases microalgal lipid accumulation without compromising growth

    PubMed Central

    Trentacoste, Emily M.; Shrestha, Roshan P.; Smith, Sarah R.; Glé, Corine; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Hildebrand, Mark; Gerwick, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Biologically derived fuels are viable alternatives to traditional fossil fuels, and microalgae are a particularly promising source, but improvements are required throughout the production process to increase productivity and reduce cost. Metabolic engineering to increase yields of biofuel-relevant lipids in these organisms without compromising growth is an important aspect of advancing economic feasibility. We report that the targeted knockdown of a multifunctional lipase/phospholipase/acyltransferase increased lipid yields without affecting growth in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antisense-expressing knockdown strains 1A6 and 1B1 exhibited wild-type–like growth and increased lipid content under both continuous light and alternating light/dark conditions. Strains 1A6 and 1B1, respectively, contained 2.4- and 3.3-fold higher lipid content than wild-type during exponential growth, and 4.1- and 3.2-fold higher lipid content than wild-type after 40 h of silicon starvation. Analyses of fatty acids, lipid classes, and membrane stability in the transgenic strains suggest a role for this enzyme in membrane lipid turnover and lipid homeostasis. These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase lipid accumulation in eukaryotic microalgae without compromising growth. PMID:24248374

  9. Physiology and pathophysiology of liver lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Pecere, Silvia; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Ojetti, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Liver lipid metabolism and its modulation are involved in many pathologic conditions, such as obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Metabolic disorders seem to share a similar background of low-grade chronic inflammation, even if the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to tissue and organ damage have not been completely clarified yet. The accumulation of neutral lipids in the liver is now recognized as a beneficial and protective mechanism; on the other hand, lipoperoxidation is involved in the development and progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The role of the gut microbiota in liver lipid metabolism has been the object of recent scientific investigations. It is likely that the gut microbiota is involved in a complex metabolic modulation and the translocation of gut microflora may also contribute to maintaining the low-grade inflammatory status of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, lipid metabolism pathology has vague limits and complex mechanisms, and the knowledge of these is essential to guide diagnostic and therapeutic decisions.

  10. Changing Metabolic Signatures of Amino Acids and Lipids During the Prediabetic Period in a Pig Model With Impaired Incretin Function and Reduced β-Cell Mass

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Simone; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Prehn, Cornelia; Krebs, Stefan; Adamski, Jerzy; Göke, Burkhard; Blum, Helmut; Suhre, Karsten; Roscher, Adelbert A.; Wolf, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is generally diagnosed too late. Therefore, biomarkers indicating early stages of β-cell dysfunction and mass reduction would facilitate timely counteraction. Transgenic pigs expressing a dominant-negative glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPRdn) reveal progressive deterioration of glucose control and reduction of β-cell mass, providing a unique opportunity to study metabolic changes during the prediabetic period. Plasma samples from intravenous glucose tolerance tests of 2.5- and 5-month-old GIPRdn transgenic and control animals were analyzed for 163 metabolites by targeted mass spectrometry. Analysis of variance revealed that 26 of 163 parameters were influenced by the interaction Genotype × Age (P ≤ 0.0001) and thus are potential markers for progression within the prediabetic state. Among them, the concentrations of seven amino acids (Phe, Orn, Val, xLeu, His, Arg, and Tyr) were increased in 2.5-month-old but decreased in 5-month-old GIPRdn transgenic pigs versus controls. Furthermore, specific sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, and ether phospholipids were decreased in plasma of 5-month-old GIPRdn transgenic pigs. Alterations in plasma metabolite concentrations were associated with liver transcriptome changes in relevant pathways. The concentrations of a number of plasma amino acids and lipids correlated significantly with β-cell mass of 5-month-old pigs. These metabolites represent candidate biomarkers of early phases of β-cell dysfunction and mass reduction. PMID:22492530

  11. Lipid metabolism in Rhodnius prolixus: Lessons from the genome.

    PubMed

    Majerowicz, David; Calderón-Fernández, Gustavo M; Alves-Bezerra, Michele; De Paula, Iron F; Cardoso, Lívia S; Juárez, M Patricia; Atella, Georgia C; Gondim, Katia C

    2017-01-05

    The kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus is both an important vector of Chagas' disease and an interesting model for investigation into the field of physiology, including lipid metabolism. The publication of this insect genome will bring a huge amount of new molecular biology data to be used in future experiments. Although this work represents a promising scenario, a preliminary analysis of the sequence data is necessary to identify and annotate the genes involved in lipid metabolism. Here, we used bioinformatics tools and gene expression analysis to explore genes from different genes families and pathways, including genes for fat breakdown, as lipases and phospholipases, and enzymes from β-oxidation, fatty acid metabolism, and acyl-CoA and glycerolipid synthesis. The R. prolixus genome encodes 31 putative lipase genes, including 21 neutral lipases and 5 acid lipases. The expression profiles of some of these genes were analyzed. We were able to identify nine phospholipase A2 genes. A variety of gene families that participate in fatty acid synthesis and modification were studied, including fatty acid synthase, elongase, desaturase and reductase. Concerning the synthesis of glycerolipids, we found a second isoform of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase that was ubiquitously expressed throughout the organs. Finally, all genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation were identified, but not a long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. These results provide fundamental data to be used in future research on insect lipid metabolism and its possible relevance to Chagas' disease transmission.

  12. Disorders of muscle lipid metabolism: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Laforêt, Pascal; Vianey-Saban, Christine

    2010-11-01

    Disorders of muscle lipid metabolism may involve intramyocellular triglyceride degradation, carnitine uptake, long-chain fatty acids mitochondrial transport, or fatty acid β-oxidation. Three main diseases leading to permanent muscle weakness are associated with severe increased muscle lipid content (lipid storage myopathies): primary carnitine deficiency, neutral lipid storage disease and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. A moderate lipidosis may be observed in fatty acid oxidation disorders revealed by rhabdomyolysis episodes such as carnitine palmitoyl transferase II, very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiencies, and in recently described phosphatidic acid phosphatase deficiency. Respiratory chain disorders and congenital myasthenic syndromes may also be misdiagnosed as fatty acid oxidation disorders due to the presence of secondary muscle lipidosis. The main biochemical tests giving clues for the diagnosis of these various disorders are measurements of blood carnitine and acylcarnitines, urinary organic acid profile, and search for intracytoplasmic lipid on peripheral blood smear (Jordan's anomaly). Genetic analysis orientated by the results of biochemical investigation allows establishing a firm diagnosis. Primary carnitine deficiency and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency may be treated after supplementation with carnitine, riboflavine and coenzyme Q10. New therapeutic approaches for fatty acid oxidation disorders are currently developed, based on pharmacological treatment with bezafibrate, and specific diets enriched in medium-chain triglycerides or triheptanoin.

  13. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling.

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid modulates the enterocyte Caco-2 cell expression of MicroRNAs involved in lipid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of the long-chain omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and greater chemoprevention. However, the mechanisms underlying the biologic effects of DHA remain unknown. It is well known that microRNAs (m...

  15. Fatty acids and retinoids control lipid metabolism through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-retinoid X receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, H; Dreyer, C; Medin, J; Mahfoudi, A; Ozato, K; Wahli, W

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptors called PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha, beta, and gamma) regulate the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids by induction of the acyl-CoA oxidase gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of the pathway. Gel retardation and cotransfection assays revealed that PPAR alpha heterodimerizes with retinoid X receptor beta (RXR beta; RXR is the receptor for 9-cis-retinoic acid) and that the two receptors cooperate for the activation of the acyl-CoA oxidase gene promoter. The strongest stimulation of this promoter was obtained when both receptors were exposed simultaneously to their cognate activators. Furthermore, we show that natural fatty acids, and especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, activate PPARs as potently as does the hypolipidemic drug Wy 14,643, the most effective activator known so far. Moreover, we discovered that the synthetic arachidonic acid analogue 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid is 100 times more effective than Wy 14,643 in the activation of PPAR alpha. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a convergence of the PPAR and RXR signaling pathways in the regulation of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids by fatty acids and retinoids. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8384714

  16. Yeast and cancer cells - common principles in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Natter, Klaus; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2013-02-01

    One of the paradigms in cancer pathogenesis is the requirement of a cell to undergo transformation from respiration to aerobic glycolysis - the Warburg effect - to become malignant. The demands of a rapidly proliferating cell for carbon metabolites for the synthesis of biomass, energy and redox equivalents, are fundamentally different from the requirements of a differentiated, quiescent cell, but it remains open whether this metabolic switch is a cause or a consequence of malignant transformation. One of the major requirements is the synthesis of lipids for membrane formation to allow for cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. Enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were indeed found to play a major role in cancer cell proliferation, and most of these enzymes are conserved in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most notably, cancer cell physiology and metabolic fluxes are very similar to those in the fermenting and rapidly proliferating yeast. Both types of cells display highly active pathways for the synthesis of fatty acids and their incorporation into complex lipids, and imbalances in synthesis or turnover of lipids affect growth and viability of both yeast and cancer cells. Thus, understanding lipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae during cell cycle progression and cell proliferation may complement recent efforts to understand the importance and fundamental regulatory mechanisms of these pathways in cancer.

  17. Ultraviolet and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine induced random mutagenesis in Chlorella vulgaris and its impact on fatty acid profile: a new insight on lipid-metabolizing genes and structural characterization of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Josephine; Rangamaran, Vijaya Raghavan; Gopal, Dharani; Shivasankarasubbiah, Kumar T; Thilagam, Mary Leema J; Peter Dhassiah, Magesh; Padinjattayil, Divya Shridhar M; Valsalan, VinithKumar N; Manambrakat, Vijayakumaran; Dakshinamurthy, Sivakumar; Thirunavukkarasu, Sivaraman; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran

    2015-02-01

    The present study was aimed at randomly mutating the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in order to alter its cellular behaviour towards increased lipid production for efficient biodiesel production from algal biomass. Individual mutants from ultraviolet light (UV-1 (30 s exposure), UV-2 (60 s exposure) and UV-3 (90 s exposure)) and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine (5'FDU-1 (0.25 mM) and 5'FDU-2 (0.50 mM)) exposed cells were identified to explore an alternative method for lipid enhancement. A marginally significant decrease in biomass in the UV mutants; marked increase in the lipid content in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 mutants; significant increase in saturated fatty acids level, especially in UV-2 mutant; insignificant increase in lipid production when these mutants were subjected to an additional stress of nitrogen starvation and predominantly enhanced level of unsaturated fatty acids in all the strains except UV-2 were noted. Chloroplast ultrastructural alterations and defective biosynthesis of chloroplast specific lipid constituents were observed in the mutants. Modelling of three-dimensional structures of acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase), omega-6, plastid delta-12 and microsomal delta-12 fatty acid desaturases for the first time and ligand-interaction studies greatly substantiated our findings. A replacement of leucine by a serine residue in the acetyl coA carboxylase gene of UV-2 mutant suggests the reason behind lipid enhancement in UV-2 mutant. Higher activity of ACCase in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 strongly proves the functional consequences of gene mutation to lipid production. In conclusion, algal mutants exhibited significant impact on biodiesel production through structural alterations in the lipid-metabolizing genes, thereby enhancing lipid production and saturated fatty acid levels.

  18. Alteration in metabolic signature and lipid metabolism in patients with angina pectoris and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Yeon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Shin, Min-Jeong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolites are indispensable regulators of physiological and pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the complex changes in lipid metabolites and metabolism that occur in patients with these conditions are incompletely understood. We performed lipid profiling to identify alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI). Global lipid profiling was applied to serum samples from patients with CAD (angina and MI) and age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy subjects using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. A multivariate analysis showed a clear separation between the patients with CAD and normal controls. Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (lysoPE) species containing unsaturated fatty acids and free fatty acids were associated with an increased risk of CAD, whereas species of lysoPC and lyso-alkyl PC containing saturated fatty acids were associated with a decreased risk. Additionally, PC species containing palmitic acid, diacylglycerol, sphingomyelin, and ceramide were associated with an increased risk of MI, whereas PE-plasmalogen and phosphatidylinositol species were associated with a decreased risk. In MI patients, we found strong positive correlation between lipid metabolites related to the sphingolipid pathway, sphingomyelin, and ceramide and acute inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). The results of this study demonstrate altered signatures in lipid metabolism in patients with angina or MI. Lipidomic profiling could provide the information to identity the specific lipid metabolites under the presence of disturbed metabolic pathways in patients with CAD.

  19. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  20. Effect of Salvianolic Acid b and Paeonol on Blood Lipid Metabolism and Hemorrheology in Myocardial Ischemia Rabbits Induced by Pituitruin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Wang, Siwang; Xie, Yanhua; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Liu, Wenbo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of salvianolic acid b and paeonol on coronary disease. The ischemia myocardial animal model is induced by administering pituitrin (20 μg·kg−1) intravenously via the abdominal vein. A combination of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (CSAP) (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) was administrated to experimental rabbits. Biochemical indices were evaluated during six weeks of intervention. We found that the compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can markedly and dose-dependently reduce fibrinogen and malonaldehyde levels, increase the HDL level, improve blood viscosity and plasma viscosity in rabbits. In addition, the medicine can still reduce the ratio of NO/ET and the contents of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates that compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can improve the blood hemorrheology, decrease oxidative injury and repair the function of blood vessel endothelium, and subsequently prevent the development of Coronary disease. PMID:21152295

  1. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  2. A novel physiological role for cardiac myoglobin in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Esfeld, Sonja; Coman, Cristina; Ahrends, Robert; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Flögel, Ulrich; Rassaf, Tienush; Totzeck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Continuous contractile activity of the heart is essential and the required energy is mostly provided by fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Myocardial lipid accumulation can lead to pathological responses, however the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The role of myoglobin in dioxygen binding in cardiomyocytes and oxidative skeletal muscle has widely been appreciated. Our recent work established myoglobin as a protector of cardiac function in hypoxia and disease states. We here unravel a novel role of cardiac myoglobin in governing FA metabolism to ensure the physiological energy production through β-oxidation, preventing myocardial lipid accumulation and preserving cardiac functions. In vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy unveils a 3-fold higher deposition of lipids in mouse hearts lacking myoglobin, which was associated with depressed cardiac function compared to wild-type hearts as assessed by echocardiography. Mass spectrometry reveals a marked increase in tissue triglycerides with preferential incorporation of palmitic and oleic acids. Phospholipid levels as well as the metabolome, transcriptome and proteome related to FA metabolism tend to be unaffected by myoglobin ablation. Our results reveal a physiological role of myoglobin in FA metabolism with the lipid accumulation-suppressing effects of myoglobin preventing cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:28230173

  3. Lipid metabolism in response to individual short chain fatty acids during mixotrophic mode of microalgal cultivation: Influence on biodiesel saturation and protein profile.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Arora, Somya; Rohit, M V; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    Critical influence of different short chain fatty acids as organic carbon source, during growth (GP) and nutrient stress lipogenic phase (NSLP) was investigated on biomass and lipid productivity, in mixotrophic fed-batch microalgae cultivation. Nutrient deprivation induced physiological stress stimulated highest lipid productivity with acetate (total/neutral lipids, 35/17) with saturation index of 80.53% by the end of NSLP followed by butyrate (12/7%; 78%). Biomass growth followed the order of acetate (2.23 g/l) >butyrate (0.99 g/l) >propionate (0.77 g/l). VFA removal (as COD) was maximum with acetate (87%) followed by butyrate (55.09%) and propionate (10.60%). Palmitic acid was the most dominant fatty acid found in the fatty acid composition of all variants and butyrate fed system yielded a maximum of 44% palmitic acid. Protein profiling illustrated prominence of acetyl CoA-synthetase activity in acetate system. Thus, fatty acids provide a promising alternative feedstock for biodiesel production with integrated microalgae-biorefinery.

  4. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  5. Retinal lipid and glucose metabolism dictates angiogenesis through lipid sensor Ffar1

    PubMed Central

    Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Sun, Ye; Gantner, Marin L.; Shao, Zhuo; Evans, Lucy P.; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Burnim, Samuel; Kim, Jin Sung; Patel, Gauri; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Hatton, Colman J.; Cui, Zhenghao; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bherer, Patrick; Aguilar, Edith; Powner, Michael B.; Vevis, Kristis; Boisvert, Michel; Fu, Zhongjie; Levy, Emile; Fruttiger, Marcus; Packard, Alan; Rezende, Flavio A.; Maranda, Bruno; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Chen, Jing; Friedlander, Martin; Clish, Clary B.; Smith, Lois E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues with high metabolic rates often use lipid as well as glucose for energy, conferring a survival advantage during feast and famine.1 Current dogma suggests that high-energy consuming photoreceptors depend on glucose.2,3 Here we show that retina also uses fatty acids (FA) β-oxidation for energy. Moreover, we identify a lipid sensor Ffar1 that curbs glucose uptake when FA are available. Very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), expressed in tissues with a high metabolic rate, facilitates the uptake of triglyceride-derived FA.4,5 Vldlr is present in photoreceptors.6 In Vldlr−/− retinas, Ffar1, sensing high circulating lipid levels despite decreased FA uptake5, suppresses glucose transporter Glut1. This impaired glucose entry into photoreceptors results in a dual lipid/glucose fuel shortage and reduction in the Krebs cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (KG). Low α-KG levels promote hypoxia-induced factor-1α (Hif1a) stabilization and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) secretion by starved Vldlr−/− photoreceptors, attracting neovessels to supply fuel. These aberrant vessels invading normally avascular photoreceptors in Vldlr−/− retinas are reminiscent of retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP), a subset of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)7, associated with high vitreous VEGF levels in humans. Dysregulated lipid and glucose photoreceptor energy metabolism may therefore be a driving force in neovascular AMD and other retinal diseases. PMID:26974308

  6. High molecular weight poly-gamma-glutamic acid regulates lipid metabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet and humans.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Ho; Choi, Jae-Chul; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kang, Jae-Heon; Chang, Moon-Jeong

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effect of high molecular weight polygamma- glutamic acid (hm gamma-PGA) on adiposity and lipid metabolism of rats in the presence of an obesity-inducing diet. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a normal-fat (11.4% kcal fat, NFC) or high-fat (51% kcal fat, HFC) diet. After 5 weeks, half of each diet-fed group was treated with hm gamma-PGA (NFP or HFP) for 4 weeks. The HFC group had significantly higher body weight, visceral fat mass, fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and leptin, and lower serum HDL cholesterol level compared with those of the NFC group (p < 0.05). Treatment with hm gamma-PGA decreased body weight gain and perirenal fat mass (p<0.05), fasting serum total cholesterol, and mRNA expression of glucose-6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), regardless of dietary fat contents (p < 0.01). However, hm gamma-PGA increased serum HDL cholesterol in the HFC group (p < 0.05). In vitro, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A (HMGCoA) reductase activity was suppressed by the addition of hm gamma-PGA. In agreement with observations in animal study, the supplementation of hm gamma-PGA (150 mg/day) to 20 female subjects in an 8-week double-blind, placebocontrolled study resulted in a tendency to decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol concentrations. We thus conclude that dietary supplementation of hm gamma-PGA may act as a hypocholestrolemic agent, secondary to its inhibitor effect on HMG-CoA reductase, and decrease abdominal adiposity by decreasing hepatic lipogenesis. The present study is an important first step in establishing the effect of hm gamma-PGA on cholesterol levels in rats and humans.

  7. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1.

  8. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1.

  9. Lipid metabolism and tissue composition in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)--effects of capelin oil, palm oil, and oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil as dietary lipid sources.

    PubMed

    Torstensen, B E; Lie, O; Frøyland, L

    2000-06-01

    Triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) were fed four diets containing different oils as the sole lipid source, i.e., capelin oil, oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil, a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of capelin oil and oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil, and palm oil (PO). The beta-oxidation capacity, protein utilization, digestibility of dietary fatty acids and fatty acid composition of lipoproteins, plasma, liver, belly flap, red and white muscle were measured. Further, the lipid class and protein levels in the lipoproteins were analyzed. The different dietary fatty acid compositions did not significantly affect protein utilization or beta-oxidation capacity in red muscle. The levels of total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and protein in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and plasma were not significantly affected by the dietary fatty acids. VLDL, LDL, and HDL fatty acid compositions were decreasingly affected by dietary fatty acid composition. Dietary fatty acid composition significantly affected both the relative fatty acid composition and the amount of fatty acids (mg fatty acid per g tissue, wet weight) in belly flap, liver, red and white muscle. Apparent digestibility of the fatty acids, measured by adding yttrium oxide as inert marker, was significantly lower in fish fed the PO diet compared to the other three diets.

  10. Dietary Salba (Salvia hispanica L) seed rich in α-linolenic acid improves adipose tissue dysfunction and the altered skeletal muscle glucose and lipid metabolism in dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M E; Ferreira, M R; Chicco, A; Lombardo, Y B

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the effect of dietary Salba (chia) seed rich in n-3 α-linolenic acid on the morphological and metabolic aspects involved in adipose tissue dysfunction and the mechanisms underlying the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in the skeletal muscle of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD). Rats were fed a SRD for 3 months. Thereafter, half the rats continued with SRD while in the other half, corn oil (CO) was replaced by chia seed for 3 months (SRD+chia). In control group, corn starch replaced sucrose. The replacement of CO by chia seed in the SRD reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, cell volume and size distribution, improved lipogenic enzyme activities, lipolysis and the anti-lipolytic action of insulin. In the skeletal muscle lipid storage, glucose phosphorylation and oxidation were normalized. Chia seed reversed the impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthase activity, glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate and GLUT-4 protein levels as well as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia.

  11. Fatty Acids from Membrane Lipids Become Incorporated into Lipid Bodies during Myxococcus xanthus Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Swapna; Boynton, Tye O.; Pham, Dan; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to amino acid limitation by producing fruiting bodies containing dormant spores. During development, cells produce triacylglycerides in lipid bodies that become consumed during spore maturation. As the cells are starved to induce development, the production of triglycerides represents a counterintuitive metabolic switch. In this paper, lipid bodies were quantified in wild-type strain DK1622 and 33 developmental mutants at the cellular level by measuring the cross sectional area of the cell stained with the lipophilic dye Nile red. We provide five lines of evidence that triacylglycerides are derived from membrane phospholipids as cells shorten in length and then differentiate into myxospores. First, in wild type cells, lipid bodies appear early in development and their size increases concurrent with an 87% decline in membrane surface area. Second, developmental mutants blocked at different stages of shortening and differentiation accumulated lipid bodies proportionate with their cell length with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.76. Third, peripheral rods, developing cells that do not produce lipid bodies, fail to shorten. Fourth, genes for fatty acid synthesis are down-regulated while genes for fatty acid degradation are up regulated. Finally, direct movement of fatty acids from membrane lipids in growing cells to lipid bodies in developing cells was observed by pulse labeling cells with palmitate. Recycling of lipids released by Programmed Cell Death appears not to be necessary for lipid body production as a fadL mutant was defective in fatty acid uptake but proficient in lipid body production. The lipid body regulon involves many developmental genes that are not specifically involved in fatty acid synthesis or degradation. MazF RNA interferase and its target, enhancer-binding protein Nla6, appear to negatively regulate cell shortening and TAG accumulation whereas most cell-cell signals activate these processes. PMID:24906161

  12. Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism by Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Wei, Jie; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StARD2) binds phosphatidylcholines and catalyzes their intermembrane transfer and exchange in vitro. The structure of PC-TP comprises a hydrophobic pocket and a well-defined head-group binding site, and its gene expression is regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α. Recent studies have revealed key regulatory roles for PC-TP in lipid and glucose metabolism. Notably, Pctp−/− mice are sensitized to insulin action and exhibit more efficient brown fat-mediated thermogenesis. PC-TP appears to limit access of fatty acids to mitochondria by stimulating the activity of thioesterase superfamily member 2, a newly characterized long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase. Because PC-TP discriminates among phosphatidylcholines within lipid bilayers, it may function as a sensor that links metabolic regulation to membrane composition. PMID:20338778

  13. Altered lipid metabolism in brain injury and disorders.

    PubMed

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Hatcher, J F

    2008-01-01

    Deregulated lipid metabolism may be of particular importance for CNS injuries and disorders, as this organ has the highest lipid concentration next to adipose tissue. Atherosclerosis (a risk factor for ischemic stroke) results from accumulation of LDL-derived lipids in the arterial wall. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1), secretory phospholipase A2 IIA and lipoprotein-PLA2 are implicated in vascular inflammation. These inflammatory responses promote atherosclerotic plaques, formation and release of the blood clot that can induce ischemic stroke. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alter lipid metabolism and stimulate production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and reactive oxygen species that potentiate CNS injuries and certain neurological disorders. Cholesterol is an important regulator of lipid organization and the precursor for neurosteroid biosynthesis. Low levels of neurosteroids were related to poor outcome in many brain pathologies. Apolipoprotein E is the principal cholesterol carrier protein in the brain, and the gene encoding the variant Apolipoprotein E4 is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Parkinson's disease is to some degree caused by lipid peroxidation due to phospholipases activation. Niemann-Pick diseases A and B are due to acidic sphingomyelinase deficiency, resulting in sphingomyelin accumulation, while Niemann-Pick disease C is due to mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 genes, resulting in defective cholesterol transport and cholesterol accumulation. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating condition of the CNS. Inhibiting phospholipase A2 attenuated the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The endocannabinoid system is hypoactive in Huntington's disease. Ethyl-eicosapetaenoate showed promise in clinical trials. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis causes loss of motorneurons. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduced spinal neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mice

  14. Specific Inhibition of Acyl-CoA Oxidase-1 by an Acetylenic Acid Improves Hepatic Lipid and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Metabolism in Rats Fed a High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Deng, Senwen; Wang, Yiping; Li, Ping; Tang, Lian; Pang, Yefeng

    2017-03-03

    A chronic high fat diet results in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation (FAO); whether specific inhibition of peroxisomal FAO benefits mitochondrial FAO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism remains unclear. In this study a specific inhibitor for the rate-limiting enzyme involved in peroxisomal FAO, acyl-CoA oxidase-1 (ACOX1) was developed and used for the investigation of peroxisomal FAO inhibition upon mitochondrial FAO and ROS metabolism. Specific inhibition of ACOX1 by 10,12-tricosadiynoic acid increased hepatic mitochondrial FAO via activation of the SIRT1-AMPK (adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase) pathway and proliferator activator receptor α and reduced hydrogen peroxide accumulation in high fat diet-fed rats, which significantly decreased hepatic lipid and ROS contents, reduced body weight gain, and decreased serum triglyceride and insulin levels. Inhibition of ACOX1 is a novel and effective approach for the treatment of high fat diet- or obesity-induced metabolic diseases by improving mitochondrial lipid and ROS metabolism.

  15. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying ...

  16. [Linoleic acid and the immune system. Controversies about lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Culebras, J M

    1992-01-01

    The selection of a given lipidic function for nutritional backup requires not only knowledge of the metabolism of the different existing lipidic emulsions and of their specific therapeutic indications, but also of their contraindications and controversies because, apart from their calorific value, the contribution of liposoluble vitamins and their function in preventing essential fatty acid deficiencies, we know that they are powerful metabolic modulators. This in associated with the fact that manipulation of dietary lipids (enteral or parenteral) can affect and modulate the response to the disease, attack or infection by improving or impairing the different immune functions. This review is focused on the scientific publications which have examined the varying effects of lipidic emulsions, in quantity and in quality (particularly linoleic acid) on the immune system, on the fatty acid composition of the cellular membranes and on the production of and prostaglandins and leukotrienes. An update is given of the known interrelation between lipids and immunity, with appraisal of triglycerides and long-medium -- and short-chain fatty acids, mixtures of medium -- and long-chain triglycerides, the proportions between infinity-3/infinity-6, and structured lipids.

  17. A global perspective on FOXO1 in lipid metabolism and lipid-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Wei; Li, Tian; Di, Shouyin; Wang, Dongjin; Yang, Yang

    2017-04-06

    Lipid metabolism is a complex physiological process that is involved in nutrient adjustment, hormone regulation, and homeostasis. An unhealthy lifestyle and chronic nutrient overload can cause lipid metabolism disorders, which may lead to serious lipid-related diseases, including obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, tools for preventing dysfunctional lipid metabolism are urgently needed. The transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) is involved in lipid metabolism and plays a critical role in the development of lipid-related diseases. In this review, we provide a global perspective on the role of FOXO1 in lipid metabolism and lipid-related diseases. The information included here may be useful for the design of future studies and advancing investigations of FOXO1 as a therapeutic target.

  18. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  19. Aspergillus awamori Feeding Modifies Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Ohtsuka, Akira; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Kunioki

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, an experiment was conducted to show that A. awamori modifies lipid metabolism in mammals. A total number of 24 rats at 6 weeks of age were divided into 2 groups (10% and 30% fat dietary groups), and each group was further divided into control and experimental groups (6 rats per group). Rats in the experimental groups were given diets containing 0.05% A. awamori. The diets were administered for 3 weeks to evaluate the effects of A. awamori on growth, plasma lipid profile, and the expressions of genes related to lipid metabolism in the liver. After the rats were fed A. awamori, body weight gain was increased, while food intake was decreased; therefore, food efficiency was increased in both A. awamori groups. Plasma triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and glucose levels were decreased, but plasma HDL cholesterol levels were increased. Furthermore, saturated fatty acids were decreased while; unsaturated fatty acids were increased in the liver. The liver mRNA levels of FAS, ACC, delta-6-desaturase, and HMG-CoA reductase were increased, while the mRNA level of LDL receptor was decreased. From these data, it is proposed that A. awamori could be used as an effective probiotic to prevent lifestyle-related diseases in humans. PMID:23841078

  20. Metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cancer: Pairing lipid metabolism with glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Sandi A; Lim, John

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in detecting some cancers has prompted a longstanding search for other positron emission tomography (PET) tracers to complement the imaging of glycolysis in oncology, with much attention paid to lipogenesis based on observations that the production of various lipid and lipid-containing compounds is increased in most cancers. Radiolabeled analogs of choline and acetate have now been used as oncologic PET probes for over a decade, showing convincingly improved detection sensitivity over FDG for certain cancers. However, neither choline nor acetate have been thoroughly validated as lipogenic biomarkers, and while acetyl-CoA produced from acetate is used in de-novo lipogenesis to synthesize fatty acids, acetate is also consumed by various other synthetic and metabolic pathways, with recent experimental observations challenging the assumption that lipogenesis is its predominant role in all cancers. Since tumors detected by acetate PET are also frequently detected by choline PET, imaging of choline metabolism might serve as an alternative albeit indirect marker of lipogenesis, particularly if the fatty acids produced in cancer cells are mainly destined for membrane synthesis through incorporation into phosphatidylcholines. Aerobic glycolysis may or may not coincide with changes in lipid metabolism, resulting in combinatorial metabolic phenotypes that may have different prognostic or therapeutic implications. Consequently, PET imaging using dual metabolic tracers, in addition to being diagnostically superior to imaging with individual tracers, could eventually play a greater role in supporting precision medicine, as efforts to develop small-molecule metabolic pathway inhibitors are coming to fruition. To prepare for this advent, clinical and translational studies of metabolic PET tracers must go beyond simply estimating tracer diagnostic utility, and aim to uncover potential therapeutic avenues associated with

  1. Lipid metabolites as metabolic messengers in inter-organ communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sihao; Alexander, Ryan K.; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved through coordinated regulation across several tissues. Studies using mouse genetic models have shown that perturbation of specific pathways of lipid metabolism in metabolically active tissues impacts systemic metabolic homeostasis. The use of metabolomic technologies combined with genetic models has helped identify several potential lipid mediators that serve as metabolic messengers to communicate energy status and modulate substrate utilization among tissues. When provided exogenously, these lipid metabolites exhibit biological effects on glucose and lipid metabolism, implicating a therapeutic potential for treating metabolic diseases. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in inter-organ communication through novel mechanisms with a focus on lipid mediators synthesized de novo or derived from dietary sources and discuss challenges and future directions. PMID:24895003

  2. Mapping condition-dependent regulation of lipid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Michael C; Workman, Christopher T; Nookaew, Intawat; Pizarro, Francisco A; Agosin, Eduardo; Hellgren, Lars I; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-11-06

    Lipids play a central role in cellular function as constituents of membranes, as signaling molecules, and as storage materials. Although much is known about the role of lipids in regulating specific steps of metabolism, comprehensive studies integrating genome-wide expression data, metabolite levels, and lipid levels are currently lacking. Here, we map condition-dependent regulation controlling lipid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring 5636 mRNAs, 50 metabolites, 97 lipids, and 57 (13)C-reaction fluxes in yeast using a three-factor full-factorial design. Correlation analysis across eight environmental conditions revealed 2279 gene expression level-metabolite/lipid relationships that characterize the extent of transcriptional regulation in lipid metabolism relative to major metabolic hubs within the cell. To query this network, we developed integrative methods for correlation of multi-omics datasets that elucidate global regulatory signatures. Our data highlight many characterized regulators of lipid metabolism and reveal that sterols are regulated more at the transcriptional level than are amino acids. Beyond providing insights into the systems-level organization of lipid metabolism, we anticipate that our dataset and approach can join an emerging number of studies to be widely used for interrogating cellular systems through the combination of mathematical modeling and experimental biology.

  3. Mapping Condition-Dependent Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C.; Workman, Christopher T.; Nookaew, Intawat; Pizarro, Francisco A.; Agosin, Eduardo; Hellgren, Lars I.; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Lipids play a central role in cellular function as constituents of membranes, as signaling molecules, and as storage materials. Although much is known about the role of lipids in regulating specific steps of metabolism, comprehensive studies integrating genome-wide expression data, metabolite levels, and lipid levels are currently lacking. Here, we map condition-dependent regulation controlling lipid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring 5636 mRNAs, 50 metabolites, 97 lipids, and 57 13C-reaction fluxes in yeast using a three-factor full-factorial design. Correlation analysis across eight environmental conditions revealed 2279 gene expression level-metabolite/lipid relationships that characterize the extent of transcriptional regulation in lipid metabolism relative to major metabolic hubs within the cell. To query this network, we developed integrative methods for correlation of multi-omics datasets that elucidate global regulatory signatures. Our data highlight many characterized regulators of lipid metabolism and reveal that sterols are regulated more at the transcriptional level than are amino acids. Beyond providing insights into the systems-level organization of lipid metabolism, we anticipate that our dataset and approach can join an emerging number of studies to be widely used for interrogating cellular systems through the combination of mathematical modeling and experimental biology. PMID:24062529

  4. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Karen; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A.; Myre, Alexandre; Thivierge, M. Carole

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying 0% or a formula containing 3.5% LCn-3PUFAs until 10 or 28 days of age. There was a developmental decline in the insulin sensitivity of amino acid disposal in control pigs during the first month of life, with a slope of −2.24 μmol·kg−1·h−1 (P = 0.01) per unit of insulin increment, as assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps. LCn-3PUFA feeding blunted this developmental decline, resulting in differing insulin sensitivities (P < 0.001). When protein metabolism was assessed under parenteral feeding-induced hyperinsulinemia, LCn-3PUFAs reduced by 16% whole body oxidative losses of amino acids (from 238 to 231 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06), allowing 41% more amino acids to accrete into body proteins (from 90 to 127 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06). The fractional synthetic rate of muscle mixed proteins remained unaltered by the LCn-3PUFA feeding. However, LCn-3PUFAs retarded a developmental increase in the essential-to-nonessential amino acid ratio of the muscle intracellular free pool (P = 0.05). Overall, alterations in metabolism were concomitant with a preferential incorporation of LCn-3PUFAs into muscle total membrane phospholipids (P < 0.001), in contrast to intramuscular triglycerides. These results underscore the potential role of LCn-3PUFAs as regulators of different aspects of protein metabolism in the neonate. PMID:17673528

  5. Physiology and lipid metabolism of Littorina saxatilis infected with trematodes.

    PubMed

    Arakelova, Katherine S; Chebotareva, Marina A; Zabelinskii, Stanislav A

    2004-09-08

    Physiological and biochemical alterations in Littorina saxatilis infected with larval trematodes were investigated and compared with the metabolism of non-parasitized snails. Oxygen consumption rates of infected snails differed from those of non-infected controls in medium sized individuals (30 to 130 mg) but not in very large infected individuals (> 200 mg). Small snails (0.5 to 8.5 mg) were seldom infected by parasites, and this size-class consisted only of non-infected specimens. The specific oxygen consumption rate of infected snails was not dependent on their mass and remained constant over the size ranges investigated. Alterations in the snail metabolism appeared to be connected to injuries to digestive gland tissues caused by the parasites. The glycogen concentration and fatty acids of neutral lipids and phospholipids in the digestive gland were determined. Infected snails differed from uninfected snails in the complete absence of glycogen in digestive gland and had proportionally higher quantities of eicosenoic (20:1) acid in the total phospholipids. It remains unclear whether infection by trematodes activates enzymes in the snail's digestive gland to synthesize eicosenoic (20:1) acid, or whether the sporocysts themselves possess these enzymes. The role of phospholipid fatty acids in the regulation and maintenance of the parasite's metabolism is briefly considered. Biochemical alterations observed in the fatty acid composition may have an adaptive significance, by helping to stabilize the host-parasite system.

  6. Chewing the fat: lipid metabolism and homeostasis during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lovewell, Rustin R; Sassetti, Christopher M; VanderVen, Brian C

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipid metabolism, the immune response and lipid homeostasis in the host creates a complex and dynamic pathogen-host interaction. Advances in imaging and metabolic analysis techniques indicate that M. tuberculosis preferentially associates with foamy cells and employs multiple physiological systems to utilize exogenously derived fatty-acids and cholesterol. Moreover, novel insights into specific host pathways that control lipid accumulation during infection, such as the PPARγ and LXR transcriptional regulators, have begun to reveal mechanisms by which host immunity alters the bacterial micro-environment. As bacterial lipid metabolism and host lipid regulatory pathways are both important, yet inherently complex, components of active tuberculosis, delineating the heterogeneity in lipid trafficking within disease states remains a major challenge for therapeutic design.

  7. BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    toxicity in vitro. To identify Myc-driven changes to lipid metabolism , we will use mass spectrometry and Biolog analysis of metabolites. Analysis of...and we can use similar techniques to perform the converse functional analysis (i.e. mutant lipid metabolism partners). We have not yet started work on...tabular results for Cox- proportional hazards regression analysis for probes to fatty acid and lipid metabolism genes identified in our screen and with

  8. Lipid metabolism-related gene expression pattern of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus L.) larvae fed on live prey.

    PubMed

    Betancor, Mónica B; Ortega, Aurelio; de la Gándara, Fernando; Tocher, Douglas R; Mourente, Gabriel

    2016-11-04

    The present study is the first to evaluate lipid metabolism in first-feeding Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABT; Thunnus thynnus L.) larvae fed different live prey including enriched rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and Acartia sp. copepod nauplii from 2 days after hatch. Understanding the molecular basis of lipid metabolism and regulation in ABT will provide insights to optimize diet formulations for this high-value species new to aquaculture. To this end, we investigated the effect of dietary lipid on whole larvae lipid class and fatty acid compositions and the expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism in first feeding ABT larvae fed different live prey. Additionally, the expression of lipid metabolism genes in tissues of adult broodstock ABT was evaluated. Growth and survival data indicated that copepods were the best live prey for first feeding ABT and that differences in growth performance and lipid metabolism observed between larvae from different year classes could be a consequence of broodstock nutrition. In addition, expression patterns of lipid metabolic genes observed in ABT larvae in the trials could reflect differences in lipid class and fatty acid compositions of the live prey. The lipid nutritional requirements, including essential fatty acid requirements of larval ABT during the early feeding stages, are unknown, and the present study represents a first step in addressing these highly relevant issues. However, further studies are required to determine nutritional requirements and understand lipid metabolism during development of ABT larvae and to apply the knowledge to the commercial culture of this iconic species.

  9. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill; Ruckerbauer, David E; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Jensen, Ole N; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-03-19

    Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular architecture and processes during physiological adaptations in yeast. Our results reveal that activation of cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling supports mitochondrial biogenesis in the transition from fermentative to respiratory metabolism, that down-regulation of de novo sterol synthesis machinery prompts differential turnover of lipid droplet-associated triacylglycerols and sterol esters during respiratory growth, that sphingolipid metabolism is regulated in a previously unrecognized growth stage-specific manner, and that endogenous synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids constitutes an in vivo upstream activator of peroxisomal biogenesis, via the heterodimeric Oaf1/Pip2 transcription factor. Our work demonstrates the pivotal role of lipid metabolism in adaptive processes and provides a resource to investigate its regulation at the cellular level.

  10. Korean pine nut oil replacement decreases intestinal lipid uptake while improves hepatic lipid metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Park, Soyoung; Lim, Yeseo; Shin, Sunhye

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Consumption of pine nut oil (PNO) was shown to reduce weight gain and attenuate hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of PNO on both intestinal and hepatic lipid metabolism in mice fed control or HFD. MATERIALS/METHODS Five-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed control diets containing 10% energy fat from either Soybean Oil (SBO) or PNO, or HFD containing 15% energy fat from lard and 30% energy fat from SBO or PNO for 12 weeks. Expression of genes related to intestinal fatty acid (FA) uptake and channeling (Cd36, Fatp4, Acsl5, Acbp), intestinal chylomicron synthesis (Mtp, ApoB48, ApoA4), hepatic lipid uptake and channeling (Lrp1, Fatp5, Acsl1, Acbp), hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) lipolysis and FA oxidation (Atgl, Cpt1a, Acadl, Ehhadh, Acaa1), as well as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly (ApoB100) were determined by real-time PCR. RESULTS In intestine, significantly lower Cd36 mRNA expression (P < 0.05) and a tendency of lower ApoA4 mRNA levels (P = 0.07) was observed in PNO-fed mice, indicating that PNO consumption may decrease intestinal FA uptake and chylomicron assembly. PNO consumption tended to result in higher hepatic mRNA levels of Atgl (P = 0.08) and Cpt1a (P = 0.05). Significantly higher hepatic mRNA levels of Acadl and ApoB100 were detected in mice fed PNO diet (P < 0.05). These results suggest that PNO could increase hepatic TAG metabolism; mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and VLDL assembly. CONCLUSIONS PNO replacement in the diet might function in prevention of excessive lipid uptake by intestine and improve hepatic lipid metabolism in both control diet and HFD fed mice. PMID:27698954

  11. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  12. Hormonal regulation of lipid metabolism in developing coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in juvenile coho salmon is characterized, and adaptive changes in lipid mobilization are described in relation to development and hormonal influences. The rates of lipogenesis and lipolysis were determined in selected tissues of juvenile salmon during the period of seawater preadaptive development (smoltification). Neutral lipid (sterol) and fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat was measured by tritium incorporation. Fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat decreased by 88% and 81%, respectively, between late February (parr) and early June (smolt). To assess the role of hormones in smoltification-associated lipid depletion, growth hormone, prolactin, thyroxin and cortisol were administered in vivo early in development (parr) to determine if any of these factors could initiate the metabolic responses normally seen later in development (smolt). Growth hormone stimulated lipid mobilization from coho salmon parr. Prolactin strongly stimulated lipid mobilization in coho parr. Thyroxin and cortisol also stimulated lipid mobilization for coho salmon parr. The direct effect of hormones was studied by in vitro pH-stat incubation of liver slices. These data suggest that norepinephrine stimulates fatty acid release via ..beta..-adrenergic pathways. Somatostatin and its partial analogue from the fish caudal neurosecretory system, urotensin II, also affect lipid mobilization. These results establish the presence of hormone-sensitive lipase in salmon liver and suggest that the regulation of lipid metabolism in salmon involves both long-acting and short-acting hormonal agents.

  13. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism Promotes Prostate Cancer: Role in Cell Survival under Hypoxia and Extracellular Vesicles Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Gagan; Schlaepfer, Isabel R.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading malignancy among men in United States. Recent studies have focused on the identification of novel metabolic characteristics of PCa, aimed at devising better preventive and therapeutic approaches. PCa cells have revealed unique metabolic features such as higher expression of several enzymes associated with de novo lipogenesis, fatty acid up-take and β-oxidation. This aberrant lipid metabolism has been reported to be important for PCa growth, hormone-refractory progression and treatment resistance. Furthermore, PCa cells effectively use lipid metabolism under adverse environmental conditions for their survival advantage. Specifically, hypoxic cancer cells accumulate higher amount of lipids through a combination of metabolic alterations including high glutamine and fatty acid uptake, as well as decreased fatty acid oxidation. These stored lipids serve to protect cancer cells from oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and play important roles in fueling cancer cell proliferation following re-oxygenation. Lastly, cellular lipids have also been implicated in extracellular vesicle biogenesis, which play a vital role in intercellular communication. Overall, the new understanding of lipid metabolism in recent years has offered several novel targets to better target and manage clinical PCa. PMID:27384557

  14. Lipids from heterotrophic microbes: advances in metabolism research.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Matyas; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2011-02-01

    Heterotrophic oleaginous microorganisms are capable of producing over 20% of their weight in single cell oils (SCOs) composed of triacylglycerols (TAGs). These TAGs contain fatty acids, such as palmitic, stearic and oleic acids, that are well-suited for biodiesel applications. Although some of these microbes are able to accumulate SCOs while growing on inexpensive agro-industrial biomass, the competition with plant oil resources means that a significant increase in productivity is desired. The present review aims to summarize recent details in lipid metabolism research and engineering (e.g. direct fatty acid ethyl ester production), as well as culture condition optimization and innovations, such as solid-state or semi-solid-state fermentation, that can all contribute to higher productivity and further advancement of the field.

  15. Mathematical modelling of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Adrian C; Wattis, Jonathan A D; Salter, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a mathematical model capable of simulating the metabolic response to a variety of mixed meals in fed and fasted conditions with particular emphasis placed on the hepatic triglyceride element of the model. Model validation is carried out using experimental data for the ingestion of three mixed composition meals over a 24-h period. Comparison with experimental data suggests the model predicts key plasma lipids accurately given a prescribed insulin profile. One counter-intuitive observation to arise from simulations is that liver triglyceride initially decreases when a high fat meal is ingested, a phenomenon potentially explained by the carbohydrate portion of the meal raising plasma insulin.

  16. PCSK9 targets important for lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Rainer; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of death worldwide and it is accelerated by increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (LDL-C) and/or lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) concentrations. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) alters both LDL-C and in part Lp(a) concentrations through its ability to induce degradation of the LDL receptor (LDLR). PCSK9, however, has additional targets which are potentially involved in lipid metabolism regulation such as the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL), CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36) and the epithelial cholesterol transporter (NPC1L1) and it affects expression of apolipoprotein B48. The PCSK9 activity is tightly regulated at several levels by factors influencing its transcription, secretion, or by extracellular inactivation and clearance. Many comorbidities (kidney insufficiency, hypothyreoidism, hyperinsulinemia, inflammation) modify PCSK9 expression and release. Two humanized antibodies directed against extracellular PCSK9 received approval by the European and US authorities and additional PCSK9 directed therapeutics (such as silencing RNA) are already in clinical trials. Their results demonstrate a significant reduction in both LDL-C and Lp(a) concentrations - independent of the concomitant medication - and one of them reduced plaque size in high risk cardiovascular patients; results of two ongoing large clinical endpoints studies are awaited. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent biological data on PCSK9, the regulation of PCSK9, and finally briefly summarize the data of recent clinical studies in the context of lipid metabolism.

  17. The WWOX Gene Modulates HDL and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iatan, Iulia; Choi, Hong Y.; Ruel, Isabelle; Linga Reddy, M.V. Prasad; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lee, Jaeho; Abu Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Nikkola, Elina; Civelek, Mete; Awan, Zuhier; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Pajukanta, Päivi; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; Genest, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) constitutes a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recent studies from our group reported a genetic association between the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene and HDL-C levels. Here, through next-generation resequencing, in vivo functional studies and gene microarray analyses, we investigated the role of WWOX in HDL and lipid metabolism. Methods and Results Using next-generation resequencing of the WWOX region, we first identified 8 variants significantly associated and perfectly segregating with the low-HDL trait in two multi-generational French Canadian dyslipidemic families. To understand in vivo functions of WWOX, we used liver-specific Wwoxhep−/− and total Wwox−/− mice models, where we found decreased ApoA-I and ABCA1 levels in hepatic tissues. Analyses of lipoprotein profiles in Wwox−/−, but not Wwox hep−/− littermates, also showed marked reductions in serum HDL-C concentrations, concordant with the low-HDL findings observed in families. We next obtained evidence of a gender-specific effect in female Wwoxhep−/− mice, where an increase in plasma triglycerides and altered lipid metabolic pathways by microarray analyses were observed. We further identified a significant reduction in ApoA-I and LPL, and upregulation in Fas, Angptl4 and Lipg, suggesting that the effects of Wwox involve multiple pathways, including cholesterol homeostasis, ApoA-I/ABCA1 pathway, and fatty acid biosynthesis/triglyceride metabolism. Conclusions Our data indicate that WWOX disruption alters HDL and lipoprotein metabolism through several mechanisms and may account for the low-HDL phenotype observed in families expressing the WWOX variants. These findings thus describe a novel gene involved in cellular lipid homeostasis, which effects may impact atherosclerotic disease development. PMID:24871327

  18. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  19. Control of lipid metabolism by Tachykinin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Veenstra, Jan A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestine is a key organ for lipid uptake and distribution, and abnormal intestinal lipid metabolism is associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia. Although multiple regulatory gut hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) regulate systemic lipid homeostasis, such as appetite control and energy balance in adipose tissue, their respective roles regarding lipid metabolism in the intestine are not well understood. We demonstrate that Tachykinins (TKs), one of the most abundant secreted peptides expressed in midgut EEs, regulate intestinal lipid production and subsequently control systemic lipid homeostasis in Drosophila, and that TKs repress lipogenesis in enterocytes (ECs) associated with the TKR99D receptor and PKA signaling. Interestingly, nutrient deprivation enhances the production of TKs in the midgut. Finally, unlike the physiological roles of TKs produced from the brain, gut-derived TKs do not affect behavior, thus demonstrating that gut TK hormones specifically regulate intestinal lipid metabolism without affecting neuronal functions. PMID:25263556

  20. Simulated microgravity enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Nguyen, Kevin; Kumar, Shalini; Toshimasa, Ochiai; Hirose, Ryuji; Reue, Karen; Vergnes, Laurent; Kinchen, Jason; Vellis, Jean de

    2016-12-01

    The primary energy sources of mammalian cells are proteins, fats, and sugars that are processed by well-known biochemical mechanisms that have been discovered and studied in 1G (terrestrial gravity). Here we sought to determine how simulated microgravity (sim-µG) impacts both energy and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin-forming cells in the central nervous system. We report increased mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolysis 24 hr after exposure to sim-µG. Moreover, examination of the secretome after 3 days' exposure of OLs to sim-µG increased the Krebs cycle (Krebs and Weitzman, ) flux in sim-µG. The secretome study also revealed a significant increase in the synthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl-GPC (5.67); lysolipids like 1-oleoyl-GPE (4.48) were also increased by microgravity. Although longer-chain lipids were not observed in this study, it is possible that at longer time points OLs would have continued moving forward toward the synthesis of lipids that constitute myelin. For centuries, basic developmental biology research has been the pillar of an array of discoveries that have led to clinical applications; we believe that studies using microgravity will open new avenues to our understanding of the brain in health and disease-in particular, to the discovery of new molecules and mechanisms impossible to unveil while in 1G. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Obesity diabetes and the role of bile acids in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bile acids have many activities over and above their primary function in aiding absorption of fat and fat soluble vitamins. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol, and thus are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Bile acids stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) production in the distal small bowel and colon, stimulating insulin secretion, and therefore, are involved in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Bile acids through their insulin sensitising effect play a part in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Bile acid metabolism is altered in obesity and diabetes. Both dietary restriction and weight loss due to bariatric surgery, alter the lipid carbohydrate and bile acid metabolism. Recent research suggests that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO is a central regulator of bile, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism, but conflicting studies mean that our understanding of the complexity is not yet complete. PMID:28191525

  2. Advancing oleaginous microorganisms to produce lipid via metabolic engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-10-01

    With the depletion of global petroleum and its increasing price, biodiesel has been becoming one of the most promising biofuels for global fuels market. Researchers exploit oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production due to their short life cycle, less labor required, less affection by venue, and easier to scale up. Many oleaginous microorganisms can accumulate lipids, especially triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are the main materials for biodiesel production. This review is covering the related researches on different oleaginous microorganisms, such as yeast, mold, bacteria and microalgae, which might become the potential oil feedstocks for biodiesel production in the future, showing that biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms has a great prospect in the development of biomass energy. Microbial oils biosynthesis process includes fatty acid synthesis approach and TAG synthesis approach. In addition, the strategies to increase lipids accumulation via metabolic engineering technology, involving the enhancement of fatty acid synthesis approach, the enhancement of TAG synthesis approach, the regulation of related TAG biosynthesis bypass approaches, the blocking of competing pathways and the multi-gene approach, are discussed in detail. It is suggested that DGAT and ME are the most promising targets for gene transformation, and reducing PEPC activity is observed to be beneficial for lipid production.

  3. Emerging roles of lipid metabolism in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiangjian; Cheng, Can; Tan, Zheqiong; Li, Namei; Tang, Min; Yang, Lifang; Cao, Ya

    2017-04-11

    Cancer cells frequently display fundamentally altered cellular metabolism, which provides the biochemical foundation and directly contributes to tumorigenicity and malignancy. Rewiring of metabolic programmes, such as aerobic glycolysis and increased glutamine metabolism, are crucial for cancer cells to shed from a primary tumor, overcome the nutrient and energy deficit, and eventually survive and form metastases. However, the role of lipid metabolism that confers the aggressive properties of malignant cancers remains obscure. The present review is focused on key enzymes in lipid metabolism associated with metastatic disease pathogenesis. We also address the function of an important membrane structure-lipid raft in mediating tumor aggressive progression. We enumerate and integrate these recent findings into our current understanding of lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer metastasis accompanied by new and exciting therapeutic implications.

  4. Understanding the control of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network of plant oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D

    2016-09-01

    Plant oil biosynthesis involves a complex metabolic network with multiple subcellular compartments, parallel pathways, cycles, and pathways that have a dual function to produce essential membrane lipids and triacylglycerol. Modern molecular biology techniques provide tools to alter plant oil compositions through bioengineering, however with few exceptions the final composition of triacylglycerol cannot be predicted. One reason for limited success in oilseed bioengineering is the inadequate understanding of how to control the flux of fatty acids through various fatty acid modification, and triacylglycerol assembly pathways of the lipid metabolic network. This review focuses on the mechanisms of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network, and highlights where uncertainty resides in our understanding of seed oil biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  5. Aberrant Schwann cell lipid metabolism linked to mitochondrial deficits leads to axon degeneration and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Viader, Andreu; Sasaki, Yo; Kim, Sungsu; Strickland, Amy; Workman, Cayce S; Yang, Kui; Gross, Richard W; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-03-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy. Much effort has been devoted to examining the role played by neuronal/axonal mitochondria, but how mitochondrial deficits in peripheral nerve glia (Schwann cells [SCs]) contribute to peripheral nerve diseases remains unclear. Here, we investigate a mouse model of peripheral neuropathy secondary to SC mitochondrial dysfunction (Tfam-SCKOs). We show that disruption of SC mitochondria activates a maladaptive integrated stress response (ISR) through the actions of heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI) kinase, and causes a shift in lipid metabolism away from fatty acid synthesis toward oxidation. These alterations in SC lipid metabolism result in depletion of important myelin lipid components as well as in accumulation of acylcarnitines (ACs), an intermediate of fatty acid β-oxidation. Importantly, we show that ACs are released from SCs and induce axonal degeneration. A maladaptive ISR as well as altered SC lipid metabolism are thus underlying pathological mechanisms in mitochondria-related peripheral neuropathies.

  6. Phosphatidic acid metabolism in rat liver cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Giusto, Norma M

    2013-04-02

    The aim of the present research was to analyze the pathways for phosphatidic acid metabolism in purified nuclei from liver. Lipid phosphate phosphatase, diacylglycerol lipase, monoacylglycerol lipase and PA-phospholipase type A activities were detected. The presence of lysophosphatidic acid significantly reduced DAG production while sphingosine 1-phoshate and ceramide 1-phosphate reduced MAG formation from PA. Using different enzymatic modulators (detergents and ions) an increase in the PA metabolism by phospholipase type A was observed. Our findings evidence an active PA metabolism in purified liver nuclei which generates important lipid second messengers, and which could thus be involved in nuclear processes such as gene transcription.

  7. Complex links between dietary lipids, endogenous endotoxins and metabolic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Laugerette, Fabienne; Vors, Cécile; Peretti, Noël; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity are characterized by a subclinical inflammatory state that contributes to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Recent reports also indicate that (i) there are alterations of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases and (ii) absorption of endogenous endotoxins (namely lipopolysaccharides, LPS) can occur, particularly during the digestion of lipids. The aim of the present review is to highlight recently gained knowledge regarding the links between high fat diets, lipid digestion, intestinal microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia & inflammation.

  8. Lipid mediators in the neural cell nucleus: their metabolism, signaling, and association with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A

    2009-08-01

    Lipid mediators are important endogenous regulators of neural cell proliferation, differentiation, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. They originate from enzymic degradation of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol by phospholipases, sphingomyelinases, and cytochrome P450 hydroxylases, respectively. Arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators are called eicosanoids. Eicosanoids have emerged as key regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. Another arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediator is lipoxin. Eicosanoids have proinflammatory effects, whereas lipoxins produce antiinflammatory effects. The crossponding lipid mediators of docosahexaenoic acid metabolism are named docosanoids. They include resolvins, protectins, and neuroprotectins. Docosanoids produce antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects in the brain tissue. Other glycerophospholipid-derived lipid mediators are platelet-activating factor, lysophosphatidic acid, and endocannabinoids. Degradation of sphingolipids also results in the generation of sphingolipid-derived lipid mediators. Sphingolipid-derived lipid mediators are ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate. They mediate cellular differentiation, cell growth, and apoptosis. Similarly, cholesterol-derived lipid mediators hydroxycholesterol and oxycholesterol produce apoptosis. Most of these mediators originate from the plasma membrane. The nucleus has its own set of enzymes and lipid mediators that originate from the nuclear envelope and matrix. The purpose of this commentary is to describe basic and clinical information on lipid mediators in the nucleus.

  9. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  10. Glucose regulates lipid metabolism in fasting king penguins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Orvoine, Jord; Groscolas, René

    2003-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether glucose intervenes in the regulation of lipid metabolism in long-term fasting birds, using the king penguin as an animal model. Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo before, during, and after a 2-h glucose infusion under field conditions. All the birds were in the phase II fasting status (large fat stores, protein sparing) but differed by their metabolic and hormonal statuses, being either nonstressed (NSB; n = 5) or stressed (SB; n = 5). In both groups, glucose infusion at 5 mg.kg-1.min-1 induced a twofold increase in glycemia. In NSB, glucose had no effect on lipolysis (maintenance of plasma concentrations and rates of appearance of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids) and no effect on the plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols (TAG), glucagon, insulin, or corticosterone. However, it limited fatty acid (FA) oxidation, as indicated by a 25% decrease in the plasma level of beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB). In SB, glucose infusion induced an approximately 2.5-fold decrease in lipolytic fluxes and a large decrease in FA oxidation, as reflected by a 64% decrease in the plasma concentration of beta-OHB. There were also a 35% decrease in plasma TAG, a 6.5- and 2.8-fold decrease in plasma glucagon and corticosterone, respectively, and a threefold increase in insulinemia. These data show that in fasting king penguins, glucose regulates lipid metabolism (inhibition of lipolysis and/or of FA oxidation) and affects hormonal status differently in stressed vs. nonstressed individuals. The results also suggest that in birds, as in humans, the availability of glucose, not of FA, is an important determinant of the substrate mix (glucose vs. FA) that is oxidized for energy production.

  11. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R.; Oliva, María E.; Lombardo, Yolanda B.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats. PMID:26828527

  12. Mechanisms Involved in the Improvement of Lipotoxicity and Impaired Lipid Metabolism by Dietary α-Linolenic Acid Rich Salvia hispanica L (Salba) Seed in the Heart of Dyslipemic Insulin-Resistant Rats.

    PubMed

    Creus, Agustina; Ferreira, María R; Oliva, María E; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2016-01-28

    This study explores the mechanisms underlying the altered lipid metabolism in the heart of dyslipemic insulin-resistant (IR) rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) and investigates if chia seeds (rich in α-linolenic acid 18:3, n-3 ALA) improve/reverse cardiac lipotoxicity. Wistar rats received an SRD-diet for three months. Half of the animals continued with the SRD up to month 6. The other half was fed an SRD in which the fat source, corn oil (CO), was replaced by chia seeds from month 3 to 6 (SRD+chia). A reference group consumed a control diet (CD) all the time. Triglyceride, long-chain acyl CoA (LC ACoA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (M-CPT1) activities and protein mass levels of M-CPT1, membrane fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed. Results show that: (a) the hearts of SRD-fed rats display lipotoxicity suggesting impaired myocardial lipid utilization; (b) Compared with the SRD group, dietary chia normalizes blood pressure; reverses/improves heart lipotoxicity, glucose oxidation, the increased protein mass level of FAT/CD36, and the impaired insulin stimulated FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane. The enhanced M-CPT1 activity is markedly reduced without similar changes in protein mass. PPARα slightly decreases, while the UCP2 protein level remains unchanged in all groups. Normalization of dyslipidemia and IR by chia reduces plasma fatty acids (FAs) availability, suggesting that a different milieu prevents the robust translocation of FAT/CD36. This could reduce the influx of FAs, decreasing the elevated M-CPT1 activity and lipid storage and improving glucose oxidation in cardiac muscles of SRD-fed rats.

  13. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Yang, Weili; Shorrosh, Basil; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.

  14. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes ofmore » mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  15. Cell proliferation and progesterone synthesis depend on lipid metabolism in bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Elis, Sebastien; Desmarchais, Alice; Maillard, Virginie; Uzbekova, Svetlana; Monget, Philippe; Dupont, Joëlle

    2015-03-15

    In dairy cows, lipids are essential to support energy supplies for all biological functions, especially during early lactation. Lipid metabolism is crucial for sustaining proper reproductive function. Alteration of lipid metabolism impacts follicular development and affects oocyte developmental competence. Indeed, nonesterified fatty acids are able to decrease granulosa cell (GC) proliferation and affect estradiol synthesis, thus potentially affecting follicular growth and viability. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of lipid metabolism on bovine GCs, through the use of the lipid metabolism inhibitors etomoxir, an inhibitor of fatty acid (FA) oxidation through inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1), and C75, an inhibitor of FA synthesis through inhibition of fatty acid synthase. We showed that etomoxir and C75 significantly inhibited DNA synthesis in vitro; C75 also significantly decreased progesterone synthesis. Both inhibitors significantly reduced AMPK (5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. Etomoxir also affected the AKT (protein kinase B) signaling pathway. Combined, these data suggest that both FA oxidation and synthesis are important for the bovine GCs to express a proliferative and steroidogenic phenotype and, thus, for sustaining follicular growth. Despite these findings, it is important to note that the changes caused by the inhibitors of FA metabolism on GCs in vitro are globally mild, suggesting that lipid metabolism is not as critical in GCs as was observed in the oocyte-cumulus complex. Further studies are needed to investigate the detailed mechanisms by which lipid metabolism interacts with GC functions.

  16. p53 as a Regulator of Lipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced proliferation and survival are common features of cancer cells. Cancer cells are metabolically reprogrammed which aids in their survival in nutrient-poor environments. Indeed, changes in metabolism of glucose and glutamine are essential for tumor progression. Thus, metabolic reprogramming is now well accepted as a hallmark of cancer. Recent findings suggest that reprogramming of lipid metabolism also occurs in cancer cells, since lipids are used for biosynthesis of membranes, post-translational modifications, second messengers for signal transduction, and as a source of energy during nutrient deprivation. The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that controls the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, and senescence. p53 also regulates cellular metabolism, which appears to play a key role in its tumor suppressive activities. In this review article, we summarize non-canonical functions of wild-type and mutant p53 on lipid metabolism and discuss their association with cancer progression. PMID:27973397

  17. Interactions between dietary boron and thiamine affect lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Herbel, J.L.; Hunt, C.D. )

    1991-03-15

    An experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that dietary boron impacts upon the function of various coenzymes involved in energy metabolism. In a 2 {times} 7 factorially-arranged experiment, weanling, vitamin D{sub 3}-deprived rats were fed a ground corn-casein-corn oil based diet supplemented with 0 or 2 mg boron/kg and 50% of the requirement for thiamine (TM), riboflavin (RF), pantothenic acid (PA) or pyridoxine (PX); 0% for folic acid (FA) or nicotinic acid (NA). All vitamins were supplemented in adequate amounts in the control diet. At 8 weeks of age, the TM dietary treatment was the one most affected by supplemental dietary boron (SDB). In rats that were fed 50% TM, SDB increased plasma concentrations of triglyceride (TG) and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), and the liver to body weight (L/B) ratio. However, in the SDB animals, adequate amounts of TM decreased the means of those variables to near that observed in non-SDB rats fed 50% TM. The findings suggest that an interaction between dietary boron and TM affects lipid metabolism.

  18. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  19. Salivary composition in obese vs normal-weight subjects: towards a role in postprandial lipid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Vors, C; Drai, J; Gabert, L; Pineau, G; Laville, M; Vidal, H; Guichard, E; Michalski, M-C; Feron, G

    2015-09-01

    In the pathophysiological context of obesity, oral exposure to dietary fat can modulate lipid digestion and absorption, but underlying in-mouth mechanisms have not been clearly identified. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that salivary components related to dietary fat sensitivity would differ according to body mass index (BMI) and postprandial lipid metabolism in young men. Saliva was collected from nine normal-weight (BMI=22.3±0.5 kg m(-2)) and nine non-morbid obese (BMI=31.7±0.3 kg m(-2)) men before an 8-h postprandial metabolic exploration test involving the consumption of a 40-g fat meal, in which obese subjects revealed a delayed postprandial lipid metabolism. Nine salivary characteristics (flow, protein content, lipolysis, amylase, proteolysis, total antioxidant status, lysozyme, lipocalin 1 and carbonic anhydrase-VI) were investigated. We show that, under fasting conditions, salivary lipolysis was lower in obese vs normal-weight subjects, whereas proteolysis and carbonic anhydrase VI were higher. We reveal through multivariate and Mann-Whitney analysis that differences in fasting salivary lipolysis and proteolysis between both groups are related to differences in postprandial lipid metabolism including exogenous fatty-acid absorption and β-oxidation. These results suggest a potential role of salivary composition on postprandial lipid metabolism and bring novel causal hypotheses on the links between salivary composition, sensitivity to dietary fat oral income and postprandial lipid metabolism according to BMI.

  20. The effects of time-restricted feeding on lipid metabolism and adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Amandine; Zarrinpar, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining natural feeding rhythms with time-restricted feeding (TRF), without altering nutritional intake, prevents and reverses diet-induced obesity (DIO) and its associated metabolic disorders in mice. TRF has a direct effect on animal adiposity, causes an alteration of adipokine signaling, and diminishes white adipose tissue inflammation. Many genes involved in lipid metabolism are normally circadian, but their expression is perturbed with DIO; TRF restores their cyclical expression. One mechanism through which TRF could affect host metabolism is by altering the gut microbiome. Changes in the gut microbiome are coupled with an altered stool bile acid profile. Hence, TRF could affect lipid metabolism by altering bile acid signaling. TRF introduces many new possibilities in treating obesity and its associated metabolic disorders. However, further studies are needed to show whether these physiological findings in mice translate to humans. PMID:26451290

  1. Wheat leaf lipids during heat stress: II. Lipids experiencing coordinated metabolism are detected by analysis of lipid co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sruthi; Prasad, P V Vara; Welti, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Identifying lipids that experience coordinated metabolism during heat stress would provide information regarding lipid dynamics under stress conditions and assist in developing heat-tolerant wheat varieties. We hypothesized that co-occurring lipids, which are up-regulated or down-regulated together through time during heat stress, represent groups that can be explained by coordinated metabolism. Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) were subjected to 12 days of high day and/or night temperature stress, followed by a 4-day recovery period. Leaves were sampled at four time points, and 165 lipids were measured by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Correlation analysis of lipid levels in 160 leaf samples from each of two wheat genotypes revealed 13 groups of lipids. Lipids within each group co-occurred through the high day and night temperature stress treatments. The lipid groups can be broadly classified as groups containing extraplastidic phospholipids, plastidic glycerolipids, oxidized glycerolipids, triacylglycerols, acylated sterol glycosides and sterol glycosides. Current knowledge of lipid metabolism suggests that the lipids in each group co-occur because they are regulated by the same enzyme(s). The results suggest that increases in activities of desaturating, oxidizing, glycosylating and acylating enzymes lead to simultaneous changes in levels of multiple lipid species during high day and night temperature stress in wheat.

  2. Microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes regulating lipid metabolism during melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Sumantran, Venil N; Mishra, Pratik; Sudhakar, N

    2015-04-01

    A new hallmark of cancer involves acquisition of a lipogenic phenotype which promotes tumorigenesis. Little is known about lipid metabolism in melanomas. Therefore, we used BRB (Biometrics Research Branch) class comparison tool with multivariate analysis to identify differentially expressed genes in human cutaneous melanomas, compared with benign nevi and normal skin derived from the microarray dataset (GDS1375). The methods were validated by identifying known melanoma biomarkers (CITED1, FGFR2, PTPRF, LICAM, SPP1 and PHACTR1) in our results. Eighteen genes regulating metabolism of fatty acids, lipid second messengers and gangliosides were 2-9 fold upregulated in melanomas of GDS-1375. Out of the 18 genes, 13 were confirmed by KEGG pathway analysis and 10 were also significantly upregulated in human melanoma cell lines of NCI-60 Cell Miner database. Results showed that melanomas upregulated PPARGC1A transcription factor and its target genes regulating synthesis of fatty acids (SCD) and complex lipids (FABP3 and ACSL3). Melanoma also upregulated genes which prevented lipotoxicity (CPT2 and ACOT7) and regulated lipid second messengers, such as phosphatidic acid (AGPAT-4, PLD3) and inositol triphosphate (ITPKB, ITPR3). Genes for synthesis of pro-tumorigenic GM3 and GD3 gangliosides (UGCG, HEXA, ST3GAL5 and ST8SIA1) were also upregulated in melanoma. Overall, the microarray analysis of GDS-1375 dataset indicated that melanomas can become lipogenic by upregulating genes, leading to increase in fatty acid metabolism, metabolism of specific lipid second messengers, and ganglioside synthesis.

  3. Dietary fenofibrate reduces hepatic lipid deposition by regulating lipid metabolism in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco exposed to waterborne Zn.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Luo, Zhi; Hu, Wei; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Zhuo, Mei-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Fenofibrate is known to possess lipid-lowering effects by regulation of gene transcription involved in lipid metabolism. Waterborne Zn exposure induces lipid deposition in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Thus, the present working hypothesis is that dietary fenofibrate addition will reduce hepatic lipids in yellow catfish exposed to waterborne Zn. To this end, juvenile yellow catfish were exposed to 0.04 (control), 0.35 mg/L waterborne Zn, 0.15% dietary fenofibrate, and 0.35 mg Zn/l + 0.15% dietary fenofibrate for 8 weeks. Growth performance, lipid deposition and metabolism in the liver were determined. Dietary fenofibrate promoted growth performance and reduced hepatic lipid content of yellow catfish exposed to waterborne Zn. However, these effects did not appear in fish in normal water. The lipid-lowering effect of fenofibrate on fish exposed to waterborne Zn was associated with increased lipolysis, as indicated by increased CPT I activities and expression of lipolytic genes PPARα, CPT IA, ATGL and HSL, and with reduced lipogenesis as indicated by reduced activities of G6PD, 6PGD, ME and ICDH. Dietary fenofibrate significantly increased mRNA levels of FAS, LPL and ACCα, but reduced mRNA levels of ACCβ and PPARγ in fish exposed to waterborne Zn. Pearson correlations between transcriptional factors expression, and activities and expression of several enzymes were observed, indicating that changes at the molecular and enzymatic levels may underlie the patterns of lipid metabolism and accordingly affect hepatic fat storage. Taken together, our results suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of fenofibrate was attributed, in part, to the down-regulation of lipogenesis and up-regulation of fatty acid oxidation.

  4. Lipids around the Clock: Focus on Circadian Rhythms and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gnocchi, Davide; Pedrelli, Matteo; Hurt-Camejo, Eva; Parini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and transport are responsible for the development of a large spectrum of pathologies, ranging from cardiovascular diseases, to metabolic syndrome, even to tumour development. Recently, a deeper knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control our biological clock and circadian rhythms has been achieved. From these studies it has clearly emerged how the molecular clock tightly regulates every aspect of our lives, including our metabolism. This review analyses the organisation and functioning of the circadian clock and its relevance in the regulation of physiological processes. We also describe metabolism and transport of lipids and lipoproteins as an essential aspect for our health, and we will focus on how the circadian clock and lipid metabolism are greatly interconnected. Finally, we discuss how a deeper knowledge of this relationship might be useful to improve the recent spread of metabolic diseases. PMID:25665169

  5. The gut microbiota modulates host energy and lipid metabolism in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Hezaveh, Rahil; Reigstad, Christopher S.; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Yetukuri, Laxman; Islam, Sama; Felin, Jenny; Perkins, Rosie; Borén, Jan; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    The gut microbiota has recently been identified as an environmental factor that may promote metabolic diseases. To investigate the effect of gut microbiota on host energy and lipid metabolism, we compared the serum metabolome and the lipidomes of serum, adipose tissue, and liver of conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free mice. The serum metabolome of CONV-R mice was characterized by increased levels of energy metabolites, e.g., pyruvic acid, citric acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid, while levels of cholesterol and fatty acids were reduced. We also showed that the microbiota modified a number of lipid species in the serum, adipose tissue, and liver, with its greatest effect on triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine species. Triglyceride levels were lower in serum but higher in adipose tissue and liver of CONV-R mice, consistent with increased lipid clearance. Our findings show that the gut microbiota affects both host energy and lipid metabolism and highlights its role in the development of metabolic diseases. PMID:20040631

  6. Myocardial Function and Lipid Metabolism in the Chronic Alcoholic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Timothy J.; Khan, Mohammad I.; Ettinger, Philip O.; Haider, Bunyad; Lyons, Michael M.; Oldewurtel, Henry A.; Weber, Marilyn

    1974-01-01

    In view of the variables that obscure the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, a study was undertaken in mongrel dogs fed ethanol as 36% of calories for up to 22 mo. Both the experimental and control groups maintained body weight, hematocrit, plasma vitamin, and protein levels. Left ventricular function was evaluated in the intact anesthetized dog using indicator dilution for end-diastolic and stroke volume determinations. During increased afterload with angiotensin, the ethanol group exhibited a larger rise of end-diastolic pressure (P<0.01), whereas end-diastolic and stroke volume responses were significantly less than in controls. Preload increments with saline elicited a significantly higher end-diastolic pressure rise in the ethanol group (P<0.01). No hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis was present and it was postulated that the enhanced diastolic stiffness was related to accumulation of Alcian Blue-positive material in the ventricular interstitium. To evaluate myocardial lipid metabolism, [1-14C]oleic acid was infused systemically. Plasma specific activity and myocardial lipid uptake were similar in both groups. There was a significantly increased incorporation of label into triglyceride, associated with a reduced 14CO2 production, considered the basis for a twofold increment of triglyceride content. In addition, diminished incorporation of [14C]oleic acid into phospholipid was observed accompanied by morphologic abnormalities of cardiac cell membranes. Potassium loss and sodium gain, like the lipid alteration, was more prominent in the subendocardium. Thus, chronic ethanol ingestion in this animal model is associated with abnormalities of ventricular function without evident malnutrition, analogous to the preclinical malfunction described in the human alcoholic. Images PMID:4368946

  7. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  8. Elevated CO2 improves lipid accumulation by increasing carbon metabolism in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Chen, Yi-Feng; Du, Jianchang

    2016-02-01

    Supplying microalgae with extra CO2 is a promising means for improving lipid production. The molecular mechanisms involved in lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2, however, remain to be fully elucidated. To understand how elevated CO2 improves lipid production, we performed sequencing of Chlorella sorokiniana LS-2 cellular transcripts during growth and compared transcriptional dynamics of genes involved in carbon flow from CO2 to triacylglycerol. These analyses identified the majority genes of carbohydrate metabolism and lipid biosynthesis pathways in C. sorokiniana LS-2. Under high doses of CO2 , despite down-regulation of most de novo fatty acid biosynthesis genes, genes involved in carbohydrate metabolic pathways including carbon fixation, chloroplastic glycolysis, components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and chloroplastic membrane transporters were upexpressed at the prolonged lipid accumulation phase. The data indicate that lipid production is largely independent of de novo fatty acid synthesis. Elevated CO2 might push cells to channel photosynthetic carbon precursors into fatty acid synthesis pathways, resulting in an increase of overall triacylglycerol generation. In support of this notion, genes involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis were substantially up-regulated. Thus, elevated CO2 may influence regulatory dynamics and result in increased carbon flow to triacylglycerol, thereby providing a feasible approach to increase lipid production in microalgae.

  9. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  10. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... This is an amino acid that helps remove ammonia from the blood. Babies with HCY may need ...

  11. Lipid metabolism and body composition in Gclm(-/-) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kendig, Eric L.; Chen, Ying; Krishan, Mansi; Johansson, Elisabet; Schneider, Scott N.; Genter, Mary Beth; Nebert, Daniel W.; Shertzer, Howard G.

    2011-12-15

    In humans and experimental animals, high fat diets (HFD) are associated with risk factors for metabolic diseases, such as excessive weight gain and adiposity, insulin resistance and fatty liver. Mice lacking the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene (Gclm(-/-)) and deficient in glutathione (GSH), are resistant to HFD-mediated weight gain. Herein, we evaluated Gclm-associated regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. C57BL/6J Gclm(-/-) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) controls received a normal diet or an HFD for 11 weeks. HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not display a decreased respiratory quotient, suggesting that they are unable to process lipid for metabolism. Although dietary energy consumption and intestinal lipid absorption were unchanged in Gclm(-/-) mice, feeding these mice an HFD did not produce excess body weight nor fat storage. Gclm(-/-) mice displayed higher basal metabolic rates resulting from higher activities of liver mitochondrial NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, thus elevating respiration. Although Gclm(-/-) mice exhibited strong systemic and hepatic oxidative stress responses, HFD did not promote glucose intolerance or insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not develop fatty liver, likely resulting from very low expression levels of genes encoding lipid metabolizing enzymes. We conclude that Gclm is involved in the regulation of basal metabolic rate and the metabolism of dietary lipid. Although Gclm(-/-) mice display a strong oxidative stress response, they are protected from HFD-induced excessive weight gain and adipose deposition, insulin resistance and steatosis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not produce body weight and fat gain in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not induce steatosis or insulin resistance in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gclm(-/-) mice have high basal metabolism and mitochondrial

  12. Lipid droplet-based storage fat metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an emerging model system in lipid metabolism research. Lipid droplets are omnipresent and dynamically regulated organelles found in various cell types throughout the complex life cycle of this insect. The vital importance of lipid droplets as energy resources and storage compartments for lipoanabolic components has recently attracted research attention to the basic enzymatic machinery, which controls the delicate balance between triacylglycerol deposition and mobilization in flies. This review aims to present current insights in experimentally supported and inferred biological functions of lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes as well as regulatory proteins, which control the lipid droplet-based storage fat turnover in Drosophila. PMID:22566574

  13. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  14. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  15. Lipid metabolism is associated with developmental epigenetic programming

    PubMed Central

    Marchlewicz, Elizabeth H.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Tang, Lu; Milewski, Samantha; Jones, Tamara R.; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Soni, Tanu; Domino, Steven E.; Song, Peter X. K.; F. Burant, Charles; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2016-01-01

    Maternal diet and metabolism impact fetal development. Epigenetic reprogramming facilitates fetal adaptation to these in utero cues. To determine if maternal metabolite levels impact infant DNA methylation globally and at growth and development genes, we followed a clinical birth cohort of 40 mother-infant dyads. Targeted metabolomics and quantitative DNA methylation were analyzed in 1st trimester maternal plasma (M1) and delivery maternal plasma (M2) as well as infant umbilical cord blood plasma (CB). We found very long chain fatty acids, medium chain acylcarnitines, and histidine were: (1) stable in maternal plasma from pregnancy to delivery, (2) significantly correlated between M1, M2, and CB, and (3) in the top 10% of maternal metabolites correlating with infant DNA methylation, suggesting maternal metabolites associated with infant DNA methylation are tightly controlled. Global DNA methylation was highly correlated across M1, M2, and CB. Thus, circulating maternal lipids are associated with developmental epigenetic programming, which in turn may impact lifelong health and disease risk. Further studies are required to determine the causal link between maternal plasma lipids and infant DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27713555

  16. Nanocellulose size regulates microalgal flocculation and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sun Il; Min, Seul Ki; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2016-01-01

    Harvesting of microalgae is a cost-consuming step for biodiesel production. Cellulose has recently been studied as a biocompatible and inexpensive flocculant for harvesting microalgae via surface modifications such as cation-modifications. In this study, we demonstrated that cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) played a role as a microalgal flocculant via its network geometry without cation modification. Sulfur acid-treated tunicate CNF flocculated microalgae, but cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) did not. In addition, desulfurization did not significantly influence the flocculation efficiency of CNF. This mechanism is likely related to encapsulation of microalgae by nanofibrous structure formation, which is derived from nanofibrils entanglement and intra-hydrogen bonding. Moreover, flocculated microalgae were subject to mechanical stress resulting in changes in metabolism induced by calcium ion influx, leading to upregulated lipid synthesis. CNF do not require surface modifications such as cation modified CNC and flocculation is derived from network geometry related to nanocellulose size; accordingly, CNF is one of the least expensive cellulose-based flocculants ever identified. If this flocculant is applied to the biodiesel process, it could decrease the cost of harvest, which is one of the most expensive steps, while increasing lipid production. PMID:27796311

  17. Protein restriction during pregnancy affects maternal liver lipid metabolism and fetal brain lipid composition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Bautista, Claudia J; Tovar, Armando R; Ordáz, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Ortiz, Victor; Granados, Omar; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Larrea, Fernando; Zambrano, Elena

    2010-02-01

    Suboptimal developmental environments program offspring to lifelong metabolic problems. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of protein restriction in pregnancy on maternal liver lipid metabolism at 19 days of gestation (dG) and its effect on fetal brain development. Control (C) and restricted (R) mothers were fed with isocaloric diets containing 20 and 10% of casein. At 19 dG, maternal blood and livers and fetal livers and brains were collected. Serum insulin and leptin levels were determinate in mothers. Maternal and fetal liver lipid and fetal brain lipid quantification were performed. Maternal liver and fetal brain fatty acids were quantified by gas chromatography. In mothers, liver desaturase and elongase mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Maternal body and liver weights were similar in both groups. However, fat body composition, including liver lipids, was lower in R mothers. A higher fasting insulin at 19 dG in the R group was observed (C = 0.2 +/- 0.04 vs. R = 0.9 +/- 0.16 ng/ml, P < 0.01) and was inversely related to early growth retardation. Serum leptin in R mothers was significantly higher than that observed in C rats (C = 5 +/- 0.1 vs. R = 7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml, P < 0.05). In addition, protein restriction significantly reduced gene expression in maternal liver of desaturases and elongases and the concentration of arachidonic (AA) and docosahexanoic (DHA) acids. In fetus from R mothers, a low body weight (C = 3 +/- 0.3 vs. R = 2 +/- 0.1 g, P < 0.05), as well as liver and brain lipids, including the content of DHA in the brain, was reduced. This study showed that protein restriction during pregnancy may negatively impact normal fetal brain development by changes in maternal lipid metabolism.

  18. The Effects of Two Lactobacillus plantarum Strains on Rat Lipid Metabolism Receiving a High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Salaj, Rastislav; Štofilová, Jana; Šoltesová, Alena; Hertelyová, Zdenka; Hijová, Emília; Bertková, Izabela; Strojný, Ladislav; Kružliak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of the different probiotic strains, Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96, on lipid metabolism and body weight in rats fed a high fat diet. Compared with the high fat diet group, the results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, but Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 decreased triglycerides and VLDL, while there was no change in the serum HDL level and liver lipids. Both probiotic strains lowered total bile acids in serum. Our strains have no significant change in body weight, gain weight, and body fat. These findings indicate that the effect of lactobacilli on lipid metabolism may differ among strains and that the Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 can be used to improve lipid profile and can contribute to a healthier bowel microbial balance. PMID:24470789

  19. The effects of two Lactobacillus plantarum strains on rat lipid metabolism receiving a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Salaj, Rastislav; Stofilová, Jana; Soltesová, Alena; Hertelyová, Zdenka; Hijová, Emília; Bertková, Izabela; Strojný, Ladislav; Kružliak, Peter; Bomba, Alojz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of the different probiotic strains, Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96, on lipid metabolism and body weight in rats fed a high fat diet. Compared with the high fat diet group, the results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 reduced serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, but Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 decreased triglycerides and VLDL, while there was no change in the serum HDL level and liver lipids. Both probiotic strains lowered total bile acids in serum. Our strains have no significant change in body weight, gain weight, and body fat. These findings indicate that the effect of lactobacilli on lipid metabolism may differ among strains and that the Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 and Lactobacillus plantarum Biocenol LP96 can be used to improve lipid profile and can contribute to a healthier bowel microbial balance.

  20. Role of cystathionine beta synthase in lipid metabolism in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Prabir K.; Xiong, Xunhao; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Saha, Sounik; Dhanasekaran, Danny; Mandal, Nawajes A.; McMeekin, Scott; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    Elevated lipid metabolism is implicated in poor survival in ovarian cancer (OC) and other cancers; however, current lipogenesis-targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identify a novel role of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), a sulphur amino acid metabolizing enzyme highly expressed in several ovarian cancer cell lines, in driving deregulated lipid metabolism in OC. We examined the role of CBS in regulation of triglycerides, cholesterol and lipogenic enzymes via the lipogenic transcription factors SREBP1 and SREBP2. CBS silencing attenuated the expression of number of key enzymes involved in lipid synthesis (FASN and ACC1). Additionally CBS abrogates lipid uptake in OC cells. Gene silencing of CBS or SREBPs abrogated cellular migration and invasion in OC, while ectopic expression of SREBPs can rescue phenotypic effects of CBS silencing by restoring cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, CBS represses SREBP1 and SREBP2 at the transcription levels by modulating the transcription factor Sp1. We further established the roles of both CBS and SREBPs in regulating ovarian tumor growth in vivo. In orthotopic tumor models, CBS or SREBP silencing resulted in reduced tumor cells proliferation, blood vessels formation and lipid content. Hence, cancer-selective disruption of the lipid metabolism pathway is possible by targeting CBS and, at least for OC, promises a profound benefit. PMID:26452259

  1. Alteration of lipid status and lipid metabolism, induction of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic herbicide in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Tayeb, Wafa; Nakbi, Amel; Cheraief, Imed; Miled, Abdelhedi; Hammami, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic herbicide (2,4-D) on plasma lipids, lipoproteins concentrations, hepatic lipid peroxidation, fatty acid composition and antioxidant enzyme activities in rats. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of 10 each: control group and three 2,4-D-treated groups G1, G2 and G3 were administered 15, 75 and 150 mg/kg/BW/d 2,4-D by gavage for 28 d, respectively. Results showed that 2,4-D caused significant negative changes in the biochemical parameters investigated. The malondialdehyde level was significantly increased in 2,4-D-treated groups. Fatty acid composition of the liver was also significantly changed with 2,4-D exposure. Furthermore, the hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly affected. Finally, 2,4-D at the studied doses modifies lipidic status, disrupt lipid metabolism and induce hepatic oxidative stress. In conclusion, at higher doses, 2,4-D may play an important role in the development of vascular disease via metabolic disorder of lipoproteins, lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress.

  2. Prognostic Implications of Serum Lipid Metabolism over Time during Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Moo Suk; Park, Byung Hoon; Jung, Won Jai; Lee, In Seon; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Ye; Kang, Young Ae; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite extensive research and an improved standard of care, sepsis remains a disorder with a high mortality rate. Sepsis is accompanied by severe metabolic alterations. Methods. We evaluated 117 patients with sepsis (severe sepsis [n = 19] and septic shock [n = 98]) who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), free fatty acid (FFA), and apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I levels were measured on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. Results. Nonsurvivors had low levels of cholesterol, TG, HDL, LDL, and Apo A-I on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. In a linear mixed model analysis, the variations in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.020, p = 0.005, and p = 0.015, resp.). According to multivariate analysis, TG levels and SOFA scores were associated with mortality on days 0 and 1 (p = 0.018 and p = 0.008, resp.). Conclusions. Our study illustrated that TG levels are associated with mortality in patients with sepsis. This may be attributable to alterations in serum lipid metabolism during sepsis, thus modulating the host response to inflammation in critically ill patients. PMID:26351639

  3. Lysosome/lipid droplet interplay in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dugail, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes and lipid droplets are generally considered as intracellular compartments with divergent roles in cell metabolism, lipid droplets serving as lipid reservoirs in anabolic pathways, whereas lysosomes are specialized in the catabolism of intracellular components. During the last few years, new insights in the biology of lysosomes has challenged this view by providing evidence for the importance of lysosome recycling as a sparing mechanism to maintain cellular fitness. On the other hand the understanding of lipid droplets has evolved from an inert intracellular deposit toward the status of an intracellular organelle with dynamic roles in cellular homeostasis beyond storage. These unrelated aspects have also recently converged in the finding of unexpected lipid droplet/lysosome communication through autophagy, and the discovery of lysosome-mediated lipid droplet degradation called lipopagy. Furthermore, adipocytes which are professional cells for lipid droplet formation were also shown to be active in peptide antigen presentation a pathway requiring lysosomal activity. The potential importance of lipid droplet/lysosome interplay is discussed in the context of metabolic diseases and the setting of chronic inflammation.

  4. Ferritin couples iron and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bu, Weiming; Liu, Renyu; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Loll, Patrick J; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2012-06-01

    A physiological relationship between iron, oxidative injury, and fatty acid metabolism exists, but transduction mechanisms are unclear. We propose that the iron storage protein ferritin contains fatty acid binding sites whose occupancy modulates iron uptake and release. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we found that arachidonic acid binds ferritin specifically and with 60 μM affinity. Arachidonate binding by ferritin enhanced iron mineralization, decreased iron release, and protected the fatty acid from oxidation. Cocrystals of arachidonic acid and horse spleen apoferritin diffracted to 2.18 Å and revealed specific binding to the 2-fold intersubunit pocket. This pocket shields most of the fatty acid and its double bonds from solvent but allows the arachidonate tail to project well into the ferrihydrite mineralization site on the ferritin L-subunit, a structural feature that we implicate in the effects on mineralization by demonstrating that the much shorter saturated fatty acid, caprylate, has no significant effects on mineralization. These combined effects of arachidonate binding by ferritin are expected to lower both intracellular free iron and free arachidonate, thereby providing a previously unrecognized mechanism for limiting lipid peroxidation, free radical damage, and proinflammatory cascades during times of cellular stress.

  5. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  6. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  7. Expression profiling and comparative sequence derived insights into lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, Matthew J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2001-12-19

    Expression profiling and genomic DNA sequence comparisons are increasingly being applied to the identification and analysis of the genes involved in lipid metabolism. Not only has genome-wide expression profiling aided in the identification of novel genes involved in important processes in lipid metabolism such as sterol efflux, but the utilization of information from these studies has added to our understanding of the regulation of pathways participating in the process. Coupled with these gene expression studies, cross species comparison, searching for sequences conserved through evolution, has proven to be a powerful tool to identify important non-coding regulatory sequences as well as the discovery of novel genes relevant to lipid biology. An example of the value of this approach was the recent chance discovery of a new apolipoprotein gene (apo AV) that has dramatic effects upon triglyceride metabolism in mice and humans.

  8. Central ghrelin regulates peripheral lipid metabolism in a growth hormone-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Vázquez, María J; Varela, Luis; Nogueiras, Rubén; Saha, Asish K; Cordido, Fernando; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    GH plays a major role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and alterations in GH axis elicit major changes in fat distribution and mobilization. For example, in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) or in mice lacking the GH receptor, the percentage of fat is increased. In addition to the direct actions of GH on lipid metabolism, current evidence indicates that ghrelin, a stomach-derived peptide hormone with potent GH secretagogue action, increases lipogenesis in white adipose tissue (WAT) through a hypothalamic-mediated mechanism. Still, the mechanism by which GH tone modulates ghrelin actions on WAT remains unclear. Here we investigated the effect of central ghrelin administration on lipid metabolism in lipogenic tissues (liver and WAT) in the absence of GH, by using a model for the study of GHD, namely the spontaneous dwarf rat, which shows increased body fat. Our data demonstrate that central chronic ghrelin administration regulates adipose lipid metabolism, mainly in a GH-independent fashion, as a result of increased mRNA, protein expression, and activity levels of fatty acid metabolism enzymes. On the contrary, central ghrelin regulates hepatic lipogenesis de novo in a GH-independent fashion but lipid mobilization in a GH-dependent fashion because carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 was decreased only in wild-type Lewis rats. These findings suggest the existence of a new central nervous system-based neuroendocrine circuit, regulating metabolic homeostasis of adipose tissue. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the interplay between GH and ghrelin and their effects on lipid metabolism will provide new strategies for the design and development of suitable drugs for the treatment of GHD, obesity, and its comorbidities.

  9. Lipid Peroxidation: Production, Metabolism, and Signaling Mechanisms of Malondialdehyde and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Mario F.; Argüelles, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation can be described generally as a process under which oxidants such as free radicals attack lipids containing carbon-carbon double bond(s), especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Over the last four decades, an extensive body of literature regarding lipid peroxidation has shown its important role in cell biology and human health. Since the early 1970s, the total published research articles on the topic of lipid peroxidation was 98 (1970–1974) and has been increasing at almost 135-fold, by up to 13165 in last 4 years (2010–2013). New discoveries about the involvement in cellular physiology and pathology, as well as the control of lipid peroxidation, continue to emerge every day. Given the enormity of this field, this review focuses on biochemical concepts of lipid peroxidation, production, metabolism, and signaling mechanisms of two main omega-6 fatty acids lipid peroxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA) and, in particular, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), summarizing not only its physiological and protective function as signaling molecule stimulating gene expression and cell survival, but also its cytotoxic role inhibiting gene expression and promoting cell death. Finally, overviews of in vivo mammalian model systems used to study the lipid peroxidation process, and common pathological processes linked to MDA and 4-HNE are shown. PMID:24999379

  10. Lipid peroxidation: production, metabolism, and signaling mechanisms of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Antonio; Muñoz, Mario F; Argüelles, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation can be described generally as a process under which oxidants such as free radicals attack lipids containing carbon-carbon double bond(s), especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Over the last four decades, an extensive body of literature regarding lipid peroxidation has shown its important role in cell biology and human health. Since the early 1970s, the total published research articles on the topic of lipid peroxidation was 98 (1970-1974) and has been increasing at almost 135-fold, by up to 13165 in last 4 years (2010-2013). New discoveries about the involvement in cellular physiology and pathology, as well as the control of lipid peroxidation, continue to emerge every day. Given the enormity of this field, this review focuses on biochemical concepts of lipid peroxidation, production, metabolism, and signaling mechanisms of two main omega-6 fatty acids lipid peroxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA) and, in particular, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), summarizing not only its physiological and protective function as signaling molecule stimulating gene expression and cell survival, but also its cytotoxic role inhibiting gene expression and promoting cell death. Finally, overviews of in vivo mammalian model systems used to study the lipid peroxidation process, and common pathological processes linked to MDA and 4-HNE are shown.

  11. Lipid metabolism during bacterial growth, sporulation, and germination: differential synthesis of individual branched- and normal-chain fatty acids during spore germination and outgrowth of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, K W; Bulla, L A; Mounts, T L

    1975-12-01

    The biosynthesis of individual branched- and normal-chain fatty acids during Bacillus thuringiensis spore germination and outgrowth was studied by comparing pulsed and continuous labeling of these fatty acids with [U-14C]acetate. The relative specific activity of each fatty acid varies with time as the cell progresses through outgrowth. However, fatty acid synthesis does occur in two distinct phases. Upon germination, acetate is incorporated only into the iso-isomers i-C13, i-C14, and i-C16; no normal or anteiso synthesis occurs. Subsequent to T30, the full complement of branched- and normal-chain homologues is formed and there is a dramatic enhancement in the overall rate of fatty acid synthesis. Significantly, this rate increase coincides with a marked shift from the synthesis of short-chain to long-chain fatty acids. These findings illustrate a dichotomy in synthesis that may result from initial fatty acid formation by preexisting spore fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Elucidation of the timing and kinetics of individual fatty acid formation provides a biochemical profile of activities directly related to membrane differentiation and cellular development.

  12. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  13. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  14. Effects of acute lipid overload on skeletal muscle insulin resistance, metabolic flexibility, and mitochondrial performance

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; DiStefano, Giovanna; Chacon, Alexander C.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Desimone, Marisa E.; Stafanovic-Racic, Maja; Hames, Kazanna C.; Despines, Alex A.; Toledo, Frederico G. S.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that acute lipid-induced insulin resistance would be attenuated in high-oxidative muscle of lean trained (LT) endurance athletes due to their enhanced metabolic flexibility and mitochondrial capacity. Lean sedentary (LS), obese sedentary (OS), and LT participants completed two hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with and without (glycerol control) the coinfusion of Intralipid. Metabolic flexibility was measured by indirect calorimetry as the oxidation of fatty acids and glucose during fasted and insulin-stimulated conditions, the latter with and without lipid oversupply. Muscle biopsies were obtained for mitochondrial and insulin-signaling studies. During hyperinsulinemia without lipid, glucose infusion rate (GIR) was lowest in OS due to lower rates of nonoxidative glucose disposal (NOGD), whereas state 4 respiration was increased in all groups. Lipid infusion reduced GIR similarly in all subjects and reduced state 4 respiration. However, in LT subjects, fat oxidation was higher with lipid oversupply, and although glucose oxidation was reduced, NOGD was better preserved compared with LS and OS subjects. Mitochondrial performance was positively associated with better NOGD and insulin sensitivity in both conditions. We conclude that enhanced mitochondrial performance with exercise is related to better metabolic flexibility and insulin sensitivity in response to lipid overload. PMID:25352435

  15. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  16. The effect of oral lipids and circulating lipoproteins on the metabolism of drugs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jigar P; Brocks, Dion R

    2009-11-01

    The oral bioavailability of many lipophilic drugs is known to increase when coadministered with fatty meals. Although such a phenomenon is typically ascribed to increased solubilization and absorption of drug, in some cases this increase in systemic exposure may be in part due to the influence of lipids on the presystemic metabolism of the affected drug. Oral lipids on their absorption may interfere with the drug metabolizing enzymes expressed in the small intestine and/or liver. Fatty acids incorporated in dietary triglyceride can modulate the expression and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes within the small intestine. Lipoproteins, which are the major carriers of lipids in the systemic circulation, can become associated with lipophilic drugs. Such a combination may influence the metabolism of lipophilic drugs through limiting their uptake into the cells thereby decreasing their metabolism. In a contrary manner, an increased uptake and metabolism of lipoprotein-bound drug may be facilitated by lipoprotein receptors mediated uptake. The components of lipoproteins may also modulate the expression or activity of hepatic and extrahepatic drug metabolizing enzymes.

  17. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals. PMID:26426396

  18. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals.

  19. Is hepatic lipid metabolism of beef cattle influenced by breed and dietary silage level?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In ruminants, unsaturated dietary fatty acids are biohydrogenated in the rumen and are further metabolised in various tissues, including liver, which has an important role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Therefore, manipulation of muscle fatty acid composition should take into account liver metabolism. In the present study, the influence of breed and diet on liver lipid composition and gene expression was investigated in order to clarify the role of this organ in the lipid metabolism of ruminants. Forty purebred young bulls from two phylogenetically distant autochthonous cattle breeds, Alentejana and Barrosã, were assigned to two different diets (low vs. high silage) and slaughtered at 18 months of age. Liver fatty acid composition, mRNA levels of enzymes and transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism, as well as the plasma lipid profile, were assessed. Results In spite of similar plasma non-esterified fatty acids levels, liver triacylglycerols content was higher in Barrosã than in Alentejana bulls. Moreover, the fatty acid composition of liver was clearly distinct from the remaining tissues involved in fatty acid metabolism of ruminants, as shown by Principal Components Analysis. The hepatic tissue is particularly rich in α-linolenic acid and their products of desaturation and elongation. Results indicate that DGAT1, ELOVL2, FADS1 and FADS2 genes influence the fatty acid composition of the liver the most. Moreover, genes such as DGAT1 and ELOVL2 appear to be more sensitive to genetic background than to dietary manipulation, whereas genes encoding for desaturases, such as FADS1, appear to be modulated by dietary silage level. Conclusions Our results indicate that liver plays an important role in the biosynthesis of n-3 LC-PUFA. It is also suggested that dietary silage level influences the hepatic fatty acid metabolism in a breed-dependent manner, through changes in the expression of genes encoding for enzymes associated with the

  20. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  1. Comprehensive insights into microcystin-LR effects on hepatic lipid metabolism using cross-omics technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongyao; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Bing; Yin, Jinbao; Yu, Yunjiang; Yang, Liuyan

    2016-09-05

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) can induce hepatic tissue damages and molecular toxicities, but its effects on lipid metabolism remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of MC-LR exposure on mice lipid metabolism and uncovered the underlying mechanism through metabonomic, transcriptomic and metagenomic analyses after administration of mice with MC-LR by gavage for 28 d. Increased liver weight and abdominal fat weight, and evident hepatic lipid vacuoles accumulation were observed in the mice fed with 0.2mg/kg/d MC-LR. Serum nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that MC-LR treatment altered the levels of serum metabolites including triglyceride, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) and very low density lipoprotein. Digital Gene Expression technology was used to reveal differential expression of hepatic transcriptomes, demonstrating that MC-LR treatment disturbed hepatic UFA biosynthesis and activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways via Pparγ, Fabp1 and Fabp2 over-expression. Metagenomic analyses of gut microbiota revealed that MC-LR exposure also increased abundant ratio of Firmicutes vs. Bacteroidetes in gut and altered biosynthetic pathways of various microbial metabolic and pro-inflammatory molecules. In conclusion, oral MC-LR exposure can induce hepatic lipid metabolism disorder mediated by UFA biosynthesis and PPAR activation, and gut microbial community shift may play an important role in the metabolic disturbance.

  2. Beyond intestinal soap--bile acids in metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Bloks, Vincent W; Groen, Albert K

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, it has become apparent that bile acids are involved in a host of activities beyond their classic functions in bile formation and fat absorption. The identification of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as a nuclear receptor directly activated by bile acids and the discovery that bile acids are also ligands for the membrane-bound, G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (also known as TGR5) have opened new avenues of research. Both FXR and TGR5 regulate various elements of glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Consequently, a picture has emerged of bile acids acting as modulators of (postprandial) metabolism. Therefore, strategies that interfere with either bile acid metabolism or signalling cascades mediated by bile acids may represent novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Synthetic modulators of FXR have been designed and tested, primarily in animal models. Furthermore, the use of bile acid sequestrants to reduce plasma cholesterol levels has unexpected benefits. For example, treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with sequestrants causes substantial reductions in plasma levels of glucose and HbA1c. This Review aims to provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms by which bile acids modulate glucose and energy metabolism, particularly focusing on the glucose-lowering actions of bile acid sequestrants in insulin resistant states and T2DM.

  3. [Exploration of regulating blood lipids metabolism by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-shan; Wu, Wei; Qing, Li-jin

    2015-02-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an important risk factor of cardio-/cerebrovascular disease, and reducing lipids has become an important project for itsclinical preventing and treating. Western medicine, with its confirmative efficacy and clear mechanism, has played an irreplaceable role. Along with the development of modern medicine, integrative medicine has gradually become a growing trend in regulating blood lipids metabolism. It not only could make up the insufficient power for Chinese medicine in lowering lipids, but also could reduce adverse reactions and economic costs brought by long-term administration of Western medicine. As a modern practitioner of Chinese medicine, we should keep clear that integrative medicine regulating blood lipids metabolism does not mean a simple combination of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine. We should treat it guided by systematic theories. We combine disease identification and syndrome differentiation, guide lipids lowering by integrative medicine including selecting Western drugs for blood lipids lowering, Chinese medical prescriptions for syndrome typing, and effective Chinese herbs based on modern pharmacologies.

  4. Oxidative and reductive metabolism of lipid-peroxidation derived carbonyls

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mahavir; Kapoor, Aniruddh; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2015-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) results in tissue injury under a variety of pathological conditions and chronic degenerative diseases. While ROS are highly reactive and can incite significant injury, polyunsaturated lipids in membranes and lipoproteins are their main targets. ROS-triggered lipid peroxidation reactions generate a range of reactive carbonyl species (RCS), and these RCS spread and amplify ROS-related injury. Several RCS generated in oxidizing lipids, such as 4-hydroxy trans-2-nonenal (HNE), 4-oxo-2-(E)-nonenal (ONE), acrolein, malondialdehyde (MDA) and phospholipid aldehydes have been shown to be produced under conditions of oxidative stress and contribute to tissue injury and dysfunction by depleting glutathione and other reductants leading to the modification of proteins, lipids, and DNA. To prevent tissue injury, these RCS are metabolized by several oxidoreductases, including members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), and alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Metabolism via these enzymes results in RCS inactivation and detoxification, although under some conditions, it can also lead to the generation of signaling molecules that trigger adaptive responses. Metabolic transformation and detoxification of RCS by oxidoreductases prevent indiscriminate ROS toxicity, while at the same time, preserving ROS signaling. A better understanding of RCS metabolism by oxidoreductases could lead to the development of novel therapeutic interventions to decrease oxidative injury in several disease states and to enhance resistance to ROS-induced toxicity. PMID:25559856

  5. Absence of cumulus cells during in vitro maturation affects lipid metabolism in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Uzbekov, Rustem; Elis, Sébastien; Sanchez, Laura; Kireev, Igor; Lardic, Lionel; Dalbies-Tran, Rozenn; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2013-03-15

    Cumulus cells (CC) surround the oocyte and are coupled metabolically through regulation of nutrient intake. CC removal before in vitro maturation (IVM) decreases bovine oocyte developmental competence without affecting nuclear meiotic maturation. The objective was to investigate the influence of CC on oocyte cytoplasmic maturation in relation to energy metabolism. IVM with either cumulus-enclosed (CEO) or -denuded (DO) oocytes was performed in serum-free metabolically optimized medium. Transmission electron microscopy revealed different distribution of membrane-bound vesicles and lipid droplets between metaphase II DO and CEO. By Nile Red staining, a significant reduction in total lipid level was evidenced in DO. Global transcriptomic analysis revealed differential expression of genes regulating energy metabolism, transcription, and translation between CEO and DO. By Western blot, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hormone-sensitive phospholipase (HSL) proteins were detected in oocytes and in CC, indicating a local lipogenesis and lypolysis. FAS protein was significantly less abundant in DO that in CEO and more highly expressed in CC than in the oocytes. On the contrary, HSL protein was more abundant in oocytes than in CC. In addition, active Ser⁵⁶³-phosphorylated HSL was detected in the oocytes only after IVM, and its level was similar in CEO and DO. In conclusion, absence of CC during IVM affected lipid metabolism in the oocyte and led to suboptimal cytoplasmic maturation. Thus, CC may influence the oocyte by orienting the consumption of nutritive storage via regulation of local fatty acid synthesis and lipolysis to provide energy for maturation.

  6. Effect of geraniol, a plant derived monoterpene on lipids and lipid metabolizing enzymes in experimental hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Muthukumaran; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major, modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we have focused on the effect of different doses of geraniol (GOH) on the lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes in atherogenic diet (AD) fed hamsters. Male Syrian hamsters were grouped into seven: group 1 were control animals; group 2 were animals fed GOH alone (200 mg/kg b.w); group 3 were animals fed AD (10 % coconut oil, 0.25 % cholesterol, and 0.25 % cholic acid); group 4 were animals fed AD + corn oil (2.5 ml/kg b.w); and groups 5, 6, and 7 were fed AD as in group 3 + different doses of GOH (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg b.w), respectively, for 12 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and various assays were performed in the plasma and tissues. The AD hamsters showed marked changes in lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes. However, supplementation with GOH counteracted the hyperlipidemia by inhibiting HMG CoA reductase and suppressing lipogenesis. The antihyperlipidemic efficacy of GOH was found to be effective at the dose of 100 mg/kg b.w. This study illustrates that GOH is effective in lowering the risk of hyperlipidemia in AD fed hamsters.

  7. Lipid Metabolism during Infection and Endotoxemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    containing 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids almost exclusively) have been used in certain therapeutic diets . In contrast to the long-chain triglycerides...increased utilization of ketone bodies. The major substrates for hepatic ketogenesis are long-chain fatty acids. The term ’ ketogenic capacity’ refers to the...bodies is influenced not only by substrate availability and enzyme activities, but also more directly by the dis- posal of acetyl-CoA through ketogenic

  8. Influence of Nutritional Factors on Lipid Metabolism.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    conditions of chronic high level fat oxidation such as exercise, Askew et al. (121) fed exercising rats diets supplemented with 0.5Z L- carnitine . Although...exercise increased adipose tissue fatty acid turnover, supplemental dietary carnitine neither increased skeletal muscle in vitro fatty acid oxidation...some investigators believe the relative activities of the sn-glycerolphosphate acyltransferase and carnitine palmttyltrans- ferase may influence the

  9. The Sheep Genome Illuminates Biology of the Rumen and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Richard; Maddox, Jillian F.; Faraut, Thomas; Wu, Chunhua; Muzny, Donna M.; Li, Yuxiang; Zhang, Wenguang; Stanton, Jo-Ann; Brauning, Rudiger; Barris, Wesley C.; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen L.; Searle, Stephen M.J.; Adelson, David L.; Bian, Chao; Cam, Graham R.; Chen, Yulin; Cheng, Shifeng; DeSilva, Udaya; Dixen, Karen; Dong, Yang; Fan, Guangyi; Franklin, Ian R.; Fu, Shaoyin; Guan, Rui; Highland, Margaret A.; Holder, Michael E.; Huang, Guodong; Ingham, Aaron B.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie L.; Lee, Sandra L.; Liu, Weiqing; Liu, Xin; Lu, Changxin; Lv, Tian; Mathew, Tittu; McWilliam, Sean; Menzies, Moira; Pan, Shengkai; Robelin, David; Servin, Bertrand; Townley, David; Wang, Wenliang; Wei, Bin; White, Stephen N.; Yang, Xinhua; Ye, Chen; Yue, Yaojing; Zeng, Peng; Zhou, Qing; Hansen, Jacob B.; Kristensen, Karsten; Gibbs, Richard A.; Flicek, Paul; Warkup, Christopher C.; Jones, Huw E.; Oddy, V. Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W.; McEwan, John C.; Kijas, James; Wang, Jun; Worley, Kim C.; Archibald, Alan L.; Cockett, Noelle; Xu, Xun; Wang, Wen; Dalrymple, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk and fiber in the form of wool, and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, which carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high quality reference sheep genome and transcriptomes from 40 different tissues. We identified highly expressed genes encoding keratin cross-linking proteins associated with rumen evolution. We also identified genes involved in lipid metabolism that had been amplified and/or had altered tissue expression patterns. This may be in response to changes in the barrier lipids of the skin, an interaction between lipid metabolism and wool synthesis, and an increased role of volatile fatty acids in ruminants, compared to non-ruminant animals. PMID:24904168

  10. The sheep genome illuminates biology of the rumen and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Xie, Min; Chen, Wenbin; Talbot, Richard; Maddox, Jillian F; Faraut, Thomas; Wu, Chunhua; Muzny, Donna M; Li, Yuxiang; Zhang, Wenguang; Stanton, Jo-Ann; Brauning, Rudiger; Barris, Wesley C; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Stephen M J; Adelson, David L; Bian, Chao; Cam, Graham R; Chen, Yulin; Cheng, Shifeng; DeSilva, Udaya; Dixen, Karen; Dong, Yang; Fan, Guangyi; Franklin, Ian R; Fu, Shaoyin; Fuentes-Utrilla, Pablo; Guan, Rui; Highland, Margaret A; Holder, Michael E; Huang, Guodong; Ingham, Aaron B; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie L; Lee, Sandra L; Liu, Weiqing; Liu, Xin; Lu, Changxin; Lv, Tian; Mathew, Tittu; McWilliam, Sean; Menzies, Moira; Pan, Shengkai; Robelin, David; Servin, Bertrand; Townley, David; Wang, Wenliang; Wei, Bin; White, Stephen N; Yang, Xinhua; Ye, Chen; Yue, Yaojing; Zeng, Peng; Zhou, Qing; Hansen, Jacob B; Kristiansen, Karsten; Gibbs, Richard A; Flicek, Paul; Warkup, Christopher C; Jones, Huw E; Oddy, V Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W; McEwan, John C; Kijas, James W; Wang, Jun; Worley, Kim C; Archibald, Alan L; Cockett, Noelle; Xu, Xun; Wang, Wen; Dalrymple, Brian P

    2014-06-06

    Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk, and fiber in the form of wool and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, that carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high-quality reference sheep genome and transcriptomes from 40 different tissues. We identified highly expressed genes encoding keratin cross-linking proteins associated with rumen evolution. We also identified genes involved in lipid metabolism that had been amplified and/or had altered tissue expression patterns. This may be in response to changes in the barrier lipids of the skin, an interaction between lipid metabolism and wool synthesis, and an increased role of volatile fatty acids in ruminants compared with nonruminant animals.

  11. Deregulation of lipid metabolism pathway genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    DAKER, MAELINDA; BHUVANENDRAN, SAATHEEYAVAANE; AHMAD, MUNIRAH; TAKADA, KENZO; KHOO, ALAN SOO-BENG

    2012-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique tumour of epithelial origin with a distinct geographical distribution, closely associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) are small non-polyadenylated RNAs that are abundantly expressed in latent EBV-infected NPC cells. To study the role of EBERs in NPC, we established stable expression of EBERs in HK1, an EBV-negative NPC cell line. Cells expressing EBERs consistently exhibited an increased growth rate. However, EBERs did not confer resistance towards cisplatin-induced apoptosis or promote migration or invasion ability in the cells tested. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified potential candidate genes that were deregulated in NPC cells expressing EBERs. Gene Ontology analysis of the data set revealed that EBERs upregulate the cellular lipid metabolic process. Upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) was observed in EBER-expressing cells. NPC cells exhibited LDL-dependent cell proliferation. In addition, a polyphenolic flavonoid compound, quercetin, known to inhibit FASN, was found to inhibit proliferation of NPC cells. PMID:23292678

  12. Brain amino acid metabolism and ketosis.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, M; Daikhin, Y; Nissim, I; Lazarow, A; Nissim, I

    2001-10-15

    The relationship between ketosis and brain amino acid metabolism was studied in mice that consumed a ketogenic diet (>90% of calories as lipid). After 3 days on the diet the blood concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 5 mmol/l (control = 0.06-0.1 mmol/l). In forebrain and cerebellum the concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 10-fold higher than control. Brain [citrate] and [lactate] were greater in the ketotic animals. The concentration of whole brain free coenzyme A was lower in ketotic mice. Brain [aspartate] was reduced in forebrain and cerebellum, but [glutamate] and [glutamine] were unchanged. When [(15)N]leucine was administered to follow N metabolism, this labeled amino acid accumulated to a greater extent in the blood and brain of ketotic mice. Total brain aspartate ((14)N + (15)N) was reduced in the ketotic group. The [(15)N]aspartate/[(15)N]glutamate ratio was lower in ketotic animals, consistent with a shift in the equilibrium of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction away from aspartate. Label in [(15)N]GABA and total [(15)N]GABA was increased in ketotic animals. When the ketotic animals were injected with glucose, there was a partial blunting of ketoacidemia within 40 min as well as an increase of brain [aspartate], which was similar to control. When [U-(13)C(6)]glucose was injected, the (13)C label appeared rapidly in brain lactate and in amino acids. Label in brain [U-(13)C(3)]lactate was greater in the ketotic group. The ratio of brain (13)C-amino acid/(13)C-lactate, which reflects the fraction of amino acid carbon that is derived from glucose, was much lower in ketosis, indicating that another carbon source, i.e., ketone bodies, were precursor to aspartate, glutamate, glutamine and GABA.

  13. Impact of dietary dairy polar lipids on lipid metabolism of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Reis, Mariza G; Roy, Nicole C; Bermingham, Emma N; Ryan, Leigh; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Young, Wayne; Krause, Lutz; Berger, Bernard; North, Mike; Stelwagen, Kerst; Reis, Marlon M

    2013-03-20

    The effect of milk polar lipids on lipid metabolism of liver, adipose tissue, and brain and on composition of intestinal microbiota was investigated. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 5 weeks, followed by 5 weeks with HFD without (control) or supplemented with total polar lipids (TPL), phospholipids (PL), or sphingolipids (SPL). Animals fed SPL showed a tendency for lower triglyceride synthesis (P = 0.058) in the liver, but not in adipose tissue. PL and TPL reduced de novo hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis. The ratio of palmitoleic to palmitic acid in the liver was lower for animals fed SPL or TPL compared to control. There was little effect of the supplementation on the cecal microbiota composition. In the brain, DHA (C22:6) content correlated negatively with tetracosanoic acid (C24:0) after TPL supplementation (-0.71, P = 0.02) but not in control (0.26, P = 0.44). Arachidonic acid (C20:4) was negatively correlated with C24:0 in both groups (TPL, -0.77, P = 0.008; control, -0.81, P = 0.003).

  14. Short term exposure to perluoroalkyl acids causes increase of hepatic lipid and triglyceride in conjunction with liver hypertrophy

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to extensive use of industrial and consumer products. These chemicals activate peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPARa) in liver and after lipid metabolism. The current stu...

  15. Diverse Roles of SIRT1 in Cancer Biology and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Glenn E.; Pruitt, Wendy M.; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, has been described in the literature as a major player in the regulation of cellular stress responses. Its expression has been shown to be altered in cancer cells, and it targets both histone and non-histone proteins for deacetylation and thereby alters metabolic programs in response to diverse physiological stress. Interestingly, many of the metabolic pathways that are influenced by SIRT1 are also altered in tumor development. Not only does SIRT1 have the potential to regulate oncogenic factors, it also orchestrates many aspects of metabolism and lipid regulation and recent reports are beginning to connect these areas. SIRT1 influences pathways that provide an alternative means of deriving energy (such as fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis) when a cell encounters nutritive stress, and can therefore lead to altered lipid metabolism in various pathophysiological contexts. This review helps to show the various connections between SIRT1 and major pathways in cellular metabolism and the consequence of SIRT1 deregulation on carcinogenesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:25569080

  16. Aronia melanocarpa Extract Ameliorates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism through PPARγ2 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Eun Byul; Hur, Wonhee; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Park, Hyoung-Jin; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that anthocyanin-rich foods may improve hyperlipidemia and ameliorate hepatic steatosis. Here, effects of Aronia melanocarpa (AM), known to be rich of anthocyanins, on hepatic lipid metabolism and adipogenic genes were determined. AM was treated to C57BL/6N mice fed with high fat diet (HFD) or to FL83B cells treated with free fatty acid (FFA). Changes in levels of lipids, enzymes and hormones were observed, and expressions of adipogenic genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism were detected by PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. In mice, AM significantly reduced the body and liver weight, lipid accumulation in the liver, and levels of biochemical markers such as fatty acid synthase, hepatic triglyceride and leptin. Serum transaminases, indicators for hepatocyte injury, were also suppressed, while superoxide dismutase activity and liver antioxidant capacity were significantly increased. In FL83B cells, AM significantly reduced FFA-induced lipid droplet accumulation. Protein synthesis of an adipogenic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2) was inhibited in vivo. Furthermore, transcriptional activity of PPARγ2 was down-regulated in vitro, and mRNA expression of PPARγ2 and its downstream target genes, adipocyte protein 2 and lipoprotein lipase were down-regulated by AM both in vitro and in vivo. These results show beneficial effects of AM against hepatic lipid accumulation through the inhibition of PPARγ2 expression along with improvements in body weight, liver functions, lipid profiles and antioxidant capacity suggesting the potential therapeutic efficacy of AM on NAFLD. PMID:28081181

  17. Effects of silicon deficiency on lipid composition and metabolism in the diatom Cyclotella cryptica

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G. )

    1988-09-01

    The effects of silicon deficiency on the metabolism and composition of lipids in Cyclotella cryptica T13L Reimann, Lewin, and Guillard were examined Silicon-deficient cells had higher levels of neutral lipids (primarily triacylglycerols) and higher proportions of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids than silicon-replete cells. After 4 h of silicon deficiency, the percentage of newly assimilated NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} partitioned into lipids increased from 27.6% to 54.1%, whereas the percentage partitioned into chrysolaminarin decreased from 21.6% to 54.1%, whereas the percentage partitioned into chrysolaminarin decreased from 21.6% to 10.6%. In addition, pulse-chase experiments with NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} indicated that the amount of {sup 14}C in the total cellular lipid fraction increased by 32% after 12 h of silicon deficiency despite the absence of additional photoassimilable {sup 14}C. Therefore, the accumulation of lipids in response to silicon deficiency appears to be due to two distinct processes: (1) an increase in the proportion of newly assimilated carbon partitioned into lipids, and (2) a slow conversion of previously assimilated carbon from non-lipid compounds into lipids.

  18. The Effect of Sitagliptin on Lipid Metabolism of Fatty Liver Mice and Related Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bilin; Shen, Tian; Chen, Lin; Xia, Juan; Zhang, Cuiping; Wang, Hongping; Yu, Ming; Lei, Tao

    2017-03-19

    BACKGROUND In clinics, patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have been shown to receive significant improvements in blood glucose levels, lipid levels, and liver function after sitagliptin treatment, although the mechanism of drug action remains poorly understood. This study investigated the possible mechanism of sitagliptin on lipid metabolism of NAFLD mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS Male C57/BL6 mice were induced for NAFLD via 16 weeks of a high-fat diet, and were treated with 15 mg/kg/day sitagliptin for 16 consecutive weeks. Blood lipid levels were measured and samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and oil red staining for liver pathology and lipid deposition. Serum levels of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-9 and FGF-21 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and cAMP reactive element binding homolog (CREBH) were measured by Western blotting, while fatty acid synthase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) mRNA levels were assayed by RT-PCR. RESULTS Compared to the control group, the NAFLD model mice had liver fatty disease, lower serum FGF-21 and FGF-19 levels, elevated serum lipid levels, depressed PPAR-α, CREBH, and CPT1 expression, and enhanced FAS expression (p<0.05). Sitagliptin treatment depressed blood lipid levels, increased serum FGF-21 and FGF-19 levels, PPAR-α, CREBH, and CPT1 expression, and suppressed FAS expression (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Sitagliptin can protect liver tissue and modulate lipid metabolism in NAFLD mice via elevating FGF-21 and FGF-19, upregulating liver PPAR-a and CREBH levels, and mediating expression levels of key enzymes for lipid metabolism.

  19. The Effect of Sitagliptin on Lipid Metabolism of Fatty Liver Mice and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bilin; Shen, Tian; Chen, Lin; Xia, Juan; Zhang, Cuiping; Wang, Hongping; Yu, Ming; Lei, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Background In clinics, patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have been shown to receive significant improvements in blood glucose levels, lipid levels, and liver function after sitagliptin treatment, although the mechanism of drug action remains poorly understood. This study investigated the possible mechanism of sitagliptin on lipid metabolism of NAFLD mice. Material/Methods Male C57/BL6 mice were induced for NAFLD via 16 weeks of a high-fat diet, and were treated with 15 mg/kg/day sitagliptin for 16 consecutive weeks. Blood lipid levels were measured and samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and oil red staining for liver pathology and lipid deposition. Serum levels of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-9 and FGF-21 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and cAMP reactive element binding homolog (CREBH) were measured by Western blotting, while fatty acid synthase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) mRNA levels were assayed by RT-PCR. Results Compared to the control group, the NAFLD model mice had liver fatty disease, lower serum FGF-21 and FGF-19 levels, elevated serum lipid levels, depressed PPAR-α, CREBH, and CPT1 expression, and enhanced FAS expression (p<0.05). Sitagliptin treatment depressed blood lipid levels, increased serum FGF-21 and FGF-19 levels, PPAR-α, CREBH, and CPT1 expression, and suppressed FAS expression (p<0.05). Conclusions Sitagliptin can protect liver tissue and modulate lipid metabolism in NAFLD mice via elevating FGF-21 and FGF-19, upregulating liver PPAR-α and CREBH levels, and mediating expression levels of key enzymes for lipid metabolism. PMID:28315901

  20. Metabolic engineering of Pichia pastoris to produce ricinoleic acid, a hydroxy fatty acid of industrial importance.

    PubMed

    Meesapyodsuk, Dauenpen; Chen, Yan; Ng, Siew Hon; Chen, Jianan; Qiu, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Ricinoleic acid (12-hydroxyoctadec-cis-9-enoic acid) has many specialized uses in bioproduct industries, while castor bean is currently the only commercial source for the fatty acid. This report describes metabolic engineering of a microbial system (Pichia pastoris) to produce ricinoleic acid using a "push" (synthesis) and "pull" (assembly) strategy. CpFAH, a fatty acid hydroxylase from Claviceps purpurea, was used for synthesis of ricinoleic acid, and CpDGAT1, a diacylglycerol acyl transferase for the triacylglycerol synthesis from the same species, was used for assembly of the fatty acid. Coexpression of CpFAH and CpDGAT1 produced higher lipid contents and ricinoleic acid levels than expression of CpFAH alone. Coexpression in a mutant haploid strain defective in the Δ12 desaturase activity resulted in a higher level of ricinoleic acid than that in the diploid strain. Intriguingly, the ricinoleic acid produced was mainly distributed in the neutral lipid fractions, particularly the free fatty acid form, but with little in the polar lipids. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of the metabolic engineering strategy and excellent capacity of the microbial system for production of ricinoleic acid as an alternative to plant sources for industrial uses.

  1. Tissue lipid metabolism and hepatic metabolomic profiling in response to supplementation of fermented cottonseedmeal in the diets of broiler chickens*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Cun-xi; Zhang, Wen-ju; Wang, Yong-qiang; Liu, Yan-feng; Ge, Wen-xia; Liu, Jian-cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fermented cottonseed meal (FCSM) on lipid metabolites, lipid metabolism-related gene expression in liver tissues and abdominal adipose tissues, and hepatic metabolomic profiling in broiler chickens. One hundred and eighty 21-d-old broiler chickens were randomly divided into three diet groups with six replicates of 10 birds in each group. The three diets consisted of a control diet supplemented with unfermented cottonseed meal, an experimental diet of cottonseed meal fermented by Candida tropicalis, and a second experimental diet of cottonseed meal fermented by C. tropicalis plus Saccharomyces cerevisae. The results showed that FCSM intake significantly decreased the levels of abdominal fat and hepatic triglycerides (P<0.05 for both). Dietary FCSM supplementation down-regulated the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase and acetyl CoA carboxylase in liver tissues and the lipoprotein lipase expression in abdominal fat tissues (P<0.05 for both). FCSM intake resulted in significant metabolic changes of multiple pathways in the liver involving the tricarboxylic acid cycle, synthesis of fatty acids, and the metabolism of glycerolipid and amino acids. These findings indicated that FCSM regulated lipid metabolism by increasing or decreasing the expression of the lipid-related gene and by altering multiple endogenous metabolites. Lipid metabolism regulation is a complex process, this discovery provided new essential information about the effects of FCSM diets in broiler chickens and demonstrated the great potential of nutrimetabolomics in researching complex nutrients added to animal diets. PMID:26055906

  2. Effect of Evolvulus alsinoides on lipid metabolism of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gomathi, Duraisamy; Ravikumar, Ganesan; Kalaiselvi, Manokaran; Devaki, Kanakasabapathi; Uma, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of ethanolic extract of Evolvulus alsinoides (E. alsinoides) on diabetes-induced changes in lipid metabolism. Methods The ethanolic extract of E. alsinoides on serum and tissue lipid levels were examined in control and experimental group rats. Results Oral administration of E. alsinoides extract to streptozotocin induced diabetic rats for 45 d significantly reduced the levels of triglycerids, phospholipids, cholesterol and free fatty acids in serum and tissues, it increases the high density lipoprotein in serum as that of control. Conclusions The ethanolic extract of E. alsinoides supplementation is useful in hyperlipidemia prevention during diabetes mellitus.

  3. Monitoring intra-cellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman- and CARS-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in lipid metabolism in vessel wall tissues. Macrophages can take up lipids by various mechanisms. As phagocytes, macrophages are important for the decomposition of lipid plaques within arterial walls that contribute to arteriosclerosis. Of special interest are uptake dynamics and intra-cellular fate of different individual types of lipids as, for example, fatty acids, triglycerides or free and esterified cholesterol. Here we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and follow subsequent storage or degradation patterns. The combination of optical microscopy with Raman spectroscopy allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through the associated spectral information. Relatively long measuring times, due to the weakness of Raman scattering can be overcome by non-linear effects such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). With this contribution we introduce first results to monitor the incorporation of lipid components into individual cells employing Raman and CARS microscopy.

  4. Astrocyte lipid metabolism is critical for synapse development and function in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Deijk, Anne-Lieke F; Camargo, Nutabi; Timmerman, Jaap; Heistek, Tim; Brouwers, Jos F; Mogavero, Floriana; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G

    2017-04-01

    The brain is considered to be autonomous in lipid synthesis with astrocytes producing lipids far more efficiently than neurons. Accordingly, it is generally assumed that astrocyte-derived lipids are taken up by neurons to support synapse formation and function. Initial confirmation of this assumption has been obtained in cell cultures, but whether astrocyte-derived lipids support synapses in vivo is not known. Here, we address this issue and determined the role of astrocyte lipid metabolism in hippocampal synapse formation and function in vivo. Hippocampal protein expression for the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and its target gene fatty acid synthase (Fasn) was found in astrocytes but not in neurons. Diminishing SREBP activity in astrocytes using mice in which the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) was deleted from GFAP-expressing cells resulted in decreased cholesterol and phospholipid secretion by astrocytes. Interestingly, SCAP mutant mice showed more immature synapses, lower presynaptic protein SNAP-25 levels as well as reduced numbers of synaptic vesicles, indicating impaired development of the presynaptic terminal. Accordingly, hippocampal short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity were defective in mutant mice. These findings establish a critical role for astrocyte lipid metabolism in presynaptic terminal development and function in vivo. GLIA 2017;65:670-682.

  5. Impact of fasting time on hepatic lipid metabolism in nutritional animal studies.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo; Metoki, Kanae; Yamahira, Takashi; Kato, Masaki; Inoue, Nao; Nagao, Koji; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Many animal studies on improvement of lipid metabolism, using dietary components, fast the animals on the final day of the feeding. Although fasting has a significant impact on lipid metabolism, its time-dependent influence is not fully understood. We examined the effects of several fasting times on lipid metabolism. Rats fed with a semisynthetic diet for 2 wk were killed after 0 (9:00 am), 6 (7:00 am-1:00 pm), 9 (0:00 am-9:00 am), and 13 h (8:00 pm-9:00 am) of fasting. Compared to the 0 h group, marked reduction of liver weight and hepatic triacylglycerol content was observed in the 9 and 13 h groups. Activities of hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis gradually decreased during fasting. In contrast, drastic time-dependent reduction of gene expression, of the enzymes, was observed. Expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase mRNA was higher in the fasting groups than in the 0 h group. Our study showed that fasting has a significant impact on several parameters related to lipid metabolism in rat liver.

  6. Overexpression of Jazf1 reduces body weight gain and regulates lipid metabolism in high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Woo Young; Bae, Ki Beom; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yu, Dong Hun; Kim, Hei Jung; Ji, Young Rae; Park, Seo Jin; Park, Si Jun; Kang, Min-Cheol; Jeong, Ja In; Park, Sang-Joon; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Inkyu; Kim, Myoung Ok; Yoon, Duhak; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The expression of Jazf1 in the liver suppressed lipid accumulation. • Jazf1 significantly increases transcription of fatty acid synthase. • Jazf1 plays a critical role in the regulation of energy and lipid homeostasis. • Jazf1 associates the development of metabolic disorder. • Jazf1 may provide a new therapeutic target in the management of metabolic disorder. - Abstract: Jazf1 is a 27 kDa nuclear protein containing three putative zinc finger motifs that is associated with diabetes mellitus and prostate cancer; however, little is known about the role that this gene plays in regulation of metabolism. Recent evidence indicates that Jazf1 transcription factors bind to the nuclear orphan receptor TR4. This receptor regulates PEPCK, the key enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis. To elucidate Jazf1’s role in metabolism, we fed a 60% fat diet for up to 15 weeks. In Jazf1 overexpression mice, weight gain was found to be significantly decreased. The expression of Jazf1 in the liver also suppressed lipid accumulation and decreased droplet size. These results suggest that Jazf1 plays a critical role in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Finally, Jazf1 may provide a new therapeutic target in the management of obesity and diabetes.

  7. Metabolic crosstalk between membrane and storage lipids facilitates heat stress management in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Péter, Mária; Glatz, Attila; Gudmann, Péter; Gombos, Imre; Török, Zsolt; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László

    2017-01-01

    Cell membranes actively participate in stress sensing and signalling. Here we present the first in-depth lipidomic analysis to characterize alterations in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe in response to mild heat stress (HS). The lipidome was assessed by a simple one-step methanolic extraction. Genetic manipulations that altered triglyceride (TG) content in the absence or presence of HS gave rise to distinct lipidomic fingerprints for S. pombe. Cells unable to produce TG demonstrated long-lasting growth arrest and enhanced signalling lipid generation. Our results reveal that metabolic crosstalk between membrane and storage lipids facilitates homeostatic maintenance of the membrane physical/chemical state that resists negative effects on cell growth and viability in response to HS. We propose a novel stress adaptation mechanism in which heat-induced TG synthesis contributes to membrane rigidization by accommodating unsaturated fatty acids of structural lipids, enabling their replacement by newly synthesized saturated fatty acids. PMID:28282432

  8. Leptin regulates peripheral lipid metabolism primarily through central effects on food intake

    PubMed Central

    Prieur, Xavier; Tung, Y. C. Loraine; Griffin, Julian L; Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Coll, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic effects of leptin may involve both centrally and peripherally mediated actions with a component of the central actions potentially independent of alterations in food intake. Ob/ob mice have significant abnormalities in lipid metabolism, correctable by leptin administration. We used ob/ob mice to study the relative importance of the subtypes of actions of leptin (central vs peripheral; food intake dependent vs independent) on lipid metabolism. Mice were treated for 3 days with leptin, either centrally (ICV) or peripherally (IP), and compared with mice pair-fed to the leptin-treated mice (PF) and with ad libitum fed controls (C). All treatment groups (ICV, IP, PF) showed indistinguishable changes in liver weight, hepatic steatosis, hepatic lipidomic profile and circulating free fatty acids, triglycerides and cholesterol lipoprotein profile. Changes in the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in liver, muscle and white fat were broadly similar in IP, ICV and PF groups. Leptin (both ICV and IP) stimulated expression of both mitochondrial and peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (liver) and PPARα (skeletal muscle) to an extent not replicated by pair feeding. Leptin had profound effects on peripheral lipid metabolism but the majority were explained by its effects on food intake. Leptin had additional centrally mediated effects to increase the expression of a limited number of genes concerned with fatty acid oxidation. While we cannot exclude direct peripheral effects of leptin on certain aspects of lipid metabolism we were unable to detect any such effects on the parameters measured in this study. PMID:18635658

  9. Effect of sunflower-seed oil and linseed oil on tissue lipid metabolism, gene expression, and milk fatty acid secretion in Alpine goats fed maize silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Bonnet, M; Leroux, C; Shingfield, K J; Chilliard, Y

    2009-12-01

    Lipid in the diet is known to enhance milk fat secretion and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating goats. In the current experiment, the contribution of peripheral tissue and mammary gland lipid metabolism to changes in milk fat composition from plant oils was examined. Fourteen Alpine goats in midlactation were used in a 3 x 3 Latin square design with 28-d experimental periods. Treatments comprised maize silage-based diets containing no additional oil (M), sunflower-seed oil (MSO; 6.1% of diet DM), or linseed oil (MLO; 6.2% of diet DM). Compared with the control, milk yield was greater in goats fed MSO (3.37 and 3.62 kg/d, respectively), whereas MLO enhanced milk fat content (+3.9 g/kg), resulting in a 14% increase in milk fat secretion. Both MSO and MLO increased milk lactose secretion by 12 and 8%, respectively, compared with M. Relative to the control, plant oils decreased C10 to C16 secretion (32 and 24%, respectively, for MSO and MLO) and enhanced C18 output in milk (ca. 110%). Diets MSO and MLO increased cis-9 18:1 secretion in milk by 25 and 31%, respectively, compared with M. The outputs of trans-11 18:1 and cis-9, trans-11 18:2 in milk were increased 8.34- and 6.02-fold for MSO and 5.58- and 3.71-fold for MLO compared with M, and MSO increased trans-10 18:1 and trans-10, cis-12 18:2 secretion. Plant oils decreased milk fat cis-9 14:1/14:0; cis-9 16:1/16:0; cis-9 18:1/18:0; and cis-9, trans-11 18:2/trans-11 18:1 concentration ratios but had no effect on mammary stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA or activity. Furthermore, changes in milk fatty acid secretion were not associated with alterations in mammary acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA and activity, abundance of mRNA encoding for lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid synthase, or malic enzyme and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in mammary tissue. Mammary lipoprotein lipase activity was increased with MSO relative to MLO. Treatments had no effect on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme

  10. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  11. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu‐Han; Linden, Melissa A.; Gordon, Alicia; Scott Rector, R.; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long‐Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long‐Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L‐Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O‐Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O‐EndEx). O‐Sed rats developed hyperphagia‐induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L‐Sed rats. O‐EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O‐Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up‐regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25602012

  12. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Han; Linden, Melissa A; Gordon, Alicia; Rector, R Scott; Buhman, Kimberly K

    2015-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L-Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O-Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O-EndEx). O-Sed rats developed hyperphagia-induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L-Sed rats. O-EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O-Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up-regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  13. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  14. [Gut microbiota may have influence on glucose and lipid metabolism].

    PubMed

    Hallundbæk Mikkelsen, Kristian; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Tvede, Michael; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye; Holst, Jens Juul; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip Krag

    2013-11-11

    New gene sequencing-based techniques and the large worldwide sequencing capacity have introduced a new era within the field of gut microbiota. Animal and human studies have shown that obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with changes in the composition of the gut microbiota and that prebiotics, antibiotics or faecal transplantation can alter glucose and lipid metabolism. This paper summarizes the latest research regarding the association between gut microbiota, diabetes and obesity and some of the mechanisms by which gut bacteria may influence host metabolism.

  15. Quantitative lipidomics reveals age-dependent perturbations of whole-body lipid metabolism in ACBP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sandra F; Sprenger, Richard R; Neess, Ditte; Pauling, Josch K; Færgeman, Nils J; Ejsing, Christer S

    2017-02-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) plays a key role in chaperoning long-chain acyl-CoAs into lipid metabolic processes and acts as an important regulatory hub in mammalian physiology. This is highlighted by the recent finding that mice devoid of ACBP suffer from a compromised epidermal barrier and delayed weaning, the physiological process where newborns transit from a fat-based milk diet to a carbohydrate-rich diet. To gain insights into how ACBP impinges on weaning and the concomitant remodeling of whole-body lipid metabolism we performed a comparative lipidomics analysis charting the absolute abundance of 613 lipid molecules in liver, muscle and plasma from weaning and adult Acbp knockout and wild type mice. Our results reveal that ACBP deficiency affects primarily lipid metabolism of liver and plasma during weaning. Specifically, we show that ACBP deficient mice have elevated levels of hepatic cholesteryl esters, and that lipids featuring an 18:1 fatty acid moiety are increased in Acbp depleted mice across all tissues investigated. Our results also show that the perturbation of systemic lipid metabolism in Acbp knockout mice is transient and becomes normalized and similar to that of wild type as mice grow older. These findings demonstrate that ACBP serves crucial functions in maintaining lipid metabolic homeostasis in mice during weaning.

  16. Functional crosstalk of CAR-LXR and ROR-LXR in drug metabolism and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Xie, Xinni; Zhai, Yonggong

    2010-10-30

    Nuclear receptor crosstalk represents an important mechanism to expand the functions of individual receptors. The liver X receptors (LXR, NR1H2/3), both the α and β isoforms, are nuclear receptors that can be activated by the endogenous oxysterols and other synthetic agonists. LXRs function as cholesterol sensors, which protect mammals from cholesterol overload. LXRs have been shown to regulate the expression of a battery of metabolic genes, especially those involved in lipid metabolism. LXRs have recently been suggested to play a novel role in the regulation of drug metabolism. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a xenobiotic receptor that regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Disruption of CAR alters sensitivity to toxins, increasing or decreasing it depending on the compounds. More recently, additional roles for CAR have been discovered. These include the involvement of CAR in lipid metabolism. Mechanistically, CAR forms an intricate regulatory network with other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, foremost the LXRs, in exerting its effect on lipid metabolism. Retinoid-related orphan receptors (RORs, NR1F1/2/3) have three isoforms, α, β and γ. Recent reports have shown that loss of RORα and/or RORγ can positively or negatively influence the expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver. The effects of RORs on expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes were reasoned to be, at least in part, due to the crosstalk with LXR. This review focuses on the CAR-LXR and ROR-LXR crosstalk, and the implications of this crosstalk in drug metabolism and lipid metabolism.

  17. Effects of Different Intensities of Endurance Exercise in Morning and Evening on the Lipid Metabolism Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Ki; Ando, Karina; Tabata, Hiroki; Konishi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masaki; Nishimaki, Mio; Xiang, Mi; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of different exercise intensity performed at different exercise times on lipid metabolism response during prolonged exercise. Nine young men performed endurance exercise at different exercise intensities (60%VO2max or Fatmax) in the morning (9 am to 10 am) or evening (5 pm to 6 pm); blood samples were collected before exercise and immediately and one and two hours after exercise completion. Expired gas was analyzed from the start of exercise until two hours after exercise completion. There were no significant changes in catecholamine (adrenaline and noradrenaline) and free fatty acid levels between morning and evening trials for each endurance exercise intensity. However, the morning and evening trials both exhibited significantly higher lipid oxidation at Fatmax than that at 60%VO2max. These results suggest that exercise at Fatmax offers greater lipid oxidation than that at 60%VO2max, regardless of exercise timing. Key points It is important to consider exercise intensity when evaluating lipid oxidation. Few studies have investigated the effects of the intensity of exercise on lipid oxidation in the morning and evening. Fatmax exhibited greater total lipid oxidation compared to that of 60%VO2max when energy expenditure was equated, but time of day did not affect lipid oxidation in prolonged exercise. PMID:27803625

  18. [Cadmium effects on lipid metabolism of rape (Brassica napus L.)].

    PubMed

    Ben Youssef, Nabil; Nouairi, Issam; Ben Temime, Sonia; Taamalli, Wael; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Ghorbal, Mohamed Habib; Ben Miled Daoud, Douja

    2005-08-01

    Treatment of rape seedlings with increasing CdCl2 concentrations in the culture medium resulted in a cadmium accumulation within plant tissues, which increased with external metal dose; such accumulation was more important in roots than in leaves. Biomass production was severely inhibited, even at low cadmium concentration. In leaves, quantities of chloroplastic lipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfolipids (SL) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) decreased sharply under metallic treatment. However, contents of extrachloroplastic lipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) increased significantly. In contrast to leaves, contents of root phospholipids decreased. Likewise, levels of tri-unsaturated fatty acids: linolenic (C18:3) and hexadecatrienoïc (C16:3) dropped in leaves of treated seedlings as compared to those of controls, suggesting that heavy metals induced an alteration in the fatty acid desaturation process or a stimulation of their peroxidation. Also, trans palmitoleic acid (C16:1-trans) level in PG decreased considerably. In roots, there was a slight decrease in C18:3 level, with a concomitant increase in the C18:2 percentage. Radioactive labelling of leaf lipids with (1-14C) acetate allowed to show that fatty acid biosynthesis was noticeably altered at the highest cadmium dose used (50 microM). Biosynthesis of tri-unsaturated fatty acids was also inhibited which may explain the decline in non-labelled lipid contents. Results showed that metallic ion seems to affect selectively chloroplastic membranes due to an inhibition of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. Moreover, a lipid peroxidation occurred in our case because of the spectacular increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) content observed in cadmium treated leaves.

  19. Effect of the level and type of starchy concentrate on tissue lipid metabolism, gene expression and milk fatty acid secretion in Alpine goats receiving a diet rich in sunflower-seed oil.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Leroux, C; Rouel, J; Bonnet, M; Chilliard, Y

    2012-04-01

    The potential benefits on human health have prompted an interest in developing nutritional strategies for reducing saturated and increasing specific unsaturated fatty acids (FA) in ruminant milk. The impact of the level and type of starchy concentrate added to diets supplemented with sunflower-seed oil on caprine milk FA composition and on mammary, omental and perirenal adipose, and liver lipid metabolism was examined in fourteen Alpine goats in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square with 21 d experimental periods. Treatments were a grass hay-based diet with a high level of forage (F) or a high level of concentrate with either maize grain (CM) or flattened wheat (CW) as source of starch and supplemented with 130 g/d sunflower-seed oil. Milk yield was enhanced (P<0·01) and milk fat content was decreased on the CM and CW diets compared with the F diet, resulting in similar milk fat secretion. Both high-concentrate diets increased (P<0·05) milk yield of 10 : 0-16 : 0 and decreased trans-9,11-18 : 1 and cis-9, trans-11-18 : 2. The CW diet decreased (P<0·05) the output of ΣC18 and Σcis-18 : 1 and increased (P<0·05) the output of trans-10-18 : 1 in milk. The expression and/or activity of fourteen proteins involved in the major lipogenic pathways in mammary tissues and of lipogenic genes in adipose and liver tissues were similar among treatments. In conclusion, high starch concentrates alter milk FA yield via mechanisms independent of changes in mammary, liver or adipose tissue lipogenic gene expression. Furthermore, data provided indications that mammary lipogenic responses to starch-rich diets differ between caprine and bovine ruminants.

  20. FAT SIGNALS - Lipases and Lipolysis in Lipid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Haemmerle, Guenter; Lass, Achim; Madeo, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Lipolysis is defined as the catabolism of triacylglycerols stored in cellular lipid droplets. Recent discoveries of essential lipolytic enzymes and characterization of numerous regulatory proteins and mechanisms have fundamentally changed our perception of lipolysis and its impact on cellular metabolism. New findings that lipolytic products and intermediates participate in cellular signaling processes and that “lipolytic signaling” is particularly important in many nonadipose tissues unveil a previously underappreciated aspect of lipolysis, which may be relevant for human disease. PMID:22405066

  1. The central melanocortin system directly controls peripheral lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Wiedmer, Petra; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Keogh, Julia M.; Sutton, Gregory M.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Neschen, Susanne; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Howles, Philip N.; Morgan, Donald A.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Szanto, Ildiko; Schrott, Brigitte; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg; Hammond, Craig; Hui, David Y.; Woods, Stephen C.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Butler, Andrew A.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2007-01-01

    Disruptions of the melanocortin signaling system have been linked to obesity. We investigated a possible role of the central nervous melanocortin system (CNS-Mcr) in the control of adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and cellular lipid metabolism independent of nutrient intake. We report that pharmacological inhibition of melanocortin receptors (Mcr) in rats and genetic disruption of Mc4r in mice directly and potently promoted lipid uptake, triglyceride synthesis, and fat accumulation in white adipose tissue (WAT), while increased CNS-Mcr signaling triggered lipid mobilization. These effects were independent of food intake and preceded changes in adiposity. In addition, decreased CNS-Mcr signaling promoted increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in WAT while decreasing glucose utilization in muscle and brown adipose tissue. Such CNS control of peripheral nutrient partitioning depended on sympathetic nervous system function and was enhanced by synergistic effects on liver triglyceride synthesis. Our findings offer an explanation for enhanced adiposity resulting from decreased melanocortin signaling, even in the absence of hyperphagia, and are consistent with feeding-independent changes in substrate utilization as reflected by respiratory quotient, which is increased with chronic Mcr blockade in rodents and in humans with loss-of-function mutations in MC4R. We also reveal molecular underpinnings for direct control of the CNS-Mcr over lipid metabolism. These results suggest ways to design more efficient pharmacological methods for controlling adiposity. PMID:17885689

  2. Regulation of egg quality and lipids metabolism by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Li, Lan; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Ding, Zhao-Peng; Wang, Shi-Wen; Shen, Wei; Min, Ling-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Hui

    2016-04-01

    This investigation was designed to explore the effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NP) on egg quality and the mechanism of decreasing of yolk lipids. Different concentration of ZnO NP and ZnSO4 were used to treat hens for 24 weeks. The body weight and egg laying frequency were recorded and analyzed. Albumen height, Haugh unit, and yolk color score were analyzed by an Egg Multi Tester. Breaking strength was determined by an Egg Force Reader. Egg shell thickness was measured using an Egg Shell Thickness Gouge. Shell color was detected by a spectrophotometer. Egg shape index was measured by Egg Form Coefficient Measuring Instrument. Albumen and yolk protein was determined by the Kjeldahl method. Amino acids were determined by an amino acids analyzer. Trace elements Zn, Fe, Cu, and P (mg/kg wet mass) were determined in digested solutions using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry. TC and TG were measured using commercial analytical kits. Yolk triglyceride, total cholesterol, pancreatic lipase, and phospholipids were determined by appropriate kits. β-carotene was determined by spectrophotometry. Lipid metabolism was also investigated with liver, plasma, and ovary samples. ZnO NP did not change the body weight of hens during the treatment period. ZnO NP slowed down egg laying frequency at the beginning of egg laying period but not at later time. ZnO NP did not affect egg protein or water contents, slightly decreased egg physical parameters (12 to 30%) and trace elements (20 to 35%) after 24 weeks treatment. However, yolk lipids content were significantly decreased by ZnO NP (20 to 35%). The mechanism of Zinc oxide nanoparticles decreasing yolk lipids was that they decreased the synthesis of lipids and increased lipid digestion. These data suggested ZnO NP affected egg quality and specifically regulated lipids metabolism in hens through altering the function of hen's ovary and liver.

  3. Integration of Cytokine Biology and Lipid Metabolism in Stroke**

    PubMed Central

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Dempsey, R.; Hatcher, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines regulate the innate and adaptive immune responses and are pleiotropic, redundant and multifunctional. Expression of most cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1α/ß, is very low in normal brain. Metabolism of lipids is of particular interest due to their high concentration in the brain. Inflammatory response after stroke suggests that cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 α/ß, IL-6), affect the phospholipid metabolism and subsequent production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and ROS that may potentiate brain injury. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are source for lipid messengers. Sphingomyelin synthase serves as a bridge between metabolism of glycerolipids and sphingolipids. TNF-α and IL-1 α/ß can induce phospholipases (A2, C, and D) and sphingomyelinases, and concomitantly proteolyse phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin synthesizing enzymes. Together, these alterations contribute to loss of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin after stroke that can be attenuated by inhibiting TNF-α or IL-1 α/ß signaling. Inflammatory responses are instrumental in the formation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Secretory PLA2 IIA is found in human atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in initiation, progression and maturation of atherosclerosis, a risk factor for stroke. Lipoprotein-PLA2, part of apolipoprotein B-100 of LDL, plays a role in vascular inflammation and coronary endothelial dysfunction. Cytokine antagonism attenuated secretory PLA2 IIA actions, suggesting cytokine-lipid integration studies will lead to new concepts contributing to bench-to-bedside transition for stroke therapy. PMID:17981627

  4. L-Carnitine induces recovery of liver lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Silvério, Renata; Laviano, Alessandro; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Seelaender, Marília

    2012-05-01

    Cancer cachexia causes metabolic alterations with a marked effect on hepatic lipid metabolism. L-Carnitine modulates lipid metabolism and its supplementation has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in many diseases. In the present study, the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on gene expression and on liver lipid metabolism-related proteins was investigated in cachectic tumour-bearing rats. Wistar rats were assigned to receive 1 g/kg of L-carnitine or saline. After 14 days, supplemented and control animals were assigned to a control (N), control supplemented with L-carnitine (CN), tumour-bearing Walker 256 carcinosarcoma (TB) and tumour-bearing supplemented with L-carnitine (CTB) group. The mRNA expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II (CPT I and II), microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) and organic cation transporter 2 (OCTN2) was assessed, and the maximal activity of CPT I and II in the liver measured, along with plasma and liver triacylglycerol content. The gene expression of MTP, and CPT I catalytic activity were reduced in TB, who also showed increased liver (150%) and plasma (3.3-fold) triacylglycerol content. L-Carnitine supplementation was able to restore these parameters back to control values (p<0.05). These data show that L-carnitine preserves hepatic lipid metabolism in tumour-bearing animals, suggesting its supplementation to be of potential interest in cachexia.

  5. Monogenic hypocholesterolaemic lipid disorders and apolipoprotein B metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Amanda J; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Burnett, John R

    2005-01-01

    The study of apolipoprotein (apo) B metabolism is central to our understanding of human lipoprotein metabolism. Moreover, the assembly and secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins is a complex process. Increased plasma concentrations of apoB-containing lipoproteins are an important risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. In contrast, decreased levels of, but not the absence of, these apoB-containing lipoproteins is associated with resistance to atherosclerosis and potential long life. The study of inherited monogenic dyslipidaemias has been an effective means to elucidate key metabolic steps and biologically relevant mechanisms. Naturally occurring gene mutations in affected families have been useful in identifying important domains of apoB and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) governing the metabolism of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Truncation-causing mutations in the APOB gene cause familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia, whereas mutations in MTP result in abetalipoproteinaemia; both rare conditions are characterised by marked hypocholesterolaemia. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of apoB in lipoprotein metabolism and to explore the key biochemical, clinical, metabolic and genetic features of the monogenic hypocholesterolaemic lipid disorders affecting apoB metabolism.

  6. Microtargeting cancer metabolism: opening new therapeutic windows based on lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as a hallmark of cancer. MicroRNAs are noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally repress the expression of target mRNAs implicated in multiple physiological processes, including apoptosis, differentiation, and cancer. MicroRNAs can affect entire biological pathways, making them good candidates for therapeutic intervention compared with classical single target approaches. Moreover, microRNAs may become more relevant in the fine-tuning adaptation to stress situations, such as oncogenic events, hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress. Furthermore, artificial microRNAs can be designed to modulate the expression of multiple targets of a specific pathway. In this review, we describe the metabolic reprogramming associated to cancer, with a special interest in the altered lipid metabolism. Next, we describe specific features of microRNAs that make them relevant to target cancer cell metabolism. Finally, in an attempt to open new therapeutic windows, we emphasize two exciting scenarios for microRNA-mediated intervention that need to be further explored: 1) the cooperation between FA biosynthesis (lipogenesis) and FA oxidation as complementary partners for the survival of cancer cells; and 2) the regulation of the intracellular lipid content modulating both lipid storage into lipid droplets, and lipid mobilization through lipolysis and/or lipophagy. PMID:26630911

  7. Effects of intermittent fasting on glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2017-01-16

    Two intermittent fasting variants, intermittent energy restriction (IER) and time-restricted feeding (TRF), have received considerable interest as strategies for weight-management and/or improving metabolic health. With these strategies, the pattern of energy restriction and/or timing of food intake are altered so that individuals undergo frequently repeated periods of fasting. This review provides a commentary on the rodent and human literature, specifically focusing on the effects of IER and TRF on glucose and lipid metabolism. For IER, there is a growing evidence demonstrating its benefits on glucose and lipid homeostasis in the short-to-medium term; however, more long-term safety studies are required. Whilst the metabolic benefits of TRF appear quite profound in rodents, findings from the few human studies have been mixed. There is some suggestion that the metabolic changes elicited by these approaches can occur in the absence of energy restriction, and in the context of IER, may be distinct from those observed following similar weight-loss achieved via modest continuous energy restriction. Mechanistically, the frequently repeated prolonged fasting intervals may favour preferential reduction of ectopic fat, beneficially modulate aspects of adipose tissue physiology/morphology, and may also impinge on circadian clock regulation. However, mechanistic evidence is largely limited to findings from rodent studies, thus necessitating focused human studies, which also incorporate more dynamic assessments of glucose and lipid metabolism. Ultimately, much remains to be learned about intermittent fasting (in its various forms); however, the findings to date serve to highlight promising avenues for future research.

  8. Some aspects of lipid metabolism in fatty liver and kidney syndrome in chicks.

    PubMed

    Evans, A J; Bannister, D W; Whitehead, C C

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of lipid metabolism were examined in broiler chicks affected with fatty liver and kidney syndrome (FLKS). Plasma free fatty acid concentrations were invariably elevated. Plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased amounts of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue was considerably reduced, but in heart tissue the enzyme activity was increased. Hepatic lipogenesis was reduced. Rates of oxidation of palmitic and succinic acids by liver, heart and kidney were normal. The increased oxidation rate of palmitic acid following the addition of carnitine was also normal. These findings indicate that elevated blood lipid levels are likely to be an important factor contributing to the development of fatty deposition, particularly in extrahepatic tissues.

  9. Membrane Lipid Metabolism in Germinating Castor Bean Endosperm 1

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Robert P.

    1976-01-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis L. var. Hale) endosperms, excised after 2 days germination at 30 C, were incubated 5 min to 8 hr with 14C-acetate and 3H-glycerol. Homogenates were fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Organelles found to be active in lipid synthesis were the lipid bodies and the endoplasmic reticulum. The products of incorporation in the lipid bodies were 3H-diglycerides containing 14C-fatty acids of more than 20 carbons. In contrast, the endoplasmic reticulum produced 3H-phospholipids as well as 3H-diglycerides rich in 14C-linoleate. The phospholipids synthesized and their acyl contents were of the types known to be the major components of organelle membranes in this tissue. Phospholipids and diglycerides containing 14C and 3H were found in the glyoxysomes and mitochondria subsequent to their appearance in the endoplasmic reticulum. The results show that germinating castor bean endosperm synthesizes membrane lipids de novo from acetate rather than reutilizing stored lipid components directly. It is also apparent that the endoplasmic reticulum is responsible for several steps in membrane lipid production. PMID:16659516

  10. Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pols, Thijs W.H.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Vos, Mariska; Levels, Johannes H.M.; Quax, Paul H.A.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Pannekoek, Hans; Groen, Albert K.; Vries, Carlie J.M. de

    2008-02-22

    NR4A nuclear receptors are induced in the liver upon fasting and regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we studied the role of nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) in hepatic lipid metabolism. We generated mice expressing hepatic Nur77 using adenoviral vectors, and demonstrate that these mice exhibit a modulation of the plasma lipid profile and a reduction in hepatic triglyceride. Expression analysis of >25 key genes involved in lipid metabolism revealed that Nur77 inhibits SREBP1c expression. This results in decreased SREBP1c activity as is illustrated by reduced expression of its target genes stearoyl-coA desaturase-1, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, fatty acid synthase and the LDL receptor, and provides a mechanism for the physiological changes observed in response to Nur77. Expression of LXR target genes Abcg5 and Abcg8 is reduced by Nur77, and may suggest involvement of LXR in the inhibitory action of Nur77 on SREBP1c expression. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity.

  11. L-Carnitine intake prevents irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Guo, Anqi; Shu, Qingyu; Qi, Yangjian; Kong, Ying; Sun, Zhiping; Sun, Shumin; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-10

    L-Carnitine supplementation has been used to reduce obesity caused by high-fat diet, which is beneficial for lowering blood and hepatic lipid levels, and for ameliorating fatty liver. However, whether l-carnitine may affect irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder is still largely unknown. In the present study, we developed a time-delayed pattern of eating, and investigated the effects of l-carnitine on the irregular eating induced adiposity in mice. After an experimental period of 8 weeks with l-carnitine supplementation, l-carnitine significantly inhibited body weight increase and epididymal fat weight gain induced by the time-delayed feeding. In addition, l-carnitine administration decreased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (GPT), glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and triglyceride (TG), which were significantly elevated by the irregular feeding. Moreover, mice supplemented with l-carnitine did not display glucose intolerance-associated hallmarks, which were found in the irregular feeding-induced obesity. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that l-carnitine counteracted the negative alterations of lipid metabolic gene expression (fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase) in the liver and fat of mice caused by the irregular feeding. Therefore, our results suggest that the time-delayed pattern of eating can induce adiposity and lipid metabolic disorders, while l-carnitine supplementation might prevent these negative symptoms.

  12. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  13. Construction of Global Acyl Lipid Metabolic Map by Comparative Genomics and Subcellular Localization Analysis in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Natsumi; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pathways of lipid metabolism have been established in land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, but the information on exact pathways is still under study in microalgae. In contrast with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is currently studied extensively, the pathway information in red algae is still in the state in which enzymes and pathways are estimated by analogy with the knowledge in plants. Here we attempt to construct the entire acyl lipid metabolic pathways in a model red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as an initial basis for future genetic and biochemical studies, by exploiting comparative genomics and localization analysis. First, the data of whole genome clustering by Gclust were used to identify 121 acyl lipid-related enzymes. Then, the localization of 113 of these enzymes was analyzed by GFP-based techniques. We found that most of the predictions on the subcellular localization by existing tools gave erroneous results, probably because these tools had been tuned for plants or green algae. The experimental data in the present study as well as the data reported before in our laboratory will constitute a good training set for tuning these tools. The lipid metabolic map thus constructed show that the lipid metabolic pathways in the red alga are essentially similar to those in A. thaliana, except that the number of enzymes catalyzing individual reactions is quite limited. The absence of fatty acid desaturation to produce oleic and linoleic acids within the plastid, however, highlights the central importance of desaturation and acyl editing in the endoplasmic reticulum, for the synthesis of plastid lipids as well as other cellular lipids. Additionally, some notable characteristics of lipid metabolism in C. merolae were found. For example, phosphatidylcholine is synthesized by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine as in yeasts. It is possible that a single 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase is involved in the condensation reactions of fatty acid

  14. Hepatic lipid metabolism changes in short- and long-term prehepatic portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; Vara, Elena; García, Cruz; Nava, Maria-Paz; Angulo, Alejandra; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Calderón, Ana; Vergara, Patri; Arias, Jaime

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To verify the impairment of the hepatic lipid metabolism in prehepatic portal hypertension. METHODS: The concentrations of free fatty acids, diacylglycerol, triglycerides, and phospholipids were assayed by using D-[U-14C] glucose incorporation in the different lipid fractions and thin-layer chromatography and cholesterol was measured by spectrophotometry, in liver samples of Wistar rats with partial portal vein ligation at short- (1 mo) and long-term (1 year) (i.e. portal hypertensive rats) and the control rats. RESULTS: In the portal hypertensive rats, liver phospholipid synthesis significantly decreased (7.42 ± 0.50 vs 4.70 ± 0.44 nCi/g protein; P < 0.01) and was associated with an increased synthesis of free fatty acids (2.08 ± 0.14 vs 3.36 ± 0.33 nCi/g protein; P < 0.05), diacylglycerol (1.93 ± 0.2 vs 2.26 ± 0.28 nCi/g protein), triglycerides (2.40 ± 0.30 vs 4.49 ± 0.15 nCi/g protein) and cholesterol (24.28 ± 2.12 vs 57.66 ± 3.26 mg/g protein; P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Prehepatic portal hypertension in rats impairs the liver lipid metabolism. This impairment consists in an increase in lipid deposits (triglycerides, diacylglycerol and cholesterol) in the liver, accompanied by a decrease in phospholipid synthesis. PMID:17106932

  15. ω-Alkynyl lipid surrogates for polyunsaturated fatty acids: free radical and enzymatic oxidations.

    PubMed

    Beavers, William N; Serwa, Remigiusz; Shimozu, Yuki; Tallman, Keri A; Vaught, Melissa; Dalvie, Esha D; Marnett, Lawrence J; Porter, Ned A

    2014-08-13

    Lipid and lipid metabolite profiling are important parameters in understanding the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alkynylated polyunsaturated fatty acids are potentially useful probes for tracking the fate of fatty acid metabolites. The nonenzymatic and enzymatic oxidations of ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were compared to that of linoleic and arachidonic acid. There was no detectable difference in the primary products of nonenzymatic oxidation, which comprised cis,trans-hydroxy fatty acids. Similar hydroxy fatty acid products were formed when ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were reacted with lipoxygenase enzymes that introduce oxygen at different positions in the carbon chains. The rates of oxidation of ω-alkynylated fatty acids were reduced compared to those of the natural fatty acids. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 did not oxidize alkynyl linoleic but efficiently oxidized alkynyl arachidonic acid. The products were identified as alkynyl 11-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid, and alkynyl prostaglandins. This deviation from the metabolic profile of arachidonic acid may limit the utility of alkynyl arachidonic acid in the tracking of cyclooxygenase-based lipid oxidation. The formation of alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid compared to alkynyl prostaglandins suggests that the ω-alkyne group causes a conformational change in the fatty acid bound to the enzyme, which reduces the efficiency of cyclization of dioxalanyl intermediates to endoperoxide intermediates. Overall, ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid appear to be metabolically competent surrogates for tracking the fate of polyunsaturated fatty acids when looking at models involving autoxidation and oxidation by lipoxygenases.

  16. Farnesoid X Receptor Signaling Shapes the Gut Microbiota and Controls Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Xie, Cen; Nichols, Robert G.; Chan, Siu H. J.; Jiang, Changtao; Hao, Ruixin; Smith, Philip B.; Cai, Jingwei; Simons, Margaret N.; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Maranas, Costas D.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiota modulates obesity and associated metabolic phenotypes in part through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling. Glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA), an intestinal FXR antagonist, has been reported to prevent or reverse high-fat diet (HFD)-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance, and fatty liver; however, the mechanism by which these phenotypes are improved is not fully understood. The current study investigated the influence of FXR activity on the gut microbiota community structure and function and its impact on hepatic lipid metabolism. Predictions about the metabolic contribution of the gut microbiota to the host were made using 16S rRNA-based PICRUSt (phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states), then validated using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics, and results were summarized by using genome-scale metabolic models. Oral Gly-MCA administration altered the gut microbial community structure, notably reducing the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes and its PICRUSt-predicted metabolic function, including reduced production of short-chain fatty acids (substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis) in the ceca of HFD-fed mice. Metabolic improvement was intestinal FXR dependent, as revealed by the lack of changes in HFD-fed intestine-specific Fxr-null (FxrΔIE) mice treated with Gly-MCA. Integrative analyses based on genome-scale metabolic models demonstrated an important link between Lactobacillus and Clostridia bile salt hydrolase activity and bacterial fermentation. Hepatic metabolite levels after Gly-MCA treatment correlated with altered levels of gut bacterial species. In conclusion, modulation of the gut microbiota by inhibition of intestinal FXR signaling alters host liver lipid metabolism and improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction. IMPORTANCE The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in mediating the dialog between the host

  17. Fatty acid profile of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the fatty acid profiles of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks for the production of bio-based fuels and chemicals. Lipids were extracted using hexane from oil-bearing seeds using a standard Soxhlet apparatus. Fatty acid profiles were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization...

  18. Expression of Lipid Metabolism-Related Proteins Differs between Invasive Lobular Carcinoma and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Kim, Hye Min; Koo, Ja Seung

    2017-01-01

    We comparatively investigated the expression and clinical implications of lipid metabolism-related proteins in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. A total of 584 breast cancers (108 ILC and 476 IDC) were subjected to tissue microarray and immunohistochemical analysis for lipid metabolism-related proteins including hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), perilipin A, fatty acid binding protein (FABP)4, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and fatty acid synthetase (FASN). HSL, perilipin A, and FABP4 expression (all p < 0.001) differed significantly: HSL and FABP4 were more frequently present in ILC, whereas perilipin A was more frequently detected in IDC. Among all invasive cancers, HSL and FABP4 were highly expressed in luminal A-type ILC (p < 0.001) and perilipin A in luminal A-type IDC (p = 0.007). Among luminal B-type cancers, HSL and FABP4 were more highly expressed in ILC (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis found associations of shorter disease-free survival with CPT-1 positivity (p = 0.004) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity (p = 0.032) and of shorter overall survival with acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity (p = 0.027). In conclusion, ILC and IDC exhibited different immunohistochemical lipid metabolism-related protein expression profiles. Notably, ILC exhibited high HSL and FABP4 and low perilipin A expression. PMID:28124996

  19. Adiponectin regulates expression of hepatic genes critical for glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Yuan, Bingbing; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Patterson, Heide Christine; Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-09-04

    The effects of adiponectin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism at transcriptional level are largely unknown. We profiled hepatic gene expression in adiponectin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice by RNA sequencing. Compared with WT mice, adiponectin KO mice fed a chow diet exhibited decreased mRNA expression of rate-limiting enzymes in several important glucose and lipid metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty-acid activation and synthesis, triglyceride synthesis, and cholesterol synthesis. In addition, binding of the transcription factor Hnf4a to DNAs encoding several key metabolic enzymes was reduced in KO mice, suggesting that adiponectin might regulate hepatic gene expression via Hnf4a. Phenotypically, adiponectin KO mice possessed smaller epididymal fat pads and showed reduced body weight compared with WT mice. When fed a high-fat diet, adiponectin KO mice showed significantly reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. These lipogenic defects are consistent with the down-regulation of lipogenic genes in the KO mice.

  20. Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Impaired Fat Efflux in Polarized Hepatic Cells: Consequences of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    McVicker, Benita L.; Rasineni, Karuna; Tuma, Dean J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Casey, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Steatosis, an early manifestation in alcoholic liver disease, is associated with the accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs). However, the role ethanol metabolism has in LD formation and turnover remains undefined. Here, we assessed LD dynamics following ethanol and oleic acid treatment to ethanol-metabolizing WIF-B cells (a hybrid of human fibroblasts (WI 38) and Fao rat hepatoma cells). An OA dose-dependent increase in triglyceride and stained lipids was identified which doubled (P < 0.05) in the presence of ethanol. This effect was blunted with the inclusion of an alcohol metabolism inhibitor. The ethanol/ OA combination also induced adipophilin, LD coat protein involved in the attenuation of lipolysis. Additionally, ethanol treatment resulted in a significant reduction in lipid efflux. These data demonstrate that the metabolism of ethanol in hepatic cells is related to LD accumulation, impaired fat efflux, and enhancements in LD-associated proteins. These alterations in LD dynamics may contribute to ethanol-mediated defects in hepatocellular LD regulation and the formation of steatosis. PMID:22506128

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the miR-33 locus to reprogram autophagy and host lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Koster, Stefan; Sakowski, Erik; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; van Solingen, Coen; Oldebeken, Scott; Karunakaran, Denuja; Celhay, Cynthia Portal; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Ray, Tathagat Dutta; Cecchini, Katharine; Zamore, Philip D; Rayner, Katey J; Marcel, Yves L; Philips, Jennifer A; Moore, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives within macrophages by evading delivery to the lysosome and promoting the accumulation of lipid bodies, which serve as a bacterial source of nutrients. Here we show that by inducing miR-33 and its passenger strand miR-33*, Mtb inhibits integrated pathways involved in autophagy, lysosomal function and fatty acid oxidation to support bacterial replication. Silencing of miR-33 and miR-33* by genetic or pharmacological means promotes autophagy flux through derepression of key autophagy effectors such as ATG5, ATG12, LC3B and LAMP1 and AMPK-dependent activation of the transcription factors FOXO3 and TFEB, enhancing lipid catabolism and Mtb xenophagy. These data define a mammalian miRNA circuit utilized by Mtb to coordinately inhibit autophagy and reprogram host lipid metabolism to enable intracellular survival and persistence in the host. PMID:27089382

  2. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  3. Acute alcohol exposure during mouse gastrulation alters lipid metabolism in placental and heart development: Folate prevention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingda

    2016-01-01

    Background Embryonic acute exposure to ethanol (EtOH), lithium, and homocysteine (HCy) induces cardiac defects at the time of exposure; folic acid (FA) supplementation protects normal cardiogenesis (Han et al., 2009, 2012; Serrano et al., 2010). Our hypothesis is that EtOH exposure and FA protection relate to lipid and FA metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation. Methods On the morning of conception, pregnant C57BL/6J mice were placed on either of two FA‐containing diets: a 3.3 mg health maintenance diet or a high FA diet of 10.5 mg/kg. Mice were injected a binge level of EtOH, HCy, or saline on embryonic day (E) 6.75, targeting gastrulation. On E15.5, cardiac and umbilical blood flow were examined by ultrasound. Embryonic cardiac tissues were processed for gene expression of lipid and FA metabolism; the placenta and heart tissues for neutral lipid droplets, or for medium chain acyl‐dehydrogenase (MCAD) protein. Results EtOH exposure altered lipid‐related gene expression on E7.5 in comparison to control or FA‐supplemented groups and remained altered on E15.5 similarly to changes with HCy, signifying FA deficiency. In comparison to control tissues, the lipid‐related acyl CoA dehydrogenase medium length chain gene and its protein MCAD were altered with EtOH exposure, as were neutral lipid droplet localization in the heart and placenta. Conclusion EtOH altered gene expression associated with lipid and folate metabolism, as well as neutral lipids, in the E15.5 abnormally functioning heart and placenta. In comparison to controls, the high FA diet protected the embryo and placenta from these effects allowing normal development. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:749–760, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296863

  4. Plasma lipids, lipoprotein metabolism and HDL lipid transfers are equally altered in metabolic syndrome and in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa M; Vinagre, Carmen G C; Dallan, Luis A O; Chacra, Ana P M; Maranhão, Raul C

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) refers to states of insulin resistance that predispose to development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim was to investigate whether plasma lipids and lipid metabolism differ in MetS patients compared to those with T2DM with poor glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin > 7.0). Eighteen patients with T2DM, 18 with MetS and 14 controls, paired for age (40-70 years) and body mass index (BMI), were studied. Plasma lipids and the kinetics of a triacylglycerol-rich emulsion labeled with [(3)H]-triolein ([(3)H]-TAG) and [(14)C]-cholesteryl esters ([(14)C]-CE) injected intravenously followed by one-hour blood sampling were determined. Lipid transfers from an artificial nanoemulsion donor to high-density lipoprotien (HDL) were assayed in vitro. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL cholesterol (mg/dl) were not different in T2DM (128 ± 7; 42 ± 7) and MetS (142 ± 6; 39 ± 3), but triacylglycerols were even higher in MetS (215 ± 13) than in T2DM (161 ±11, p < 0.05). Fractional clearance rate (FCR, in min(1)) of [(3)H]-TAG and [(14)C]-CE were equal in T2DM (0.008 ± 0.018; 0.005 ± 0.024) and MetS (0.010 ± 0.016; 0.006 ± 0.013), and both were reduced compared to controls. The transfer of non-esterified cholesterol, phospholipids and triacylglycerols to HDL was higher in MetS and T2DM than in controls (p < 0.01). Cholesteryl ester transfer and HDL size were equal in all groups. Results imply that MetS is equal to poorly controlled T2DM concerning the disturbances of plasma lipid metabolism examined here, and suggest that there are different thresholds for the insulin action on glucose and lipids. These findings highlight the magnitude of the lipid disturbances in MetS, and may have implications in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Dietary carbohydrate and lipid source affect cholesterol metabolism of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carolina; Corraze, Geneviève; Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Larroquet, Laurence; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Panserat, Stéphane; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2015-10-28

    Plant feedstuffs (PF) are rich in carbohydrates, which may interact with lipid metabolism. Thus, when considering dietary replacement of fishery by-products with PF, knowledge is needed on how dietary lipid source (LS) and carbohydrates affect lipid metabolism and other metabolic pathways. For that purpose, a 73-d growth trial was performed with European sea bass juveniles (IBW 74 g) fed four diets differing in LS (fish oil (FO) or a blend of vegetable oils (VO)) and carbohydrate content (0 % (CH-) or 20 % (CH+) gelatinised starch). At the end of the trial no differences among diets were observed on growth and feed utilisation. Protein efficiency ratio was, however, higher in the CH+ groups. Muscle and liver fatty acid profiles reflected the dietary LS. Dietary carbohydrate promoted higher plasma cholesterol and phospholipids (PL), whole-body and hepatic (mainly 16 : 0) lipids and increased muscular and hepatic glycogen. Except for PL, which were higher in the FO groups, no major alterations between FO and VO groups were observed on plasma metabolites (glucose, TAG, cholesterol, PL), liver and muscle glycogen, and lipid and cholesterol contents. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme - lipogenesis-related enzymes - increased with carbohydrate intake. Hepatic expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism was up-regulated with carbohydrate (HMGCR and CYP3A27) and VO (HMGCR and CYP51A1) intake. No dietary regulation of long-chain PUFA biosynthesis at the transcriptional level was observed. Overall, very few interactions between dietary carbohydrates and LS were observed. However, important insights on the direct relation between dietary carbohydrate and the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in European sea bass were demonstrated.

  6. Regulation of exercise-induced lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Kiens, Bente

    2014-12-01

    Exercise increases the utilization of lipids in muscle. The sources of lipids are long-chain fatty acids taken up from the plasma and fatty acids released from stores of intramuscular triacylglycerol by the action of intramuscular lipases. In the present review, we focus on the role of fatty acid binding proteins, particularly fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), in the exercise- and contraction-induced increase in uptake of long-chain fatty acids in muscle. The FAT/CD36 translocates from intracellular depots to the surface membrane upon initiation of exercise/muscle contractions. This occurs independently of AMP-activated protein kinase, and data suggest that Ca(2+)-related signalling is responsible. The FAT/CD36 has an important role; long-chain fatty acid uptake is markedly decreased in FAT/CD36 knockout mice during contractions/exercise compared with wild-type control mice. In skeletal muscle, 98% of the lipase activity is accounted for by adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. Give that inhibition or knockout of hormone-sensitive lipase does not impair lipolysis in muscle during contraction, the data point to an important role of adipose triglyceride lipase in regulation of muscle lipolysis. Although the molecular regulation of the lipases in muscle is not understood, it is speculated that intramuscular lipolysis may be regulated in part by the availability of the plasma concentration of long-chain fatty acids.

  7. Alterations in Lipid Metabolism and Antioxidant Status in Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Falguni H; Ray, Somshukla; Munshi, Renuka P; Bhalerao, Supriya S; Nayak, Chitra S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lichen planus (LP), a T-cell-mediated inflammatory disorder, wherein inflammation produces lipid metabolism disturbances, is linked to increase in cardiovascular (CV) risk with dyslipidemia. Increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the status on lipid disturbances, oxidative stress, and inflammation in LP patients. Materials and Methods: The study was initiated after obtaining Institutional Ethics Committee permission and written informed consent from participants. The study included 125 patients (74 LP patients and 51 age and sex-matched controls) visiting the outpatient clinic in the dermatology department of our hospital. Variables analyzed included lipid profile, C-reactive protein (CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and catalase (CAT) activity. Results: Analysis of lipid parameters revealed significantly higher levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) along with decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in LP patients as compared to their respective controls. LP patients also presented with a significantly higher atherogenic index that is, (TC/HDL-C) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios than the controls. A significant increase in CRP levels was observed among the LP patients. There was a statistically significant increase in the serum levels of the lipid peroxidation product, MDA and a statistically significant decrease in CAT activity in LP patients as compared to their respective controls. A statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.96) was observed between serum MDA levels and duration of LP whereas a significantly negative correlation (r = −0.76) was seen between CAT activity and LP duration. Conclusion: Chronic inflammation in patients with LP may explain the association with dyslipidemia and CV risk. Our findings also suggest that an increase in oxidative

  8. Regulation of lipid metabolism in the green microalga Chlorella protothecoides by heterotrophy-photoinduction cultivation regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Feng, Bo; Zeng, Hongyan

    2015-09-01

    Proteomics in conjunction with biochemical strategy was employed to unravel regulation of lipid metabolism in the green microalga Chlorella protothecoides by heterotrophy-photoinduction cultivation regime (HPC). Interestingly, HPC triggered transiently synthesis of starch followed by substantial lipid accumulation. And a marked decrease in intracellular protein and chlorophyll contents was also observed after 12h of photo-induction. The highest lipid content of 50.5% was achieved upon the photo-induction stage, which represented 69.3% higher than that of the end of heterotrophic cultivation. Results suggested that turnover of carbon-nitrogen-rich compounds such as starch, protein, and chlorophyll might provide carbon or energy for lipid accumulation. The proteomics analysis indicated that several pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, Calvin cycle, photosynthesis, energy and transport, protein biosynthesis, regulate and defense were involved in the lipid biosynthesis. Malate dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were suggested as key regulatory factors in enhancing lipid accumulation.

  9. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  10. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway.

  11. Lipid metabolism, adipocyte depot physiology and utilization of meat animals as experimental models for metabolic research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meat animals are unique as experimental models for both lipid metabolism and adipocyte studies because of their direct economic value for animal production. This paper discusses the principles that regulate adipogenesis in major meat animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, and pigs), the definition of a...

  12. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H I; León, J; Raskin, I

    1995-01-01

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-beta-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:11607533

  13. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Mechanistic Role of MicroRNAs in Coupling Lipid Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Novák, Jan; Olejníčková, Veronika; Tkáčová, Nikola; Santulli, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) represent a group of powerful and versatile posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression being involved in the fine control of a plethora of physiological and pathological processes. Besides their well-established crucial roles in the regulation of cell cycle, embryogenesis or tumorigenesis, these tiny molecules have also been shown to participate in the regulation of lipid metabolism. In particular, miRs orchestrate cholesterol and fatty acids synthesis, transport, and degradation and low-density and high-density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL) formation. It is thus not surprising that they have also been reported to affect the development and progression of several lipid metabolism-related disorders including liver steatosis and atherosclerosis. Mounting evidence suggests that miRs might represent important "posttranscriptional hubs" of lipid metabolism, which means that one miR usually targets 3'-untranslated regions of various mRNAs that are involved in different steps of one precise metabolic/signaling pathway, e.g., one miR targets mRNAs of enzymes important for cholesterol synthesis, degradation, and transport. Therefore, changes in the levels of one key miR affect various steps of one pathway, which is thereby promoted or inhibited. This makes miRs potent future diagnostic and even therapeutic tools for personalized medicine. Within this chapter, the most prominent microRNAs involved in lipid metabolism, e.g., miR-27a/b, miR-33/33*, miR-122, miR-144, or miR-223, and their intracellular and extracellular functions will be extensively discussed, in particular focusing on their mechanistic role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Special emphasis will be given on miR-122, the first microRNA currently in clinical trials for the treatment of hepatitis C and on miR-223, the most abundant miR in lipoprotein particles.

  15. Rebamipide ameliorates atherosclerosis by controlling lipid metabolism and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Jung, KyungAh; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Mi-La

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the accumulation of excess lipid in the aorta and the severity is regulated by T lymphocytes subsets. Rebamipide has therapeutic activity in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) by controlling the balance between T helper (Th) 17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this study, we aimed to determine whether rebamipide reduces the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate the therapeutic effect of rebamipide, ApoE-KO mice fed a western diet were administered rebamipide orally for 8 weeks. Mice were sacrificed followed by the evaluation of plaque formation in the aorta or immunohistochemistry for IL-17 and Foxp3. Serum was also prepared to determine the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. The ability of rebamipide to regulate lipid metabolism or inflammation was confirmed ex vivo. Results The oral administration of rebamipide decreased plaque formation in atherosclerotic lesions as well as the markers of metabolic disorder in ApoE-deficient mice with atherosclerosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were also suppressed by rebamapide. In addition, the population of Th17 was decreased, whereas Treg was increased in the spleen of rebamipide-treated ApoE deficient mice. Rebamipide also ameliorated the severity of obese arthritis and has the capability to reduce the development of atherosclerosis by controlling the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Thus, rebamipide could be a therapeutic agent to improve the progression of inflammation in metabolic diseases. PMID:28241014

  16. Citric Acid Metabolism in the Bovine Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms rapidly metabolize citric acid to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. The rate of metabolism varied between 0.00008 and 0.76 μmoles per g per min, the rate becoming higher as the citric acid concentration increased. The addition of potassium chloride to rumen contents decreased the rate of utilization. The results indicate that dietary citric acid is unlikely to accumulate in the rumen to a sufficiently high level to be an important factor in hypomagnesemia, except where other factors such as very high potassium levels in the food influence its metabolism. PMID:5549696

  17. Tracking the metabolic pulse of plant lipid production with isotopic labeling and flux analyses: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K; Bates, Philip D; Tjellström, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Metabolism is comprised of networks of chemical transformations, organized into integrated biochemical pathways that are the basis of cellular operation, and function to sustain life. Metabolism, and thus life, is not static. The rate of metabolites transitioning through biochemical pathways (i.e., flux) determines cellular phenotypes, and is constantly changing in response to genetic or environmental perturbations. Each change evokes a response in metabolic pathway flow, and the quantification of fluxes under varied conditions helps to elucidate major and minor routes, and regulatory aspects of metabolism. To measure fluxes requires experimental methods that assess the movements and transformations of metabolites without creating artifacts. Isotopic labeling fills this role and is a long-standing experimental approach to identify pathways and quantify their metabolic relevance in different tissues or under different conditions. The application of labeling techniques to plant science is however far from reaching it potential. In light of advances in genetics and molecular biology that provide a means to alter metabolism, and given recent improvements in instrumentation, computational tools and available isotopes, the use of isotopic labeling to probe metabolism is becoming more and more powerful. We review the principal analytical methods for isotopic labeling with a focus on seminal studies of pathways and fluxes in lipid metabolism and carbon partitioning through central metabolism. Central carbon metabolic steps are directly linked to lipid production by serving to generate the precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid assembly. Additionally some of the ideas for labeling techniques that may be most applicable for lipid metabolism in the future were originally developed to investigate other aspects of central metabolism. We conclude by describing recent advances that will play an important future role in quantifying flux and metabolic operation in plant

  18. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of lipid accumulation in the oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wang, Liping; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei; Song, Yuanda

    2015-12-01

    The oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides is of industrial interest because it can produce high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid γ-linolenic acid. M. circinelloides CBS 277.49 is able to accumulate less than 15% of cell dry weight as lipids, while M. circinelloides WJ11 can accumulate lipid up to 36%. In order to better understand the mechanisms behind the differential lipid accumulation in these two strains, tracer experiments with (13)C-glucose were performed with the growth of M. circinelloides and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection of (13)C-patterns in proteinogenic amino acids was carried out to identify the metabolic network topology and estimate intracellular fluxes. Our results showed that the high oleaginous strain WJ11 had higher flux of pentose phosphate pathway and malic enzyme, lower flux in tricarboxylic acid cycle, higher flux in glyoxylate cycle and ATP: citrate lyase, together, it might provide more NADPH and substrate acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis.

  19. Carnitine is associated with fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Adenier, Hervé; Perrin, Yolande

    2007-12-01

    The finding of acylcarnitines alongside free carnitine in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography shows a link between carnitine and plant fatty acid metabolism. Moreover the occurrence of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines suggests that carnitine is connected to diverse fatty acid metabolic pathways in plant tissues. The carnitine and acylcarnitine contents in plant tissues are respectively a hundred and a thousand times lower than in animal tissues, and acylcarnitines represent less than 2% of the total carnitine pool whereas this percentage reaches 30% in animal tissues. These results suggest that carnitine plays a lesser role in lipid metabolism in plants than it does in animals.

  20. The effect of hypokinesia on lipid metabolism in adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Ladislav; Kvetn̆anský, Richard; Ficková, Mária

    The increase of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration in plasma was observed in rats subjected to hypokinesia for 1-60 days. In the period of recovery (7 and 21 days after 60 days immobilization) the content of NEFA returned to control values. The increase of fatty acid release from adipose tissue was observed in hypokinetic rats, however the stimulation of lipolysis by norepinephrine was lower in rats exposed to hypokinesis. The decrease of the binding capacity and a diminished number of beta-adrenergic receptors were found in animals after hypokinesia. The augmentation of the incorporation of glucose into lipids and the marked increase in the stimulation of lipogenesis by insulin were found in adipose tissue of rats subjected to long-term hypokinesia. These results showed an important effect of hypokinesia on lipid mobilization, on lipogenesis and on the processes of hormone regulation in adipose tissue.

  1. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  2. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  3. Bile Acids, Obesity, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huijuan; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are increasingly recognized as key regulators of systemic metabolism. While bile acids have long been known to play important and direct roles in nutrient absorption, bile acids also serve as signaling molecules. Bile acid interactions with the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the membrane receptor G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 (TGR5) can regulate incretin hormone and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) secretion, cholesterol metabolism, and systemic energy expenditure. Bile acid levels and distribution are altered in type 2 diabetes and increased following bariatric procedures, in parallel with reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Thus, modulation of bile acid levels and signaling, using bile acid binding resins, TGR5 agonists, and FXR agonists, may serve as a potent therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other components of the metabolic syndrome in humans. PMID:25194176

  4. Lxr regulates lipid metabolic and visual perception pathways during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline Lucia; Kalasekar, Sharanya Maanasi; McCollum, Catherine W; Riu, Anne; Jonsson, Philip; Lopez, Justin; Swindell, Eric C; Bouhlatouf, Abdel; Balaguer, Patrick; Bondesson, Maria; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-01-05

    The Liver X Receptors (LXRs) play important roles in multiple metabolic pathways, including fatty acid, cholesterol, carbohydrate and energy metabolism. To expand the knowledge of the functions of LXR signaling during embryonic development, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of Lxr target genes in zebrafish larvae treated with either one of the synthetic LXR ligands T0901317 or GW3965. Assessment of the biological processes enriched by differentially expressed genes revealed a prime role for Lxr in regulating lipid metabolic processes, similarly to the function of LXR in mammals. In addition, exposure to the Lxr ligands induced changes in expression of genes in the neural retina and lens of the zebrafish eye, including the photoreceptor guanylate cyclase activators and lens gamma crystallins, suggesting a potential novel role for Lxr in modulating the transcription of genes associated with visual function in zebrafish. The regulation of expression of metabolic genes was phenotypically reflected in an increased absorption of yolk in the zebrafish larvae, and changes in the expression of genes involved in visual perception were associated with morphological alterations in the retina and lens of the developing zebrafish eye. The regulation of expression of both lipid metabolic and eye specific genes was sustained in 1 month old fish. The transcriptional networks demonstrated several conserved effects of LXR activation between zebrafish and mammals, and also identified potential novel functions of Lxr, supporting zebrafish as a promising model for investigating the role of Lxr during development.

  5. Lxr regulates lipid metabolic and visual perception pathways during zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Caroline Lucia; Kalasekar, Sharanya Maanasi; McCollum, Catherine W.; Riu, Anne; Jonsson, Philip; Lopez, Justin; Swindell, Eric; Bouhlatouf, Abdel; Balaguer, Patrick; Bondesson, Maria; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-01-01

    The Liver X Receptors (LXRs) play important roles in multiple metabolic pathways, including fatty acid, cholesterol, carbohydrate and energy metabolism. To expand the knowledge of the functions of LXR signaling during embryonic development, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of Lxr target genes in zebrafish larvae treated with either one of the synthetic LXR ligands T0901317 or GW3965. Assessment of the biological processes enriched by differentially expressed genes revealed a prime role for Lxr in regulating lipid metabolic processes, similarly to the function of LXR in mammals. In addition, exposure to the Lxr ligands induced changes in expression of genes in the neural retina and lens of the zebrafish eye, including the photoreceptor guanylate cyclase activators and lens gamma crystallins, suggesting a potential novel role for Lxr in modulating the transcription of genes associated with visual function in zebrafish. The regulation of expression of metabolic genes was phenotypically reflected in an increased absorption of yolk in the zebrafish larvae, and changes in the expression of genes involved in visual perception were associated with morphological alterations in the retina and lens of the developing zebrafish eye. The regulation of expression of both lipid metabolic and eye specific genes was sustained in 1 month old fish. The transcriptional networks demonstrated several conserved effects of LXR activation between zebrafish and mammals, and also identified potential novel functions of Lxr, supporting zebrafish as a promising model for investigating the role of Lxr during development. PMID:26427652

  6. Proteomic and lipidomic signatures of lipid metabolism in NASH-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muir, Kyle; Hazim, Antonious; He, Ying; Peyressatre, Marion; Kim, Do-Young; Song, Xiaoling; Beretta, Laura

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common preneoplastic condition of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Mice with hepatocytic deletion of Pten develop NASH and HCC later in life. This model is highly valuable for studies aimed at identifying the molecular mechanism by which metabolic disorders contribute to tumor development. We applied proteomic and lipidomic profiling approaches to Pten-null NASH liver and tumors. Circulating fatty acid composition was also characterized in these mice. The relevance to human NASH and HCC was further validated. This integrative proteomic and lipidomic study from mouse to human and from liver to blood identified the following disease signatures: (i) an HCC signature: upregulated hepatic scd1/scd2, fads2, and acsl5:acsl1 ratio, elevated vaccenic and erucic acids, and reduced margaric and linoleic acids in both liver and plasma; (ii) a NASH signature that correlates with tumor burden: upregulated hepatic elovl6, elevated oleic, adrenic, and osbond acids, and reduced cervonic acid in liver and plasma; and (iii) a NASH signature: reduced hepatic and circulating lignoceric and eicosapentaenoic acids. Altogether, these results show the role of lipid-modifying enzymes converting saturated fatty acids (SFA) to monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in HCC and the importance of an increased ratio of long chain n6-polyunsaturated fatty acids over n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids in NASH and HCC risk. They also highlight the relevance of the Pten-null model for studies related to NASH and HCC and show that circulating lipid metabolome provides a direct read of lipid changes in the liver. Most importantly, novel candidate targets for HCC diagnosis, therapy, risk assessment, and prevention were identified.

  7. Diacylglycerol kinase ϵ deficiency preserves glucose tolerance and modulates lipid metabolism in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Mannerås-Holm, Louise; Schönke, Milena; Brozinick, Joseph T; Vetterli, Laurène; Bui, Hai-Hoang; Sanders, Philip; Nascimento, Emmani B M; Björnholm, Marie; Chibalin, Alexander V; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-02-28

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) catalyze the phosphorylation and conversion of DAG into phosphatidic acid. DGK isozymes have unique primary structures, expression patterns, subcellular localizations, regulatory mechanisms and DAG preferences. DGKε has a hydrophobic segment that promotes its attachment to membranes and shows substrate specificity for DAG with an arachidonoyl acyl chain in the sn-2 position of the substrate. We determined the role of DGKε in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in relation to diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity using DGKε deficient (KO) and wild-type mice. Lipidomic analysis revealed elevated unsaturated and saturated DAG species in skeletal muscle of DGKε KO mice, which was paradoxically associated with increased glucose tolerance. While skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was unaltered, whole body respiratory exchange ratio was reduced, and abundance of mitochondrial markers was increased, indicating a greater reliance on fat oxidation and intracellular lipid metabolism in DGKε KO mice. Thus, the increased intracellular lipids in skeletal muscle from DGKε KO mice may undergo rapid turnover due to increased mitochondrial function and lipid oxidation, rather than storage, which in turn may preserve insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, DGKε plays a role in glucose and energy homeostasis by modulating lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  8. Zinc Regulates Lipid Metabolism and MMPs Expression in Lipid Disturbance Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenggui; Huang, Zhibin; Liu, Lijuan; Luo, Chufan; Lu, Guihua; Li, Qinglang; Gao, Xiuren

    2015-12-01

    Lipid disturbance induced by high-fat diet is a worldwide problem, and it can induce inflammation and oxidative stress in vivo. Zinc is considered as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory agent. Since matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP2) and matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP9)'s expressions are changed under many pathological conditions, we would like to know how zinc affects lipid metabolism and MMP2, MMP9's expressions in the lipid disturbance rabbits. Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. Each group had six rabbits, and they were fed with regular diet, high-fat diet, high-fat diet+zinc, and regular diet+zinc separately for 12 weeks. High-fat diet induced lipid disturbance significantly which raised the level of aspartate aminotransferase (p<0.01) and alanine transaminase (p<0.05) in the high-fat diet group, but zinc supplement reversed this phenomenon (p<0.05). Zinc did not reduce total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p>0.05), but it lowered triglyceride (TG) and raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p<0.01). Zinc also reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (p<0.01) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)'s expressions (p<0.05). Zinc reduced the epicardial adipose tissue and alleviated the hepatic steatosis. Zinc suppressed MMP2 and MMP9's expressions in vivo, but it did not alleviate the aorta fatty streak's severity in the lipid disturbance rabbits. Zinc protected the liver, reduced TG, hs-CRP, and IL-6 and raised HDL-C in the lipid disturbance rabbits. Zinc suppressed MMP2 and MMP9's expressions in vivo, but it did not alleviate the severity of aorta fatty streak induced by the high-fat diet.

  9. Sasa quelpaertensis and p-coumaric acid attenuate oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seung-Woo; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Jeju dwarf bamboo (Sasa quelpaertensis Nakai) extract (JBE) and p-coumaric acid (CA) on oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. JBE and CA increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a (CPT1a) in OA-treated HepG2 cells. Additionally, these compounds decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and OA-induced lipid accumulation, suggesting that JBE and CA modulate lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells via the AMPK activation pathway.

  10. Genetic Variant in Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Alters Lipid Metabolism in Laying Hens in a Diet-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Long, Cheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hao; Yue, Hongyuan; Wang, Xiaocui; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variant T329S in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) impairs trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism in birds. The TMA metabolism that under complex genetic and dietary regulation, closely linked to cardiovascular disease risk. We determined whether the genetic defects in TMA metabolism may change other metabolic traits in birds, determined whether the genetic effects depend on diets, and to identify genes or gene pathways that underlie the metabolic alteration induced by genetic and diet factors. We used hens genotyped as FMO3 c.984 A>T as well as those with the homozygous normal genotype. For each genotype, hens were provided with either a corn-soybean meal basal diets (SM), which contains lower levels of TMA precursor, or the basal diets supplemented with 21% of rapeseed meal (RM), which contains higher levels of TMA precursor. An integrative analysis of metabolomic and transcriptomic was used to explore the metabolic patterns of FMO3 genetic variant in hens that were fed the two defined diets. In birds that consumed SM diets, the T329S mutation increased levels of plasma TMA and lipids, FMO3 mRNA levels, and the expression of genes involved in long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. In birds that consumed RM diets, the T329S mutation induced fishy odor syndrome, a repression in LXR pathway and a reciprocal change in lipid metabolism. Variations in TMA and lipid metabolism were linked to the genetic variant in FMO3 in a diet-specific manner, which suggest FMO3 functions in TMA metabolism and lipid homeostasis. LXR pathway and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism are two possible mechanisms of FMO3 action in response to dietary TMA precursor. PMID:27877090

  11. An ER protein functionally couples neutral lipid metabolism on lipid droplets to membrane lipid synthesis in the ER.

    PubMed

    Markgraf, Daniel F; Klemm, Robin W; Junker, Mirco; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Rapoport, Tom A

    2014-01-16

    Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG). During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p) facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic domain with affinity for LDs and is required for the efficient utilization of LD-derived DAG in the ER. Ice2p breaks a futile cycle on LDs between TAG degradation and synthesis, promoting the rapid relocalization of Dga1p to the ER. Our results show that Ice2p functionally links LDs with the ER and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption.

  12. Effects of Puerarin on Lipid Accumulation and Metabolism in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guodong; Lin, Lezhen; Zhong, Shusheng; Zhang, Qingfeng; Li, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms by which puerarin from kudzu root extract regulates lipid metabolism, fifty mice were randomly assigned to five groups: normal diet, high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD containing 0.2%, 0.4% or 0.8% puerarin for 12 weeks. Body weight, intraperitioneal adipose tissue (IPAT) weight, serum biochemical parameters, and hepatic and feces lipids were measured. Activity and mRNA and protein expressions of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes were analyzed. Compared with HFD, 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin significantly decreased body and IPAT weight. There was a significant decrease in the serum and hepatic concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides and leptin in mice fed the 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets compared with HFD. Fatty acid synthase activity was suppressed in mice fed the 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets, while the activities of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), carnitine acyltransferase (CAT) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were increased. mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ 2 (PPARγ 2) was down-regulated in liver of mice fed the 0.8% diet compared with HFD, while mRNA expression of CAT and HSL was considerably up-regulated by 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets. The protein expression of PPARγ2 in liver was decreased and those of p-AMPK, HSL and p-HSL were increased in mice fed 0.4% and 0.8% puerarin diets. These results suggest that > 0.4% puerarin influenced the activity, mRNA and protein levels of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes, decreasing serum and liver lipids, body weight gain and fat accumulation. Puerarin might be beneficial to prevent lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:25822741

  13. Exploration of Lipid Metabolism in Relation with Plasma Membrane Properties of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Cells: Influence of L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Françoise; Guyot, Stéphane; Logerot, Morgan; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick; Demarquoy, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) arises as a consequence of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-spanning protein that connects the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. The most distinctive features of DMD are a progressive muscular dystrophy, a myofiber degeneration with fibrosis and metabolic alterations such as fatty infiltration, however, little is known on lipid metabolism changes arising in Duchenne patient cells. Our goal was to identify metabolic changes occurring in Duchenne patient cells especially in terms of L-carnitine homeostasis, fatty acid metabolism both at the mitochondrial and peroxisomal level and the consequences on the membrane structure and function. In this paper, we compared the structural and functional characteristics of DMD patient and control cells. Using radiolabeled L-carnitine, we found, in patient muscle cells, a marked decrease in the uptake and the intracellular level of L-carnitine. Associated with this change, a decrease in the mitochondrial metabolism can be seen from the analysis of mRNA encoding for mitochondrial proteins. Probably, associated with these changes in fatty acid metabolism, alterations in the lipid composition of the cells were identified: with an increase in poly unsaturated fatty acids and a decrease in medium chain fatty acids, mono unsaturated fatty acids and in cholesterol contents. Functionally, the membrane of cells lacking dystrophin appeared to be less fluid, as determined at 37°C by fluorescence anisotropy. These changes may, at least in part, be responsible for changes in the phospholipids and cholesterol profile in cell membranes and ultimately may reduce the fluidity of the membrane. A supplementation with L-carnitine partly restored the fatty acid profile by increasing saturated fatty acid content and decreasing the amounts of MUFA, PUFA, VLCFA. L-carnitine supplementation also restored muscle membrane fluidity. This suggests that regulating lipid metabolism in DMD cells may

  14. Exploration of lipid metabolism in relation with plasma membrane properties of Duchenne muscular dystrophy cells: influence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Françoise; Guyot, Stéphane; Logerot, Morgan; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick; Demarquoy, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) arises as a consequence of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-spanning protein that connects the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. The most distinctive features of DMD are a progressive muscular dystrophy, a myofiber degeneration with fibrosis and metabolic alterations such as fatty infiltration, however, little is known on lipid metabolism changes arising in Duchenne patient cells. Our goal was to identify metabolic changes occurring in Duchenne patient cells especially in terms of L-carnitine homeostasis, fatty acid metabolism both at the mitochondrial and peroxisomal level and the consequences on the membrane structure and function. In this paper, we compared the structural and functional characteristics of DMD patient and control cells. Using radiolabeled L-carnitine, we found, in patient muscle cells, a marked decrease in the uptake and the intracellular level of L-carnitine. Associated with this change, a decrease in the mitochondrial metabolism can be seen from the analysis of mRNA encoding for mitochondrial proteins. Probably, associated with these changes in fatty acid metabolism, alterations in the lipid composition of the cells were identified: with an increase in poly unsaturated fatty acids and a decrease in medium chain fatty acids, mono unsaturated fatty acids and in cholesterol contents. Functionally, the membrane of cells lacking dystrophin appeared to be less fluid, as determined at 37°C by fluorescence anisotropy. These changes may, at least in part, be responsible for changes in the phospholipids and cholesterol profile in cell membranes and ultimately may reduce the fluidity of the membrane. A supplementation with L-carnitine partly restored the fatty acid profile by increasing saturated fatty acid content and decreasing the amounts of MUFA, PUFA, VLCFA. L-carnitine supplementation also restored muscle membrane fluidity. This suggests that regulating lipid metabolism in DMD cells may

  15. Altered Cholesterol and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Block, Robert C.; Dorsey, E. Ray; Beck, Christopher A.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease. PMID:20802793

  16. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  17. The Contributing Role of Bile Acids to Metabolic Improvements After Obesity and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Farnaz; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Steffen, Kristine J

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and metabolic surgery (OMS) leads to several metabolic improvements, which often occur prior to substantial weight loss. Therefore, other factors in addition to weight loss contribute to the metabolic benefits. This literature review offers an overview of studies investigating bile acids (BAs) and their metabolic effects after OMS. Rearrangement of enterohepatic circulation, changes in BA synthesis, BA conjugation, intestinal reabsorption, and alterations in the gut microbiota are potential mechanisms for altered BA profiles after surgery. Increased BA levels are associated with improved glucose homeostasis and lipid profiles, which are mediated by two major receptors: the Transmembrane G-protein Coupled Receptor and the Farnesoid X Receptor. Therefore, pharmacological manipulation of BAs and their receptors may be viable targets for less invasive obesity treatment.

  18. SUMO-specific protease 3 is a key regulator for hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhan; Yu, Fudong; Han, Yan; Li, Qing; Cao, Zhujun; Xiang, Xiaogang; Jiang, Shaowen; Wang, Xiaolin; Lu, Jie; Lai, Rongtao; Wang, Hui; Cai, Wei; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism, particularly NAFLD, is unclear. Our results showed that hepatic SENP3 was up-regulated in NAFLD patients and an animal model in vivo and after loading hepatocytes with free fatty acids (FFA) in vitro. Intracellular lipid accumulation was determined in SENP3 silenced or overexpressed hepatocytes with/without FFA in vitro. Confirming a role for SENP3, gene silencing was associated in vitro with amelioration of lipid accumulation and overexpression with enhancement of lipid accumulation. SENP3 related genes in NAFLD were determined in vitro using RNA-Seq. Eleven unique genes closely associated with lipid metabolism were generated using bioinformatics. Three selected genes (apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b) were verified in vitro, showing apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b were regulated by SENP3 with FFA stimulation. Intrahepatic and circulating APOE, A2M and TNFRSF11B were elevated in NAFLD compared with controls. These data demonstrate the important role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism during the development of NAFLD via downstream genes, which may be useful information in the development of NAFLD. The precise role of SENP3 in NAFLD will be investigated using liver-specific conditional knockout mice in future studies. PMID:27853276

  19. SUMO-specific protease 3 is a key regulator for hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhan; Yu, Fudong; Han, Yan; Li, Qing; Cao, Zhujun; Xiang, Xiaogang; Jiang, Shaowen; Wang, Xiaolin; Lu, Jie; Lai, Rongtao; Wang, Hui; Cai, Wei; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing

    2016-11-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism, particularly NAFLD, is unclear. Our results showed that hepatic SENP3 was up-regulated in NAFLD patients and an animal model in vivo and after loading hepatocytes with free fatty acids (FFA) in vitro. Intracellular lipid accumulation was determined in SENP3 silenced or overexpressed hepatocytes with/without FFA in vitro. Confirming a role for SENP3, gene silencing was associated in vitro with amelioration of lipid accumulation and overexpression with enhancement of lipid accumulation. SENP3 related genes in NAFLD were determined in vitro using RNA-Seq. Eleven unique genes closely associated with lipid metabolism were generated using bioinformatics. Three selected genes (apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b) were verified in vitro, showing apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b were regulated by SENP3 with FFA stimulation. Intrahepatic and circulating APOE, A2M and TNFRSF11B were elevated in NAFLD compared with controls. These data demonstrate the important role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism during the development of NAFLD via downstream genes, which may be useful information in the development of NAFLD. The precise role of SENP3 in NAFLD will be investigated using liver-specific conditional knockout mice in future studies.

  20. Effect of dietary phosphorus levels on meat quality and lipid metabolism in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Ke; Wang, Jin-Zhi; Wang, Chun-Qing; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Li, Xia; Tang, Chun-Hong; Wei, Xiu-Li

    2016-08-15

    To analyze the influence of dietary phosphorus (P) levels on meat quality and lipid metabolism, a 42-day feeding experiment (P deficient group; normal group; high P level groups of H1 and H2, respectively) using 100 one-day-old broilers was conducted. Results demonstrated that the quality of broiler chicken meat in deficient or high P groups decreased relative to the normal group. High P diets resulted in increased lightness, redness values, shear forces and decreased fatty acid contents and intramuscular fat content in breast meat (p<0.01). Compared with normal group, lower malic enzyme activity, higher fatty acid synthase and AMP-activated protein kinase activities were observed in the treatment groups (p<0.05). Chickens fed with normal diets had the lowest serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels which differed from that of other treatments (p<0.05). High-P diets significantly decreased the lipid accumulation in the liver (p<0.01), whereas phosphorus levels in breast meat increased significantly (p<0.01). It can be concluded that deficient or higher P levels could affect meat quality and expression of indicators on lipid metabolism of broiler chickens.

  1. Roles of PPAR delta in lipid absorption and metabolism: a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Luquet, Serge; Gaudel, Celine; Holst, Dorte; Lopez-Soriano, Joaquin; Jehl-Pietri, Chantal; Fredenrich, Alexandre; Grimaldi, Paul A

    2005-05-30

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are lipid-activated transcription factors exerting several functions in development and metabolism. PPARalpha, activated by polyunsaturated fatty acids and fibrates, is implicated in regulation of lipid metabolism, lipoprotein synthesis and metabolism and inflammatory response in liver and other tissues. PPARgamma plays important roles in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of several cell types, including adipose cells. Its activation by thiazolidinediones results in insulin sensibilization and antidiabetic action. Until recently, the physiological functions of PPARdelta remain elusive. The utilization of specific agonists and of appropriate cellular and animal models revealed that PPARdelta has an important role in metabolic adaptation of several tissues to environmental changes. Treatment of obese animals by specific PPARdelta agonists results in normalization of metabolic parameters and reduction of adiposity. The nuclear receptor appeared to be implicated in the regulation of fatty acid burning capacities of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue by controlling the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake, beta-oxidation and energy uncoupling. PPARdelta is also implicated in the adaptive metabolic response of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise by controlling the number of oxidative myofibers. Given the results obtained with animal models, PPARdelta agonists may have therapeutic usefulness in metabolic syndrome by increasing fatty acid consumption in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

  2. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  3. Developmental ethanol exposure leads to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Logan-Garbisch, Theresa; Bortolazzo, Anthony; Luu, Peter; Ford, Audrey; Do, David; Khodabakhshi, Payam; French, Rachael L

    2014-11-11

    Ethanol exposure during development causes an array of developmental abnormalities, both physiological and behavioral. In mammals, these abnormalities are collectively known as fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model of FASD and have previously shown that developmental ethanol exposure in flies leads to reduced expression of insulin-like peptides (dILPs) and their receptor. In this work, we link that observation to dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism and lipid accumulation. Further, we show that developmental ethanol exposure in Drosophila causes oxidative stress, that this stress is a primary cause of the developmental lethality and delay associated with ethanol exposure, and, finally, that one of the mechanisms by which ethanol increases oxidative stress is through abnormal fatty acid metabolism. These data suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ethanol causes the symptoms associated with FASD.

  4. Effects of Opioid Peptides on Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Rats Subjected to Swimming Stress.

    PubMed

    Solin, A V; Lyashev, A Yu; Lyashev, Yu D

    2017-01-01

    Blood levels of nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL increased in rats subjected to forced swimming stress. Administration of opioid peptides dynorphin A(1-13), DSLET, or DAGO reduced stress-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Dynorphin A(1-13) and DAGO produced the most pronounced effects and prevented an increase in concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL as soon as 39 h after treatment. Only DSLET increased HDL content in the plasma of stressed rats. The observed effects can be explained by the stress-limiting effects of opioids, e.g. attenuation of the effect of catecholamines on the adipose tissue and inhibition of the generation LPO products suppressing activity of the cholesterol metabolizing enzyme.

  5. Developmental Ethanol Exposure Leads to Dysregulation of Lipid Metabolism and Oxidative Stress in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Logan-Garbisch, Theresa; Bortolazzo, Anthony; Luu, Peter; Ford, Audrey; Do, David; Khodabakhshi, Payam; French, Rachael L.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during development causes an array of developmental abnormalities, both physiological and behavioral. In mammals, these abnormalities are collectively known as fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model of FASD and have previously shown that developmental ethanol exposure in flies leads to reduced expression of insulin-like peptides (dILPs) and their receptor. In this work, we link that observation to dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism and lipid accumulation. Further, we show that developmental ethanol exposure in Drosophila causes oxidative stress, that this stress is a primary cause of the developmental lethality and delay associated with ethanol exposure, and, finally, that one of the mechanisms by which ethanol increases oxidative stress is through abnormal fatty acid metabolism. These data suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ethanol causes the symptoms associated with FASD. PMID:25387828

  6. Association of Lipid Accumulation Product with Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Namazi Shabestari, Alireza; Asadi, Mojgan; Jouyandeh, Zahra; Qorbani, Mostafa; Kelishadi, Roya

    2016-06-01

    The lipid accumulation product is a novel, safe and inexpensive index of central lipid over accumulation based on waist circumference and fasting concentration of circulating triglycerides. This study was designed to investigate the ability of lipid accumulation product to predict Cardio-metabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women. In this Cross-sectional study, 264 postmenopausal women by using convenience sampling method were selected from menopause clinic in Tehran. Cardio-metabolic risk factors were measured, and lipid accumulation product (waist-58×triglycerides [nmol/L]) was calculated. Optimal cut-off point of lipid accumulation product for predicting metabolic syndrome was estimated by ROC (Receiver-operating characteristic) curve analysis. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 41.2% of subjects. Optimal cut-off point of lipid accumulation product for predicting metabolic syndrome was 47.63 (sensitivity:75%; specificity:77.9%). High lipid accumulation product increases risk of all Cardio-metabolic risk factors except overweight, high Total Cholesterol, high Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and high Fasting Blood Sugar in postmenopausal women. Our findings show that lipid accumulation product is associated with metabolic syndrome and some Cardio-metabolic risk factors Also lipid accumulation product may have been a useful tool for predicting cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome risk in postmenopausal women.

  7. Modulation of Lipid Metabolism and Spiramycin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces ambofaciens Unstable Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schauner, Catherine; Dary, Annie; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Leblond, Pierre; Decaris, Bernard; Germain, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens is prone to genetic instability involving genomic rearrangements at the extremities of the chromosomal DNA. An amplified DNA sequence (ADS205), including an open reading frame (orfPS), is responsible for the reversible loss of spiramycin production in the mutant strain NSA205 (ADS205+ Spi−). The product of orfPS is homologous to polyketide synthase systems (PKSs) involved in the biosynthesis of erythromycin and rapamycin and is overexpressed in strain NSA205 compared with the parental strain RP181110. As PKSs and fatty acid synthase systems have the same precursors, we tested the possibility that overexpression of orfPS also affects lipid metabolism in strain NSA205. This report focuses on comparative analysis of lipids in strain RP181110, the mutant strain NSA205, and a derivative, NSA228 (ADS205− Spi+). NSA205 showed a dramatically depressed lipid content consisting predominantly of phospholipids and triacylglycerols. This lipid content was globally restored in strain NSA228, which had lost ADS205. Furthermore, strains RP181110 and NSA205 presented similar phospholipid and triacylglycerol compositions. No abnormal fatty acids were detected in NSA205. PMID:10347068

  8. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  9. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  10. A combined clinical phenotype and lipidomic analysis reveals the impact of chronic kidney disease on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Liu, Dan; Chen, Dan-Qian; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li; Su, Wei; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2017-03-13

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in significant dyslipidemia and profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The associated dyslipidemia, in turn, contributes to progression of CKD and its cardiovascular complications. To gain an in-depth insight into the disorders of lipid metabolism in advanced CKD, we applied UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomics to measure serum lipid metabolites in 180 patients with advanced CKD and 120 age-matched healthy controls. We found significant increases in the levels of total free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids in patients with CKD. The levels of free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids directly correlated with the level of serum triglyceride, and inversely correlated with the levels of total cholesterol and eGFR. A total of 126 lipid species were identified from positive and negative ion modes. 113 out of 126 identified lipid species were significantly altered in patients with CKD based on the adjusted FDR method. These results point to profound disturbance of fatty acid and triglyceride metabolisms in patients with CKD. Logistic regression analysis showed strong correlations between serum methyl hexadecanoic acid, LPC(24:1), 3-oxooctadecanoic acid and PC(20:2/24:1) levels with eGFR and serum creatinine levels (R>0.8758). In conclusion application of UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomic technique revealed profound changes in lipid metabolites in patients with CKD. The observed increases in serum total fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids levels directly correlated with increased serum triglyceride level, and inversely correlated with the eGFR and triglyceride levels.

  11. Metabolic interactions between vitamin A and conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Cordeddu, Lina; Ortiz, Berenice; Giordano, Elena; Belury, Martha A; Quadro, Loredana; Banni, Sebastiano

    2014-03-24

    Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4). However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  12. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment. PMID:27570415

  13. (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis of acetate conversion to lipids by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Qiao, Kangjian; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are an inexpensive and renewable carbon source that can be generated from gas fermentation and anaerobic digestion of fermentable wastes. The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising biocatalyst that can utilize VFAs and convert them into triacylglycerides (TAGs). However, currently there is limited knowledge on the metabolism of Y. lipolytica when cultured on VFAs. To develop a better understanding, we used acetate as the sole carbon source to culture two strains, a control strain and a previously engineered strain for lipid overaccumulation. For both strains, metabolism during the growth phase and lipid production phase were investigated by metabolic flux analysis using two parallel sodium acetate tracers. The resolved flux distributions demonstrate that the glyoxylate shunt pathway is constantly active and the flux through gluconeogenesis varies depending on strain and phase. In particular, by regulating the activities of malate transport and pyruvate kinase, the cells divert only a portion of the glyoxylate shunt flux required to satisfy the needs for anaplerotic reactions and NADPH production through gluconeogenesis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Excess flux flows back to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy production. As with the case of glucose as the substrate, the primary source for lipogenic NADPH is derived from the oxidative PPP.

  14. [The effect of microwaves on lipid peroxidation and on lipid and mineral metabolism in warm-blooded animals (experimental research)].

    PubMed

    Guliaev, V Iu; Tereshin, S Iu; Oranskiĭ, I E

    1990-01-01

    The experiments on 50 white mature male rats have provided evidence on the effect produced by microwave therapy on lipid peroxidation, lipid and mineral metabolism and weight of the animals. The effect varied with frequency, wavelength and the site of the exposure (abdominal or cervical zones).

  15. Alteration of cellular lipids and lipid metabolism markers in RTL-W1 cells exposed to model endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Dimastrogiovanni, Giorgio; Córdoba, Marlon; Navarro, Isabel; Jáuregui, Olga; Porte, Cinta

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the suitability of the rainbow trout liver cell line (RTL-W1) as an in-vitro model to study the ability of model endocrine disrupters, namely TBT, TPT, 4-NP, BPA and DEHP, to act as metabolic disrupters by altering cellular lipids and markers of lipid metabolism. Among the tested compounds, BPA and DEHP significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), while all the compounds -apart from TPT-, altered membrane lipids - phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and plasmalogen PCs - indicating a strong interaction of the toxicants with cell membranes and cell signaling. RTL-W1 expressed a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism that were modulated by exposure to BPA, TBT and TPT (up-regulation of FATP1 and FAS) and 4-NP and DEHP (down-regulation of FAS and LPL). Multiple and complex modes of action of these chemicals were observed in RTL-W1 cells, both in terms of expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular lipids. Although further characterization is needed, this might be a useful model for the detection of chemicals leading to steatosis or other diseases associated with lipid metabolism in fish.

  16. MRNA expression of genes regulating lipid metabolism in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from differently polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Martina Galatea; Rusten, Marte; Goksøyr, Anders; Routti, Heli

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the ability of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to influence lipid metabolism. Although POPs are found at high concentrations in some populations of marine mammals, for example in the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) from the Baltic Sea, little is known about the effects of POPs on their lipid metabolism. An optimal regulation of lipid metabolism is crucial for ringed seals during the fasting/molting season. This is a physiologically stressful period, during which they rely on the energy stored in their fat reserves. The mRNA expression levels for seven genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed in liver and/or blubber tissue from molting ringed seals from the polluted Baltic Sea and a less polluted reference location, Svalbard (Norway). mRNA expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α and γ and their target genes acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) were analyzed in liver. mRNA expression level of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ and their target genes encoding fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) were measured in inner and middle blubber layers. In addition, we evaluated the influence of molting status on hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARs and their target genes in ringed seals from Svalbard. Our results show higher mRNA expression of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ and adipose PPARβ, FABP4, and ADIPOQ in the Baltic seals compared to the Svalbard seals. A positive relationship between mRNA expressions of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ, adipose FABP4, adipose ADIPOQ and ΣPOP concentrations was observed. These findings suggest that lipid metabolism may be affected by contaminant exposure in the Baltic population. mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ, FABP4 and ADIPOQ were similar between the mid and inner adipose layer. Hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARα and PPARγ was higher in the pre

  17. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River

    PubMed Central

    Murzina, Svetlana A.; Nefedova, Zinaida A.; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N.; Veselov, Alexey E.; Efremov, Denis A.; Nemova, Nina N.

    2016-01-01

    The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years) after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes. PMID:27376274

  18. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River.

    PubMed

    Murzina, Svetlana A; Nefedova, Zinaida A; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N; Veselov, Alexey E; Efremov, Denis A; Nemova, Nina N

    2016-06-30

    The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years) after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes.

  19. Nutritional regulation of lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Coppack, S W; Patel, J N; Lawrence, V J

    2001-01-01

    Pfeiffer and colleagues years ago pointed out that different distributions and amounts of adipose tissue are associated with abnormalities of lipolysis and lipoprotein metabolism. Adipose tissue has several crucial roles including (i) mobilization from stores of fatty acids as an energy source, (ii) catabolism of lipoproteins such as very-low-density lipoprotein and (iii) synthesis and release of hormonal signals such as leptin and interleukin-6. These adipose tissue actions are crucially regulated by nutrition. The review considers the existence of metabolic pathways and modes of regulation within adipose tissue, and how such metabolic activity can be quantitated in humans. Nutrition can influence adipose tissue at several 'levels'. Firstly the level of obesity or malnutrition has important effects on many aspects of adipose tissue metabolism. Secondly short-term overfeeding, underfeeding and exercise have major impacts on adipose tissue behaviour. Lastly, specific nutrients are capable of regulating adipose tissue metabolism. Recently there have been considerable advances in understanding adipose tissue metabolism and in particular its regulation. This review discusses the behaviour of adipose tissue under various nutritional conditions. There is then a review of recent work examining the ways in which nutritional influences act via intra-cellular mechanisms, insulin and the sympathetic innervation of adipose tissue.

  20. MicroRNA-26a regulates insulin sensitivity and metabolism of glucose and lipids

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xianghui; Dong, Bingning; Tian, Yan; Lefebvre, Philippe; Meng, Zhipeng; Wang, Xichun; Pattou, François; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Lou, Fang; Jove, Richard; Staels, Bart; Moore, David D.; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and increased hepatic glucose production, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that have been implicated in the regulation of human diseases, including T2D. miR-26a is known to play a critical role in tumorigenesis; however, its function in cellular metabolism remains unknown. Here, we determined that miR-26a regulates insulin signaling and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Compared with lean individuals, overweight humans had decreased expression of miR-26a in the liver. Moreover, miR-26 was downregulated in 2 obese mouse models compared with control animals. Global or liver-specific overexpression of miR-26a in mice fed a high-fat diet improved insulin sensitivity, decreased hepatic glucose production, and decreased fatty acid synthesis, thereby preventing obesity-induced metabolic complications. Conversely, silencing of endogenous miR-26a in conventional diet–fed mice impaired insulin sensitivity, enhanced glucose production, and increased fatty acid synthesis. miR-26a targeted several key regulators of hepatic metabolism and insulin signaling. These findings reveal miR-26a as a regulator of liver metabolism and suggest miR-26a should be further explored as a potential target for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25961460

  1. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  2. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling in Cholestasis, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport, and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug, and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport, and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration, and carcinogenesis.

  3. Metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids.

    PubMed

    Cattoor, Ko; Dresel, Michael; De Bock, Lies; Boussery, Koen; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Keukeleire, Denis; Deforce, Dieter; Hofmann, Thomas; Heyerick, Arne

    2013-08-21

    In this study, in vitro metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids was investigated. Besides their well-known use as bitter compounds in beer, in several studies, bioactive properties have been related to these types of molecules. However, scientific data on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion aspects of these compounds are limited. More specific, in this study, α-acids, β-acids, and iso-α-acids were incubated with rabbit microsomes, and fractions were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for identification of oxidative biotransformation products. Metabolism of β-acids was mainly characterized by conversion into hulupones and the formation of a series of tricyclic oxygenated products. The most important metabolites of α-acids were identified as humulinones and hulupones. Iso-α-acids were found to be primarly metabolized into cis- and trans-humulinic acids, next to oxidized alloiso-α-acids. Interestingly, the phase I metabolites were highly similar to the oxidative degradation products in beer. These findings show a first insight into the metabolites of hop-derived bitter acids and could have important practical implications in the bioavailability aspects of these compounds, following ingestion of hop-based food products and nutraceuticals.

  4. The autonomic nervous system regulates postprandial hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bruinstroop, Eveline; la Fleur, Susanne E; Ackermans, Mariette T; Foppen, Ewout; Wortel, Joke; Kooijman, Sander; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Rensen, Patrick C N; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-05-15

    The liver is a key organ in controlling glucose and lipid metabolism during feeding and fasting. In addition to hormones and nutrients, inputs from the autonomic nervous system are also involved in fine-tuning hepatic metabolic regulation. Previously, we have shown in rats that during fasting an intact sympathetic innervation of the liver is essential to maintain the secretion of triglycerides by the liver. In the current study, we hypothesized that in the postprandial condition the parasympathetic input to the liver inhibits hepatic VLDL-TG secretion. To test our hypothesis, we determined the effect of selective surgical hepatic denervations on triglyceride metabolism after a meal in male Wistar rats. We report that postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations were significantly elevated in parasympathetically denervated rats compared with control rats (P = 0.008), and VLDL-TG production tended to be increased (P = 0.066). Sympathetically denervated rats also showed a small rise in postprandial triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.045). On the other hand, in rats fed on a six-meals-a-day schedule for several weeks, a parasympathetic denervation resulted in >70% higher plasma triglycerides during the day (P = 0.001), whereas a sympathetic denervation had no effect. Our results show that abolishing the parasympathetic input to the liver results in increased plasma triglyceride levels during postprandial conditions.

  5. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration.

  6. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  7. [EFFECT OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE ON NEUTRAL LIPID METABOLISM AND CELLULAR ENERGETICS IN FROG URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, E V; Fock, E M; Braylovskaya, I V; Bachteeva, V T; Lavrova, E A; Zabelinskiĭ, S A; Parnova, R G

    2015-09-01

    It was shown previously that colonization of the frog urinary bladder by gram-negative bacteria leads to decreased ability of antidiuretic hormone to reabsorb water from the urinary bladder (Fock et al. J. Exp. Zool., 2013, 319A: 487-494). In the present work performed on epithelial cells isolated from the frog urinary bladder the influence of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on neutral lipid metabolism and cellular energetics was studied. It was shown that incubation of cells with LPS led to decrease of fatty acids oxidation and to retention of triacylglycerols (TAG) followed by an increase of the cytoplasmic lipid droplets content and cellular amount of TAG. Fatty acid composition of TAG was not changed under LPS. LPS did not alter mitochondrial membrane potential, however, LPS decreased oxygen consumption rate both in basal and uncoupling conditions. Cellular ATP production was also reduced in the presence of LPS. The data obtained indicate that a decreased ability of antidiuretic hormone to reabsorb water from the urinary bladder induced by bacterial pathogens could be related to inhibition of fatty acids oxidation and impaired energy metabolism.

  8. Enhanced lipid extraction from algae using free nitrous acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Naghdi, Forough Ghasemi; Ye, Liu; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lipid extraction has been identified as a major bottleneck for large-scale algal biodiesel production. In this work free nitrous acid (FNA) is presented as an effective and low cost pretreatment to enhance lipid recovery from algae. Two batch tests, with a range of FNA additions, were conducted to disrupt algal cells prior to lipid extraction by organic solvents. Total accessible lipid content was quantified by the Bligh and Dyer method, and was found to increase with pretreatment time (up to 48 h) and FNA concentration (up to 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L). Hexane extraction was used to study industrially accessible lipids. The mass transfer coefficient (k) for lipid extraction using hexane from algae treated with 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L FNA was found to be dramatically higher than for extraction from untreated algae. Consistent with extraction results, cell disruption analysis indicated the disruption of the cell membrane barrier.

  9. Breast cancer metabolic cross-talk: Fibroblasts are hubs and breast cancer cells are gatherers of lipids.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Coelho, Filipa; André, Saudade; Félix, Ana; Serpa, Jacinta

    2017-01-22

    The cellular components of microenvironment are partners of cancer cells, sharing soluble factors and organic molecules to accomplish tumor energy and biomass demands. We tested the role of fibroblasts in fatty acids metabolism in breast cancer, addressing fatty acid synthase (FASN) expression and activity, the expression of lipids chaperons (FABPs) and transporters (FATPs) and lipids cellular content. We showed that the amount of lipids increased in cancer cells exposed to fibroblasts conditioned media, showing that lipids transfer is crucial in this metabolic cross-talk. Accordingly, it was seen in those cancer cells a concomitant decrease in the expression of FABP2 and FABP3 and an increase in FATP1 expression, whose function is independent of FABPs. The in vivo experiment corroborates the role of CAFs in tumor growth. Our study is one more step toward the understanding of metabolic dynamics between cancer cells and CAFs, disclosing FATP1 as a putative target to disturb the transfer of lipids between CAFs and breast cancer cells.

  10. Identification of a novel human long non-coding RNA that regulates hepatic lipid metabolism by inhibiting SREBP-1c

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duan; Cheng, Min; Niu, Yuqiang; Chi, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuying; Fan, Jingjing; Fan, Heng; Chang, Yongsheng; Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are master regulators of hepatic lipid homeostasis. Aberrant expression of SREBPs frequently leads to lipid metabolism dysregulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified with diverse biological functions, but the effects of lncRNAs on lipid metabolism are rarely reported. Here, we identified a novel human specific lncRNA, lncHR1, as a negative regulator of SREBP-1c expression. Overexpression of lncHR1 inhibited expression of SREBP-1c and fatty acid synthase (FAS) and then repressed oleic acid-induced hepatic cell triglyceride (TG) and lipid droplet (LD) accumulation. In vivo, the data of established transgenic animals showed that mice with lncHR1 expression had less hepatic expression of SREBP-1c, FAS, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), and less hepatic and plasma TG after being fed a high-fat diet. Therefore, we report a novel lncRNA which can decrease lipid metabolism by repressing SREBP-1c gene expression. PMID:28367099

  11. D-Xylose suppresses adipogenesis and regulates lipid metabolism genes in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eunjin; Lim, Ji Ye; Shin, Jae-Ho; Seok, Pu Reum; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2015-07-01

    D-Xylose, a natural pentose, has been reported to reduce postprandial glucose levels, although its effect on lipid metabolism has not been investigated. Therefore, this study hypothesized that d-xylose, as an alternative sweetener, suppresses adipogenesis and lipid metabolism by regulating blood lipid profiles, blood glucose levels, and related gene expression in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Mice were fed a normal diet, a 60% HFD diet, or an HFD with 5% or 10% of the total sucrose content supplemented with d-xylose (Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 diets, respectively). Weight gain, food intake, and serum lipid levels for each group were measured. After 12 weeks, histopathology of liver sections and assays of gene expression related to adipogenesis and lipid metabolism in visceral fat and liver tissues were analyzed. Body weight gain; fasting blood glucose levels; weights of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues; and serum biochemical markers, including total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-/high-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein, were significantly lowered in the Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 groups. In addition, d-xylose supplementation resulted in the down-regulation of adipogenesis-related genes, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C, fatty acid synthase, adipocyte protein 2, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α in visceral adipose tissues. Histopathologically, Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 supplementation reduced HFD-induced fat accumulation in the liver and decreased expressions of fatty acid synthase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. D-Xylose supplementation also enhanced lipid oxidation by increasing expressions of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A; cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily a, polypeptide 10; and acyl-CoA oxidase. In conclusion, our finding suggests that d-xylose may help prevent or attenuate the progression of obesity-related metabolic disorders by alleviating adipogenesis

  12. D/H Ratios in Lipids as a Tool to Elucidate Microbial Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijker, R. S.; Sessions, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Large D/H fractionations have been observed in the lipids and growth water of most organisms studied today. These fractionations have generally been assumed to be constant across most biota because they originate solely from isotope effects imposed by the highly conserved lipid biosynthetic pathway. Recent data is illustrating this conclusion as incomplete. Lipids from field and laboratory samples exhibit huge variations in D/H fractionation. In environmental samples, lipids vary in δD by up to 300 ‰ and in laboratory cultures the documented variation is up to 500 ‰ within the same organism. Remarkably, the isotope fractionation appears to be correlated with the type of metabolism employed by the host organism. However, the underlying biochemical mechanisms leading to these isotopic variations are not yet fully understood. Because the largest proportion of H-bound C in fatty acids is derived directly from NADPH during biosynthesis, the original hypothesis was that large differences in the isotopic composition of NADPH, generated by different central metabolic pathways, were the primary source of D/H variation in lipids. However, recent observations indicate that this cannot be the whole story and lead us to the conclusion that additional processes must affect the isotope composition of NADPH. These processes may include the isotopic exchange of NADPH with water as well as fractionation of NADPH by transhydrogenases, interconverting NADH to NADPH by exhibiting large isotope effects. In this project, our objective is to ascertain whether D/H fractionation and these biochemical processes are correlated. We investigate correlations between cellular NADPH/NADP+ as well as NADH/NAD+ pool sizes and the D/H fractionation in a set of different microorganisms and will present the first trends here. Our results will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the basic biological regulations over D/H fractionation and potentially enables their use as tracers and

  13. D/H Ratios in Lipids as a Tool to Elucidate Microbial Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijker, Reto S.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-04-01

    Large D/H fractionations have been observed in the lipids and growth water of most organisms studied today. These fractionations have generally been assumed to be constant across most biota because they originate solely from isotope effects imposed by the highly conserved lipid biosynthetic pathway. Recent data is illustrating this conclusion as incomplete. Lipids from field and laboratory samples exhibit huge variations in D/H fractionation. In environmental samples, lipids vary in δD by up to 300 ‰ and in laboratory cultures the documented variation is up to 500 ‰ within the same organism. Remarkably, the isotope fractionation appears to be correlated with the type of metabolism employed by the host organism. However, the underlying biochemical mechanisms leading to these isotopic variations are not yet fully understood. Because the largest proportion of H-bound C in fatty acids is derived directly from NADPH during biosynthesis, the original hypothesis was that large differences in the isotopic composition of NADPH, generated by different central metabolic pathways, were the primary source of D/H variation in lipids. However, recent observations indicate that this cannot be the whole story and lead us to the conclusion that additional processes must affect the isotope composition of NADPH. These processes may include the isotopic exchange of NADPH with water as well as fractionation of NADPH by transhydrogenases, interconverting NADH to NADPH by exhibiting large isotope effects. In this project, our objective is to ascertain whether D/H fractionation and these biochemical processes are correlated. We investigate correlations between cellular NADPH/NADP+ as well as NADH/NAD+ pool sizes and the D/H fractionation in a set of different microorganisms and will present the trends here. Our results will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the basic biological regulations over D/H fractionation and potentially enables their use as tracers and

  14. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  15. Transcriptome survey of the lipid metabolic pathways involved in energy production and ecdysteroid synthesis in the salmon louse Caligus rogercresseyi (Crustacea: Copepoda).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Teresa; Farlora, Rodolfo; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to identify and analyze the lipid metabolic pathways involved in energy production and ecdysteroid synthesis in the ectoparasite copepod Caligus rogercresseyi. Massive transcriptome sequencing analysis was performed during the infectious copepodid larval stage, during the attached chalimus larval stage, and also in female and male adults. Thirty genes were selected for describing the pathways, and these were annotated for proteins or enzymes involved in lipid digestion, absorption, and transport; fatty acid degradation; the synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies; and steroid and ecdysteroid syntheses. Differential expression of these genes was analyzed by ontogenic stage and discussed considering each stage's feeding habits and energetic needs. Copepodids showed a low expression of fatty acid digestion genes, reflected by a non-feeding behavior, and the upregulation of genes involved in steroid biosynthesis, which was consistent with a pathway for cholesterol synthesis during ecdysis. The chalimus stage showed an upregulation of genes related to fatty acid digestion, absorption, and transport, as well as to fatty acid degradation and the synthesis of ketone bodies, therefore suggesting that lipids ingested from the mucus and skin of the host fish are metabolized as important sources of energy. Adult females also showed a pattern of high lipid metabolism for energy supply and mobilization in relation to reproduction and vitellogenesis. Adult females and males revealed different lipid metabolism patterns that reflected different energetic needs. This study reports for the first time the probable lipid metabolic pathways involved in the energy production and ecdysteroid synthesis of C. rogercresseyi.

  16. Muscle and liver-specific alterations in lipid and acylcarnitine metabolism after a single bout of exercise in mice.

    PubMed

    Hoene, Miriam; Li, Jia; Li, Yanjie; Runge, Heike; Zhao, Xinjie; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang; Weigert, Cora

    2016-02-26

    Intracellular lipid pools are highly dynamic and tissue-specific. Physical exercise is a strong physiologic modulator of lipid metabolism, but most studies focus on changes induced by long-term training. To assess the acute effects of endurance exercise, mice were subjected to one hour of treadmill running, and (13)C16-palmitate was applied to trace fatty acid incorporation in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle and liver. The amounts of carnitine, FFA, lysophospholipids and diacylglycerol and the post-exercise increase in acetylcarnitine were pronouncedly higher in soleus than in gastrocnemius. In the liver, exercise increased the content of lysophospholipids, plasmalogens and carnitine as well as transcript levels of the carnitine transporter. (13)C16-palmitate was detectable in several lipid and acylcarnitine species, with pronounced levels of tracer-derived palmitoylcarnitine in both muscles and a strikingly high incorporation into triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine in the liver. These data illustrate the high lipid storing activity of the liver immediately after exercise whereas in muscle, fatty acids are directed towards oxidation. The observed muscle-specific differences accentuate the need for single-muscle analyses as well as careful consideration of the particular muscle employed when studying lipid metabolism in mice. In addition, our results reveal that lysophospholipids and plasmalogens, potential lipid signalling molecules, are acutely regulated by physical exercise.

  17. Effects on Liver Lipid Metabolism of the Naturally Occurring Dietary Flavone Luteolin-7-glucoside

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Carla; Oliveira, Ana Rita; Machado, Cátia; Azevedo, Marisa; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in whole-body lipid metabolism can lead to the onset of several pathologies such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The present study aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the lipid-lowering effects of the flavone luteolin-7-glucoside (L7G) which we previously showed to improve plasma lipid profile in rats. L7G is abundant in plant foods of Mediterranean diet such as aromatic plants used as herbs. Results show that dietary supplementation with L7G for one week induced the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) and of its target gene carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT-1) in rat liver. L7G showed a tendency to decrease the hepatic expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), without affecting fatty acid synthase (FAS) protein levels. Although SREBP-2 and LDLr mRNA levels did not change, the expression of HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) was significantly repressed by L7G. L7G also inhibited this enzyme's in vitro activity in a dose dependent manner, but only at high and not physiologically relevant concentrations. These results add new evidence that the flavone luteolin-7-glucoside may help in preventing metabolic diseases and clarify the mechanisms underlying the beneficial health effects of diets rich in fruits and vegetables. PMID:26113868

  18. TPhP exposure disturbs carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhongkun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guowei; Peng, Jianbiao; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-02-01

    Triphenyl phosphate is a high production volume organophosphate flame retardant that has been detected in multiple environmental media at increasing concentrations. The environmental and health risks of triphenyl phosphate have drawn attention because of the multiplex toxicity of this chemical compound. However, few studies have paid close attention to the impacts of triphenyl phosphate on liver metabolism. We investigated hepatic histopathological, metabolomic and transcriptomic responses of zebrafish after exposure to 0.050 mg/L and 0.300 mg/L triphenyl phosphate for 7 days. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant changes in the contents of glucose, UDP-glucose, lactate, succinate, fumarate, choline, acetylcarnitine, and several fatty acids. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that related pathways, such as the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, PPAR signaling pathway and fatty acid elongation, were significantly affected. These results suggest that triphenyl phosphate exposure markedly disturbs hepatic carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Moreover, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and non-homologous end-joining and base excision repair were strongly affected, thus indicating that triphenyl phosphate hinders the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver cells. The present study provides a systematic analysis of the triphenyl phosphate-induced toxic effects in zebrafish liver and demonstrates that low concentrations of triphenyl phosphate affect normal metabolism and cell cycle.

  19. TPhP exposure disturbs carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhongkun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guowei; Peng, Jianbiao; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Triphenyl phosphate is a high production volume organophosphate flame retardant that has been detected in multiple environmental media at increasing concentrations. The environmental and health risks of triphenyl phosphate have drawn attention because of the multiplex toxicity of this chemical compound. However, few studies have paid close attention to the impacts of triphenyl phosphate on liver metabolism. We investigated hepatic histopathological, metabolomic and transcriptomic responses of zebrafish after exposure to 0.050 mg/L and 0.300 mg/L triphenyl phosphate for 7 days. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant changes in the contents of glucose, UDP-glucose, lactate, succinate, fumarate, choline, acetylcarnitine, and several fatty acids. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that related pathways, such as the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, PPAR signaling pathway and fatty acid elongation, were significantly affected. These results suggest that triphenyl phosphate exposure markedly disturbs hepatic carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Moreover, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and non-homologous end-joining and base excision repair were strongly affected, thus indicating that triphenyl phosphate hinders the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver cells. The present study provides a systematic analysis of the triphenyl phosphate-induced toxic effects in zebrafish liver and demonstrates that low concentrations of triphenyl phosphate affect normal metabolism and cell cycle. PMID:26898711

  20. 2009 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function Gordon Research Conference - February 1- 6 ,2009

    SciTech Connect

    Kent D. Chapman

    2009-02-06

    The Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism and Function' has been instituted to accelerate research productivity in the field of plant lipids. This conference will facilitate wide dissemination of research breakthroughs, support recruitment of young scientists to the field of plant lipid metabolism and encourage broad participation of the plant lipid community in guiding future directions for research in plant lipids. This conference will build upon the strengths of the successful, previous biannual meetings of the National Plant Lipid Cooperative (www.plantlipids.org) that began in 1993, but will reflect a broader scope of topics to include the biochemistry, cell biology, metabolic regulation, and signaling functions of plant acyl lipids. Most importantly, this conference also will serve as a physical focal point for the interaction of the plant lipid research community. Applications to attend this conference will be open to all researchers interested in plant lipids and will provide a venue for the presentation of the latest research results, networking opportunities for young scientists, and a forum for the development and exchange of useful lipid resources and new ideas. By bringing together senior- and junior-level scientists involved in plant lipid metabolism, a broad range of insights will be shared and the community of plant lipid researchers will function more as a network of vested partners. This is important for the vitality of the research community and for the perceived value that will encourage conference attendance into the future.

  1. [Oral contraceptives and cardiovascular disease--aspects of lipid metabolism].

    PubMed

    Crona, N; Silfverstolpe, G

    1984-02-08

    A review of the research data concerning cardiovascular disease induced by oral contraceptives (OC) relies on the findings of 3 US and British prospective studies involving 80,000 women. Pill users under 35 who were nonsmokers had 1/4 of the risk of dying as a result of this use than of pregnancy complications (in smokers, the risk is the same). Acute pathogenetical effects include blood coagulation homeostasis leading to thromboembolism and long-term disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The estrogen component of OCs, ethinyl estradiol (EE), tends to increase Very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL) and High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) levels while decreasing Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) levels. The gestagen component, a nortestosterone derivative, acts in the opposite way. The estrogen component also increases the level of triglycerides in the VLDL fraction and in serum. There seems to be an inverse ratio between VLDL and HDL levels (gestagen-dominant OCs lower the HDL cholesterol level). The thromboembolitic side effects of estrogen led to the introduction of low-dose pills in the 1970s (acute pancreatitis, a severe side effect, has been all but eliminated). The cardiovascular complications and cerebral insult induced by the gestagen component, a 19-nortestosterone derivative, have also resulted in decreased doses of gestagens in OCs. Non-alkylated estrogens ("natural" estrogens) have been favored recently because they do not increase VLDL levels, while still increasing HDL. A 17-alpha-hydroxprogesterone derivative as the gestagen component of pills has been used in recent years, since it is inert in lipid metabolism, unlike 19-nortestosterone. The effect of exogenous sexual steriods on prostaglandin synethis and on the balance of thromboxanes and prostacyclines will require futher study.

  2. Sec14 Like PITPs Couple Lipid Metabolism with Phosphoinositide Synthesis to Regulate Golgi Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Davison, James M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2017-01-01

    An interface coordinating lipid metabolism with proteins that regulate membrane trafficking is necessary to regulate Golgi morphology and dynamics. Such an interface facilitates the membrane deformations required for vesicularization, forms platforms for protein recruitment and assembly on appropriate sites on a membrane surface and provides lipid co-factors for optimal protein activity in the proper spatio-temporally regulated manner. Importantly, Sec14 and Sec14-like proteins are a unique superfamily of proteins that sense specific aspects of lipid metabolism, employing this information to potentiate phosphoinositide production. Therefore, Sec14 and Sec14 like proteins form central conduits to integrate multiple aspects of lipid metabolism with productive phosphoinositide signaling. PMID:22374094

  3. Beneficiary effect of Tinospora cordifolia against high-fructose diet induced abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Sreenivasa; Ramatholisamma, P; Ramesh, B; Baskar, R; Saralakumari, D

    2009-10-01

    High intake of dietary fructose has been shown to exert a number of adverse metabolic eff ects in humans and experimental animals. The present study was designed to investigate the eff ect of the aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia stem (TCAE) on the adverse eff ects of fructose loading toward carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats. Adult male Wistar rats of body weight around 200 g were divided into four groups, two of which were fed with starch diet and the other two with high fructose (66 %) diet. Plant extract of TC (400 mg/kg/day) was administered orally to each group of the starch fed rats and the highfructose fed rats. At the end of 60 days of experimental period, biochemical parameters related to carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were assayed. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and elevated levels of hepatic total lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids (p < 0.05) observed in fructose-fed rats were completely prevented with TCAE treatment. Alterations in the activities of enzymes of glucose metabolism (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthetase, lipoprotein lipase, and malic enzyme) as observed in the high fructose-fed rats were prevented with TCAE administration. In conclusion, our fi ndings indicate improvement of glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fructose fed rats by treatment with Tinospora cordifolia, and suggest that the plant can be used as an adjuvant for the prevention and/or management of insulin resistance and disorders related to it.

  4. Norepinephrine inhibits islet lipid metabolism, sup 45 Ca sup 2+ uptake, and insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Vara, E.; Tamarit-Rodriguez, J. )

    1989-12-01

    We have previously shown that palmitate potentiates, in isolated islets, glucose-induced stimulation of insulin release, de novo lipid synthesis, and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} turnover in a correlative manner. Norepinephrine, a known inhibitor of the secretory response, has now been used to further investigate the relationships among the three phenomena. The amine decreased insulin secretion dose dependently in response to glucose and palmitate with alpha 2-adrenergic specificity. It also reduced similarly the oxidation of 1 mmol/l (U-{sup 14}C)palmitate as well as the incorporation of 20 mmol/l D-(U-{sup 14}C)glucose into islet phospholipids and neutral lipids through an alpha 2-adrenergic mechanism. These results indirectly suggest that alpha 2-adrenoceptor stimulation inhibits in islets both palmitate oxidation and esterification through an inactivation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase and other enzymes of glycerolipid synthesis. Islet uptake of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} was also decreased by norepinephrine with a similar sensitivity to that shown by insulin release and de novo lipid synthesis. Therefore, it is suggested that alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated reduction of the potentiation by palmitate of the secretory response to glucose depends on the inhibition of fatty acid metabolism and the resulting impairment of de novo lipid synthesis and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} turnover.

  5. Lipoic Acid Metabolism in Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Maroya D.; Prigge, Sean T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Lipoic acid [(R)-5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid] is an enzyme cofactor required for intermediate metabolism in free-living cells. Lipoic acid was discovered nearly 60 years ago and was shown to be covalently attached to proteins in several multicomponent dehydrogenases. Cells can acquire lipoate (the deprotonated charge form of lipoic acid that dominates at physiological pH) through either scavenging or de novo synthesis. Microbial pathogens implement these basic lipoylation strategies with a surprising variety of adaptations which can affect pathogenesis and virulence. Similarly, lipoylated proteins are responsible for effects beyond their classical roles in catalysis. These include roles in oxidative defense, bacterial sporulation, and gene expression. This review surveys the role of lipoate metabolism in bacterial, fungal, and protozoan pathogens and how these organisms have employed this metabolism to adapt to niche environments. PMID:20508247

  6. Longitudinal Metabolomic Profiling of Amino Acids and Lipids across Healthy Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Karen L.; Hellmuth, Christian; Uhl, Olaf; Buss, Claudia; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Koletzko, Berthold; Entringer, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a complexity of metabolic processes that may impact fetal development and ultimately, infant health outcomes. However, our understanding of whole body maternal and fetal metabolism during this critical life stage remains incomplete. The objective of this study is to utilize metabolomics to profile longitudinal patterns of fasting maternal metabolites among a cohort of non-diabetic, healthy pregnant women in order to advance our understanding of changes in protein and lipid concentrations across gestation, the biochemical pathways by which they are metabolized and to describe variation in maternal metabolites between ethnic groups. Among 160 pregnant women, amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, keto-bodies and non-esterified fatty acids were detected by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, while polar lipids were detected through flow-injected mass spectrometry. The maternal plasma concentration of several essential and non-essential amino acids, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins significantly decreased across pregnancy. Concentrations of several TCA intermediates increase as pregnancy progresses, as well as the keto-body β-hydroxybutyrate. Ratios of specific acylcarnitines used as indicators of metabolic pathways suggest a decreased beta-oxidation rate and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 enzyme activity with advancing gestation. Decreasing amino acid concentrations likely reflects placental uptake and tissue biosynthesis. The absence of any increase in plasma non-esterified fatty acids is unexpected in the catabolic phase of later pregnancy and may reflect enhanced placental fatty acid uptake and utilization for fetal tissue growth. While it appears that energy production through the TCA cycle increases as pregnancy progresses, decreasing patterns of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine as well as increased

  7. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  8. Novel interference in thiobarbituric acid assay for lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Baker, N; Hill, V A; Wright, E T

    1975-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation, when applied to a mixture of acetaldehyde and sucrose, produces a 532 nm aborbing chromogen which is indistinguishable from that formed by malonaldehyde and thiobarbituric acid. Unless special procedures are adopted to correct for this effect, the combined action of acetaldehyde and sucrose interferes seriously with the assay of lipid peroxidation reactions, notably those implicated in alcohol-induced liver injuries. However, this unusual thiobarbituric acid effect also can be used as a sensitive method for the detection of acetaldehyde.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands regulate lipid content, metabolism, and composition in fetal lungs of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, M; Capobianco, E; Careaga, V; Martinez, N; Mazzucco, M B; Maier, M; Jawerbaum, A

    2014-03-01

    Maternal diabetes impairs fetal lung development. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors relevant in lipid homeostasis and lung development. This study aims to evaluate the effect of in vivo activation of PPARs on lipid homeostasis in fetal lungs of diabetic rats. To this end, we studied lipid concentrations, expression of lipid metabolizing enzymes and fatty acid composition in fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats i) after injections of the fetuses with Leukotriene B4 (LTB4, PPARα ligand) or 15deoxyΔ(12,14)prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2, PPARγ ligand) and ii) fed during pregnancy with 6% olive oil- or 6% safflower oil-supplemented diets, enriched with PPAR ligands were studied. Maternal diabetes increased triglyceride concentrations and decreased expression of lipid-oxidizing enzymes in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, an expression further decreased by LTB4 and partially restored by 15dPGJ2 in lungs of male fetuses in the diabetic group. In lungs of female fetuses in the diabetic group, maternal diets enriched with olive oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid synthase expression, while those enriched with safflower oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid transporter expression. Both olive oil- and safflower oil-supplemented diets decreased cholesterol and cholesteryl ester concentrations and increased the expression of the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 in fetal lungs of female fetuses of diabetic rats. In fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats, the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with the maternal diets enriched with olive and safflower oils. Our results revealed important changes in lipid metabolism in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, and in the ability of PPAR ligands to modulate the composition of lipid species relevant in the lung during the perinatal period.

  10. SC-10DIVERGENT LIPID METABOLISM DRIVES SELF-RENEWAL IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Hale, James; Gromovsky, Tony; Alex Brown, H.; Mark Brown, J.; Lathia, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is essential to cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, providing discreet cues influencing cellular behavior. However, the mechanisms by which CSCs sense and respond to microenvironmental stresses, such as lipid availability, which regulates cellular metabolism and membrane turnover, are poorly understood. Scavenger receptors, a broad class of membrane receptors, are instrumental in the recognition and uptake of modified lipids, presenting a unique link between CSCs and the tumor microenvironment. Recent work published by our group utilizing patient-derived CSCs demonstrated elevated levels of the scavenger receptor CD36 in Glioblastoma (GBM) CSCs, with functional consequences on self-renewal and tumorigenesis. These results highlighted enhanced oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake and utilization by CSCs and suggest that lipid metabolism is intimately linked to CSC maintenance. We therefore hypothesize that CSCs possess increased ability to take up and metabolize lipid species. We have observed increased lipid uptake and incorporation in CSCs as assessed by 14C acetate and 3H oleate. Despite increased uptake, CSCs show decreased lipid droplet accumulation as evidenced by Oil Red O staining. These results were confirmed by flow cytometry with the alternative lipid stain Nile Red. A metabolic shRNA screen is currently underway to identify potential targets in the regulation of lipid metabolism in CSCs. These data provide a paradigm by which CSCs utilize lipid species, providing survival and metabolic advantages and thereby allowing for tumor progression.

  11. Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María J; González, C Ruth; Varela, Luis; Lage, Ricardo; Tovar, Sulay; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Williams, Lynda M; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the adipocyte-derived hormone resistin (RSTN) directly regulates both feeding and peripheral metabolism through, so far, undefined hypothalamic-mediated mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the anorectic effect of RSTN is associated with inappropriately decreased mRNA expression of orexigenic (agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y) and increased mRNA expression of anorexigenic (cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript) neuropeptides in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Of interest, RSTN also exerts a profound nutrition-dependent inhibitory effect on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by increased phosphorylation levels of both AMP-activated protein kinase and its downstream target acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, associated with decreased expression of fatty acid synthase in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, we also demonstrate that chronic central RSTN infusion results in decreased body weight and major changes in peripheral expression of lipogenic enzymes, in a tissue-specific and nutrition-dependent manner. Thus, in the fed state central RSTN is associated with induced expression of fatty acid synthesis enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines in liver, whereas its administration in the fasted state does so in white adipose tissue. Overall, our results indicate that RSTN controls feeding and peripheral lipid metabolism and suggest that hepatic RSTN-induced insulin resistance may be mediated by central activation of de novo lipogenesis in liver.

  12. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Chrast, Roman; Saher, Gesine; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Verheijen, Mark H. G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid synthesis of myelinating glial cells because of blood barriers shielding the nervous system from circulating lipids. Recent insights from analysis of inherited lipid disorders, especially those with prevailing lipid depletion and from mouse models with glia-specific disruption of lipid metabolism, shed new light on this issue. The particular lipid composition of myelin, the transport of lipid-associated myelin proteins, and the necessity for timely assembly of the myelin sheath all contribute to the observed vulnerability of myelin to perturbed lipid metabolism. Furthermore, the uptake of external lipids may also play a role in the formation of myelin membranes. In addition to an improved understanding of basic myelin biology, these data provide a foundation for future therapeutic interventions aiming at preserving glial cell integrity in metabolic disorders. PMID:21062955

  13. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  14. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  15. Metabolic engineering of Pichia pastoris to produce ricinoleic acid, a hydroxy fatty acid of industrial importance[S

    PubMed Central

    Meesapyodsuk, Dauenpen; Chen, Yan; Ng, Siew Hon; Chen, Jianan; Qiu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Ricinoleic acid (12-hydroxyoctadec-cis-9-enoic acid) has many specialized uses in bioproduct industries, while castor bean is currently the only commercial source for the fatty acid. This report describes metabolic engineering of a microbial system (Pichia pastoris) to produce ricinoleic acid using a “push” (synthesis) and “pull” (assembly) strategy. CpFAH, a fatty acid hydroxylase from Claviceps purpurea, was used for synthesis of ricinoleic acid, and CpDGAT1, a diacylglycerol acyl transferase for the triacylglycerol synthesis from the same species, was used for assembly of the fatty acid. Coexpression of CpFAH and CpDGAT1 produced higher lipid contents and ricinoleic acid levels than expression of CpFAH alone. Coexpression in a mutant haploid strain defective in the Δ12 desaturase activity resulted in a higher level of ricinoleic acid than that in the diploid strain. Intriguingly, the ricinoleic acid produced was mainly distributed in the neutral lipid fractions, particularly the free fatty acid form, but with little in the polar lipids. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of the metabolic engineering strategy and excellent capacity of the microbial system for production of ricinoleic acid as an alternative to plant sources for industrial uses. PMID:26323290

  16. Solubilization of lipids and lipid phases by the styrene-maleic acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez Pardo, Juan J; Dörr, Jonas M; Iyer, Aditya; Cox, Ruud C; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Subramaniam, Vinod; Killian, J Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    A promising tool in membrane research is the use of the styrene-maleic acid (SMA) copolymer to solubilize membranes in the form of nanodiscs. Since membranes are heterogeneous in composition, it is important to know whether SMA thereby has a preference for solubilization of either specific types of lipids or specific bilayer phases. Here, we investigated this by performing partial solubilization of model membranes and analyzing the lipid composition of the solubilized fraction. We found that SMA displays no significant lipid preference in homogeneous binary lipid mixtures in the fluid phase, even when using lipids that by themselves show very different solubilization kinetics. By contrast, in heterogeneous phase-separated bilayers, SMA was found to have a strong preference for solubilization of lipids in the fluid phase as compared to those in either a gel phase or a liquid-ordered phase. Together the results suggest that (1) SMA is a reliable tool to characterize native interactions between membrane constituents, (2) any solubilization preference of SMA is not due to properties of individual lipids but rather due to properties of the membrane or membrane domains in which these lipids reside and (3) exploiting SMA resistance rather than detergent resistance may be an attractive approach for the isolation of ordered domains from biological membranes.

  17. Alterations in Lipid and Inositol Metabolisms in Two Dopaminergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Hannah S.; Do, Kieu Trinh; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Wahl, Simone; Adamski, Jerzy; Peters, Annette; Krumsiek, Jan; Suhre, Karsten; Haslinger, Bernhard; Ceballos-Baumann, Andres; Gieger, Christian; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum metabolite profiling can be used to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of and potential biomarkers for a given disease. Both restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson`s disease (PD) represent movement disorders for which currently no blood-based biomarkers are available and whose pathogenesis has not been uncovered conclusively. We performed unbiased serum metabolite profiling in search of signature metabolic changes for both diseases. Methods 456 metabolites were quantified in serum samples of 1272 general population controls belonging to the KORA cohort, 82 PD cases and 95 RLS cases by liquid-phase chromatography and gas chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Genetically determined metabotypes were calculated using genome-wide genotyping data for the 1272 general population controls. Results After stringent quality control, we identified decreased levels of long-chain (polyunsaturated) fatty acids of individuals with PD compared to both RLS (PD vs. RLS: p = 0.0001 to 5.80x10-9) and general population controls (PD vs. KORA: p = 6.09x10-5 to 3.45x10-32). In RLS, inositol metabolites were increased specifically (RLS vs. KORA: p = 1.35x10-6 to 3.96x10-7). The impact of dopaminergic drugs was reflected in changes in the phenylalanine/tyrosine/dopamine metabolism observed in both individuals with RLS and PD. Conclusions A first discovery approach using serum metabolite profiling in two dopamine-related movement disorders compared to a large general population sample identified significant alterations in the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in PD and implicated the inositol metabolism in RLS. These results provide a starting point for further studies investigating new perspectives on factors involved in the pathogenesis of the two diseases as well as possible points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26808974

  18. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  19. Fatty Acids and Bioactive Lipids of Potato Cultivars: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Oraby, Hesahm Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Potato tuber is a highly nutritious, wherein genotype and environmental differences are known to exist in the shape, size and nutritional value of potatoes. Owing to its high consumption, potato could be an ideal carrier of health-promoting phytochemicals. Potato cultivars contain many bioactive lipidic compounds such as fatty acids, glycolipids, phospholipids, sterols, tocols and carotenoids, which are highly desirable in diet because of their health-promoting effects. In the scientific literature, information on the content and profile of bioactive lipidic compounds in potato cultivars are few. The concentration and stability of bioactive lipids are affected by many factors such as genotype, agronomic factors, postharvest storage, cooking and processing conditions. In this review levels and composition of bioactive lipids in terms of lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols, and caroteinoids distribution in different potato cultivars including genetically modified potato (GMP) were highlighted and discussed. In addition, factors affecting bioactive lipids levels, stability and health benefits are reviewed. In consideration of potential nutritional value, detailed knowledge on lipids of potato cultivars is of major importance.

  20. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used.

  1. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  2. Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Reveals the Role of PPARγ Controlling the Lipid Metabolism in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wangsheng; Zhang, Changhui

    2016-01-01

    To explore the large-scale effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC), an oligonucleotide microarray platform was used for transcriptome profiling in cells overexpressing PPARG and incubated with or without rosiglitazone (ROSI, a PPARγ agonist). A total of 1143 differentially expressed genes (DEG) due to treatment were detected. The Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA) analysis uncovered the most impacted and induced pathways “fatty acid elongation in mitochondria,” “glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis-keratan sulfate,” and “pentose phosphate pathway.” The data highlights the central role of PPARG in milk fatty acid metabolism via controlling fatty acid elongation, biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, lipid formation, and lipid secretion; furthermore, its role related to carbohydrate metabolism promotes the production of intermediates required for milk fat synthesis. Analysis of upstream regulators indicated that PPARG participates in multiple physiological processes via controlling or cross talking with other key transcription factors such as PPARD and NR1H3 (also known as liver-X-receptor-α). This transcriptome-wide analysis represents the first attempt to better understand the biological relevance of PPARG expression in ruminant mammary cells. Overall, the data underscored the importance of PPARG in mammary lipid metabolism and transcription factor control. PMID:27818678

  3. Antiobesity efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide is associated with peripheral tissue-specific modulation of lipid metabolic regulators.

    PubMed

    Decara, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Beiroa, Daniel; Rivera, Patricia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ballesteros, Joan; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-11-12

    To investigate the role of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in peripheral lipid metabolism. Both lean and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) rats were used to compare the peripheral effects of the subcutaneous and repeated administration of the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide on the expression of key regulators involved in lipid metabolism, β-oxidation and thermogenesis in liver, abdominal muscle, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). We observed that liraglutide reduced caloric intake, body weight, and plasma levels of triglycerides and VLDL in a diet-independent manner. However, changes in liver fat content and the expression of lipid metabolism regulators were produced in a diet and tissue-dependent manner. In lean rats, liraglutide increased the gene/protein expression of elements involved in lipogenesis (ChREBP, Acaca/ACC, Fasn/FAS, Scd1/SCD1, PPARα/γ), β-oxidation (CPT1b), and thermogenesis (Cox4i1, Ucp1/UCP1) in eWAT and muscle, which suggest an increase in fatty-acid flux and utilization to activate energy expenditure. Regarding DIO rats, the specific reduction of liver lipid content by liraglutide was associated with a decreased expression of main elements involved in lipogenesis (phospho-ACC), peroxisomal β-oxidation (ACOX1), and lipid flux/storage (Pparγ/PPARγ) in liver, which suggest a recovery of lipid homeostasis. Interestingly, the muscle of DIO rats treated with liraglutide showed a decreased expression of PPARγ and the thermogenic factor UCP1. These results help us to better understand the peripheral mechanisms regulating lipid metabolism that underlay the effectiveness of GLP-1 analogues for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):600-611, 2016.

  4. Sudachitin, a polymethoxylated flavone, improves glucose and lipid metabolism by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and stroke. Flavonoids are effective antioxidants that protect against these chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sudachitin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid found in the skin of the Citrus sudachi fruit, on glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity and db/db diabetic mice. In our current study, we show that sudachitin improves metabolism and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby increasing energy expenditure and reducing weight gain. Methods C57BL/6 J mice fed a high-fat diet (40% fat) and db/db mice fed a normal diet were treated orally with 5 mg/kg sudachitin or vehicle for 12 weeks. Following treatment, oxygen expenditure was assessed using indirect calorimetry, while glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and indices of dyslipidemia were assessed by serum biochemistry. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effect of sudachitin on the transcription of key metabolism-regulating genes in the skeletal muscle, liver, and white and brown adipose tissues. Primary myocytes were also prepared to examine the signaling mechanisms targeted by sudachitin in vitro. Results Sudachitin improved dyslipidemia, as evidenced by reduction in triglyceride and free fatty acid levels, and improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. It also enhanced energy expenditure and fatty acid β-oxidation by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function. The in vitro assay results suggest that sudachitin increased Sirt1 and PGC-1α expression in the skeletal muscle. Conclusions Sudachitin may improve dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome by improving energy metabolism. Furthermore, it also induces mitochondrial biogenesis to protect against metabolic disorders. PMID:25114710

  5. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury: Implications for temporal homeostasis of lipid metabolism and eicosanoid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Maria; Gruia, Alexandra T; Nica, Dragos V; Azghadi, Seyed M R; Mic, Ani A; Mic, Felix A

    2015-12-05

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used drug that induces serious hepatotoxicity when overdosed, leading to increased levels of serum aminotransferases. However, little knowledge exists linking acetaminophen to liver free fatty acids and the eicosanoid-mediated signaling pathway. To this end, adult NMRI mice injected with a dose of 400 mg/kg acetaminophen were monitored for one week post-treatment. Consistent changes were observed in serum transaminases, profile of hepatic free fatty acids, expression of cyclooxygenase, elongase, lipogenesis, and lipolysis genes; as well as in expression patterns of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 in the liver. Both linoleic acid and arachidonic acid--substrates in eicosanoid biosynthesis--were significantly influenced by overdose, and the latter peaked first among the free fatty acids examined here. There was a close similarity between the temporal dynamics of linoleic acid and aspartate aminotransferases. Moreover, serum transaminases were reduced by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but not by cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors. Our results hence attest to the hazard of acetaminophen overdose on the temporal homeostasis of hepatic concentrations of free fatty acids and expression of key genes underlying liver lipid metabolism. There is also evidence for activation of a cyclooxygenase-mediated signaling pathway, especially the cyclooxygenase 2-prostanoid pathway, during acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Therefore, the results of the present study should provide valuable information to a wide audience, working to understand the health hazard of this drug and the implications of the eicosanoid signaling pathway in liver pathophysiology.

  6. Investigating the Effects of Statins on Cellular Lipid Metabolism Using a Yeast Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynska, Agata; Burzynska, Beata; Plochocka, Danuta; Kaminska, Joanna; Zimnicka, Magdalena; Kania, Magdalena; Kiliszek, Marek; Wysocka-Kapcinska, Monika; Danikiewicz, Witold; Szkopinska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    In humans, defects in lipid metabolism are associated with a number of severe diseases such as atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia is a primary risk factor for coronary artery disease, the major cause of premature deaths in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), the key enzyme of the sterol synthesis pathway. Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours many counterparts of mammalian enzymes involved in lipid-synthesizing pathways, conclusions drawn from research with this single cell eukaryotic organism can be readily applied to higher eukaryotes. Using a yeast strain with deletions of both HMG1 and HMG2 genes (i.e. completely devoid of HMGR activity) with introduced wild-type or mutant form of human HMGR (hHMGR) gene we investigated the effects of statins on the lipid metabolism of the cell. The relative quantification of mRNA demonstrated a different effect of simvastatin on the expression of the wild-type and mutated hHMGR gene. GC/MS analyses showed a significant decrease of sterols and enhanced conversion of squalene and sterol precursors into ergosterol. This was accompanied by the mobilization of ergosterol precursors localized in lipid particles in the form of steryl esters visualized by confocal microscopy. Changes in the level of ergosterol and its precursors in cells treated with simvastatin depend on the mutation in the hHMGR gene. HPLC/MS analyses indicated a reduced level of phospholipids not connected with the mevalonic acid pathway. We detected two significant phenomena. First, cells treated with simvastatin develop an adaptive response compensating the lower activity of HMGR. This includes enhanced conversion of sterol precursors into ergosterol, mobilization of steryl esters and increased expression of the hHMGR gene. Second, statins cause a substantial drop in the level of glycerophospholipids. PMID:20041128

  7. Maternal obesity programs mitochondrial and lipid metabolism gene expression in infant umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Costa, Suzana Maria; Isganaitis, Elvira; Matthews, Tucker; Hughes, Katelyn; Daher, Grace; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Pontes da Silva, Giselia Alves; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Maternal obesity increases risk for childhood obesity, but molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized that primary umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) from infants of overweight and obese mothers would harbor transcriptional patterns reflecting offspring obesity risk. Subjects/Methods In this observational cohort study, we recruited 13 lean (pre-pregnancy BMI <25.0 kg/m2) and 24 overweight-obese (‘ov-ob’, BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2) women. We isolated primary HUVEC, and analyzed both gene expression (Primeview, Affymetrix) and cord blood levels of hormones and adipokines. Results 142 transcripts were differentially expressed in HUVEC from infants of overweight-obese mothers (false discovery rate, FDR <0.05). Pathway analysis revealed that genes involved in mitochondrial and lipid metabolism were negatively correlated with maternal BMI (FDR <0.05). To test whether these transcriptomic patterns were associated with distinct nutrient exposures in the setting of maternal obesity, we analyzed the cord blood lipidome and noted significant increases in levels of total free fatty acids (lean: 95.5 ± 37.1 ug/ml, ov-ob: 124.1 ± 46.0 ug/ml, P=0.049), palmitate (lean: 34.5 ± 12.7 ug/ml, ov-ob: 46.3 ± 18.4 ug/ml, P=0.03) and stearate (lean: 20.8 ± 8.2 ug/ml, ov-ob: 29.7 ± 17.2 ug/ml, P=0.04), in infants of overweight-obese mothers. Conclusion Prenatal exposure to maternal obesity alters HUVEC expression of genes involved in mitochondrial and lipid metabolism, potentially reflecting developmentally-programmed differences in oxidative and lipid metabolism. PMID:27531045

  8. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  9. The role of PPARalpha in lipid metabolism and obesity: focusing on the effects of estrogen on PPARalpha actions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Michung

    2009-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that belongs to the steroid hormone receptor superfamily. PPARalpha is expressed predominantly in tissues that have a high level of fatty acid catabolism, such as liver, heart, and muscle. PPARalpha regulates the expression of a number of genes critical for lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PPARalpha ligand fibrates have been used for the treatment of dyslipidemia due to their ability to lower plasma triglyceride levels and elevate HDL cholesterol levels. PPARalpha activators have been shown to regulate obesity in rodents by both increasing hepatic fatty acid oxidation and decreasing the levels of circulating triglycerides responsible for adipose cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. However, these effects of PPARalpha on obesity and lipid metabolism may be exerted with sexual dimorphism and seem to be influenced by estrogen. Estrogen inhibits the actions of PPARalpha on obesity and lipid metabolism through its effects on PPARalpha-dependent regulation of target genes. Thus, the use of fibrates seems to be effective in men and postmenopausal women with obesity and lipid disorders, but not in premenopausal women with functioning ovaries.

  10. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  11. Transcription analysis of genes involved in lipid metabolism reveals the role of chromium in reducing body fat in animal models.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Najaf Panah, Mohammad Javad; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Emami, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential trace element over 50 years ago and has been accepted as an essential element for over 30 years. The recent studies indicated that the addition of supra nutritional amounts of chromium to the diet can only be considered as having pharmacological effects. However, the precise mechanism through which chromium acts on lipid, carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid metabolism are relatively poor studied. To uncover, at least partially, the role of chromium in lipid metabolism, in this study, we evaluated the expression status of eight important genes, involved in fat biosynthesis and lipid metabolism, in four different tissue types (liver, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat, and longissimus muscle) in domestic goat kids feeding on three different chromium levels. The quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was established for expression analyses with HSP90 gene was used as reference gene. The results showed that supplementation of goats with 1.5mg/day chromium significantly decreases the expression of the ACC1, DGAT1, FABP4, FAS, HSL, LEP genes, but does not affect the expression of the LPL and SCD1 genes in all studied tissues. This study highlights, for the first time, the role of supra nutritional levels of chromium in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism. These findings are of especial importance for improving meat quality in domestic animals.

  12. Remodeling the Integration of Lipid Metabolism Between Liver and Adipose Tissue by Dietary Methionine Restriction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasek, Barbara E.; Boudreau, Anik; Shin, Jeho; Feng, Daorong; Hulver, Matthew; Van, Nancy T.; Laque, Amanda; Stewart, Laura K.; Stone, Kirsten P.; Wanders, Desiree; Ghosh, Sujoy; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Gettys, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) produces an integrated series of biochemical and physiological responses that improve biomarkers of metabolic health, limit fat accretion, and enhance insulin sensitivity. Using transcriptional profiling to guide tissue-specific evaluations of molecular responses to MR, we report that liver and adipose tissue are the primary targets of a transcriptional program that remodeled lipid metabolism in each tissue. The MR diet produced a coordinated downregulation of lipogenic genes in the liver, resulting in a corresponding reduction in the capacity of the liver to synthesize and export lipid. In contrast, the transcriptional response in white adipose tissue (WAT) involved a depot-specific induction of lipogenic and oxidative genes and a commensurate increase in capacity to synthesize and oxidize fatty acids. These responses were accompanied by a significant change in adipocyte morphology, with the MR diet reducing cell size and increasing mitochondrial density across all depots. The coordinated transcriptional remodeling of lipid metabolism between liver and WAT by dietary MR produced an overall reduction in circulating and tissue lipids and provides a potential mechanism for the increase in metabolic flexibility and enhanced insulin sensitivity produced by the diet. PMID:23801581

  13. Immunomodulatory lipids in plants: plant fatty acid amides and the human endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Since the discovery that endogenous lipid mediators show similar cannabimimetic effects as phytocannabinoids from CANNABIS SATIVA, our knowledge about the endocannabinoid system has rapidly expanded. Today, endocannabinoid action is known to be involved in various diseases, including inflammation and pain. As a consequence, the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoid transport, as well as endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes represent targets to block or enhance cannabinoid receptor-mediated signalling for therapeutic intervention. Based on the finding that certain endocannabinoid-like fatty acid N-alkylamides from purple coneflower ( ECHINACEA spp.) potently activate CB2 cannabinoid receptors we have focused our interest on plant fatty acid amides (FAAs) and their overall cannabinomodulatory effects. Certain FAAs are also able to partially inhibit the action of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which controls the breakdown of endocannabinoids. Intriguingly, plants lack CB receptors and do not synthesize endocannabinoids, but express FAAH homologues capable of metabolizing plant endogenous N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). While the site of action of these NAEs in plants is unknown, endogenous NAEs and arachidonic acid glycerols in animals interact with distinct physiological lipid receptors, including cannabinoid receptors. There is increasing evidence that also plant FAAs other than NAEs can pharmacologically modulate the action of these endogenous lipid signals. The interference of plant FAAs with the animal endocannabinoid system could thus be a fortunate evolutionary cross point with yet unexplored therapeutic potential.

  14. Apparent Role of Phosphatidylcholine in the Metabolism of Petroselinic Acid in Developing Umbelliferae Endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, E. B.; Ohlrogge, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the metabolism of the unusual fatty acid petroselinic acid (18:1cis[delta]6) in developing endosperm of the Umbelliferae species coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.). Analyses of fatty acid compositions of glycerolipids of these tissues revealed a dissimilar distribution of petroselinic acid in triacylglycerols (TAG) and the major polar lipids phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Petroselinic acid comprised 70 to 75 mol% of the fatty acids of TAG but only 9 to 20 mol% of the fatty acids of PC and PE. Although such data appeared to suggest that petroselinic acid is at least partially excluded from polar lipids, results of [1-14C]acetate radiolabeling experiments gave a much different picture of the metabolism of this fatty acid. In time-course labeling of carrot endosperm, [1-14C]acetate was rapidly incorporated into PC in high levels. Through 30 min, radiolabel was most concentrated in PC, and of this, 80 to 85% was in the form of petroselinic acid. One explanation for the large disparity in amounts of petroselinic acid in PC as determined by fatty acid mass analyses and 14C radiolabeling is that turnover of these lipids or the fatty acids of these lipids results in relatively low accumulation of petroselinic acid mass. Consistent with this, the kinetics of [1-14C]acetate time-course labeling of carrot endosperm and "pulse-chase" labeling of coriander endosperm suggested a possible flux of fatty acids from PC into TAG. In time-course experiments, radiolabel initially entered PC at the highest rates but accumulated in TAG at later time points. Similarly, in pulse-chase studies, losses in absolute amounts of radioactivity from PC were accompanied by significant increases of radiolabel in TAG. In addition, stereospecific analyses of unlabeled and [1-14C]acetate-labeled PC of coriander endosperm indicated that petroselinic acid can be readily incorporated into both the sn-1 and sn

  15. The Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones in Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mells, Jamie Eugene; Anania, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular accumulation of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the form of triglycerides constitutes the metabolic basis for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Recent data demonstrate that excess FFA hepatocyte storage is likely to lead to lipotoxicity and hepatocyte apoptosis. Hence, FFA-mediated hepatocyte injury is a key contributor to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, essential hypertension, and other common medical problems together comprise metabolic syndrome. Evidence suggests that peptide hormones from the L cells of the distal small intestine, which comprise the core of the enteroendocrine system (EES), play two key roles, serving either as incretins, or as mediators of appetite and satiety in the central nervous system. Recent data related to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and other known L-cell hormones have accumulated due to the increasing frequency of bariatric surgery, which increase delivery of bile salts to the hindgut. Bile acids are a key stimulus for the TGR5 receptor of the L cells. Enhanced bile-salt flow and subsequent EES stimulation may be central to elimination of hepatic steatosis following bariatric surgery. Although GLP-1 is a clinically relevant pharmacological analogue that drives pancreatic β-cell insulin output, GLP-1 analogues also have independent benefits via their effects on hepatocellular FFA metabolism. The authors also discuss recent data regarding the role of the major peptides released by the EES, which promote satiety and modulate energy homeostasis and utilization, as well as those that control fat absorption and intestinal permeability. Taken together, elucidating novel functions for EES-related peptides and pharmacologic development of peptide analogues offer potential far-ranging treatment for obesity-related human disease. PMID:24222092

  16. Autonomic nervous system-mediated effects of galanin-like peptide on lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hirako, Satoshi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Kageyama, Haruaki; Takenoya, Fumiko; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Kim, Hyounju; Iizuka, Yuzuru; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Okabe, Mai; Kimura, Ai; Suzuki, Mamiko; Yamanaka, Satoru; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is a neuropeptide involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism in mammals. While a weight loss effect of GALP has been reported, its effects on lipid metabolism have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine if GALP regulates lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue via an action on the sympathetic nervous system. The respiratory exchange ratio of mice administered GALP intracerebroventricularly was lower than that of saline-treated animals, and fatty acid oxidation-related gene mRNA levels were increased in the liver. Even though the respiratory exchange ratio was reduced by GALP, this change was not significant when mice were treated with the sympatholytic drug, guanethidine. Lipolysis-related gene mRNA levels were increased in the adipose tissue of GALP-treated mice compared with saline-treated animals. These results show that GALP stimulates fatty acid β-oxidation in liver and lipolysis in adipose tissue, and suggest that the anti-obesity effect of GALP may be due to anorexigenic actions and improvement of lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues via the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:26892462

  17. Storage lipids of yeasts: a survey of nonpolar lipid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Daum, Günther

    2014-09-01

    Biosynthesis and storage of nonpolar lipids, such as triacylglycerols (TG) and steryl esters (SE), have gained much interest during the last decades because defects in these processes are related to severe human diseases. The baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a valuable tool to study eukaryotic lipid metabolism because this single-cell microorganism harbors many enzymes and pathways with counterparts in mammalian cells. In this article, we will review aspects of TG and SE metabolism and turnover in the yeast that have been known for a long time and combine them with new perceptions of nonpolar lipid research. We will provide a detailed insight into the mechanisms of nonpolar lipid synthesis, storage, mobilization, and degradation in the yeast S. cerevisiae. The central role of lipid droplets (LD) in these processes will be addressed with emphasis on the prevailing view that this compartment is more than only a depot for TG and SE. Dynamic and interactive aspects of LD with other organelles will be discussed. Results obtained with S. cerevisiae will be complemented by recent investigations of nonpolar lipid research with Yarrowia lipolytica and Pichia pastoris. Altogether, this review article provides a comprehensive view of nonpolar lipid research in yeast.

  18. Lipid interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. Acid-triggered permeabilization and aggregation of lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Pederzolli, C; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with small unilamellar vesicles comprised of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin, and lipid concentration. We have found that this toxin induces vesicle permeabilization, as measured by the release of a fluorescent dye. Permeabilization is due to the formation of ion-conductive channels which we have directly observed in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin also produces vesicle aggregation, as indicated by an increase of the turbidity. Aggregation and permeabilization have completely different time course and extent upon toxin dose and lipid composition, thus suggesting that they are two independent events. Both time constants decrease by lowering the pH of the bulk phase or by introducing a negative lipid into the vesicles. Our results indicate that at least three steps are involved in the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with lipid vesicles. After protonation of one charged group the toxin becomes competent to bind to the surface of the vesicles. Binding is probably initiated by an electrostatic interaction because it is absolutely dependent on the presence of acidic phospholipids. Binding is a prerequisite for the subsequent insertion of the toxin into the lipid bilayer, with a special preference for phosphatidylglycerol-containing membranes, to form ionic channels. At high toxin and vesicle concentrations, bound toxin may also induce aggregation of the vesicles, particularly when phosphatidic acid is present in the lipid mixture. A quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein, which is induced by lowering the pH of the solution, becomes more drastic in the presence of lipid vesicles. However, this further quenching takes so long that it cannot be a prerequisite to either vesicle permeabilization or aggregation. Pseudomonas exotoxin A shares many of these properties with other bacterial toxins like diphtheria and tetanus toxin. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12

  19. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  20. Dynamics of lipid and fatty acid composition of shallow-water corals under thermal stress: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbs, A. B.; Yakovleva, I. M.

    2012-03-01

    Coral bleaching induces changes in lipid and fatty acid composition that result in low lipid content, reducing the likelihood of coral survival. Species-specific differences in the metabolism of lipid reserves may contribute to the differential resistance of corals under acute heat exposures. Here, we examined the dynamics of lipids and fatty acid abundance in corals subjected to short-term heat stress. The stony corals Acropora intermedia, Montipora digitata, and the soft coral Sinularia capitalis all showed a 60-75% decline in both storage and structural lipids. However, S. capitalis and M. digitata exhibited no significant change in the percentages of structural lipids (i.e., polar lipids and sterols) until they had lost 90-95% of their endosymbionts, whereas A. intermedia showed a rapid decline in structural lipids after a 50% loss of symbionts. After a 90-95% loss of symbionts under heat stress, all three corals showed a relative depletion of polyunsaturated fatty acids that had symbiont biomarkers, suggesting that polyunsaturated fatty acids were translocated from the symbiont to the coral host tissue.

  1. Associations among Metabolic Syndrome, Ischemia, Inflammatory, Oxidatives, and Lipids Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Valle Gottlieb, Maria Gabriela; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Duarte, Marta M. F.; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Wiehe, Mário; Schwanke, Carla Helena Augustin; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Context: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is described as a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors. Studies suggest that ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. IMA levels could be associated with cardiometabolic risks and represent a possible indication of microvascular dysfunction in MS patients. Objective: To confirm this possible association, we evaluated the association between IMA levels and MS. Design: We performed a case-control study (32 healthy individuals and 74 subjects with MS) to evaluate the association between MS, IMA, and other biomarkers [high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL), oxidized low-density lipoprotein autoantibodies (anti-OxLDL), IL-6, lipid profile, and glucose]. Results: The MS group showed higher levels of IMA (0.618 ± 0.1355) as well as higher levels of hs-CRP, OxLDL, anti-OxLDL, and IL-6 than did control subjects (IMA = 0.338 ± 0.0486) (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that IMA and MS association was independent of sex, age, diabetes mellitus 2, and hypercholesterolemia. Conclusion: We found an association between IMA and MS. Additional studies including prospective genetic variation approaches need to be performed to help elucidate this association between IMA and MS and its potential clinical role. PMID:20016051

  2. CREB controls hepatic lipid metabolism through nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Stephan; Hedrick, Susan; Morantte, Ianessa; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Galimi, Francesco; Montminy, Marc

    2003-11-13

    Fasting triggers a series of hormonal cues that promote energy balance by inducing glucose output and lipid breakdown in the liver. In response to pancreatic glucagon and adrenal cortisol, the cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB activates gluconeogenic and fatty acid oxidation programmes by stimulating expression of the nuclear hormone receptor coactivator PGC-1 (refs 2-5). In parallel, fasting also suppresses lipid storage and synthesis (lipogenic) pathways, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that mice deficient in CREB activity have a fatty liver phenotype and display elevated expression of the nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma, a key regulator of lipogenic genes. CREB inhibits hepatic PPAR-gamma expression in the fasted state by stimulating the expression of the Hairy Enhancer of Split (HES-1) gene, a transcriptional repressor that is shown here to be a mediator of fasting lipid metabolism in vivo. The coordinate induction of PGC-1 and repression of PPAR-gamma by CREB during fasting provides a molecular rationale for the antagonism between insulin and counter-regulatory hormones, and indicates a potential role for CREB antagonists as therapeutic agents in enhancing insulin sensitivity in the liver.

  3. Oral MSG administration alters hepatic expression of genes for lipid and nitrogen metabolism in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yuzhe; Liao, Peng; Li, Tiejun; Chen, Lixiang; Yin, Yulong; Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of oral administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on expression of genes for hepatic lipid and nitrogen metabolism in piglets. A total of 24 newborn pigs were assigned randomly into one of four treatments (n = 6/group). The doses of oral MSG administration, given at 8:00 and 18:00 to sow-reared piglets between 0 and 21 days of age, were 0 (control), 0.06 (low dose), 0.5 (intermediate dose), and 1 (high dose) g/kg body weight/day. At the end of the 3-week treatment, serum concentrations of total protein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intermediate dose group were elevated than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels for fatty acid synthase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, insulin-like growth factor-1, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase were higher in the middle-dose group (P < 0.05), compared with the control group. MSG administration did not affect hepatic mRNA levels for hormone-sensitive lipase or carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1. We conclude that oral MSG administration alters hepatic expression of certain genes for lipid and nitrogen metabolism in suckling piglets.

  4. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  5. Farnesoid X receptor ligand CDCA suppresses human prostate cancer cells growth by inhibiting lipid metabolism via targeting sterol response element binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Jinguo; Teng, Haolin; Fu, Yaowen; Yuan, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A wealth of studies have demonstrated that abnormal cellular lipid metabolism plays an important role in prostate cancer (PCa) development. Therefore, manipulating lipid metabolism is a potential PCa therapy strategy. In this study, our goal is to investigate the role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in regulating the proliferation and lipid metabolism of human PCa cells following its ligand chenodexycholic acid (CDCA) treatment. Methods: Oil Red O was used to stain lipid contents in PCa cells, and siRNA knockdown was performed to deplete FXR expression. To study the cell proliferation when treated by CDCA or FXR knockdown, cell counting kit 8 (CCK8) was adopted to evaluate tumor cell growth. Western blot was used for protein analysis. Results: Our data suggest that activation of FXR by CDCA reduces lipid accumulation and significantly inhibits cells proliferation in prostate tumor cells. Instead, CDCA treatment doesn’t affect normal prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells growth in vitro. FXR activation decreases mRNA and protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and some other key regulators involved in lipid metabolism. Depletion of FXR by siRNA attenuates the inhibitory effects. Conclusion: Our study indicates that activation of FXR inhibits lipid metabolism via SREBP1 pathway and further suppresses prostate tumor growth in vitro. PMID:27904713

  6. Cellular Metabolism of Unnatural Sialic Acid Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam D.; Fermaintt, Charles S.; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; McCombs, Janet E.; Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in addition to their metabolic functions, serve important roles as receptors, ligands, and structural molecules for diverse biological processes. Insight into carbohydrate biology and mechanisms has been aided by metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE). In MOE, unnatural carbohydrate analogs with novel functional groups are incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and used to probe biological systems. While MOE has expanded knowledge of carbohydrate biology, limited metabolism of unnatural carbohydrate analogs restricts its use. Here we assess metabolism of SiaDAz, a diazirine-modified analog of sialic acid, and its cell-permeable precursor, Ac4ManNDAz. We show that the efficiency of Ac4ManNDAz and SiaDAz metabolism depends on cell type. Our results indicate that different cell lines can have different metabolic roadblocks in the synthesis of cell surface SiaDAz. These findings point to roles for promiscuous intracellular esterases, kinases, and phosphatases during unnatural sugar metabolism and provide guidance for ways to improve MOE. PMID:25957566

  7. Wet and dry extraction of coconut oil: impact on lipid metabolic and antioxidant status in cholesterol coadministered rats.

    PubMed

    Nevin, K Govindan; Rajamohan, Thankappan

    2009-08-01

    Because coconut oil extracted by wet process (virgin coconut oil, VCO) is gaining popularity among consumers, this study was conducted to evaluate VCO compared with coconut oil extracted by dry process (copra oil, CO) for their influence on lipid parameters, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status in rats coadministered with cholesterol. VCO, CO, and cholesterol were fed in a semi-synthetic diet to 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats for 45 days. After the experimental period, lipid and lipid peroxide levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were observed. Chemical composition and antioxidant properties of the polyphenolic fraction from VCO and CO were also analyzed. The results showed that lipid and lipid peroxide levels were lower in VCO-fed animals than in animals fed either CO or cholesterol alone. Antioxidant enzyme activities in VCO-fed animals were comparable with those in control animals. Although the fatty acid profiles of both oils were similar, a significantly higher level of unsaponifiable components was observed in VCO. Polyphenols from VCO also showed significant radical-scavenging activity compared with those from CO. This study clearly indicates the potential benefits of VCO over CO in maintaining lipid metabolism and antioxidant status. These effects may be attributed in part to the presence of biologically active minor unsaponifiable components.

  8. Effects of maternal treatment of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on serum lipid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism-related gene expression in embryonic chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Tang, Xue; Zhang, Yuanshu; Ma, Haitian; Zou, Sixiang

    2010-04-01

    Over the last decade, much evidence emerged to suggest that alterations in maternal diets during pregnancy may irreversibly affect aspects of physiological and biochemical functions in the fetus. To explore the effects of maternal dietary treatments with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on lipid metabolism in the embryo, we investigated serum lipid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism-related gene expression in the maternal and embryonic chicken. Sixteen-week-old pullets were allocated into 3 groups (n=30), and after laying, they were provided with a commercial diet supplemented with DHEA at 0, 20 or 100mg/kg diet. Eggs were collected after DHEA treatment and incubated at 37.5 degrees C and a relative humidity of 60%. Blood and liver samples were collected from hens and embryonic chickens. DHEA treatment resulted in decreased body weight and increased relative liver weight in both maternal and embryonic chickens, while the concentrations of blood triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) were significantly lower in the 20mg DHEA/kg group as compared to the control group during embryonic development. The expression of acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPTI) gene was also reduced following treatment with 20mg DHEA/kg at hatching. However, blood TC, and hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hydroxy methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) gene expression were significantly up-regulated in the 100mg DHEA/kg group during embryonic development and hatching. Overall, the results of this study indicate that maternal dietary treatment with DHEA regulates serum lipid metabolism and hepatic gene expression.

  9. Acylation and metabolism of (n-6) fatty acids in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, A.C.; Sprecher, H.

    1986-05-01

    Isolated hepatocytes (5 x 10/sup 6/ in 2ml) from chow fed rats were incubated from 20 to 60 min. with increasing concentrations of (1-/sup 14/C) labeled 18:2 (n-6), 18:3 (n-6) or 20:3 (n-6) to define optimum conditions for measuring acylation and metabolism to other (n-6) acids with subsequent incorporation into lipids. The triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PL) contained 157 and 80 nmols of 18:2 (n-6) and 6.0 and 6.1 nmols of other (n-6) acids, respectively, when cells were incubated with 0.3mM (1-/sup 14/C) 18:2 (n-6) for 40 min. When cells were incubated with 0.3mM (1-/sup 14/C) 18:2 (n-6) plus 0.15 to 0.45mM 18:3 (n-6) or 20:3 (n-6), the metabolism of 18:2 (n-6) to other (n-6) acids was inhibited but not totally abolished. These results may suggest that (n-6) acid made from linoleate do not totally equilibrate with exogenous 18:3 (n-6) or 20:3 (n-6).

  10. Thioredoxin-interacting protein regulates lipid metabolism via Akt/mTOR pathway in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyang; Wu, Ming; Liu, Huan; Ren, Yunzhuo; Du, Yunxia; Wu, Haijiang; Wei, Jinying; Liu, Chuxin; Yao, Fang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Yan; Duan, Huijun; Shi, Yonghong

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolism contributes to the renal lipid accumulation, which is associated with diabetic kidney disease, but its precise mechanism remains unclear. The growing evidence demonstrates that thioredoxin-interacting protein is involved in regulating cellular glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of thioredoxin-interacting protein on lipid accumulation in diabetic kidney disease. In contrast to the diabetic wild-type mice, the physical and biochemical parameters were improved in the diabetic thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout mice. The increased renal lipid accumulation, expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, and phosphorylated Akt and mTOR associated with diabetes in wild-type mice was attenuated in diabetic thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout mice. Furthermore, thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferaser 1 in diabetic kidneys. In vitro experiments, using HK-2 cells, revealed that knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein inhibited high glucose-mediated lipid accumulation, expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, as well as activation of Akt and mTOR. Moreover, knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein reversed high glucose-induced reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferaser 1 expression in HK-2 cells. Importantly, blockade of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway with LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, replicated these effects of thioredoxin-interacting protein silencing. Taken together, these data suggest that thioredoxin-interacting protein deficiency alleviates diabetic renal lipid accumulation through regulation of Akt/mTOR pathway, thioredoxin

  11. Metabolic changes in lipids of rat plasma and hepatocytes induced by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Koide, K; Hirata, Y; Ohtani, H; Yamada, K; Kajiyama, G

    1986-11-14

    Cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were used to investigate the change of lipid metabolism induced by administration of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol. Treatment with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol caused a decrease of rat plasma lipids (free cholesterol, cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine). No difference in the ability of urea nitrogen synthesis could be demonstrated between cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats and propylene glycol-treated rats (control). Total cholesterol and cholesterol ester contents of cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were increased in comparison with those of the control. Triacylglycerol content of cultured hepatocytes was not affected by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment. There was no difference in the composition of lipid content between liver tissues and cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that hepatocytes isolated from livers maintain the character of livers treated with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol or livers treated with propylene glycol. Free cholesterol and cholesterol ester synthesis from [14C]acetic acid by cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were decreased to about 30% of the control. Triacylglycerol and polar lipid (phospholipid) synthesis from [14C]acetic acid were not affected by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment. Microsomal hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity of rat liver treated with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol was decreased to about 50% of control. The secretions of free cholesterol, cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, apolipoprotein BL and BS by cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treated rats were not decreased when compared with the control. Because lipid and apolipoprotein secretions from cultured hepatocytes treated with 17 alpha

  12. Dysregulated signaling hubs of liver lipid metabolism reveal hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunjae; Mardinoglu, Adil; Zhang, Cheng; Lee, Doheon; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high mortality rate and early detection of HCC is crucial for the application of effective treatment strategies. HCC is typically caused by either viral hepatitis infection or by fatty liver disease. To diagnose and treat HCC it is necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. As a major cause for development of HCC is fatty liver disease, we here investigated anomalies in regulation of lipid metabolism in the liver. We applied a tailored network-based approach to identify signaling hubs associated with regulation of this part of metabolism. Using transcriptomics data of HCC patients, we identified significant dysregulated expressions of lipid-regulated genes, across many different lipid metabolic pathways. Our findings, however, show that viral hepatitis causes HCC by a distinct mechanism, less likely involving lipid anomalies. Based on our analysis we suggest signaling hub genes governing overall catabolic or anabolic pathways, as novel drug targets for treatment of HCC that involves lipid anomalies. PMID:27216817

  13. 15(S)-Lipoxygenase-1 associates with neutral lipid droplets in macrophage foam cells: evidence of lipid droplet metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weibel, Ginny L.; Joshi, Michelle R.; Wei, Cong; Bates, Sandra R.; Blair, Ian A.; Rothblat, George H.

    2009-01-01

    15(S)-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LO-1) was present in the whole-cell homogenate of an acute human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Additionally, 15-LO-1 was detected on neutral lipid droplets isolated from THP-1 foam cells. To investigate if 15-LO-1 is active on lipid droplets, we used the mouse leukemic monocytic macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7), which are stably transfected with human 15-LO-1. The RAW 15-LO-1 cells were incubated with acetylated low density lipoprotein to generate foam cells. 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE], the major 15-LO-1 metabolite of arachidonic acid, was produced in the 15-LO-1 RAW but not in the mock transfected cells when incubated with arachidonic acid. Lipid droplets were isolated from the cells and incubated with arachidonic acid, and production of 15(S)-HETE was measured over 2 h. 15(S)-HETE was produced in the incubations with the lipid droplets, and this production was attenuated when the lipid droplet fraction was subjected to enzyme inactivation through heating. Efflux of 15(S)-HETE from cholesteryl ester-enriched 15-LO RAW cells, when lipid droplets are present, was significantly reduced compared with that from cells enriched with free cholesterol (lipid droplets are absent). We propose that 15-LO-1 is present and functional on cytoplasmic neutral lipid droplets in macrophage foam cells, and these droplets may act to accumulate the anti-inflammatory lipid mediator 15(S)-HETE. PMID:19528634

  14. Targeting host lipid synthesis and metabolism to inhibit dengue and hepatitis C viruses.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Valerie A; Rodgers, Mary A; Costello, Deirdre A; Yang, Priscilla L

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are necessary for every step in the replication cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and dengue virus (DENV), members of the family Flaviviridae. Recent studies have demonstrated that discrete steps in the replication cycles of these viruses can be inhibited by pharmacological agents that target host factors mediating lipid synthesis, metabolism, trafficking, and signal transduction. Despite this, targeting host lipid metabolism and trafficking as an antiviral strategy by blockade of entire pathways may be limited due to host toxicity. Knowledge of the molecular details of lipid structure and function in replication and the mechanisms whereby specific lipids are generated and trafficked to the relevant sites may enable more targeted antiviral strategies without global effects on the host cell. In this review, we discuss lipids demonstrated to be critical to the replication cycles of HCV and DENV and highlight potential areas for anti-viral development. This review article forms part of a symposium on flavivirus drug discovery in Antiviral Research.

  15. Lipid Desaturation Is a Metabolic Marker and Therapeutic Target of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Condello, Salvatore; Thomes-Pepin, Jessica; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yu; Hurley, Thomas D; Matei, Daniela; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-03-02

    Lack of sensitive single-cell analysis tools has limited the characterization of metabolic activity in cancer stem cells. By hyperspectral-stimulated Raman scattering imaging of single living cells and mass spectrometry analysis of extracted lipids, we report here significantly increased levels of unsaturated lipids in ovarian cancer stem cells (CSCs) as compared to non-CSCs. Higher lipid unsaturation levels were also detected in CSC-enriched spheroids compared to monolayer cultures of ovarian cancer cell lines or primary cells. Inhibition of lipid desaturases effectively eliminated CSCs, suppressed sphere formation in vitro, and blocked tumor initiation capacity in vivo. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) directly regulates the expression levels of lipid desaturases, and inhibition of desaturases blocks NF-κB signaling. Collectively, our findings reveal that increased lipid unsaturation is a metabolic marker for ovarian CSCs and a target for CSC-specific therapy.

  16. Effects of gemfibrozil on lipid metabolism, steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fi...

  17. Dynamics of human adipose lipid turnover in health and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Arner, Peter; Bernard, Samuel; Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Liebl, Jakob; Steier, Peter; Buchholz, Bruce A; Eriksson, Mats; Arner, Erik; Hauner, Hans; Skurk, Thomas; Rydén, Mikael; Frayn, Keith N; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2011-09-25

    Adipose tissue mass is determined by the storage and removal of triglycerides in adipocytes. Little is known, however, about adipose lipid turnover in humans in health and pathology. To study this in vivo, here we determined lipid age by measuring (14)C derived from above ground nuclear bomb tests in adipocyte lipids. We report that during the average ten-year lifespan of human adipocytes, triglycerides are renewed six times. Lipid age is independent of adipocyte size, is very stable across a wide range of adult ages and does not differ between genders. Adipocyte lipid turnover, however, is strongly related to conditions with disturbed lipid metabolism. In obesity, triglyceride removal rate (lipolysis followed by oxidation) is decreased and the amount of triglycerides stored each year is increased. In contrast, both lipid removal and storage rates are decreased in non-obese patients diagnosed with the most common hereditary form of dyslipidaemia, familial combined hyperlipidaemia. Lipid removal rate is positively correlated with the capacity of adipocytes to break down triglycerides, as assessed through lipolysis, and is inversely related to insulin resistance. Our data support a mechanism in which adipocyte lipid storage and removal have different roles in health and pathology. High storage but low triglyceride removal promotes fat tissue accumulation and obesity. Reduction of both triglyceride storage and removal decreases lipid shunting through adipose tissue and thus promotes dyslipidaemia. We identify adipocyte lipid turnover as a novel target for prevention and treatment of metabolic disease.

  18. Estradiol mediates vasculoprotection via ERRα-dependent regulation of lipid and ROS metabolism in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Huawen; Liu, Zhaoyu; Gou, Yulan; Yu, Haibing; Siminelakis, Stavros; Wang, Shixuan; Kong, Danli; Zhou, Yikai; Liu, Zhengxiang; Ding, Yuanling; Yao, Dachun

    2015-10-01

    The estrogen-mediated vasculoprotective effect has been widely reported in many animal studies, although the clinical trials are controversial and the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the molecular mechanism and consequence of 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced ERRα (estrogen-related receptor alpha) expression in endothelium and its potential beneficial effects on vascular function. The human aorta endothelial cells were used to identify the detailed molecular mechanism and consequences for E2-induced ERRα expression through estrogen receptors (ER), where ERα responses E2-induced ERRα activation, and ERβ responses basal ERRα expression. E2-induced ERRα expression increases fatty acid uptake/oxidation with increased mitochondrial replication, ATP generation and attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We have obtained further in vivo proof from high-fat diet mice that the lentivirus-carried endothelium-specific delivery of ERRα expression on the vascular wall normalizes E2 deficiency-induced increased plasma lipids with ameliorated vascular damage. ERRα knockdown worsens the problem, and the E2 could only partly restore this effect. This is the first time we report the detailed mechanism with direct evidence that E2-induced ERRα expression modulates the fatty acid metabolism and reduces the circulating lipids through endothelium. We conclude that E2-induced ERRα expression in endothelium plays an important role for the E2-induced vasculoprotective effect.

  19. Comparative Study of EPA-enriched Phosphatidylcholine and EPA-enriched Phosphatidylserine on Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Miaomiao; Du, Lei; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that EPA enriched PLs have beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. Our previous study has demonstrated that the anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of EPA-PL were superior to DHA-PL. In the present study, we comparatively evaluated the effects of EPA-enriched phosphatidylcholine (EPA-PC) and EPA-enriched phosphatidylserine (EPA-PS) on lipid metabolism in mice. Both 2% dietary EPA-PC and EPA-PS significantly improved serum and hepatic lipid levels in mice. The HDL-c level in mice on EPA-PC diet was significantly higher than the other two groups. The level of DHA in hepatic TG and PL were significantly increased in both EPA-PC and EPA-PS fed groups (98.3 and 117.8%, respectively; p < 0.05). Notably, the proportion of DHA in EPA-PS group was significantly higher than the EPA-PC group. EPA-PC and EPA-PS suppressed hepatic SREBP-1c mediated lipogenesis and activated PPARα mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in the liver. These data are the first to indicate that EPA-PS has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism.

  20. Modulation of tissue fatty acids by L-carnitine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C; Waanders, Jennifer; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and dyslipidaemia are metabolic defects resulting from impaired lipid metabolism. These impairments are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Correcting the defects in lipid metabolism may attenuate obesity and dyslipidaemia, and reduce cardiovascular risk and liver damage. L-Carnitine supplementation was used in this study to enhance fatty acid oxidation so as to ameliorate diet-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were fed with either corn starch or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diets for 16 weeks. Separate groups were supplemented with L-carnitine (1.2% in food) on either diet for the last 8 weeks of the protocol. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. L-Carnitine supplementation attenuated these high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced changes, together with modifications in lipid metabolism including the inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, reduced storage of short-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in the tissues with decreased linoleic acid content and trans fatty acids stored in retroperitoneal fat. Thus, L-carnitine supplementation attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome through inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, preferential β-oxidation of some fatty acids and increased storage of saturated fatty acids and relatively inert oleic acid in the tissues.

  1. Effect of hepatoprotectors on lipid metabolism in hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Vengerovskii, A.I.; Chuchalin, V.S.; Paul's; O.V.; Saratikov, A.S.

    1987-09-01

    The authors study the effect of the widely used hepatoprotective agents- the flavonoid silybinin and the phosphatidylcholine-containing substance essentiale - on the combination of disturbances of lipid metabolism present in severe toxic hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats. It was found that CCl/sub 4/ caused a profound disturbance of lipid metabolism. The hepatoprotective effect of silybinin and essentiale is due to their antioxidant action and to normalization of function of the liver phospholipids.

  2. Interleukin-4 regulates lipid metabolism by inhibiting adipogenesis and promoting lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Chang-Hui; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Chuang, Pei-Hua; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Hwang, Jaulang

    2014-01-01

    Long-term cytokine-mediated inflammation is a risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Our previous studies reveal significant associations between promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of interleukin (IL)-4 and T2DM, as well as between SNPs in genes encoding IL-4/IL-4 receptor and high density lipoproteins. Our animal study reveals that IL-4 regulates glucose/lipid metabolism by promoting glucose tolerance and inhibiting lipid deposits. The above results strongly suggest the involvement of IL-4 in energy homeostasis. In the present study, we focus on examining the regulatory mechanism of IL-4 to lipid metabolism. Our results show that IL-4 inhibits adipogenesis by downregulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α. Additionally, IL-4 promotes lipolysis by enhancing the activity and translocation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) in mature adipocytes, which suggests that IL-4 plays a pro-lipolytic role in lipid metabolism by boosting HSL activity. Our results demonstrate that IL-4 harbors pro-lipolysis capacity by inhibiting adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation as well as by promoting lipolysis in mature adipocytes to decrease lipid deposits. The above findings uncover the novel roles of IL-4 in lipid metabolism and provide new insights into the interactions among cytokine/immune responses, insulin sensitivity, and metabolism. PMID:24347527

  3. The metabolism of "surplus" amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bender, David A

    2012-08-01

    For an adult in N balance, apart from small amounts of amino acids required for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, hormones, etc, an amount of amino acids almost equal to that absorbed from the diet can be considered to be "surplus" in that it will be catabolized. The higher diet-induced thermogenesis from protein than from carbohydrate or fat has generally been assumed to be due to increased protein synthesis, which is ATP expensive. To this must be added the ATP cost of protein catabolism through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Amino acid catabolism will add to thermogenesis. Deamination results in net ATP formation except when serine and threonine deaminases are used, but there is the energy cost of synthesizing glutamine in extra-hepatic tissues. The synthesis of urea has a net cost of only 1·5 × ATP when the ATP yield from fumarate metabolism is offset against the ATP cost of the urea cycle, but this offset is thermogenic. In fasting and on a low carbohydrate diet as much of the amino acid carbon as possible will be used for gluconeogenesis - an ATP-expensive, and hence thermogenic, process. Complete oxidation of most amino acid carbon skeletons also involves a number of thermogenic steps in which ATP (or GTP) or reduced coenzymes are utilized. There are no such thermogenic steps in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetyl CoA or acetoacetate, but for amino acids that are metabolized by way of the citric acid cycle intermediates there is thermogenesis ranging from 1 up to 7 × ATP equivalent per mol.

  4. Metabolic glycoengineering: sialic acid and beyond.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Meledeo, M Adam; Wang, Zhiyun; Khanna, Hargun S; Paruchuri, Venkata D P; Yarema, Kevin J

    2009-12-01

    This report provides a perspective on metabolic glycoengineering methodology developed over the past two decades that allows natural sialic acids to be replaced with chemical variants in living cells and animals. Examples are given demonstrating how this technology provides the glycoscientist with chemical tools that are beginning to reproduce Mother Nature's control over complex biological systems - such as the human brain - through subtle modifications in sialic acid chemistry. Several metabolic substrates (e.g., ManNAc, Neu5Ac, and CMP-Neu5Ac analogs) can be used to feed flux into the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway resulting in numerous - and sometime quite unexpected - biological repercussions upon nonnatural sialoside display in cellular glycans. Once on the cell surface, ketone-, azide-, thiol-, or alkyne-modified glycans can be transformed with numerous ligands via bioorthogonal chemoselective ligation reactions, greatly increasing the versatility and potential application of this technology. Recently, sialic acid glycoengineering methodology has been extended to other pathways with analog incorporation now possible in surface-displayed GalNAc and fucose residues as well as nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc-modified proteins. Finally, recent efforts to increase the "druggability" of sugar analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering, which have resulted in unanticipated "scaffold-dependent" activities, are summarized.

  5. G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor plays a key role in bile acid metabolism and fasting-induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Boehme, Shannon; Li, Feng; Chiang, John Y L

    2017-03-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that play a critical role in regulation of hepatic metabolic homeostasis by activating nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr) and membrane G-protein-coupled receptor (Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5; Tgr5). The role of FXR in regulation of bile acid synthesis and hepatic metabolism has been studied extensively. However, the role of TGR5 in hepatic metabolism has not been explored. The liver plays a central role in lipid metabolism, and impaired response to fasting and feeding contributes to steatosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver and obesity. We have performed a detailed analysis of gallbladder bile acid and lipid metabolism in Tgr5(-/-) mice in both free-fed and fasted conditions. Lipid profiles of serum, liver and adipose tissues, bile acid composition, energy metabolism, and messenger RNA and protein expression of the genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed. Results showed that deficiency of the Tgr5 gene in mice alleviated fasting-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Expression of liver oxysterol 7α-hydroxylase in the alternative bile acid synthesis pathway was reduced. Analysis of gallbladder bile acid composition showed marked increase of taurocholic acid and decrease of tauro-α and β-muricholic acid in Tgr5(-/-) mice. Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation rate and decreased hepatic fatty acid uptake. Interestingly, fasting induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 in liver was attenuated. In addition, fasted Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased activation of hepatic growth hormone-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (GH-Stat5) signaling compared to wild-type mice.

  6. Metabolic Inflexibility with Obesity and the Effects of Fenofibrate on Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kristen E; Friedman, Jacob E; Janssen, Rachel C; Underkofler, Chantal; Houmard, Joseph A; Rasouli, Neda

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate mechanisms of lipid metabolic inflexibility in human obesity and the ability of fenofibrate (FENO) to increase skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in primary human skeletal muscle cell cultures (HSkMC) exhibiting metabolic inflexibility. HSkMC from 10 lean and 10 obese, insulin resistant subjects were treated with excess fatty acid for 24 h (24hFA) to gauge lipid-related metabolic flexibility. Metabolically inflexible HSkMC from obese individuals were then treated with 24hFA in combination with FENO to determine effectiveness for increasing FAO. Mitochondrial enzyme activity and FAO were measured in skeletal muscle from subjects with prediabetes (n=11) before and after 10 weeks of fenofibrate in vivo. 24hFA increased FAO to a greater extent in HSkMC from lean versus obese subjects (+49% vs. +9%, for lean vs. obese, respectively; p<0.05) indicating metabolic inflexibility with obesity. Metabolic inflexibility was not observed for measures of cellular respiration in permeabilized cells using carbohydrate substrate. Fenofibrate co-incubation with 24hFA, increased FAO in a subset of HSkMC from metabolically inflexible, obese subjects (p<0.05), which was eliminated by PPARα antagonist. In vivo, fenofibrate treatment increased skeletal muscle FAO in a subset of subjects with prediabetes but did not affect gene transcription or mitochondrial enzyme activity. Lipid metabolic inflexibility observed in HSkMC from obese subjects is not due to differences in electron transport flux, but rather upstream decrements in lipid metabolism. Fenofibrate increases the capacity for FAO in human skeletal muscle cells, though its role in skeletal muscle metabolism in vivo remains unclear.