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Sample records for acid metabolizing enzymes

  1. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  2. Temperature Features of Enzymes Affecting Crassulacean acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, P. C.

    1967-01-01

    Enzymes involved in malic acid production via a pathway with 2 carboxylation reactions and in malic acid conversion via total oxidation have been demonstrated in mitochondria of Bryophyllum tubiflorum Harv. Activation of the mitochondria by Tween 40 was necessary to reveal part of the enzyme activities. The temperature behavior of the enzymes has been investigated, revealing optimal activity of acid-producing enzymes at 35°. Even at 53° the optimum for acid-converting enzymes was not yet reached. From the simultaneous action of acid-producing and acid-converting enzyme systems the overall result at different temperatures was established. Up to 15° the net result was a malic acid production. Moderate temperatures brought about a decrease in this accumulation, which was partly accompanied by a shift to isocitrate production, while at higher temperatures total oxidation of the acids exceeded the production. PMID:16656606

  3. Potent inhibition of retinoic acid metabolism enzyme(s) by novel azolyl retinoids.

    PubMed

    Njar, V C; Nnane, I P; Brodie, A M

    2000-09-04

    Novel (+/-)-4-azolyl retinoic acid analogues 4, 5, 7 and 8 have been designed and synthesized and have been shown to be powerful inhibitors of hamster microsomal all-trans-retinoic acid 4-hydroxylase enzyme(s). (+/-)-4-(1H-Imidazol-1-yl)retinoic acid (4) is the most potent inhibitor of this enzyme reported to date.

  4. Cell organelles from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants : II. Compartmentation of enzymes of the crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, C; Groß, D; Burkhard, C; Herbert, M

    1980-02-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes involved in the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) has been studied in Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Crassula lycopodioides Lam. After separation of cell organelles by isopycnic centrifugation, enzymes of the Crassulacean acid metabolism were found in the following cell fractions: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria and in the supernatant; NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the chloroplasts; NADP-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to a minor extent in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to some degree in the mitochondria; and pyruvate; orthophosphate dikinase in the chloroplasts. The activity of the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase was due to three isoenzymes separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization. These isoenzymes represented 17, 78, and 5% of the activity recovered, respectively, in the order of elution. The isoenzyme eluting first was associated with the mitochondria and the second isoenzyme was of cytosolic origin, while the intracellular location of the third isoenzyme was probably the peroxisome. Based on these findings, the metabolic path of Crassulacean acid metabolism within cells of CAM plants is discussed.

  5. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  6. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  7. Dynamic expression of retinoic acid synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes in the developing mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Romand, Raymond; Kondo, Takako; Fraulob, Valérie; Petkovich, Martin; Dollé, Pascal; Hashino, Eri

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid signaling plays essential roles in morphogenesis and neural development through transcriptional regulation of downstream target genes. It is believed that the balance between the activities of synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes determines the amount of active retinoic acid to which a developing tissue is exposed. In this study, we investigated spatio-temporal expression patterns of four synthesizing enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases 1, 2, 3 and 4 (Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Raldh4) and two metabolizing enzymes (Cyp26A1 and Cyp26B1) in the embryonic and postnatal mouse inner ear using quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blot data revealed that the expression of CYP26s was much higher than that of Raldhs at early embryonic ages, but that Cyp26 expression was down-regulated during embryonic development. Conversely, the expression levels of Raldh2 and -3 increased during development and were significantly higher than the Cyp26 levels at postnatal day 20. At this age, Raldh3 was expressed predominantly in the cochlea, while Raldh2 was present in the vestibular end organ. At early embryonic stages as observed by in situ hybridization, the synthesizing enzymes were expressed only in the dorsoventral epithelium of the otocyst, while the metabolizing enzymes were present mainly in mesenchymal cells surrounding the otic epithelium. At later stages, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Cyp26B1 were confined to the stria vascularis, spiral ganglion and supporting cells in the cochlear and vestibular epithelia, respectively. The downregulation of Cyp26s and the upregulation of Raldhs after birth during inner ear maturation suggests tissue changes in the sensitivity to retinoic acid concentrations. PMID:16615129

  8. Allosteric ACTion: the varied ACT domains regulating enzymes of amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lang, Eric J M; Cross, Penelope J; Mittelstädt, Gerd; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2014-12-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzyme activity plays important metabolic roles. Here we review the allostery of enzymes of amino-acid metabolism conferred by a discrete domain known as the ACT domain. This domain of 60-70 residues has a βαββαβ topology leading to a four-stranded β4β1β3β2 antiparallel sheet with two antiparallel helices on one face. Extensive sequence variation requires a combined sequence/structure/function analysis for identification of the ACT domain. Common features include highly varied modes of self-association of ACT domains, ligand binding at domain interfaces, and transmittal of allosteric signals through conformational changes and/or the manipulation of quaternary equilibria. A recent example illustrates the relatively facile adoption of this versatile module of allostery by gene fusion.

  9. Protective effect of p-methoxycinnamic acid, an active phenolic acid against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis: modulating biotransforming bacterial enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Sivagami; Venkatachalam, Karthikkumar; Jeyavel, Kabalimoorthy; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Objective of the study is to evaluate the modifying potential of p-methoxycinnamic acid (p-MCA), an active rice bran phenolic acid on biotransforming bacterial enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. 48 male albino wistar rats were divided into six groups. Group1 (control) received modified pellet diet and 0.1 % carboxymethylcellulose; group2 received modified pellet diet along with p-MCA (80 mg/kg b.wt. p.o.) everyday for 16 weeks; groups 3-6 received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg b.wt.) subcutaneous injection once a week for the first 4 weeks, while groups 4-6 received p-MCA at three different doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.wt. p.o. everyday for 16 weeks. A significant increase in carcinogen-activating enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, cytochrome P4502E1, NADH-cytochrome-b5-reductase and NADPH-cytochrome-P450 reductase) with concomitant decrease in phaseII enzymes, DT-Diaphorase, glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronyl-transferase and gamma glutamyltransferase were observed in group3 compared to control. DMH treatment significantly increased the activities of feacal and colonic bacterial enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucuronidase, nitroreductase, sulphatase and mucinase). p-MCA supplementation (40 mg/kg b.wt) to carcinogen exposed rats inhibited these enzymes, which were near those of control rats. The formation of dysplastic aberrant crypt foci in the colon and the histopathological observations of the liver also supports our biochemical findings. p-MCA (40 mg/kg b.wt.) offers remarkable modulating efficacy of biotransforming bacterial and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in colon carcinogenesis.

  10. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  11. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  12. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  13. Adapting capillary gel electrophoresis as a sensitive, high-throughput method to accelerate characterization of nucleic acid metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Lucia; Schermerhorn, Kelly M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Slatko, Barton E; Gardner, Andrew F

    2016-01-29

    Detailed biochemical characterization of nucleic acid enzymes is fundamental to understanding nucleic acid metabolism, genome replication and repair. We report the development of a rapid, high-throughput fluorescence capillary gel electrophoresis method as an alternative to traditional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to characterize nucleic acid metabolic enzymes. The principles of assay design described here can be applied to nearly any enzyme system that acts on a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Herein, we describe several assays using this core capillary gel electrophoresis methodology to accelerate study of nucleic acid enzymes. First, assays were designed to examine DNA polymerase activities including nucleotide incorporation kinetics, strand displacement synthesis and 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Next, DNA repair activities of DNA ligase, flap endonuclease and RNase H2 were monitored. In addition, a multicolor assay that uses four different fluorescently labeled substrates in a single reaction was implemented to characterize GAN nuclease specificity. Finally, a dual-color fluorescence assay to monitor coupled enzyme reactions during Okazaki fragment maturation is described. These assays serve as a template to guide further technical development for enzyme characterization or nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitor screening in a high-throughput manner.

  14. Adapting capillary gel electrophoresis as a sensitive, high-throughput method to accelerate characterization of nucleic acid metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, Lucia; Schermerhorn, Kelly M.; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Slatko, Barton E.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed biochemical characterization of nucleic acid enzymes is fundamental to understanding nucleic acid metabolism, genome replication and repair. We report the development of a rapid, high-throughput fluorescence capillary gel electrophoresis method as an alternative to traditional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to characterize nucleic acid metabolic enzymes. The principles of assay design described here can be applied to nearly any enzyme system that acts on a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Herein, we describe several assays using this core capillary gel electrophoresis methodology to accelerate study of nucleic acid enzymes. First, assays were designed to examine DNA polymerase activities including nucleotide incorporation kinetics, strand displacement synthesis and 3′-5′ exonuclease activity. Next, DNA repair activities of DNA ligase, flap endonuclease and RNase H2 were monitored. In addition, a multicolor assay that uses four different fluorescently labeled substrates in a single reaction was implemented to characterize GAN nuclease specificity. Finally, a dual-color fluorescence assay to monitor coupled enzyme reactions during Okazaki fragment maturation is described. These assays serve as a template to guide further technical development for enzyme characterization or nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitor screening in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26365239

  15. Characterization of arachidonic acid metabolism by rat cytochrome P450 enzymes: the involvement of CYP1As.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2014-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes mediate arachidonic acid (AA) oxidation to several biologically active metabolites. Our aims in this study were to characterize AA metabolism by different recombinant rat P450 enzymes and to identify new targets for modulating P450-AA metabolism in vivo. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous measurements of AA and 15 of its P450 metabolites. CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1, CYP2C6, and CYP2C11 were found to metabolize AA with high catalytic activity, and CYP2A1, CYP2C13, CYP2D1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A1 had lower activity. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 produced ω-1→4 hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) as 88.7 and 62.7%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. CYP2C11 produced epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) as 61.3%, and CYP2C6 produced midchain HETEs and EETs as 48.3 and 29.4%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. The formation of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2C6, and CYP2C11 major metabolites followed an atypical kinetic profile of substrate inhibition. CYP1As inhibition by α-naphthoflavone or anti-CYP1As antibodies significantly reduced ω-1→4 HETE formation in the lungs and liver, whereas CYP1As induction by 3-methylcholanthrene resulted in a significant increase in ω-1→4 HETEs formation in the heart, lungs, kidney, and livers by 370, 646, 532, and 848%, respectively. In conclusion, our results suggest that CYP1As and CYP2Cs are major players in the metabolism of AA. The significant contribution of CYP1As to AA metabolism and their strong inducibility suggest their possible use as targets for the prevention and treatment of several diseases.

  16. Clinical and metabolic correction of pompe disease by enzyme therapy in acid maltase-deficient quail.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, T; Yang, H W; Pennybacker, M; Ichihara, N; Mizutani, M; Van Hove, J L; Chen, Y T

    1998-01-01

    Pompe disease is a fatal genetic muscle disorder caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), a glycogen degrading lysosomal enzyme. GAA-deficient (AMD) Japanese quails exhibit progressive myopathy and cannot lift their wings, fly, or right themselves from the supine position (flip test). Six 4-wk-old acid maltase-deficient quails, with the clinical symptoms listed, were intravenously injected with 14 or 4.2 mg/kg of precursor form of recombinant human GAA or buffer alone every 2-3 d for 18 d (seven injections). On day 18, both high dose-treated birds (14 mg/kg) scored positive flip tests and flapped their wings, and one bird flew up more than 100 cm. GAA activity increased in most of the tissues examined. In heart and liver, glycogen levels dropped to normal and histopathology was normal. In pectoralis muscle, morphology was essentially normal, except for increased glycogen granules. In sharp contrast, sham-treated quail muscle had markedly increased glycogen granules, multi-vesicular autophagosomes, and inter- and intrafascicular fatty infiltrations. Low dose-treated birds (4.2 mg/kg) improved less biochemically and histopathologically than high dose birds, indicating a dose-dependent response. Additional experiment with intermediate doses and extended treatment (four birds, 5.7-9 mg/kg for 45 d) halted the progression of the disease. Our data is the first to show that an exogenous protein can target to muscle and produce muscle improvement. These data also suggest enzyme replacement with recombinant human GAA is a promising therapy for human Pompe disease. PMID:9466978

  17. Clinical and metabolic correction of pompe disease by enzyme therapy in acid maltase-deficient quail.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T; Yang, H W; Pennybacker, M; Ichihara, N; Mizutani, M; Van Hove, J L; Chen, Y T

    1998-02-15

    Pompe disease is a fatal genetic muscle disorder caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), a glycogen degrading lysosomal enzyme. GAA-deficient (AMD) Japanese quails exhibit progressive myopathy and cannot lift their wings, fly, or right themselves from the supine position (flip test). Six 4-wk-old acid maltase-deficient quails, with the clinical symptoms listed, were intravenously injected with 14 or 4.2 mg/kg of precursor form of recombinant human GAA or buffer alone every 2-3 d for 18 d (seven injections). On day 18, both high dose-treated birds (14 mg/kg) scored positive flip tests and flapped their wings, and one bird flew up more than 100 cm. GAA activity increased in most of the tissues examined. In heart and liver, glycogen levels dropped to normal and histopathology was normal. In pectoralis muscle, morphology was essentially normal, except for increased glycogen granules. In sharp contrast, sham-treated quail muscle had markedly increased glycogen granules, multi-vesicular autophagosomes, and inter- and intrafascicular fatty infiltrations. Low dose-treated birds (4.2 mg/kg) improved less biochemically and histopathologically than high dose birds, indicating a dose-dependent response. Additional experiment with intermediate doses and extended treatment (four birds, 5.7-9 mg/kg for 45 d) halted the progression of the disease. Our data is the first to show that an exogenous protein can target to muscle and produce muscle improvement. These data also suggest enzyme replacement with recombinant human GAA is a promising therapy for human Pompe disease.

  18. Intracellular Localization of Enzymes of Carbon Metabolism in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Exhibiting C3 Photosynthetic Characteristics or Performing Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Foster, Joyce G.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Holtum, Joseph A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, a halophilic, inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, was grown at NaCl concentrations of 20 and 400 millimolar in the rooting medium. Plants from the low salinity treatment showed exclusively C3-photosynthetic net CO2 fixation, whereas plants exposed to the high salinity level exhibited net CO2 dark fixation involving CAM. Mesophyll protoplasts, isolated from both tissues, were gently ruptured, and the intracellular localization of enzymes was studied following differential centrifugation and Percoll density gradient centrifugation of protoplast extracts. Both centrifugation techniques resulted in the separation of intact chloroplasts, with up to 90% yield, from other organelles and the nonparticulate fraction of cells. Enzymes were identified by determination of activity and by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of enzyme protein. Experiments established the extraorganellar (cytoplasmic) location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, enolase, phosphoglyceromutase, and NADP-malic enzyme; the mitochondrial location of NAD-malic enzyme; and the chloroplastic location of pyruvate, Pi dikinase. NAD-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphohexose isomerase, and phosphoglycerate kinase were associated with both cytoplasm and chloroplasts. NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase activity was found in both the chloroplastic and extrachloroplastic fractions; the activity in the chloroplast showed an optimum at pH 8.0 and was dependent upon preincubation of enzyme with dithiothreitol. The extrachloroplastic activity showed an optimum at pH 6.5 and was independent of pretreatment with dithiothreitol. Protoplast extracts of M. crystallinum performing CAM exhibited higher activities (expressed per mg chlorophyll per min) of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, NADP-malic enzyme, NAD-malic enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, enolase, phosphoglyceromutase, NAD-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  19. Synthetic metabolism: metabolic engineering meets enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Erb, Tobias J; Jones, Patrik R; Bar-Even, Arren

    2017-01-30

    Metabolic engineering aims at modifying the endogenous metabolic network of an organism to harness it for a useful biotechnological task, for example, production of a value-added compound. Several levels of metabolic engineering can be defined and are the topic of this review. Basic 'copy, paste and fine-tuning' approaches are limited to the structure of naturally existing pathways. 'Mix and match' approaches freely recombine the repertoire of existing enzymes to create synthetic metabolic networks that are able to outcompete naturally evolved pathways or redirect flux toward non-natural products. The space of possible metabolic solution can be further increased through approaches including 'new enzyme reactions', which are engineered on the basis of known enzyme mechanisms. Finally, by considering completely 'novel enzyme chemistries' with de novo enzyme design, the limits of nature can be breached to derive the most advanced form of synthetic pathways. We discuss the challenges and promises associated with these different metabolic engineering approaches and illuminate how enzyme engineering is expected to take a prime role in synthetic metabolic engineering for biotechnology, chemical industry and agriculture of the future.

  20. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  1. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  5. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  6. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  7. [Metabolism of Yarrowia lipolytica grown on ethanol under conditions promoting the production of alpha-ketoglutaric and citric acids: a comparative study of the central metabolism enzymes].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A P; Cherniavskaia, O G; Shishkanova, N V; Finogenova, T V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and glyoxylate cycles in the mutant Yarrowia lipolytica strain N1 capable of producing alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) and citric acid showed that almost all enzymes of the TCA cycle are more active under conditions promoting the production of KGA. The only exception was citrate synthase, whose activity was higher in yeast cells producing citric acid. The production of both acids was accompanied by suppression of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, aconitase, NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and fumarase were higher in cells producing KGA than in cells producing citric acid.

  8. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  9. Cell organelles from crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plants : I. Enzymes in isolated peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1978-01-01

    Cell organelles were isolated from the CAM plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 2.5% Ficoll in the grinding medium proved to be essential for a satisfactory separation of cell organelles during the subsequent centrifugation. Peroxisomes, mitochondria, and whole and broken chloroplasts were at least partially resolved as judged by marker-enzyme-activity profiles. The isolated peroxisomes contained activities of glycollate oxidase, catalase, hydroxypyruvate reductase, glycine aminotransferase, serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, comparable to activities found in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes. In contrast to spinach, however, only little, if any, particulate malate dehydrogenase activity could be attributed to isolated peroxisomes of the three CAM plants.

  10. Enhanced expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing enzyme CYP26A1 in sunlight-damaged human skin.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Makoto; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is associated with increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis. CYP26A1, the gene encoding a cytochrome P450 enzyme specifically involved in metabolic inactivation of retinoic acid (RA), the most active vitamin A derivative, has been shown to result in a state of functional VAD of the cell. Recently, we demonstrated that CYP26A1 efficiently promotes cell survival properties and eventually contributes to the carcinogenic process, implying roles as an oncogene. To clarify the possible association between VAD caused by CYP26A1 expression and the development of human epithelial neoplasia, we examined whether enhanced expression of CYP26A1 might be observed in various lesions of human skin. We report here that basal keratinocytes showed only weak positivity of CYP26A1 in sunlight-nonexposed areas, whereas strong positive staining was observed in skin from chronically sunexposed body areas and in epidermis that had the dysplastic changes known as actinic keratosis. However, we found no expression of constitutive CYP26A1 in skin malignancies such as squamous cell carcinomas. Our observation suggests an involvement of enhanced CYP26A1 expression causing a functional VAD state in skin that can potentially lead to neoplastic transformation of keratinocytes in an early phase during skin carcinogenesis.

  11. Fatty Acid Synthase: A Metabolic Enzyme and Candidate Oncogene in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Toshiro; Ruiz, Stacey; Fornari, Alessandro; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Priolo, Carmen; Zadra, Giorgia; Inazuka, Fumika; Grisanzio, Chiara; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Shin, Eyoung; Fiore, Christopher; Xie, Wanling; Kung, Andrew L.; Febbo, Phillip G.; Subramanian, Aravind; Mucci, Lorelei; Ma, Jing; Signoretti, Sabina; Stampfer, Meir; Hahn, William C.; Finn, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the fatty acid synthase (FASN) gene has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis. We sought to directly assess the oncogenic potential of FASN. Methods We used immortalized human prostate epithelial cells (iPrECs), androgen receptor–overexpressing iPrECs (AR-iPrEC), and human prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cells that stably overexpressed FASN for cell proliferation assays, soft agar assays, and tests of tumor formation in immunodeficient mice. Transgenic mice expressing FASN in the prostate were generated to assess the effects of FASN on prostate histology. Apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33342 staining and by fluorescence-activated cell sorting in iPrEC-FASN cells treated with stimulators of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis (ie, camptothecin and anti-Fas antibody, respectively) or with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting FASN. FASN expression was compared with the apoptotic index assessed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end-labeling method in 745 human prostate cancer samples by using the least squares means procedure. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Forced expression of FASN in iPrECs, AR-iPrECs, and LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation and soft agar growth. iPrECs that expressed both FASN and androgen receptor (AR) formed invasive adenocarcinomas in immunodeficient mice (12 of 14 mice injected formed tumors vs 0 of 14 mice injected with AR-iPrEC expressing empty vector (P < .001, Fisher exact test); however, iPrECs that expressed only FASN did not. Transgenic expression of FASN in mice resulted in prostate intraepithelial neoplasia, the incidence of which increased from 10% in 8- to 16-week-old mice to 44% in mice aged 7 months or more (P  = .0028, Fisher exact test), but not in invasive tumors. In LNCaP cells, siRNA-mediated silencing of FASN resulted in apoptosis. FASN overexpression protected iPrECs from apoptosis induced by camptothecin but did not

  12. Study of the serum levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the expression of related liver metabolic enzymes in a rat valproate-induced autism model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Gao, Jingquan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Xuelai; Sun, Caihong; Xia, Wei; Hao, Yanqiu; Li, Xiang; Cao, Yonggang; Wu, Lijie

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether the decreased level of serum polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with autism is associated with the expression of related liver metabolic enzymes, we selected rats that were exposed to valproic acid (VPA) on embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) as a model of autism. We observed the serum levels of PUFAs and the expression of related liver metabolic enzymes, including Δ5-desaturase, Δ6-desaturase and elongase (Elovl2), in VPA-exposed and control rats on postnatal day 35 (PND35) and conducted sex dimorphic analysis. We found that the levels of serum PUFAs and related liver metabolic enzymes in the VPA rats were significantly reduced, in association with autism-like behavioral changes, the abnormal expression of apoptosis-related proteins and hippocampal neuronal injury, compared to the control rats and showed sex difference in VPA group. This finding indicated that rats exposed to VPA at the embryonic stage may exhibit reduced synthesis of serum PUFAs due to the down-regulation of liver metabolic enzymes, thereby inducing nervous system injury and behavioral changes, which is affected by sex in the meantime.

  13. Application of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics to profile protein expression changes of hepatic transporters and metabolizing enzymes during cholic acid-promoted liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takayuki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Fukase, Koji; Nakayama, Shun; Sakata, Naoaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-02-26

    Preoperative administration of cholic acid (CA) may be an option to increase the liver volume before elective liver resection surgery, so it is important to understand its effects on liver functionality for drug transport and metabolism. The purpose of this study was to clarify the absolute protein expression dynamics of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the liver of mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days (CA1) and mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days followed by diet without CA for 7 days (CA2), in comparison with non CA-fed control mice. The CA1 group showed the increased liver weight, cell proliferation index, and oxidative stress, but no increase of apoptosis. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics revealed (i) decreases in basolateral bile acid transporters ntcp, oatp1a1, oatp1b2, bile acid synthesis-related enzymes cyp7a1 and cyp8b1, and drug transporters bcrp, mrp6, ent1, oatp2b1, and (ii) increases in glutathione biosynthetic enzymes and drug-metabolizing enzyme cyp3a11. Liver concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione were both increased. In the CA2 group, the increased liver weight was maintained, while the biochemical features and protein profiles were restored to the non-CA-fed control levels. These findings suggest that CA administration alters liver functionality per body during liver regeneration and restoration.

  14. Analysis of ATP-citrate lyase and malic enzyme mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica points out the importance of mannitol metabolism in fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Thierry; Lazar, Zbigniew; Dulermo, Rémi; Rakicka, Magdalena; Haddouche, Ramedane; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    The role of the two key enzymes of fatty acid (FA) synthesis, ATP-citrate lyase (Acl) and malic enzyme (Mae), was analyzed in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. In most oleaginous yeasts, Acl and Mae are proposed to provide, respectively, acetyl-CoA and NADPH for FA synthesis. Acl was mainly studied at the biochemical level but no strain depleted for this enzyme was analyzed in oleaginous microorganisms. On the other hand the role of Mae in FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica remains unclear since it was proposed to be a mitochondrial NAD(H)-dependent enzyme and not a cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent enzyme. In this study, we analyzed for the first time strains inactivated for corresponding genes. Inactivation of ACL1 decreases FA synthesis by 60 to 80%, confirming its essential role in FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica. Conversely, inactivation of MAE1 has no effects on FA synthesis, except in a FA overaccumulating strain where it improves FA synthesis by 35%. This result definitively excludes Mae as a major key enzyme for FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica. During the analysis of both mutants, we observed a negative correlation between FA and mannitol level. As mannitol and FA pathways may compete for carbon storage, we inactivated YlSDR, encoding a mannitol dehydrogenase converting fructose and NADPH into mannitol and NADP+. The FA content of the resulting mutant was improved by 60% during growth on fructose, demonstrating that mannitol metabolism may modulate FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica.

  15. A Comparative Study for the Evaluation of Two Doses of Ellagic Acid on Hepatic Drug Metabolizing and Antioxidant Enzymes in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Gurbet; Semiz, Aslı; Karakurt, Serdar; Arslan, Sevki; Adali, Orhan; Sen, Alaattin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate different doses of ellagic acid (EA) in vivo in rats for its potential to modulate hepatic phases I, II, and antioxidant enzymes. EA (10 or 30 mg/kg/day, intragastrically) was administered for 14 consecutive days, and activity, protein, and mRNA levels were determined. Although the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B and CYP2E enzyme activities were decreased significantly, the activities of all other enzymes were unchanged with the 10 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, western-blot and qRT-PCR results clearly corroborated the above enzyme expressions. On the other hand, while the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were increased significantly, CYP1A, 2B, 2C, 2E, and 19 enzyme activities were reduced significantly with 30 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, CYP2B, 2C6, 2E1, and 19 protein and mRNA levels were substantially decreased by the 30 mg/kg/day dose of EA, but the CYP1A protein, and mRNA levels were not changed. CYP3A enzyme activity, protein and mRNA levels were not altered by neither 10 nor 30 mg/kg/day ellagic acid. These results indicate that EA exerts a dose-dependent impact on the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and drugs by affecting the enzymes involved in xenobiotics activation/detoxification and antioxidant pathways. PMID:23971029

  16. Purification by Immunoadsorption and Immunochemical Properties of NADP-Dependent Malic Enzymes from Leaves of C3, C4, and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Marion; Schnarrenberger, Claus

    1990-01-01

    NADP:malic enzyme from corn (Zea mays L.) leaves was purified by conventional techniques to apparent homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antibodies raised against this protein in rabbits were purified, coupled covalently to protein A-Sepharose CL-4B, and used as an immunoaffinity resin to purify the NADP:malic enzymes of the C3 plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Bryophyllum daigremontianum R. Hamed et Perr. de la Bathie and the C4 plants corn, sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.), and Portulaca grandiflora L. Such procedures yielded homogeneous protein preparations with a single protein band, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, except for P. grandiflora L. with two bands. The specific activities of the purified proteins ranged between 56 and 91 units (milligrams per protein). NADP:malic enzyme represented up to 1% of the total soluble protein in C4 plants, 0.5% in the CAM plant, and less than 0.01% in C3 plants. In immunotitration tests involving immunoprecipitation and immunoinhibition of activity by an antiserum against the corn leaf enzyme, the NADP:malic enzymes of corn and sugarcane showed virtually full identity of epitopes, while the NADP:malic enzymes of the C3 and CAM plants exhibited a cross-reaction of one-twentieth and one-fourth by these tests, respectively. The NADP:malic enzyme of P. grandiflora exhibited characteristics more closely related to the enzymes of C3 and CAM plants than to those of C4 plants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667339

  17. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  18. Dietary back-calculation using stable isotopes: can activities of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism be used to improve estimates of trophic shifts in fish?

    PubMed

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the effects of dietary protein content and feeding level on trophic shifts of C and N isotopes (Delta delta(13)C(tissue-diet) and Delta delta(15)N(tissue-diet)) and (2) to test whether the measurement of the activities of two enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids could improve the accuracy of estimation of the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes. For this, 36 Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were kept under controlled conditions for 8 weeks and fed at three different levels (2, 4 and 8 g kg(-0.8) d(-1)) with three diets differing in their protein content only (20, 29 and 39 %). For each fish, food to fish body trophic shifts of C and N isotopes were measured as well as the hepatic activities of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The feeding level affected the activities of ASAT and GDH as well as the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes significantly but the dietary protein content had no significant effect except on the specific activity of ASAT. Fish fed at the lowest level had significantly higher trophic shifts of C and N isotopes than fish fed at higher levels. The trophic shifts were significantly lower in fish with a high protein utilisation. Values of the 'goodness-of-fit' for linear regressions between enzyme activities and trophic shifts were low. Thus, activities of ASAT and GDH are not suitable for predicting estimates of trophic shifts in situations where the amount of food consumed or the dietary protein content is not known. In further studies, activities of enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids combined with measurements of the activities of other enzymes should be used to try and improve the accuracy of estimates of trophic shifts.

  19. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-12-22

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage.

  20. Improved Homology Model of the Human all-trans Retinoic Acid Metabolizing Enzyme CYP26A1.

    PubMed

    Awadalla, Mohamed K A; Alshammari, Thamir M; Eriksson, Leif A; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia

    2016-03-15

    A new CYP26A1 homology model was built based on the crystal structure of cyanobacterial CYP120A1. The model quality was examined for stereochemical accuracy, folding reliability, and absolute quality using a variety of different bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, the docking capabilities of the model were assessed by docking of the natural substrate all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), and a group of known azole- and tetralone-based CYP26A1 inhibitors. The preferred binding pose of atRA suggests the (4S)-OH-atRA metabolite production, in agreement with recently available experimental data. The distances between the ligands and the heme group iron of the enzyme are in agreement with corresponding distances obtained for substrates and azole inhibitors for other cytochrome systems. The calculated theoretical binding energies agree with recently reported experimental data and show that the model is capable of discriminating between natural substrate, strong inhibitors (R116010 and R115866), and weak inhibitors (liarozole, fluconazole, tetralone derivatives).

  1. EFFECTS OF HYDRAZINES ON THE METABOLISM OF CERTAIN AMINES AND AMINO ACIDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMINES, * AMINO ACIDS , *DIAMINE OXIDASE, TOXICITY, METABOLISM, METABOLISM, DIMETHYLHYDRAZINES, GLUTAMIC ACID, ENZYMES, PHARMACOLOGY, TRACER STUDIES, LABELED SUBSTANCES, RESPIRATION, GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM, RATS.

  2. Gene polymorphisms as risk factors for predicting the cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome. Role of folic acid metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Mátyás, Gábor; Szokolai, Viola; Harsányi, Gergely; Szilveszter, Bálint; Odler, Balázs; Pólos, Miklós; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Radovits, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid metabolism enzyme polymorphisms are believed to be responsible for the elevation of homocysteine (HCY) concentration in the blood plasma, correlating with the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. We studied 71 Marfan patients divided into groups based on the severity of cardiovascular involvement: no intervention required (n=27, Group A); mild involvement requiring intervention (n=17, Group B); severe involvement (n=27, Group C) subdivided into aortic dilatation (n=14, Group C1) and aortic dissection (n=13, Group C2), as well as 117 control subjects. We evaluated HCY, folate, vitamin B12 and the polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR;c.665C>T and c.1286A>C), methionine synthase (MTR;c.2756A>G) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR;c.66A>G). Multiple comparisons showed significantly higher levels of HCY in Group C2 compared to Groups A, B, C1 and control group (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). Folate was lower in Group C2 than in Groups A, B, C1 and control subjects (p<0.0001, p=0.02, p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Group C2 had the highest prevalence of homozygotes for all four gene polymorphisms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HCY plasma level was an independent risk factor for severe cardiovascular involvement (Group C; odds ratio [OR] 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-2.67, p=0.001) as well as for aortic dissection (Group C2; OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.30-4.78, p=0.006). In conclusion, severe cardiovascular involvement in Marfan patients, and especially aortic dissection, is associated with higher HCY plasma levels and prevalence of homozygous genotypes of folic acid metabolism enzymes than mild or no cardiovascular involvement. These results suggest that impaired folic acid metabolism has an important role in the development and remodelling of the extracellular matrix of the aorta.

  3. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling.

  4. Nuclear localisation of the endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in invasive trophoblasts and an association with recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Chamley, L W; Bhalla, A; Stone, P R; Liddell, H; O'Carroll, S; Kearn, C; Glass, M

    2008-11-01

    Endocannabinoids are lipid signalling molecules that are related to the major psychoactive component in marijuana, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and are increasingly recognized as being important in implantation and development of early embryos. The endocannabinoid anandamide, is metabolized by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and insufficient levels of this enzyme have been implicated in spontaneous miscarriage in women and implantation failure in mice. We screened placental bed biopsies and placental tissue from 45 women with recurrent miscarriage and 17 gestation-matched women with normal pregnancies for the expression of FAAH by immunohistochemistry. Unexpectedly, the enzyme appeared to be localised to the nucleus of trophoblasts and this was confirmed by western blotting of sub-cellular fractions and confocal microscopy. FAAH was expressed in the cytoplasm of large decidual stromal cells and significantly more women with recurrent miscarriage (73%) expressed FAAH in these cells than women with normal pregnancy (31%). FAAH was also expressed in the nucleus of extravillous trophoblasts that had invaded the decidua from 67% of women with recurrent miscarriage but was not expressed by these cells in any women with normal pregnancies. In contrast, FAAH was expressed in extravillous trophoblasts that had migrated out of the villi but that had not yet invaded the decidua in both normal pregnancies and in cases of recurrent miscarriage. FAAH was also present in the nucleus of a small number of villous trophoblasts in some specimens. FAAH appears to be over expressed in trophoblasts that have invaded the decidua, as well as in large decidual stromal cells in many cases of recurrent miscarriage. This may reflect inadequate control of the cannabinoid system in the uterus of women who experience recurrent miscarriages. The functional significance of the unexpected nuclear localisation of FAAH in trophoblasts is not yet clear.

  5. Contributions of human enzymes in carcinogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F Peter

    2012-07-16

    Considerable support exists for the roles of metabolism in modulating the carcinogenic properties of chemicals. In particular, many of these compounds are pro-carcinogens that require activation to electrophilic forms to exert genotoxic effects. We systematically analyzed the existing literature on the metabolism of carcinogens by human enzymes, which has been developed largely in the past 25 years. The metabolism and especially bioactivation of carcinogens are dominated by cytochrome P450 enzymes (66% of bioactivations). Within this group, six P450s--1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2E1, and 3A4--accounted for 77% of the P450 activation reactions. The roles of these P450s can be compared with those estimated for drug metabolism and should be considered in issues involving enzyme induction, chemoprevention, molecular epidemiology, interindividual variations, and risk assessment.

  6. Contributions of Human Enzymes in Carcinogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Considerable support exists for roles of metabolism in modulating the carcinogenic properties of chemicals. In particular, many of these compounds are procarcinogens that require activation to electrophilic forms to exert genotoxic effects. We systematically analyzed the existing literature on metabolism of carcinogens by human enzymes, which has been developed largely in the past 25 years. The metabolism and especially bioactivation of carcinogens are dominated by cytochrome P450 enzymes (66% of bioactivations). Within this group, six P450s—1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2E1, and 3A4—accounted for 77% of the P450 activation reactions. The roles of these P450s can be compared with those estimated for drug metabolism and should be considered in issues involving enzyme induction, chemoprevention, molecular epidemiology, inter-individual variations, and risk assessment. PMID:22531028

  7. Imaging enzymes at work: metabolic mapping by enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2010-06-01

    For the understanding of functions of proteins in biological and pathological processes, reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins have become indispensable tools for visualizing the location of these proteins in intact animals, tissues, and cells. For enzymes, imaging their activity also provides information on their function or functions, which does not necessarily correlate with their location. Metabolic mapping enables imaging of activity of enzymes. The enzyme under study forms a reaction product that is fluorescent or colored by conversion of either a fluorogenic or chromogenic substrate or a fluorescent substrate with different spectral characteristics. Most chromogenic staining methods were developed in the latter half of the twentieth century but still find new applications in modern cell biology and pathology. Fluorescence methods have rapidly evolved during the last decade. This review critically evaluates the methods that are available at present for metabolic mapping in living animals, unfixed cryostat sections of tissues, and living cells, and refers to protocols of the methods of choice.

  8. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H I; León, J; Raskin, I

    1995-01-01

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-beta-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:11607533

  9. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Epoetin beta pegol, but not recombinant erythropoietin, retains its hematopoietic effect in vivo in the presence of the sialic acid-metabolizing enzyme sialidase.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Ken; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Hirata, Michinori; Endo, Koichi; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are widely used for treating chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia. The biological activity of ESAs is mainly regulated by the number of sialic acid-containing carbohydrates on the erythropoietin (EPO) peptide. Sialidase, a sialic acid-metabolizing enzyme that accumulates in CKD patients, is suspected of contributing to shortening the circulation half-life of ESAs. Epoetin beta pegol (continuous erythropoietin receptor activator; C.E.R.A.), is an EPO integrated with methoxypolyethylene glycol (PEG). It has been suggested that C.E.R.A. may exert a favorable therapeutic effect, even under conditions of elevated sialidase; however, no detailed investigation of the pharmacological profile of C.E.R.A. in the presence of sialidase has been reported. In the present study, we injected C.E.R.A. or EPO pre-incubated with sialidase into rats, and assessed the hematopoietic effect by reticulocyte count. The hematopoietic effect of C.E.R.A., but not EPO, was preserved after sialidase treatment, despite the removal of sialic acid. Proliferation of EPO-dependent leukemia cells (AS-E2) was significantly increased by desialylated C.E.R.A. and EPO compared to non-treated C.E.R.A. or EPO. In conclusion, we show that C.E.R.A. exerts a favorable hematopoietic effect even under conditions of elevated sialidase. Our findings may contribute to a better understanding of CKD and more effective therapeutic approaches based on a patient's profile of anemia.

  11. Widespread Inter- and Intra-Domain Horizontal Gene Transfer of d-Amino Acid Metabolism Enzymes in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo-Ortíz, Miguel A.; Brock, Matthias; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the growing number of available fully-sequenced genomes has shown that Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in eukaryotes is more common than previously thought. It has been proposed that genes with certain functions may be more prone to HGT than others, but we still have a very poor understanding of the selective forces driving eukaryotic HGT. Recent work uncovered that d-amino acid racemases have been commonly transferred from bacteria to fungi, but their role in the receiving organisms is currently unknown. Here, we set out to assess whether d-amino acid racemases are commonly transferred to and between eukaryotic groups. For this we performed a global survey that used a novel automated phylogeny-based HGT-detection algorithm (Abaccus). Our results revealed that at least 7.0% of the total eukaryotic racemase repertoire is the result of inter- or intra-domain HGT. These transfers are significantly enriched in plant-associated fungi. For these, we hypothesize a possible role for the acquired racemases allowing to exploit minoritary nitrogen sources in plant biomass, a nitrogen-poor environment. Finally, we performed experiments on a transferred aspartate-glutamate racemase in the fungal human pathogen Candida glabrata, which however revealed no obvious biological role. PMID:28066338

  12. Nature's inordinate fondness for metabolic enzymes: why metabolic enzyme loci are so frequently targets of selection.

    PubMed

    Marden, James H

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic enzyme loci were some of the first genes accessible for molecular evolution and ecology research. New technologies now make the whole genome, transcriptome or proteome readily accessible, allowing unbiased scans for loci exhibiting significant differences in allele frequency or expression level and associated with phenotypes and/or responses to natural selection. With surprising frequency and in many cases in proportions greater than chance relative to other genes, glycolysis and TCA cycle enzyme loci appear among the genes with significant associations in these studies. Hence, there is an ongoing need to understand the basis for fitness effects of metabolic enzyme polymorphisms. Allele-specific effects on the binding affinity and catalytic rate of individual enzymes are well known, but often of uncertain significance because metabolic control theory and in vivo studies indicate that many individual metabolic enzymes do not affect pathway flux rate. I review research, so far little used in evolutionary biology, showing that metabolic enzyme substrates affect signalling pathways that regulate cell and organismal biology, and that these enzymes have moonlighting functions. To date there is little knowledge of how alleles in natural populations affect these phenotypes. I discuss an example in which alleles of a TCA enzyme locus associate with differences in a signalling pathway and development, organismal performance, and ecological dynamics. Ultimately, understanding how metabolic enzyme polymorphisms map to phenotypes and fitness remains a compelling and ongoing need for gaining robust knowledge of ecological and evolutionary processes.

  13. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 1; Metabolic Enzymes of Individual Muscle Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Krasnov, I. B.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M.-Y.; Choksi, R.; Manchester, J. K.; McDougal, D. B.; Nemeth, P. M.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Individual fibers of any given muscle vary widely in enzyme composition, a fact obscured when enzyme levels of whole muscle are measured. Therefore, the purpose of this part of the study was to assess the effects of microgravity and hind limb suspension on the enzyme patterns within a slow twitch muscle (soleus) and a fast twitch muscle (tibialis anterior).

  14. Biotransformation of cobicistat: metabolic pathways and enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Shehu, Amina I.; Liu, Ke; Lu, Jie; Ma, Xiaochao

    2017-01-01

    Background Cobicistat (COBI) is a pharmacoenhancer for antiretroviral therapy. Objective The current study was designed to profile the metabolic pathways of COBI and to determine the enzymes that contribute to COBI metabolism. Method We screened COBI metabolites in mice and human liver microsomes. We also used cDNA-expressed human cytochromes P450 (CYPs) to explore the role of human enzymes in COBI metabolism. Results Twenty new and three known metabolites of COBI were identified in mouse urine and feces. These new metabolic pathways of COBI include glycine conjugation, N-acetyl cysteine conjugation, morpholine ring-opening, and thiazole ring-opening. Twelve of COBI metabolites were further confirmed in mouse and human liver microsomes, including nine new metabolites. Consistent with the previous report, CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 were determined as the major enzymes that contribute to COBI metabolism. Conclusion This study provided a full map of COBI metabolism. These results can be used to manage CYP-mediated drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions that are associated with COBI-containing regimens in human. PMID:26935921

  15. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function. A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained. After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and −0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; −0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and −1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and −0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and −2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters. Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the

  16. Drug-metabolizing enzymes: mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes are called mixed-function oxidase or monooxygenase and containing many enzymes including cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and other components. The hepatic cytochrome P450s (Cyp) are a multigene family of enzymes that play a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs and xenobiotics with each cytochrome isozyme responding differently to exogenous chemicals in terms of its induction and inhibition. For example, Cyp 1A1 is particularly active towards polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), activating them into reactive intermediates those covalently bind to DNA, a key event in the initiation of carcinogenesis. Likewise, Cyp 1A2 activates a variety of bladder carcinogens, such as aromatic amines and amides. Also, some forms of cytochrome P450 isozymes such as Cyp 3A and 2E1 activate the naturally occurring carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin B1) and N-nitrosamines respectively into highly mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. The carcinogenic potency of PAHs, and other carcinogens and the extent of binding of their ultimate metabolites to DNA and proteins are correlated with the induction of cytochrome P450 isozymes. Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase, aryl sulfatase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase inactivate chemical carcinogens into less toxic or inactive metabolites. Many drugs change the rate of activation or detoxification of carcinogens by changing the activities of phases I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The balance of detoxification and activation reactions depends on the chemical structure of the agents, and is subjected to many variables that are a function of this structure, or genetic background, sex, endocrine status, age, diet, and the presence of other chemicals. It is important to realize that the enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism are also involved in the metabolism of a variety of substrates, and thus the introduction of specific xenobiotics may change

  17. P450 enzymes of estrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C P; Fishman, J

    1993-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous estrogens undergo extensive oxidative metabolism by specific cytochrome P450 enzymes. Certain drugs and xenobiotics have been found to be potent inducers of estrogen hydroxylating enzymes with C-2 hydroxylase induction being greater than that of C-16 hydroxylase. Oxygenated estrogen metabolites have different biological activities, with C-2 metabolites having limited or no activity and C-4 and C-16 metabolites having similar potency to estradiol. Pathophysiological roles for some of the oxygenated estrogen metabolites have been proposed, e.g. 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone. These reactive estrogens are capable of damaging cellular proteins and DNA and may be carcinogenic in specific cells.

  18. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  19. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  20. Lipoic Acid Metabolism in Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Maroya D.; Prigge, Sean T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Lipoic acid [(R)-5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid] is an enzyme cofactor required for intermediate metabolism in free-living cells. Lipoic acid was discovered nearly 60 years ago and was shown to be covalently attached to proteins in several multicomponent dehydrogenases. Cells can acquire lipoate (the deprotonated charge form of lipoic acid that dominates at physiological pH) through either scavenging or de novo synthesis. Microbial pathogens implement these basic lipoylation strategies with a surprising variety of adaptations which can affect pathogenesis and virulence. Similarly, lipoylated proteins are responsible for effects beyond their classical roles in catalysis. These include roles in oxidative defense, bacterial sporulation, and gene expression. This review surveys the role of lipoate metabolism in bacterial, fungal, and protozoan pathogens and how these organisms have employed this metabolism to adapt to niche environments. PMID:20508247

  1. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  2. Influence of salicylic acid on H2O2 production, oxidative stress, and H2O2-metabolizing enzymes. Salicylic acid-mediated oxidative damage requires H2O2.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M V; Paliyath, G; Ormrod, D P; Murr, D P; Watkins, C B

    1997-01-01

    We investigated how salicylic acid (SA) enhances H2O2 and the relative significance of SA-enhanced H2O2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA treatments enhanced H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative damage to proteins, and resulted in the formation of chlorophyll and carotene isomers. SA-enhanced H2O2 levels were related to increased activities of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and were independent of changes in catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities. Prolonging SA treatments inactivated catalase and ascorbate peroxidase and resulted in phytotoxic symptoms, suggesting that inactivation of H2O2-degrading enzymes serves as an indicator of hypersensitive cell death. Treatment of leaves with H2O2 alone failed to invoke SA-mediated events. Although leaves treated with H2O2 accumulated in vivo H2O2 by 2-fold compared with leaves treated with SA, the damage to membranes and proteins was significantly less, indicating that SA can cause greater damage than H2O2. However, pretreatment of leaves with dimethylthiourea, a trap for H2O2, reduced SA-induced lipid peroxidation, indicating that SA requires H2O2 to initiate oxidative damage. The relative significance of the interaction among SA, H2O2, and H2O2-metabolizing enzymes with oxidative damage and cell death is discussed. PMID:9306697

  3. Activity of anandamide (AEA) metabolic enzymes in rat placental bed.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, B M; Battista, N; Correia-da-Silva, G; Rapino, C; Maccarrone, M; Teixeira, N A

    2014-11-01

    Endocannabinoids are endogenous lipid mediators, with anandamide (AEA) being the first member identified. It is now widely accepted that AEA influences early pregnancy events and its levels, which primarily depend on its synthesis by an N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) and degradation by a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), must be tightly regulated. Previous studies demonstrated that AEA levels require in situ regulation of these respective metabolic enzymes, and thus, any disturbance in AEA levels may impact maternal remodeling processes occurring during placental development. In this study, the activities of the AEA-metabolic enzymes that result in the establishment of proper local AEA levels during rat gestation were examined. Here, we demonstrate that during placentation NAPE-PLD and FAAH activities change in a temporal manner. Our findings suggest that NAPE-PLD and FAAH create the appropriate AEA levels required for tissue remodeling in the placental bed, a process essential to pregnancy maintenance.

  4. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  5. Truffles contain endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes and anandamide.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, Giovanni; Rapino, Cinzia; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Falconi, Anastasia; Leonardi, Marco; Battista, Natalia; Colafarina, Sabrina; Sergi, Manuel; Bonfigli, Antonella; Miranda, Michele; Barsacchi, Daniela; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Truffles are the fruiting body of fungi, members of the Ascomycota phylum endowed with major gastronomic and commercial value. The development and maturation of their reproductive structure are dependent on melanin synthesis. Since anandamide, a prominent member of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), is responsible for melanin synthesis in normal human epidermal melanocytes, we thought that ECS might be present also in truffles. Here, we show the expression, at the transcriptional and translational levels, of most ECS components in the black truffle Tuber melanosporum Vittad. at maturation stage VI. Indeed, by means of molecular biology and immunochemical techniques, we found that truffles contain the major metabolic enzymes of the ECS, while they do not express the most relevant endocannabinoid-binding receptors. In addition, we measured anandamide content in truffles, at different maturation stages (from III to VI), through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis, whereas the other relevant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was below the detection limit. Overall, our unprecedented results suggest that anandamide and ECS metabolic enzymes have evolved earlier than endocannabinoid-binding receptors, and that anandamide might be an ancient attractant to truffle eaters, that are well-equipped with endocannabinoid-binding receptors.

  6. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-04-25

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways.

  7. Freeze-thaw effects on metabolic enzymes in wood frog organs.

    PubMed

    Cowan, K J; Storey, K B

    2001-08-01

    To determine whether episodes of natural freezing and thawing altered the metabolic makeup of wood frog (Rana sylvatica) organs, the maximal activities of 28 enzymes of intermediary metabolism were assessed in six organs (brain, heart, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, gut) of control (5 degrees C acclimated), frozen (24 h at -3 degrees C), and thawed (24 h back at 5 degrees C) frogs. The enzymes assessed represented pathways including glycolysis, gluconeo-genesis, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, the TCA cycle, and adenylate metabolism. Organ-specific responses seen included (a) the number of enzymes affected by freeze-thaw (1 in gut ranging to 17 in heart), (b) the magnitude and direction of response (most often enzyme activities decreased during freezing and rebounded with thawing but, liver showed freeze-specific increases in several enzymes), and (c) the response to freezing versus thawing (enzyme activities in gut and kidney changed during freezing, whereas most enzymes in skeletal muscle responded to thawing). Overall, the data show that freeze-thaw implements selected changes to the maximal activities of various enzymes of intermediary metabolism and that these may aid organ-specific responses that alter fuel use during freeze-thaw, support cryoprotectant metabolism, and aid organ endurance of freeze-induced ischemia.

  8. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD) 19), neonatal (postnatal day (PND) 7), prepubescent (PND32), middle age (12 months), and old age (18 and 24 months) in the C57BL/6J (C57) mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I), conjugation (Phase II) and excretion (Phase III). In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs w

  9. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Peters, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight and it is feasible to conduct ground experiments using known radiation exposures. The health of the liver, especially the activity rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. While radiation is known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects liver metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. This study is an effort to identify liver metabolic enzymes whose expression is altered by spaceflight or by radiation exposures that mimic features of the spaceflight environment. METHODS: Using procedures approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee, mice were exposed to either 137Cs (controls, 50 mGy, 6Gy, or 50 mGy + 6Gy separated by 24 hours) or 13 days of spaceflight on STS 135. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed at several time points (4 hours, 24 hours or 7 days) after their last radiation exposure, or within 6 hours of return to Earth for the STS 135 animals. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted, purified and quality-tested. Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used in RT-qPCR experiments to determine relative expression of a wide variety of genes involved in general metabolism and drug metabolism. RESULTS: Results of the ground radiation exposure experiments indicated 65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post

  10. 1-Heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A₂α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: Effect of the replacement of the ether oxygen with sulfur and nitrogen moieties on enzyme inhibition and metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Fabian, Jörg; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2015-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes, which have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that certain 3-phenoxy-substituted 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are inhibitors of cPLA2α and/or FAAH. Starting from 1-[2-oxo-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (3) and 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propan-2-one (4), the effect of the replacement of the oxygen in position 3 of the propan-2-one scaffold by sulfur and nitrogen containing moieties on inhibition of cPLA2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase as well as on metabolic stability in rat liver S9 fractions was investigated. As a result of these structure-activity relationship studies it was found that the ether oxygen is of great importance for enzyme inhibitory potency. Replacement by sulfur led to an about 100-fold decrease of enzyme inhibition, nitrogen and substituted nitrogen atoms at this position even resulted in inactivity of the compounds. The effect of the structural variations performed on metabolic stability of the important ketone pharmacophore was partly different in the two series of compounds. While introduction of SO and SO2 significantly increased stability of the ketone against reduction in case of the indole-5-carboxylic acid 3, it had no effect in case of the benzotriazole 4. Further analysis of the metabolism of 3 and 4 in rat liver S9 fractions revealed that the major metabolite of 3 was the alcohol 53 formed by reduction of the keto group. In contrast, in case of 4 beside keto reduction an excessive hydroxylation of the terminal phenoxy group occurred leading to the dihydroxy compound 50. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors showed that the phenylhydroxylation of 4 was catalyzed by tranylcypromine sensitive cytochrome P450 isoforms, while the reduction of the ketone function of 3 and 4 was mainly caused by cytosolic short chain dehydrogenases

  11. Enzymes of fructose metabolism in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Fritz; Lamprecht, Walther; Kirsch, Joachim

    1968-01-01

    The enzyme activities involved in fructose metabolism were measured in samples of human liver. On the basis of U/g of wet-weight the following results were found: ketohexokinase, 1.23; aldolase (substrate, fructose-1-phosphate), 2.08; aldolase (substrate, fructose-1,6-diphosphate), 3.46; triokinase, 2.07; aldehyde dehydrogenase (substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 1.04; D-glycerate kinase, 0.13; alcohol dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NAD]) substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 3.1; alcohol dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NADP]) (substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 3.6; and glycerol kinase, 0.62. Sorbitol dehydrogenases (25.0 U/g), hexosediphosphatase (4.06 U/g), hexokinase (0.23 U/g), and glucokinase (0.08 U/g) were also measured. Comparing these results with those of the rat liver it becomes clear that the activities of alcohol dehydrogenases (NAD and NADP) in rat liver are higher than those in human liver, and that the values of ketohexokinase, sorbitol dehydrogenases, and hexosediphosphatase in human liver are lower than those values found in rat liver. Human liver contains only traces of glycerate kinase. The rate of fructose uptake from the blood, as described by other investigators, can be based on the activity of ketohexokinase reported in the present paper. In human liver, ketohexokinase is present in a four-fold activity of glucokinase and hexokinase. This result may explain the well-known fact that fructose is metabolized faster than glucose. PMID:4385849

  12. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862.3360 Section 862.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... drug metabolizing enzyme. This device is used as an aid in determining treatment choice...

  13. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  14. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... This is an amino acid that helps remove ammonia from the blood. Babies with HCY may need ...

  15. Evolution of enzymes in metabolism: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rui; Chaleil, Raphael A G; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2002-07-19

    Several models have been proposed to explain the origin and evolution of enzymes in metabolic pathways. Initially, the retro-evolution model proposed that, as enzymes at the end of pathways depleted their substrates in the primordial soup, there was a pressure for earlier enzymes in pathways to be created, using the later ones as initial template, in order to replenish the pools of depleted metabolites. Later, the recruitment model proposed that initial templates from other pathways could be used as long as those enzymes were similar in chemistry or substrate specificity. These two models have dominated recent studies of enzyme evolution. These studies are constrained by either the small scale of the study or the artificial restrictions imposed by pathway definitions. Here, a network approach is used to study enzyme evolution in fully sequenced genomes, thus removing both constraints. We find that homologous pairs of enzymes are roughly twice as likely to have evolved from enzymes that are less than three steps away from each other in the reaction network than pairs of non-homologous enzymes. These results, together with the conservation of the type of chemical reaction catalyzed by evolutionarily related enzymes, suggest that functional blocks of similar chemistry have evolved within metabolic networks. One possible explanation for these observations is that this local evolution phenomenon is likely to cause less global physiological disruptions in metabolism than evolution of enzymes from other enzymes that are distant from them in the metabolic network.

  16. Ketone Body Metabolic Enzyme OXCT1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    and cellular energy homeostasis . Analysis of patient data indicated that higher OXCT1 levels are associated with docetaxel chemotherapy resistance...knock down induced metabolic inefficiency upon docetaxel treatment Since OXCT1 is a metabolic enzyme involved in energy homeostasis , next, to...ketone body metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis . Analysis of our previous data from patient needle biopsy samples indicated that higher

  17. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  18. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  19. Acute metabolic effects of ammonia on the enzymes of glutamate metabolism in isolated astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Subbalakshmi, G Y; Murthy, C R

    1983-01-01

    Enzymes of glutamate metabolism were studied in the astrocytes isolated from rats injected with a large dose of ammonium acetate and compared with those isolated from controls. The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutaminase decreased while those of glutamine synthetase (GS) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) increased both in convulsive and comatose states. The activity of alanine aminotransferase (A1AT) increased only in convulsive state. The results suggested that glutamate required for the formation of glutamine in astrocytes might have its origin in nerve endings and the depletion of citric acid cycle intermediates might occur in nerve endings at least in acute ammonia toxicity.

  20. Carbohydrate Content and Enzyme Metabolism in Developing Canola Siliques.

    PubMed Central

    King, S. P.; Lunn, J. E.; Furbank, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Little biochemical information is available on carbohydrate metabolism in developing canola (Brassica napus L.) silique (pod) wall and seed tissues. This research examines the carbohydrate contents and sucrose (Suc) metabolic enzyme activities in different aged silique wall and seed tissues during oil filling. The silique wall partitioned photosynthate into Suc over starch and predominantly accumulated hexose. The silique wall hexose content and soluble acid invertase activity rapidly fell as embryos progressed from the early- to late-cotyledon developmental stages. A similar trend was not evident for alkaline invertase, Suc synthase (SuSy), and Suc-phosphate synthase. Silique wall SuSy activities were much higher than source leaves at all times and may serve to supply the substrate for secondary cell wall thickening. In young seeds starch was the predominant accumulated carbohydrate over the sampled developmental range. Seed hexose levels dropped as embryos developed from the early- to midcotyledon stage. Hexose and starch were localized to the testa or liquid endosperm, whereas Suc was evenly distributed among seed components. With the switch to oil accumulation, seed SuSy activity increased by 3.6-fold and soluble acid invertase activity decreased by 76%. These data provide valuable baseline knowledge for the genetic manipulation of canola seed carbon partitioning. PMID:12223695

  1. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  2. Retinoic acid: its biosynthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1999-01-01

    This article presents a model that integrates the functions of retinoid-binding proteins with retinoid metabolism. One of these proteins, the widely expressed (throughout retinoid target tissues and in all vertebrates) and highly conserved cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), sequesters retinol in an internal binding pocket that segregates it from the intracellular milieu. The CRBP-retinol complex appears to be the quantitatively major form of retinol in vivo, and may protect the promiscuous substrate from nonenzymatic degradation and/or non-specific enzymes. For example, at least seven types of dehydrogenases catalyze retinal synthesis from unbound retinol in vitro (NAD+ vs. NADP+ dependent, cytosolic vs. microsomal, short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases vs. medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases). But only a fraction of these (some of the short-chain de-hydrogenases/reductases) have the fascinating additional ability of catalyzing retinal synthesis from CRBP-bound retinol as well. Similarly, CRBP and/or other retinoid-binding proteins function in the synthesis of retinal esters, the reduction of retinal generated from intestinal beta-carotene metabolism, and retinoic acid metabolism. The discussion details the evidence supporting an integrated model of retinoid-binding protein/metabolism. Also addressed are retinoid-androgen interactions and evidence incompatible with ethanol causing fetal alcohol syndrome by competing directly with retinol dehydrogenation to impair retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  3. Enzyme clustering accelerates processing of intermediates through metabolic channeling

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Michele; Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Xu, Yifan; Joshi, Preeti; Cristea, Ileana M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model to demonstrate that coclustering multiple enzymes into compact agglomerates accelerates the processing of intermediates, yielding the same efficiency benefits as direct channeling, a well-known mechanism in which enzymes are funneled between enzyme active sites through a physical tunnel. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with previously reported spacings between coclusters in mammalian cells. For direct validation, we study a metabolic branch point in Escherichia coli and experimentally confirm the model prediction that enzyme agglomerates can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch, and thus regulate steady-state flux division. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation. PMID:25262299

  4. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects.

  5. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  6. Undercover: gene control by metabolites and metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2016-01-01

    To make the appropriate developmental decisions or maintain homeostasis, cells and organisms must coordinate the expression of their genome and metabolic state. However, the molecular mechanisms that relay environmental cues such as nutrient availability to the appropriate gene expression response remain poorly understood. There is a growing awareness that central components of intermediary metabolism are cofactors or cosubstrates of chromatin-modifying enzymes. As such, their concentrations constitute a potential regulatory interface between the metabolic and chromatin states. In addition, there is increasing evidence for a direct involvement of classic metabolic enzymes in gene expression control. These dual-function proteins may provide a direct link between metabolic programing and the control of gene expression. Here, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms connecting metabolism to gene expression and their implications for development and disease. PMID:27881599

  7. Enhancing flora balance in the gastrointestinal tract of mice by lactic acid bacteria from Chinese sourdough and enzyme activities indicative of metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate by the flora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Yu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yaoping; Chen, Xingxing; Wei, Hua; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of administration of 5 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Chinese sourdough on the flora balance of gastrointestinal tract of mice. We specifically measured Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Bacteroides, and Lactobacillus by plate count and real-time PCR methods, and α-glucosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities as indicative of metabolism of sugar, fat, and protein from LAB isolated from feces of mice in vitro. The results showed that administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201 and Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 lowered the uricacid index of serum. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201, L. fermentum LFE0302, as well as Lactobacillus curvatus LCU0401 administration resulted in a reduction in the opportunistic pathogens (i.e., Enterococcus and Enterobacter), meanwhile, administration of L. fermentum LFE0302 and Lactobacillus sp. ULA0104 resulted in an increase in the counts of Lactobacillus. Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 administration increased starch digestion of intestinal flora after 4wk of feeding and also resulted in increased α-glucosidase activity in the intestinal flora after 3wk of feeding. We found a similar trend in esterase activity after administration of L. acidophilus LAC0201 for 3wk. Hence, our study suggested that LAB from Chinese sourdough might be used as potential probiotics to strengthen the flora balance in gastrointestinal tract and positively change the metabolism of nutrients through bacterial enzyme activities.

  8. Dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation downregulates arachidonate but upregulates docosahexaenoate metabolizing enzymes in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Rao, Jagadeesh S; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Igarashi, Miki

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deprivation increases expression of arachidonic acid (AA 20:4n-6)-selective cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in rat brain, while decreasing expression of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA 22:6n-3)-selective calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA. Assuming that these enzyme changes represented brain homeostatic responses to deprivation, we hypothesized that dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation would produce changes in the opposite directions. Methods Brain expression of PUFA-metabolizing enzymes and their transcription factors was quantified in male rats fed an n-6 PUFA adequate or deficient diet for 15 weeks post-weaning. Results The deficient compared with adequate diet increased brain mRNA, protein and activity of iPLA2 VIA and 15-lipoxygenase (LOX), but decreased cPLA2 IVA and COX-2 expression. The brain protein level of the iPLA2 transcription factor SREBP-1 was elevated, while protein levels were decreased for AP-2α and NF-κB p65, cPLA2 and COX-2 transcription factors, respectively. Conclusions With dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation, rat brain PUFA metabolizing enzymes and some of their transcription factors change in a way that would homeostatically dampen reductions in brain n-6 PUFA concentrations and metabolism, while n-3 PUFA metabolizing enzyme expression is increased. The changes correspond to reported in vitro enzyme selectivities for AA compared with DHA. (198 words) PMID:21070866

  9. Bedaquiline metabolism: enzymes and novel metabolites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Li, Feng; Lu, Jie; Liu, Shinlan; Dorko, Kenneth; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2014-05-01

    Bedaquiline is a recently approved drug for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Adverse cardiac and hepatic drug reactions to bedaquiline have been noted in clinical practice. The current study investigated bedaquiline metabolism in human hepatocytes using a metabolomic approach. Bedaquiline N-demethylation via CYP3A4 was confirmed as the major pathway in bedaquiline metabolism. In addition to CYP3A4, we found that both CYP2C8 and CYP2C19 contributed to bedaquiline N-demethylation. The Km values of CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 in bedaquiline N-demethylation were 13.1, 21.3, and 8.5 µM, respectively. We also identified a novel metabolic pathway of bedaquiline that produced an aldehyde intermediate. In summary, this study extended our knowledge of bedaquiline metabolism, which can be applied to predict and prevent drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions associated with bedaquiline.

  10. Targeting protozoan parasite metabolism: glycolytic enzymes in the therapeutic crosshairs.

    PubMed

    Harris, M T; Mitchell, W G; Morris, J C

    2014-01-01

    Glycolysis is an important metabolic pathway for most organisms, including protozoan parasites. Many of these primitive eukaryotes have streamlined their metabolism, favoring glycolysis for generating ATP in the glucose-rich environments in which they reside. Therefore, the enzymes involved in hexose metabolism could prove to be attractive targets for therapeutic development. This hypothesis is supported by a number of chemical and genetic validation studies. Additionally, the peculiar biochemistry of many of the components, along with limited protein sequence identity emphasizes the likelihood of developing compounds that selectively inhibit the parasite enzymes. In this review, we examine the status of target validation at the genetic and/or chemical levels from the protozoan parasites. While the proteins from some species have been interrogated to the point that well-defined lead compounds have been identified with activities against both enzyme and parasite growth, progress in other systems has to date been limited.

  11. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  12. Renal fructose-metabolizing enzymes: significance in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kranhold, J F; Loh, D; Morris, R C

    1969-07-25

    In patients with hereditary fructose intolerance, which is characterized by deficient aldolase activity toward fructose-1-phosphate, fructose induces a renal tubular dysfunction that implicates only the proximal convoluted tubule. Because normal metabolism of fructose by way of fructose-1-phosphate requires fructokinase, aldolase "B," and triokinase, the exclusively cortical location of these enzymes indicates that the medulla is not involved in the metabolic abnormality presumably causal of the renal dysfunction.

  13. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edith E; Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Feichtinger, René G; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 ρ(0) cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in ρ(0) cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  14. Differential diagnosis of (inherited) amino acid metabolism or transport disorders.

    PubMed

    Blom, W; Huijmans, J G

    1992-02-01

    Disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport are most clearly expressed in urine. Nevertheless the interpretation of abnormalities in urinary amino acid excretion remains difficult. An increase or decrease of almost every amino acid in urine can be due to various etiology. To differentiate between primary and secondary aminoacido-pathies systematic laboratory investigation is necessary. Early diagnosis of disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport is very important, because most of them can be treated, leading to the prevention of (further) clinical abnormalities. In those disorders, which cannot be treated, early diagnosis in an index-patient may prevent the birth of other siblings by means of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.Primary aminoacidopathies can be due to genetically determined transport disorders and enzyme deficiencies in amino acid metabolism or degradation. Secondary aminoacidopathies are the result of abnormal or deficient nutrition, intestinal dysfunction, organ pathology or other metabolic diseases like organic acidurias.A survey of amino acid metabolism and transport abnormalities will be given, illustrated with metabolic pathways and characteristic abnormal amino acid chromatograms.

  15. Enzymes and Metabolites in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Desiccation Tolerant Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwei; Song, Xiaomin; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-12-15

    Resurrection plants can tolerate extreme water loss. Substantial sugar accumulation is a phenomenon in resurrection plants during dehydration. Sugars have been identified as one important factor contributing to desiccation tolerance. Phylogenetic diversity of resurrection plants reflects the diversity of sugar metabolism in response to dehydration. Sugars, which accumulate during dehydration, have been shown to protect macromolecules and membranes and to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This review focuses on the performance of enzymes participating in sugar metabolism during dehydration stress. The relation between sugar metabolism and other biochemical activities is discussed and open questions as well as potential experimental approaches are proposed.

  16. Enzymes and Metabolites in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Desiccation Tolerant Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwei; Song, Xiaomin; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Resurrection plants can tolerate extreme water loss. Substantial sugar accumulation is a phenomenon in resurrection plants during dehydration. Sugars have been identified as one important factor contributing to desiccation tolerance. Phylogenetic diversity of resurrection plants reflects the diversity of sugar metabolism in response to dehydration. Sugars, which accumulate during dehydration, have been shown to protect macromolecules and membranes and to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This review focuses on the performance of enzymes participating in sugar metabolism during dehydration stress. The relation between sugar metabolism and other biochemical activities is discussed and open questions as well as potential experimental approaches are proposed. PMID:28248249

  17. Enzyme kinetics in drug metabolism: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Swati; Argikar, Upendra A; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are protein catalysts that lower the energy barrier for a reaction and speed the rate of a chemical change. The kinetics of reactions catalyzed by enzymes, as well as several mechanisms underlying the kinetics, have been comprehensively studied and written in textbooks (1, 2). The importance of quantitative evaluation of enzymatic processes has been recognized in many fields of study, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and pharmaceutical sciences to name a few. In pharmaceutical sciences, the applications of enzyme kinetics range from hit finding efforts for new chemical entities on a pharmacological target to concentration effect relationships to large-scale biosynthesis. The study of the science of drug metabolism has two principal concepts-rate and extent. While understanding disposition pathways and identification of metabolites provides an insight into the extent of metabolism, kinetics of depletion of substrates (endogenous or exogenous) and formation of metabolites deals with the rate of metabolism. The current textbook specifically focuses on kinetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes, detailing specific enzyme classes, and discusses kinetics as they apply to drug transporters. This textbook also outlines additional factors that contribute to the kinetics of reactions catalyzed by these proteins such as variability in isoforms (pharmacogenomics) and experimental factors including key concepts such as alterations of substrate concentrations due to binding. Applications of these approaches in predicting kinetic parameters and alternative approaches for enzymes (systems biology) and transporters are also discussed. The final section focuses on real-life examples (case studies) to try and exemplify the applications of enzyme kinetic principles. This chapter provides a brief overview outlining some key concepts within each of the sections and the chapters within this textbook.

  18. Enzyme Regulation& Catalysis in Carbon Fixation Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-12-14

    The overall long term goal of this program is the elucidation of molecular events in carbon assimilation. It has become axiomatic that control of flux through metabolic pathways is effectively imposed at irreversible reactions situated early in those pathways. The current focal point of this project is phosphoribulokinase (PRK), which catalyzes formation of the carbon dioxide acceptor, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. This reaction represents an early irreversible step unique to Calvin's reductive pentose phosphate pathway. Predictably, the PRK reaction represents an important control point in carbon fixation, regulated by a light dependent thiol/disulfide exchange in eukaryotes and by allosteric effectors in prokaryotes. Characterization of naturally occurring mutants as well as gene knockout experiments substantiate the importance of PRK to in vivo control of carbon assimilation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Thus, given the potential impact of enhancement or inhibition of PRK activity on energy (biomass/biofuel) production, elucidation of the molecular events that account for PRK activity is a significant scientific goal.

  19. Effects of microsomal enzyme induction on paracetamol metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, L F; Critchley, J A; Balali-Mood, M; Pentland, B

    1981-01-01

    1 The metabolism of paracetamol after a single oral dose of 20 mg/kg was compared in fifteen patients with microsomal enzyme induction taking anticonvulsants or rifampicin and twelve healthy volunteers. 2 Induction was confirmed by measurement of the plasma antipyrine half-life (mean 6.4 h in the patients compared with 12.8 h in the volunteers). 3 The glucuronide conjugation of paracetamol was enhanced in the induced patients as shown by lower plasma paracetamol concentrations, a shorter paracetamol half-life, higher paracetamol glucuronide concentrations and an increased ratio of the area under the plasma concentration time curves of the glucuronide to the unchanged drug. There were no significant differences in sulphate conjugation. 4 There was a corresponding change in the pattern of urinary metabolite excretion. The induced patients excreted significantly less unchanged drug and sulphate conjugate and more glucuronide conjugate than the healthy volunteers. 5 The urinary excretion of the mercapturic acid and cysteine conjugated of paracetamol was the same in both groups. 6 Conversion of paracetamol to its potentially hepatotoxic metabolite does not seem to be increased in patients induced with anticonvulsants or rifampicin. There would seem to be no contraindication to the use of these drugs in combination. PMID:7306429

  20. Analysis of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway using mutant genes.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, R A

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a fundamental process for plant growth and development. Although a considerable amount of information is available, little is known about the genetic control of enzymatic steps or regulation of several pathways. Much of the information about biochemical pathways has arisen from the use of mutants lacking key enzymes. Although mutants were largely used already in the 60's, by bacterial and fungal geneticists, it took plant research a long time to catch up. The advance in this area was rapid in the 80's, which was followed in the 90's by the development of techniques of plant transformation. In this review we present an overview of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway, the key regulatory enzymes and the mutants and transgenic plants produced for lysine and threonine metabolism. We also discuss and propose a new study of high-lysine mutants.

  1. How nutritional status signalling coordinates metabolism and lignocellulolytic enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-11-01

    The utilisation of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an abundant, renewable feedstock for green chemistries and biofuel production is inhibited by its recalcitrant nature. In the environment, lignocellulolytic fungi are naturally capable of breaking down plant biomass into utilisable saccharides. Nonetheless, within the industrial context, inefficiencies in the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes impede the implementation of green technologies. One of the primary causes of such inefficiencies is the tight transcriptional control of lignocellulolytic enzymes via carbon catabolite repression. Fungi coordinate metabolism, protein biosynthesis and secretion with cellular energetic status through the detection of intra- and extra-cellular nutritional signals. An enhanced understanding of the signals and signalling pathways involved in regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of lignocellulolytic enzymes is therefore of great biotechnological interest. This comparative review describes how nutrient sensing pathways regulate carbon catabolite repression, metabolism and the utilisation of alternative carbon sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ascomycete fungi.

  2. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio.

  3. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  4. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  5. Articulation of three core metabolic processes in Arabidopsis: Fatty acid biosynthesis, leucine catabolism and starch metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mentzen, Wieslawa I; Peng, Jianling; Ransom, Nick; Nikolau, Basil J; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2008-01-01

    Background Elucidating metabolic network structures and functions in multicellular organisms is an emerging goal of functional genomics. We describe the co-expression network of three core metabolic processes in the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana: fatty acid biosynthesis, starch metabolism and amino acid (leucine) catabolism. Results These co-expression networks form modules populated by genes coding for enzymes that represent the reactions generally considered to define each pathway. However, the modules also incorporate a wider set of genes that encode transporters, cofactor biosynthetic enzymes, precursor-producing enzymes, and regulatory molecules. We tested experimentally the hypothesis that one of the genes tightly co-expressed with starch metabolism module, a putative kinase AtPERK10, will have a role in this process. Indeed, knockout lines of AtPERK10 have an altered starch accumulation. In addition, the co-expression data define a novel hierarchical transcript-level structure associated with catabolism, in which genes performing smaller, more specific tasks appear to be recruited into higher-order modules with a broader catabolic function. Conclusion Each of these core metabolic pathways is structured as a module of co-expressed transcripts that co-accumulate over a wide range of environmental and genetic perturbations and developmental stages, and represent an expanded set of macromolecules associated with the common task of supporting the functionality of each metabolic pathway. As experimentally demonstrated, co-expression analysis can provide a rich approach towards understanding gene function. PMID:18616834

  6. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  7. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  8. Optimal control of metabolic networks with saturable enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Oyarzuun, D A

    2011-03-01

    This note addresses the optimal control of non-linear metabolic networks by means of time-dependent enzyme synthesis rates. The authors consider networks with general topologies described by a control-affine dynamical system coupled with a linear model for enzyme synthesis and degradation. The problem formulation accounts for transitions between two metabolic equilibria, which typically arise in metabolic adaptations to environmental changes, and the minimisation of a quadratic functional that weights the cost/benefit relation between the transcriptional effort required for enzyme synthesis and the transition to the new phenotype. Using a linear time-variant approximation of the non-linear dynamics, the problem is recast as a sequence of linear-quadratic problems, the solution of which involves a sequence of differential Lyapunov equations. The authors provide conditions for convergence to an approximate solution of the original problem, which are naturally satisfied by a wide class of models for saturable enzyme kinetics. As a case study the authors use the method to examine the robustness of an optimal just-in-time gene expression pattern with respect to heterogeneity in the biosynthetic costs of individual proteins.

  9. The role of CYP26 enzymes in retinoic acid clearance

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Jayne E.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule that regulates gene transcription and the cell cycle. Understanding of RA signaling has increased dramatically over the past decades, but the connection between whole body RA homeostasis and gene regulation in individual cells is still unclear. It has been proposed that cytochrome P450 family 26 (CYP26) enzymes have a role in determining the cellular exposure to RA by inactivating RA in cells that do not need RA. The CYP26 enzymes have been shown to metabolize RA efficiently and they are also inducible by RA in selected systems. However, their expression patterns in different cell types and a mechanistic understanding of their function is still lacking. Based on preliminary kinetic data and protein expression levels, one may predict that if CYP26A1 is expressed in the liver at even very low levels, it will be the major RA hydroxylase in this tissue. As such, it is an attractive pharmacological target for drug development when one aims to increase circulating or cellular RA concentrations. To further the understanding of how CYP26 enzymes contribute to the regulation of RA homeostasis, structural information of the CYP26’s, commercially available recombinant enzymes and good specific and sensitive antibodies are needed. PMID:19519282

  10. Citric Acid Metabolism in the Bovine Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms rapidly metabolize citric acid to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. The rate of metabolism varied between 0.00008 and 0.76 μmoles per g per min, the rate becoming higher as the citric acid concentration increased. The addition of potassium chloride to rumen contents decreased the rate of utilization. The results indicate that dietary citric acid is unlikely to accumulate in the rumen to a sufficiently high level to be an important factor in hypomagnesemia, except where other factors such as very high potassium levels in the food influence its metabolism. PMID:5549696

  11. Dynamic Reorganization of Metabolic Enzymes into Intracellular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Zhao, Alice; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Both focused and large-scale cell biological and biochemical studies have revealed that hundreds of metabolic enzymes across diverse organisms form large intracellular bodies. These proteinaceous bodies range in form from fibers and intracellular foci—such as those formed by enzymes of nitrogen and carbon utilization and of nucleotide biosynthesis—to high-density packings inside bacterial microcompartments and eukaryotic microbodies. Although many enzymes clearly form functional mega-assemblies, it is not yet clear for many recently discovered cases whether they represent functional entities, storage bodies, or aggregates. In this article, we survey intracellular protein bodies formed by metabolic enzymes, asking when and why such bodies form and what their formation implies for the functionality—and dysfunctionality—of the enzymes that comprise them. The panoply of intracellular protein bodies also raises interesting questions regarding their evolution and maintenance within cells. We speculate on models for how such structures form in the first place and why they may be inevitable. PMID:23057741

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  13. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  14. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  15. Bile Acids, Obesity, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huijuan; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are increasingly recognized as key regulators of systemic metabolism. While bile acids have long been known to play important and direct roles in nutrient absorption, bile acids also serve as signaling molecules. Bile acid interactions with the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the membrane receptor G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 (TGR5) can regulate incretin hormone and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) secretion, cholesterol metabolism, and systemic energy expenditure. Bile acid levels and distribution are altered in type 2 diabetes and increased following bariatric procedures, in parallel with reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Thus, modulation of bile acid levels and signaling, using bile acid binding resins, TGR5 agonists, and FXR agonists, may serve as a potent therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other components of the metabolic syndrome in humans. PMID:25194176

  16. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  17. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  18. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  19. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  20. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  1. Preparation of Metabolically Active Staphylococcus aureus Protoplasts by Use of the Aeromonas hydrophila Lytic Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Coles, N. W.; Gross, R.

    1973-01-01

    Stable, metabolically active protoplasts of Staphylococcus aureus have been prepared by the use of a staphylolytic enzyme produced by Aeromonas hydrophila. Respiratory and glycolytic rates and synthesis of nucleic acids, protein, and lipid in these protoplasts, stabilized variously in 1.1 M sucrose, 0.37 M sodium succinate, or 0.37 M sodium sulfate, have been shown to be comparable with the same parameters in intact cells under the same conditions. Images PMID:4728270

  2. Enzyme Recruitment and Its Role in Metabolic Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although more than 109 years have passed since the existence of the last universal common ancestor, proteins have yet to reach the limits of divergence. As a result, metabolic complexity is ever expanding. Identifying and understanding the mechanisms that drive and limit the divergence of protein sequence space impact not only evolutionary biologists investigating molecular evolution but also synthetic biologists seeking to design useful catalysts and engineer novel metabolic pathways. Investigations over the past 50 years indicate that the recruitment of enzymes for new functions is a key event in the acquisition of new metabolic capacity. In this review, we outline the genetic mechanisms that enable recruitment and summarize the present state of knowledge regarding the functional characteristics of extant catalysts that facilitate recruitment. We also highlight recent examples of enzyme recruitment, both from the historical record provided by phylogenetics and from enzyme evolution experiments. We conclude with a look to the future, which promises fruitful consequences from the convergence of molecular evolutionary theory, laboratory-directed evolution, and synthetic biology. PMID:24483367

  3. Enzyme recruitment and its role in metabolic expansion.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Cindy; Miller, Brian G

    2014-02-11

    Although more than 10(9) years have passed since the existence of the last universal common ancestor, proteins have yet to reach the limits of divergence. As a result, metabolic complexity is ever expanding. Identifying and understanding the mechanisms that drive and limit the divergence of protein sequence space impact not only evolutionary biologists investigating molecular evolution but also synthetic biologists seeking to design useful catalysts and engineer novel metabolic pathways. Investigations over the past 50 years indicate that the recruitment of enzymes for new functions is a key event in the acquisition of new metabolic capacity. In this review, we outline the genetic mechanisms that enable recruitment and summarize the present state of knowledge regarding the functional characteristics of extant catalysts that facilitate recruitment. We also highlight recent examples of enzyme recruitment, both from the historical record provided by phylogenetics and from enzyme evolution experiments. We conclude with a look to the future, which promises fruitful consequences from the convergence of molecular evolutionary theory, laboratory-directed evolution, and synthetic biology.

  4. Clinically Relevant Genetic Variations in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In the field of pharmacogenetics, we currently have a few markers to guide physicians as to the best course of therapy for patients. For the most part, these genetic variants are within a drug metabolizing enzyme that has a large effect on the degree or rate at which a drug is converted to its metabolites. For many drugs, response and toxicity are multi-genic traits and understanding relationships between a patient's genetic variation in drug metabolizing enzymes and the efficacy and/or toxicity of a medication offers the potential to optimize therapies. This review will focus on variants in drug metabolizing enzymes with predictable and relatively large impacts on drug efficacy and/or toxicity; some of these drug/gene variant pairs have impacted drug labels by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The challenges in identifying genetic markers and implementing clinical changes based on known markers will be discussed. In addition, the impact of next generation sequencing in identifying rare variants will be addressed. PMID:21453273

  5. Enzyme kinetics of oxidative metabolism: cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) are the most important enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of hydrophobic drugs and other foreign compounds (xenobiotics). The versatility of these enzymes results in some unusual kinetic properties, stemming from the simultaneous interaction of multiple substrates with the CYP active site. Often, the CYPs display kinetics that deviate from standard hyperbolic saturation or inhibition kinetics. Non-Michaelis-Menten or "atypical" saturation kinetics include sigmoidal, biphasic, and substrate inhibition kinetics (see Chapter 3 ). Interactions between substrates include competitive inhibition, noncompetitive inhibition, mixed inhibition, partial inhibition, activation, and activation followed by inhibition (see Chapter 4 ). Models and equations that can result in these kinetic profiles will be presented and discussed.

  6. Prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes: important regulators of cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Su, Huizhong; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Kranc, Kamil R; Pollard, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs) regulate the stability of HIF protein by post-translational hydroxylation of two conserved prolyl residues in its α subunit in an oxygen-dependent manner. Trans-4-prolyl hydroxylation of HIFα under normal oxygen (O2) availability enables its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor pVHL E3 ligase complex, leading to the degradation of HIFα via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Due to the obligatory requirement of molecular O2 as a co-substrate, the activity of PHDs is inhibited under hypoxic conditions, resulting in stabilized HIFα, which dimerizes with HIFβ and, together with transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300, activates the transcription of its target genes. As a key molecular regulator of adaptive response to hypoxia, HIF plays important roles in multiple cellular processes and its overexpression has been detected in various cancers. The HIF1α isoform in particular has a strong impact on cellular metabolism, most notably by promoting anaerobic, whilst inhibiting O2-dependent, metabolism of glucose. The PHD enzymes also seem to have HIF-independent functions and are subject to regulation by factors other than O2, such as by metabolic status, oxidative stress, and abnormal levels of endogenous metabolites (oncometabolites) that have been observed in some types of cancers. In this review, we aim to summarize current understandings of the function and regulation of PHDs in cancer with an emphasis on their roles in metabolism. PMID:27774472

  7. Enzymes To Die For: Exploiting Nucleotide Metabolizing Enzymes for Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ardiani, Andressa; Johnson, Adam J.; Ruan, Hongmei; Sanchez-Bonilla, Marilyn; Serve, Kinta; Black, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is an attractive strategy to selectively destroy cancer cells while minimizing unnecessary toxicity to normal cells. Since this idea was first introduced more than two decades ago, numerous studies have been conducted and significant developments have been made to further its application for mainstream cancer therapy. Major limitations of the suicide gene therapy strategy that have hindered its clinical application include inefficient directed delivery to cancer cells and the poor prodrug activation capacity of suicide enzymes. This review is focused on efforts that have been and are currently being pursued to improve the activity of individual suicide enzymes towards their respective prodrugs with particular attention to the application of nucleotide metabolizing enzymes in suicide cancer gene therapy. A number of protein engineering strategies have been employed and our discussion here will center on the use of mutagenesis approaches to create and evaluate nucleotide metabolizing enzymes with enhanced prodrug activation capacity and increased thermostability. Several of these studies have yielded clinically important enzyme variants that are relevant for cancer gene therapy applications because their utilization can serve to maximize cancer cell killing while minimizing the prodrug dose, thereby limiting undesirable side effects. PMID:22384805

  8. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed.

  9. CYP450 Enzyme-Mediated Metabolism of TCAS and Its Inhibitory and Induced Effects on Metabolized Enzymes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guolin; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, Lili; Li, Lei; Chen, Huiming; Yu, Wenlian; Li, Haishan

    2015-09-02

    In this study, we investigated the enzymes catalyzing the phase I metabolism of thiacalixarene (TCAS) based on in vitro system including cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes, human liver microsomes plus inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. In addition, the inhibitory potential of TCAS on major CYP450 drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) was assessed. The results showed that CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 mediated TCAS hydroxylation. IC50 values for TCAS in rat and human liver microsomes were greater than 50 µM, and it demonstrated a weak inhibition of rat and human CYP450 enzymes. Finally, sandwiched hepatocytes were used to evaluate the induction of CYP1A and CYP3A to define the function of TCAS in vivo. The results showed that incubation of TCAS at different concentrations for 72 h failed to induce CYP1A and CYP3A. However, incubation of the cells with 50 and 100 µM TCAS caused a profound decrease in the activities of CYP1A and CYP3A, which was probably due to cytotoxic effects, suggesting that exposure to TCAS might be a health concern.

  10. Metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids.

    PubMed

    Cattoor, Ko; Dresel, Michael; De Bock, Lies; Boussery, Koen; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Keukeleire, Denis; Deforce, Dieter; Hofmann, Thomas; Heyerick, Arne

    2013-08-21

    In this study, in vitro metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids was investigated. Besides their well-known use as bitter compounds in beer, in several studies, bioactive properties have been related to these types of molecules. However, scientific data on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion aspects of these compounds are limited. More specific, in this study, α-acids, β-acids, and iso-α-acids were incubated with rabbit microsomes, and fractions were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for identification of oxidative biotransformation products. Metabolism of β-acids was mainly characterized by conversion into hulupones and the formation of a series of tricyclic oxygenated products. The most important metabolites of α-acids were identified as humulinones and hulupones. Iso-α-acids were found to be primarly metabolized into cis- and trans-humulinic acids, next to oxidized alloiso-α-acids. Interestingly, the phase I metabolites were highly similar to the oxidative degradation products in beer. These findings show a first insight into the metabolites of hop-derived bitter acids and could have important practical implications in the bioavailability aspects of these compounds, following ingestion of hop-based food products and nutraceuticals.

  11. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  12. Alteration of drug metabolizing enzymes in sulphite oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Begum; Kuçukatay, Vural; Arslan, Sevki; Sahin, Barbaros; Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of sulphite oxidase (SOX, E.C. 1.8.3.1) deficiency on xenobiotic metabolism. For this purpose, SOX deficiency was produced in rats by the administration of a low molybdenum diet with concurrent addition of 200 ppm tungsten to their drinking water. First, hepatic SOX activity in deficient groups was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. Then, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline 4-hydroxylase, aromatase, caffeine N-demethylase, cytochrome b5 reductase, erythromycin N-demethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase and penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were determined to follow changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in SOX-deficient rats. Our results clearly demonstrated that SOX deficiency significantly elevated A4H, caffeine N-demethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase activities while decreasing ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aromatase activities. These alterations in drug metabolizing enzymes can contribute to the varying susceptibility and response of sulphite-sensitive individuals to different drugs and/or therapeutics used for treatments. PMID:22798713

  13. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  14. Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Drug Metabolism: Beyond a Role as a 
Detoxifying Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the last two steps of purine catabolism in the highest uricotelic primates. XOR is an enzyme with dehydrogenase activity that, in mammals, may be converted into oxidase activity under a variety of pathophysiologic conditions. XOR activity is highly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels and may generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which trigger different consequences, ranging from cytotoxicity to inflammation. The low specificity for substrates allows XOR to metabolize a number of endogenous metabolites and a variety of exogenous compounds, including drugs. The present review focuses on the role of XOR as a drug-metabolizing enzyme, specifically for drugs with anticancer, antimicrobial, antiviral, immunosuppressive or vasodilator activities, as well as drugs acting on metabolism or inducing XOR expression. XOR has an activating role that is essential to the pharmacological action of quinone drugs, cyadox, antiviral nucleoside analogues, allopurinol, nitrate and nitrite. XOR activity has a degradation function toward thiopurine nucleotides, pyrazinoic acid, methylxanthines and tolbutamide, whose half-life may be prolonged by the use of XOR inhibitors. In conclusion, to avoid potential drug interaction risks, such as a toxic excess of drug bioavailability or a loss of drug efficacy, caution is suggested in the use of XOR inhibitors, as in the case of hyperuricemic patients affected by gout or tumor lysis syndrome, when it is necessary to simultaneously administer therapeutic substances that are activated or degraded by the drug-metabolizing activity of XOR. PMID:27458036

  15. Enzymes of yeast polyphosphate metabolism: structure, enzymology and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is found in all living organisms. The known polyP functions in eukaryotes range from osmoregulation and virulence in parasitic protozoa to modulating blood coagulation, inflammation, bone mineralization and cellular signalling in mammals. However mechanisms of regulation and even the identity of involved proteins in many cases remain obscure. Most of the insights obtained so far stem from studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide a short overview of the properties and functions of known yeast polyP metabolism enzymes and discuss future directions for polyP research.

  16. Drug metabolizing enzyme systems in the houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata).

    PubMed

    Bailey, T A; John, A; Mensah-Brown, E P; Garner, A; Samour, J; Raza, H

    1998-10-01

    This study compared catalytic and immunochemical properties of drug metabolizing phase I and II enzyme systems in houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) liver and kidney and rat liver. P450 content in bustard liver (0.34 +/- 0.03 nmol mg-1 protein) was 50% lower than that of rat liver (0.70 +/- 0.02 nmol mg-1 protein). With the exception of aniline hydroxylase activity, monooxygenase activities using aminopyrine, ethoxyresorufin and ethoxycoumarin as substrates were all significantly lower than corresponding rat liver enzymes. As found in mammalian systems the P450 activities in the bird liver were higher than in the kidney. Immunohistochemical analysis of microsomes using antibodies to rat hepatic P450 demonstrated that bustard liver and kidney express P4502C11 homologous protein; no appreciable cross-reactivity was observed in bustards using antibodies to P4502E1, 1A1 or 1A2 isoenzymes. Glutathione content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in bustard liver were comparable with those of rat liver. GST activity in the kidney was 65% lower than the liver. Western blotting of liver and kidney cytosol with human GST isoenzyme-specific antibodies revealed that the expression of alpha-class of antibodies exceeds mu in the bustard. In contrast, the pi-class of GST was not detected in the bustard liver. This data demonstrates that hepatic and renal microsomes from the bustard have multiple forms of phase I and phase II enzymes. The multiplicity and tissue specific expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in bustards may play a significant role in determining the pharmacokinetics of drugs and susceptibility of the birds to various environmental pollutants and toxic insults.

  17. The RNA world and the origin of metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    An RNA world has been placed centre stage for explaining the origin of life. Indeed, RNA is the most plausible molecule able to form both a (self)-replicator and to inherit information, necessities for initiating genetics. However, in parallel with self-replication, the proto-organism had to obtain the ability to catalyse supply of its chemical constituents, including the ribonucleotide metabolites required to replicate RNA. Although the possibility of an RNA-catalysed metabolic network has been considered, it is to be questioned whether RNA molecules, at least on their own, possess the required catalytic capacities. An alternative scenario for the origin of metabolism involves chemical reactions that are based on environmental catalysts. Recently, we described a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway-like reactions catalysed by metal ions [mainly Fe(II)] and phosphate, simple inorganic molecules abundantly found in Archaean sediments. While the RNA world can serve to explain the origin of genetics, the origin of the metabolic network might thus date back to constraints of environmental chemistry. Interestingly, considering a metal-catalysed origin of metabolism gives rise to an attractive hypothesis about how the first enzymes could have formed: simple RNA or (poly)peptide molecules could have bound the metal ions, and thus increased their solubility, concentration and accessibility. In a second step, this would have allowed substrate specificity to evolve. PMID:25109990

  18. Control of immune response by amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Ursula; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The interaction between pathogenic microorganisms and their hosts is regulated by reciprocal survival strategies, including competition for essential nutrients. Though paradoxical, mammalian hosts have learned to take advantage of amino acid catabolism for controlling pathogen invasion and, at the same time, regulating their own immune responses. In this way, ancient catabolic enzymes have acquired novel functions and evolved into new structures with highly specialized functions, which go beyond the struggle for survival. In this review, we analyze the evidence supporting a critical role for the metabolism of various amino acids in regulating different steps of both innate and adaptive immunity.

  19. PLP-dependent enzymes as entry and exit gates of sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Florence; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are membrane constituents as well as signaling molecules involved in many essential cellular processes. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL), both PLP (pyridoxal 5′-phosphate)-dependent enzymes, function as entry and exit gates of the sphingolipid metabolism. SPT catalyzes the condensation of serine and a fatty acid into 3-keto-dihydrosphingosine, whereas SPL degrades sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) into phosphoethanolamine and a long-chain aldehyde. The recently solved X-ray structures of prokaryotic homologs of SPT and SPL combined with functional studies provide insight into the structure–function relationship of the two enzymes. Despite carrying out different reactions, the two enzymes reveal striking similarities in the overall fold, topology, and residues crucial for activity. Unlike their eukaryotic counterparts, bacterial SPT and SPL lack a transmembrane helix, making them targets of choice for biochemical characterization because the use of detergents can be avoided. Both human enzymes are linked to severe diseases or disorders and might therefore serve as targets for the development of therapeutics aiming at the modulation of their activity. This review gives an overview of the sphingolipid metabolism and of the available biochemical studies of prokaryotic SPT and SPL, and discusses the major similarities and differences to the corresponding eukaryotic enzymes. PMID:21710479

  20. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  1. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling in Cholestasis, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport, and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug, and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport, and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration, and carcinogenesis.

  2. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  3. Altered expression of fatty acid–metabolizing enzymes in aromatase-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Yoshihisa; Toda, Katsumi; Ono, Masafumi; Fujikawa-Adachi, Kiyomi; Saibara, Toshiji; Onishi, Saburo; Enzan, Hideaki; Okada, Teruhiko; Shizuta, Yutaka

    2000-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is a frequent complication in nonobese patients with breast cancer treated with tamoxifen, a potent antagonist of estrogen. In addition, hepatic steatosis became evident spontaneously in the aromatase-deficient (ArKO) mouse, which lacks intrinsic estrogen production. These clinical and laboratory observations suggest that estrogen helps to maintain constitutive lipid metabolism. To clarify this hypothesis, we characterized the expression and activity in ArKO mouse liver of enzymes involved in peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. Northern analysis showed reduced expression of mRNAs for very long fatty acyl-CoA synthetase, peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA oxidase, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enzymes required in fatty acid β-oxidation. In vitro assays of fatty acid β-oxidation activity using very long (C24:0), long (C16:0), or medium (C12:0) chain fatty acids as the substrates confirmed that the corresponding activities are also diminished. Impaired gene expression and enzyme activities of fatty acid β-oxidation were restored to the wild-type levels, and hepatic steatosis was substantially diminished in animals treated with 17β-estradiol. Wild-type and ArKO mice showed no difference in the binding activities of the hepatic nuclear extracts to a peroxisome proliferator response element. These findings demonstrate the pivotal role of estrogen in supporting constitutive hepatic expression of genes involved in lipid β-oxidation and in maintaining hepatic lipid homeostasis. PMID:10862797

  4. Pharmacogenetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes in US Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Duconge, Jorge; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the Hispanic population is continuously growing in the United States, they are underrepresented in pharmacogenetic studies. This review addresses the need for compiling available pharmacogenetic data in US Hispanics, discussing the prevalence of clinically relevant polymorphisms in pharmacogenes encoding for drug-metabolizing enzymes. CYP3A5*3 (0.245–0.867) showed the largest frequency in a US Hispanic population. A higher prevalence of CYP2C9*3, CYP2C19*4, and UGT2B7 IVS1+985 A>Gwas observed in US Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic populations. We found interethnic and intraethnic variability in frequencies of genetic polymorphisms for metabolizing enzymes, which highlights the need to define the ancestries of participants in pharmacogenetic studies. New approaches should be integrated in experimental designs to gain knowledge about the clinical relevance of the unique combination of genetic variants occurring in this admixed population. Ethnic subgroups in the US Hispanic population may harbor variants that might be part of multiple causative loci or in linkage-disequilibrium with functional variants. Pharmacogenetic studies in Hispanics should not be limited to ascertain commonly studied polymorphisms that were originally identified in their parental populations. The success of the Personalized Medicine paradigm will depend on recognizing genetic diversity between and within US Hispanics and the uniqueness of their genetic backgrounds. PMID:25431893

  5. Glutaric acid moderately compromises energy metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    da C Ferreira, Gustavo; Viegas, Carolina M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Latini, Alexandra; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2005-12-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of predominantly glutaric acid (GA). Affected patients present frontotemporal hypotrophy, as well as caudate and putamen injury following acute encephalopathic crises. Considering that the underlying mechanisms of basal ganglia damage in this disorder are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of glutaric acid (0.2-5mM) on critical enzyme activities of energy metabolism, namely the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in midbrain of developing rats. Glutaric acid significantly inhibited creatine kinase activity (up to 26%) even at the lowest dose used in the assays (0.2mM). We also observed that CK inhibition was prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of GA was possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex I-III and of succinate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by 20 and 30%, respectively, at the highest glutaric acid concentration tested (5mM). In contrast, complexes II-III and IV activities of the electron transport chain were not affected by the acid. The effect of glutaric acid on the rate of oxygen consumption in intact mitochondria from the rat cerebrum was also investigated. Glutaric acid (1mM) significantly lowered the respiratory control ratio (state III/state IV) up to 40% in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate or succinate. Moreover, state IV respiration linked to NAD and FAD substrates was significantly increased in GA-treated mitochondria while state III was significantly diminished. The results indicate that the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I moderately compromises brain energy metabolism in vitro.

  6. Comparison of metabolism of sesamin and episesamin by drug-metabolizing enzymes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Wakayama, Shuto; Itoh, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kamakura, Masaki; Munetsuna, Eiji; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2012-10-01

    Sesamin and episesamin are two epimeric lignans that are found in refined sesame oil. Commercially available sesamin supplements contain both sesamin and episesamin at an approximate 1:1 ratio. Our previous study clarified the sequential metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in human liver. In addition, we revealed that sesamin caused a mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) of CYP2C9, the P450 enzyme responsible for sesamin monocatecholization. In the present study, we compared the metabolism and the MBI of episesamin with those of sesamin. Episesamin was first metabolized to the two epimers of monocatechol, S- and R-monocatechols in human liver microsomes. The P450 enzymes responsible for S- and R-monocatechol formation were CYP2C9 and CYP1A2, respectively. The contribution of CYP2C9 was much larger than that of CYP1A2 in sesamin metabolism, whereas the contribution of CYP2C9 was almost equal to that of CYP1A2 in episesamin metabolism. Docking of episesamin to the active site of CYP1A2 explained the stereoselectivity in CYP1A2-dependent episesamin monocatecholization. Similar to sesamin, the episesamin S- and R-monocatechols were further metabolized to dicatechol, glucuronide, and methylate metabolites in human liver; however, the contribution of each reaction was significantly different between sesamin and episesamin. The liver microsomes from CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizers showed a significant amount of episesamin dicatechol. In this study, we have revealed significantly different metabolism by P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and catechol-O-methyltransferase for sesamin and episesamin, resulting in different biological effects.

  7. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baraibar, Martín A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2016-12-04

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not completely understood. In the present study we have addressed the potential impact of oxidatively modified proteins on the altered metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a modified proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during the replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome appeared to be a likely contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Metabolic and functional analyses revealed an impaired glucose metabolism in senescent cells. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates such as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated an increased turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Taken together, these results support a link between oxidative protein modifications and the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype of human myoblasts.

  8. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Baraibar, Martín A.; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not completely understood. In the present study we have addressed the potential impact of oxidatively modified proteins on the altered metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a modified proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during the replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome appeared to be a likely contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Metabolic and functional analyses revealed an impaired glucose metabolism in senescent cells. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates such as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated an increased turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Taken together, these results support a link between oxidative protein modifications and the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype of human myoblasts. PMID:27922824

  9. Extending enzyme molecular recognition with an expanded amino acid alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Windle, Claire L.; Simmons, Katie J.; Ault, James R.; Trinh, Chi H.; Nelson, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Natural enzymes are constructed from the 20 proteogenic amino acids, which may then require posttranslational modification or the recruitment of coenzymes or metal ions to achieve catalytic function. Here, we demonstrate that expansion of the alphabet of amino acids can also enable the properties of enzymes to be extended. A chemical mutagenesis strategy allowed a wide range of noncanonical amino acids to be systematically incorporated throughout an active site to alter enzymic substrate specificity. Specifically, 13 different noncanonical side chains were incorporated at 12 different positions within the active site of N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NAL), and the resulting chemically modified enzymes were screened for activity with a range of aldehyde substrates. A modified enzyme containing a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl cysteine at position 190 was identified that had significantly increased activity for the aldol reaction of erythrose with pyruvate compared with the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic investigation of a saturation library of the canonical amino acids at the same position showed that this increased activity was not achievable with any of the 20 proteogenic amino acids. Structural and modeling studies revealed that the unique shape and functionality of the noncanonical side chain enabled the active site to be remodeled to enable more efficient stabilization of the transition state of the reaction. The ability to exploit an expanded amino acid alphabet can thus heighten the ambitions of protein engineers wishing to develop enzymes with new catalytic properties. PMID:28196894

  10. Neonicotinoid metabolism: compounds, substituents, pathways, enzymes, organisms, and relevance.

    PubMed

    Casida, John E

    2011-04-13

    Neonicotinoids are one of the three principal insecticide chemotypes. The seven major commercial neonicotinoids are readily biodegraded by metabolic attack at their N-heterocyclylmethyl moiety, heterocyclic or acyclic spacer, and N-nitroimine, nitromethylene, or N-cyanoimine tip. Phase I metabolism is largely dependent on microsomal CYP450 isozymes with situ selectivity in hydroxylation, desaturation, dealkylation, sulfoxidation, and nitro reduction. Cytosolic aldehyde oxidase is a nitroreductase for some neonicotinoids. Phase II metabolism involves methylation, acetylation, and formation of glucuronide, glucoside, amino acid, and sulfate- and glutathione-derived conjugates. Some neonicotinoids act as proinsecticides with metabolism to more potent nicotinic agonists. Pest resistance is more commonly due to synergist-reversible CYP450 detoxification than to nAChR mutants or variants. Metabolites in some cases contribute to mammalian hepatotoxicity and carcinogenesis and in others to enhanced plant vigor and stress shields. These relationships explain much of neonicotinoid comparative toxicology and provide the basis for continued and improved safety and effectiveness of this chemotype.

  11. Life-history evolution and the microevolution of intermediary metabolism: activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes in life-history morphs of a wing-dimorphic cricket.

    PubMed

    Zera, Anthony J; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2003-03-01

    Although a considerable amount of information is available on the ecology, genetics, and physiology of life-history traits, much more limited data are available on the biochemical and genetic correlates of life-history variation within species. Specific activities of five enzymes of lipid biosynthesis and two enzymes of amino acid catabolism were compared among lines selected for flight-capable (LW[f]) versus flightless (SW) morphs of the cricket Gryllus firmus. These morphs, which exist in natural populations, differ genetically in ovarian growth (100-400% higher in SW) and aspects of flight capability including the size of wings and flight muscles, and the concentration of triglyceride flight fuel (40% greater in LW[f]). Consistently higher activity of each enzyme in LW(f) versus SW-selected lines, and strong co-segregation between morph and enzyme activity, demonstrated genetically based co-variance between wing morph and enzyme activity. Developmental profiles of enzyme activities strongly paralleled profiles of triglyceride accumulation during adulthood and previous measures of in vivo lipid biosynthesis. These data strongly imply that genetically based elevation in activities of lipogenic enzymes, and enzymes controlling the conversion of amino acids into lipids, is an important cause underlying the elevated accumulation of triglyceride in the LW(f) morph, a key biochemical component of the trade-off between elevated early fecundity and flight capability. Global changes in lipid and amino-acid metabolism appear to have resulted from microevolutionary alteration of regulators of metabolism. Finally, strong genotype x environment (diet) interactions were observed for most enzyme activities. Future progress in understanding the functional causes of life-history evolution requires a more detailed synthesis of the fields of life-history evolution and metabolic biochemistry. Wing polymorphism is a powerful experimental model in such integrative studies.

  12. From 20th century metabolic wall charts to 21st century systems biology: database of mammalian metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Callan C; Grady, Cameron R; Pisitkun, Trairak; Parulekar, Jaya; Knepper, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    The organization of the mammalian genome into gene subsets corresponding to specific functional classes has provided key tools for systems biology research. Here, we have created a web-accessible resource called the Mammalian Metabolic Enzyme Database (https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/MetabolicEnzymes/MetabolicEnzymeDatabase.html) keyed to the biochemical reactions represented on iconic metabolic pathway wall charts created in the previous century. Overall, we have mapped 1,647 genes to these pathways, representing ~7 percent of the protein-coding genome. To illustrate the use of the database, we apply it to the area of kidney physiology. In so doing, we have created an additional database (Database of Metabolic Enzymes in Kidney Tubule Segments: https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/MetabolicEnzymes/), mapping mRNA abundance measurements (mined from RNA-Seq studies) for all metabolic enzymes to each of 14 renal tubule segments. We carry out bioinformatics analysis of the enzyme expression pattern among renal tubule segments and mine various data sources to identify vasopressin-regulated metabolic enzymes in the renal collecting duct.

  13. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight conditions on the activities of certain enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rat liver are investigated in an attempt to account for the losses in body weight observed during space flight despite preflight caloric consumption. Liver samples were analyzed for the activities of 32 cytosolic and microsomal enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen and individual fatty acid levels for ground control rats and rats flown on board the Cosmos 936 biosatellite under normal space flight conditions and in centrifuges which were sacrificed upon recovery or 25 days after recovery. Significant decreases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in palmitoyl CoA desaturase are found in the flight stationary relative to the flight contrifuged rats upon recovery, with all enzymes showing alterations returning to normal values 25 days postflight. The flight stationary group is also observed to be characterized by more than twice the amount of liver glycogen of the flight centrifuged group as well as a significant increase in the ratio of palmitic to palmitoleic acid. Results thus indicate metabolic changes which may be involved in the mechanism of weight loss during weightlessness, and demonstrate the equivalence of centrifugation during space flight to terrestrial gravity.

  14. Something Old, Something New: Conserved Enzymes and the Evolution of Novelty in Plant Specialized Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Last, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of small molecules known as specialized metabolites, many of which are of economic and ecological importance. This remarkable variety is a consequence of the diversity and rapid evolution of specialized metabolic pathways. These novel biosynthetic pathways originate via gene duplication or by functional divergence of existing genes, and they subsequently evolve through selection and/or drift. Studies over the past two decades revealed that diverse specialized metabolic pathways have resulted from the incorporation of primary metabolic enzymes. We discuss examples of enzyme recruitment from primary metabolism and the variety of paths taken by duplicated primary metabolic enzymes toward integration into specialized metabolism. These examples provide insight into processes by which plant specialized metabolic pathways evolve and suggest approaches to discover enzymes of previously uncharacterized metabolic networks.

  15. Cortisol-Metabolizing Enzymes in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Zeev; Kaidar, Gabi; Zuckerman-Levin, Nehama; Dumin, Elena; Knopf, Carlos; Hochberg, Ze’ev

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess the activity of cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), using a fully quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) method. DESIGN We investigated the glucocorticoid degradation pathways that include 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1, 5α-reductase (5α-R) and 5β-reductase (5β-R), 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20α- and 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSD and 20β-HSD, respectively) in young nonobese women with PCOS, using a fully quantitative GCMS method. SETTING This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital in Israel. PATIENTS This study group consisted of 13 young women, aged 20.1 ± 2.8 years (mean ± SD), with the body mass index (BMI) of 22.6 ± 3.7 kg/m2, diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria. The control group consisted of 14 healthy young women matched for weight, height, and BMI. INTERVENTIONS Urine samples were analyzed using GCMS. We measured urinary steroid metabolites that represent the products and substrates of the study enzymes and calculated the product/substrate ratios to represent enzyme activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The calculation of enzymatic activity, based on glucocorticoid degradation metabolites, was done by GCMS in PCOS vs. controls. RESULTS All glucocorticoid degradation metabolites were higher in the PCOS group than in controls. Of the adrenal enzymes, the activities of 21-hydroxylase and 17α-hydroxylase were reduced, whereas the activity of 17,20-lyase was enhanced in PCOS. Of the degradation enzymes, the activity of 11β-HSD type 1 was reduced in women with PCOS only when calculated from cortoles and cortolones ratios. The activities of 5α-R/5β-R were increased only when calculating the 11-hydroxy metabolites of androgens. The activity of 20α-HSD was elevated in the patients with PCOS and its relation with the substrate levels was lost. CONCLUSIONS We confirm PCOS

  16. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  17. Engineering specialized metabolic pathways--is there a room for enzyme improvements?

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Salah Tawfik, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in enzyme engineering enable dramatic improvements in catalytic efficiency and/or selectivity, as well as de novo engineering of enzymes to catalyze reactions where natural enzymes are not available. Can these capabilities be utilized to transform biosynthesis pathways? Metabolic engineering is traditionally based on combining existing enzymes to give new, or modified, pathways, within a new context and/or organism. How efficient, however, are the individual enzyme components? Is there room to improve pathway performance by enzyme engineering? We discuss the differences between enzymes in central versus specialized, or secondary metabolism and highlight unique features of specialized metabolism enzymes participating in the synthesis of natural products. We argue that, for the purpose of metabolic engineering, the catalytic efficiency and selectivity of many enzymes can be improved with the aim of achieving higher rates, yields and product purities. We also note the relative abundance of spontaneous reactions in specialized metabolism, and the potential advantage of engineering enzymes that will catalyze these steps. Specialized metabolism therefore offers new opportunities to integrate enzyme and pathway engineering, thereby achieving higher metabolic efficiencies, enhanced production rates and improved product purities.

  18. Remarkable Reproducibility of Enzyme Activity Profiles in Tomato Fruits Grown under Contrasting Environments Provides a Roadmap for Studies of Fruit Metabolism1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biais, Benoît; Bénard, Camille; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Colombié, Sophie; Prodhomme, Duyên; Ménard, Guillaume; Bernillon, Stéphane; Gehl, Bernadette; Gautier, Hélène; Ballias, Patricia; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Sweetlove, Lee; Génard, Michel; Gibon, Yves

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’) plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels. PMID:24474652

  19. Cellular Metabolism of Unnatural Sialic Acid Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam D.; Fermaintt, Charles S.; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; McCombs, Janet E.; Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in addition to their metabolic functions, serve important roles as receptors, ligands, and structural molecules for diverse biological processes. Insight into carbohydrate biology and mechanisms has been aided by metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE). In MOE, unnatural carbohydrate analogs with novel functional groups are incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and used to probe biological systems. While MOE has expanded knowledge of carbohydrate biology, limited metabolism of unnatural carbohydrate analogs restricts its use. Here we assess metabolism of SiaDAz, a diazirine-modified analog of sialic acid, and its cell-permeable precursor, Ac4ManNDAz. We show that the efficiency of Ac4ManNDAz and SiaDAz metabolism depends on cell type. Our results indicate that different cell lines can have different metabolic roadblocks in the synthesis of cell surface SiaDAz. These findings point to roles for promiscuous intracellular esterases, kinases, and phosphatases during unnatural sugar metabolism and provide guidance for ways to improve MOE. PMID:25957566

  20. Simultaneous modulation of transport and metabolism of acyclovir prodrugs across rabbit cornea: An approach involving enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Suresh; Talluri, Ravi S; Mitra, Ashim K

    2006-08-31

    The aim of this study is to identify the class of enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) and to modulate transport and metabolism of amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir by enzyme inhibitors across rabbit cornea. l-Valine ester of acyclovir, valacyclovir (VACV) and l-glycine-valine ester of acyclovir, gly-val-acyclovir (GVACV) were used as model compounds. Hydrolysis studies of VACV and GVACV in corneal homogenate were conducted in presence of various enzyme inhibitors. IC(50) values were determined for the enzyme inhibitors. Transport studies were conducted with isolated rabbit corneas at 34 degrees C. Complete inhibition of VACV hydrolysis was observed in the presence of Pefabloc SC (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl-fluoride) and PCMB (p-chloromercuribenzoic acid). Similar trend was also observed with GVACV in the presence of bestatin. IC(50) values of PCMB and bestatin for VACV and GVACV were found to be 3.81+/-0.94 and 0.34+/-0.08muM respectively. Eserine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate (TEPP) and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) also produced significant inhibition of VACV hydrolysis. Transport of VACV and GVACV across cornea showed decreased metabolic rate and modulation of transport in presence of PCMB and bestain respectively. The principle enzyme classes responsible for the hydrolysis of VACV and GVACV were carboxylesterases and aminopeptidases respectively. Enzyme inhibitors modulated the transport and metabolism of prodrugs simultaneously even though their affinity towards prodrugs was distinct. In conclusion, utility of enzyme inhibitors to modulate transport and metabolism of prodrugs appears to be promising strategy for enhancing drug transport across cornea.

  1. Disturbances to neurotransmitter levels and their metabolic enzyme activity in a freshwater planarian exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-Pin; Li, Mei-Hui; Chen, Jhih-Sheng; Chung, Szu-Yao; Lee, Hui-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Using specific neurobehaviors as endpoints, previous studies suggested that planarian neurotransmission systems could be targets of Cd neurotoxicity. However, direct evidence for disturbed neurotransmission systems by Cd in treated planarians is still lacking. In planarians, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play critical roles in neuromuscular function, but little is known about their metabolic degradation. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to determine the appearances of DA, 5-HT, and their metabolic products in the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica, characterize the activity of enzymes involved in their metabolism, and investigate the effects of Cd on planarian 5-HTergic and DAergic neurotransmission systems. Only DA, 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were found in planarian tissues. Further enzymatic study revealed the activity of planarian monoamine oxidase (MAO) but not catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). These findings suggest that planarian MAO catalyzes the metabolism of 5-HT into 5-HIAA. However, DA metabolites from the MAO-involved metabolic pathway were not found, which might be due to a lack of COMT activity. Finally, in Cd-treated planarians, tissue levels of 5-HT and DA were decreased and MAO activity altered, suggesting that planarian neurotransmission systems are disturbed following Cd treatment.

  2. Gestational Age-Dependent Changes in Gene Expression of Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Diana L.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; MacDonald, James W.; Tsai, Jesse M.; Farin, Frederico M.; Hebert, Mary F.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics can be explained by changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and/or normal physiology. In this study, we determined gestational age-dependent expression profiles for all metabolic enzyme and transporter genes in the maternal liver, kidney, small intestine, and placenta of pregnant mice by microarray analysis. We specifically examined the expression of genes important for xenobiotic, bile acid, and steroid hormone metabolism and disposition, namely, cytochrome P450s (Cyp), UDP-glucuronosyltranserases (Ugt), sulfotransferases (Sult), and ATP-binding cassette (Abc), solute carrier (Slc), and solute carrier organic anion (Slco) transporters. Few Ugt and Sult genes were affected by pregnancy. Cyp17a1 expression in the maternal liver increased 3- to 10-fold during pregnancy, which was the largest observed change in the maternal tissues. Cyp1a2, most Cyp2 isoforms, Cyp3a11, and Cyp3a13 expression in the liver decreased on gestation days (gd) 15 and 19 compared with nonpregnant controls (gd 0). In contrast, Cyp2d40, Cyp3a16, Cyp3a41a, Cyp3a41b, and Cyp3a44 in the liver were induced throughout pregnancy. In the placenta, Cyp expression on gd 10 and 15 was upregulated compared with gd 19. Notable changes were also observed in Abc and Slc transporters. Abcc3 expression in the liver and Abcb1a, Abcc4, and Slco4c1 expression in the kidney were downregulated on gd 15 and 19. In the placenta, Slc22a3 (Oct3) expression on gd 10 was 90% lower than that on gd 15 and 19. This study demonstrates important gestational age-dependent expression of metabolic enzyme and transporter genes, which may have mechanistic relevance to drug disposition in human pregnancy. PMID:23175668

  3. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    We have examined, in the livers of rats carried aboard the Cosmos 936 biosatellite, the activities of about 30 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition to the enzyme studies, the levels of glycogen and of the individual fatty acids in hepatic lipids were determined. Livers from flight and ground control rats at recovery (R0) and 25 days after recovery (R25) were used for these analyses. For all parameters measured, the most meaningful comparisons are those made between flight stationary (FS) and flight centrifuged (FC) animals at R0. When these two groups of flight rats were compared at R0, statistically significant decreases in the activity levels of glycogen phosphorylase, α-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in the palmitoyl CoA desaturase were noted in the weightless group (FS). The significance of these findings was strengthened by the fact that all enzyme activities showing alterations at R0 returned to normal 25 days postflight. When liver glycogen and total fatty acids of the two sets of flight animals were determined, significant differences that could be attributed to reduced gravity were observed. The weightless group (FS) at R0 contained, on the average, more than twice the amount of glycogen than did the centrifuged controls (FC) and a remarkable shift in the ratio of palmitate to palmitoleate was noted. These metabolic alterations, both in enzyme levels and in hepatic constituents, appear to be characteristic of the weightless condition. Our data seem to justify the conclusion that centrifugation during flight is equivalent to terrestrial gravity.

  4. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-07

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  5. Metabolism of Cholesterol and Bile Acids by the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host's enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered. PMID:25437605

  6. Metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Philippe

    2013-12-30

    The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host's enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered.

  7. The metabolism of "surplus" amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bender, David A

    2012-08-01

    For an adult in N balance, apart from small amounts of amino acids required for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, hormones, etc, an amount of amino acids almost equal to that absorbed from the diet can be considered to be "surplus" in that it will be catabolized. The higher diet-induced thermogenesis from protein than from carbohydrate or fat has generally been assumed to be due to increased protein synthesis, which is ATP expensive. To this must be added the ATP cost of protein catabolism through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Amino acid catabolism will add to thermogenesis. Deamination results in net ATP formation except when serine and threonine deaminases are used, but there is the energy cost of synthesizing glutamine in extra-hepatic tissues. The synthesis of urea has a net cost of only 1·5 × ATP when the ATP yield from fumarate metabolism is offset against the ATP cost of the urea cycle, but this offset is thermogenic. In fasting and on a low carbohydrate diet as much of the amino acid carbon as possible will be used for gluconeogenesis - an ATP-expensive, and hence thermogenic, process. Complete oxidation of most amino acid carbon skeletons also involves a number of thermogenic steps in which ATP (or GTP) or reduced coenzymes are utilized. There are no such thermogenic steps in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetyl CoA or acetoacetate, but for amino acids that are metabolized by way of the citric acid cycle intermediates there is thermogenesis ranging from 1 up to 7 × ATP equivalent per mol.

  8. Metabolic glycoengineering: sialic acid and beyond.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Meledeo, M Adam; Wang, Zhiyun; Khanna, Hargun S; Paruchuri, Venkata D P; Yarema, Kevin J

    2009-12-01

    This report provides a perspective on metabolic glycoengineering methodology developed over the past two decades that allows natural sialic acids to be replaced with chemical variants in living cells and animals. Examples are given demonstrating how this technology provides the glycoscientist with chemical tools that are beginning to reproduce Mother Nature's control over complex biological systems - such as the human brain - through subtle modifications in sialic acid chemistry. Several metabolic substrates (e.g., ManNAc, Neu5Ac, and CMP-Neu5Ac analogs) can be used to feed flux into the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway resulting in numerous - and sometime quite unexpected - biological repercussions upon nonnatural sialoside display in cellular glycans. Once on the cell surface, ketone-, azide-, thiol-, or alkyne-modified glycans can be transformed with numerous ligands via bioorthogonal chemoselective ligation reactions, greatly increasing the versatility and potential application of this technology. Recently, sialic acid glycoengineering methodology has been extended to other pathways with analog incorporation now possible in surface-displayed GalNAc and fucose residues as well as nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc-modified proteins. Finally, recent efforts to increase the "druggability" of sugar analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering, which have resulted in unanticipated "scaffold-dependent" activities, are summarized.

  9. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  10. The Roles of Acids and Bases in Enzyme Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2007-01-01

    Many organic reactions are catalyzed by strong acids or bases that protonate or deprotonate neutral reactants leading to reactive cations or anions that proceed to products. In enzyme reactions, only weak acids and bases are available to hydrogen bond to reactants and to transfer protons in response to developing charges. Understanding this…

  11. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  12. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saruwatari, Junji; Ishitsu, Takateru; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed. PMID:27713373

  13. Role of malic enzyme during fatty acid synthesis in the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Wang, Lei; Gu, Zhennan; Song, Yuanda; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2014-05-01

    The generation of NADPH by malic enzyme (ME) was postulated to be a rate-limiting step during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi, based primarily on the results from research focusing on ME in Mucor circinelloides. This hypothesis is challenged by a recent study showing that leucine metabolism, rather than ME, is critical for fatty acid synthesis in M. circinelloides. To clarify this, the gene encoding ME isoform E from Mortierella alpina was homologously expressed. ME overexpression increased the fatty acid content by 30% compared to that for a control. Our results suggest that ME may not be the sole rate-limiting enzyme, but does play a role, during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi.

  14. Plastid-localized amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Plantae are predominantly composed of non-cyanobacterial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Studies of photosynthetic eukaryotes have revealed that the evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria involved the recruitment of non-cyanobacterial proteins. Our phylogenetic survey of >100 Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded plastid enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis identified only 21 unambiguous cyanobacterial-derived proteins. Some of the several non-cyanobacterial plastid enzymes have a shared phylogenetic origin in the three Plantae lineages. We hypothesize that during the evolution of plastids some enzymes encoded in the host nuclear genome were mistargeted into the plastid. Then, the activity of those foreign enzymes was sustained by both the plastid metabolites and interactions with the native cyanobacterial enzymes. Some of the novel enzymatic activities were favored by selective compartmentation of additional complementary enzymes. The mosaic phylogenetic composition of the plastid amino acid biosynthetic pathways and the reduced number of plastid-encoded proteins of non-cyanobacterial origin suggest that enzyme recruitment underlies the recompartmentation of metabolic routes during the evolution of plastids. PMID:23233874

  15. [Effect of T-activin on enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Arion, V Ia; Khromenkov, Iu I; Tagirova, A K; Karaulov, A V; Breusov, Iu N

    1987-01-01

    Effect of T-activin on some xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and several immunity parametres in secondary immune deficiency (subacute and chronic benzene intoxication) were investigated. T-activin was shown to regulate the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme system. The compound decreased the enzymatic activity in subacute benzene intoxication, approaching their values up to the control level. In chronic benzene intoxications, which were accompanied by decrease in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes activity, except of glutathione-S-transferase, T-activin stimulated these enzymes. At the same time, T-activin increased some immunological parameters in these models. Thymus-tropic peptides appear to be the bioregulators of some in vivo systems.

  16. Genome-Wide Prediction of Metabolic Enzymes, Pathways, and Gene Clusters in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peifen; Kim, Taehyong; Banf, Michael; Chavali, Arvind K.; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Bernard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Plant metabolism underpins many traits of ecological and agronomic importance. Plants produce numerous compounds to cope with their environments but the biosynthetic pathways for most of these compounds have not yet been elucidated. To engineer and improve metabolic traits, we need comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the organization and regulation of plant metabolism at the genome scale. Here, we present a computational pipeline to identify metabolic enzymes, pathways, and gene clusters from a sequenced genome. Using this pipeline, we generated metabolic pathway databases for 22 species and identified metabolic gene clusters from 18 species. This unified resource can be used to conduct a wide array of comparative studies of plant metabolism. Using the resource, we discovered a widespread occurrence of metabolic gene clusters in plants: 11,969 clusters from 18 species. The prevalence of metabolic gene clusters offers an intriguing possibility of an untapped source for uncovering new metabolite biosynthesis pathways. For example, more than 1,700 clusters contain enzymes that could generate a specialized metabolite scaffold (signature enzymes) and enzymes that modify the scaffold (tailoring enzymes). In four species with sufficient gene expression data, we identified 43 highly coexpressed clusters that contain signature and tailoring enzymes, of which eight were characterized previously to be functional pathways. Finally, we identified patterns of genome organization that implicate local gene duplication and, to a lesser extent, single gene transposition as having played roles in the evolution of plant metabolic gene clusters. PMID:28228535

  17. A metabolic node in action: chorismate-utilizing enzymes in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dosselaere, F; Vanderleyden, J

    2001-01-01

    The shikimate pathway has been described as a metabolic tree with many branches that led to the synthesis of an extensive range of products. This pathway is present only in bacteria, fungi, and plants. While there is only little difference in the sequence of the chemical reactions of the pathway, significant differences exist in terms of organization and regulation. In the main trunk of the shikimate pathway, D-erythrose 4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate are converted via shikimate to chorismate. Chorismate is the common precursor for the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, but also for other products as diverse as folate cofactors, benzoid and naphthoid coenzymes, phenazines, and siderophores. Five chorismate-utilizing enzymes have been characterized in microorganisms: chorismate mutase, anthranilate synthase, aminodeoxychorismate synthase, isochorismate synthase, and chorismate pyruvate-lyase. In this review these enzymes are discussed in terms of the corresponding gene structures and regulation, nucleotide and protein sequences, protein structures, and reaction mechanisms. The main emphasis is on transcriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, in view of how a microbial cell exploits its chorismate pool in diverse anabolic pathways. Comparison of the chorismate-utilizing enzymes has shown that some of them share sequence similarity, suggesting divergent evolution and commonality in reaction mechanisms. However, other chorismate-utilizing enzymes are examples of convergent evolution toward similar reaction capabilities.

  18. Lead (Pb)-inhibited radicle emergence in Brassica campestris involves alterations in starch-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Kaur, Gurpreet; Batish, Daizy R; Kohli, Ravinder K

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal released into the natural environment and known to cause oxidative damage and alter antioxidant mechanism in plants. However, not much is known about the interference of Pb with the biochemical processes and carbohydrate metabolism during seed germination. We, therefore, investigated the effect of Pb (50-500 μM) upon biochemical alterations in germinating seeds (at 24-h stage) of Brassica campestris L. Pb treatment significantly enhanced protein and carbohydrate contents that increased by ~43% and 200%, respectively, at 500-μM Pb over control. In contrast, the activities of starch/carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes--α-amylases, β-amylases, acid invertases, and acid phosphatases--decreased by ~54%, 60%, 74%, and 52%, respectively, over control. Activities of peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases, involved in stress acclimation, however, increased by ~1.2- to 3.9-folds and 0.4- to 1.4-folds upon 50-500-μM Pb treatment. Pb enhanced oxidizing ability by 10 to 16.7 times over control suggesting interference with emerging root's oxidizing capacity. The study concludes that Pb exposure inhibits radicle emergence from B. campestris by interfering with the biochemical processes linked to protein and starch metabolism.

  19. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation of damaged macromolecules, including irreversibly oxidized proteins, is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing. Failure of protein homesotasis is a major contributor to the age-related accumulation of damaged proteins. In skeletal muscle, tissue maintenance and regeneration is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome in aged cells appeared as a key contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Untargeted metabolomic profiling and functional analyses indicated glucose metabolism impairment in senescent cells, although mitochondrial respiration remained unaffected. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed in senescent cells. In addition, phospho-and glycerolipids metabolism was altered. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated augmented turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Such changes reflect alterations in membrane composition and dysregulation of sphingolipids signaling during senescence. This study establishes a new concept connecting oxidative protein modifications with the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype. In addition, these findings highlight the molecular mechanisms implicated in satellite cells dysfunction during ageing, paving the road for future therapeutic interventions

  20. Ferritin couples iron and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bu, Weiming; Liu, Renyu; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Loll, Patrick J; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2012-06-01

    A physiological relationship between iron, oxidative injury, and fatty acid metabolism exists, but transduction mechanisms are unclear. We propose that the iron storage protein ferritin contains fatty acid binding sites whose occupancy modulates iron uptake and release. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we found that arachidonic acid binds ferritin specifically and with 60 μM affinity. Arachidonate binding by ferritin enhanced iron mineralization, decreased iron release, and protected the fatty acid from oxidation. Cocrystals of arachidonic acid and horse spleen apoferritin diffracted to 2.18 Å and revealed specific binding to the 2-fold intersubunit pocket. This pocket shields most of the fatty acid and its double bonds from solvent but allows the arachidonate tail to project well into the ferrihydrite mineralization site on the ferritin L-subunit, a structural feature that we implicate in the effects on mineralization by demonstrating that the much shorter saturated fatty acid, caprylate, has no significant effects on mineralization. These combined effects of arachidonate binding by ferritin are expected to lower both intracellular free iron and free arachidonate, thereby providing a previously unrecognized mechanism for limiting lipid peroxidation, free radical damage, and proinflammatory cascades during times of cellular stress.

  1. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  2. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  3. Enzymic synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-d-glucose. II. Metabolic characteristics of the enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leznicki, A. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-D-glucose from indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and uridine diphosphoglucose (UDPG) has been shown to be a reversible reaction with the equilibrium away from ester formation and toward formation of IAA. The enzyme occurs primarily in the liquid endosperm of the corn kernel but some activity occurs in the embryo. It is relatively specific showing no glucose ester formation with oxindole-3-acetic acid or 7-hydroxy-oxindole-3-acetic acid, and low activity with phenylpropene acids, such as rho-coumaric acid. The enzyme is also specific for the nucleotide sugar showing no activity with UDPGalactose or UDPXylose. The enzyme is inhibited by inorganic pyrophosphate, by phosphate esters and by phospholipids, particularly phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The enzyme is inhibited by zeatin, by 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, by IAA-myo-inositol and IAA-glucan, but not by zeatin riboside, and only weakly by gibberellic acid, abscisic acid and kinetin. The reaction is slightly stimulated by both calcium and calmodulin and, in some cases, by thiol compounds. The role of this enzyme in the homeostatic control of indole-3-acetic acid levels in Zea mays is discussed.

  4. Phenotypic knockouts of selected metabolic pathways by targeting enzymes with camel-derived nanobodies (V(HH)s).

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José I; Fraile, Sofía; Zafra, Olga; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-07-01

    Surveying the dynamics of metabolic networks of Gram-negative bacteria often requires the conditional shutdown of enzymatic activities once the corresponding proteins have been produced. We show that given biochemical functions can be entirely suppressed in vivo with camel antibodies (VHHs, nanobodies) that target active sites of cognate enzymes expressed in the cytoplasm. As a proof of principle, we raised VHHs against 2,5-dihydroxypyridine dioxygenase (NicX) of Pseudomonas putida, involved in nicotinic acid metabolism. Once fused to a thioredoxin domain, the corresponding nanobodies inhibited the enzyme both in Escherichia coli and in P. putida cells, which then accumulated the metabolic substrate of NicX. VHHs were further engineered to track the antigen in vivo by C-terminal fusion to a fluorescent protein. Conditional expression of the resulting VHHs allows simultaneously to track and target proteins of interest and enables the design of transient phenotypes without mutating the genetic complement of the bacteria under study.

  5. Simultaneous prediction of enzyme orthologs from chemical transformation patterns for de novo metabolic pathway reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Kotera, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolic pathways are an important class of molecular networks consisting of compounds, enzymes and their interactions. The understanding of global metabolic pathways is extremely important for various applications in ecology and pharmacology. However, large parts of metabolic pathways remain unknown, and most organism-specific pathways contain many missing enzymes. Results: In this study we propose a novel method to predict the enzyme orthologs that catalyze the putative reactions to facilitate the de novo reconstruction of metabolic pathways from metabolome-scale compound sets. The algorithm detects the chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs using chemical graph alignments, and constructs a set of enzyme-specific classifiers to simultaneously predict all the enzyme orthologs that could catalyze the putative reactions of the substrate–product pairs in the joint learning framework. The originality of the method lies in its ability to make predictions for thousands of enzyme orthologs simultaneously, as well as its extraction of enzyme-specific chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method by applying it to some ten thousands of metabolic compounds, and analyze the extracted chemical transformation patterns that provide insights into the characteristics and specificities of enzymes. The proposed method will open the door to both primary (central) and secondary metabolism in genomics research, increasing research productivity to tackle a wide variety of environmental and public health matters. Availability and Implementation: Contact: maskot@bio.titech.ac.jp PMID:27307627

  6. Cytochrome P4502C9: an enzyme of major importance in human drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Miners, John O; Birkett, Donald J

    1998-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that CYP2C9 ranks amongst the most important drug metabolizing enzymes in humans. Substrates for CYP2C9 include fluoxetine, losartan, phenytoin, tolbutamide, torsemide, S-warfarin, and numerous NSAIDs. CYP2C9 activity in vivo is inducible by rifampicin. Evidence suggests that CYP2C9 substrates may also be induced variably by carbamazepine, ethanol and phenobarbitone. Apart from the mutual competitive inhibition which may occur between alternate substrates, numerous other drugs have been shown to inhibit CYP2C9 activity in vivo and/or in vitro. Clinically significant inhibition may occur with coadministration of amiodarone, fluconazole, phenylbutazone, sulphinpyrazone, sulphaphenazole and certain other sulphonamides. Polymorphisms in the coding region of the CYP2C9 gene produce variants at amino acid residues 144 (Arg144Cys) and 359 (Ile359Leu) of the CYP2C9 protein. Individuals homozygous for Leu359 have markedly diminished metabolic capacities for most CYP2C9 substrates, although the frequency of this allele is relatively low. Consistent with the modulation of enzyme activity by genetic and other factors, wide interindividual variability occurs in the elimination and/or dosage requirements of prototypic CYP2C9 substrates. Individualisation of dose is essential for those CYP2C9 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index. PMID:9663807

  7. Labeling and enzyme studies of the central carbon metabolism in Metallosphaera sedula.

    PubMed

    Estelmann, Sebastian; Hügler, Michael; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Werner, Katharina; Berg, Ivan A; Ramos-Vera, W Hugo; Say, Rafael F; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Gad'on, Nasser; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-03-01

    Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales, Crenarchaeota) uses the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle for autotrophic carbon fixation. In this pathway, acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and succinyl-CoA are the only intermediates that can be considered common to the central carbon metabolism. We addressed the question of which intermediate of the cycle most biosynthetic routes branch off. We labeled autotrophically growing cells by using 4-hydroxy[1-¹⁴C]butyrate and [1,4-¹³C₁]succinate, respectively, as precursors for biosynthesis. The labeling patterns of protein-derived amino acids verified the operation of the proposed carbon fixation cycle, in which 4-hydroxybutyrate is converted to two molecules of acetyl-CoA. The results also showed that major biosynthetic flux does not occur via acetyl-CoA, except for the formation of building blocks that are directly derived from acetyl-CoA. Notably, acetyl-CoA is not assimilated via reductive carboxylation to pyruvate. Rather, our data suggest that the majority of anabolic precursors are derived from succinyl-CoA, which is removed from the cycle via oxidation to malate and oxaloacetate. These C₄intermediates yield pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Enzyme activities that are required for forming intermediates from succinyl-CoA were detected, including enzymes catalyzing gluconeogenesis from PEP. This study completes the picture of the central carbon metabolism in autotrophic Sulfolobales by connecting the autotrophic carbon fixation cycle to the formation of central carbon precursor metabolites.

  8. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  9. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  10. Primacy of cardiac chymase over angiotensin converting enzyme as an angiotensin-(1-12) metabolizing enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Varagic, Jasmina; VonCannon, Jessica L.; Groban, Leanne; Collawn, James F.; Dell'Italia, Louis J.; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    We showed previously that rat angiotensin-(1-12) [Ang-(1-12)] is metabolized by chymase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate Angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we investigated the affinity of cardiac chymase and ACE enzymes for Ang-(1-12) and Angiotensin I (Ang I) substrates. Native plasma membranes (PMs) isolated from heart and lung tissues of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were incubated with radiolabeled 125I-Ang-(1-12) or 125I-Ang I, in the absence or presence of a chymase or ACE inhibitor (chymostatin and lisinopril, respectively). Products were quantitated by HPLC connected to an in-line flow-through gamma detector. The rate of 125I-Ang II formation from 125I-Ang-(1-12) by chymase was significantly higher (heart: 7.0 ± 0.6 fmol/min/mg; lung: 33 ± 1.2 fmol/min/mg, P < 0.001) when compared to 125I-Ang I substrate (heart: 0.8 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg; lung: 2.1 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg). Substrate affinity of 125I-Ang-(1-12) for rat cardiac chymase was also confirmed using excess unlabeled Ang-(1-12) or Ang I (0–250 µM). The rate of 125I-Ang II formation was significantly lower using unlabeled Ang-(1-12) compared to unlabeled Ang I substrate. Kinetic data showed that rat chymase has a lower Km (64 ± 6.3 µM vs 142 ± 17 µM), higher Vmax (13.2 ± 1.3 µM/min/mg vs 1.9 ± 0.2 µM/min/mg) and more than 15-fold higher catalytic efficiency (ratio of Vmax/Km) for Ang-(1-12) compared to Ang I substrate, respectively. We also investigated ACE mediated hydrolysis of 125I-Ang-(1-12) and 125I-Ang I in solubilized membrane fractions of the SHR heart and lung. Interestingly, no significant difference in 125I-Ang II formation by ACE was detected using either substrate, 125I-Ang-(1-12) or 125I-Ang I, both in the heart (1.8 ± 0.2 fmol/min/mg and 1.8 ± 0.3 fmol/min/mg, respectively) and in the lungs (239 ± 25 fmol/min/mg and 248 ± 34 fmol/min/mg, respectively). Compared to chymase, ACE-mediated Ang-(1-12) metabolism in the heart was several fold lower

  11. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium ‘Hongdeng’), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit. PMID:28245268

  12. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Zhu, Tingting; Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium 'Hongdeng'), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit.

  13. Brain amino acid metabolism and ketosis.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, M; Daikhin, Y; Nissim, I; Lazarow, A; Nissim, I

    2001-10-15

    The relationship between ketosis and brain amino acid metabolism was studied in mice that consumed a ketogenic diet (>90% of calories as lipid). After 3 days on the diet the blood concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 5 mmol/l (control = 0.06-0.1 mmol/l). In forebrain and cerebellum the concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 10-fold higher than control. Brain [citrate] and [lactate] were greater in the ketotic animals. The concentration of whole brain free coenzyme A was lower in ketotic mice. Brain [aspartate] was reduced in forebrain and cerebellum, but [glutamate] and [glutamine] were unchanged. When [(15)N]leucine was administered to follow N metabolism, this labeled amino acid accumulated to a greater extent in the blood and brain of ketotic mice. Total brain aspartate ((14)N + (15)N) was reduced in the ketotic group. The [(15)N]aspartate/[(15)N]glutamate ratio was lower in ketotic animals, consistent with a shift in the equilibrium of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction away from aspartate. Label in [(15)N]GABA and total [(15)N]GABA was increased in ketotic animals. When the ketotic animals were injected with glucose, there was a partial blunting of ketoacidemia within 40 min as well as an increase of brain [aspartate], which was similar to control. When [U-(13)C(6)]glucose was injected, the (13)C label appeared rapidly in brain lactate and in amino acids. Label in brain [U-(13)C(3)]lactate was greater in the ketotic group. The ratio of brain (13)C-amino acid/(13)C-lactate, which reflects the fraction of amino acid carbon that is derived from glucose, was much lower in ketosis, indicating that another carbon source, i.e., ketone bodies, were precursor to aspartate, glutamate, glutamine and GABA.

  14. Retinoids inhibit 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine-induced activity of benzo[a]pyrene metabolizing enzymes in human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kohl, F V; Rüdiger, H W

    1980-09-01

    Retinoids are known to inhibit the substrate mediated enzyme induction of benzo[a]pyrene metabolizing enzymes. Consequently, the effect of two retinoids on the induction of benzo[a]pyrene metabolizing enzymes by the more potent inductor 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine (TCDD) was investigated. The studies were performed with human diploid fibroblasts in culture. Vitamin A palmitate and all-trans-retinoic-acid were found to prevent the TCDD induced increase of benzo[a]pyrene metabolism in a dose-dependent manner. The fact that this effect was immediately reversible makes it unlikely that it was due to non-specific toxic effects. The data suggest that retinoids cause a preferential inhibition of the de novo synthesis of benzo[a]pyrene metabolizing enzymes.

  15. Comprehensive Structural Characterization of the Bacterial Homospermidine Synthase–an Essential Enzyme of the Polyamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krossa, Sebastian; Faust, Annette; Ober, Dietrich; Scheidig, Axel J.

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved bacterial homospermidine synthase (HSS) is a key enzyme of the polyamine metabolism of many proteobacteria including pathogenic strains such as Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; The unique usage of NAD(H) as a prosthetic group is a common feature of bacterial HSS, eukaryotic HSS and deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). The structure of the bacterial enzyme does not possess a lysine residue in the active center and thus does not form an enzyme-substrate Schiff base intermediate as observed for the DHS. In contrast to the DHS the active site is not formed by the interface of two subunits but resides within one subunit of the bacterial HSS. Crystal structures of Blastochloris viridis HSS (BvHSS) reveal two distinct substrate binding sites, one of which is highly specific for putrescine. BvHSS features a side pocket in the direct vicinity of the active site formed by conserved amino acids and a potential substrate discrimination, guiding, and sensing mechanism. The proposed reaction steps for the catalysis of BvHSS emphasize cation-π interaction through a conserved Trp residue as a key stabilizer of high energetic transition states. PMID:26776105

  16. Comprehensive Structural Characterization of the Bacterial Homospermidine Synthase-an Essential Enzyme of the Polyamine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Krossa, Sebastian; Faust, Annette; Ober, Dietrich; Scheidig, Axel J

    2016-01-18

    The highly conserved bacterial homospermidine synthase (HSS) is a key enzyme of the polyamine metabolism of many proteobacteria including pathogenic strains such as Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; The unique usage of NAD(H) as a prosthetic group is a common feature of bacterial HSS, eukaryotic HSS and deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). The structure of the bacterial enzyme does not possess a lysine residue in the active center and thus does not form an enzyme-substrate Schiff base intermediate as observed for the DHS. In contrast to the DHS the active site is not formed by the interface of two subunits but resides within one subunit of the bacterial HSS. Crystal structures of Blastochloris viridis HSS (BvHSS) reveal two distinct substrate binding sites, one of which is highly specific for putrescine. BvHSS features a side pocket in the direct vicinity of the active site formed by conserved amino acids and a potential substrate discrimination, guiding, and sensing mechanism. The proposed reaction steps for the catalysis of BvHSS emphasize cation-π interaction through a conserved Trp residue as a key stabilizer of high energetic transition states.

  17. Evidence of Selection for Low Cognate Amino Acid Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rui; Savageau, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary If the enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of a given amino acid are repressed and the cognate amino acid pool suddenly depleted, then derepression of these enzymes and replenishment of the pool would be problematic, if the enzymes were largely composed of the cognate amino acid. In the proverbial ‘Catch 22’, cells would lack the necessary enzymes to make the amino acid, and they would lack the necessary amino acid to make the needed enzymes. Based on this scenario, we hypothesize that evolution would lead to the selection of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that have a relatively low content of their cognate amino acid. We call this the ‘cognate bias hypothesis’. Here we test several implications of this hypothesis directly using data from the proteome of Escherichia coli. Several lines of evidence show that low cognate bias is evident in 15 of the 20 amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Comparison with closely related Salmonella typhimurium shows similar results. Comparison with more distantly related Bacillus subtilis shows general similarities as well as significant differences in the detailed profiles of cognate bias. Thus, selection for low cognate bias plays a significant role in shaping the amino acid composition for a large class of cellular proteins. PMID:15853887

  18. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  19. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  20. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Stols, L.; Donnelly, M.I.

    1997-07-01

    NAD{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The K{sub m} values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. 27 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator increasing succinate excretion from unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Shirai, Tomokazu; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Y

    2015-01-01

    Succinate is a building block compound that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has declared as important in biorefineries, and it is widely used as a commodity chemical. Here, we identified the two genes increasing succinate production of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Succinate was excreted under dark, anaerobic conditions, and its production level increased by knocking out ackA, which encodes an acetate kinase, and by overexpressing sigE, which encodes an RNA polymerase sigma factor. Glycogen catabolism and organic acid biosynthesis were enhanced in the mutant lacking ackA and overexpressing sigE, leading to an increase in succinate production reaching five times of the wild-type levels. Our genetic and metabolomic analyses thus demonstrated the effect of genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator on succinate excretion from this cyanobacterium with the data based on metabolomic technique.

  2. Genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator increasing succinate excretion from unicellular cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Takashi; Shirai, Tomokazu; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Y.

    2015-01-01

    Succinate is a building block compound that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has declared as important in biorefineries, and it is widely used as a commodity chemical. Here, we identified the two genes increasing succinate production of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Succinate was excreted under dark, anaerobic conditions, and its production level increased by knocking out ackA, which encodes an acetate kinase, and by overexpressing sigE, which encodes an RNA polymerase sigma factor. Glycogen catabolism and organic acid biosynthesis were enhanced in the mutant lacking ackA and overexpressing sigE, leading to an increase in succinate production reaching five times of the wild-type levels. Our genetic and metabolomic analyses thus demonstrated the effect of genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator on succinate excretion from this cyanobacterium with the data based on metabolomic technique. PMID:26500619

  3. Modeling the role of covalent enzyme modification in Escherichia coli nitrogen metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Philip B.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2010-03-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. GS is principally active when the cell is experiencing nitrogen limitation, and its activity is regulated by a bicyclic covalent modification cascade. The advantages of this bicyclic-cascade architecture are poorly understood. We analyze a simple model of the GS cascade in comparison to other regulatory schemes and conclude that the bicyclic cascade is suboptimal for maintaining metabolic homeostasis of the free glutamine pool. Instead, we argue that the lag inherent in the covalent modification of GS slows the response to an ammonium shock and thereby allows GS to transiently detoxify the cell, while maintaining homeostasis over longer times.

  4. Discovery of a sesamin-metabolizing microorganism and a new enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Takuto; Fujiki, Etsuko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-01

    Sesamin is one of the major lignans found in sesame oil. Although some microbial metabolites of sesamin have been identified, sesamin-metabolic pathways remain uncharacterized at both the enzyme and gene levels. Here, we isolated microorganisms growing on sesamin as a sole-carbon source. One microorganism showing significant sesamin-degrading activity was identified as Sinomonas sp. no. 22. A sesamin-metabolizing enzyme named SesA was purified from this strain and characterized. SesA catalyzed methylene group transfer from sesamin or sesamin monocatechol to tetrahydrofolate (THF) with ring cleavage, yielding sesamin mono- or di-catechol and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. The kinetic parameters of SesA were determined to be as follows: Km for sesamin = 0.032 ± 0.005 mM, Vmax = 9.3 ± 0.4 (μmol⋅min−1⋅mg−1), and kcat = 7.9 ± 0.3 s−1. Next, we investigated the substrate specificity. SesA also showed enzymatic activity toward (+)-episesamin, (−)-asarinin, sesaminol, (+)-sesamolin, and piperine. Growth studies with strain no. 22, and Western blot analysis revealed that SesA formation is inducible by sesamin. The deduced amino acid sequence of sesA exhibited weak overall sequence similarity to that of the protein family of glycine cleavage T-proteins (GcvTs), which catalyze glycine degradation in most bacteria, archaea, and all eukaryotes. Only SesA catalyzes C1 transfer to THF with ring cleavage reaction among GcvT family proteins. Moreover, SesA homolog genes are found in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our findings provide new insights into microbial sesamin metabolism and the function of GcvT family proteins. PMID:27444012

  5. Discovery of a sesamin-metabolizing microorganism and a new enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Takuto; Fujiki, Etsuko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-08-09

    Sesamin is one of the major lignans found in sesame oil. Although some microbial metabolites of sesamin have been identified, sesamin-metabolic pathways remain uncharacterized at both the enzyme and gene levels. Here, we isolated microorganisms growing on sesamin as a sole-carbon source. One microorganism showing significant sesamin-degrading activity was identified as Sinomonas sp. no. 22. A sesamin-metabolizing enzyme named SesA was purified from this strain and characterized. SesA catalyzed methylene group transfer from sesamin or sesamin monocatechol to tetrahydrofolate (THF) with ring cleavage, yielding sesamin mono- or di-catechol and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. The kinetic parameters of SesA were determined to be as follows: Km for sesamin = 0.032 ± 0.005 mM, Vmax = 9.3 ± 0.4 (μmol⋅min(-1)⋅mg(-1)), and kcat = 7.9 ± 0.3 s(-1) Next, we investigated the substrate specificity. SesA also showed enzymatic activity toward (+)-episesamin, (-)-asarinin, sesaminol, (+)-sesamolin, and piperine. Growth studies with strain no. 22, and Western blot analysis revealed that SesA formation is inducible by sesamin. The deduced amino acid sequence of sesA exhibited weak overall sequence similarity to that of the protein family of glycine cleavage T-proteins (GcvTs), which catalyze glycine degradation in most bacteria, archaea, and all eukaryotes. Only SesA catalyzes C1 transfer to THF with ring cleavage reaction among GcvT family proteins. Moreover, SesA homolog genes are found in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our findings provide new insights into microbial sesamin metabolism and the function of GcvT family proteins.

  6. Dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression: Impact of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, P; Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-04-30

    The brain astrocyte glycogen reservoir is a vital energy reserve and, in the cerebral cortex, subject among other factors to noradrenergic control. The ovarian steroid estradiol potently stimulates nerve cell aerobic respiration, but its role in glial glycogen metabolism during energy homeostasis or mismatched substrate supply/demand is unclear. This study examined the premise that estradiol regulates hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression during normo- and hypoglycemia in vivo through dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine (CA)-dependent mechanisms. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH), arcuate hypothalamic (ARH), and paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats after insulin or vehicle injection, and pooled within each site. Stimulation [VMH, LHA] or suppression [PVH, ARH] of basal glycogen synthase (GS) protein expression by E was reversed in the former three sites by caudal fourth ventricular pretreatment with the CA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). E diminished glycogen phosphorylase (GP) protein profiles by CA-dependent [VMH, PVH] or -independent mechanisms [LHA]. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) increased GS expression in the PVH in OVX+E, but reduced this protein in the PVH, ARH, and LHA in OVX+O. Moreover, IIH augmented GP expression in the VMH, LHA, and ARH in OVX+E and in the ARH in OVX+O, responses that normalized by 6-OHDA. Results demonstrate site-specific effects of E on astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression in the female rat hypothalamus, and identify locations where dorsomedial hindbrain CA input is required for such action. Evidence that E correspondingly increases and reduces basal GS and GP in the VMH and LHA, but augments the latter protein during IIH suggests that E regulates

  7. Sensor potency of the moonlighting enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton: the cytoskeleton as a metabolic sensor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence for the interaction of metabolic enzymes with the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The significance of these interactions is far from clear. Presentation of the hypothesis In the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis presented here, the cytoskeleton senses and integrates the general metabolic activity of the cell. This activity depends on the binding to the cytoskeleton of enzymes and, depending on the nature of the enzyme, this binding may occur if the enzyme is either active or inactive but not both. This enzyme-binding is further proposed to stabilize microtubules and microfilaments and to alter rates of GTP and ATP hydrolysis and their levels. Testing the hypothesis Evidence consistent with the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis is presented in the case of glycolysis. Several testable predictions are made. There should be a relationship between post-translational modifications of tubulin and of actin and their interaction with metabolic enzymes. Different conditions of cytoskeletal dynamics and enzyme-cytoskeleton binding should reveal significant differences in local and perhaps global levels and ratios of ATP and GTP. The different functions of moonlighting enzymes should depend on cytoskeletal binding. Implications of the hypothesis The physical and chemical effects arising from metabolic sensing by the cytoskeleton would have major consequences on cell shape, dynamics and cell cycle progression. The hypothesis provides a framework that helps the significance of the enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton be determined. PMID:23398642

  8. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  9. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  10. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. We report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis employing an exhaustive dataset of NAT-homologous sequences recovered through inspection of 2445 genomes. We describe ...

  11. Bottom-up Metabolic Reconstruction of Arabidopsis and Its Application to Determining the Metabolic Costs of Enzyme Production[W

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Anne; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale modeling of plant metabolism provides the possibility to compare and contrast different cellular and environmental scenarios with the ultimate aim of identifying the components underlying the respective plant behavior. The existing models of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are top-down assembled, whereby the starting point is the annotated genome, in particular, the metabolic genes. Hence, dead-end metabolites and blocked reactions can arise that are subsequently addressed by using gap-filling algorithms in combination with species-unspecific genes. Here, we present a bottom-up-assembled, large-scale model that relies solely on Arabidopsis-specific annotations and results in the inclusion of only manually curated reactions. While the existing models are largely condition unspecific by employing a single biomass reaction, we provide three biomass compositions that pertain to realistic and frequently examined scenarios: carbon-limiting, nitrogen-limiting, and optimal growth conditions. The comparative analysis indicates that the proposed Arabidopsis core model exhibits comparable efficiency in carbon utilization and flexibility to the existing network alternatives. Moreover, the model is utilized to quantify the energy demand of amino acid and enzyme de novo synthesis in photoautotrophic growth conditions. Illustrated by the case of the most abundant protein in the world, Rubisco, we determine its synthesis cost in terms of ATP requirements. This, in turn, allows us to explore the tradeoff between protein synthesis and growth in Arabidopsis. Altogether, the model provides a solid basis for completely species-specific integration of high-throughput data, such as gene expression levels, and for condition-specific investigations of in silico metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:24808102

  12. Metabolism of citral, the major constituent of lemongrass oil, in the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, and effects of enzyme inhibitors on toxicity and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tak, Jun-Hyung; Isman, Murray B

    2016-10-01

    Although screening for new and reliable sources of botanical insecticides remains important, finding ways to improve the efficacy of those already in use through better understanding of their modes-of-action or metabolic pathways, or by improving formulations, deserves greater attention as the latter may present lesser regulation hurdles. Metabolic processing of citral (a combination of the stereoisomers geranial and neral), a main constituent of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil has not been previously examined in insects. To address this, we investigated insecticidal activities of lemongrass oil and citral, as well as the metabolism of citral in larvae of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, in associations with well-known enzyme inhibitors. Among the inhibitors tested, piperonyl butoxide showed the highest increase in toxicity followed by triphenyl phosphate, but no synergistic interaction between the inhibitors was observed. Topical application of citral to fifth instar larvae produced mild reductions in food consumption, and frass analysis after 24h revealed geranic acid (99.7%) and neric acid (98.8%) as major metabolites of citral. Neither citral nor any other metabolites were found following in vivo analysis of larvae after 24h, and no significant effect of enzyme inhibitors was observed on diet consumption or citral metabolism.

  13. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression in aging humans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of foreign compounds, metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate these xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will...

  14. Development of radiometric assays for quantification of enzyme activities of the key enzymes of thyroid hormones metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, S

    2014-01-01

    We newly elaborated and adapted several radiometric enzyme assays for the determination of activities of the key enzymes engaged in the biosynthesis (thyroid peroxidase, TPO) and metabolic transformations (conjugating enzymes and iodothyronine deiodinases, IDs) of thyroid hormones (THs) in the thyroid gland and in peripheral tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT). We also elaborated novel, reliable radiometric methods for extremely sensitive determination of enzyme activities of IDs of types 1, 2 and 3 in microsomal fractions of different rat and human tissues, as well as in homogenates of cultured mammalian cells. The use of optimized TLC separation of radioactive products from the unconsumed substrates and film-less autoradiography of radiochromatograms, taking advantage of storage phosphor screens, enabled us to determine IDs enzyme activities as low as 10(-18) katals. In studies of the interaction of fluoxetine (Fluox) with the metabolism of THs, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT). Fluox is the most frequently used representative of a new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs--selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. We used the elaborated assays for quantification the effects of Fluox and for the assessment of the degree of potential induction of rat liver ST and/or UDP-GT enzyme activities by Fluox alone or in combination with T(3). Furthermore, we studied possible changes in IDs activities in murine adipose tissue under the conditions that promoted either tissue hypertrophy (obesogenic treatment) or involution (caloric restriction), and in response to leptin, using our newly developed radiometric enzyme assays for IDs. Our results suggest that deiodinase D1 has a functional role in WAT, with D1 possibly being involved in the control of adipose tissue metabolism and/or accumulation of the tissue. Significant positive correlation between

  15. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  16. Genome-wide identification of gibberellins metabolic enzyme genes and expression profiling analysis during seed germination in maize.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Guo, Baojian; Song, Fangwei; Peng, Huiru; Yao, Yingyin; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2011-08-15

    Gibberellin (GA) is an essential phytohormone that controls many aspects of plant development. To enhance our understanding of GA metabolism in maize, we intensively screened and identified 27 candidate genes encoding the seven GA metabolic enzymes including ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA 20-oxidase (GA20ox), GA 3-oxidase (GA3ox), and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox), using all available public maize databases. The results indicate that maize genome contains three CPS, four KS, two KO and one KAO genes, and most of them are arranged separately on the maize genome, which differs from that in rice. In addition, the enzymes catalyzing the later steps (ZmGA20ox, ZmGA3ox and ZmGA2ox) are also encoded by gene families in maize, but GA3ox enzyme is likely to be encoded by single gene. Expression profiling analysis exhibited that transcripts of 15 GA metabolic genes could be detected during maize seed germination, which provides further evidence for the notion that increased synthesis of active GA in the embryo is required for triggering germination events. Moreover, a variety of temporal genes expression patterns of GA metabolic genes were detected, which revealed the complexity of underlying mechanism for GA regulated seed germination.

  17. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  18. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dadinova, Liubov A.; Shtykova, Eleonora V.; Konarev, Petr V.; Rodina, Elena V.; Snalina, Natalia E.; Vorobyeva, Natalia N.; Kurilova, Svetlana A.; Nazarova, Tatyana I.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2016-01-01

    The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i) class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB); (ii) inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase); (iii) 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI); and (iv) glutamate decarboxylase (GadA). The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin) metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques. PMID:27227414

  19. Quercetin-metabolizing CYP6AS enzymes of the pollinator Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenfu; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G; Johnson, Reed M; Zangerl, Arthur R; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2009-12-01

    Although the honey bee (Apis mellifera) genome contains far fewer cytochrome P450 genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism than other insect genomes sequenced to date, the CYP6AS subfamily, apparently unique to hymenopterans, has undergone an expansion relative to the genome of the jewel wasp (Nasonia vitripennis). The relative dominance of this family in the honey bee genome is suggestive of a role in processing phytochemicals encountered by honey bees in their relatively unusual diet of honey (comprising concentrated processed nectar of many plant species) and bee bread (a mixture of honey and pollen from many plant species). In this study, quercetin was initially suggested as a shared substrate for CYP6AS1, CYP6AS3, and CYP6AS4, by its presence in honey, extracts of which induce transcription of these three genes, and by in silico substrate predictions based on a molecular model of CYP6AS3. Biochemical assays with heterologously expressed CYP6AS1, CYP6AS3, CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 enzymes subsequently confirmed their activity toward this substrate. CYP6AS1, CYP6AS3, CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 metabolize quercetin at rates of 0.5+/-0.1, 0.5+/-0.1, 0.2+/-0.1, and 0.2+/-0.1 pmol quercetin/ pmol P450/min, respectively. Substrate dockings and sequence alignments revealed that the positively charged amino acids His107 and Lys217 and the carbonyl group of the backbone between Leu302 and Ala303 are essential for quercetin orientation in the CYP6AS3 catalytic site and its efficient metabolism. Multiple replacements in the catalytic site of CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 and repositioning of the quercetin molecule likely account for the lower metabolic activities of CYP6AS4 and CYP6AS10 compared to CYP6AS1 and CYP6AS3.

  20. Mitigating role of baicalein on lysosomal enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme status during lung carcinogenesis of Swiss albino mice induced by benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Naveenkumar, Chandrashekar; Raghunandakumar, Subramanian; Asokkumar, Selvamani; Binuclara, John; Rajan, Balan; Premkumar, Thandavamoorthy; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2014-06-01

    The lungs mainly serve as a primary site for xenobiotic metabolism and constitute an important defense mechanism against inhalation of carcinogens. Our current study aimed to evaluate the chemotherapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) in Swiss albino mice exposed to tobacco-specific carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] for its ability to mitigate pulmonary carcinogenesis. Here, we report that altered activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes (cathepsin-D, cathepsin-B, acid phosphatase, β-D-galactosidase, β-D-glucuronidase, and β-D-N-acetyl glucosaminidase), phase I biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase), and phase II enzymes (glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronyl transferase, and DT-diaphorase) were observed in the B(a)P-induced mice. Treatment with BE significantly restored back the activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes, phase I and phase II biotransformation enzymes. Moreover, assessment of lysosomal abnormalities by transmission electron microscopic examination revealed that BE treatment effectively counteract B(a)P-induced oxidative damages. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot analysis of CYP1A1 revealed that BE treatment effectively negate B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of CYP1A1. Further analysis of scanning electron microscopic studies in lung was carried out to substantiate the anticarcinogenic effect of BE. The overall data suggest that BE treatment significantly inhibits lysosomal and microsomal dysfunction, thus revealing its potent anticarcinogenic effect.

  1. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  2. Reappraisal of the 20th-century version of amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Masayuki; Nakamura, Masahiko

    2003-12-05

    In this article, we advocate the radical revision of the 20th-century version of amino acid metabolism as follows. (1) Classic studies on the incorporation of [15N]ammonia into glutamate, once considered to be an epoch-making event, are not distinctive proof of the ability of animals to utilize ammonia for the synthesis of alpha-amino nitrogen. (2) Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase has been implicated to function as a glutamate-synthesizing enzyme albeit lack of convincing proof. This enzyme, in combination with aminotransferases, is now known to play an exclusive role in the metabolic removal of amino nitrogen and energy production from excess amino acids. (3) Dr. William C Rose's "nutritionally nonessential amino acids" are, of course, essential in cellular metabolism; the nutritional nonessentiality is related to their carbon skeletons, many of which are intermediates of glycolysis or the TCA cycle. Obviously, the prime importance of amino acid nutrition should be the means of obtaining amino nitrogen. (4) Because there is no evidence of the presence of any glutamate-synthesizing enzymes in mammalian tissues, animals must depend on plants and microorganisms for preformed alpha-amino nitrogen. This is analogous to the case of carbohydrates. (5) In contrast, individual essential amino acids, similar to vitamins and essential fatty acids, should be considered important nutrients that must be included regularly in sufficient amounts in the diet.

  3. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  4. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-06-19

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco.

  5. Adenosine deaminase deficiency with normal immune function. An acidic enzyme mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Mitchell, B S; Meuwissen, H J; Davidson, B L; Wilson, J M; Koller, C A

    1983-01-01

    In most instances, marked deficiency of the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase results in lymphopenia and severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Over a 2-yr period, we studied a white male child with markedly deficient erythrocyte and lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity and normal immune function. We have documented that (a) adenosine deaminase activity and immunoreactive protein are undetectable in erythrocytes, 0.9% of normal in lymphocytes, 4% in cultured lymphoblasts, and 14% in skin fibroblasts; (b) plasma adenosine and deoxyadenosine levels are undetectable and deoxy ATP levels are only slightly elevated in lymphocytes and in erythrocytes; (c) no defect in deoxyadenosine metabolism is present in the proband's cultured lymphoblasts; (d) lymphoblast adenosine deaminase has normal enzyme kinetics, absolute specific activity, S20,w, pH optimum, and heat stability; and (e) the proband's adenosine deaminase exhibits a normal apparent subunit molecular weight but an abnormal isoelectric pH. In contrast to the three other adenosine deaminase-deficient healthy subjects who have been described, the proband is unique in demonstrating an acidic, heat-stable protein mutation of the enzyme that is associated with less than 1% lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity. Residual adenosine deaminase activity in tissues other than lymphocytes may suffice to metabolize the otherwise lymphotoxic enzyme substrate(s) and account for the preservation of normal immune function. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6603477

  6. Innovative use of a bacterial enzyme involved in sialic acid degradation to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis in glycoengineered insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system is widely used for recombinant protein production, but it is suboptimal for recombinant glycoprotein production because it does not provide sialylation, which is an essential feature of many glycoprotein biologics. This problem has been addressed by metabolic engineering, which has extended endogenous insect cell N-glycosylation pathways and enabled glycoprotein sialylation by baculovirus/insect cell systems. However, further improvement is needed because even the most extensively engineered baculovirus/insect cell systems require media supplementation with N-acetylmannosamine, an expensive sialic acid precursor, for efficient recombinant glycoprotein sialylation. Our solution to this problem focused on E. coli N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate 2′-epimerase (GNPE), which normally functions in bacterial sialic acid degradation. Considering that insect cells have the product, but not the substrate for this enzyme, we hypothesized that GNPE might drive the reverse reaction in these cells, thereby initiating sialic acid biosynthesis in the absence of media supplementation. We tested this hypothesis by isolating transgenic insect cells expressing E. coli GNPE together with a suite of mammalian genes needed for N-glycoprotein sialylation. Various assays showed that these cells efficiently produced sialic acid, CMP-sialic acid, and sialylated recombinant N-glycoproteins even in growth media without N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, this study demonstrated that a eukaryotic recombinant protein production platform can be glycoengineered with a bacterial gene, that a bacterial enzyme which normally functions in sialic acid degradation can be used to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis, and that insect cells expressing this enzyme can produce sialylated N-glycoproteins without N-acetylmannosamine supplementation, which will reduce production costs in glycoengineered baculovirus/insect cell systems. PMID:23022569

  7. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  8. Role of cytochrome P-450 and related enzymes in the pulmonary metabolism of xenobiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Philpot, R M; Smith, B R

    1984-01-01

    The lung metabolizes a wide variety of xenobiotics and, in the process, forms products that may be more or less toxic than the parent compound. The consequence of metabolism, activation or detoxication, is a function of the nature of the substrate and of the characteristics and concentrations of the enzymes involved. As a result, the biotransformation of xenobiotics can lead to their excretion or to the formation of reactive products that produce deleterious effects by binding covalently to tissue macromolecules. Among the enzymes that metabolize xenobiotics, those associated with the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system are probably the most important. The route by which a given substrate is metabolized in a tissue or cell is, to a great extent, determined by the types and concentrations of cytochrome P-450 isozymes present. We are just beginning to understand the distribution of these enzymes in lung and to appreciate the species and cellular differences that exist. PMID:6376107

  9. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter S; Filippov, Mikhail; Dityatev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include chondroitinase ABC, heparin/heparan sulfate-mimicking oligosaccharides, ECM cross-linking antibodies, and drugs stimulating expression of ECM molecules. The amount or activity of ECM-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases can be modulated indirectly via the regulation of endogenous inhibitors like TIMPs and RECK or at the transcriptional and translational levels using, e.g., histone deacetylase inhibitors, synthetic inhibitors like Periostat, microRNA-interfering drugs like AC1MMYR2, and natural compounds like flavonoids, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, anacardic acid, and erythropoietin. Among drugs targeting the major ECM receptors, integrins, are the anticancer peptide cilengitide and anti-integrin antibodies, which have a potential for treatment of stroke, multiple sclerosis, and AD. The latter can be also potentially treated with modulators of CAMs, such as peptide mimetics derived from L1-CAM and NCAM1.

  10. Polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzymes, fish intake, and risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Catsburg, Chelsea; Joshi, Amit D; Corral, Román; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Koo, Jocelyn; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Stern, Mariana C

    2012-07-01

    Cooking fish at high temperature can produce potent carcinogens such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effects of these carcinogens may undergo modification by the enzymes responsible for their detoxification and/or activation. In this study, we investigated genetic polymorphisms in nine carcinogen metabolism enzymes and their modifying effects on the association between white or dark fish consumption and prostate cancer (PCA) risk. We genotyped 497 localized and 936 advanced PCA cases and 760 controls from the California Collaborative Case-Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Three polymorphisms, EPHX1 Tyr113His, CYP1B1 Leu432Val and GSTT1 null/present, were associated with localized PCA risk. The PTGS2 765 G/C polymorphism modified the association between white fish consumption and advanced PCA risk (interaction P 5 0.002), with high white fish consumption being positively associated with risk only among carriers of the C allele. This effect modification by PTGS2 genotype was stronger when restricted to consumption of well-done white fish (interaction P 5 0.021). These findings support the hypotheses that changes in white fish brought upon by high-temperature cooking methods, such as carcinogen accumulation and/or fatty acid composition changes, may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. However, the gene-diet interactions should be interpreted with caution given the limited sample size. Thus, our findings require further validation with additional studies.

  11. Computational Prediction of Metabolism: Sites, Products, SAR, P450 Enzyme Dynamics, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism of xenobiotics remains a central challenge for the discovery and development of drugs, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and agrochemicals. Metabolic transformations are frequently related to the incidence of toxic effects that may result from the emergence of reactive species, the systemic accumulation of metabolites, or by induction of metabolic pathways. Experimental investigation of the metabolism of small organic molecules is particularly resource demanding; hence, computational methods are of considerable interest to complement experimental approaches. This review provides a broad overview of structure- and ligand-based computational methods for the prediction of xenobiotic metabolism. Current computational approaches to address xenobiotic metabolism are discussed from three major perspectives: (i) prediction of sites of metabolism (SOMs), (ii) elucidation of potential metabolites and their chemical structures, and (iii) prediction of direct and indirect effects of xenobiotics on metabolizing enzymes, where the focus is on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes, the cardinal xenobiotics metabolizing enzymes. For each of these domains, a variety of approaches and their applications are systematically reviewed, including expert systems, data mining approaches, quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs), and machine learning-based methods, pharmacophore-based algorithms, shape-focused techniques, molecular interaction fields (MIFs), reactivity-focused techniques, protein–ligand docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and combinations of methods. Predictive metabolism is a developing area, and there is still enormous potential for improvement. However, it is clear that the combination of rapidly increasing amounts of available ligand- and structure-related experimental data (in particular, quantitative data) with novel and diverse simulation and modeling approaches is accelerating the development of effective tools for

  12. Improving Fatty Acid Availability for Bio-Hydrocarbon Production in Escherichia coli by Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fengming; Chen, Yu; Levine, Robert; Lee, Kilho; Yuan, Yingjin; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of producing fatty-acid-derived hydrocarbons in Escherichia coli. However, product titers and yields remain low. In this work, we demonstrate new methods for improving fatty acid production by modifying central carbon metabolism and storing fatty acids in triacylglycerol. Based on suggestions from a computational model, we deleted seven genes involved in aerobic respiration, mixed-acid fermentation, and glyoxylate bypass (in the order of cyoA, nuoA, ndh, adhE, dld, pta, and iclR) to modify the central carbon metabolic/regulatory networks. These gene deletions led to increased total fatty acids, which were the highest in the mutants containing five or six gene knockouts. Additionally, when two key enzymes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway were over-expressed, we observed further increase in strain △cyoA△adhE△nuoA△ndh△pta△dld, leading to 202 mg/g dry cell weight of total fatty acids, ~250% of that in the wild-type strain. Meanwhile, we successfully introduced a triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway into E. coli through heterologous expression of wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) enzymes. The added pathway improved both the amount and fuel quality of the fatty acids. These new metabolic engineering strategies are providing promising directions for future investigation. PMID:24147139

  13. Polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and susceptibility to cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, A

    1999-01-01

    The variation in individual responses to exogenous agents is exceptionally wide. It is because of this large diversity of responsiveness that risk factors to environmentally induced diseases have been difficult to pinpoint, particularly at low exposure levels. Opportunities now exist for studies of host factors in cancer or other diseases in which an environmental component can be presumed. Many of the studies have shown an elevated disease proneness for individuals carrying the potential at-risk alleles of metabolic genes, but a number of controversial results have also been reported. This article is an overview of the data published to date on metabolic genotypes related to individual susceptibility to cancer. PMID:10229705

  14. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  15. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  16. Interaction of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and methamphetamine during metabolism by in vitro human metabolic enzymes and in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-01

    Illicit amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) tablets commonly contain one or more active ingredients, which have hallucinogenic and/or stimulant effects. Because components such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (MA) in ATS tablets have similar chemical structures, they could be metabolized by common metabolic enzymes. To investigate potential metabolic interactions of ATS tablet components, we studied the in vitro metabolism of MDMA and MA using human metabolic enzymes. MDMA and MA were mainly metabolized by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) and mutually inhibited the production of their main metabolites. In vivo experiments were also performed using intravenous administration of MDMA, MA, or their mixture to rats. The plasma concentrations of MDMA and MA after co-administration were higher than those after administration of MDMA or MA alone. The results in this study imply that multiple components in ATS tablets can interact to mutually inhibit their metabolism and potentially enhance the toxicity of each component.

  17. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia.

  18. Metabolic cold adaptation in fishes occurs at the level of whole animal, mitochondria and enzyme.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Alton, Lesley A; Frappell, Peter B

    2012-05-07

    Metabolic cold adaptation (MCA), the hypothesis that species from cold climates have relatively higher metabolic rates than those from warm climates, was first proposed nearly 100 years ago and remains one of the most controversial hypotheses in physiological ecology. In the present study, we test the MCA hypothesis in fishes at the level of whole animal, mitochondria and enzyme. In support of the MCA hypothesis, we find that when normalized to a common temperature, species with ranges that extend to high latitude (cooler climates) have high aerobic enzyme (citrate synthase) activity, high rates of mitochondrial respiration and high standard metabolic rates. Metabolic compensation for the global temperature gradient is not complete however, so when measured at their habitat temperature species from high latitude have lower absolute rates of metabolism than species from low latitudes. Evolutionary adaptation and thermal plasticity are therefore insufficient to completely overcome the acute thermodynamic effects of temperature, at least in fishes.

  19. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  20. The rabbit pulmonary cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolic pathway: characterization and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, D C; Plitman, J D; Kobayashi, J; Miller, R F; Snapper, J R; Falck, J R; Szarek, J L; Philpot, R M; Capdevila, J H

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolizes arachidonic acid to several unique and biologically active compounds in rabbit liver and kidney. Microsomal fractions prepared from rabbit lung homogenates metabolized arachidonic acid through cytochrome P450 pathways, yielding cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their hydration products, vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, mid-chain cis-trans conjugated dienols, and 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Inhibition studies using polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified CYP2B4 demonstrated 100% inhibition of arachidonic acid epoxide formation. Purified CYP2B4, reconstituted in the presence of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5, metabolized arachidonic acid, producing primarily EETs. EETs were detected in lung homogenate using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, providing evidence for the in vivo pulmonary cytochrome P450 epoxidation of arachidonic acid. Chiral analysis of these lung EETs demonstrated a preference for the 14(R),15(S)-, 11(S),12(R)-, and 8(S),9(R)-EET enantiomers. Both EETs and vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. At micromolar concentrations, methylated 5,6-EET and 8,9-EET significantly relaxed histamine-contracted guinea pig hilar bronchi in vitro. In contrast, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid caused contraction to near maximal tension. We conclude that CYP2B4, an abundant rabbit lung cytochrome P450 enzyme, is the primary constitutive pulmonary arachidonic acid epoxygenase and that these locally produced, biologically active eicosanoids may be involved in maintaining homeostasis within the lung. Images PMID:7738183

  1. Characterization of the metabolic interaction between trihalomethanes and chloroacetic acids using rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Annie; Krishnan, Kannan; Tardif, Robert

    2005-02-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro metabolism of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the presence of trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloracetic acid (DCA), monochloroacetic acid (MCA), and 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) using liver microsomes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using the vial equilibration technique, initial experiments were carried out with starting concentrations of approximately 40 ppm THMs and 12-22 mM chloroacetic acids. The results indicated a mutual metabolic inhibition between THMs present as binary or quaternary mixtures. Although DCA and MCA had no influence on THMs, TCA produced a marked inhibition of the metabolism of all THMs: chloroform (CHCl3) (55%), bromodichloromethane (BDCM) (34%), dibromochloromethane (DBCM) (30%), and bromoform (TBM) (23%). The presence of 4-MP also reduced THM metabolism, the importance of which decreased in the following order: CHCl3 > BDCM > DBCM = TBM. In further vial equilibration experiments, using 9-140 ppm as starting concentrations of THMs, enzyme kinetic parameters (i.e., Michaelis constant, K(m), and maximum velocity, V(max)) were determined both in the absence and in the presence of TCA (12.2 mM). Results are consistent with a competitive inhibition between TCA and CHCl3, whereas the metabolic inhibition of BDCM and TMB by TCA was non-competitive. As for DBCM, results suggest a more complex pattern of inhibition. These results suggest that CYP2E1 is involved in the metabolism of THMs as well as in the metabolic interaction between THMs and TCA.

  2. Persistent Overexpression of Phosphoglycerate Mutase, a Glycolytic Enzyme, Modifies Energy Metabolism and Reduces Stress Resistance of Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shioi, Tetsuo; Kato, Takao; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Tamaki, Yodo; Kawamoto, Akira; Tanada, Yohei; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Narazaki, Michiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Adachi, Souichi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Takemura, Genzou; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure is associated with changes in cardiac energy metabolism. Glucose metabolism in particular is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of heart failure. We examined the effects of persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (Pgam2), a glycolytic enzyme, on cardiac energy metabolism and function. Methods and Results Transgenic mice constitutively overexpressing Pgam2 in a heart-specific manner were generated, and cardiac energy metabolism and function were analyzed. Cardiac function at rest was normal. The uptake of analogs of glucose or fatty acids and the phosphocreatine/βATP ratio at rest were normal. A comprehensive metabolomic analysis revealed an increase in the levels of a few metabolites immediately upstream and downstream of Pgam2 in the glycolytic pathway, whereas the levels of metabolites in the initial few steps of glycolysis and lactate remained unchanged. The levels of metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were altered. The capacity for respiration by isolated mitochondria in vitro was decreased, and that for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro was increased. Impaired cardiac function was observed in response to dobutamine. Mice developed systolic dysfunction upon pressure overload. Conclusions Constitutive overexpression of Pgam2 modified energy metabolism and reduced stress resistance of heart in mice. PMID:23951293

  3. Chemical characterization, antioxidant and inhibitory effects of some marine sponges against carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 15,000 marine products have been described up to now; Sponges are champion producers, concerning the diversity of products that have been found. Most bioactive compounds from sponges were classified into anti-inflammatory, antitumor, immuno- or neurosurpressive, antiviral, antimalarial, antibiotic, or antifouling. Evaluation of in vitro inhibitory effects of different extracts from four marine sponges versus some antioxidants indices and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes concerned with diabetes mellitus was studied. The chemical characterizations for the extracts of the predominating sponges; SP1 and SP3 were discussed. Methods All chemicals served in the biological study were of analytical grade and purchased from Sigma, Merck and Aldrich. All kits were the products of Biosystems (Spain), Sigma Chemical Company (USA), Biodiagnostic (Egypt). Carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes; α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and β-galactosidase (EC3.2.1.1, EC3.2.1.20, and EC3.2.1.23, respectively) were obtained from Sigma Chemical Company (USA). Results Four marine sponges; Smenospongia (SP1), Callyspongia (SP2), Niphates (SP3), and Stylissa (SP4), were collected from the Red Sea at Egyptian coasts, and taxonomically characterized. The sponges' extracts exhibited diverse inhibitory effects on oxidative stress indices and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in linear relationships to some extent with concentration of inhibitors (dose dependant). The extracts of sponges (3, 1, and 2) showed, respectively, potent-reducing power. Purification and Chemical characterization of sponge 1 using NMR and mass spectroscopy, recognized the existence of di-isobutyl phthalate (1), di-n-butyl phthalate (2), linoleic acid (3), β-sitosterol (4), and cholesterol (5). Sponge 3 produced bis-[2-ethyl]-hexyl-phthylester (6) and triglyceride fatty acid ester (7). Conclusion Marine sponges are promising sources for delivering of bioactive compounds. Four marine sponges, collected from

  4. Correlation-based network analysis of metabolite and enzyme profiles reveals a role of citrate biosynthesis in modulating N and C metabolism in zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their ...

  5. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in cells used for testing skin sensitization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Vogel, D; Blatz, V; Ramirez, T; Kolle, S; Eltze, T; van Ravenzwaay, B; Oesch, F; Landsiedel, R

    2013-09-01

    For ethical and regulatory reasons, in vitro tests for scoring potential toxicities of cosmetics are essential. A test strategy for investigating potential skin sensitization using two human keratinocytic and two human dendritic cell lines has been developed (Mehling et al. Arch Toxicol 86:1273–1295, 2012). Since prohaptens may be metabolically activated in the skin, information on xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) activities in these cell lines is of high interest. In this study, XME activity assays, monitoring metabolite or cofactor, showed the following: all three passages of keratinocytic (KeratinoSens® and LuSens) and dendritic (U937 und THP-1) cells displayed N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) activities (about 6–60 nmol/min/mg S9-protein for acetylation of para-aminobenzoic acid). This is relevant since reactive species of many cosmetics are metabolically controlled by cutaneous NAT1. Esterase activities of about 1–4 nmol fluorescein diacetate/min/mg S9-protein were observed in all passages of investigated keratinocytic and about 1 nmol fluorescein diacetate/min/mg S9-protein in dendritic cell lines. This is also of practical relevance since many esters and amides are detoxified and others activated by cutaneous esterases. In both keratinocytic cell lines, activities of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) were observed (5–17 nmol product/min/mg cytosolic protein). ALDH is relevant for the detoxication of reactive aldehydes. Activities of several other XME were below detection, namely the investigated cytochrome P450-dependent alkylresorufin O-dealkylases 7-ethylresorufin O-deethylase, 7-benzylresorufin O-debenzylase and 7-pentylresorufin O-depentylase (while NADPH cytochrome c reductase activities were much above the limit of quantification), the flavin-containing monooxygenase, the alcohol dehydrogenase as well as the UDP glucuronosyl transferase activities.

  6. Ketone Body Metabolic Enzyme OXCT1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    was upregulated in a subset of patients and the upregulation was associated with chemotherapy resistance. In vitro analysis showed that OXCT1 was...hypothesis that OXCT1 plays important role prostate cancer chemotherapy sensitivity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS chemosensitivity, OXCT1, docetaxel...prostate cancer resistance to docetaxel-based chemotherapy has never been tested. OXCT1 encodes the rate limiting enzyme converting ketone bodies to

  7. Upregulated expression of brain enzymatic markers of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid metabolism in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In animal models, the metabolic syndrome elicits a cerebral response characterized by altered phospholipid and unesterified fatty acid concentrations and increases in pro-apoptotic inflammatory mediators that may cause synaptic loss and cognitive impairment. We hypothesized that these changes are associated with phospholipase (PLA2) enzymes that regulate arachidonic (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6n-6) acid metabolism, major polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain. Male Wistar rats were fed a control or high-sucrose diet for 8 weeks. Brains were assayed for markers of AA metabolism (calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 IVA and cyclooxygenases), DHA metabolism (calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA and lipoxygenases), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptic integrity (drebrin and synaptophysin). Lipid concentrations were measured in brains subjected to high-energy microwave fixation. Results The high-sucrose compared with control diet induced insulin resistance, and increased phosphorylated-cPLA2 protein, cPLA2 and iPLA2 activity and 12-lipoxygenase mRNA, but decreased BDNF mRNA and protein, and drebrin mRNA. The concentration of several n-6 fatty acids in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and lysophosphatidylcholine was increased, as was unesterified AA concentration. Eicosanoid concentrations (prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2 and leukotriene B4) did not change. Conclusion These findings show upregulated brain AA and DHA metabolism and reduced BDNF and drebrin, but no changes in eicosanoids, in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome. These changes might contribute to altered synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairment in rats and humans with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:23110484

  8. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  9. Metabolism of Cyclohexane Carboxylic Acid by Alcaligenes Strain W1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David G.; Trudgill, Peter W.

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-three microorganisms capable of growth with cyclohexane carboxylate as the sole source of carbon were isolated from mud, water, and soil samples from the Aberystwyth area. Preliminary screening and whole-cell oxidation studies suggested that, with one exception, all of the strains metabolized the growth substrate by beta-oxidation of the coenzyme A ester. This single distinctive strain, able to oxidize rapidly trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate, 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and protocatechuate when grown with cyclohexane carboxylate, was classified as a strain of Alcaligenes and given the number W1. Enzymes capable of converting cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate were induced by growth with the alicyclic acid and included the first unambiguous specimen of a cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase. Because it is a very fragile protein, attempts to stabilize the cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase so that a purification procedure could be developed have consistently failed. In limited studies with crude cell extracts, we found that hydroxylation occurred at the 4 position, probably yielding the trans isomer of 4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidation, coupled with an assessment of reactant stoichiometry, showed the enzyme to be a mixed-function oxygenase. Mass spectral analysis enabled the conversion of cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate by cell extracts to be established unequivocally, and all of our data were consistent with the pathway: cyclohexane carboxylate → trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate → 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate → p-hydroxybenzoate. The further metabolism of p-hydroxybenzoate proceeded by meta fission and by the oxidative branch of the 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconic semialde-hyde-cleaving pathway. PMID:207665

  10. Metabolic Fate of Unsaturated Glucuronic/Iduronic Acids from Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Takase, Ryuichi; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans in mammalian extracellular matrices are degraded to their constituents, unsaturated uronic (glucuronic/iduronic) acids and amino sugars, through successive reactions of bacterial polysaccharide lyase and unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase. Genes coding for glycosaminoglycan-acting lyase, unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase, and the phosphotransferase system are assembled into a cluster in the genome of pathogenic bacteria, such as streptococci and clostridia. Here, we studied the streptococcal metabolic pathway of unsaturated uronic acids and the structure/function relationship of its relevant isomerase and dehydrogenase. Two proteins (gbs1892 and gbs1891) of Streptococcus agalactiae strain NEM316 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. 4-Deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate (Dhu) nonenzymatically generated from unsaturated uronic acids was converted to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate via 3-deoxy-d-glycero-2,5-hexodiulosonate through successive reactions of gbs1892 isomerase (DhuI) and gbs1891 NADH-dependent reductase/dehydrogenase (DhuD). DhuI and DhuD enzymatically corresponded to 4-deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate ketol-isomerase (KduI) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate dehydrogenase (KduD), respectively, involved in pectin metabolism, although no or low sequence identity was observed between DhuI and KduI or between DhuD and KduD, respectively. Genes for DhuI and DhuD were found to be included in the streptococcal genetic cluster, whereas KduI and KduD are encoded in clostridia. Tertiary and quaternary structures of DhuI and DhuD were determined by x-ray crystallography. Distinct from KduI β-barrels, DhuI adopts an α/β/α-barrel structure as a basic scaffold similar to that of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase. The structure of DhuD is unable to accommodate the substrate/cofactor, suggesting that conformational changes are essential to trigger enzyme catalysis. This is the first report on the bacterial metabolism of

  11. Exploiting the Genetic Diversity of Maize using a Combined Metabolomic, Enzyme Activity Profiling, and Metabolic Modelling Approach to Link Leaf Physiology to Kernel Yield.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Rafael A; Yesbergenova-Cuny, Zhazira; Simons, Margaret; Chardon, Fabien; Armengaud, Patrick; Quilleré, Isabelle; Cukier, Caroline; Gibon, Yves; Limami, Anis M; Nicolas, Stéphane D; Brulé, Lénaïg; Lea, Peter J; Maranas, Costas D; Hirel, Bertrand

    2017-04-10

    A combined metabolomic, biochemical, fluxomic, and metabolic modelling approach was developed using nineteen genetically distant maize (Zea mays L.) lines from Europe and America. Considerable differences were detected between the lines when leaf metabolic profiles and activities of the main enzymes involved in primary metabolism were compared. During grain filling, the leaf metabolic composition appeared to be a reliable marker, allowing a classification matching the genetic diversity of the lines. During the same period, there was a significant correlation between the genetic distance of the lines and the activities of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, notably glycolysis. Although large differences were observed in terms of leaf metabolic fluxes, these variations were not tightly linked to the genome structure of the lines. Both correlation studies and metabolic network analyses allowed the description of a maize ideotype with a high grain yield potential. Such an ideotype is characterized by low accumulation of soluble amino acids and carbohydrates in the leaves and high activity of enzymes involved in the C4 photosynthetic pathway and in the biosynthesis of amino acids derived from glutamate. Chlorogenates appear to be important markers that can be used to select for maize lines that produce larger kernels.

  12. Proteomic analysis of B-aminobutyric acid priming and aba-induction of drought resistance in crabapple (Malus pumila): effect on general metabolism, the phenylpropanoid pathway and cell wall enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a variety of annual crops and model plants, the xenobiotic compound, DL-beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA), has been shown to enhance disease resistance and increase salt, drought, and thermotolerance. BABA does not activate stress genes directly but rather sensitizes plants to respond more quickly a...

  13. Metabolic engineering as a tool for enhanced lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Bikram P; DeVeaux, Linda C; Christopher, Lew P

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic engineering is a powerful biotechnological tool that finds, among others, increased use in constructing microbial strains for higher lactic acid productivity, lower costs and reduced pollution. Engineering the metabolic pathways has concentrated on improving the lactic acid fermentation parameters, enhancing the acid tolerance of production organisms and their abilities to utilize a broad range of substrates, including fermentable biomass-derived sugars. Recent efforts have focused on metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria as they produce high yields and have a small genome size that facilitates their genetic manipulation. We summarize here the current trends in metabolic engineering techniques and strategies for manipulating lactic acid producing organisms developed to address and overcome major challenges in the lactic acid production process.

  14. Obesity diabetes and the role of bile acids in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bile acids have many activities over and above their primary function in aiding absorption of fat and fat soluble vitamins. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol, and thus are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Bile acids stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) production in the distal small bowel and colon, stimulating insulin secretion, and therefore, are involved in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Bile acids through their insulin sensitising effect play a part in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Bile acid metabolism is altered in obesity and diabetes. Both dietary restriction and weight loss due to bariatric surgery, alter the lipid carbohydrate and bile acid metabolism. Recent research suggests that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO is a central regulator of bile, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism, but conflicting studies mean that our understanding of the complexity is not yet complete. PMID:28191525

  15. Foliar and Seed Application of Amino Acids Affects the Antioxidant Metabolism of the Soybean Crop

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Walquíria F.; Fagan, Evandro B.; Soares, Luís H.; Umburanas, Renan C.; Reichardt, Klaus; Neto, Durval D.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the application of natural substances on crops has been intensified in order to increase the resistance and yield of the soybean crop. Among these products are included plant biostimulants that may contain algae extracts, amino acids, and plant regulators in their composition. However, there is little information on the isolated effect of each of these constituents. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of the application of isolated amino acids on the antioxidant metabolism of the soybean crop. Experiments were carried out in a greenhouse and in the field with the application of the amino acids glutamate, phenylalanine, cysteine, glycine in seed treatment, and foliar application at V4 growth stage. Antioxidant metabolism constituents evaluated were superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, hydrogen peroxide content, proline, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, resistance enzymes as polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were evaluated. In both experiments, the use of cysteine, only in seed treatment and in both seed treatment and foliar application increased the activity of the enzyme PAL and catalase. Also in both experiments, the use of phenylalanine increased the activity of the enzyme PAL when the application was carried out as foliar application or both in seed treatment and foliar application. In the field experiment, the application of glutamate led to an increase in the activity of the catalase and PAL enzymes for seed treatment and foliar application. The use of the set of amino acids was only efficient in foliar application, which led to a greater activity of the enzymes peroxidase, PAL, and polyphenol oxidase. The other enzymes as well as lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide presented different results according to the experiment. Therefore, glutamate, cysteine, phenylalanine, and glycine can act as signaling amino acids in soybean plants, since small doses are enough to increase the activity

  16. The role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during Giardia – host cell interactions in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid important in growing individuals and under non-homeostatic conditions/disease. Many pathogens interfere with arginine-utilization in host cells, especially nitric oxide (NO) production, by changing the expression of host enzymes involved in arginine metabolism. Here we used human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and three different isolates of the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis to investigate the role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during intestinal protozoan infections. Results RNA expression analyses of major arginine-metabolizing enzymes revealed the arginine-utilizing pathways in human IECs (differentiated Caco-2 cells) grown in vitro. Most genes were constant or down-regulated (e.g. arginase 1 and 2) upon interaction with Giardia, whereas inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were up-regulated within 6 h of infection. Giardia was shown to suppress cytokine-induced iNOS expression, thus the parasite has both iNOS inducing and suppressive activities. Giardial arginine consumption suppresses NO production and the NO-degrading parasite protein flavohemoglobin is up-regulated in response to host NO. In addition, the secreted, arginine-consuming giardial enzyme arginine deiminase (GiADI) actively reduces T-cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, the effects on NO production and T cell proliferation could be reversed by addition of external arginine or citrulline. Conclusions Giardia affects the host’s arginine metabolism on many different levels. Many of the effects can be reversed by addition of arginine or citrulline, which could be a beneficial supplement in oral rehydration therapy. PMID:24228819

  17. The function of oxalic acid in the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel Stewart

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions in cells which involve oxalic acid are described. It is shown that this compound is required for the formation of uracil and orotic acid. The former is a component of RNA which is common to all cells in the human metabolism. On the basis of the biochemical reactions described a possible treatment to relieve the effects of calcium oxalate renal calculi whose origin is related to the metabolic concentration of oxalic acid is proposed.

  18. Relevance of induction of human drug-metabolizing enzymes: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    PubMed Central

    PARK, B. K.; KITTERINGHAM, N. R.; PIRMOHAMED, M.; TUCKER, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    1Human drug-metabolizing systems can be induced, or activated, by a large number of exogenous agents including drugs, alcohol, components in the diet and cigarette smoke, as well as by endogenous factors. 2Such perturbation of enzyme activity undoubtedly contributes to both intra- and inter-individual variation both with respect to the rate and route of metabolism for a particular drug. Induction may, in theory, either attenuate the pharmacological response or exacerbate the toxicity of a particular drug, or both. 3The clinical impact of enzyme induction will depend upon the number of different enzyme isoforms affected and the magnitude of the inductive response within an individual, and also on the therapeutic indices of the affected substrates. 4The toxicological implications will be determined either by any change in the route of metabolism, or by a disturbance of the balance between activation and detoxication processes, which may be isozyme selective. PMID:8799511

  19. CO2 Metabolism in Corn Roots. II. Intracellular Distribution of Enzymes 1

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Jean; Ting, Irwin P.

    1967-01-01

    Three enzymes assumed to mediate CO2 metabolism in corn root tips, P-enolpyruvate carboxylase, malic dehydrogenase, and the malic enzyme, were extracted to determine their relative specific activities and their partitioning between soluble and particulate fractions. The data indicated that the intracellular location of these 3 enzymes is nonparticulate and thus these enzymatic reactions of CO2 metabolism are apparently nonparticulate. The soluble malic dehydrogenase fraction differed from the particulate fraction in several kinetic properties, viz., response to the thionicotinamide analog of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide, oxaloacetate substrate inhibition at pH 8.3, and Km's for nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide and l-malate. It was concluded that the soluble-malic dehydrogenase differed from the particulate forms in both structure and function. The soluble malic dehydrogenase is apparently involved in CO2 metabolism. PMID:16656561

  20. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Kye Sook; Kang, Keon Wook; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ki Ho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2011-08-15

    Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, it remains to be determined whether changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism occur in cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutic medications. We compared expression/activity of sulfur amino acid metabolizing enzymes and cellular levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites between normal MCF-7 cells and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Adr) cells. The S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in MCF-7/Adr cells decreased to {approx} 10% relative to that in MCF-7 cells, which may have resulted from down-regulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Expression of homocysteine-clearing enzymes, such as cystathionine beta-synthase, methionine synthase/methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, was up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells, suggesting that acquiring doxorubicin resistance attenuated methionine-dependence and activated transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine. Homocysteine was similar, which is associated with a balance between the increased expressions of homocysteine-clearing enzymes and decreased extracellular homocysteine. Despite an elevation in cysteine, cellular GSH decreased in MCF-7/Adr cells, which was attributed to over-efflux of GSH into the medium and down-regulation of the GSH synthesis enzyme. Consequently, MCF-7/Adr cells were more sensitive to the oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione than MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target for chemoresistant cancer cells. These results warrant further investigations to determine the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in acquiring anticancer drug resistance in cancer cells using chemical and biological regulators involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. - Research Highlights: > MCF-7/Adr cells showed decreases in cellular GSH

  1. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

  2. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP .

  3. Key Residues Controlling Phenacetin Metabolism By Human Cytochrome P450 2A Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, N.M.; Smith, B.D.; Urban, M.J.; Scott, E.E.

    2009-05-14

    Although the human lung cytochrome P450 2A13 (CYP2A13) and its liver counterpart cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) are 94% identical in amino acid sequence, they metabolize a number of substrates with substantially different efficiencies. To determine differences in binding for a diverse set of cytochrome P450 2A ligands, we have measured the spectral binding affinities (K{sub D}) for nicotine, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), coumarin, 2{prime}-methoxyacetophenone (MAP), and 8-methoxypsoralen. The differences in the K{sub D} values for CYP2A6 versus CYP2A13 ranged from 74-fold for 2{prime}-methoxyacetophenone to 1.1-fold for coumarin, with CYP2A13 demonstrating the higher affinity. To identify active site amino acids responsible for the differences in binding of MAP, PEITC, and coumarin, 10 CYP2A13 mutant proteins were generated in which individual amino acids from the CYP2A6 active site were substituted into CYP2A13 at the corresponding position. Titrations revealed that substitutions at positions 208, 300, and 301 individually had the largest effects on ligand binding. The collective relevance of these amino acids to differential ligand selectivity was verified by evaluating binding to CYP2A6 mutant enzymes that incorporate several of the CYP2A13 amino acids at these positions. Inclusion of four CYP2A13 amino acids resulted in a CYP2A6 mutant protein (I208S/I300F/G301A/S369G) with binding affinities for MAP and PEITC much more similar to those observed for CYP2A13 than to those for CYP2A6 without altering coumarin binding. The structure-based quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis using COMBINE successfully modeled the observed mutant-ligand trends and emphasized steric roles for active site residues including four substituted amino acids and an adjacent conserved Leu{sup 370}.

  4. Assembly and multiple gene expression of thermophilic enzymes in Escherichia coli for in vitro metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Pham Huynh; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In vitro reconstitution of an artificial metabolic pathway is an emerging approach for the biocatalytic production of industrial chemicals. However, several enzymes have to be separately prepared (and purified) for the construction of an in vitro metabolic pathway, thereby limiting the practical applicability of this approach. In this study, genes encoding the nine thermophilic enzymes involved in a non-ATP-forming chimeric glycolytic pathway were assembled in an artificial operon and co-expressed in a single recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Gene expression levels of the thermophilic enzymes were controlled by their sequential order in the artificial operon. The specific activities of the recombinant enzymes in the cell-free extract of the multiple-gene-expression E. coli were 5.0-1,370 times higher than those in an enzyme cocktail prepared from a mixture of single-gene-expression strains, in each of which a single one of the nine thermophilic enzymes was overproduced. Heat treatment of a crude extract of the multiple-gene-expression cells led to the denaturation of indigenous proteins and one-step preparation of an in vitro synthetic pathway comprising only a limited number of thermotolerant enzymes. Coupling this in vitro pathway with other thermophilic enzymes including the H2 O-forming NADH oxidase or the malate/lactate dehydrogenase facilitated one-pot conversion of glucose to pyruvate or lactate, respectively.

  5. New glycyl radical enzymes catalysing key metabolic steps in anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Selmer, Thorsten; Pierik, Antonio J; Heider, Johann

    2005-10-01

    During the last decade, an increasing number of new enzymes containing glycyl radicals in their active sites have been identified and biochemically characterised. These include benzylsuccinate synthase (Bss), 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (Hpd) and the coenzyme B12-independent glycerol dehydratase (Gdh). These are involved in metabolic pathways as different as anaerobic toluene metabolism, fermentative production of p-cresol and glycerol fermentation. Some features of these newly discovered enzymes are described and compared with those of the previously known glycyl radical enzymes pyruvate formate-lyase (Pfl) and anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase (Nrd). Among the new enzymes, Bss and Hpd share the presence of small subunits, the function of which in the catalytic mechanisms is still enigmatic, and both enzymes contain metal centres in addition to the glycyl radical prosthetic group. The activating enzymes of the novel systems also deviate from the standard type, containing at least one additional Fe-S cluster. Finally, the available whole-genome sequences of an increasing number of strictly or facultative anaerobic bacteria revealed the presence of many more hitherto unknown glycyl radical enzyme (GRE) systems. Recent studies suggest that the particular types of these enzymes represent the ends of different evolutionary lines, which emerged early in evolution and diversified to yield remarkably versatile biocatalysts for chemical reactions that are otherwise difficult to perform in anoxic environments.

  6. Metabolic Inflexibility with Obesity and the Effects of Fenofibrate on Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kristen E; Friedman, Jacob E; Janssen, Rachel C; Underkofler, Chantal; Houmard, Joseph A; Rasouli, Neda

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate mechanisms of lipid metabolic inflexibility in human obesity and the ability of fenofibrate (FENO) to increase skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in primary human skeletal muscle cell cultures (HSkMC) exhibiting metabolic inflexibility. HSkMC from 10 lean and 10 obese, insulin resistant subjects were treated with excess fatty acid for 24 h (24hFA) to gauge lipid-related metabolic flexibility. Metabolically inflexible HSkMC from obese individuals were then treated with 24hFA in combination with FENO to determine effectiveness for increasing FAO. Mitochondrial enzyme activity and FAO were measured in skeletal muscle from subjects with prediabetes (n=11) before and after 10 weeks of fenofibrate in vivo. 24hFA increased FAO to a greater extent in HSkMC from lean versus obese subjects (+49% vs. +9%, for lean vs. obese, respectively; p<0.05) indicating metabolic inflexibility with obesity. Metabolic inflexibility was not observed for measures of cellular respiration in permeabilized cells using carbohydrate substrate. Fenofibrate co-incubation with 24hFA, increased FAO in a subset of HSkMC from metabolically inflexible, obese subjects (p<0.05), which was eliminated by PPARα antagonist. In vivo, fenofibrate treatment increased skeletal muscle FAO in a subset of subjects with prediabetes but did not affect gene transcription or mitochondrial enzyme activity. Lipid metabolic inflexibility observed in HSkMC from obese subjects is not due to differences in electron transport flux, but rather upstream decrements in lipid metabolism. Fenofibrate increases the capacity for FAO in human skeletal muscle cells, though its role in skeletal muscle metabolism in vivo remains unclear.

  7. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    PubMed

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action.

  8. Beyond intestinal soap--bile acids in metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Bloks, Vincent W; Groen, Albert K

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, it has become apparent that bile acids are involved in a host of activities beyond their classic functions in bile formation and fat absorption. The identification of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as a nuclear receptor directly activated by bile acids and the discovery that bile acids are also ligands for the membrane-bound, G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (also known as TGR5) have opened new avenues of research. Both FXR and TGR5 regulate various elements of glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Consequently, a picture has emerged of bile acids acting as modulators of (postprandial) metabolism. Therefore, strategies that interfere with either bile acid metabolism or signalling cascades mediated by bile acids may represent novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Synthetic modulators of FXR have been designed and tested, primarily in animal models. Furthermore, the use of bile acid sequestrants to reduce plasma cholesterol levels has unexpected benefits. For example, treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with sequestrants causes substantial reductions in plasma levels of glucose and HbA1c. This Review aims to provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms by which bile acids modulate glucose and energy metabolism, particularly focusing on the glucose-lowering actions of bile acid sequestrants in insulin resistant states and T2DM.

  9. Fatty acid metabolic reprogramming via mTOR-mediated inductions of PPARγ directs early activation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Angela, Mulki; Endo, Yusuke; Asou, Hikari K.; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tumes, Damon J.; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Yokote, Koutaro; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    To fulfil the bioenergetic requirements for increased cell size and clonal expansion, activated T cells reprogramme their metabolic signatures from energetically quiescent to activated. However, the molecular mechanisms and essential components controlling metabolic reprogramming in T cells are not well understood. Here, we show that the mTORC1–PPARγ pathway is crucial for the fatty acid uptake programme in activated CD4+ T cells. This pathway is required for full activation and rapid proliferation of naive and memory CD4+ T cells. PPARγ directly binds and induces genes associated with fatty acid uptake in CD4+ T cells in both mice and humans. The PPARγ-dependent fatty acid uptake programme is critical for metabolic reprogramming. Thus, we provide important mechanistic insights into the metabolic reprogramming mechanisms that govern the expression of key enzymes, fatty acid metabolism and the acquisition of an activated phenotype during CD4+ T cell activation. PMID:27901044

  10. Enzyme therapy for lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Du, H; Schiavi, S; Levine, M; Mishra, J; Heur, M; Grabowski, G A

    2001-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is the critical enzyme for the hydrolysis of the triglycerides (TG) and cholesteryl esters (CE) delivered to lysosomes. Its deficiency produces two human phenotypes, Wolman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). A targeted disruption of the LAL locus produced a null (lal( -/-)) mouse model that mimics human WD/CESD. The potential for enzyme therapy was tested using mannose terminated human LAL expressed in Pichia pastoris (phLAL), purified, and administered by tail vein injections to lal( -/-) mice. Mannose receptor (MR)-dependent uptake and lysosomal targeting of phLAL were evidenced ex vivo using competitive assays with MR-positive J774E cells, a murine monocyte/macrophage line, immunofluorescence and western blots. Following (bolus) IV injection, phLAL was detected in Kupffer cells, lung macrophages and intestinal macrophages in lal( -/-) mice. Two-month-old lal( -/-) mice received phLAL (1.5 U/dose) or saline injections once every 3 days for 30 days (10 doses). The treated lal( -/-) mice showed nearly complete resolution of hepatic yellow coloration; hepatic weight decreased by approximately 36% compared to PBS-treated lal( -/-) mice. Histologic analyses of numerous tissues from phLAL-treated mice showed reductions in macrophage lipid storage. TG and cholesterol levels decreased by approximately 50% in liver, 69% in spleen and 50% in small intestine. These studies provide feasibility for LAL enzyme therapy in human WD and CESD.

  11. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  12. Increments and duplication events of enzymes and transcription factors influence metabolic and regulatory diversity in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected.

  13. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  14. Ecophysiology of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM)

    PubMed Central

    LÜTTGE, ULRICH

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Scope Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) as an ecophysiological modification of photosynthetic carbon acquisition has been reviewed extensively before. Cell biology, enzymology and the flow of carbon along various pathways and through various cellular compartments have been well documented and discussed. The present attempt at reviewing CAM once again tries to use a different approach, considering a wide range of inputs, receivers and outputs. • Input Input is given by a network of environmental parameters. Six major ones, CO2, H2O, light, temperature, nutrients and salinity, are considered in detail, which allows discussion of the effects of these factors, and combinations thereof, at the individual plant level (‘physiological aut‐ecology’). • Receivers Receivers of the environmental cues are the plant types genotypes and phenotypes, the latter including morphotypes and physiotypes. CAM genotypes largely remain ‘black boxes’, and research endeavours of genomics, producing mutants and following molecular phylogeny, are just beginning. There is no special development of CAM morphotypes except for a strong tendency for leaf or stem succulence with large cells with big vacuoles and often, but not always, special water storage tissues. Various CAM physiotypes with differing degrees of CAM expression are well characterized. • Output Output is the shaping of habitats, ecosystems and communities by CAM. A number of systems are briefly surveyed, namely aquatic systems, deserts, salinas, savannas, restingas, various types of forests, inselbergs and paramós. • Conclusions While quantitative census data for CAM diversity and biomass are largely missing, intuition suggests that the larger CAM domains are those systems which are governed by a network of interacting stress factors requiring versatile responses and not systems where a single stress factor strongly prevails. CAM is noted to be a strategy for variable, flexible and plastic

  15. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  16. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets--"Sand Out and Gold Stays".

    PubMed

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: (1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune, and other tissues; (2) our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, and histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and (3) histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization/ differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of "Sand out and Gold stays," where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity.

  17. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate by a soil pseudomonad. Ring-fission, lactonizing and delactonizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, J K; Evans, W C

    1971-05-01

    1. A cell-free system, prepared from Pseudomonas N.C.I.B. 9340 grown on 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate (MCPA) was shown to catalyse the reaction sequence: 5-chloro-3-methylcatechol --> cis-cis-gamma-chloro-alpha-methylmuconate --> gamma-carboxymethylene-alpha-methyl-Delta(alphabeta)-butenolide --> gamma-hydroxy-alpha-methylmuconate. 2. The activity of the three enzymes involved in these reactions was completely resolved and the lactonizing and delactonizing enzymes were separated. 3. This part of the metabolic pathway of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate is thus confirmed for this bacterium. 4. The ring-fission oxygenase required Fe(2+) or Fe(3+) and reduced glutathione for activity; the lactonizing enzyme is stimulated by Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+) and Fe(2+); no cofactor requirement could be demonstrated for the delactonizing enzyme. 5. cis-cis-gamma-Chloro-alpha-methylmuconic acid was isolated and found to be somewhat unstable, readily lactonizing to gamma-carboxymethylene-alpha-methyl-Delta(alphabeta)-butenolide. 6. Enzymically the lactonization appears to be a single-step dehydrochlorinase reaction.

  18. Adipose tissue branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism modulates circulating BCAA levels.

    PubMed

    Herman, Mark A; She, Pengxiang; Peroni, Odile D; Lynch, Christopher J; Kahn, Barbara B

    2010-04-09

    Whereas the role of adipose tissue in glucose and lipid homeostasis is widely recognized, its role in systemic protein and amino acid metabolism is less well-appreciated. In vitro and ex vivo experiments suggest that adipose tissue can metabolize substantial amounts of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). However, the role of adipose tissue in regulating BCAA metabolism in vivo is controversial. Interest in the contribution of adipose tissue to BCAA metabolism has been renewed with recent observations demonstrating down-regulation of BCAA oxidation enzymes in adipose tissue in obese and insulin-resistant humans. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we observe alterations in adipose-tissue BCAA enzyme expression caused by adipose-selective genetic alterations in the GLUT4 glucose-transporter expression. We show that the rate of adipose tissue BCAA oxidation per mg of tissue from normal mice is higher than in skeletal muscle. In mice overexpressing GLUT4 specifically in adipose tissue, we observe coordinate down-regulation of BCAA metabolizing enzymes selectively in adipose tissue. This decreases BCAA oxidation rates in adipose tissue, but not in muscle, in association with increased circulating BCAA levels. To confirm the capacity of adipose tissue to modulate circulating BCAA levels in vivo, we demonstrate that transplantation of normal adipose tissue into mice that are globally defective in peripheral BCAA metabolism reduces circulating BCAA levels by 30% (fasting)-50% (fed state). These results demonstrate for the first time the capacity of adipose tissue to catabolize circulating BCAAs in vivo and that coordinate regulation of adipose-tissue BCAA enzymes may modulate circulating BCAA levels.

  19. Case study 3. Application of basic enzyme kinetics to metabolism studies: real-life examples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmei; McCabe, Michelle; Podila, Lalitha; Tracy, Timothy S; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    An appreciation of the principles of enzyme kinetics can be applied in a number of drug metabolism applications. The concept for this chapter arose from a simple discussion on selecting appropriate time points to most efficiently assess metabolite profiles in a human Phase 1a clinical study (Subheading 4). By considering enzyme kinetics, a logical approach to the issue was derived. The dialog was an important learning opportunity for the participants in the discussion, and we have endeavored to capture this experience with other questions related to determination of K m and V max parameters, a consideration of the value of hepatocytes versus liver microsomes and enzyme inhibition parameters.

  20. PGC-1α-mediated branched-chain amino acid metabolism in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hatazawa, Yukino; Tadaishi, Miki; Nagaike, Yuta; Morita, Akihito; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Ezaki, Osamu; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Kamei, Yasutomi; Miura, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a coactivator of various nuclear receptors and other transcription factors, which is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, thermogenesis, and other biological processes that control phenotypic characteristics of various organ systems including skeletal muscle. PGC-1α in skeletal muscle is considered to be involved in contractile protein function, mitochondrial function, metabolic regulation, intracellular signaling, and transcriptional responses. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism mainly occurs in skeletal muscle mitochondria, and enzymes related to BCAA metabolism are increased by exercise. Using murine skeletal muscle overexpressing PGC-1α and cultured cells, we investigated whether PGC-1α stimulates BCAA metabolism by increasing the expression of enzymes involved in BCAA metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing PGC-1α specifically in the skeletal muscle had increased the expression of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) 2, branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), which catabolize BCAA. The expression of BCKDH kinase (BCKDK), which phosphorylates BCKDH and suppresses its enzymatic activity, was unchanged. The amount of BCAA in the skeletal muscle was significantly decreased in the transgenic mice compared with that in the wild-type mice. The amount of glutamic acid, a metabolite of BCAA catabolism, was increased in the transgenic mice, suggesting the activation of muscle BCAA metabolism by PGC-1α. In C2C12 cells, the overexpression of PGC-1α significantly increased the expression of BCAT2 and BCKDH but not BCKDK. Thus, PGC-1α in the skeletal muscle is considered to significantly contribute to BCAA metabolism.

  1. Enzymes involved in crotonate metabolism in Syntrophomonas wolfei

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.; Wofford, N.Q.

    1992-12-31

    Cell-free extracts of Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. wolfei grown with crotonate in pure culture or in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei contained crotonyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase activity. This activity was not detected in cell-free extracts from the butyrate-grown coculture which suggests that the long lag times observed before S. wolfei grew with crotonate were initially due to the inability to activate crotonate. Cell-free extracts of S. wolfei grown in pure culture contained high specific activities of hydrogenase and very low levels of formate dehydrogenase. The low levels suggest a biosynthetic rather than a catabolic role for the latter enzyme when S. wolfei is grown in pure culture. CO dehydrogenase activity was not detected. S. wolfei can form butyrate using a CoA transferase activity, but not by a phosphotransbutyrylase or enoate reductase activity. A c-type cytochrome was detected in S. wolfei grown in pure culture or in coculture indicating the presence of an electron transport system. This is a characteristic which separates S. wolfei from other known crotonate-using bacteria.

  2. Subcellular Distribution of Enzymes of Glycolate Metabolism in the Alga Cyanidium caldarium1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Wolfgang; Beevers, Harry

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes capable of catalyzing the reactions from phosphoglycolate to glycerate in the bluegreen colored eucaryotic alga Cyanidium caldarium has been studied. After separating the organelles from a crude homogenate on a linear flotation gradient, the enzymes glycolate oxidase and glutamate-glyoxylate aminotransferase along with catalase were present in the peroxisomal fraction (density: 1.23 grams per cubic centimeter). Serine hydroxymethyltransferase was found in the mitochondrial fraction (density: 1.18 grams per cubic centimeter). In contrast to the observations in green leaves of higher plants, the enzymes for the conversion of serine to glycerate (serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase) were found only in the soluble fraction of the gradient. The partial characterization of enzymes from Cyanidium participating in glycolate metabolism revealed only slight differences from the corresponding enzymes from higher plants. The phylogenetic implications of the observed similarities between the enigmatic alga Cyanidium and higher plants are discussed. PMID:16666880

  3. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1: Is It the Link between Sulfur Amino Acids and Lipid Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Poloni, Soraia; Blom, Henk J; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2015-06-03

    An association between sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine, homocysteine and taurine) and lipid metabolism has been described in several experimental and population-based studies. Changes in the metabolism of these amino acids influence serum lipoprotein concentrations, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. However, recent evidence has suggested that the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) may be the link between these two metabolic pathways. SCD-1 is a key enzyme for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Its main substrates C16:0 and C18:0 and products palmitoleic acid (C16:1) and oleic acid (C18:1) are the most abundant fatty acids in triglycerides, cholesterol esters and membrane phospholipids. A significant suppression of SCD-1 has been observed in several animal models with disrupted sulfur amino acid metabolism, and the activity of SCD-1 is also associated with the levels of these amino acids in humans. This enzyme also appears to be involved in the etiology of metabolic syndromes because its suppression results in decreased fat deposits (regardless of food intake), improved insulin sensitivity and higher basal energy expenditure. Interestingly, this anti-obesogenic phenotype has also been described in humans and animals with sulfur amino acid disorders, which is consistent with the hypothesis that SCD-1 activity is influenced by these amino acids, in particularly cysteine, which is a strong and independent predictor of SCD-1 activity and fat storage. In this narrative review, we discuss the evidence linking sulfur amino acids, SCD-1 and lipid metabolism.

  4. Combinatorial Effects of Fatty Acid Elongase Enzymes on Nervonic Acid Production in Camelina sativa

    PubMed Central

    Huai, Dongxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) with chain lengths of 20 carbons and longer provide feedstocks for various applications; therefore, improvement of VLCFA contents in seeds has become an important goal for oilseed enhancement. VLCFA biosynthesis is controlled by a multi-enzyme protein complex referred to as fatty acid elongase, which is composed of β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), β-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase (HCD) and enoyl reductase (ECR). KCS has been identified as the rate-limiting enzyme, but little is known about the involvement of other three enzymes in VLCFA production. Here, the combinatorial effects of fatty acid elongase enzymes on VLCFA production were assessed by evaluating the changes in nervonic acid content. A KCS gene from Lunaria annua (LaKCS) and the other three elongase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were used for the assessment. Five seed-specific expressing constructs, including LaKCS alone, LaKCS with AtKCR, LaKCS with AtHCD, LaKCS with AtECR, and LaKCS with AtKCR and AtHCD, were transformed into Camelina sativa. The nervonic acid content in seed oil increased from null in wild type camelina to 6-12% in LaKCS-expressing lines. However, compared with that from the LaKCS-expressing lines, nervonic acid content in mature seeds from the co-expressing lines with one or two extra elongase genes did not show further increases. Nervonic acid content from LaKCS, AtKCR and AtHCD co-expressing line was significantly higher than that in LaKCS-expressing line during early seed development stage, while the ultimate nervonic acid content was not significantly altered. The results from this study thus provide useful information for future engineering of oilseed crops for higher VLCFA production. PMID:26121034

  5. Elasticity analysis and design for large metabolic responses produced by changes in enzyme activities.

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Fernando; Acerenza, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis has been extensively used to describe how the sensitivity properties of the component enzymes in a metabolic pathway (represented by the elasticity coefficients) determine the way in which metabolic variables respond (described by the control coefficients). Similarly, metabolic control design addresses the inverse problem of obtaining the sensitivity properties of the component enzymes that are required for the system to show a pre-established pattern of responses. These formalisms, including what is called elasticity analysis and design, were developed for small, strictly speaking infinitesimal, changes. Here we extend them to large metabolic responses. The new approach can be applied to simple two-step pathways or to any arbitrary metabolic system divided into two groups linked by one intermediate. General expressions that relate control and elasticity coefficients for large changes are derived. Concentration and flux connectivity relationships are obtained. The relationships for large changes indicate that the pattern of responses is not necessarily the same as the one obtained with the traditional infinitesimal approach, in some cases the patterns being qualitatively different. The general analysis is used to study the control of ketogenesis in rat liver mitochondria, starting from data available in the literature. The control profile of the pathway subject to large changes shows both quantitative and qualitative differences from the one obtained from an analysis that is performed with infinitesimal coefficients. This exemplifies the type of errors that may be introduced when drawing conclusions about large metabolic responses from results obtained with an infinitesimal treatment. PMID:12084013

  6. Role of retinoic acid metabolizing cytochrome P450s, CYP26, in inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevison, Faith; Jing, Jing; Tripathy, Sasmita; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) and its active metabolite, all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), play critical roles in regulating the differentiation, growth and migration of immune cells. Similarly, as critical signaling molecules in the regulation of the cell cycle, retinoids are important in cancers. Concentrations of atRA are tightly regulated in tissues, predominantly by the availability of retinol, synthesis of atRA by ALDH1A enzymes and metabolism and clearance of atRA by CYP26 enzymes. The ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes are expressed in several cell types in the immune system and in cancer cells. In the immune system the ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes appear to modulate RA concentrations. Consequently, alterations in the activity of ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes are expected to change disease outcomes in inflammation. There is increasing evidence from various disease models of intestinal and skin inflammation that treatment with atRA has a positive effect on disease markers. However, whether aberrant atRA concentrations or atRA synthesis and metabolism play a role in inflammatory disease development and progression is not well understood. In cancers, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia and neuroblastoma, increasing intracellular concentrations of atRA appears to provide clinical benefit. Inhibition of the CYP26 enzymes to increase atRA concentrations and combat therapy resistance has been pursued as a drug target in these cancers. This chapter covers the current knowledge of how atRA and retinol regulate the immune system and inflammation, how retinol and atRA metabolism is altered in inflammation and cancer and what roles atRA metabolizing enzymes have in immune responses and cancers. PMID:26233912

  7. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque.

  8. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  9. [Use of genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers of Chlorobi Phylum representatives].

    PubMed

    Turova, T P; Kovaleva, O L; Gorlenko, V M; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2014-01-01

    This work examined the feasibility of using certain genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers adequate for studying phylogeny and ecology of green sulfur bacteria (GSB) of the Chlorobi phylum. Primers designed to amplify the genes of ATP citrate lyase (aclB) and citrate synthase (gltA) revealed the respective genes in the genomes of all of the newly studied GSB strains. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on nucleotide sequences of these genes and amino acid sequences of the conceptually translated proteins were on the whole congruent with the 16S rRNA gene tree, with the single exception of GltA of Chloroherpeton thalassium, which formed a separate branch beyond the cluster comprised by other representatives of the Chlorobi phylum. Thus, the aclB genes but not gltA genes proved to be suitable for the design of primers specific to all Chlorobi representatives. Therefore, it was the aclB gene that was further used asa molecular marker to detect GSB in enrichment cultures and environmental samples. AclB phylotypes of GSB were revealed in all of the samples studied, with the exception of environmental samples from soda lakes. The identification of the revealed phylotypes was in agreement with the identification based on the FMO protein gene (fmo), is a well-known Chlorobi-specific molecular marker.

  10. Increased fatty acid unsaturation and production of arachidonic acid by homologous over-expression of the mitochondrial malic enzyme in Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Du, Kai; Huang, Xiaoyun; Song, Yuanda; Gu, Zhennan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2014-09-01

    Malic enzyme (ME) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to pyruvate and provides NADPH for intracellular metabolism, such as fatty acid synthesis. Here, the mitochondrial ME (mME) gene from Mortierella alpina was homologously over-expressed. Compared with controls, fungal arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4 n-6) content increased by 60 % without affecting the total fatty acid content. Our results suggest that enhancing mME activity may be an effective mean to increase industrial production of ARA in M. alpina.

  11. Metabolism of berry anthocyanins to phenolic acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tarja; Mursu, Jaakko; Heinonen, Marina; Nurmi, Anna; Hiltunen, Raimo; Voutilainen, Sari

    2009-03-25

    We studied the metabolism of berry anthocyanins to phenolic acids in six human subjects by giving them bilberry-lingonberry puree with and without oat cereals. Puree + cereals contained 1435 micromol of anthocyanins and 339 micromol of phenolic acids. The urinary excretion of measured 18 phenolic acids increased 241 micromol during the 48 h follow-up after the puree + cereals supplementation. The excretion peak of dietary phenolic acids was observed at 4-6 h after the puree + cereals supplementation and 2 h earlier after the supplementation of the puree alone. Homovanillic and vanillic acids were the most abundant metabolites, and they were partly produced from anthocyanins. No gallic acid, a fragmentation product of delphinidin glycosides, was detected, and only a very low amount of malvidin glycosides was possibly metabolized to syringic acid. Although anthocyanins were partly fragmented to phenolic acids, still a large part of metabolites remained unknown.

  12. Activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta and liver in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Eric; Wang, Xinyi; Engel, Franziska; Li, Hequn; Landsiedel, Robert; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2016-06-01

    In order to assess whether the placental metabolism of xenobiotic compounds should be taken into consideration for physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling, the activities of seven phase I and phase II enzymes have been quantified in the 18-day placenta of untreated Wistar rats. To determine their relative contribution, these activities were compared to those of untreated adult male rat liver, using commonly accepted assays. The enzymes comprised cytochrome P450 (CYP), flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), esterase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST). In contrast to liver, no activities were measurable for 7-ethylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP1A), 7-pentylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP2B), 7-benzylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP2B, 2C and 3 A), UGT1, UGT2 and GST in placenta, indicating that the placental activity of these enzymes was well below their hepatic activity. Low activities in placenta were determined for FMO (4%), and esterase (8%), whereas the activity of placental ADH and ALDH accounted for 35% and 40% of the hepatic activities, respectively. In support of the negligible placental CYP activity, testosterone and six model azole fungicides, which were readily metabolized by rat hepatic microsomes, failed to exhibit any metabolic turnover with rat placental microsomes. Hence, with the possible exception of ADH and ALDH, the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta are too low to warrant consideration in PBTK modelling.

  13. Phylogenetic and biological investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 (FDB2) gene of Fusarium verticillioides was the first NAT cloned and character...

  14. Comparative investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the first NAT cloned and characterized from fun...

  15. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  16. Astrocyte-neuron crosstalk regulates the expression and subcellular localization of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mamczur, Piotr; Borsuk, Borys; Paszko, Jadwiga; Sas, Zuzanna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Gizak, Agnieszka; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytes releasing glucose- and/or glycogen-derived lactate and glutamine play a crucial role in shaping neuronal function and plasticity. Little is known, however, how metabolic functions of astrocytes, e.g., their ability to degrade glucosyl units, are affected by the presence of neurons. To address this issue we carried out experiments which demonstrated that co-culturing of rat hippocampal astrocytes with neurons significantly elevates the level of mRNA and protein for crucial enzymes of glycolysis (phosphofructokinase, aldolase, and pyruvate kinase), glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase), and glutamine synthetase in astrocytes. Simultaneously, the decrease of the capability of neurons to metabolize glucose and glutamine is observed. We provide evidence that neurons alter the expression of astrocytic enzymes by secretion of as yet unknown molecule(s) into the extracellular fluid. Moreover, our data demonstrate that almost all studied enzymes may localize in astrocytic nuclei and this localization is affected by the co-culturing with neurons which also reduces proliferative activity of astrocytes. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that the astrocyte-neuron crosstalk substantially affects the expression of basal metabolic enzymes in the both types of cells and influences their subcellular localization in astrocytes.

  17. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF CHANGES IN XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM ENZYME EXPRESSION DURING AGING USING COMPREHENSIVE TRANSCRIPT PROFILING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging leads to changes in the expression of enzymes and transporters important in the metabolism and fate of xenobiotics in liver, kidney and intestine. Most notable are the changes in a number of CYP and xenobiotic transporter genes regulated by the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR an...

  19. Targeted proteome analysis of single-gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking enzymes in the central carbon metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Syohei; Nishino, Shunsuke; Tomita, Atsumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Central carbon metabolism is controlled by modulating the protein abundance profiles of enzymes that maintain the essential systems in living organisms. In this study, metabolic adaptation mechanisms in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated by direct determination of enzyme abundance levels in 30 wild type and mutant strains. We performed a targeted proteome analysis using S. cerevisiae strains that lack genes encoding the enzymes responsible for central carbon metabolism. Our analysis revealed that at least 30% of the observed variations in enzyme abundance levels could be explained by global regulatory mechanisms. A enzyme-enzyme co-abundance analysis revealed that the abundances of enzyme proteins involved in the trehalose metabolism and glycolysis changed in a coordinated manner under the control of the transcription factors for global regulation. The remaining variations were derived from local mechanisms such as a mutant-specific increase in the abundances of remote enzymes. The proteome data also suggested that, although the functional compensation of the deficient enzyme was attained by using more resources for protein biosynthesis, available resources for the biosynthesis of the enzymes responsible for central metabolism were not abundant in S. cerevisiae cells. These results showed that global and local regulation of enzyme abundance levels shape central carbon metabolism in S. cerevisiae by using a limited resource for protein biosynthesis. PMID:28241048

  20. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  1. [Effect of Low-Intensity 900 MHz Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation on Rat Brain Enzyme Activities Linked to Energy Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, M S; Nersesova, L S; Gazaryants, M G; Meliksetyan, G O; Malakyan, M G; Bajinyan, S A; Akopian, J I

    2015-01-01

    The research deals with the effect of low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR), power density 25 μW/cm2, on the following rat brain and blood serum enzyme activities: creatine kinase (CK), playing a central role in the process of storing and distributing the cell energy, as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) that play a key role in providing the conjunction of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. The comparative analysis of the changes in the enzyme activity studied at different times following the two-hour single, as well as fractional, radiation equivalent of the total time showed that the most radiosensitive enzyme is the brain creatine kinase, which may then be recommended as a marker of the radio frequency radiation impact. According to the analysis of the changing dynamics of the CK, ALT and AST activity level, with time these changes acquire the adaptive character and are directed to compensate the damaged cell energy metabolism.

  2. The effect of exogenous calcium on mitochondria, respiratory metabolism enzymes and ion transport in cucumber roots under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Li, Bin; Lu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Lingyun; Yang, Yanjuan; Yuan, Yinghui; Du, Jing; Guo, Shirong

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia induces plant stress, particularly in cucumber plants under hydroponic culture. In plants, calcium is involved in stress signal transmission and growth. The ultimate goal of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous calcium on the mitochondrial antioxidant system, the activity of respiratory metabolism enzymes, and ion transport in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No. 2) roots under hypoxic conditions. Our experiments revealed that exogenous calcium reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria under hypoxia. Exogenous calcium also enhances the accumulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We utilized fluorescence and ultrastructural cytochemistry methods to observe that exogenous calcium increases the concentrations of Ca(2+) and K(+) in root cells by increasing the activity of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase and tonoplast H(+)-ATPase and H(+)-PPase. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxic stress has an immediate and substantial effect on roots. Exogenous calcium improves metabolism and ion transport in cucumber roots, thereby increasing hypoxia tolerance in cucumber.

  3. Murine atrial HL-1 cell line is a reliable model to study drug metabolizing enzymes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Elshenawy, Osama H; Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2013-04-01

    HL-1 cells are currently the only cells that spontaneously contract while maintaining a differentiated cardiac phenotype. Thus, our objective was to examine murine HL-1 cells as a new in vitro model to study drug metabolizing enzymes. We examined the expression of cytochrome P450s (Cyps), phase II enzymes, and nuclear receptors and compared their levels to mice hearts. Our results demonstrated that except for Cyp4a12 and Cyp4a14 all Cyps, phase II enzymes: glutathione-S-transferases (Gsts), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1), nuclear receptors: aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-alpha) were all constitutively expressed in HL-1 cells. Cyp2b19, Cyp2c29, Cyp2c38, Cyp2c40, and Cyp4f16 mRNA levels were higher in HL-1 cells compared to mice hearts. Cyp2b9, Cyp2c44, Cyp2j9, Cyp2j11, Cyp2j13, Cyp4f13, Cyp4f15 mRNA levels were expressed to the same extent to that of mice hearts. Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2b10, Cyp2d10, Cyp2d22, Cyp2e1, Cyp2j5, Cyp2j6, Cyp3a11, Cyp4a10, and Cyp4f18 mRNA levels were lower in HL-1 cells compared to mice hearts. Moreover, 3-methylcholanthrene induced Cyp1a1 while fenofibrate induced Cyp2j9 and Cyp4f13 mRNA levels in HL-1 cells. Examining the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by HL-1 cells, our results demonstrated that HL-1 cells metabolize AA to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. In conclusion, HL-1 cells provide a valuable in vitro model to study the role of Cyps and their associated AA metabolites in addition to phase II enzymes in cardiovascular disease states.

  4. Regional variation in muscle metabolic enzymes in individual American shad (Alosa sapidissima)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, J.B.K.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the activity of metabolic enzymes is often used to asses metabolic capacity at the tissue level, but the amount of regional variability within a tissue in an individual fish of a given species is frequently unknown. The activities of four enzymes (citrate synthase (CS), phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ??-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) were assayed in red and white muscle at 10 sites along the body of adult American shad (Alosa sapidissima). Red and white muscle HOAD and white muscle CS and LDH varied significantly, generally increasing posteriorly. Maximal variation occurs in red muscle HOAD (~450%) and white muscle LDH (~60%) activity. Differences between the sexes also vary with sampling location. This study suggests that the variability in enzyme activity may be linked to functional differences in the muscle at different locations, and also provides guidelines for sample collection in this species.

  5. THE EFFECT OF NITROGEN MUSTARDS ON ENZYMES AND TISSUE METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Barron, E. S. Guzman; Bartlett, Grant R.; Miller, Zelma Baker; Meyer, Joe; Seegmiller, J. E.

    1948-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards at a concentration forty times the minimum lethal dose inhibited the respiration of all tissues studied but affected anaerobic glycolysis very little. The inhibiting effect increased with time. The respiration of lymphoid tissue was extremely sensitive to nitrogen mustard, as concentrations below the LD50 definitely inhibited the respiration of rabbit lymph nodes. In tissue slices nitrogen mustards inhibited the oxidation of pyruvate and of l-amino acids and the utilization of NH3. A number of synthesis reactions were also inhibited, such as the synthesis of carbohydrate, of creatine, and of urea. When added to growing seeds, nitrogen mustards inhibited their growth. In rats given lethal doses of nitrogen mustards there were found complete inhibition of choline oxidation and strong inhibition of pyruvate oxidation by the kidney and partial inhibition of urea synthesis by the liver. Inhibition of bone marrow respiration by nitrogen mustards was prevented by the addition of choline, and of dimethylaminoethanol plus methionine The possible mechanism of nitrogen mustard intoxication is discussed. PMID:18858641

  6. Colon cancer chemopreventive efficacy of silibinin through perturbation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Nagarajan; Viswanathan, Periyaswamy; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2012-01-15

    Our findings reported so far demonstrate that silibinin modulates gut microbial enzymes, colonic oxidative stress and Wnt/β-catenin signaling, to exert its antiproliferative effect against 1,2 di-methylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis. Since xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes play a crucial role in carcinogen activation and metabolism, we aimed to explore the effect of silibinin on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes during DMH induced colon carcinogenesis. Male albino rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control and group 2 rats received 50mg/kg body weight of silibinin p.o. every day. Groups 3-6 rats were given DMH at a dose of (20mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) once a week for 15 weeks to induce colonic tumors. In addition to DMH, group 4 (initiation), group 5 (post-initiation) and group 6 (entire period) rats received silibinin (50mg/kg body weight, p.o., everyday) at different time points during the experimental period of 32 weeks. Rats exposed to DMH alone showed increased activities of phase I enzymes (cytochrome b5, cytochrome b5 reductase, cytochromeP450, cytochromeP450 reductase, cytochromP4502E1) and decreased activities of phase II enzymes (Uridine diphospho glucuronyl transferase, Glutathione-S-transferase and DT-Diaphorase) in the liver and colonic mucosa as compared to control rats. Silibinin supplementation modulates the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes favoring carcinogen detoxification. Evaluation of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants status showed that silibinin supplementation counteracts DMH induced hepatic and circulatory oxidative stress. Tumor burden in experimental animals was assessed both macroscopically and microscopically in the colon tissues. Our findings emphasize the potential chemopreventive action of silibinin against DMH induced colon carcinogenesis.

  7. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Roberto, Francisco F; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-20

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  8. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Apel, William A.; Reed, David William; Lee, Brady D.; Thompson, David N.; Roberto, Francisco F.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-29

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  9. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F.; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M.; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M.; Agbo, Eddy C.; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo 13C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast. PMID:23898325

  10. Cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolism in bovine corneal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Masferrer, J.; Schwartzman, M.L.; Abraham, N.G.; Dunn, M.W.; McGiff, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    The presence of the cytochrom P450 system and its involvement in the metabolism of AA was studied in the corneal epithelium. This tissue contains cytochrome P450 as assessed directly by measurement of the carbon monoxide reduced spectrum (specific activity of 161 pmol/10 mg protein) and indirectly by measuring the activity of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) - a cytochrome P450-dependent enzyme (11-39 pmol 3-OH benzopyrene/mg protein/10 min). When corneal epithelial microsomes were incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid, 30-50% of the total radioactivity was converted to two peaks, I and II. Further separation using high performance liquid chromatography has shown that each peak contains two metabolites, A,B and C,D. Metabolite formation was dependent on the addition of NADPH (1 mM) and inhibited by carbon monoxide and SKF-525A (100 ..mu..M) suggesting a cytochrome P450-dependent mechanism. Compound C (5-10 ..mu..M) inhibited the activity of corneal epithelial Na-K-ATPase by 30-60%, being 100-fold more potent than ouabain. Compound D (10-100 ng) induced a dose dependent relaxation of the rat caudal artery. Compound D also inhibited corneal Na-K-ATPase activity but less potently than compound C. These compounds may be important to transport processes of ocular epithelia and participate in the control of the ocular circulation and aqueous humor dynamics.

  11. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified...

  12. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  13. Phosphatidic acid metabolism in rat liver cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Giusto, Norma M

    2013-04-02

    The aim of the present research was to analyze the pathways for phosphatidic acid metabolism in purified nuclei from liver. Lipid phosphate phosphatase, diacylglycerol lipase, monoacylglycerol lipase and PA-phospholipase type A activities were detected. The presence of lysophosphatidic acid significantly reduced DAG production while sphingosine 1-phoshate and ceramide 1-phosphate reduced MAG formation from PA. Using different enzymatic modulators (detergents and ions) an increase in the PA metabolism by phospholipase type A was observed. Our findings evidence an active PA metabolism in purified liver nuclei which generates important lipid second messengers, and which could thus be involved in nuclear processes such as gene transcription.

  14. Metabolic engineering strategies to bio-adipic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kruyer, Nicholas S; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela

    2017-03-30

    Adipic acid is the most industrially important dicarboxylic acid as it is a key monomer in the synthesis of nylon. Today, adipic acid is obtained via a chemical process that relies on petrochemical precursors and releases large quantities of greenhouse gases. In the last two years, significant progress has been made in engineering microbes for the production of adipic acid and its immediate precursors, muconic acid and glucaric acid. Not only have the microbial substrates expanded beyond glucose and glycerol to include lignin monomers and hemicellulose components, but the number of microbial chassis now goes further than Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to include microbes proficient in aromatic degradation, cellulose secretion and degradation of multiple carbon sources. Here, we review the metabolic engineering and nascent protein engineering strategies undertaken in each of these chassis to convert different feedstocks to adipic, muconic and glucaric acid. We also highlight near term prospects and challenges for each of the metabolic routes discussed.

  15. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  16. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation. PMID:22435484

  17. Metabolic Pathways of Inhaled Glucocorticoids by the CYP3A Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Chad D.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Orton, Christopher R.; Murai, Takahiro; Fidler, Trevor P.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Ward, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, for which the mainstay treatment has been inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs). Despite the widespread use of these drugs, approximately 30% of asthma sufferers exhibit some degree of steroid insensitivity or are refractory to inhaled GCs. One hypothesis to explain this phenomenon is interpatient variability in the clearance of these compounds. The objective of this research is to determine how metabolism of GCs by the CYP3A family of enzymes could affect their effectiveness in asthmatic patients. In this work, the metabolism of four frequently prescribed inhaled GCs, triamcinolone acetonide, flunisolide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate, by the CYP3A family of enzymes was studied to identify differences in their rates of clearance and to identify their metabolites. Both interenzyme and interdrug variability in rates of metabolism and metabolic fate were observed. CYP3A4 was the most efficient metabolic catalyst for all the compounds, and CYP3A7 had the slowest rates. CYP3A5, which is particularly relevant to GC metabolism in the lungs, was also shown to efficiently metabolize triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate. In contrast, flunisolide was only metabolized via CYP3A4, with no significant turnover by CYP3A5 or CYP3A7. Common metabolites included 6β-hydroxylation and Δ6-dehydrogenation for triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and flunisolide. The structure of Δ6-flunisolide was unambiguously established by NMR analysis. Metabolism also occurred on the D-ring substituents, including the 21-carboxy metabolites for triamcinolone acetonide and flunisolide. The novel metabolite 21-nortriamcinolone acetonide was also identified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and NMR analysis. PMID:23143891

  18. Regulation of hormone metabolism in Arabidopsis seeds: phytochrome regulation of abscisic acid metabolism and abscisic acid regulation of gibberellin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mitsunori; Hanada, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Endo, Akira; Okamoto, Masanori; Yamauchi, Yukika; North, Helen; Marion-Poll, Annie; Sun, Tai-Ping; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Nambara, Eiji

    2006-11-01

    In a wide range of plant species, seed germination is regulated antagonistically by two plant hormones, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA). In the present study, we have revealed that ABA metabolism (both biosynthesis and inactivation) was phytochrome-regulated in an opposite fashion to GA metabolism during photoreversible seed germination in Arabidopsis. Endogenous ABA levels were decreased by irradiation with a red (R) light pulse in dark-imbibed seeds pre-treated with a far-red (FR) light pulse, and the reduction in ABA levels in response to R light was inhibited in a phytochrome B (PHYB)-deficient mutant. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis gene, AtNCED6, and the inactivation gene, CYP707A2, was regulated in a photoreversible manner, suggesting a key role for the genes in PHYB-mediated regulation of ABA metabolism. Abscisic acid-deficient mutants such as nced6-1, aba2-2 and aao3-4 exhibited an enhanced ability to germinate relative to wild type when imbibed in the dark after irradiation with an FR light pulse. In addition, the ability to synthesize GA was improved in the aba2-2 mutant compared with wild type during dark-imbibition after an FR light pulse. Activation of GA biosynthesis in the aba2-2 mutant was also observed during seed development. These data indicate that ABA is involved in the suppression of GA biosynthesis in both imbibed and developing seeds. Spatial expression patterns of the AtABA2 and AAO3 genes, responsible for last two steps of ABA biosynthesis, were distinct from that of the GA biosynthesis gene, AtGA3ox2, in both imbibed and developing seeds, suggesting that biosynthesis of ABA and GA in seeds occurs in different cell types.

  19. Polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzymes, fish intake, and risk of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Mariana C.

    2012-01-01

    Cooking fish at high temperature can produce potent carcinogens such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effects of these carcinogens may undergo modification by the enzymes responsible for their detoxification and/or activation. In this study, we investigated genetic polymorphisms in nine carcinogen metabolism enzymes and their modifying effects on the association between white or dark fish consumption and prostate cancer (PCA) risk. We genotyped 497 localized and 936 advanced PCA cases and 760 controls from the California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Three polymorphisms, EPHX1 Tyr113His, CYP1B1 Leu432Val and GSTT1 null/present, were associated with localized PCA risk. The PTGS2 765 G/C polymorphism modified the association between white fish consumption and advanced PCA risk (interaction P 5 0.002), with high white fish consumption being positively associated with risk only among carriers of the C allele. This effect modification by PTGS2 genotype was stronger when restricted to consumption of well-done white fish (interaction P 5 0.021). These findings support the hypotheses that changes in white fish brought upon by high-temperature cooking methods, such as carcinogen accumulation and/or fatty acid composition changes, may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. However, the gene–diet interactions should be interpreted with caution given the limited sample size. Thus, our findings require further validation with additional studies. Abbreviations: AA African American; BMI body mass index; CI confidence interval; CNV copy number variant; EPIC European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition; HCA heterocyclic amine; HCFA Health Care Financing Administration; LAC Los Angeles county; MAF minor allele frequency; NHW non-Hispanic White; OR odds ratio; PAH polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; PCA prostate cancer; PTGS2 prostaglandin- endoperoxide synthase 2; PUFA polyunsaturated fatty acids; RDD

  20. Decreased consumption of branched chain amino acids improves metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Kasza, Ildiko; Schmidt, Brian A.; Cava, Edda; Spelta, Francesco; Tosti, Valeria; Syed, Faizan A.; Baar, Emma L.; Veronese, Nicola; Cottrell, Sara E.; Fenske, Rachel J.; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Brar, Harpreet K.; Pietka, Terri; Bullock, Arnold D.; Figenshau, Robert S.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Merrins, Matthew J.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Kimple, Michelle E.; Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Protein restricted, high carbohydrate diets improve metabolic health in rodents, yet the precise dietary components that are responsible for these effects have not been identified. Further, the applicability of these studies to humans is unclear. Here, we demonstrate in a randomized controlled trial that a moderately protein restricted (PR) diet also improves markers of metabolic health in humans. Intriguingly, we find that feeding mice a diet specifically reduced in branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) is sufficient to improve glucose tolerance and body composition equivalently to a PR diet, via metabolically distinct pathways. Our results highlight a critical role for dietary quality at the level of amino acids in the maintenance of metabolic health, and suggest that diets specifically reduced in BCAAs, or pharmacological interventions in this pathway, may offer a translatable way to achieve many of the metabolic benefits of a PR diet. PMID:27346343

  1. Iron-dependent changes in cellular energy metabolism: influence on citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oexle, H; Gnaiger, E; Weiss, G

    1999-11-10

    Iron modulates the expression of the critical citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase via a translational mechanism involving iron regulatory proteins. Thus, the present study was undertaken to investigate the consequences of iron perturbation on citric acid cycle activity, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiration in the human cell line K-562. In agreement with previous data iron increases the activity of mitochondrial aconitase while it is reduced upon addition of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). Interestingly, iron also positively affects three other citric acid cycle enzymes, namely citrate synthase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase, while DFO decreases the activity of these enzymes. Consequently, iron supplementation results in increased formation of reducing equivalents (NADH) by the citric acid cycle, and thus in increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP formation via oxidative phosphorylation as shown herein. This in turn leads to downregulation of glucose utilization. In contrast, all these metabolic pathways are reduced upon iron depletion, and thus glycolysis and lactate formation are significantly increased in order to compensate for the decrease in ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of DFO. Our results point to a complex interaction between iron homeostasis, oxygen supply and cellular energy metabolism in human cells.

  2. Distribution of a Fatty Acid Cyclase Enzyme System in Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmermann, Don C.

    1979-01-01

    Extracts from tissues of 24 plant species were tested for the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 13-l-hydroperoxy-cis-9,15-trans-11-octadecatrienoic acid to the cyclic fatty acid 12-oxo-cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid. The enzyme was detected in 15 of the 24 tissues examined, and was demonstrated in seedlings, leaves, and fruits. PMID:16660932

  3. Is the alkaline tide a signal to activate metabolic or ionoregulatory enzymes in the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias)?

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Kajimura, Makiko; Mommsen, Thomas P; Walsh, Patrick J

    2008-01-01

    Experimental metabolic alkalosis is known to stimulate whole-animal urea production and active ion secretion by the rectal gland in the dogfish shark. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that a marked alkaline tide (systemic metabolic alkalosis) follows feeding in this species and that the activities of the enzymes of the ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) for urea synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver and of energy metabolism and ion transport in the rectal gland are increased at this time. We therefore evaluated whether alkalosis and/or NaCl/volume loading (which also occurs with feeding) could serve as a signal for activation of these enzymes independent of nutrient loading. Fasted dogfish were infused for 20 h with either 500 mmol L(-1) NaHCO3 (alkalosis + volume expansion) or 500 mmol L(-1) NaCl (volume expansion alone), both isosmotic to dogfish plasma, at a rate of 3 mL kg(-1) h(-1). NaHCO3 infusion progressively raised arterial pH to 8.28 (control = 7.85) and plasma [HCO3-] to 20.8 mmol L(-1) (control = 4.5 mmol L(-1)) at 20 h, with unchanged arterial P(CO2), whereas NaCl/volume loading had no effect on blood acid-base status. Rectal gland Na+,K+-ATPase activity was increased 50% by NaCl loading and more than 100% by NaHCO3 loading, indicating stimulatory effects of both volume expansion and alkalosis. Rectal gland lactate dehydrogenase activity was elevated 25% by both treatments, indicating volume expansion effects only, whereas neither treatment increased the activities of the aerobic enzymes citrate synthase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, or the ketone body-utilizing enzyme beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase in the rectal gland or liver. The activity of ornithine-citrulline transcarbamoylase in skeletal muscle was doubled by NaHCO3 infusion, but neither treatment altered the activities of other OUC-related enzymes (glutamine synthetase, carbamoylphosphate synthetase III). We conclude that both the alkaline tide and salt loading/volume expansion act as

  4. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  5. Expression in human prostate of drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes: association with prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, J. A.; Martínez, C.; Olivera, M.; Gallardo, L.; Ladero, J. M.; Rosado, C.; Prados, J.; Rodriguez-Molina, J.; Resel, L.; Benítez, J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of two common polymorphisms of enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs and carcinogens was studied in relation to prostate cancer. The gene encoding one of these enzymes (NAT2) is located in an area where frequent allelic loss occurs in prostate cancer. Mutations at the genes CYP2D6 and NAT2 were analysed by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction mapping in DNA from 94 subjects with prostate cancer and 160 male healthy control subjects. Eleven prostate specimens were analysed for genotype and enzymatic activities NAT2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A by using the enzyme-specific substrates sulphamethazine and dextromethorphan. Enzyme activities with substrate specificities corresponding to NAT2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A are present in human prostate tissue, with mean +/-s.d. activities of 4.8+/-4.4 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, 156+/-91 and 112+/-72 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein respectively. The Km values for the prostate CYP2D6 and CYP3A enzyme activities corresponded to that of liver CYP2D6 and CYP3A activities, and the CYP2D6 enzyme activity is related to the CYP2D6 genotype. The N-acetyltransferase, in contrast, had a higher Km than NAT2 and was independent of the NAT2 genotype. The CYP2D6 and CYP3A enzymes, and an N-acetyltransferase activity that is independent of the regulation of the NAT2 gene, are expressed in human prostate tissue. The presence of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in human prostate with a high interindividual variability may be involved in the regulation of local levels of carcinogens and mutagens and may underlie interindividual differences in cancer susceptibility. Images Figure 1 PMID:9823980

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression.

  7. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-08

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus.

  8. The Effects of Pharmaceutical Excipients on Gastrointestinal Tract Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters-an Update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenpeng; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Wu, Man; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence from the last decade has shown that many pharmaceutical excipients are not pharmacologically inert but instead have effects on metabolic enzymes and/or drug transporters. Hence, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) may be altered due to the modulation of their metabolism and transport by excipients. The impact of excipients is a potential concern for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)-based biowaivers, particularly as the BCS-based biowaivers have been extended to class 3 drugs in certain dosage forms. The presence of different excipients or varying amounts of excipients between formulations may result in bio-inequivalence. The excipient impact may lead to significant variations in clinical outcomes as well. The aim of this paper is to review the recent findings of excipient effects on gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, focusing on their interactions with the metabolic enzymes and transporters in the GI tract. A wide range of commonly used excipients such as binders, diluents, fillers, solvents, and surfactants are discussed here. We summarized the reported effects of those excipients on GI tract phase I and phase II enzymes, uptake and efflux transporters, and relevant clinical significance. This information can enhance our understanding of excipient influence on drug absorption and is useful in designing pharmacokinetic studies and evaluating the resultant data.

  9. Filament formation by metabolic enzymes is a specific adaptation to an advanced state of cellular starvation

    PubMed Central

    Petrovska, Ivana; Nüske, Elisabeth; Munder, Matthias C; Kulasegaran, Gayathrie; Malinovska, Liliana; Kroschwald, Sonja; Richter, Doris; Fahmy, Karim; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the key questions in biology is how the metabolism of a cell responds to changes in the environment. In budding yeast, starvation causes a drop in intracellular pH, but the functional role of this pH change is not well understood. Here, we show that the enzyme glutamine synthetase (Gln1) forms filaments at low pH and that filament formation leads to enzymatic inactivation. Filament formation by Gln1 is a highly cooperative process, strongly dependent on macromolecular crowding, and involves back-to-back stacking of cylindrical homo-decamers into filaments that associate laterally to form higher order fibrils. Other metabolic enzymes also assemble into filaments at low pH. Hence, we propose that filament formation is a general mechanism to inactivate and store key metabolic enzymes during a state of advanced cellular starvation. These findings have broad implications for understanding the interplay between nutritional stress, the metabolism and the physical organization of a cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02409.001 PMID:24771766

  10. Enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2014-09-07

    Fast, reliable and sensitive methods for nucleic acid detection are of growing practical interest with respect to molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious and genetic diseases. Currently, PCR-based and other target amplification strategies are most extensively used in practice. At the same time, such assays have limitations that can be overcome by alternative approaches. There is a recent explosion in the design of methods that amplify the signal produced by a nucleic acid target, without changing its copy number. This review aims at systematization and critical analysis of the enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) signal amplification technique. The approach uses nucleases to recognize and cleave the probe-target complex. Cleavage reactions produce a detectable signal. The advantages of such techniques are potentially low sensitivity to contamination and lack of the requirement of a thermal cycler. Nucleases used for EATR include sequence-dependent restriction or nicking endonucleases or sequence independent exonuclease III, lambda exonuclease, RNase H, RNase HII, AP endonuclease, duplex-specific nuclease, DNase I, or T7 exonuclease. EATR-based assays are potentially useful for point-of-care diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping and microRNA analysis. Specificity, limit of detection and the potential impact of EATR strategies on molecular diagnostics are discussed.

  11. Determination of pyruvic acid by using enzymic fluorescence capillary analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Gao, Xiu-Feng; Li, Yong-Sheng; Ju, Xiang; Zhang, Jia; Zheng, Jia

    2008-07-15

    A new method (P-LE-FCA) for the determination of pyruvic acid was proposed based on liquid enzyme method (LE) and fluorescence capillary analysis (FCA). The optimum experimental conditions were as follows: the excitation and emission wavelengths were 350 and 460 nm, respectively; the reaction time and temperature were 20 min and 38 degrees C, respectively; the pH of phosphate buffer solution was 7.5; the concentrations of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and lactate dehydrogenase were 1.0 mmol L(-1) and 5.0 k UL(-1), respectively. The linear range of this method was 0.2-1.2 mmol L(-1) (Delta F=327.13C-10.018, r=0.9942). Its detection limit was 0.012 mmol L(-1). And its relative standard deviation was 0.86%. Only 18 microL of total reaction solution is enough for the detection. P-LE-FCA has some merits such as lower cost, simple operation procedure and micro determination. It has been used for the determination of pyruvic acid content in human urine samples.

  12. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  13. Metabolism of xenobiotic carboxylic acids: focus on coenzyme A conjugation, reactivity, and interference with lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Malin; Weidolf, Lars

    2013-08-19

    While xenobiotic carboxylic acids (XCAs) have been studied extensively with respect to their enzymatic conversion to potentially reactive acyl glucuronides with implications to drug induced hepatotoxicity, the formation of xenobiotic-S-acyl-CoA thioesters (xenobiotic-CoAs) have been much less studied in spite of data indicating that such conjugates may be equally or more reactive than the corresponding acyl glucuronides. This review addresses enzymes and cell organelles involved in the formation of xenobiotic-CoAs, the reactivity of such conjugates toward biological macromolecules, and in vitro and in vivo methodology to assess consequences of such reactivity. Further, the propensity of xenobiotic-CoAs to interfere with endogenous lipid metabolism, e.g., inhibition of β-oxidation or depletion of the CoA or carnitine pools, adds to the complexity of the potential contribution of XCAs to hepatotoxicity by a number of mechanisms in addition to those in common with the corresponding acyl glucuronides. On the basis of our review of the literature on xenobiotic-CoA conjugates, there appear to be a number of gaps in our understanding of the bioactivation of XCA both with respect to the mechanisms involved and the experimental approaches to distinguish between the role of acyl glucuronides and xenobiotic-CoA conjugates. These aspects are focused upon and described in detail in this review.

  14. Spore Germination and Carbon Metabolism in Fusarium solani V. Changes in Anaerobic Metabolism and Related Enzyme Activities during Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Vincent W.; Cochrane, Jean C.

    1966-01-01

    Macroconidia of Fusarium solani f. phascoli have no detectable capacity to respire glucose anaerobically; germinated spores and mycelium, on the other hand, ferment glucose, although slowly. Extracts of ungerminated spores contain hexokinase, phosphohexoisomerase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, triose phosphate dehydrogenase, triose phosphate isomerase, phosphoglyceric kinase, enolase, phosphoglyceric mutase, pyruvate kinase, and pyruvate decarboxylase. It follows, therefore, that the appearance of fermentative capacity during spore germination cannot be ascribed to the de novo synthesis of any of these enzymes. During germination and mycelial development the specific activity of all of the enzymes named except phosphohexoisomerase and aldolase increases 2- to 8-fold. Specific activity of all of the enzymes is substantially higher than the fermentative capacity of intact cells, i.e., none is limiting to anaerobic respiration. The enzymatic assay data are consistent with a conclusion reached earlier on the basis of studies of aerobic glucose metabolism, that the process of germination involves an acceleration of pre-existing metabolic systems rather than an appearance of new pathways. PMID:16656324

  15. Increased oxygen radical-dependent inactivation of metabolic enzymes by liver microsomes after chronic ethanol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, E.; Cederbaum, A.I. )

    1988-10-01

    Enzymatic and nonenzymatic mixed-function oxidase systems have been shown to generate an oxidant that catalyzes the inactivation of glutamine synthetase and other metabolic enzymes. Recent studies have shown that microsomes isolated from rats chronically fed ethanol generate reactive oxygen intermediates at elevated rates compared with controls. Microsomes from rats fed ethanol were found to be more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes added to the incubation system. The enzymes studied were alcohol dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase. The inactivation process by both types of microsomal preparations was sensitive to catalase and glutathione plus glutathione peroxidase, but was not affected by superoxide dismutase or hydroxyl radical scavengers. Iron was required for the inactivation of added enzymes; microsomes from the rats fed ethanol remained more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes in the absence or presence of several ferric complexes. The inactivation of enzymes was enhanced by the addition of menadione or paraquat to the microsomes, and rates of inactivation were higher with the microsomes from the ethanol-fed rats. The enhanced generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and increased inactivation of enzymes by microsomes may contribute toward the hepatotoxic effects associated with ethanol consumption.

  16. Stereochemical course, isotope effects, and enzyme inhibitor studies of glaucine metabolism in fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial transformation of the aporphine alkaloid glaucine by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030) proceeds with complete substrate stereoselectivity. The fungus F. solani metabolizes only S-(+)-glaucine (1) to dehydroglaucine (3), and A. flavipes metabolizes only R-(-)-glaucine (2) to dehydroglaucine. This facile microbiological reaction is useful in the destructive resolution of racemic mixtures of glaucine, and may provide a model for producing pure enantiomers (either R or S) of other aporphines from racemic mixtures. In order to extend the reaction to other aporphines and related alkaloids, the overall stereochemical course and enzyme(s) involved in the reaction, and the substrate requirements of the enzyme were investigated. The overall stereochemical course of the transformation was examined using C-7 methyl-blocked analogs of glaucine, cis- and trans-7-methylglaucine, as substrates for the fungi. Isolation and examination of residual substrates from semi-preparative scale incubations by MS, PMR, PMR with a chiral shift reagent, OR and ORD indicated that the transformation was enantioselective in the case of A. flavipes. However, only a 10% enrichment of 6aR,7R-cis-7-methylglaucine was observed in F. solani cultures. The oxidation of glaucine can be envisioned as proceeding through one of several mechanisms, each involving a different enzyme system. Deuterium isotope, induction and enzyme inhibitor experiments helped to distinguish between the three mechanisms.

  17. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stäubert, Claudia; Broom, Oliver Jay; Nordström, Anders

    2015-08-14

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them.We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation.We found HCA1 and HCA3 mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid β-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death.Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy.

  18. Metabolism of aflatoxins: key enzymes and interindividual as well as interspecies differences.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Vlastimil; Wu, Qinghua; Kuča, Kamil

    2014-09-01

    Aflatoxins are potent hepatocarcinogen in animal models and suspected carcinogen in humans. The most important aflatoxin in terms of toxic potency and occurrence is aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). In this review, we mainly summarized the key metabolizing enzymes of AFB1 in animals and humans. Moreover, the interindividual and the interspecies differences in AFB1 metabolism are highly concerned. In human liver, CYP3A4 plays an important role in biotransforming AFB1 to the toxic product AFB1-8,9-epoxide. In human lung, CYP2A13 has a significant activity in metabolizing AFB1 to AFB1-8,9-epoxide and AFM1-8,9-epoxide. The epoxide of AFB1-8,9-epoxide could conjugate with glutathione to reduce the toxicity by glutathione-S-transferase (GST). In poultry species, CYP2A6, CYP3A37, CYP1A5, and CYP1A1 are responsible for bioactivation of AFB1. There are interindividual variations in the rate of activation of aflatoxins in various species, and there are also differences between children and adults. The age and living regions are important factors affecting resistance of species to AFB1. The rate of AFB1-8,9-epoxide formation and its conjugation with glutathione are key parameters in interspecies and interindividual differences in sensitivity to the toxic effect of AFB1. This review provides an important information for key metabolizing enzymes and the global metabolism of aflatoxins in different species.

  19. Branched short-chain fatty acids modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in primary adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Degerman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid, generated through colonic fermentation of dietary fibers, have been shown to reach the systemic circulation at micromolar concentrations. Moreover, SCFAs have been conferred anti-obesity properties in both animal models and human subjects. Branched SCFAs (BSCFAs), e.g., isobutyric and isovaleric acid, are generated by fermentation of branched amino acids, generated from undigested protein reaching colon. However, BSCFAs have been sparsely investigated when referring to effects on energy metabolism. Here we primarily investigate the effects of isobutyric acid and isovaleric acid on glucose and lipid metabolism in primary rat and human adipocytes. BSCFAs inhibited both cAMP-mediated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis at 10 mM, whereas isobutyric acid potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by all concentrations (1, 3 and 10 mM) in rat adipocytes. For human adipocytes, only SCFAs inhibited lipolysis at 10 mM. In both in vitro models, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, a rate limiting enzyme in lipolysis. In addition, BSCFAs and SCFAs, in contrast to insulin, inhibited lipolysis in the presence of wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor and OPC3911, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor in rat adipocytes. Furthermore, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B. To conclude, BSCFAs have effects on adipocyte lipid and glucose metabolism that can contribute to improved insulin sensitivity in individuals with disturbed metabolism. PMID:27994949

  20. Metabolism of amino acids, dipeptides and tetrapeptides by Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Sinz, Quirin; Schwab, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    The microbial degradation of proteins, peptides and amino acids generates volatiles involved in the typical flavor of dry fermented sausage. The ability of three Lactobacillus sakei strains to form aroma compounds was investigated. Whole resting cells were fermented in phosphate buffer with equimolar amounts of substrates consisting of dipeptides, tetrapeptides and free amino acids, respectively. Dipeptides disappeared quickly from the solutions whereas tetrapeptides were only partially degraded. In both approaches the concentration of free amino acids increased in the reaction mixture but did not reach the equimolar amount of the initial substrates. When free amino acids were fed to the bacteria their levels decreased only slightly. Although peptides were more rapidly degraded and/or transported into the cells, free amino acids produced higher amounts of volatiles. It is suggested, that after transport into the cell peptides are only partially hydrolyzed to their amino acids, while the rest is metabolized via alternative metabolic pathways. The three L. sakei strains differed to some extend in their ability to metabolize the substrates to volatile compounds. In a few cases this was due to the position of the amino acids within the peptides. Compared to other starter cultures used for the production of dry fermented sausages, the metabolic impact of the L. sakei strains on the formation of volatiles was very low.

  1. Effects of phenol on metabolic activities and transcription profiles of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Chironomus kiinensis larvae.

    PubMed

    Cao, C W; Sun, L L; Niu, F; Liu, P; Chu, D; Wang, Z Y

    2016-02-01

    Phenol, also known as carbolic acid or phenic acid, is a priority pollutant in aquatic ecosystems. The present study has investigated metabolic activities and transcription profiles of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Chironomus kiinensis under phenol stress. Exposure of C. kiinensis larvae to three sublethal doses of phenol (1, 10 and 100 µM) inhibited cytochrome P450 enzyme activity during the 96 h exposure period. The P450 activity measured after the 24 h exposure to phenol stress could be used to assess the level (low or high) of phenol contamination in the environment. To investigate the potential of cytochrome P450 genes as molecular biomarkers to monitor phenol contamination, the cDNA of ten CYP6 genes from the transcriptome of C. kiinensis were identified and sequenced. The open reading frames of the CYP6 genes ranged from 1266 to 1587 bp, encoding deduced polypeptides composed of between 421 and 528 amino acids, with predicted molecular masses from 49.01 to 61.94 kDa and isoelectric points (PI) from 6.01 to 8.89. Among the CYP6 genes, the mRNA expression levels of the CYP6EW3, CYP6EV9, CYP6FV1 and CYP6FV2 genes significantly altered in response to phenol exposure; therefore, these genes could potentially serve as biomarkers in the environment. This study shows that P450 activity combined with one or multiple CYP6 genes could be used to monitor phenol pollution.

  2. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  3. Cloning, expression, and sequencing of squalene-hopene cyclase, a key enzyme in triterpenoid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, D; Kaletta, C; Entian, K D; Beck-Sickinger, A; Poralla, K

    1992-01-01

    The pentacyclic hopanoids, a class of eubacterial lipids, are synthesized by squalene-hopene cyclase and side chain-elongating enzymes. With the aid of DNA probes based on the amino-terminal sequence of purified squalene-hopene cyclase from Bacillus acidocaldarius, clones of Escherichia coli that express this enzyme in the cytoplasmic membrane were isolated. According to the DNA sequence, the cyclase contained 627 amino acids with a molecular mass of 69,473 Da. A high percentage of the amino acids were basic. No significant similarity to existing sequenced proteins was found. Images PMID:1729216

  4. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  5. Novel roles for the polyphenol oxidase enzyme in secondary metabolism and the regulation of cell death in walnut.

    PubMed

    Araji, Soha; Grammer, Theresa A; Gertzen, Ross; Anderson, Stephen D; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Veberic, Robert; Phu, My L; Solar, Anita; Leslie, Charles A; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Escobar, Matthew A

    2014-03-01

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) catalyzes the oxidation of phenolic compounds into highly reactive quinones. Polymerization of PPO-derived quinones causes the postharvest browning of cut or bruised fruit, but the native physiological functions of PPOs in undamaged, intact plant cells are not well understood. Walnut (Juglans regia) produces a rich array of phenolic compounds and possesses a single PPO enzyme, rendering it an ideal model to study PPO. We generated a series of PPO-silenced transgenic walnut lines that display less than 5% of wild-type PPO activity. Strikingly, the PPO-silenced plants developed spontaneous necrotic lesions on their leaves in the absence of pathogen challenge (i.e. a lesion mimic phenotype). To gain a clearer perspective on the potential functions of PPO and its possible connection to cell death, we compared the leaf transcriptomes and metabolomes of wild-type and PPO-silenced plants. Silencing of PPO caused major alterations in the metabolism of phenolic compounds and their derivatives (e.g. coumaric acid and catechin) and in the expression of phenylpropanoid pathway genes. Several observed metabolic changes point to a direct role for PPO in the metabolism of tyrosine and in the biosynthesis of the hydroxycoumarin esculetin in vivo. In addition, PPO-silenced plants displayed massive (9-fold) increases in the tyrosine-derived metabolite tyramine, whose exogenous application elicits cell death in walnut and several other plant species. Overall, these results suggest that PPO plays a novel and fundamental role in secondary metabolism and acts as an indirect regulator of cell death in walnut.

  6. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  7. Immune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Cordes, Thekla; Ghelfi, Jenny; Pailot, Arnaud; Reiling, Norbert; Goldmann, Oliver; Binz, Tina; Wegner, André; Tallam, Aravind; Rausell, Antonio; Buttini, Manuel; Linster, Carole L; Medina, Eva; Balling, Rudi; Hiller, Karsten

    2013-05-07

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

  8. Ornithine Aminotransferase, an Important Glutamate-Metabolizing Enzyme at the Crossroads of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ginguay, Antonin; Cynober, Luc; Curis, Emmanuel; Nicolis, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Ornithine δ-aminotransferase (OAT, E.C. 2.6.1.13) catalyzes the transfer of the δ-amino group from ornithine (Orn) to α-ketoglutarate (aKG), yielding glutamate-5-semialdehyde and glutamate (Glu), and vice versa. In mammals, OAT is a mitochondrial enzyme, mainly located in the liver, intestine, brain, and kidney. In general, OAT serves to form glutamate from ornithine, with the notable exception of the intestine, where citrulline (Cit) or arginine (Arg) are end products. Its main function is to control the production of signaling molecules and mediators, such as Glu itself, Cit, GABA, and aliphatic polyamines. It is also involved in proline (Pro) synthesis. Deficiency in OAT causes gyrate atrophy, a rare but serious inherited disease, a further measure of the importance of this enzyme. PMID:28272331

  9. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.

  10. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: Structure elucidation and metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-10-20

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. Lastly, in this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.

  11. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  12. Physiological and metabolic effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid for mitigating salinity stress in creeping bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhimin; Chang, Zuoliang; Sun, Lihong; Yu, Jingjin; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether foliar application of a chlorophyll precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), could mitigate salinity stress damages in perennial grass species by regulating photosynthetic activities, ion content, antioxidant metabolism, or metabolite accumulation. A salinity-sensitive perennial grass species, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), was irrigated daily with 200 mM NaCl for 28 d, which were foliar sprayed with water or ALA (0.5 mg L-1) weekly during the experiment in growth chamber. Foliar application of ALA was effective in mitigating physiological damage resulting from salinity stress, as manifested by increased turf quality, shoot growth rate, leaf relative water content, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate. Foliar application of ALA also alleviated membrane damages, as shown by lower membrane electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation, which was associated with increases in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Leaf content of Na+ was reduced and the ratio of K+/Na+ was increased with ALA application under salinity stress. The positive effects of ALA for salinity tolerance were also associated with the accumulation of organic acids (α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and malic acid), amino acids (alanine, 5-oxoproline, aspartic acid, and γ -aminobutyric acid), and sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, lyxose, allose, xylose, sucrose, and maltose). ALA-mitigation of physiological damages by salinity could be due to suppression of Na+ accumulation and enhanced physiological and metabolic activities related to photosynthesis, respiration, osmotic regulation, and antioxidant defense.

  13. Physiological and Metabolic Effects of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid for Mitigating Salinity Stress in Creeping Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhimin; Chang, Zuoliang; Sun, Lihong; Yu, Jingjin; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether foliar application of a chlorophyll precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), could mitigate salinity stress damages in perennial grass species by regulating photosynthetic activities, ion content, antioxidant metabolism, or metabolite accumulation. A salinity-sensitive perennial grass species, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), was irrigated daily with 200 mM NaCl for 28 d, which were foliar sprayed with water or ALA (0.5 mg L−1) weekly during the experiment in growth chamber. Foliar application of ALA was effective in mitigating physiological damage resulting from salinity stress, as manifested by increased turf quality, shoot growth rate, leaf relative water content, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate. Foliar application of ALA also alleviated membrane damages, as shown by lower membrane electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation, which was associated with increases in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Leaf content of Na+ was reduced and the ratio of K+/Na+ was increased with ALA application under salinity stress. The positive effects of ALA for salinity tolerance were also associated with the accumulation of organic acids (α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and malic acid), amino acids (alanine, 5-oxoproline, aspartic acid, and γ -aminobutyric acid), and sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, lyxose, allose, xylose, sucrose, and maltose). ALA-mitigation of physiological damages by salinity could be due to suppression of Na+ accumulation and enhanced physiological and metabolic activities related to photosynthesis, respiration, osmotic regulation, and antioxidant defense. PMID:25551443

  14. Transcription Factor Nrf1 Negatively Regulates the Cystine/Glutamate Transporter and Lipid-Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Peirce, Vivian; Baird, Liam; Matsuyama, Yuka; Takaku, Misaki; Walsh, Shawn V.; Griffin, Julian L.; Uruno, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Liver-specific Nrf1 (NF-E2-p45-related factor 1) knockout mice develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify postnatal mechanisms responsible for this phenotype, we generated an inducible liver-specific Nrf1 knockout mouse line using animals harboring an Nrf1flox allele and a rat CYP1A1-Cre transgene (Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre mice). Administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) to these mice (Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice) resulted in loss of hepatic Nrf1 expression. The livers of mice lacking Nrf1 accumulated lipid, and the hepatic fatty acid (FA) composition in such animals differed significantly from that in the Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre control. This change was provoked by upregulation of several FA metabolism genes. Unexpectedly, we also found that the level of glutathione was increased dramatically in livers of Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice. While expression of glutathione biosynthetic enzymes was unchanged, xCT, a component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc−, was significantly upregulated in livers of Nrf1flox/flox::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice, suggesting that Nrf1 normally suppresses xCT. Thus, stress-inducible expression of xCT is a two-step process: under homeostatic conditions, Nrf1 effectively suppresses nonspecific transactivation of xCT, but when cells encounter severe oxidative/electrophilic stress, Nrf1 is displaced from an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the gene promoter while Nrf2 is recruited to the ARE. Thus, Nrf1 controls both the FA and the cystine/cysteine content of hepatocytes by participating in an elaborate regulatory network. PMID:25092871

  15. Transcription factor Nrf1 negatively regulates the cystine/glutamate transporter and lipid-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Tadayuki; Peirce, Vivian; Baird, Liam; Matsuyama, Yuka; Takaku, Misaki; Walsh, Shawn V; Griffin, Julian L; Uruno, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John D

    2014-10-01

    Liver-specific Nrf1 (NF-E2-p45-related factor 1) knockout mice develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify postnatal mechanisms responsible for this phenotype, we generated an inducible liver-specific Nrf1 knockout mouse line using animals harboring an Nrf1(flox) allele and a rat CYP1A1-Cre transgene (Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre mice). Administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) to these mice (Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice) resulted in loss of hepatic Nrf1 expression. The livers of mice lacking Nrf1 accumulated lipid, and the hepatic fatty acid (FA) composition in such animals differed significantly from that in the Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre control. This change was provoked by upregulation of several FA metabolism genes. Unexpectedly, we also found that the level of glutathione was increased dramatically in livers of Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice. While expression of glutathione biosynthetic enzymes was unchanged, xCT, a component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system x(c)(-), was significantly upregulated in livers of Nrf1(flox/flox)::CYP1A1-Cre+3MC mice, suggesting that Nrf1 normally suppresses xCT. Thus, stress-inducible expression of xCT is a two-step process: under homeostatic conditions, Nrf1 effectively suppresses nonspecific transactivation of xCT, but when cells encounter severe oxidative/electrophilic stress, Nrf1 is displaced from an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the gene promoter while Nrf2 is recruited to the ARE. Thus, Nrf1 controls both the FA and the cystine/cysteine content of hepatocytes by participating in an elaborate regulatory network.

  16. Effect of geraniol, a plant derived monoterpene on lipids and lipid metabolizing enzymes in experimental hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Muthukumaran; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major, modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we have focused on the effect of different doses of geraniol (GOH) on the lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes in atherogenic diet (AD) fed hamsters. Male Syrian hamsters were grouped into seven: group 1 were control animals; group 2 were animals fed GOH alone (200 mg/kg b.w); group 3 were animals fed AD (10 % coconut oil, 0.25 % cholesterol, and 0.25 % cholic acid); group 4 were animals fed AD + corn oil (2.5 ml/kg b.w); and groups 5, 6, and 7 were fed AD as in group 3 + different doses of GOH (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg b.w), respectively, for 12 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and various assays were performed in the plasma and tissues. The AD hamsters showed marked changes in lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes. However, supplementation with GOH counteracted the hyperlipidemia by inhibiting HMG CoA reductase and suppressing lipogenesis. The antihyperlipidemic efficacy of GOH was found to be effective at the dose of 100 mg/kg b.w. This study illustrates that GOH is effective in lowering the risk of hyperlipidemia in AD fed hamsters.

  17. Importance of influx and efflux systems and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rochat, B

    2009-08-01

    In this review, intratumoral drug disposition will be integrated into the wide range of resistance mechanisms to anticancer agents with particular emphasis on targeted protein kinase inhibitors. Six rules will be established: 1. There is a high variability of extracellular/intracellular drug level ratios; 2. There are three main systems involved in intratumoral drug disposition that are composed of SLC, ABC and XME enzymes; 3. There is a synergistic interplay between these three systems; 4. In cancer subclones, there is a strong genomic instability that leads to a highly variable expression of SLC, ABC or XME enzymes; 5. Tumor-expressed metabolizing enzymes play a role in tumor-specific ADME and cell survival and 6. These three systems are involved in the appearance of resistance (transient event) or in the resistance itself. In addition, this article will investigate whether the overexpression of some ABC and XME systems in cancer cells is just a random consequence of DNA/chromosomal instability, hypo- or hypermethylation and microRNA deregulation, or a more organized modification induced by transposable elements. Experiments will also have to establish if these tumor-expressed enzymes participate in cell metabolism or in tumor-specific ADME or if they are only markers of clonal evolution and genomic deregulation. Eventually, the review will underline that the fate of anticancer agents in cancer cells should be more thoroughly investigated from drug discovery to clinical studies. Indeed, inhibition of tumor expressed metabolizing enzymes could strongly increase drug disposition, specifically in the target cells resulting in more efficient therapies.

  18. Improving fatty acids production by engineering dynamic pathway regulation and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Koffas, Mattheos

    2014-01-01

    Global energy demand and environmental concerns have stimulated increasing efforts to produce carbon-neutral fuels directly from renewable resources. Microbially derived aliphatic hydrocarbons, the petroleum-replica fuels, have emerged as promising alternatives to meet this goal. However, engineering metabolic pathways with high productivity and yield requires dynamic redistribution of cellular resources and optimal control of pathway expression. Here we report a genetically encoded metabolic switch that enables dynamic regulation of fatty acids (FA) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. The engineered strains were able to dynamically compensate the critical enzymes involved in the supply and consumption of malonyl-CoA and efficiently redirect carbon flux toward FA biosynthesis. Implementation of this metabolic control resulted in an oscillatory malonyl-CoA pattern and a balanced metabolism between cell growth and product formation, yielding 15.7- and 2.1-fold improvement in FA titer compared with the wild-type strain and the strain carrying the uncontrolled metabolic pathway. This study provides a new paradigm in metabolic engineering to control and optimize metabolic pathways facilitating the high-yield production of other malonyl-CoA–derived compounds. PMID:25049420

  19. The effect of enzyme inhibition on the metabolism and activation of tacrine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Spaldin, V; Madden, S; Pool, W F; Woolf, T F; Park, B K

    1994-01-01

    1. Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine-hydrochloride: THA) underwent metabolism in vitro by a panel (n = 12) of human liver microsomes genotyped for CYP2D6, in the presence of NADPH, to both protein-reactive and stable metabolites. 2. There was considerable variation in the extent of THA metabolism amongst human livers. Protein-reactive metabolite formation showed a 10-fold variation (0.6 +/- 0.1%-5.2 +/- 0.8% of incubated radioactivity mg-1 protein) whilst stable metabolites showed a 3-fold variation (24.3 +/- 1.7%-78.6 +/- 2.6% of incubated radioactivity). 3. Using cytochrome P450 isoform specific inhibitors CYP1A2 was identified as the major enzyme involved in all routes of THA metabolism. 4. There was a high correlation between aromatic and alicyclic hydroxylation (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001) consistent with these biotransformations being catalysed by the same enzymes. 5. Enoxacin (ENOX), cimetidine (CIM) and chloroquine (CQ) inhibited THA metabolism by a preferential decrease in the bioactivation to protein-reactive, and hence potentially toxic, species. The inhibitory potency of ENOX and CIM was increased significantly upon pre-incubation with microsomes and NADPH. 6. Covalent binding correlated with 7-OH-THA formation before (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001) and after (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001) inhibition by CIM, consistent with a two-step mechanism in the formation of protein-reactive metabolite(s) via a 7-OH intermediate. 7. The use of enzyme inhibitors may provide a useful tool for examining the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of THA in vivo. PMID:7946932

  20. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans.

  1. Can valproic acid be an inducer of clozapine metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisco J.; Eap, Chin B.; Ansermot, Nicolas; Crettol, Severine; Spina, Edoardo; de Leon, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior clozapine studies indicated no effects, mild inhibition or induction of valproic acid (VPA) on clozapine metabolism. The hypotheses that 1) VPA is a net inducer of clozapine metabolism, and 2) smoking modifies this inductive effect were tested in a therapeutic drug monitoring study. Methods After excluding strong inhibitors and inducers, 353 steady-state total clozapine (clozapine plus norclozapine) concentrations provided by 151 patients were analyzed using a random intercept linear model. Results VPA appeared to be an inducer of clozapine metabolism since total plasma clozapine concentrations in subjects taking VPA were significantly lower (27% lower; 95% confidence interval, 14% to 39%) after controlling for confounding variables including smoking (35% lower, 28% to 56%). Discussion Prospective studies are needed to definitively establish that VPA may 1) be an inducer of clozapine metabolism when induction prevails over competitive inhibition, and 2) be an inducer even in smokers who are under the influence of smoking inductive effects on clozapine metabolism. PMID:24764199

  2. Impact of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) on Skeletal Muscle Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Jonggun; Whang, Kwang-Youn; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has garnered special attention as a food bioactive compound that prevents and attenuates obesity. Although most studies on the effects of CLA on obesity have focused on the reduction of body fat, a number of studies have demonstrated that CLA also increases lean body mass and enhances physical performances. It has been suggested that these effects may be due in part to physiological changes in the skeletal muscle, such as changes in the muscle fiber type transformation, alteration of the intracellular signaling pathways in muscle metabolism, or energy metabolism. However, the mode of action for CLA in muscle metabolism is not completely understood. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the effects of CLA on skeletal muscle metabolism. Given that CLA not only reduces body fat, but also improves lean mass, there is great potential for the use of CLA to improve muscle metabolism, which would have a significant health impact.

  3. Oxidative bioelectrocatalysis: From natural metabolic pathways to synthetic metabolons and minimal enzyme cascades.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Shelley D

    2016-05-01

    Anodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells are more complex than cathodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells, because laccase and bilirubin oxidase can individually catalyze four electron reduction of oxygen to water, whereas most anodic enzymes only do a single two electron oxidation of a complex fuel (i.e. glucose oxidase oxidizing glucose to gluconolactone while generating 2 electrons of the total 24 electrons), so enzyme cascades are typically needed for complete oxidation of the fuel. This review article will discuss the lessons learned from natural metabolic pathways about multi-step oxidation and how those lessons have been applied to minimal or artificial enzyme cascades. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  4. Enzyme activities of D-glucose metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Shi, J L; Beehler, B W; Beck, B

    1992-12-01

    The activities of key enzymes that are members of D-glucose metabolic pathways in Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoing respirative, respirofermentative, and fermentative metabolisms are monitored. The steady-state activities of glycolytic enzymes, except phosphofructokinase, decrease with a reduced efficiency in D-glucose utilization by yeast continuous culture. On the other hand, the enzymic activities of pentose monophosphate pathway reach the maximum when the cell mass production of the cultures is optimum. Enzymes of tricarboxylate cycle exhibit the maximum activities at approximately the washout rate. The steady-state activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex increases rapidly when D-glucose is efficiently utilized. By comparison, the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase begins to increase only when ethanol production occurs. Depletion of dissolved oxygen suppresses the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex but facilitates that of pyruvate decarboxylase. Acetate greatly enhances the acetyl CoA synthetase activity. Similarly, ethanol stimulates alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Evidence for the existence of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes in the fission yeast is presented.

  5. Metabolic stability: main enzymes involved and best tools to assess it.

    PubMed

    Laine, Romuald

    2008-11-01

    The introduction of in vitro tools to predict clearance in the early discovery process has led to new ways of working. Combined with metabolite identification, such tools have allowed design of compounds with low clearance. Encouraged by the success of such an approach and by the better knowledge of the enzyme involved in the metabolism, in vitro teams have begun to develop a plethora of assays to assess the metabolic clearance, understand the route of metabolism, and predict the human clearance. Although the diversity of assays may have allowed a more thorough approach to addressing specific issues, in the time of budget constrictions, limited access to resources and materials in vitro teams have now to decide what are the 'must have' and 'nice to have' assays to enable them to help as efficiently as possible projects at the discovery stage. Reducing the number of assays and focusing on the most relevant ones is an option to consider. Knowledge of the main enzymes involved in the drug metabolism should help to select the most relevant in vitro tools. Although the systems presented here have their merits, the author proposes that hepatocytes should be considered as the in vitro tool of choice.

  6. Mouse Genetics Suggests Cell-Context Dependency for Myc-Regulated Metabolic Enzymes during Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Lisa M.; Kreutzer, Christiane; Pretsch, Walter; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Nilsson, Jonas A.

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc (hereafter called Myc) belongs to a family of transcription factors that regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Myc initiates the transcription of a large cast of genes involved in cell growth by stimulating metabolism and protein synthesis. Some of these, like those involved in glycolysis, may be part of the Warburg effect, which is defined as increased glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of adequate oxygen supply. In this study, we have taken a mouse-genetics approach to challenge the role of select Myc-regulated metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis in vivo. By breeding λ-Myc transgenic mice, Apc Min mice, and p53 knockout mice with mouse models carrying inactivating alleles of Lactate dehydrogenase A (Ldha), 3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) and Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (Shmt1), we obtained offspring that were monitored for tumor development. Very surprisingly, we found that these genes are dispensable for tumorigenesis in these genetic settings. However, experiments in fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells expressing oncogenic Ras show that these cells are sensitive to Ldha knockdown. Our genetic models reveal cell context dependency and a remarkable ability of tumor cells to adapt to alterations in critical metabolic pathways. Thus, to achieve clinical success, it will be of importance to correctly stratify patients and to find synthetic lethal combinations of inhibitors targeting metabolic enzymes. PMID:22438825

  7. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources. PMID:24829223

  8. DMET™ (Drug Metabolism Enzymes and Transporters): a pharmacogenomic platform for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Arbitrio, Mariamena; Martino, Maria Teresa Di; Scionti, Francesca; Agapito, Giuseppe; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, high-throughput technologies have allowed the investigation of genetic variations underlying the inter-individual variability in drug pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. Several studies have recently moved from a candidate gene-based pharmacogenetic approach to genome-wide pharmacogenomic analyses to identify biomarkers for selection of patient-tailored therapies. In this aim, the identification of genetic variants affecting the individual drug metabolism is relevant for the definition of more active and less toxic treatments. This review focuses on the potentiality, reliability and limitations of the DMET™ (Drug Metabolism Enzymes and Transporters) Plus as pharmacogenomic drug metabolism multi-gene panel platform for selecting biomarkers in the final aim to optimize drugs use and characterize the individual genetic background. PMID:27304055

  9. Differences in activities of the enzymes of nucleotide metabolism and its implications for cardiac xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Yuen, A H Y; Khalpey, Z; Lavitrano, M; McGregor, C G A; Kalsi, K K; Yacoub, M H; Smolenski, R T

    2006-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is one be possible solution for a severe shortage of human organs available for transplantation. However, only a few studies addressed metabolic compatibility of transplanted animal organs. Our aim was to compare activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in the heart of different species that are relevant to clinical or experimental xenotransplantation. We noted fundamental differences: ecto-5' nucleotidease (E5' N) activity was 4-fold lower in pig and baboon hearts compared to the human hearts while mouse activity was compatible with human and rat activity was three times higher than human. There also were significant differences in AMP-deaminase (AMPD), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activities. We conclude that differences in nucleotide metabolism may contribute to organ dysfunction after xenotransplantation.

  10. Genetic Investigation of Tricarboxylic Acid Metabolism During the Plasmodium falciparum Lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Hangjun; Lewis, Ian A.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; McLean, Kyle J.; Ganesan, Suresh M.; Painter, Heather J.; Mather, Michael W.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Llinás, Manuel; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimalarial drugs are urgently needed to control drug resistant forms of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Mitochondrial electron transport is the target of both existing and new antimalarials. Herein, we describe 11 genetic knockout (KO) lines that delete six of the eight mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Although all TCA KOs grew normally in asexual blood stages, these metabolic deficiencies halted lifecycle progression in later stages. Specifically, aconitase KO parasites arrested as late gametocytes, whereas α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase deficient parasites failed to develop oocysts in the mosquitoes. Mass spectrometry analysis of 13C isotope-labeled TCA mutant parasites showed that P. falciparum has significant flexibility in TCA metabolism. This flexibility manifested itself through changes in pathway fluxes and through altered exchange of substrates between cytosolic and mitochondrial pools. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic plasticity is essential for parasite development. PMID:25843709

  11. Metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids and their tartaric acid esters by Brettanomyces and Pediococcus in red wines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric, respectively) are found in wines in varying concentrations. While Brettanomyces and Pediococcus can utilize the free acids, it is not known whether they can metabolize the correspon...

  12. Tissue-of-origin Dictates Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Mutant Kras-driven Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Jared R.; Torrence, Margaret E.; Danai, Laura V.; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Davidson, Shawn M.; Bauer, Matthew R.; Lau, Allison N.; Ji, Brian W.; Dixit, Purushottam D.; Hosios, Aaron M.; Muir, Alexander; Chin, Christopher R.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Jacks, Tyler; Wolpin, Brian M.; Vitkup, Dennis; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor genetics guides patient selection for many new therapies, and cell culture studies have demonstrated that specific mutations can promote metabolic phenotypes. However, whether tissue context defines cancer dependence on specific metabolic pathways is unknown. Kras activation and Trp53 deletion in the pancreas or the lung result in pancreatic ductal adenocarinoma (PDAC) or non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) respectively, but despite the same initiating events, these tumors utilize branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) differently. NSCLC tumors incorporate free BCAAs into tissue protein and use BCAAs as a nitrogen source while PDAC tumors have decreased BCAA uptake. These differences are reflected in expression levels of BCAA catabolic enzymes in both mice and humans. Loss of Bcat1 and Bcat2, the enzymes responsible for BCAA utilization, impairs NSCLC tumor formation, but these enzymes are not required for PDAC tumor formation, arguing that tissue-of-origin is an important determinant of how cancers satisfy their metabolic requirements. PMID:27609895

  13. Metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids in chlorotic leaves of 'Honeycrisp' apple (Malus domestica Borkh) with excessive accumulation of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huicong; Ma, Fangfang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2010-07-01

    Metabolite profiles and activities of key enzymes in the metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids were compared between chlorotic leaves and normal leaves of 'Honeycrisp' apple to understand how accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates affects the metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids. Excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates and much lower CO(2) assimilation were found in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves, confirming feedback inhibition of photosynthesis in chlorotic leaves. Dark respiration and activities of several key enzymes in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, ATP-phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were significantly higher in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. However, concentrations of most organic acids including phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), pyruvate, oxaloacetate, 2-oxoglutarate, malate and fumarate, and activities of key enzymes involved in the anapleurotic pathway including PEP carboxylase, NAD-malate dehydrogenase and NAD-malic enzyme were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. Concentrations of soluble proteins and most free amino acids were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. Activities of key enzymes in nitrogen assimilation and amino acid synthesis, including nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase, ferredoxin and NADH-dependent glutamate synthase, and glutamate pyruvate transaminase were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. It was concluded that, in response to excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates, glycolysis and TCA cycle were up-regulated to "consume" the excess carbon available, whereas the anapleurotic pathway, nitrogen assimilation and amino acid synthesis were down-regulated to reduce the overall rate of amino acid and protein synthesis.

  14. Characterization of metabolic pathway of linoleic acid 9-hydroperoxide in cytosolic fraction of potato tubers and identification of reaction products.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideto; Yokota, Kazushige

    2004-01-01

    Potato tubers are shown to contain a unique lipoxygenase pathway to form 9-hydroperoxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid (9-HPODE) from linoleic acid. Here, we report the metabolic pathway of 9-HPODE in the cytosolic fraction and the characterization of enzymes involved in the conversion of metabolites. The analysis of enzymatic reaction products at pH 5.5 revealed the formation of 9-keto-10,12-octadecadienoic acid, 9-hydroxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid, 9,10-epoxy-11-hydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid, 9,10,13-trihydroxy-11-octadecenoic acid, and 9,12,13-trihydroxy-10-octadecenoic acid. The cytosolic enzymes were separated by anion-exchange chromatography into two fractions E1 and E2, having molecular masses of 66 and 54 kDa, respectively. The enzyme fraction E1 only produced 9-keto-10,12-octadecadienoic acid, whereas E2 formed other products. The enzyme E1 showed higher reactivity with 13- and 9-hydroperoxide of alpha-linolenic acid than 9-HPODE, but no reaction with hydroxy fatty acids. In contrast, the enzyme E2 showed the highest reactivity with 9-HPODE, followed by hydroperoxides of alpha-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid. We also evaluated the antibacterial activity of hydroxy fatty acids against Erwinia carotovora T-29, a bacterium infecting potato tubers. Growth of the bacteria was suppressed more potently with 9- or 13-hydroxy fatty acids than dihydroxy or trihydroxy fatty acids, suggesting a role for the metabolites in the resistance of bacterial infection.

  15. Production of cellulolytic enzymes containing cinnamic acid esterase from Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Tsujiyama, Sho-ichi; Ueno, Hitomi

    2011-01-01

    To develop enzyme preparations capable of digesting plant biomass, we examined the production of cinnamic acid esterase as well as cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes in cultures of Schizophyllum commune. The cinnamic acid esterase was produced in the cultures containing solid cellulosic substrates, with production being enhanced by delignifying the wood powder. This indicates that these esterases are produced by cellulose, despite their substrates being phenolic compounds. Cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes, with the exception of α-arabinofuranosidase, were also produced in cultures containing cellulosic substances. These results show that enzyme preparation can have high activity of cinnamic acid esterase and cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes when S. commune is incubated in the presence of cellulose. These enzyme preparations will be useful for digesting plant biomass and for releasing cinnamic acid derivatives from plant cell walls.

  16. Phytic acid and raffinose series oligosaccharides metabolism in developing chickpea seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhawar, Vikramjit Kaur; Kaur, Narinder; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Phytic acid and raffinose series oligosaccharides (RFOs) have anti-nutritional properties where phytic acid chelates minerals and reduces their bioavailability to humans and other animals, and RFOs cause flatulence. Both phytic acid and RFOs cannot be digested by monogastric animals and are released as pollutant-wastes. Efforts are being made to reduce the contents of these factors without affecting the viability of seeds. This will require a thorough understanding of their metabolism in different crops. Biosynthetic pathways of both metabolites though are interlinked but not well described. This study was made on metabolism of these two contents in developing chickpea (Cicer arietinum L cv GL 769) seeds. In this study, deposition of RFOs was found to occur before deposition of phytic acid. A decline in inorganic phosphorus and increase in phospholipid phosphorus and phytic acid was observed in seeds during development. Acid phosphatase was the major phosphatase in seed as well as podwall and its activity was highest at early stage of development, thereafter it decreased. Partitioning of (14) C label from (14) C-glucose and (14) C-sucrose into RFOs and phytic acid was studied in seeds in presence of inositol, galactose and iositol and galactose, which favored the view that galactinol synthase is not the key enzyme in RFOs synthesis.

  17. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  18. Correlation-Based Network Analysis of Metabolite and Enzyme Profiles Reveals a Role of Citrate Biosynthesis in Modulating N and C Metabolism in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, David; Xue, Wentao; Zhang, Nengyi; Kremling, Karl; Gur, Amit; Pilosof, Shai; Gibon, Yves; Stitt, Mark; Buckler, Edward S.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Fait, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their variance within the population, consistently with their related enzymes. The overall higher CV values for metabolites as compared to the tested enzymes are indicative for their greater phenotypic plasticity. H2 tests revealed galactinol (1) and asparagine (0.91) as the highest scorers among metabolites and nitrate reductase (0.73), NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase (0.52), and phosphoglucomutase (0.51) among enzymes. The overall low H2 scores for metabolites and enzymes are suggestive for a great environmental impact or gene-environment interaction. Correlation-based network generation followed by community detection analysis, partitioned the network into three main communities and one dyad, (i) reflecting the different levels of phenotypic plasticity of the two molecular classes as observed for the CV values and (ii) highlighting the concerted changes between classes of chemically related metabolites. Community 1 is composed mainly of enzymes and specialized metabolites, community 2′ is enriched in N-containing compounds and phosphorylated-intermediates. The third community contains mainly organic acids and sugars. Cross-community linkages are supported by aspartate, by the photorespiration amino acids glycine and serine, by the metabolically related GABA and putrescine, and by citrate. The latter displayed the strongest node-betweenness value (185.25) of all nodes highlighting its fundamental structural role in the connectivity of the network by linking between different communities and to the also strongly connected enzyme aldolase. PMID:27462343

  19. Impact of dioxin-type induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the metabolism of endo- and xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, D

    1998-04-15

    The induction of a number of drug-metabolizing enzymes is among the best-understood biochemical effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Among the cytochrome P450s (CYPs), the genes encoding CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 are responsive to AhR agonists, i.e. their expression is inducible in various mammalian tissues and organs as well as in many types of cell lines and primary cells in culture. In addition, an aldehyde dehydrogenase, an NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase, and the phase II conjugating enzymes glutathione-S-transferase (GST) Ya and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 have been identified as responsive to AhR agonists. Induced expression of these members of the AhR gene battery is thought to be aimed at an improved elimination of the inducing agent and its metabolites. However, the identity of the physiological ligand(s) of the AhR is still obscure. The consequences of induced expression of AhR-regulated genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes have been investigated in human populations, e.g. in smokers, and in various experimental models. A prominent example of increased adverse effects due to the induction of CYP1A isozymes is the metabolic activation of carcinogenic aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. An increasing amount of data is also available on the impact of dioxin-type induction on the metabolism of drugs, food constituents, and endogenous substrates. For example, the hepatic clearance of the drug theophylline, which is widely used in asthma therapy, is enhanced significantly in smokers. Increased glucuronidation of thyroxine in rats treated with TCDD or other potent AhR agonists is thought to result in hypothyroxinemia and its biological consequences, such as sustained hyperplasia of the thyroid, bearing a higher risk of thyroid cancer. The relevance of these observations for humans exposed to dioxin-type inducers is discussed.

  20. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V.; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Groen, Albert K.; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1−/−) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1−/− and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  1. Higher plant metabolism and energetics in hypogravity: Amino acid metabolism in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazelis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory's investigation into the amino acid metabolism of dwarf marigolds exposed to an environment of simulated hypogravity is summarized. Using both in vivo, and/or in vitro studies, the following effects of hypogravitational stress have been shown: (1) increased proline incorporation into cell wall protein, (2) inhibition of amino acid decarboxylation, (3) decrease in glutamic acid decarboxylase activity; and (4) decrease in the relative amount of a number of soluble amino acids present in deproteinized extracts of marigold leaves. It is concluded from these data there are several rapid, major alterations in amino acid metabolism associated with hypogravitational stress in marigolds. The mechanism(s) and generality of these effects with regard to other species is still unknown.

  2. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I–IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  3. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), a specific enzyme that modifies ghrelin with a medium-chain fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayasu; Hamamoto, Akie; Sato, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    In the gastric peptide hormone ghrelin, serine 3 (threonine 3 in frogs) is modified, primarily by n-octanoic acid; this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. The enzyme that transfers n-octanoic acid to Ser3 of ghrelin is ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT). GOAT, the only enzyme known to catalyze acyl modification of ghrelin, specifically modifies serine (or threonine) at the third position and does not modify other serine residues in ghrelin peptides. GOAT prefers n-hexanoyl-CoA over n-octanoyl-CoA as the acyl donor, although in the stomach the n-octanoyl form is the predominant form of acyl-modified ghrelin. GOAT is a promising target for drug development to treat metabolic diseases and eating disorders.

  4. The Effects of Space Flight on Some Liver Enzymes Concerned with Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1978-01-01

    The activities of about 30 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and the levels of glycogen and of individual fatty acids were measured in livers of rats ex- posed to prolonged space flight (18.5 days) aboard COSMOS 986 Biosatellite. When flight stationary, (FS) and flight centrifuged (FC) rats were compared at recovery (R(sub 0)), decrceases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha glycerphosphate, acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, acconitase and Epsilon-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were noted in the weightless group (FS). The significance of these findings was strengthened since all activities, showing alterations at R(sub 0), returned to normal 25 days post-flight. Differences were also seen in levels of two liver constituents. When glycogen and total fatty acids of the two groups of flight animals were determined, differences that could be attributed to reduced gravity were observed, the FS group at R(sub 0) contained, on the average, more than twice the amount of glycogen than did controls ad a remarkable shift in the ratio of palmitate to palmitoleate were noted. These metabolic alterations appear to be unique to the weightless condition. Our data justify the conclusion that centrifugation during space flight is equivalent to terrestrial gravity.

  5. Amino acid metabolism in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, S; Azcón-Bieto, J; López-Soriano, F J; Miralpeix, M; Argilés, J M

    1988-01-01

    Mice bearing the Lewis lung carcinoma showed a high tumour glutaminase activity and significantly higher concentrations of most amino acids than in both the liver and the skeletal muscle of the host. Tumour tissue slices showed a marked preference for glutamine, especially for oxidation of its skeleton to CO2. It is proposed that the metabolism of this particular carcinoma is focused on amino acid degradation, glutamine being its preferred substrate. PMID:3342022

  6. CO2-fixing enzymes and phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocio; Valero, Adela; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2009-07-23

    CO2 stimulates the development of many of the intestinal helminths that are able to fix CO2 by means of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), such as Hysterothylacium aduncum. We determined the activity of CO2-fixing enzymes such as PEPCK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), although no significant activity was detected for pyruvate carboxylase or carboxylating-malic enzyme. The former act on phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield oxalacetate. In the helminths studied, PEP has a vital role in glucidic metabolism. Consequently, we determined the activity of other enzymes involved in the crossroad of PEP, such as pyruvate kinase (PK), lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase. All enzymes detected showed significant variations in activity during the in vitro development of the parasite from the third larval stage to mature adult. Fixing of CO2 by PEPCK decreased during development (from 228 to 115 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), while that by PEPC increased (from 19 to 46 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein). This enzyme, which is rare in animals, could play a part in detecting levels of free phosphate, releasing it from PEP when required for processes such as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. PK, which showed increasing activity during development up to immature adult (from 56 to 82 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), could act in combination with PEPC to obtain energy in the cytosol (in the form of ATP) and in the mitochondria (possible destination of the pyruvate formed), compensating for the decrease in activity of PEPCK.

  7. Evaluation of endogenous acidic metabolic products associated with carbohydrate metabolism in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Tumor cells have a high tolerance for acidic and hypoxic microenvironments, also producing abundant lactic acid through accelerated glycolysis in the presence or absence of O2. While the accumulation of lactate is thought to be a major contributor to the reduction of pH-circumscribing aggressive tumors, it is not known if other endogenous metabolic products contribute this acidity. Furthermore, anaerobic metabolism in cancer cells bears similarity to homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, however very little is known about an alternative pathway that may drive adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production independent of glycolysis. In this study, we quantify over 40 end-products (amines, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, or ketones) produced by malignant neuroblastoma under accelerated glycolysis (+glucose (GLU) supply 1–10 mM) ± mitochondrial toxin; 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+) to abate aerobic respiration to delineate differences between anaerobic vs. aerobic cell required metabolic pathways. The data show that an acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis prompts an expected reduction in extracellular pH (pHex) from neutral to 6.7±0.006. Diverse metabolic acids associated with this drop in acidity were quantified by ionic exchange liquid chromatography (LC), showing concomitant rise in lactate (Ctrls 7.5±0.5 mM; +GLU 12.35±1.3 mM; +GLU + MPP 18.1±1.8 mM), acetate (Ctrl 0.84±0.13 mM: +GLU 1.3±0.15 mM; +GLU + MPP 2.7±0.4 mM), fumarate, and a-ketoglutarate (<10μM) while a range of other metabolic organic acids remained undetected. Amino acids quantified by o-phthalaldehyde precolumn derivatization/electrochemical detection–LC show accumulation of L-alanine (1.6±.052 mM), L-glutamate (285±9.7μM), L-asparagine (202±2.1μM), and L-aspartate (84.2±4.9μM) produced during routine metabolism, while other amino acids remain undetected. In contrast, the data show no evidence for accumulation of acetaldehyde, aldehydes, or ketones (Purpald/2

  8. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease—age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network. PMID:26378592

  9. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-09-10

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease-age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network.

  10. Ganoderic Acid A Metabolites and Their Metabolic Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang-Rui; Feng, Li; Ye, Lin-Hu; Wang, Li-Sha; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Tao, Xue; Chang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderic acid A (GAA), a representative active triterpenoid from Ganoderma lucidum, has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidative, cytotoxic, hepatoprotective and anticancer activities. The present study aims (1) to identify GAA metabolites, in vivo by analyzing the bile, plasma and urine after intravenous administration to rats (20 mg/kg), and in vitro by incubating with rat liver microsomes (RLMs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs); (2) to investigate the metabolic kinetics of main GAA metabolites. Using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS techniques, a total of 37 metabolites were tentatively characterized from in vivo samples based on their fragmentation behaviors. The metabolites detected in in vitro samples were similar to those found in vivo. GAA underwent extensive phase I and II metabolism. The main metabolic soft spots of GAA were 3, 7, 11, 15, 23-carbonyl groups (or hydroxyl groups) and 12, 20, 28 (29)-carbon atoms. Ganoderic acid C2 (GAC2) and 7β,15-dihydroxy-3,11,23-trioxo-lanost-26-oic acid were two main reduction metabolites of GAA, and their kinetics followed classical hyperbolic kinetics. The specific isoenzyme responsible for the biotransformation of the two metabolites in RLMs and HLMs was CYP3A. This is the first report on the comprehensive metabolism of GAA, as well as the metabolic kinetics of its main metabolites.

  11. Dynamic modeling of lactic acid fermentation metabolism with Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euhlim; Lu, Mingshou; Park, Changhun; Park, Changhun; Oh, Han Bin; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Jinwon

    2011-02-01

    A dynamic model of lactic acid fermentation using Lactococcus lactis was constructed, and a metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and metabolic control analysis (MCA) were performed to reveal an intensive metabolic understanding of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The parameter estimation was conducted with COPASI software to construct a more accurate metabolic model. The experimental data used in the parameter estimation were obtained from an LC-MS/ MS analysis and time-course simulation study. The MFA results were a reasonable explanation of the experimental data. Through the parameter estimation, the metabolic system of lactic acid bacteria can be thoroughly understood through comparisons with the original parameters. The coefficients derived from the MCA indicated that the reaction rate of L-lactate dehydrogenase was activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and pyruvate, and pyruvate appeared to be a stronger activator of L-lactate dehydrogenase than fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Additionally, pyruvate acted as an inhibitor to pyruvate kinase and the phosphotransferase system. Glucose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate showed activation effects on pyruvate kinase. Hexose transporter was the strongest effector on the flux through L-lactate dehydrogenase. The concentration control coefficient (CCC) showed similar results to the flux control coefficient (FCC).

  12. Ganoderic Acid A Metabolites and Their Metabolic Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang-Rui; Feng, Li; Ye, Lin-Hu; Wang, Li-Sha; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Tao, Xue; Chang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderic acid A (GAA), a representative active triterpenoid from Ganoderma lucidum, has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidative, cytotoxic, hepatoprotective and anticancer activities. The present study aims (1) to identify GAA metabolites, in vivo by analyzing the bile, plasma and urine after intravenous administration to rats (20 mg/kg), and in vitro by incubating with rat liver microsomes (RLMs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs); (2) to investigate the metabolic kinetics of main GAA metabolites. Using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS techniques, a total of 37 metabolites were tentatively characterized from in vivo samples based on their fragmentation behaviors. The metabolites detected in in vitro samples were similar to those found in vivo. GAA underwent extensive phase I and II metabolism. The main metabolic soft spots of GAA were 3, 7, 11, 15, 23-carbonyl groups (or hydroxyl groups) and 12, 20, 28 (29)-carbon atoms. Ganoderic acid C2 (GAC2) and 7β,15-dihydroxy-3,11,23-trioxo-lanost-26-oic acid were two main reduction metabolites of GAA, and their kinetics followed classical hyperbolic kinetics. The specific isoenzyme responsible for the biotransformation of the two metabolites in RLMs and HLMs was CYP3A. This is the first report on the comprehensive metabolism of GAA, as well as the metabolic kinetics of its main metabolites. PMID:28326038

  13. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  14. Human microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics: well-known and promising members of the SDR superfamily.

    PubMed

    Skarydová, Lucie; Wsól, Vladimír

    2012-05-01

    The best known, most widely studied enzyme system in phase I biotransformation is cytochrome P450 (CYP), which participates in the metabolism of roughly 9 of 10 drugs in use today. The main biotransformation isoforms of CYP are associated with the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Other enzymes that are also active in phase I biotransformation are carbonyl reducing enzymes. Much is known about the role of cytosolic forms of carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics, but their microsomal forms have been mostly poorly studied. The only well-known microsomal carbonyl reducing enzyme taking part in the biotransformation of xenobiotics is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Physiological roles of microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes are better known than their participation in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This review is a summary of the fragmentary information known about the roles of the microsomal forms. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, it has been reported, so far, that retinol dehydrogenase 12 participates only in the detoxification of unsaturated aldehydes formed upon oxidative stress. Another promising group of microsomal biotransformation carbonyl reducing enzymes are some members of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Generally, it is clear that this area is, overall, quite unexplored, but carbonyl reducing enzymes located in the ER have proven very interesting. The study of these enzymes could shed new light on the metabolism of several clinically used drugs or they could become an important target in connection with some diseases.

  15. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  16. Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids: Oxidised derivatives of linoleic acid and their role in inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vangaveti, Venkat N; Jansen, Holger; Kennedy, Richard Lee; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-15

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a major constituent of low-density lipoproteins. An essential fatty acid, LA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is oxidised by endogenous enzymes and reactive oxygen species in the circulation. Increased levels of low-density lipoproteins coupled with oxidative stress and lack of antioxidants drive the oxidative processes. This results in synthesis of a range of oxidised derivatives, which play a vital role in regulation of inflammatory processes. The derivatives of LA include, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, oxo-​octadecadienoic acids, epoxy octadecadecenoic acid and epoxy-keto-octadecenoic acids. In this review, we examine the role of LA derivatives and their actions on regulation of inflammation relevant to metabolic processes associated with atherogenesis and cancer. The processes affected by LA derivatives include, alteration of airway smooth muscles and vascular wall, affecting sensitivity to pain, and regulating endogenous steroid hormones associated with metabolic syndrome. LA derivatives alter cell adhesion molecules, this initial step, is pivotal in regulating inflammatory processes involving transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways, thus, leading to alteration of metabolic processes. The derivatives are known to elicit pleiotropic effects that are either beneficial or detrimental in nature hence making it difficult to determine the exact role of these derivatives in the progress of an assumed target disorder. The key may lie in understanding the role of these derivatives at various stages of development of a disorder. Novel pharmacological approaches in altering the synthesis or introduction of synthesised LA derivatives could possibly help drive processes that could regulate inflammation in a beneficial manner. Chemical Compounds: Linoleic acid (PubChem CID: 5280450), 9- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 5312830), 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 6443013), 9-oxo

  17. Carbohydrate metabolism in Archaea: current insights into unusual enzymes and pathways and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Bräsen, Christopher; Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette; Siebers, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many "classical" pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of "new," unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented.

  18. Metabolism of fatty acids in rat brain in microsomal membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Aeberhard, E.E.; Gan-Elepano, M.; Mead, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Using a technique in which substrate fatty acids are incorporated into microsomal membranes followd by comparison of their rates of desaturation or elongation with those of exogenous added fatty acids it has been found that the desaturation rate is more rapid for the membrane-bound substrate than for the added fatty acid. Moreover, the product of the membrane-bound substrate is incorporated into membrane phospholipid whereas the product of the exogenous substrate is found in di- and triacyl glycerols and in free fatty acids as well. These and other findings point to a normal sequence of reaction of membrane liqids with membrane-bound substrates involving transfer of fatty acid from phospholipid to the coupled enzyme systems without ready equilibration with the free fatty acid pool.

  19. Identification of enzymes responsible for extracellular alginate depolymerization and alginate metabolism in Vibrio algivorus.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hidetaka; Tokura, Yuriko; Mori, Yukiko; Mori, Kenichi; Asakura, Yoko; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Hiroo; Chinen, Akito

    2017-02-01

    Alginate is a marine non-food-competing polysaccharide that has potential applications in biorefinery. Owing to its large size (molecular weight >300,000 Da), alginate cannot pass through the bacterial cell membrane. Therefore, bacteria that utilize alginate are presumed to have an enzyme that degrades extracellular alginate. Recently, Vibrio algivorus sp. SA2(T) was identified as a novel alginate-decomposing and alginate-utilizing species. However, little is known about the mechanism of alginate degradation and metabolism in this species. To address this issue, we screened the V. algivorus genomic DNA library for genes encoding polysaccharide-decomposing enzymes using a novel double-layer plate screening method and identified alyB as a candidate. Most identified alginate-decomposing enzymes (i.e., alginate lyases) must be concentrated and purified before extracellular alginate depolymerization. AlyB of V. algivorus heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli depolymerized extracellular alginate without requiring concentration or purification. We found seven homologues in the V. algivorus genome (alyB, alyD, oalA, oalB, oalC, dehR, and toaA) that are thought to encode enzymes responsible for alginate transport and metabolism. Introducing these genes into E. coli enabled the cells to assimilate soluble alginate depolymerized by V. algivorus AlyB as the sole carbon source. The alginate was bioconverted into L-lysine (43.3 mg/l) in E. coli strain AJIK01. These findings demonstrate a simple and novel screening method for identifying polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in bacteria and provide a simple alginate biocatalyst and fermentation system with potential applications in industrial biorefinery.

  20. Regulation of enzymes involved in C(4) photosynthesis and the antioxidant metabolism by UV-B radiation in Egeria densa, a submersed aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Casati, Paula; Lara, María V; Andreo, Carlos S

    2002-01-01

    Egeria densa, a submersed aquatic species, was exposed to different treatments under UV-B radiation, and the response of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) was determined. Exposure to UV-B radiation for 4 h per day over 7-16 days caused an increase in both enzymes, together with an increase in the activity of some isoforms of several enzymes involved in the antioxidant metabolism, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD). The content of chlorophylls and carotenoids was considerably decreased, suggesting that degradation or repression of the synthesis of these molecules may be occurring after UV-B exposure. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also required for UV-B induction of PEPC and NADP-ME, as the addition of ascorbic acid before UV-B treatment prevented the induction of these enzymes, while salicylic acid was not effective in inducing NADP-ME but increased the expression of the lower molecular mass isoform of PEPC. On the other hand, damage to the photosynthetic machinery may be occurring after exposure to UV-B radiation for 8 per day over 1-2 days, as indicated by a decrease in the levels of Rubisco, PEPC and NADP-ME. Some of the enzymes involved in the antioxidant metabolism, such as CAT and APX, were also sensitive to continuous exposure, evidenced by a decrease in their activity. In this way, in E. densa, several enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways showed a distinct response, depending on the UV-B treatment.

  1. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase: potential targets for metabolic engineering of microorganism oil.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Hao; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-04-01

    Oleaginous microorganism is becoming one of the most promising oil feedstocks for biodiesel production due to its great advantages in triglyceride (TAG) accumulation. Previous studies have shown that de novo TAG biosynthesis can be divided into two parts: the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (the upstream part which generates acyl-CoAs) and the glycerol-3-phosphate acylation pathway (the downstream part in which three acyl groups are sequentially added onto a glycerol backbone). This review mainly focuses on two enzymes in the G3P pathway, phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). The former catalyzes a dephosphorylation reaction, and the latter catalyzes a subsequent acylation reaction. Genes, functional motifs, transmembrane domains, action mechanism, and new studies of the two enzymes are discussed in detail. Furthermore, this review also covers diacylglycerol kinase, an enzyme that catalyzes the reverse reaction of diacylglycerol formation. In addition, PAP and DGAT are the conjunction points of the G3P pathway, the Kennedy pathway, and the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway (CDP-DAG pathway), and the mutual transformation between TAGs and phospholipids is discussed as well. Given that both the Kennedy and CDP-diacylglycerol pathways are in metabolic interlock (MI) with the G3P pathway, it is suggested that, via metabolic engineering, TAG accumulation can be improved by the two pathways based on the pivotal function of PAP and DGAT.

  2. Perfluorononanoic acid disturbed the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Gao, Guizhen; Zhang, Xingtao; Wang, Haichao

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on the liver toxicity of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are focused on healthy individuals, whereas the effects of PFCs on individuals with diabetes mellitus have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to investigate the acute exposure of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) on the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male diabetic rats were orally dosed by gavage for 7 days with 0, 0.2, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day PFNA. The contents of lipid, the activities of enzyme, the expressions of protein in the liver and the serum parameters were detected. The results indicate that dose-dependent accumulation of triglyceride and total cholesterol occurred in the livers of diabetic rats after PFNA treatment. PFNA increased the activities of lipid synthetase, fatty acid synthease, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased the activity of lipolytic enzyme, hepatic lipase, in the liver of diabetic rats. The changes of the isocitrate dehydrogenase, malicenzyme and lipoprotein lipase were not obvious. The expressions of protein related to lipid homeostasis, liver X receptor α and apolipoprotein E, were decreased after PFNA administration. Exposure to PFNA also increased the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase in diabetic rats. In conclusion, this study discloses that exposure to PFNA impacts on enzymes and proteins related to liver lipid metabolism and lead to obvious accumulation of lipid in the liver of diabetic rats, which may be responsible for hepatotoxicity of this compound in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  3. Carnitine is associated with fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Adenier, Hervé; Perrin, Yolande

    2007-12-01

    The finding of acylcarnitines alongside free carnitine in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography shows a link between carnitine and plant fatty acid metabolism. Moreover the occurrence of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines suggests that carnitine is connected to diverse fatty acid metabolic pathways in plant tissues. The carnitine and acylcarnitine contents in plant tissues are respectively a hundred and a thousand times lower than in animal tissues, and acylcarnitines represent less than 2% of the total carnitine pool whereas this percentage reaches 30% in animal tissues. These results suggest that carnitine plays a lesser role in lipid metabolism in plants than it does in animals.

  4. Pharmacogenetic profile of xenobiotic enzyme metabolism in survivors of the Spanish toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ladona, M G; Izquierdo-Martinez, M; Posada de la Paz, M P; de la Torre, R; Ampurdanés, C; Segura, J; Sanz, E J

    2001-01-01

    In 1981, the Spanish toxic oil syndrome (TOS) affected more than 20,000 people, and over 300 deaths were registered. Assessment of genetic polymorphisms on xenobiotic metabolism would indicate the potential metabolic capacity of the victims at the time of the disaster. Thus, impaired metabolic pathways may have contributed to the clearance of the toxicant(s) leading to a low detoxification or accumulation of toxic metabolites contributing to the disease. We conducted a matched case-control study using 72 cases (54 females, 18 males) registered in the Official Census of Affected Patients maintained by the Spanish government. Controls were nonaffected siblings (n =72) living in the same household in 1981 and nonaffected nonrelatives (n = 70) living in the neighborhood at that time, with no ties to TOS. Genotype analyses were performed to assess the metabolic capacity of phase I [cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), CYP2D6] and phase II [arylamine N-acetyltransferase-2 (NAT2), GSTM1 (glutathione S-transferase M1) and GSTT1] enzyme polymorphisms. The degree of association of the five metabolic pathways was estimated by calculating their odds ratios (ORs) using conditional logistic regression analysis. In the final model, cases compared with siblings (72 pairs) showed no differences either in CYP2D6 or CYP1A1 polymorphisms, or in conjugation enzyme polymorphisms, whereas cases compared with the unrelated controls (70 pairs) showed an increase in NAT2 defective alleles [OR = 6.96, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.46-33.20] adjusted by age and sex. Glutathione transferase genetic polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1) showed no association with cases compared with their siblings or unrelated controls. These findings suggest a possible role of impaired acetylation mediating susceptibility in TOS. PMID:11335185

  5. Nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategy for biochemical analysis: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Qing, Taiping; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Wen, Li; Shangguan, Jingfang; Mao, Zhengui; Lei, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their highly efficient catalytic effects and substrate specificity, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are applied as 'nano-tools' for manipulating different nucleic acid substrates both in the test-tube and in living organisms. In addition to the function as molecular scissors and molecular glue in genetic engineering, the application of nucleic acid tool enzymes in biochemical analysis has also been extensively developed in the past few decades. Used as amplifying labels for biorecognition events, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are mainly applied in nucleic acids amplification sensing, as well as the amplification sensing of biorelated variations of nucleic acids. With the introduction of aptamers, which can bind different target molecules, the nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategies can also be used to sense non-nucleic targets (e.g., ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells). This review describes and discusses the amplification strategies of nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors for biochemical analysis applications. Various analytes, including nucleic acids, ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells, are reviewed briefly. This work also addresses the future trends and outlooks for signal amplification in nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors.

  6. Nicotinamide metabolism in ferns: formation of nicotinic acid glucoside.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide was investigated in 9 fern species, Psilotum nudum, Angiopteris evecta, Lygodium japonicum, Acrostichum aureum, Asplenium antiquum, Diplazium subsinuatum, Thelypteris acuminate, Blechnum orientale and Crytomium fortune. All fern species produce a large quantity of nicotinic acid glucoside from [(14)C]nicotinamide, but trigonelline formation is very low. Increases in the release of (14)CO(2) with incubation time was accompanied by decreases in [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid glucoside. There was slight stimulation of nicotinic acid glucoside formation by 250 mM NaCl in mature leaves of the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum, but it is unlikely that this compound acts as a compatible solute. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid salvage for pyridine nucleotide synthesis was detected in all fern species, although this activity was always less than nicotinic acid glucoside synthesis. Predominant formation of nicotinic acid glucoside is characteristic of nicotinic acid metabolism in ferns. This reaction appears to act as a detoxication mechanism, removing excess nicotinic acid.

  7. Arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, H.; Sato, Y.; Kanoh, H.

    1985-07-01

    The authors attempted to characterize the general features of arachidonate metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes. The cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were stimulated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), ionophore A23187, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). Common to the three substances, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine almost equally served as sources of arachidonate liberated by the action of phospholipase A2. The stimulation of phospholipase A2 action was observed in the order of A23187 greater than FBS greater than TPA. When stimulated by TPA or A23187, the radioactivity released into the extracellular medium was mostly found in prostaglandin (PG) E2. Formation of other PGs and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate (HETE) was extremely limited. In the case of stimulation by FBS, however, the released radioactivity was mainly associated with non-converted arachidonate. FBS also inhibited the TPA- and A23187-induced conversion of arachidonate to PGE2. Phospholipid degradation induced by the three stimulators was similarly dependent on extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The stimulation by FBS and A23187 was suppressed by calmodulin antagonists, though the effect of A23187 was much more sensitive to the antagonists when compared to that of FBS. The authors observed more than additive effects of the three stimulators when tested together.

  8. Biological definition of multiple chemical sensitivity from redox state and cytokine profiling and not from polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, Chiara; Scordo, Maria G.; Cesareo, Eleonora; Pastore, Saveria; Mariani, Serena; Maiani, Gianluca; Stancato, Andrea; Loreti, Beatrice; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lubrano, Carla; Raskovic, Desanka; De Padova, Luigia; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a poorly clinically and biologically defined environment-associated syndrome. Although dysfunctions of phase I/phase II metabolizing enzymes and redox imbalance have been hypothesized, corresponding genetic and metabolic parameters in MCS have not been systematically examined. Objectives: We sought for genetic, immunological, and metabolic markers in MCS. Methods: We genotyped patients with diagnosis of MCS, suspected MCS and Italian healthy controls for allelic variants of cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A5), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1), and glutathione S-transferases (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1). Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, antioxidant (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and glutathione metabolizing (GST, glutathione peroxidase (Gpx)) enzymes, whole blood chemiluminescence, total antioxidant capacity, levels of nitrites/nitrates, glutathione, HNE-protein adducts, and a wide spectrum of cytokines in the plasma were determined. Results: Allele and genotype frequencies of CYPs, UGT, GSTM, GSTT, and GSTP were similar in the Italian MCS patients and in the control populations. The activities of erythrocyte catalase and GST were lower, whereas Gpx was higher than normal. Both reduced and oxidised glutathione were decreased, whereas nitrites/nitrates were increased in the MCS groups. The MCS fatty acid profile was shifted to saturated compartment and IFNgamma, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, PDGFbb, and VEGF were increased. Conclusions: Altered redox and cytokine patterns suggest inhibition of expression/activity of metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in MCS. Metabolic parameters indicating accelerated lipid oxidation, increased nitric oxide production and glutathione depletion in combination with increased plasma inflammatory cytokines should be considered in biological definition and diagnosis of MCS.

  9. Emerging Perspectives on Essential Amino Acid Metabolism in Obesity and the Insulin-Resistant State12

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sean H.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of insulin action is most often considered in the context of impaired glucose homeostasis, with the defining feature of diabetes mellitus being elevated blood glucose concentration. Complications arising from the hyperglycemia accompanying frank diabetes are well known and epidemiological studies point to higher risk toward development of metabolic disease in persons with impaired glucose tolerance. Although the central role of proper blood sugar control in maintaining metabolic health is well established, recent developments have begun to shed light on associations between compromised insulin action [obesity, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)] and altered intermediary metabolism of fats and amino acids. For amino acids, changes in blood concentrations of select essential amino acids and their derivatives, in particular BCAA, sulfur amino acids, tyrosine, and phenylalanine, are apparent with obesity and insulin resistance, often before the onset of clinically diagnosed T2DM. This review provides an overview of these changes and places recent observations from metabolomics research into the context of historical reports in the areas of biochemistry and nutritional biology. Based on this synthesis, a model is proposed that links the FFA-rich environment of obesity/insulin resistance and T2DM with diminution of BCAA catabolic enzyme activity, changes in methionine oxidation and cysteine/cystine generation, and tissue redox balance (NADH/NAD+). PMID:22332087

  10. Motility, ATP levels and metabolic enzyme activity of sperm from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Burness, Gary; Moyes, Christopher D; Montgomerie, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Male bluegill displays one of two life history tactics. Some males (termed "parentals") delay reproduction until ca. 7 years of age, at which time they build nests and actively courts females. Others mature precociously (sneakers) and obtain fertilizations by cuckolding parental males. In the current study, we studied the relations among sperm motility, ATP levels, and metabolic enzyme activity in parental and sneaker bluegill. In both reproductive tactics, sperm swimming speed and ATP levels declined in parallel over the first 60 s of motility. Although sneaker sperm initially had higher ATP levels than parental sperm, by approximately 30 s postactivation, no differences existed between tactics. No differences were noted between tactics in swimming speed, percent motility, or the activities of key metabolic enzymes, although sperm from parentals had a higher ratio of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) to citrate synthase (CS). In both tactics, with increasing CPK and CS activity, sperm ATP levels increased at 20 s postactivation, suggesting that capacities for phosphocreatine hydrolysis and aerobic metabolism may influence interindividual variation in rates of ATP depletion. Nonetheless, there was no relation between sperm ATP levels and either swimming speed or percent of sperm that were motile. This suggests that interindividual variation in ATP levels may not be the primary determinant of variation in sperm swimming performance in bluegill.

  11. Seasonal changes in thermal environment and metabolic enzyme activity in the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin).

    PubMed

    Williard, Amanda Southwood; Harden, Leigh Anne

    2011-04-01

    Diamondback terrapins experience broad fluctuations in temperature on both a daily and seasonal basis in their estuarine environment. We measured metabolic enzyme activity in terrapin muscle tissue to assess thermal dependence and the role of temperature in seasonal metabolic downregulation in this species. Activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), citrate synthase (CS), and cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) was assayed at 10, 20, 30, and 40 °C for tissue collected during summer and winter. The Q(10) for enzyme activity varied between 1.31 and 2.11 within the temperature range at which terrapins were active (20-40 °C). The Q(10) for LDH, CS, and CCO varied between 1.39 and 1.76 and between 10 and 20 °C, but PK exhibited heightened thermal sensitivity within this lower temperature range, with a Q(10) of 2.90 for summer-collected tissue and 5.55 for winter-collected tissue. There was no significant effect of season on activity of LDH or PK, but activity of CS and CCO was significantly lower in winter-collected tissue compared with summer-collected tissue. Results indicate that temperature effects contribute to seasonal metabolic downregulation and dormancy in terrapins, but other environmental factors (i.e. oxygen availability), as well as seasonal shifts in blood biochemistry and circulating hormones may also play an important role.

  12. Bioactive enzyme-metal composites: the entrapment of acid phosphatase within gold and silver.

    PubMed

    Ben-Knaz, Racheli; Avnir, David

    2009-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the entrapment of an enzyme within an aggregated metallic matrix and the development of a bioactive enzyme-metal composite. Whereas the use of organic polymers and metal oxides for the preparation of enzymatically active materials is well developed, the third principle enzyme-material combination, namely protein-metal bulk, has not yet been reported. A new methodology for the entrapment of organic molecules and polymers within metals has been employed for the preparation of bioactive acid phosphatase@gold and acid phosphatase@silver, according to which room temperature reduction of the metal cation is carried out in the presence of the enzyme to be entrapped. Protectability of the entrapped enzyme against harsh conditions is shown: the acidic enzyme is kept alive under basic conditions.

  13. Ascorbic acid requirements and metabolism in relation to organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Street, J C; Chadwick, R W

    1975-09-30

    Those organochlorine pesticides which possess both high lipoid solubility and high resistance to biodegradation are prone to accumulation in animal tissues and produce relatively long-term effects as toxicants. Such compounds, typified by DDT, Dieldrin, and Lindane, are profound inducers of hepatic microsomal enzymes, including parts of the glucuronic acid and ascorbic acid biosynthetic pathways. Consequently, administering such pesticides to rats in accompanied by enhanced formation and excretion of D-glucuronic acid and L-ascorbic acid, or D-glucaric acid in the case of guinea pigs. Secondarily, the efficiency in biodegrading the pesticides is reduced in ascorbic-acid-deficient guinea pigs with correspondingly greater residue accumulation in tissue. This would aggravate chronic toxic effects of the compounds. Finally, the capacity of the liver to adapt to the presence of such toxicants through enhanced microsomal enzymatic levels appears to be sensitive to its ascorbate status. Impaired enzyme induction is apparent quite early during ascorbic acid depletion in guinea pigs. The enhanced turnover of ascorbate produced by such pesticides, the poor enzymatic adaptation to them during ascorbate depletion and the dependency of the oxidase system upon adequate ascorbate, all point to the central significance of ascorbate status in the liver, and possibly other tissues, as a determinant of their chronic toxicity.

  14. Transport and metabolic effects of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, K W; Roon, R J

    1982-11-24

    alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid is actively transported into yeast cells by the general amino acid transport system. The system exhibits a Km for alpha-aminoisobutyric acid of 270 microM, a Vmax of 24 nmol/min per mg cells (dry weight), and a pH optimum of 4.1-4.3. alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid is also transported by a minor system(s) with a Vmax of 1.7 nmol/min per mg cells. Transport occurs against a concentration gradient with the concentration ratio reaching over 1000:1 (in/out). The alpha-aminoisobutyric acid is not significantly metabolized or incorporated into protein after an 18 h incubation. alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid inhibits cell growth when a poor nitrogen source such as proline is provided but not with good nitrogen sources such as NH+4. During nitrogen starvation alpha-aminoisobutyric acid strongly inhibits the synthesis of the nitrogen catabolite repression sensitive enzyme, asparaginase II. Studies with a mutant yeast strain (GDH-CR) suggest that alpha-aminoisobutyric acid inhibition of asparaginase II synthesis occurs because alpha-aminoisobutyric acid is an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis in nitrogen starved cells.

  15. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  16. Redirection of pyruvate flux toward desired metabolic pathways through substrate channeling between pyruvate kinase and pyruvate-converting enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Bae, Sang-Jeong; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-04-07

    Spatial organization of metabolic enzymes allows substrate channeling, which accelerates processing of intermediates. Here, we investigated the effect of substrate channeling on the flux partitioning at a metabolic branch point, focusing on pyruvate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a platform strain for the channeling of pyruvate flux, PYK1-Coh-Myc strain was constructed in which PYK1 gene encoding pyruvate kinase is tagged with cohesin domain. By using high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interaction, the pyruvate-forming enzyme Pyk1 was tethered to heterologous pyruvate-converting enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase and α-acetolactate synthase, to produce lactic acid and 2,3-butanediol, respectively. Pyruvate flux was successfully redirected toward desired pathways, with a concomitant decrease in ethanol production even without genetic attenuation of the ethanol-producing pathway. This pyruvate channeling strategy led to an improvement of 2,3-butanediol production by 38%, while showing a limitation in improving lactic acid production due to a reduced activity of lactate dehydrogenase by dockerin tagging.

  17. Metabolism of Sialic Acid by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Ventura, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria constitute a specific group of commensal bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 has previously been shown to utilize several plant-derived carbohydrates that include cellodextrins, starch, and galactan. In the present study, we investigated the ability of this strain to utilize the mucin- and human milk oligosaccharide (HMO)-derived carbohydrate sialic acid. Using a combination of transcriptomic and functional genomic approaches, we identified a gene cluster dedicated to the uptake and metabolism of sialic acid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that B. breve UCC2003 can cross feed on sialic acid derived from the metabolism of 3′-sialyllactose, an abundant HMO, by another infant gut bifidobacterial strain, Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. PMID:24814790

  18. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  19. Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

    2014-10-28

    This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

  20. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan.

  1. Repurposing Resveratrol and Fluconazole To Modulate Human Cytochrome P450-Mediated Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2016-04-04

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to several biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Repurposing clinically-approved drugs could provide safe and readily available means to control EETs and HETEs levels in humans. Our aim was to determine how to significantly and selectively modulate P450-AA metabolism in humans by clinically-approved drugs. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine the formation of 15 AA metabolites by human recombinant P450 enzymes, as well as human liver and kidney microsomes. CYP2C19 showed the highest EET-forming activity, while CYP1B1 and CYP2C8 showed the highest midchain HETE-forming activities. CYP1A1 and CYP4 showed the highest subterminal- and 20-HETE-forming activity, respectively. Resveratrol and fluconazole produced the most selective and significant modulation of hepatic P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational agents. Monte Carlo simulations showed that 90% of human population would experience a decrease by 6-22%, 16-39%, and 16-35% in 16-, 18-, and 20-HETE formation, respectively, after 2.5 g daily of resveratrol, and by 22-31% and 14-23% in 8,9- and 14,15-EET formation after 50 mg of fluconazole. In conclusion, clinically-approved drugs can provide selective and effective means to modulate P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational drugs. Resveratrol and fluconazole are good candidates to be repurposed as new P450-based treatments.

  2. Metabolism of (+)-terpinen-4-ol by cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Haigou, Risa; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    We examined the in vitro metabolism of (+)-terpinen-4-ol by human liver microsomes and recombinant enzymes. The biotransformation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (+)-Terpinen-4-ol was found to be oxidized to (+)-(1R,2S,4S)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol, (+)-(1S,2R,4S)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol, and (4S)-p-menth-1-en-4,8-diol by human liver microsomal P450 enzymes. The identities of (+)-terpinen-4-ol metabolites were determined through the relative abundance of mass fragments and retention times on GC-MS. Of 11 recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP3A4 were found to catalyze the oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol. Based on several lines of evidence, CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 were determined to be major enzymes involved in the oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol by human liver microsomes. First, of the 11 recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 catalyzed oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol. Second, oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol was inhibited by (+)-menthofuran and ketoconazole, inhibitors known to be specific for these enzymes. Finally, there was a good correlation between CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 activities and (+)-terpinen-4-ol oxidation activities in the 10 human liver microsomes.

  3. [The retrospection of nucleic acids metabolism research before the 1950s].

    PubMed

    Zhang, He

    2015-09-01

    People found the guanine in the 1840s and the nucleic acid in the 1860s. But they did not know the relationship between them. Later, people found various bases, confirmed the relationship between bases and nucleic acids, and understood the three basic processes of katabolic metabolism of nucleic acids by a number of scientists, especially with Kossel's efforts. In the 1940s, Kalckar isolated and identified some key enzymes of nucleotides metabolism, as well as Buchanan and Greenberg found the two processes of synthesis of nucleotides. The model of DNA double helix came out in 1953. Kornberg proved DNA is self-replicating in 1956. Stahl, Meselson and Vinograd found the semiconservative replication mechanism of DNA in 1958. At the same time, Ochoa found the polynucleotide phosphorylase, the enzyme can catalyze the synthesis of RNA, and synthesized RNA in 1955. Kornberg synthesized DNA on the basis of Ochoa's work in 1956. So far people found the processes of genetic information flow from DNA to RNA. It contributed to the comprehensive recognition and exploration of the pathways of genetic information and made the research of gene expression and regulation possible.

  4. Comparisons of different muscle metabolic enzymes and muscle fiber types in Jinhua and Landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Shan, T; Wu, T; Zhu, L N; Ren, Y; An, S; Wang, Y

    2011-01-01

    Western and indigenous Chinese pig breeds show obvious differences in muscle growth and meat quality, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the breed-specific mechanisms controlling meat quality and postmortem muscle metabolism. The specific purpose was to investigate the variations in meat quality, muscle fiber type, and enzyme activity between local Jinhua and exotic Landrace pigs at the same age (180 d of age), as well as the same BW of 64 kg, respectively. We compared differentially expressed muscle fiber types such as types I and IIa (oxidative), type IIb (glycolytic), as well as type IIx (intermediate) fibers in LM and soleus muscles of Jinhua and Landrace pigs using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Furthermore, the metabolic enzyme activities of lactate dehydrogenase, as well as succinic dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, were used as markers of glycolytic and oxidative capacities, respectively. Results showed that Jinhua pigs exhibited greater intramuscular fat content and less drip loss compared with the Landrace (P < 0.01). Meanwhile, the mRNA abundance of oxidative and intermediate fibers was increased in Jinhua pigs, whereas the glycolytic fibers were more highly expressed in the Landrace (P < 0.01). In addition, Jinhua pigs possessed greater oxidative capacity than that of the Landrace (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the increased expression of the oxidative and intermediate fibers and greater activities of oxidative enzymes in Jinhua pigs were related to meat quality as indicated by a greater intramuscular fat and reduced drip loss. Based on these results, we conclude that muscle fiber composition and postmortem muscle metabolism can explain, in part, the variation of meat quality in Jinhua and Landrace pigs. These results may provide valuable information for understanding the molecular mechanism responsible for breed specific differences in growth performance

  5. In Vivo Exposure of Kaempferol Is Driven by Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Efflux Transporters.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Zhu, Lijun; Zhao, Min; Shi, Jian; Li, Yuhuan; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Huangyu; Wu, Jinjun; Tong, Yunli; Liu, Yuting; Hu, Ming; Lu, Linlin; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2016-09-01

    Kaempferol is a well-known flavonoid; however, it lacks extensive pharmacokinetic studies. Phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters play an important role in the disposition of flavonoids. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters determine the in vivo exposure of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic analysis in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that kaempferol was mostly biotransformed to conjugates, namely, kaempferol-3-glucuronide (K-3-G), kaempferol-7-glucuronide (K-7-G), and kaempferol-7-sulfate, in plasma. K-3-G represented the major metabolite. Compared with that in wild-type mice, pharmacokinetics in knockout FVB mice demonstrated that the absence of multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) of the conjugates. The lack of MRP1 resulted in a much lower AUC of the conjugates. Intestinal perfusion in rats revealed that the glucuronide conjugates were mainly excreted in the small intestine, but 7-sulfate was mainly excreted in the colon. In Caco-2 monolayers, K-7-G efflux toward the apical (AP) side was significantly higher than K-3-G efflux. In contrast, K-3-G efflux toward the basolateral (BL) side was significantly higher than K-7-G efflux. The BL-to-AP efflux was significantly reduced in the presence of the MRP2 inhibitor LTC4. The AP-to-BL efflux was significantly decreased in the presence of the BL-side MRPs inhibitor MK571. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143 decreased the glucuronide conjugate efflux. Therefore, kaempferol is mainly exposed as K-3-G in vivo, which is driven by phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters (i.e., BCRP and MRPs).

  6. ARISTOLOCHIC ACID I METABOLISM IN THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Priestap, Horacio A.; Torres, M. Cecilia; Rieger, Robert A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Freshwater, Tomoko; Taft, David R.; Barbieri, Manuel A.; Iden, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochic acids are natural nitro-compounds found globally in the plant genus Aristolochia that have been implicated in the severe illness in humans termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Aristolochic acids undergo nitroreduction, among other metabolic reactions, and active intermediates arise that are carcinogenic. Previous experiments with rats showed that aristolochic acid I (AA-I), after oral administration or injection, is subjected to detoxication reactions to give aristolochic acid Ia, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and their glucuronide and sulfate conjugates that can be found in urine and faeces. Results obtained with whole rats do not clearly define the role of liver and kidney in such metabolic transformation. In this study, in order to determine the specific role of the kidney on the renal disposition of AA-I and to study the biotransformations suffered by AA-I in this organ, isolated kidneys of rats were perfused with AA-I. AA-I and metabolite concentrations were determined in perfusates and urines using HPLC procedures. The isolated perfused rat kidney model showed that AA-I distributes rapidly and extensively in kidney tissues by uptake from the peritubular capillaries and the tubules. It was also established that the kidney is able to metabolize AA-I into aristolochic acid Ia, aristolochic acid Ia O-sulfate, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and aristolactam Ia O-glucuronide. Rapid demethylation and sulfation of AA-I in the kidney generate aristolochic acid Ia and its sulfate conjugate that are voided to the urine. Reduction reactions to give the aristolactam metabolites occur to a slower rate. Renal clearances showed that filtered AA-I is reabsorbed at the tubules whereas the metabolites are secreted. The unconjugated metabolites produced in the renal tissues are transported to both urine and perfusate whereas the conjugated metabolites are almost exclusively secreted to the urine. PMID:22118289

  7. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  8. In vivo cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzyme characterization using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfang; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2003-07-01

    The development of a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate in vivo phenotyping methodology for characterizing drug-metabolizing phenotypes with reference to the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes would be very beneficial. In terms of application, in the wake of the human genome project, considerable interest is focused on the development of new drugs whose uses will be tailored to specific genetic polymorphisms, and on the individualization of dosing regimens that are also tailored to meet individual patient needs depending upon genotype. In this investigation, chemical probes for CYP450 enzymes were characterized and identified with Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, gold-based metal colloid clusters were utilized to generate surface enhanced Raman spectra for each of the chemical probes. Results will be presented demonstrating the ability of SERS to identify minute quantities of these probes on the order needed for in vivo application.

  9. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  10. Effect of Chromium(VI) Toxicity on Enzymes of Nitrogen Metabolism in Clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Punesh; Joshi, U. N.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are the intrinsic component of the environment with both essential and nonessential types. Their excessive levels pose a threat to plant growth and yield. Also, some heavy metals are toxic to plants even at very low concentrations. The present investigation (a pot experiment) was conducted to determine the affects of varying chromium(VI) levels (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg chromium(VI) kg−1 soil in the form of potassium dichromate) on the key enzymes of nitrogen metabolism in clusterbean. Chromium treatment adversely affect nitrogenase, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate dehydrogenase in various plant organs at different growth stages as specific enzyme activity of these enzymes decreased with an increase in chromium(VI) levels from 0 to 2.0 mg chromium(VI) kg−1 soil and 4.0 mg chromium(VI) kg−1 soil was found to be lethal to clusterbean plants. In general, the enzyme activity increased with advancement of growth to reach maximum at flowering stage and thereafter decreased at grain filling stage. PMID:24744916

  11. Systems biology approaches to enzyme kinetics: analyzing network models of drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Finn, Nnenna A; Kemp, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular drug metabolism involves transport, bioactivation, conjugation, and other biochemical steps. The dynamics of these steps are each dependent on a number of other cellular factors that can ultimately lead to unexpected behavior. In this review, we discuss the confounding processes and coupled reactions within bioactivation networks that require a systems-level perspective in order to fully understand the time-varying behavior. When converting known in vitro characteristics of drug-enzyme interactions into descriptions of cellular systems, features such as substrate availability, cell-to-cell variability, and intracellular redox state deserve special focus. An example of doxorubicin bioactivation is used for discussing points of consideration when constructing and analyzing network models of drug metabolism.

  12. Citric acid metabolism in hetero- and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Drinan, D F; Robin, S; Cogan, T M

    1976-01-01

    The effect of citrate on production of diacetyl and acetoin by four strains each of heterofermentative and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria capable of utilizing citrate was studied. Acetoin was quantitatively the more important compound. The heterofermentative bacteria produced no acetoin or diacetyl in the absence of citrate, and two strains produced traces of acetoin in its presence. Citrate stimulated the growth rate of the heterofermentative lactobacilli. Acidification of all heterofermentative cultures with citric acid resulted in acetoin production. Destruction of accumulated acetoin appeared to coincide with the disappearance of citrate. All homofermentative bacteria produced more acetoin and diacetyl in the presence of citrate than in its absence. Citrate utilization was begun immediately by the streptococci but was delayed until at least the middle of the exponential phase in the case of the lactobacilli. PMID:5054

  13. Characterization of benidipine and its enantiomers' metabolism by human liver cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yune-Jung; Kim, Kwon-Bok; Kim, Hyunmi; Seo, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Ho-Sook; Cha, In-June; Kim, Eun-Young; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2007-09-01

    Benidipine is a dihydropyridine calcium antagonist that has been used clinically as an antihypertensive and antianginal agent. It is used clinically as a racemate, containing the (-)-alpha and (+)-alpha isomers of benidipine. This study was performed to elucidate the metabolism of benidipine and its enantiomers in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to characterize the cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of benidipine. Human liver microsomal incubation of benidipine in the presence of NADPH resulted in the formation of two metabolites, N-desbenzylbenidipine and dehydrobenidipine. The intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) of the formation of N-desbenzylbenidipine and dehydrobenidipine metabolites from (-)-alpha isomer was similar to those from the (+)-alpha isomer (1.9 +/- 0.1 versus 2.3 +/- 2.3 microl/min/pmol P450 and 0.5 +/- 0.2 versus 0.6 +/- 0.6 microl/min/pmol P450, respectively). Correlation analysis between the known P450 enzyme activities and the rate of the formation of benidipine metabolites in the 15 HLMs showed that benidipine metabolism is correlated with CYP3A activity. The P450 isoform-selective inhibition study in liver microsomes and the incubation study of cDNA-expressed enzymes also showed that theN-debenzylation and dehydrogenation of benidipine are mainly mediated by CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. The total CL(int) values of CYP3A4-mediated metabolite formation from (-)-alpha isomer were similar to those from (+)-alpha isomer (17.7 versus 14.4 microl/min/pmol P450, respectively). The total CL(int) values of CYP3A5-mediated metabolite formation from (-)-alpha isomer were also similar to those from (+)-alpha isomer (8.3 versus 11.0 microl/min/pmol P450, respectively). These findings suggest that CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 isoforms are major enzymes contributing to the disposition of benidipine, but stereoselective disposition of benidipine in vivo may be influenced not by stereoselective metabolism but by other factors.

  14. A Multiscale Approach to Modelling Drug Metabolism by Membrane-Bound Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Mark S. P.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are found in all life forms. P450s play an important role in drug metabolism, and have potential uses as biocatalysts. Human P450s are membrane-bound proteins. However, the interactions between P450s and their membrane environment are not well-understood. To date, all P450 crystal structures have been obtained from engineered proteins, from which the transmembrane helix was absent. A significant number of computational studies have been performed on P450s, but the majority of these have been performed on the solubilised forms of P450s. Here we present a multiscale approach for modelling P450s, spanning from coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to reaction modelling using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of such an integrated multiscale approach to modelling of a membrane-bound enzyme. We have applied this protocol to a key human P450 involved in drug metabolism: CYP3A4. A biologically realistic model of CYP3A4, complete with its transmembrane helix and a membrane, has been constructed and characterised. The dynamics of this complex have been studied, and the oxidation of the anticoagulant R-warfarin has been modelled in the active site. Calculations have also been performed on the soluble form of the enzyme in aqueous solution. Important differences are observed between the membrane and solution systems, most notably for the gating residues and channels that control access to the active site. The protocol that we describe here is applicable to other membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:25033460

  15. Enzymes of creatine biosynthesis, arginine and methionine metabolism in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Bera, Soumen; Wallimann, Theo; Ray, Subhankar; Ray, Manju

    2008-12-01

    The creatine/creatine kinase system decreases drastically in sarcoma. In the present study, an investigation of catalytic activities, western blot and mRNA expression unambiguously demonstrates the prominent expression of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in sarcoma, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, whereas both enzymes were virtually undetectable in normal muscle. Compared to that of normal animals, these enzymes remained unaffected in the kidney or liver of sarcoma-bearing mice. High activity and expression of mitochondrial arginase II in sarcoma indicated increased ornithine formation. Slightly or moderately higher levels of ornithine, guanidinoacetate and creatinine were observed in sarcoma compared to muscle. Despite the intrinsically low level of creatine in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, these cells could significantly take up and release creatine, suggesting a functional creatine transport, as verified by measuring mRNA levels of creatine transporter. Transcript levels of arginase II, ornithine-decarboxylase, S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and methionine-synthase were significantly upregulated in sarcoma and in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells. Overall, the enzymes related to creatine and arginine/methionine metabolism were found to be significantly upregulated in malignant cells. However, the low levels of creatine kinase in the same malignant cells do not appear to be sufficient for the building up of an effective creatine/phosphocreatine pool. Instead of supporting creatine biosynthesis, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase appear to be geared to support cancer cell metabolism in the direction of polyamine and methionine synthesis because both these compounds are in high demand in proliferating cancer cells.

  16. Impact of androgenic/antiandrogenic compounds (AAC) on human sex steroid metabolizing key enzymes.

    PubMed

    Alléra, A; Lo, S; King, I; Steglich, F; Klingmüller, D

    2004-12-01

    Various pesticides, industrial pollutants and synthetic compounds, to which human populations are exposed, are known or suspected to interfere with endogenous sex hormone functions. Such interference potentially affect the development and expression of the male and female reproductive system or both. Chemicals in this class are thus referred to as endocrine disruptors (ED). This emphazises on the relevance of screening ED for a wide range of sex hormone-mimicking effects. These compounds are believed to exert influence on hormonal actions predominantly by (i) interfering with endogenous steroids in that they functionally interact with plasma membrane-located receptors as well as with nuclear receptors both for estrogens and androgens or (ii) affecting the levels of sex hormones as a result of their impact on steroid metabolizing key enzymes. Essential sex hormone-related enzymes within the endocrine system of humans are aromatase, 5alpha-reductase 2 as well as specific sulfotransferases and sulfatases (so-called phase I and phase II enzymes, respectively). Using suitable human tissues and human cancer cell lines (placenta, prostate, liver and JEG-3, lymph node carcinoma of prostate (LnCaP) cells) we investigated the impact of 10 widely used chemicals suspected of acting as ED with androgenic or antiandrogenic activity (so-called AAC) on the activity of these sex hormone metabolizing key enzymes in humans. In addition, the respective effects of six substances were also studied as positive controls due to their well-known specific hormonal agonistic/antagonistic activities. The aim of this report and subsequent investigations is to improve human health risk assessment for AAC and other ED.

  17. A robust and efficient method for estimating enzyme complex abundance and metabolic flux from expression data

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Brandon E.; Smallbone, Kieran; Myers, Christopher R.; Xi, Hongwei; Locasale, Jason W.; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-01-01

    A major theme in constraint-based modeling is unifying experimental data, such as biochemical information about the reactions that can occur in a system or the composition and localization of enzyme complexes, with high-throughput data including expression data, metabolomics, or DNA sequencing. The desired result is to increase predictive capability and improve our understanding of metabolism. The approach typically employed when only gene (or protein) intensities are available is the creation of tissue-specific models, which reduces the available reactions in an organism model, and does not provide an objective function for the estimation of fluxes. We develop a method, flux assignment with LAD (least absolute deviation) convex objectives and normalization (FALCON), that employs metabolic network reconstructions along with expression data to estimate fluxes. In order to use such a method, accurate measures of enzyme complex abundance are needed, so we first present an algorithm that addresses quantification of complex abundance. Our extensions to prior techniques include the capability to work with large models and significantly improved run-time performance even for smaller models, an improved analysis of enzyme complex formation, the ability to handle large enzyme complex rules that may incorporate multiple isoforms, and either maintained or significantly improved correlation with experimentally measured fluxes. FALCON has been implemented in MATLAB and ATS, and can be downloaded from: https://github.com/bbarker/FALCON. ATS is not required to compile the software, as intermediate C source code is available. FALCON requires use of the COBRA Toolbox, also implemented in MATLAB. PMID:26381164

  18. Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Heather E. Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-10-15

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have

  19. The Contributing Role of Bile Acids to Metabolic Improvements After Obesity and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Farnaz; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Steffen, Kristine J

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and metabolic surgery (OMS) leads to several metabolic improvements, which often occur prior to substantial weight loss. Therefore, other factors in addition to weight loss contribute to the metabolic benefits. This literature review offers an overview of studies investigating bile acids (BAs) and their metabolic effects after OMS. Rearrangement of enterohepatic circulation, changes in BA synthesis, BA conjugation, intestinal reabsorption, and alterations in the gut microbiota are potential mechanisms for altered BA profiles after surgery. Increased BA levels are associated with improved glucose homeostasis and lipid profiles, which are mediated by two major receptors: the Transmembrane G-protein Coupled Receptor and the Farnesoid X Receptor. Therefore, pharmacological manipulation of BAs and their receptors may be viable targets for less invasive obesity treatment.

  20. A Systems Biology Framework for Modeling Metabolic Enzyme Inhibition of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-15

    Quadri LE: Assembly of aryl-capped siderophores by modular peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases . Mol Microbiol 2000, 37:1-12. 51. Chou CJ...opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Results: We developed a mathematical framework to simulate the effects on the growth of a pathogen when enzymes in... on the growth of M. tuberculosis in a medium whose carbon source was restricted to fatty acids, and that of the 5’-O-(N-salicylsulfamoyl) adenosine

  1. Model-Assisted Analysis of Sugar Metabolism throughout Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Enzyme and Carrier Properties in Relation to Vacuole Expansion[W

    PubMed Central

    Beauvoit, Bertrand P.; Colombié, Sophie; Monier, Antoine; Andrieu, Marie-Hélène; Biais, Benoit; Bénard, Camille; Chéniclet, Catherine; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Nazaret, Christine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Gibon, Yves

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model combining enzyme activity measurements and subcellular compartmentation was parameterized to fit the sucrose, hexose, and glucose-6-P contents of pericarp throughout tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development. The model was further validated using independent data obtained from domesticated and wild tomato species and on transgenic lines. A hierarchical clustering analysis of the calculated fluxes and enzyme capacities together revealed stage-dependent features. Cell division was characterized by a high sucrolytic activity of the vacuole, whereas sucrose cleavage during expansion was sustained by both sucrose synthase and neutral invertase, associated with minimal futile cycling. Most importantly, a tight correlation between flux rate and enzyme capacity was found for fructokinase and PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase during cell division and for sucrose synthase, UDP-glucopyrophosphorylase, and phosphoglucomutase during expansion, thus suggesting an adaptation of enzyme abundance to metabolic needs. In contrast, for most enzymes, flux rates varied irrespectively of enzyme capacities, and most enzymes functioned at <5% of their maximal catalytic capacity. One of the major findings with the model was the high accumulation of soluble sugars within the vacuole together with organic acids, thus enabling the osmotic-driven vacuole expansion that was found during cell division. PMID:25139005

  2. [Important application of intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes on gastrointestinal disposal of active ingredients of Chinese materia medica].

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaolin; Du, Qiu; Di, Liuqing

    2010-02-01

    Oral drug bioavailability depends on gastrointestinal absorption, intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes are the important factors in drug gastrointestinal absorption and they can also be induced or inhibited by the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica. This article presents important application of intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes on gastrointestinal disposal of the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica, and points out the importance of research on transport and metabolism of the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica in Chinese extract and Chinese medicinal formulae.

  3. Reaction phenotyping: advances in the experimental strategies used to characterize the contribution of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Michael A; Youdim, Kuresh

    2015-01-01

    During the process of drug discovery, the pharmaceutical industry is faced with numerous challenges. One challenge is the successful prediction of the major routes of human clearance of new medications. For compounds cleared by metabolism, accurate predictions help provide an early risk assessment of their potential to exhibit significant interpatient differences in pharmacokinetics via routes of metabolism catalyzed by functionally polymorphic enzymes and/or clinically significant metabolic drug-drug interactions. This review details the most recent and emerging in vitro strategies used by drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic scientists to better determine rates and routes of metabolic clearance and how to translate these parameters to estimate the amount these routes contribute to overall clearance, commonly referred to as fraction metabolized. The enzymes covered in this review include cytochrome P450s together with other enzymatic pathways whose involvement in metabolic clearance has become increasingly important as efforts to mitigate cytochrome P450 clearance are successful. Advances in the prediction of the fraction metabolized include newly developed methods to differentiate CYP3A4 from the polymorphic enzyme CYP3A5, scaling tools for UDP-glucuronosyltranferase, and estimation of fraction metabolized for substrates of aldehyde oxidase.

  4. Proteomics-based metabolic modeling reveals that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) controls endothelial cell (EC) permeability.

    PubMed

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability.

  5. Acid-base metabolism: implications for kidney stones formation.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The physiology and pathophysiology of renal H+ ion excretion and urinary buffer systems are reviewed. The main focus is on the two major conditions related to acid-base metabolism that cause kidney stone formation, i.e., distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and abnormally low urine pH with subsequent uric acid stone formation. Both the entities can be seen on the background of disturbances of the major urinary buffer system, NH3+ <--> NH4+. On the one hand, reduced distal tubular secretion of H+ ions results in an abnormally high urinary pH and either incomplete or complete dRTA. On the other hand, reduced production/availability of NH4+ is the cause of an abnormally low urinary pH, which predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Most recent research indicates that the latter abnormality may be a renal manifestation of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Despite opposite deviations from normal urinary pH values, both the dRTA and uric acid stone formation due to low urinary pH require the same treatment, i.e., alkali. In the dRTA, alkali is needed for improving the body's buffer capacity, whereas the goal of alkali treatment in uric acid stone formers is to increase the urinary pH to 6.2-6.8 in order to minimize uric acid crystallization.

  6. Comparative analysis on the key enzymes of the glycerol cycle metabolic pathway in Dunaliella salina under osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments.

  7. In vitro metabolism of a novel antithrombotic compound, S002-333, and its enantiomers: quantitative cytochrome P450 phenotyping, metabolic profiling and enzyme kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amrita; Jain, Girish K; Siddiqui, Hefazat H; Bhunia, Shom S; Saxena, Anil K; Gayen, Jiaur R

    2014-04-01

    1. S002-333, (2-(4'-methoxy-benzenesulfonyl)-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido (3,4-b) indole-3-carboxylic acid amide) is a novel potent antithrombotic molecule currently under development phase. It is the racemic mixture of two enantiomers, namely S004-1032 (R-form) and S007-1558 (S-form). 2. The contribution of five major isoenzymes, namely CYP2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 was quantified using recombinant P450s in the phase-I metabolism through relative activity factor approach. CYP2C19 was found to be the major contributor for S002-333 and S007-1558, while CYP3A4 showed greater involvement in S004-1032 metabolism. Chemical inhibition and immunoinhibition studies reconfirmed the results in human liver microsomes (HLM). 3. Four major phase-I metabolites of S002-333; M-1 and M-3 (oxidative), M-2 (O-demethylated) and M-4 (dehydrogenated) were characterized in HLM. These metabolites constituted 11.2, 11.3 and 21.5% of the parent in comparison with the net phase-I metabolism of 29.9, 31.4 and 38.3% of S002-333, S004-1032 and S007-1558, respectively. 4. Among CYP2C9, 2C19 and 3A4, the relative contribution of CYP2C9 was found to be maximum during M-1 through M-4 formation. Enzyme kinetic analysis for detected metabolites indicated that M-1 to M-3 followed classical hyperbolic kinetics, whereas M-4 showed evidence of autoactivation. In conclusion, the results suggest prominent role of CYP2C9, 2C19 and 3A4 isoforms for enantioselective disposition of S002-333 in vitro.

  8. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli MG1655 under octanoic acid (C8) stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanfen; Yoon, Jong Moon; Jarboe, Laura; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2015-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering has made the renewable production of industrial chemicals a feasible alternative to modern operations. One major example of a renewable process is the production of carboxylic acids, such as octanoic acid (C8), from Escherichia coli, engineered to express thioesterase enzymes. C8, however, is toxic to E. coli above a certain concentration, which limits the final titer. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of E. coli was performed for both C8 stress and control conditions using NMR2Flux with isotopomer balancing. A mixture of labeled and unlabeled glucose was used as the sole carbon source for bacterial growth for (13)C flux analysis. By comparing the metabolic flux maps of the control condition and C8 stress condition, pathways that were altered under the stress condition were identified. C8 stress was found to reduce carbon flux in several pathways: the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the CO2 production, and the pyruvate dehydrogenase pathway. Meanwhile, a few pathways became more active: the pyruvate oxidative pathway, and the extracellular acetate production. These results were statistically significant for three biological replicates between the control condition and C8 stress. As a working hypothesis, the following causes are proposed to be the main causes for growth inhibition and flux alteration for a cell under stress: membrane disruption, low activity of electron transport chain, and the activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase regulator (PdhR).

  9. Sulfur amino acid metabolism limits the growth of children living in environments of poor sanitation.

    PubMed

    Bickler, Stephen W; Ring, Jason; De Maio, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Environmental enteropathy has been identified as a cause of poor growth in children living in low-income countries, but a mechanism has not been well defined. We suggest changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism can in part explain the poor growth and possibly the histological changes in the small bowel, which is the hallmark of environmental enteropathy. In environments of poor sanitation, where infection is common, we propose increased oxidative stress drives methionine metabolism toward cystathionine synthesis. This "cystathionine siphon" limits sulfur amino acids from participating in critical protein synthesis pathways. Increased expression of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) could be one mechanism, as lipopolysaccharide and TNFα increase activity of this enzyme in vivo. CBS catalyzes the first of two steps in the transsulfuration pathway that converts homocysteine to cysteine. As enterocytes are one of the most rapidly proliferating cells in the body, we suggest diminished translation might also be important in the barrier failure observed in environmental enteropathy. Identifying sulfur amino acid metabolism as a mechanism leading to poor growth provides a new testable hypothesis for the undernutrition observed in children living in settings of poor sanitation.

  10. Effects of bioactive fatty acid amide derivatives in zebrafish scale model of bone metabolism and disease.

    PubMed

    Carnovali, M; Ottria, R; Pasqualetti, S; Banfi, G; Ciuffreda, P; Mariotti, M

    2016-02-01

    The endocannabinoid system (which includes fatty acid derivatives, receptors, and metabolizing enzymes) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, including bone metabolism in which it regulates the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, as well as differentiation of their precursors. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides a useful animal model for bone research since zebrafish bones develop rapidly and are anatomically similar to mammalian bones. Putative orthologues and paralogs of endocannabinoid genes have recently been identified in zebrafish, demonstrating the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) receptors with affinity to endocannabinoid ligands. To identify therapeutic molecules potentially useful in bone-related diseases, we evaluated the in vivo effects of exposure to long-chain fatty acid amides in adult zebrafish. Using a well-established zebrafish scale model, we found that anandamide and N-linoleoylethanolamine are able to stimulate bone formation by increasing alkaline phosphatase activity in physiological conditions. In addition, they prevent the alteration of bone markers in a prednisolone-induced osteoporosis model in adult zebrafish scal