Science.gov

Sample records for acid metabolizing enzymes

  1. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  2. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  3. Diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, and their metabolic enzymes in synaptic vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Tu-Sekine, Becky; Goldschmidt, Hana; Raben, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle includes exocytosis of vesicles loaded with a neurotransmitter such as glutamate, coordinated recovery of SVs by endocytosis, refilling of vesicles, and subsequent release of the refilled vesicles from the presynaptic bouton. SV exocytosis is tightly linked with endocytosis, and variations in the number of vesicles, and/or defects in the refilling of SVs, will affect the amount of neurotransmitter available for release (Sudhof, 2004). There is increasing interest in the roles synaptic vesicle lipids and lipid metabolizing enzymes play in this recycling. Initial emphasis was placed on the role of polyphosphoinositides in SV cycling as outlined in a number of reviews (Lim and Wenk, 2009; Martin, 2012; Puchkov and Haucke, 2013; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005). Other lipids are now recognized to also play critical roles. For example, PLD1 (Humeau et al., 2001; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005) and some DGKs (Miller et al., 1999; Nurrish et al., 1999) play roles in neurotransmission which is consistent with the critical roles for phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) and diacylglycerol (DAG) in the regulation of SV exo/endocytosis (Cremona et al., 1999; Exton, 1994; Huttner and Schmidt, 2000; Lim and Wenk, 2009; Puchkov and Haucke, 2013; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005). PLD generates phosphatidic acid by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and in some systems this PtdOH is de-phosphorylated to generate DAG. In contrast, DGK catalyzes the phosphorylation of DAG thereby converting it into PtdOH. While both enzymes are poised to regulate the levels of DAG and PtdOH, therefore, they both lead to the generation of PtdOH and could have opposite effects on DAG levels. This is particularly important for SV cycling as PtdOH and DAG are both needed for evoked exocytosis (Lim and Wenk, 2009; Puchkov and Haucke, 2013; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005). Two lipids and their involved metabolic enzymes, two sphingolipids have also been implicated in

  4. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  5. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  6. Photosynthesis in Rhodospirillum rubrum. III. Metabolic Control of Reductive Pentose Phosphate and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise; Fuller, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle including ribulose-diphosphate carboxylase, ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and alkaline fructose-1,6-diphos-phatase were shown to be present in autotrophically grown Rhodospirillum rubrum. Enzyme levels were measured in this organism grown photo- and dark heterotrophically as well. Several, but not all, of these enzymes appeared to be under metabolic control, mediated by exogenous carbon and nitrogen compounds. Light had no effect on the presence or levels of any of these enzymes in this photosynthetic bacterium. The enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and enolase were shown to be present in R. rubrum cultured aerobically, autotrophically, or photoheterotrophically, both in cultures evolving hydrogen and under conditions where hydrogen evolution is not observed. Light had no clearly demonstrable effect on the presence or levels of any of these enzymes. PMID:6042359

  7. Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Estrogen-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis by Modulating Enzymes of Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Harini S.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine whether dietary berries and ellagic acid prevent 17β estradiol (E2) -induced mammary tumors by altering estrogen metabolism, we randomized ACI rats (n=6/group) into 5 groups − sham implant + control diet (SH-CD), E2 − implant + control diet (E2-CD), E2+2.5% black raspberry (E2-BRB); E2+2.5% blueberry (E2-BB) and E2+ 400ppm ellagic acid (E2-EA). Animals were euthanized at early (6wk), intermediate (18wk) and late (24wk) phases of E2-carcinogenesis and the mammary tissue analyzed for gene-expression changes using quantitative real-time PCR. At 6 weeks, E2-treatment caused 48-fold increase in cytochrome P4501A1(CYP1A1) (p<0.0001), which was attenuated by both BRB and BB diets to 12- and 21-fold, respectively (p<0.001). E2 did not alter CYP1B1 levels, but both berry and EA diets significantly suppressed it by 11- and 3.5-fold, respectively from baseline (p<0.05). There was a 5-fold increase in 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehyrdogenase(17βHSD7) and this was moderately abrogated to about 2-fold by all supplementation (p<0.05). At 18 weeks, CYP1A1 was elevated by 15-fold in E2-CD and only E2-BB reduced this increase to 7-fold (p<0.05). Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) expression was elevated 2-fold by E2-treatment (p<0.05) and all supplementation reversed this. At 24 weeks, CYP1A1 expression was less pronounced, but still high (8-fold) in E2-treated rats. This increase was reduced to 3.2 and 4.6-fold, by E2-BRB and E2-EA, respectively (p<0.05), but not by E2-BB. Supplementation did not alter the effect of E2 on steroid receptors. The diets also significantly suppressed mammary tumor incidence (10–30%), volume (41–67%) and multiplicity (38 to 51%) (p<0.05). Berries may prevent mammary tumors by suppressing the levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes during the early phase of E2-carcinogenesis. PMID:20501861

  8. Hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D based on the uric acid metabolism enzymes PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Gang; Hou, Pi-Yong; Zhang, Xi; He, Yi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Anderson, Samantha; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Allopurinol is a commonly used medication to treat hyperuricemia and its complications. Pallidifloside D, a saponin glycoside constituent from the total saponins of Smilax riparia, had been proved to enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol based on uric acid metabolism enzyme XOD. In this study, we evaluated whether Pallidifloside D (5mg/kg) enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol (5mg/kg) related to others uric acid metabolism enzymes such as PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT. We found that, compared with allopurinol alone, the combination of allopurinol and Pallidifloside D significantly up-regulated HGPRT mRNA expression and down-regulated the mRNA expression of PRPS and PRPPAT in PC12 cells (all P<0.01). These results strongly suggest that hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D via numerous mechanisms and our data may have a potential value in clinical practice in the treatment of gout and other hyperuricemic conditions. PMID:27370097

  9. Metabolism of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid and naphthalene via gentisic acid by distinctly different sets of enzymes in Burkholderia sp. strain BC1.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Piyali Pal; Sarkar, Jayita; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Tapan K

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain BC1, a soil bacterium, isolated from a naphthalene balls manufacturing waste disposal site, is capable of utilizing 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) and naphthalene individually as the sole source of carbon and energy. To deduce the pathway for degradation of 2H1NA, metabolites isolated from resting cell culture were identified by a combination of chromatographic and spectrometric analyses. Characterization of metabolic intermediates, oxygen uptake studies and enzyme activities revealed that strain BC1 degrades 2H1NA via 2-naphthol, 1,2,6-trihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene and gentisic acid. In addition, naphthalene was found to be degraded via 1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, salicylic acid and gentisic acid, with the putative involvement of the classical nag pathway. Unlike most other Gram-negative bacteria, metabolism of salicylic acid in strain BC1 involves a dual pathway, via gentisic acid and catechol, with the latter being metabolized by catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Involvement of a non-oxidative decarboxylase in the enzymic transformation of 2H1NA to 2-naphthol indicates an alternative catabolic pathway for the bacterial degradation of hydroxynaphthoic acid. Furthermore, the biochemical observations on the metabolism of structurally similar compounds, naphthalene and 2-naphthol, by similar but different sets of enzymes in strain BC1 were validated by real-time PCR analyses.

  10. Efficacy of azelaic acid on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, Shanmugam; Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2013-06-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA), a C9 linear α,ω-dicarboxylic acid, is found in whole grains namely wheat, rye, barley, oat seeds and sorghum. The study was performed to investigate whether AzA exerts beneficial effect on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diet for 10 weeks and subjected to intragastric administration of various doses (20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg/kg BW) of AzA daily for the subsequent 5 weeks. Rosiglitazone (RSG) was used as reference drug. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, plasma insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), blood glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), liver glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase), hepatic shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes(glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase), liver glycogen, plasma and liver triglycerides were examined in mice fed with normal standard diet (NC), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with AzA (HFD + AzA) and HFD with rosiglitazone (HFD + RSG). Among the three doses, 80 mg/kg BW of AzA was able to positively regulate plasma glucose, insulin, blood HbA1c and haemoglobin levels by significantly increasing the activity of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and significantly decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase thereby increasing the glycogen content in the liver. From this study, we put forward that AzA could significantly restore the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, Hb, liver glycogen and carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes to near normal in diabetic mice and hence, AzA may be useful as a biomaterial in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat diet induced T2DM.

  11. Influence of certain essential oils on carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and acid-soluble sulfhydryls in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Sharma, R; Kale, R K; Rao, A R

    1994-01-01

    The influence of essential oils from naturally occurring plant dietary items such as cardamom, celery seed, cumin seed, coriander, ginger, nutmeg, and zanthoxylum on the activities of hepatic carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, and glutathione S-transferase) and acid-soluble sulfhydryl level was investigated in Swiss albino mice. Each oil was fed by gavage at 10 microliters/day for 14 days, and then the animals were sacrificed and their hepatic enzyme activities and sulfhydryl levels were evaluated. Only nutmeg and zanthoxylum oils induced cytochrome P450 level significantly (p < 0.05), whereas cardamom oil caused a significant reduction in its activity (p < 0.05). Furthermore, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was significantly elevated only by treatment with ginger oil (p < 0.01), whereas nutmeg oil caused a significant reduction in its activity (p < 0.01). The remaining oils did not significantly alter the level of cytochrome P450 and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity. Glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly elevated in all experimental groups (p < 0.1-p < 0.001) compared with controls. The acid-soluble sulfhydryl was significantly elevated only by the essential oils of cardamom (p < 0.05), nutmeg (p < 0.05), and zanthoxylum (p < 0.01). Our observations suggest that intake of essential oils affects the host enzymes associated with activation and detoxication of xenobiotic compounds, including chemical carcinogens and mutagens. PMID:8072879

  12. RDH10 is the primary enzyme responsible for the first step of embryonic Vitamin A metabolism and retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Krysten M; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Nikolaeva, Olga; Sandell, Lisa L; Trainor, Paul A; Ma, Jian-xing

    2011-09-15

    Retinoic acid (atRA) signaling is essential for regulating embryonic development, and atRA levels must be tightly controlled in order to prevent congenital abnormalities and fetal death which can result from both excessive and insufficient atRA signaling. Cellular enzymes synthesize atRA from Vitamin A, which is obtained from dietary sources. Embryos express multiple enzymes that are biochemically capable of catalyzing the initial step of Vitamin A oxidation, but the precise contribution of these enzymes to embryonic atRA synthesis remains unknown. Using Rdh10(trex)-mutant embryos, dietary supplementation of retinaldehyde, and retinol dehydrogenase (RDH) activity assays, we demonstrate that RDH10 is the primary RDH responsible for the first step of embryonic Vitamin A oxidation. Moreover, we show that this initial step of atRA synthesis occurs predominantly in a membrane-bound cellular compartment, which prevents inhibition by the cytosolic cellular retinol-binding protein (RBP1). These studies reveal that widely expressed cytosolic enzymes with RDH activity play a very limited role in embryonic atRA synthesis under normal dietary conditions. This provides a breakthrough in understanding the precise cellular mechanisms that regulate Vitamin A metabolism and the synthesis of the essential embryonic regulatory molecule atRA.

  13. Chlorogenic acid and caffeine in combination inhibit fat accumulation by regulating hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guodong; Qiu, Yangyang; Zhang, Qing-Feng; Li, Dongming

    2014-09-28

    Obesity has become a public health concern due to its positive association with the incidence of many diseases, and coffee components including chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeine have been demonstrated to play roles in the suppression of fat accumulation. To investigate the mechanism by which CGA and caffeine regulate lipid metabolism, in the present study, forty mice were randomly assigned to four groups and fed diets containing no CGA or caffeine, CGA, caffeine, or CGA+caffeine for 24 weeks. Body weight, intraperitoneal adipose tissue (IPAT) weight, and serum biochemical parameters were measured, and the activities and mRNA and protein expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes were analysed. There was a decrease in the body weight and IPAT weight of mice fed the CGA+caffeine diet. There was a significant decrease in the serum and hepatic concentrations of total cholesterol, TAG and leptin of mice fed the CGA+caffeine diet. The activities of carnitine acyltransferase (CAT) and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) were increased in mice fed the caffeine and CGA+caffeine diets, while the activity of fatty acid synthase (FAS) was suppressed in those fed the CGA+caffeine diet. The mRNA expression levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), CAT and ACO were considerably up-regulated in mice fed the CGA+caffeine diet, while those of PPARγ2 were down-regulated. The protein expression levels of AMPK were increased and those of FAS were decreased in mice fed the CGA+caffeine diet. These results indicate that CGA+caffeine suppresses fat accumulation and body weight gain by regulating the activities and mRNA and protein expression levels of hepatic lipid metabolism-related enzymes and that these effects are stronger than those exerted by CGA and caffeine individually. PMID:25201308

  14. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  19. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  20. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  1. Regulatory mechanisms of cellular respiration. III. Enzyme distribution in the cell. Its influence on the metabolism of pyruvic acid by bakers' yeast.

    PubMed

    BARRON, E S G; ARDAO, M I; HEARON, M

    1950-11-01

    The rate of the aerobic metabolism of pyruvic acid by bakers' yeast cells is determined mainly by the amount of undissociated acid present. As a consequence, the greatest rate of oxidation was observed at pH 2.8. Oxidation, at a slow rate, started at pH 1.08; at pH 9.4 there was no oxidation at all. The anaerobic metabolism, only a fraction of the aerobic, was observed only in acid solutions. There was none at pH values higher than 3. Pyruvic acid in the presence of oxygen was oxidized directly to acetic acid; in the absence of oxygen it was metabolized mainly by dismutation to lactic and acetic acids, and CO(2). Acetic acid formation was demonstrated on oxidation of pyruvic acid at pH 1.91, and on addition of fluoroacetic acid. Succinic acid formation was shown by addition of malonic acid. These metabolic pathways in a cell so rich in carboxylase may be explained by the arrangement of enzymes within the cell, so that carboxylase is at the center, while pyruvic acid oxidase is located at the periphery. Succinic and citric acids were oxidized only in acid solutions up to pH 4. Malic and alpha-ketoglutaric acids were not oxidized, undoubtedly because of lack of penetration.

  2. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  3. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  4. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  5. Fusidic Acid Inhibits Hepatic Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Potential Cause of Clinical Drug-Drug Interaction Observed with Statin Coadministration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshul; Harris, Jennifer J; Lin, Jianrong; Bulgarelli, James P; Birmingham, Bruce K; Grimm, Scott W

    2016-10-01

    Fusidic acid (FA), which was approved in the 1960s in many European and Asian countries, has gained renewed interest due to its continued effectiveness against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus As rhabdomyolysis has been reported upon coadministration of FA with statins, we aimed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to FA-statin drug-drug interactions. Because of the association between rhabdomyolysis and increased exposure to statins, we investigated if cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and transporters involved in the disposition of various statins are inhibited by FA. FA was found to inhibit BCRP and OATP1B1 but not P-gp. In overexpressing cell systems, FA inhibited BCRP-mediated efflux (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], ∼50 to 110 μM) and OATP1B1-mediated uptake (IC50, ∼4 to 35 μM) of statins at clinically relevant concentrations achievable in the intestine and liver (based on a 550-mg oral dose of FA, the expected maximum theoretical gastrointestinal concentration is ∼4 mM, and the maximum total or unbound concentration in the inlet to the liver was reported to be up to 223 μM or 11 μM, respectively, upon multiple dosing). Similarly, FA inhibited metabolism of statins in human liver microsomes (IC50, ∼17 to 195 μM). These data suggest that FA inhibits at least 3 major dispositional pathways (BCRP, OATP1B1, and CYP3A) and thus affects the clearance of several statins. We confirmed that FA is eliminated via phase 1 metabolism (primarily via CYP3A); however, there is also some phase 2 metabolism (mediated primarily by UGT1A1). Taken together, these data provide evidence for molecular mechanisms that may explain the occurrence of rhabdomyolysis when FA is administered with statins.

  6. Influence of gallic acid esters on drug-metabolizing enzymes of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Depner, M; Kahl, G F; Kahl, R

    1982-10-01

    The effect of three antioxidants, propyl, octyl and dodecyl gallate, on hepatic drug metabolism in male rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. When fed at a dietary concentration of 1% for 14 days, only dodecyl gallate increased relative liver weight. Cytochrome P-450 content was not influenced, but a slight increase in cytochrome b5 content was observed after the feeding of propyl gallate. Monooxygenase activity (benzo[a]pyrene-hydroxylase and ethoxycoumarin-deethylase activities) was not affected by propyl or octyl gallate, but a significant decrease in benzo[a]pyrene-hydroxylase activity was apparent in rats fed dodecyl gallate. Study of benzo[a]pyrene-metabolite formation in liver microsome preparations from control and propyl gallate-treated rats showed an overall decrease in metabolite production following gallate treatment, the decrease being statistically significant for the formation of the 9,10-dihydrodiol. Epoxide-hydratase activity was enhanced by a factor of 1.5 in rats fed propyl gallate; glutathione-transferase activity was unaffected. In vitro, the gallates proved to be potent inhibitors of ethoxycoumarin deethylation in liver microsomes from untreated and phenobarbital-treated rats; however, when cytochrome P-448 had been induced by pretreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene, ethoxycoumarin deethylase was less sensitive to the inhibitory action of the gallates.

  7. Enzyme complexity in intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van Schaftingen, Emile; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Linster, Carole L

    2015-07-01

    A good appraisal of the function of enzymes is essential for the understanding of inborn errors of metabolism. However, it is clear now that the 'one gene, one enzyme, one catalytic function' rule oversimplifies the actual situation. Genes often encode several related proteins, which may differ in their subcellular localisation, regulation or function. Furthermore, enzymes often show several catalytic activities. In some cases, this is because they are multifunctional, possessing two or more different active sites that catalyse different, physiologically related reactions. In enzymes with broad specificity or in multispecificity enzymes, a single type of catalytic site performs the same reaction on different physiological substrates at similar rates. Enzymes that act physiologically in only one reaction often show nonetheless substrate promiscuity: they act at low rates on compounds that resemble their physiological substrate(s), thus forming non-classical metabolites, which are in some cases eliminated by metabolite repair. In addition to their catalytic role, enzymes may have moonlighting functions, i.e. non-catalytic functions that are most often not related with their catalytic activity. Deficiency in such functions may participate in the phenotype of inborn errors of metabolism. Evolution has also made that some enzymes have lost their catalytic activity to become allosteric proteins.

  8. [Metabolism of pantothenic acid and its derivatives in animals deficient in this enzyme].

    PubMed

    Gurinovich, V A; Moiseenok, A G

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of [14C]labelled metabolites of pantothenic acid (PAA) has been studied in tissues of normal and PAA-deficient rats-weaners 6 h after single injection of the calcium pantothenate (PAA-Ca), calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (PAA-Ca) or pantethine (PT) preparations. Essential differences in the intertissue distribution of vitamin derivatives to be injected are revealed against a background of a higher vitamin-retaining ability of the PAA-deficient tissues. A degree of radionuclides' biotransformation into CoA permits them to be arranged in the series: PPA-Ca greater than PAA-Ca greater than PT. In PAA-deficient animals which were injected labelled PPA-Ca up to 41% of the liver radioactivity is concentrated in the CoA fraction and the quantity of label in the composition of PAA-protein cytosolium complexes increases considerably. It is supposed that there is a special PAA-depositing system which provides the intracellular CoA biosynthesis. PMID:3686695

  9. Acid ceramidase (AC)--a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism--correlates with better prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Lars Christian; Karn, Thomas; Holtrich, Uwe; Gätje, Regine; Rody, Achim; Heinrich, Tomas; Ruckhäberle, Eugen; Engels, Knut

    2013-05-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC), a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism, seems to play an important role in cancer progression. The objective of this study was to explore the expression of AC in ovarian cancer and its impact on prognosis. Expression analysis of AC in n=112 ovarian cancer patients was performed by immunohistochemical analysis of primary paraffin-embedded tumor samples. The results were scored on the basis of the staining intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells, resulting in an immunoreactive score from 0 to 12. These results were correlated to clinical and pathologic characteristics and survival. AC expression correlated significantly only with FIGO stage (0.047). In serous carcinoma, low level of AC was independently associated with reduced progression-free survival and overall survival of 12.0 mo [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.78-18.23] versus 18.1 mo (95% CI, 11.61-24.59; P=0.008) and 35.7 mo (95% CI, 22.24-47.16) versus 58.7 mo (95% CI, 36.48-80.91; P=0.032), respectively. In multivariate analysis, AC presents as an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.88; 95% CI, 1.13-3.11; P=0.015). AC is a prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer. Low AC expression can be associated with tumor progression in carcinoma of the ovaries. These results are in contrast to the concept of AC as a promoter for cancer progression. Nevertheless, they are supported by the lately discovered tumor-suppressing function of sphingosine, the enzymatic product of AC.

  10. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  11. Liver-specific cytochrome P450 CYP2C22 is a direct target of retinoic acid and a retinoic acid-metabolizing enzyme in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Qian, Linxi; Zolfaghari, Reza; Ross, A Catharine

    2010-07-01

    Several cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes catalyze the C4-hydroxylation of retinoic acid (RA), a potent inducer of cell differentiation and an agent in the treatment of several diseases. Here, we have characterized CYP2C22, a member of the rat CYP2C family with homology to human CYP2C8 and CYP2C9. CYP2C22 was expressed nearly exclusively in hepatocytes, where it was one of the more abundant mRNAs transcripts. In H-4-II-E rat hepatoma cells, CYP2C22 mRNA was upregulated by all-trans (at)-RA, and Am580, a nonmetabolizable analog of at-RA. In comparison, in primary human hepatocytes, at-RA increased CYP2C9 but not CYP2C8 mRNA. Analysis of the CYP2C22 promoter region revealed a RA response element (5'-GGTTCA-(n)5-AGGTCA-3') in the distal flanking region, which bound the nuclear hormone receptors RAR and RXR and which was required for transcriptional activation response of this promoter to RA in CYP2C22-luciferase-transfected RA-treated HepG2 cells. The cDNA-expressed CYP2C22 protein metabolized [3H]at-RA to more polar metabolites. While long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids competed, 9-cis-RA was a stronger competitor. Our studies demonstrate that CYP2C22 is a high-abundance, retinoid-inducible, hepatic P450 with the potential to metabolize at-RA, providing additional insight into the role of the CYP2C gene family in retinoid homeostasis.

  12. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  13. Nitro-Oleic Acid Reduces J774A.1 Macrophage Oxidative Status and Triglyceride Mass: Involvement of Paraoxonase2 and Triglyceride Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, Mira; Rom, Oren; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids possess anti-atherogenic properties, but their effects on macrophage oxidative status and lipid metabolism that play important roles in atherosclerosis development are unclear. This study compared the effects of nitro-oleic acid (OLA-NO2) with those of native oleic acid (OLA) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, anti-oxidants and metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol in J774A.1 macrophages. Upon incubating the cells with physiological concentrations of OLA-NO2 (0-1 µM) or with equivalent levels of OLA, ROS levels measured by 2, 7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, decreased dose-dependently, but the anti-oxidative effects of OLA-NO2 were significantly augmented. Copper ion addition increased ROS generation in OLA treated macrophages without affecting OLA-NO2 treated cells. These effects could be attributed to elevated glutathione levels and to increased activity and expression of paraoxonase2 that were observed in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated cells. Beneficial effects on triglyceride metabolism were noted in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated macrophages in which cellular triglycerides were reduced due to attenuated biosynthesis and accelerated hydrolysis of triglycerides. Accordingly, OLA-NO2 treated cells demonstrated down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1, the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis, and increased expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase that regulate triglyceride hydrolysis. Finally, OLA-NO2 vs OLA treatment resulted in modest but significant beneficial effects on macrophage cholesterol metabolism, reducing cholesterol biosynthesis rate and low density lipoprotein influx into the cells, while increasing high density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Collectively, compared with OLA, OLA-NO2 modestly but significantly reduces macrophage oxidative status and cellular triglyceride content via modulation of cellular anti-oxidants and triglyceride

  14. Nitro-Oleic Acid Reduces J774A.1 Macrophage Oxidative Status and Triglyceride Mass: Involvement of Paraoxonase2 and Triglyceride Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, Mira; Rom, Oren; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids possess anti-atherogenic properties, but their effects on macrophage oxidative status and lipid metabolism that play important roles in atherosclerosis development are unclear. This study compared the effects of nitro-oleic acid (OLA-NO2) with those of native oleic acid (OLA) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, anti-oxidants and metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol in J774A.1 macrophages. Upon incubating the cells with physiological concentrations of OLA-NO2 (0-1 µM) or with equivalent levels of OLA, ROS levels measured by 2, 7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, decreased dose-dependently, but the anti-oxidative effects of OLA-NO2 were significantly augmented. Copper ion addition increased ROS generation in OLA treated macrophages without affecting OLA-NO2 treated cells. These effects could be attributed to elevated glutathione levels and to increased activity and expression of paraoxonase2 that were observed in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated cells. Beneficial effects on triglyceride metabolism were noted in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated macrophages in which cellular triglycerides were reduced due to attenuated biosynthesis and accelerated hydrolysis of triglycerides. Accordingly, OLA-NO2 treated cells demonstrated down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1, the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis, and increased expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase that regulate triglyceride hydrolysis. Finally, OLA-NO2 vs OLA treatment resulted in modest but significant beneficial effects on macrophage cholesterol metabolism, reducing cholesterol biosynthesis rate and low density lipoprotein influx into the cells, while increasing high density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Collectively, compared with OLA, OLA-NO2 modestly but significantly reduces macrophage oxidative status and cellular triglyceride content via modulation of cellular anti-oxidants and triglyceride

  15. Analysis of ATP-citrate lyase and malic enzyme mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica points out the importance of mannitol metabolism in fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Thierry; Lazar, Zbigniew; Dulermo, Rémi; Rakicka, Magdalena; Haddouche, Ramedane; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    The role of the two key enzymes of fatty acid (FA) synthesis, ATP-citrate lyase (Acl) and malic enzyme (Mae), was analyzed in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. In most oleaginous yeasts, Acl and Mae are proposed to provide, respectively, acetyl-CoA and NADPH for FA synthesis. Acl was mainly studied at the biochemical level but no strain depleted for this enzyme was analyzed in oleaginous microorganisms. On the other hand the role of Mae in FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica remains unclear since it was proposed to be a mitochondrial NAD(H)-dependent enzyme and not a cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent enzyme. In this study, we analyzed for the first time strains inactivated for corresponding genes. Inactivation of ACL1 decreases FA synthesis by 60 to 80%, confirming its essential role in FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica. Conversely, inactivation of MAE1 has no effects on FA synthesis, except in a FA overaccumulating strain where it improves FA synthesis by 35%. This result definitively excludes Mae as a major key enzyme for FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica. During the analysis of both mutants, we observed a negative correlation between FA and mannitol level. As mannitol and FA pathways may compete for carbon storage, we inactivated YlSDR, encoding a mannitol dehydrogenase converting fructose and NADPH into mannitol and NADP+. The FA content of the resulting mutant was improved by 60% during growth on fructose, demonstrating that mannitol metabolism may modulate FA synthesis in Y. lipolytica.

  16. A Comparative Study for the Evaluation of Two Doses of Ellagic Acid on Hepatic Drug Metabolizing and Antioxidant Enzymes in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Gurbet; Semiz, Aslı; Karakurt, Serdar; Arslan, Sevki; Adali, Orhan; Sen, Alaattin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate different doses of ellagic acid (EA) in vivo in rats for its potential to modulate hepatic phases I, II, and antioxidant enzymes. EA (10 or 30 mg/kg/day, intragastrically) was administered for 14 consecutive days, and activity, protein, and mRNA levels were determined. Although the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B and CYP2E enzyme activities were decreased significantly, the activities of all other enzymes were unchanged with the 10 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, western-blot and qRT-PCR results clearly corroborated the above enzyme expressions. On the other hand, while the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were increased significantly, CYP1A, 2B, 2C, 2E, and 19 enzyme activities were reduced significantly with 30 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, CYP2B, 2C6, 2E1, and 19 protein and mRNA levels were substantially decreased by the 30 mg/kg/day dose of EA, but the CYP1A protein, and mRNA levels were not changed. CYP3A enzyme activity, protein and mRNA levels were not altered by neither 10 nor 30 mg/kg/day ellagic acid. These results indicate that EA exerts a dose-dependent impact on the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and drugs by affecting the enzymes involved in xenobiotics activation/detoxification and antioxidant pathways. PMID:23971029

  17. Purification by Immunoadsorption and Immunochemical Properties of NADP-Dependent Malic Enzymes from Leaves of C3, C4, and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Marion; Schnarrenberger, Claus

    1990-01-01

    NADP:malic enzyme from corn (Zea mays L.) leaves was purified by conventional techniques to apparent homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antibodies raised against this protein in rabbits were purified, coupled covalently to protein A-Sepharose CL-4B, and used as an immunoaffinity resin to purify the NADP:malic enzymes of the C3 plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Bryophyllum daigremontianum R. Hamed et Perr. de la Bathie and the C4 plants corn, sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.), and Portulaca grandiflora L. Such procedures yielded homogeneous protein preparations with a single protein band, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, except for P. grandiflora L. with two bands. The specific activities of the purified proteins ranged between 56 and 91 units (milligrams per protein). NADP:malic enzyme represented up to 1% of the total soluble protein in C4 plants, 0.5% in the CAM plant, and less than 0.01% in C3 plants. In immunotitration tests involving immunoprecipitation and immunoinhibition of activity by an antiserum against the corn leaf enzyme, the NADP:malic enzymes of corn and sugarcane showed virtually full identity of epitopes, while the NADP:malic enzymes of the C3 and CAM plants exhibited a cross-reaction of one-twentieth and one-fourth by these tests, respectively. The NADP:malic enzyme of P. grandiflora exhibited characteristics more closely related to the enzymes of C3 and CAM plants than to those of C4 plants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667339

  18. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-12-22

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage.

  19. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage. PMID:26782412

  20. A study of ozone-induced edema in the isolated rat lung in relation to arachidonic acid metabolism, mixed-function oxidases and angiotensin converting enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Chatterjee, M; Teknos, T N; Carlson, R W

    1990-01-01

    In order to elucidate the role of arachidonic acid in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced pulmonary edema, isolated rat lungs were exposed to 14C-arachidonic acid in the presence or absence of ozone and the incorporation of radiolabelled arachidonate into pulmonary cell lipids was studied. The perfusates from these studies were also subjected to differential extraction and thin layer chromatography (t.l.c.) to determine synthesis of both cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products. In the presence of an edemagenic concentration of ozone, isolated lungs incorporated significantly less exogenous arachidonic acid into phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine, whereas incorporation into phosphatidyl inositol or serine was not affected. The edemagenic concentration of ozone also increased production of a variety of arachidonic acid metabolites via cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. In separate studies, a similar ozone exposure did not affect 14CO2 production, resulting from the metabolism of 14C-antipyrine by mixed function oxidases (MFO). Similarly, an edemagenic concentration of ozone did not affect pulmonary angiotensin converting enzyme activity (ACE) as determined by the rate of formation of 14C-hippuric acid from 14C-hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (14C-HHL). Thus, acute ozone exposure is specifically associated with a reduced incorporation of arachidonate into phospholipids and with an increased conversion of arachidonate into bio-active metabolites.

  1. Enzyme clustering can induce metabolic channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Direct channeling of intermediates via a physical tunnel between enzyme active sites is an established mechanism to improve metabolic efficiency. In this talk, I will present a theoretical model that demonstrates that coclustering multiple enzymes into proximity can yield the full efficiency benefits of direct channeling. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with the spacing between coclusters in yeast and mammalian cells. The model also predicts that enzyme agglomerates can regulate steady-state flux division at metabolic branch points: we experimentally test this prediction for a fundamental branch point in Escherichia coli, and the results confirm that enzyme colocalization within an agglomerate can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation.

  2. Retinoic acid-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) is essential for implantation: functional study of its role in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing-Chen; Xia, Hong-Fei; Sun, Jing; Yang, Ying; Peng, Jing-Pian

    2010-05-01

    Vitamin A (VA) is required for normal fetal development and successful pregnancy. Excessive VA intake during pregnancy may lead to adverse maternal and fetal effects. Cytochrome P450 26A1 (cyp26a1), a retinoic acid (RA)-metabolizing enzyme, is involved in VA metabolism. It has been shown that cyp26a1 is expressed in female reproductive tract, especially in uterus. In order to investigate the role of cyp26a1 during pregnancy, we constructed a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine encoding cyp26a1 protein and immunized mice with the plasmid. Compared to control groups, the pregnancy rate of the cyp26a1 plasmid-immunized mice were significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Further results showed that both cyp26a1 mRNA and protein were specifically induced in the uterus during implantation period and localized in the uterine luminal epithelium. Importantly, the number of implantation sites was also significantly reduced (P < 0.05) after the uterine injection of cyp26a1-specific antisense oligos or anti-cyp26a1 antibody on day 3 of pregnancy. Accordingly, the expression of RA-related cellular retinoic acid binding protein 1 and tissue transglutaminase was markedly increased (P < 0.05) in the uterine luminal epithelium after intrauterine injection treatments. These data demonstrate that uterine cyp26a1 activity is important for the maintenance of pregnancy, especially during the process of blastocyst implantation.

  3. Effects of postprandial starvation on mRNA expression of endocrine-, amino acid and peptide transporter-, and metabolic enzyme-related genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Tian, Juan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Liu, Chengdong

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically evaluate the molecular activities of endocrine-, amino acid and peptide transporters-, and metabolic enzyme-related genes in 35-day-old mixed-sex zebrafish (Danio rerio) after feeding . Zebrafish with initial body weights ranging from 9 to 11 mg were fasted for 384 h in a controlled indoor environment. Fish were sampled at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96, 192, and 384 h after fed. Overall, the present study results show that the regulatory mechanism that insulin-like growth factor I negative feedback regulated growth hormone is conserved in zebrafish, as it is in mammals, but that regulation of growth hormone receptors is highly intricate. Leptin and cholecystokinin are time-dependent negative feedback signals, and neuropeptide Y may be an important positive neuropeptide for food intake in zebrafish. The amino acid/carnitine transporters B(0,+) (ATB(0,+)) and broad neutral (0) amino acid transporter 1(B(0)AT1) mRNA levels measured in our study suggest that protein may be utilized during 24-96 h of fasting in zebrafish. Glutamine synthetase mRNA levels were downregulated, and glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, and trypsin mRNA levels were upregulated after longtime fasting in this study. The mRNA expression levels of fatty acid synthetase decreased significantly (P < 0.05), whereas those of lipoprotein lipase rapidly increased after 96 h of fasting. Fasting activated the expression of glucose synthesis genes when fasting for short periods of time; when fasting is prolonged, the mRNA levels of glucose breakdown enzymes and pentose phosphate shunt genes decreased. PMID:25805459

  4. Gene polymorphisms as risk factors for predicting the cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome. Role of folic acid metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Mátyás, Gábor; Szokolai, Viola; Harsányi, Gergely; Szilveszter, Bálint; Odler, Balázs; Pólos, Miklós; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Radovits, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid metabolism enzyme polymorphisms are believed to be responsible for the elevation of homocysteine (HCY) concentration in the blood plasma, correlating with the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. We studied 71 Marfan patients divided into groups based on the severity of cardiovascular involvement: no intervention required (n=27, Group A); mild involvement requiring intervention (n=17, Group B); severe involvement (n=27, Group C) subdivided into aortic dilatation (n=14, Group C1) and aortic dissection (n=13, Group C2), as well as 117 control subjects. We evaluated HCY, folate, vitamin B12 and the polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR;c.665C>T and c.1286A>C), methionine synthase (MTR;c.2756A>G) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR;c.66A>G). Multiple comparisons showed significantly higher levels of HCY in Group C2 compared to Groups A, B, C1 and control group (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). Folate was lower in Group C2 than in Groups A, B, C1 and control subjects (p<0.0001, p=0.02, p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Group C2 had the highest prevalence of homozygotes for all four gene polymorphisms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HCY plasma level was an independent risk factor for severe cardiovascular involvement (Group C; odds ratio [OR] 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-2.67, p=0.001) as well as for aortic dissection (Group C2; OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.30-4.78, p=0.006). In conclusion, severe cardiovascular involvement in Marfan patients, and especially aortic dissection, is associated with higher HCY plasma levels and prevalence of homozygous genotypes of folic acid metabolism enzymes than mild or no cardiovascular involvement. These results suggest that impaired folic acid metabolism has an important role in the development and remodelling of the extracellular matrix of the aorta.

  5. Treatment with PPARδ agonist alleviates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by modulating glucose and fatty acid metabolic enzymes in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuli; Li, Jin; Lu, Xiaolan; Ma, Huihui; Shi, Haitao; Li, Hong; Xie, Danhong; Dong, Lei; Liang, Chunlian

    2015-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly common condition which is associated with certain features of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)δ is an important regulator of energy metabolism and insulin resistance in diabetes. However, the function of PPARδ in NAFLD has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, in order to explore the function of PPARδ in NAFLD, we created a rat model of NALFD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) and treated the rats with GW501516, a PPARδ agonist. We found that the lipid levels decreased, and hepatocellular ballooning and inflammatory cell infiltration were also significantly decreased following treatment of the rats with GW501516 compared to the untreated rats. Treatment with GW501516 also significantly decreased the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, as well as the low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. In addition, treatment with GW501516 increased the levels of insulin‑like growth factor‑1 (IGF-1) and high‑density lipoprotein (HDL) compared to the HFD group. Furthermore, the elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma‑glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the HFD group were all restored to the normal control levels following treatment with GW501516. RT‑qPCR and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein‑1c (SREBP‑1c) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT‑2) were both restored to normal control levels following treatment with GW501516. Also, the levels of enzymes related to lipid metabolism were increased following treatment with GW501516. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that treatment with GW501516 alleviates NAFLD by modulating glucose and fatty acid metabolism. PMID:26133486

  6. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling.

  7. Contributions of Human Enzymes in Carcinogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Considerable support exists for roles of metabolism in modulating the carcinogenic properties of chemicals. In particular, many of these compounds are procarcinogens that require activation to electrophilic forms to exert genotoxic effects. We systematically analyzed the existing literature on metabolism of carcinogens by human enzymes, which has been developed largely in the past 25 years. The metabolism and especially bioactivation of carcinogens are dominated by cytochrome P450 enzymes (66% of bioactivations). Within this group, six P450s—1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2E1, and 3A4—accounted for 77% of the P450 activation reactions. The roles of these P450s can be compared with those estimated for drug metabolism and should be considered in issues involving enzyme induction, chemoprevention, molecular epidemiology, inter-individual variations, and risk assessment. PMID:22531028

  8. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  9. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated.

  10. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Phylogenomic reconstruction of archaeal fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dibrova, Daria V.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.

    2014-01-01

    While certain archaea appear to synthesize and/or metabolize fatty acids, the respective pathways still remain obscure. By analyzing the genomic distribution of the key lipid-related enzymes, we were able to identify the likely components of the archaeal pathway of fatty acid metabolism, namely, a combination of the enzymes of bacterial-type β-oxidation of fatty acids (acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) with paralogs of the archaeal acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase, an enzyme of the mevalonate biosynthesis pathway. These three β-oxidation enzymes working in the reverse direction could potentially catalyze biosynthesis of fatty acids, with paralogs of acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase performing addition of C2 fragments. The presence in archaea of the genes for energy-transducing membrane enzyme complexes, such as cytochrome bc complex, cytochrome c oxidase, and diverse rhodopsins, was found to correlate with the presence of the proposed system of fatty acid biosynthesis. We speculate that because these membrane complexes functionally depend on fatty acid chains, their genes could have been acquired via lateral gene transfer from bacteria only by those archaea that already possessed a system of fatty acid biosynthesis. The proposed pathway of archaeal fatty acid metabolism operates in extreme conditions and therefore might be of interest in the context of biofuel production and other industrial applications. PMID:24818264

  12. Imaging enzymes at work: metabolic mapping by enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2010-06-01

    For the understanding of functions of proteins in biological and pathological processes, reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins have become indispensable tools for visualizing the location of these proteins in intact animals, tissues, and cells. For enzymes, imaging their activity also provides information on their function or functions, which does not necessarily correlate with their location. Metabolic mapping enables imaging of activity of enzymes. The enzyme under study forms a reaction product that is fluorescent or colored by conversion of either a fluorogenic or chromogenic substrate or a fluorescent substrate with different spectral characteristics. Most chromogenic staining methods were developed in the latter half of the twentieth century but still find new applications in modern cell biology and pathology. Fluorescence methods have rapidly evolved during the last decade. This review critically evaluates the methods that are available at present for metabolic mapping in living animals, unfixed cryostat sections of tissues, and living cells, and refers to protocols of the methods of choice.

  13. Nature's inordinate fondness for metabolic enzymes: why metabolic enzyme loci are so frequently targets of selection.

    PubMed

    Marden, James H

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic enzyme loci were some of the first genes accessible for molecular evolution and ecology research. New technologies now make the whole genome, transcriptome or proteome readily accessible, allowing unbiased scans for loci exhibiting significant differences in allele frequency or expression level and associated with phenotypes and/or responses to natural selection. With surprising frequency and in many cases in proportions greater than chance relative to other genes, glycolysis and TCA cycle enzyme loci appear among the genes with significant associations in these studies. Hence, there is an ongoing need to understand the basis for fitness effects of metabolic enzyme polymorphisms. Allele-specific effects on the binding affinity and catalytic rate of individual enzymes are well known, but often of uncertain significance because metabolic control theory and in vivo studies indicate that many individual metabolic enzymes do not affect pathway flux rate. I review research, so far little used in evolutionary biology, showing that metabolic enzyme substrates affect signalling pathways that regulate cell and organismal biology, and that these enzymes have moonlighting functions. To date there is little knowledge of how alleles in natural populations affect these phenotypes. I discuss an example in which alleles of a TCA enzyme locus associate with differences in a signalling pathway and development, organismal performance, and ecological dynamics. Ultimately, understanding how metabolic enzyme polymorphisms map to phenotypes and fitness remains a compelling and ongoing need for gaining robust knowledge of ecological and evolutionary processes.

  14. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 1; Metabolic Enzymes of Individual Muscle Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Krasnov, I. B.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M.-Y.; Choksi, R.; Manchester, J. K.; McDougal, D. B.; Nemeth, P. M.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Individual fibers of any given muscle vary widely in enzyme composition, a fact obscured when enzyme levels of whole muscle are measured. Therefore, the purpose of this part of the study was to assess the effects of microgravity and hind limb suspension on the enzyme patterns within a slow twitch muscle (soleus) and a fast twitch muscle (tibialis anterior).

  15. Chlorogenic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced liver injury: the involvement of CYP450 metabolic enzymes and some antioxidant signals.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun; Sheng, Yu-chen; Jiang, Ping; Wei, Hai; Ji, Li-li

    2015-07-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound, is abundant in fruits, dietary vegetables, and some medicinal herbs. This study investigated the prevention of CGA against acetaminophen (AP)-induced hepatotoxicity and its engaged mechanisms. CGA reversed the decreased cell viability induced by AP in L-02 cells in vitro. In addition, CGA reduced the AP-induced increased serum levels of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) in vivo. The effect of CGA on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymatic (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4) activities showed that CGA caused very little inhibition on CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic activities, but not CYP3A4. The measurement of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) levels showed that CGA prevented AP-induced liver oxidative stress injury. Further, CGA increased the AP-induced decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxin (Prx) 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, epoxide hydrolase (Ephx) 2, and polymerase (RNA) II (DNA directed) polypeptide K (Polr2k), and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In summary, CGA ameliorates the AP-induced liver injury probably by slightly inhibiting CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic properties. In addition, cellular important antioxidant signals such as Prx1, 2, 3, 5, 6, Ephx2, Polr2k, and Nrf2 also contributed to the protection of CGA against AP-induced oxidative stress injury. PMID:26160718

  16. Chlorogenic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced liver injury: the involvement of CYP450 metabolic enzymes and some antioxidant signals*

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chun; Sheng, Yu-chen; Jiang, Ping; Wei, Hai; Ji, Li-li

    2015-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound, is abundant in fruits, dietary vegetables, and some medicinal herbs. This study investigated the prevention of CGA against acetaminophen (AP)-induced hepatotoxicity and its engaged mechanisms. CGA reversed the decreased cell viability induced by AP in L-02 cells in vitro. In addition, CGA reduced the AP-induced increased serum levels of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) in vivo. The effect of CGA on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymatic (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4) activities showed that CGA caused very little inhibition on CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic activities, but not CYP3A4. The measurement of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) levels showed that CGA prevented AP-induced liver oxidative stress injury. Further, CGA increased the AP-induced decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxin (Prx) 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, epoxide hydrolase (Ephx) 2, and polymerase (RNA) II (DNA directed) polypeptide K (Polr2k), and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In summary, CGA ameliorates the AP-induced liver injury probably by slightly inhibiting CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 enzymatic properties. In addition, cellular important antioxidant signals such as Prx1, 2, 3, 5, 6, Ephx2, Polr2k, and Nrf2 also contributed to the protection of CGA against AP-induced oxidative stress injury. PMID:26160718

  17. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function. A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained. After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and −0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; −0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and −1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and −0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and −2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters. Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the

  18. BRENDA, enzyme data and metabolic information.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Ida; Chang, Antje; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2002-01-01

    BRENDA is a comprehensive relational database on functional and molecular information of enzymes, based on primary literature. The database contains information extracted and evaluated from approximately 46 000 references, holding data of at least 40 000 different enzymes from more than 6900 different organisms, classified in approximately 3900 EC numbers. BRENDA is an important tool for biochemical and medical research covering information on properties of all classified enzymes, including data on the occurrence, catalyzed reaction, kinetics, substrates/products, inhibitors, cofactors, activators, structure and stability. All data are connected to literature references which in turn are linked to PubMed. The data and information provide a fundamental tool for research of enzyme mechanisms, metabolic pathways, the evolution of metabolism and, furthermore, for medicinal diagnostics and pharmaceutical research. The database is a resource for data of enzymes, classified according to the EC system of the IUBMB Enzyme Nomenclature Committee, and the entries are cross-referenced to other databases, i.e. organism classification, protein sequence, protein structure and literature references. BRENDA provides an academic web access at http://www.brenda.uni-koeln.de.

  19. The retinoic acid-metabolizing enzyme CYP26A1 upregulates fascin and promotes the malignant behavior of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Makoto; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2015-08-01

    The retinoic acid (RA)-metabolizing enzyme CYP26A1 has been shown to efficiently enhance the oncogenic potential of breast cancer, suggesting a potential oncogenic function. We previously demonstrated that CYP26A1 confers unique cell survival properties by modulating the expression of a variety of genes and identified a number of genes that drive the cells into the oncogenic state. Accumulating evidence suggested that fascin is overexpressed in various types of cancer, primarily leading to increased cell motility. Therefore, in the present study, we examined fascin, an actin-bundling protein, using immunohistochemical and SA-β-gal staining as well as TUNEL and colony forming assays. The results of the present study showed that the expression levels of fascin increased significantly in response to CYP26A1 overexpression and, conversely, treatment with all-trans RA downregulated the expression of fascin. In addition, primary breast carcinoma samples, particularly hormone receptor-negative carcinomas and CYP26A1-overexpressing cancers, expressed elevated levels of fascin. Notably, fascin contributed to the ability of breast carcinoma cells to escape premature senescence and exhibit enhanced cell apoptotic resistance, promoting anchorage-independent growth properties. Fascin also promoted cell motility and the invasiveness of CYP26A1-expressing breast carcinoma cells. These data suggest that fascin expression is modulated by the intracellular RA status regulated by the expression of CYP26A1 and plays a significant role in the malignant behavior of CYP26A1-expressing breast carcinoma cells. CYP26A1 exerts oncogenic functions during breast carcinogenesis. Therefore, CYP26A1-mediated oncogenic characteristics may be partially responsible for the elevated expression of fascin. PMID:26058854

  20. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  1. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  2. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Phenylacetate-Coenzyme A Ligase, an Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step in Aerobic Metabolism of Phenylacetic Acid in Azoarcus evansii

    PubMed Central

    El-Said Mohamed, Magdy

    2000-01-01

    Phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase (PA-CoA ligase; AMP forming, EC 6.2.1.30), the enzyme catalyzing the first step in the aerobic degradation of phenylacetate (PA) in Azoarcus evansii, has been purified and characterized. The gene (paaK) coding for this enzyme was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme catalyzes the reaction of PA with CoA and MgATP to yield phenylacetyl-CoA (PACoA) plus AMP plus PPi. The enzyme was specifically induced after aerobic growth in a chemically defined medium containing PA or phenylalanine (Phe) as the sole carbon source. Growth with 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, benzoate, adipate, or acetate did not induce the synthesis of this enzyme. This enzymatic activity was detected very early in the exponential phase of growth, and a maximal specific activity of 76 nmol min−1 mg of cell protein−1 was measured. After 117-fold purification to homogeneity, a specific activity of 48 μmol min−1 mg of protein−1 was achieved with a turnover number (catalytic constant) of 40 s−1. The protein is a monomer of 52 kDa and shows high specificity towards PA; other aromatic or aliphatic acids were not used as substrates. The apparent Km values for PA, ATP, and CoA were 14, 60, and 45 μM, respectively. The PA-CoA ligase has an optimum pH of 8 to 8.5 and a pI of 6.3. The enzyme is labile and requires the presence of glycerol for stabilization. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein showed no homology with other reported PA-CoA ligases. The gene encoding this enzyme is 1,320 bp long and codes for a protein of 48.75 kDa (440 amino acids) which shows high similarity with other reported PA-CoA ligases. An amino acid consensus for an AMP binding motif (VX2SSGTTGXP) was identified. The biochemical and molecular characteristics of this enzyme are quite different from those of the isoenzyme catalyzing the same reaction under anaerobic conditions in the same bacterium. PMID:10629172

  3. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  4. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  5. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  6. Metabolic annotation of 2-ethylhydracrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-25

    Increased levels of the organic acid, 2-ethylhydracrylic acid (2-EHA) occur in urine of subjects with impaired L(+)-isoleucine metabolism. Chiral intermediates formed during isoleucine degradation are (S) enantiomers. Blockage of (S) pathway flux drives racemization of (2S, 3S) L(+)-isoleucine and its (2S, 3R) stereoisomer, L(+)-alloisoleucine. This non-protein amino acid is metabolized to (R)-2-methylbutyryl CoA via enzymes common to branched chain amino acid degradation. Subsequently, (R) intermediates serve as alternate substrates for three valine metabolic enzymes, generating 2-EHA. Once formed, 2-EHA accumulates because it is poorly recognized by distal valine pathway enzymes. Thus, urinary 2-EHA represents a biomarker of isoleucine pathway defects. 2-EHA levels are also increased in rats exposed to the industrial solvent, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether or the neurotoxin precursor, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. In these cases, a block in (S) pathway isoleucine catabolism occurs at the level of (S)-2-methylbutyryl CoA conversion to tiglyl CoA via inhibition of electron transferring flavoprotein/ubiquinone oxidoreductase dependent reactions. Elevated urinary 2-EHA in propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency and methylmalonic aciduria results from a buildup of distal intermediates in the (S) pathway of isoleucine degradation. In Barth syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome, 2-EHA is a byproduct of impeded propionyl CoA entry into the Krebs cycle.

  7. Metabolic annotation of 2-ethylhydracrylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Increased levels of the organic acid, 2-ethylhydracrylic acid (2-EHA) occur in urine of subjects with impaired L(+)-isoleucine metabolism. Chiral intermediates formed during isoleucine degradation are (S) enantiomers. Blockage of (S) pathway flux drives racemization of (2S, 3S) L(+)-isoleucine and its (2S, 3R) stereoisomer, L(+)-alloisoleucine. This non-protein amino acid is metabolized to (R)-2-methylbutyryl CoA via enzymes common to branched chain amino acid degradation. Subsequently, (R) intermediates serve as alternate substrates for three valine metabolic enzymes, generating 2-EHA. Once formed, 2-EHA accumulates because it is poorly recognized by distal valine pathway enzymes. Thus, urinary 2-EHA represents a biomarker of isoleucine pathway defects. 2-EHA levels are also increased in rats exposed to the industrial solvent, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether or the neurotoxin precursor, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. In these cases, a block in (S) pathway isoleucine catabolism occurs at the level of (S)-2-methylbutyryl CoA conversion to tiglyl CoA via inhibition of electron transferring flavoprotein / ubiquinone oxidoreductase dependent reactions. Elevated urinary 2-EHA in propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency and methylmalonic aciduria results from a buildup of distal intermediates in the (S) pathway of isoleucine degradation. In Barth syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome, 2-EHA is a byproduct of impeded propionyl CoA entry into the Krebs cycle. PMID:26115894

  8. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Amino acid metabolism disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  9. [Aspartate aminotransferase--key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism].

    PubMed

    Otto-Ślusarczyk, Dagmara; Graboń, Wojciech; Mielczarek-Puta, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ-nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms--cytoplasmic (AST1) and mitochondrial (AST2), that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys - 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp) in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs. PMID:27117097

  10. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  11. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-04-25

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways.

  12. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  13. Branched tricarboxylic acid metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Kellen L; Mather, Michael W; Morrisey, Joanne M; Garcia, Benjamin A; Vaidya, Akhil B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    A central hub of carbon metabolism is the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which serves to connect the processes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, respiration, amino acid synthesis and other biosynthetic pathways. The protozoan intracellular malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), however, have long been suspected of possessing a significantly streamlined carbon metabolic network in which tricarboxylic acid metabolism plays a minor role. Blood-stage Plasmodium parasites rely almost entirely on glucose fermentation for energy and consume minimal amounts of oxygen, yet the parasite genome encodes all of the enzymes necessary for a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here, by tracing (13)C-labelled compounds using mass spectrometry we show that tricarboxylic acid metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is largely disconnected from glycolysis and is organized along a fundamentally different architecture from the canonical textbook pathway. We find that this pathway is not cyclic, but rather is a branched structure in which the major carbon sources are the amino acids glutamate and glutamine. As a consequence of this branched architecture, several reactions must run in the reverse of the standard direction, thereby generating two-carbon units in the form of acetyl-coenzyme A. We further show that glutamine-derived acetyl-coenzyme A is used for histone acetylation, whereas glucose-derived acetyl-coenzyme A is used to acetylate amino sugars. Thus, the parasite has evolved two independent production mechanisms for acetyl-coenzyme A with different biological functions. These results significantly clarify our understanding of the Plasmodium metabolic network and highlight the ability of altered variants of central carbon metabolism to arise in response to unique environments. PMID:20686576

  14. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Peters, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight and it is feasible to conduct ground experiments using known radiation exposures. The health of the liver, especially the activity rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. While radiation is known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects liver metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. This study is an effort to identify liver metabolic enzymes whose expression is altered by spaceflight or by radiation exposures that mimic features of the spaceflight environment. METHODS: Using procedures approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee, mice were exposed to either 137Cs (controls, 50 mGy, 6Gy, or 50 mGy + 6Gy separated by 24 hours) or 13 days of spaceflight on STS 135. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed at several time points (4 hours, 24 hours or 7 days) after their last radiation exposure, or within 6 hours of return to Earth for the STS 135 animals. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted, purified and quality-tested. Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used in RT-qPCR experiments to determine relative expression of a wide variety of genes involved in general metabolism and drug metabolism. RESULTS: Results of the ground radiation exposure experiments indicated 65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post

  15. 1-Heteroaryl-3-phenoxypropan-2-ones as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A₂α and fatty acid amide hydrolase: Effect of the replacement of the ether oxygen with sulfur and nitrogen moieties on enzyme inhibition and metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Sundermann, Tom; Fabian, Jörg; Hanekamp, Walburga; Lehr, Matthias

    2015-05-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are enzymes, which have emerged as attractive targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. We recently reported that certain 3-phenoxy-substituted 1-heteroarylpropan-2-ones are inhibitors of cPLA2α and/or FAAH. Starting from 1-[2-oxo-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propyl]indole-5-carboxylic acid (3) and 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-3-(4-phenoxyphenoxy)propan-2-one (4), the effect of the replacement of the oxygen in position 3 of the propan-2-one scaffold by sulfur and nitrogen containing moieties on inhibition of cPLA2α and fatty acid amide hydrolase as well as on metabolic stability in rat liver S9 fractions was investigated. As a result of these structure-activity relationship studies it was found that the ether oxygen is of great importance for enzyme inhibitory potency. Replacement by sulfur led to an about 100-fold decrease of enzyme inhibition, nitrogen and substituted nitrogen atoms at this position even resulted in inactivity of the compounds. The effect of the structural variations performed on metabolic stability of the important ketone pharmacophore was partly different in the two series of compounds. While introduction of SO and SO2 significantly increased stability of the ketone against reduction in case of the indole-5-carboxylic acid 3, it had no effect in case of the benzotriazole 4. Further analysis of the metabolism of 3 and 4 in rat liver S9 fractions revealed that the major metabolite of 3 was the alcohol 53 formed by reduction of the keto group. In contrast, in case of 4 beside keto reduction an excessive hydroxylation of the terminal phenoxy group occurred leading to the dihydroxy compound 50. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors showed that the phenylhydroxylation of 4 was catalyzed by tranylcypromine sensitive cytochrome P450 isoforms, while the reduction of the ketone function of 3 and 4 was mainly caused by cytosolic short chain dehydrogenases

  16. Concentration of Specific Amino Acids at the Catalytic/Active Centers of Highly-Conserved ``Housekeeping'' Enzymes of Central Metabolism in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota: Is There a Widely Conserved Chemical Signal of Prebiotic Assembly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Pan, Xueliang; Pearl, Dennis K.

    2010-06-01

    In alignments of 1969 protein sequences the amino acid glycine and others were found concentrated at most-conserved sites within ˜15 Å of catalytic/active centers (C/AC) of highly conserved kinases, dehydrogenases or lyases of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Lysine and glutamic acid were concentrated at least-conserved sites furthest from their C/ACs. Logistic-regression analyses corroborated the “movement” of glycine towards and lysine away from their C/ACs: the odds of a glycine occupying a site were decreased by 19%, while the odds for a lysine were increased by 53%, for every 10 Å moving away from the C/AC. Average conservation of MSA consensus sites was highest surrounding the C/AC and directly decreased in transition toward model’s peripheries. Findings held with statistical confidence using sequences restricted to individual Domains or enzyme classes or to both. Our data describe variability in the rate of mutation and likelihoods for phylogenetic trees based on protein sequence data and endorse the extension of substitution models by incorporating data on conservation and distance to C/ACs rather than only using cumulative levels. The data support the view that in the most-conserved environment immediately surrounding the C/AC of taxonomically distant and highly conserved essential enzymes of central metabolism there are amino acids whose identity and degree of occupancy is similar to a proposed amino acid set and frequency associated with prebiotic evolution.

  17. Concentration of specific amino acids at the catalytic/active centers of highly-conserved "housekeeping" enzymes of central metabolism in archaea, bacteria and Eukaryota: is there a widely conserved chemical signal of prebiotic assembly?

    PubMed

    Pollack, J Dennis; Pan, Xueliang; Pearl, Dennis K

    2010-06-01

    In alignments of 1969 protein sequences the amino acid glycine and others were found concentrated at most-conserved sites within approximately 15 A of catalytic/active centers (C/AC) of highly conserved kinases, dehydrogenases or lyases of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Lysine and glutamic acid were concentrated at least-conserved sites furthest from their C/ACs. Logistic-regression analyses corroborated the "movement" of glycine towards and lysine away from their C/ACs: the odds of a glycine occupying a site were decreased by 19%, while the odds for a lysine were increased by 53%, for every 10 A moving away from the C/AC. Average conservation of MSA consensus sites was highest surrounding the C/AC and directly decreased in transition toward model's peripheries. Findings held with statistical confidence using sequences restricted to individual Domains or enzyme classes or to both. Our data describe variability in the rate of mutation and likelihoods for phylogenetic trees based on protein sequence data and endorse the extension of substitution models by incorporating data on conservation and distance to C/ACs rather than only using cumulative levels. The data support the view that in the most-conserved environment immediately surrounding the C/AC of taxonomically distant and highly conserved essential enzymes of central metabolism there are amino acids whose identity and degree of occupancy is similar to a proposed amino acid set and frequency associated with prebiotic evolution.

  18. p-Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida F6

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Kevin E.; Witholt, Bernard; Duetz, Wouter

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida F6 was found to metabolize p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid through 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde. Cell extracts of P. putida F6 catalyze the NAD(P)H-independent hydroxylation of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid which is further oxidized to 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid. Oxidation and decarboxylation of the latter yields 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde. A red-brown color accompanies all of the above enzyme activities and is probably due to the polymerization of quinone-like compounds. 3,4-Dihydroxybenzaldehyde is further metabolized through extradiol ring cleavage. PMID:11208791

  19. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve 'metabolic remodeling' with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation ('moonlighting') and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme-RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future.

  20. Bile acids as metabolic regulators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small molecule ligands that target to TGR5 and FXR have shown promise in treating various metabolic and inflammation-related human diseases. New insights into the mechanisms underlying the bariatric surgery and bile acid sequestrant treatment suggest that targeting the enterohepatic circulation to modulate gut-liver bile acid signaling, incretin production and microbiota represents a new strategy to treat obesity and type-2 diabetes. PMID:25584736

  1. Branched Tricarboxylic Acid Metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Kellen L.; Mather, Michael W.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    A central hub of carbon metabolism is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle1, which serves to connect the processes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, respiration, amino acid synthesis and other biosynthetic pathways. The protozoan intracellular malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), however, have long been suspected of possessing a significantly streamlined carbon metabolic network in which TCA metabolism plays a minor role2. Blood-stage Plasmodium parasites rely almost entirely on glucose fermentation for energy and consume minimal amounts of oxygen3, yet the parasite genome encodes all of the enzymes necessary for a complete TCA cycle4. By tracing 13C-labeled compounds using mass spectrometry5 we show that TCA metabolism in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum is largely disconnected from glycolysis and is organized along a fundamentally different architecture than the canonical textbook pathway. We find that this pathway is not cyclic but rather a branched structure in which the major carbon sources are the amino acids glutamate and glutamine. As a consequence of this branched architecture, several reactions must run in the reverse of the standard direction thereby generating two-carbon units in the form of acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We further show that glutamine-derived acetyl-CoA is used for histone acetylation while glucose-derived acetyl-CoA is used to acetylate aminosugars. Thus the parasite has evolved two independent acetyl-CoA-production mechanisms with different biological functions. These results significantly clarify our understanding of the Plasmodium metabolic network and highlight the ability of altered variants of central carbon metabolism to arise in response to unique environments. PMID:20686576

  2. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  3. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying; Naleway, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  4. Patterns of diversity of citric acid cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, P D

    1987-01-01

    The citric acid cycle performs a dual role in cell metabolism, acting as a source of both 'energy' and biosynthetic starting materials. The widespread occurrence of the cycle throughout Nature is an excellent example of the unity of biochemistry, but closer examination reveals that there is considerable diversity in the citric acid cycle of different organisms with respect to metabolic role, molecular enzymology and mode of regulation. Two enzymes of the cycle--citrate synthase and succinate thiokinase--have been found to exhibit particularly striking patterns of diversity in structure and catalytic and regulatory function. Some of these patterns show a correlation with the taxonomic groupings of the organisms and with their physiological characteristics. Comparative enzyme studies have a contribution to make to an ultimate understanding of the cycle and its cellular operation, and there are substantial benefits to be gained from interactive studies on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.

  5. Metabolic Enzymes Enjoying New Partnerships as RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W.; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the past century, few areas of biology advanced as much as our understanding of the pathways of intermediary metabolism. Initially considered unimportant in terms of gene regulation, crucial cellular fate changes, cell differentiation, or malignant transformation are now known to involve ‘metabolic remodeling’ with profound changes in the expression of many metabolic enzyme genes. This review focuses on the recent identification of RNA-binding activity of numerous metabolic enzymes. We discuss possible roles of this unexpected second activity in feedback gene regulation (‘moonlighting’) and/or in the control of enzymatic function. We also consider how metabolism-driven post-translational modifications could regulate enzyme–RNA interactions. Thus, RNA emerges as a new partner of metabolic enzymes with far-reaching possible consequences to be unraveled in the future. PMID:26520658

  6. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  7. Retinoic acid: its biosynthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1999-01-01

    This article presents a model that integrates the functions of retinoid-binding proteins with retinoid metabolism. One of these proteins, the widely expressed (throughout retinoid target tissues and in all vertebrates) and highly conserved cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), sequesters retinol in an internal binding pocket that segregates it from the intracellular milieu. The CRBP-retinol complex appears to be the quantitatively major form of retinol in vivo, and may protect the promiscuous substrate from nonenzymatic degradation and/or non-specific enzymes. For example, at least seven types of dehydrogenases catalyze retinal synthesis from unbound retinol in vitro (NAD+ vs. NADP+ dependent, cytosolic vs. microsomal, short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases vs. medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases). But only a fraction of these (some of the short-chain de-hydrogenases/reductases) have the fascinating additional ability of catalyzing retinal synthesis from CRBP-bound retinol as well. Similarly, CRBP and/or other retinoid-binding proteins function in the synthesis of retinal esters, the reduction of retinal generated from intestinal beta-carotene metabolism, and retinoic acid metabolism. The discussion details the evidence supporting an integrated model of retinoid-binding protein/metabolism. Also addressed are retinoid-androgen interactions and evidence incompatible with ethanol causing fetal alcohol syndrome by competing directly with retinol dehydrogenation to impair retinoic acid biosynthesis. PMID:10506831

  8. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  9. Enzyme clustering accelerates processing of intermediates through metabolic channeling

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Michele; Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Xu, Yifan; Joshi, Preeti; Cristea, Ileana M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model to demonstrate that coclustering multiple enzymes into compact agglomerates accelerates the processing of intermediates, yielding the same efficiency benefits as direct channeling, a well-known mechanism in which enzymes are funneled between enzyme active sites through a physical tunnel. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with previously reported spacings between coclusters in mammalian cells. For direct validation, we study a metabolic branch point in Escherichia coli and experimentally confirm the model prediction that enzyme agglomerates can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch, and thus regulate steady-state flux division. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation. PMID:25262299

  10. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects.

  11. Enhancing flora balance in the gastrointestinal tract of mice by lactic acid bacteria from Chinese sourdough and enzyme activities indicative of metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate by the flora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Yu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yaoping; Chen, Xingxing; Wei, Hua; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of administration of 5 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Chinese sourdough on the flora balance of gastrointestinal tract of mice. We specifically measured Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Bacteroides, and Lactobacillus by plate count and real-time PCR methods, and α-glucosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities as indicative of metabolism of sugar, fat, and protein from LAB isolated from feces of mice in vitro. The results showed that administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201 and Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 lowered the uricacid index of serum. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201, L. fermentum LFE0302, as well as Lactobacillus curvatus LCU0401 administration resulted in a reduction in the opportunistic pathogens (i.e., Enterococcus and Enterobacter), meanwhile, administration of L. fermentum LFE0302 and Lactobacillus sp. ULA0104 resulted in an increase in the counts of Lactobacillus. Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 administration increased starch digestion of intestinal flora after 4wk of feeding and also resulted in increased α-glucosidase activity in the intestinal flora after 3wk of feeding. We found a similar trend in esterase activity after administration of L. acidophilus LAC0201 for 3wk. Hence, our study suggested that LAB from Chinese sourdough might be used as potential probiotics to strengthen the flora balance in gastrointestinal tract and positively change the metabolism of nutrients through bacterial enzyme activities. PMID:27448855

  12. In vivo effects of diabetes, insulin and oleanolic acid on enzymes of glycogen metabolism in the skin of streptozotocin-induced diabetic male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Mukundwa, Andrew; Langa, Silvana O; Mukaratirwa, Samson; Masola, Bubuya

    2016-03-01

    The skin is the largest organ in the body and diabetes induces pathologic changes on the skin that affect glucose homeostasis. Changes in skin glycogen and glucose levels can mirror serum glucose levels and thus the skin might contribute to whole body glucose metabolism. This study investigated the in vivo effects of diabetes, insulin and oleanolic acid (OA) on enzymes of glycogen metabolism in skin of type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetic and non-diabetic adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a single daily dose of insulin (4 IU/kg body weight), OA (80 mg/kg body weight) and a combination of OA + insulin for 14 days. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) expression; and GP, glycogen synthase (GS) and hexokinase activities as well glycogen levels were evaluated. The results suggest that diabetes lowers hexokinase activity, GP activity and GP expression with no change in GS activity whilst the treatments increased GP expression and the activities of hexokinase, GP and GS except for the GS activity in OA treated rats. Glycogen levels were increased slightly by diabetes as well as OA treatment. In conclusion diabetes, OA and insulin can lead to changes in GS and GP activities in skin without significantly altering the glycogen content. We suggest that the skin may contribute to whole body glucose homeostasis particularly in disease states.

  13. Use of immobilized enzymes in drug metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Dulik, D M; Fenselau, C

    1988-04-01

    The immobilization of drug-metabolizing enzymes onto polymeric supports offers several advantages over use of conventional microsomal or soluble enzyme preparations. These include increased storage stability, facilitated separation of products from the incubation mixture, the ability to recover and reuse the enzyme catalyst, and in many cases, stabilization of the tertiary structure of membrane-bound enzymes. Attachment of the protein to the solid support may be accomplished by adsorption, covalent bonding, or entrapment techniques. This methodology has been successfully utilized for studies with such enzymes as cytochrome P-450, UDP-glucuronyltransferases, glutathione S-transferases, S-methyltransferases, and N-acetyltransferases. Although often employed for the synthesis of xenobiotic metabolites, immobilized enzymes have been used for mechanistic and relative reactivity studies, limited kinetic studies, and extracorporeal detoxification. Co-immobilization of multiple drug-metabolizing enzyme systems has made possible the sequential formation of metabolites arising from oxidation followed by conjugation. Immobilized enzymes may also be used in the prediction of species-dependent metabolic pathways. The potential for large-scale synthesis of drug metabolites using this methodology has been explored. PMID:3127263

  14. [Enzyme immunoassay of usnic acid in lichens].

    PubMed

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P; Tolpysheva, T Iu

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay for usnic acid in lichens was developed, the sensitivity of which was 0.1 microg/g of air-dried material (0.00001%). Polyclonal rabbit antibodies against bovine serum albumin conjugated to (+)-usnic acid under the conditions of formaldehyde condensation made it possible to determine the analyzed substance in solutions at concentrations from 1 ng/mL when it interacts with an immobilized gelatin conjugate homologous in the binding mode. Usnic acid in 2-26600 microg/g (0.0002-2.6%) amounts was found in all 236 studied samples of lichens belonging to 53 species and 8 families.

  15. Recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes in metabolic anticancer therapy and bioanalytics.

    PubMed

    Stasyk, Oleh V; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Gonchar, Mykhailo V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2015-03-01

    Tumor cells often exhibit specific metabolic defects due to the aberrations in oncogene-dependent regulatory and/or signaling pathways that distinguish them from normal cells. Among others, many malignant cells are deficient in biosynthesis of certain amino acids and concomitantly exhibit elevated sensitivity to deprivation of these amino acids. Although the underlying causes of such metabolic changes are still not fully understood, this feature of malignant cells is exploited in metabolic enzymotherapies based on single amino acid, e.g., arginine, deprivation. To achieve efficient arginine depletion in vivo, two recombinant enzymes, bacterial arginine deiminase and human arginase I have been evaluated and are undergoing further development. This review is aimed to summarize the current knowledge on the application of arginine-degrading enzymes as anticancer agents and as bioanalytical tools for arginine assays. The problems that have to be solved to optimize this therapy for clinical application are discussed. PMID:25231409

  16. Nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Flavin, M

    1976-01-10

    Nucleotides have at least two functions in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. ATP, originating in the cells, is utilized for motility by energy-transducing protein(s) called dynein, and the binding of guanine nucleotides to tubulin, and probably certain transformations of the bound nucleotides, are prerequisites for the assembly of microtubules. Besides dynein, which can be solubulized from Chlamydomonas flagella as a heterogeneous, Mg2+ or Ca2+-activated ATPase, we have purified and characterized five other flagellar enzymes involved in nucleotide transformations. A homogeneous, low molecular weight, Ca2+-specific adenosine triphosphatase was isolated, which was inhibited by Mg2+ and was not specific for ATP. This enzyme was not formed by treating purified dynein with proteases. It was absent from extracts of Tetrahymena cilia. Its function might be an auxiliary energy transducer, or in steering or tactic responses. Two species of adenylate kinase were isolated, one of which was much elevated in regenerating flagella; the latter was also present in cell bodies. A large part of flagellar nucleoside diphosphokinase activity could not be solubilized. Two soluble enzyme species were identified, one of which was also present in cell bodies. Since these enzymes are of interest because they might function in microtubule assembly, we studied the extent to which brain nucleoside diphosphokinase co-polymerizes with tubulin purified by repeated cycles of polymerization. Arginine kinase was not detected in Chlamydomonas flagellar extracts. PMID:397

  17. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  18. Interplay of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) and Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Bian, Yicong; Jiang, Yan; Qian, Sainan; Yu, Aiming; Zeng, Su

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of the interplay between metabolizing enzymes and BCRP has drawn more and more attention from people. BCRP, a transporter belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been hypothesized to play roles in many aspects including protecting the human body against therapeutics because it is expressed in the tissues that function as barriers in vivo. Efficient coupling of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes enables rapid elimination of foreign compounds from the body because BCRP could facilitate the excretion of metabolites catalyzed by phase I and II enzymes into bile, urine and feces. Without BCRP coupling, pass through the cell membrane may be difficult for them by passive diffusion because of the increment of the molecular weight and water solubility. Thus the metabolism-efflux alliance has extraordinary importance to drug metabolism, distribution, pharmacological effect, toxicity and elimination. In this manuscript, a brief discussion about the interplays of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes in liver, intestine, kidney, lung and other organs were presented and summarized. Many endogenous and exogenous compounds belong to different chemical groups, for instance, the dietary flavonoids and the steroidal hormones were involved. Clarifying the cooperation mechanisms of BCRP and enzymes could lead to a better prediction of drug clearance in vitro.

  19. Interplay of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) and Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Bian, Yicong; Jiang, Yan; Qian, Sainan; Yu, Aiming; Zeng, Su

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of the interplay between metabolizing enzymes and BCRP has drawn more and more attention from people. BCRP, a transporter belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, has been hypothesized to play roles in many aspects including protecting the human body against therapeutics because it is expressed in the tissues that function as barriers in vivo. Efficient coupling of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes enables rapid elimination of foreign compounds from the body because BCRP could facilitate the excretion of metabolites catalyzed by phase I and II enzymes into bile, urine and feces. Without BCRP coupling, pass through the cell membrane may be difficult for them by passive diffusion because of the increment of the molecular weight and water solubility. Thus the metabolism-efflux alliance has extraordinary importance to drug metabolism, distribution, pharmacological effect, toxicity and elimination. In this manuscript, a brief discussion about the interplays of BCRP and metabolizing enzymes in liver, intestine, kidney, lung and other organs were presented and summarized. Many endogenous and exogenous compounds belong to different chemical groups, for instance, the dietary flavonoids and the steroidal hormones were involved. Clarifying the cooperation mechanisms of BCRP and enzymes could lead to a better prediction of drug clearance in vitro. PMID:26652256

  20. Enzyme immunoassay for carminic acid in foods.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Takagaki, Y; Nishimune, T

    1995-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for carminic acid was investigated. Monoclonal anticarminic acid antibody was obtained from A/J mice immunized with carminic acid-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) conjugate. Carminic acid was extracted with distilled water from beverage, jelly, candy, pasta sauce, yogurt, or ice cream samples. Ham or fish paste samples were digested with pronase, then carminic acid was extracted from samples with sodium hydroxide solution. The extract was diluted more than 10-fold with 1% gelatin in borate buffer solution. Microtiter plates were coated with carminic acid-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate or just BSA. Goat anti-mouse IgG(H+L)-peroxidase complex was used as a second antibody, and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine was used as a substrate for the peroxidase. The working range for quantitative analysis was 0.3-10 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.2 micrograms/g original sample. Recoveries of carminic acid by this assay were > 95% for milk beverage and jelly, and > 85% for yogurt and fish paste. Carminic acid was detected in 7 of 26 red-colored commercial food products and ranged from 3.5 to 356 micrograms/g. This EIA system also responded to the structural analogue of carminic acid, laccaic acid. PMID:7756895

  1. Folic Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Regulate the Antitumor Effect of 5-Fluoro-2′-Deoxyuridine in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsukihara, Hiroshi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Takechi, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In colorectal cancer chemotherapy, the current standard of care includes combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV). However, the factors that determine the LV-mediated enhancement of 5-FU antitumor activity are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of thymidine synthase (TYMS), folate receptor 1 (FOLR1), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase (GART), methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD1), and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in LV-mediated enhancement of 5-fluoro-2′-deoxyuridine (FdUrd) cytotoxicity in vitro as a model of 5-FU antitumor activity. These genes were downregulated in DLD-1 and HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells by using small-interfering RNA. Reduced expression of TYMS mRNA significantly increased FdUrd cytotoxicity by 100- and 8.3-fold in DLD-1 and HCT116 cells, respectively. In contrast, reducing the expression of FOLR1, DHFR, GART, MTHFD1, and MTHFR decreased FdUrd cytotoxicity by 2.13- to 12.91-fold in DLD-1 cells and by 3.52- to 10.36-fold in HCT116 cells. These results demonstrate that folate metabolism is important for the efficacy of FdUrd. Overall, the results indicate that it is important to clarify the relationship between folate metabolism-related molecules and 5-FU treatment in order to improve predictions of the effectiveness of 5-FU and LV combination therapy. PMID:27685866

  2. Effect on morphology, oxidative stress and energy metabolism enzymes in the testes of mice after a 13-week oral administration of melamine and cyanuric acid combination.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yingjun; Liu, Zhijun; Tian, Yujie; Chen, Hongbo

    2013-03-01

    Cases of pet poisoning and infant renal calculus have attracted much attention to the toxicity of melamine and its derivatives, such as cyanuric acid. Although individually melamine and cyanuric acid have low toxicity, their simultaneous presence can cause severe damage. Little is known about their adverse effects on the reproductive system. In this study, mice were orally administrated 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/d of both melamine and cyanuric acid for 13 weeks. Lethargy, rough hair, and reduction of food and water intake and of body and testis weight were found after exposure to the combination, and pathological changes were found in the morphology of the testes, such as disruption of the seminiferous tubule structure, decrease of the spermatogenic cell series and coagulation necrosis. Total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activities and glutathione concentration was lower and malondialdehyde concentration was higher than in control mice. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were also lower in combination treated mice than in control mice. These results indicate that the combined exposure to both melamine and cyanuric acid damaged testes in mice by either a direct or indirect effect, which may be related to renal failure and secondary anorexia. Oxidative stress and lower energy production levels both contributed to the testicular damage.

  3. Effect on morphology, oxidative stress and energy metabolism enzymes in the testes of mice after a 13-week oral administration of melamine and cyanuric acid combination.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yingjun; Liu, Zhijun; Tian, Yujie; Chen, Hongbo

    2013-03-01

    Cases of pet poisoning and infant renal calculus have attracted much attention to the toxicity of melamine and its derivatives, such as cyanuric acid. Although individually melamine and cyanuric acid have low toxicity, their simultaneous presence can cause severe damage. Little is known about their adverse effects on the reproductive system. In this study, mice were orally administrated 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/d of both melamine and cyanuric acid for 13 weeks. Lethargy, rough hair, and reduction of food and water intake and of body and testis weight were found after exposure to the combination, and pathological changes were found in the morphology of the testes, such as disruption of the seminiferous tubule structure, decrease of the spermatogenic cell series and coagulation necrosis. Total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activities and glutathione concentration was lower and malondialdehyde concentration was higher than in control mice. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were also lower in combination treated mice than in control mice. These results indicate that the combined exposure to both melamine and cyanuric acid damaged testes in mice by either a direct or indirect effect, which may be related to renal failure and secondary anorexia. Oxidative stress and lower energy production levels both contributed to the testicular damage. PMID:23220542

  4. Molecular Genetics of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, J. C.; Bohnert, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Most higher plants assimilate atmospheric CO2 through the C3 pathway of photosynthesis using ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). However, when CO2 availability is reduced by environmental stress conditions, the incomplete discrimination of CO2 over O2 by Rubisco leads to increased photorespiration, a process that reduces the efficiency of C3 photosynthesis. To overcome the wasteful process of photorespiration, approximately 10% of higher plant species have evolved two alternate strategies for photosynthetic CO2 assimilation, C4 photosynthesis and Crassulacean acid metabolism. Both of these biochemical pathways employ a "CO2 pump" to elevate intracellular CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of Rubisco, suppressing photorespiration and therefore improving the competitiveness of these plants under conditions of high light intensity, high temperature, or low water availability. This CO2 pump consists of a primary carboxylating enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. In C4 plants, this CO2-concentrating mechanism is achieved by the coordination of two carboxylating reactions that are spatially separated into mesophyll and bundle-sheath cell types (for review, see R.T. Furbank, W.C. Taylor [1995] Plant Cell 7: 797-807;M.S.B. Ku, Y. Kano-Murakami, M. Matsuoka [1996] Plant Physiol 111: 949-957). In contrast, Crassulacean acid metabolism plants perform both carboxylation reactions within one cell type, but the two reactions are separated in time. Both pathways involve cell-specific changes in the expression of many genes that are not present in C3 plants. PMID:12223634

  5. Targeting protozoan parasite metabolism: glycolytic enzymes in the therapeutic crosshairs.

    PubMed

    Harris, M T; Mitchell, W G; Morris, J C

    2014-01-01

    Glycolysis is an important metabolic pathway for most organisms, including protozoan parasites. Many of these primitive eukaryotes have streamlined their metabolism, favoring glycolysis for generating ATP in the glucose-rich environments in which they reside. Therefore, the enzymes involved in hexose metabolism could prove to be attractive targets for therapeutic development. This hypothesis is supported by a number of chemical and genetic validation studies. Additionally, the peculiar biochemistry of many of the components, along with limited protein sequence identity emphasizes the likelihood of developing compounds that selectively inhibit the parasite enzymes. In this review, we examine the status of target validation at the genetic and/or chemical levels from the protozoan parasites. While the proteins from some species have been interrogated to the point that well-defined lead compounds have been identified with activities against both enzyme and parasite growth, progress in other systems has to date been limited.

  6. Enzymes of energy metabolism in hatchlings of amazonian freshwater turtles (Testudines, Podocnemididae).

    PubMed

    Duncan, W P; Marcon, J L

    2009-05-01

    The metabolic profiles of selected tissues were analyzed in hatchlings of the Amazonian freshwater turtles Podocnemis expansa, P. unifilis and P. sextuberculata. Metabolic design in these species was judged based on the key enzymes of energy metabolism, with special emphasis on carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid and ketone body metabolism. All species showed a high glycolytic potential in all sampled tissues. Based on low levels of hexokinase, glycogen may be an important fuel for these species. The high lactate dehydrogenase activity in the liver may play a significant role in carbohydrate catabolism, possibly during diving. Oxidative metabolism in P. sextuberculata appears to be designed for the use of lipids, amino acids and ketone bodies. The maximal activities of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glutamine dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and succinyl-CoA keto transferase display high aerobic potential, especially in muscle and liver tissues of this species. Although amino acids and ketone bodies may be important fuels for oxidative metabolism, carbohydrates and lipids are the major fuels used by P. expansa and P. unifilis. Our results are consistent with the food habits and lifestyle of Amazonian freshwater turtles. The metabolic design, based on enzyme activities, suggests that hatchlings of P. unifilis and P. expansa are predominately herbivorous, whereas P. sextuberculata rely on a mixed diet of animal matter and vegetation. PMID:19675933

  7. Enzyme kinetics in drug metabolism: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Swati; Argikar, Upendra A; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are protein catalysts that lower the energy barrier for a reaction and speed the rate of a chemical change. The kinetics of reactions catalyzed by enzymes, as well as several mechanisms underlying the kinetics, have been comprehensively studied and written in textbooks (1, 2). The importance of quantitative evaluation of enzymatic processes has been recognized in many fields of study, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and pharmaceutical sciences to name a few. In pharmaceutical sciences, the applications of enzyme kinetics range from hit finding efforts for new chemical entities on a pharmacological target to concentration effect relationships to large-scale biosynthesis. The study of the science of drug metabolism has two principal concepts-rate and extent. While understanding disposition pathways and identification of metabolites provides an insight into the extent of metabolism, kinetics of depletion of substrates (endogenous or exogenous) and formation of metabolites deals with the rate of metabolism. The current textbook specifically focuses on kinetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes, detailing specific enzyme classes, and discusses kinetics as they apply to drug transporters. This textbook also outlines additional factors that contribute to the kinetics of reactions catalyzed by these proteins such as variability in isoforms (pharmacogenomics) and experimental factors including key concepts such as alterations of substrate concentrations due to binding. Applications of these approaches in predicting kinetic parameters and alternative approaches for enzymes (systems biology) and transporters are also discussed. The final section focuses on real-life examples (case studies) to try and exemplify the applications of enzyme kinetic principles. This chapter provides a brief overview outlining some key concepts within each of the sections and the chapters within this textbook.

  8. Enzyme kinetics in drug metabolism: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Swati; Argikar, Upendra A; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are protein catalysts that lower the energy barrier for a reaction and speed the rate of a chemical change. The kinetics of reactions catalyzed by enzymes, as well as several mechanisms underlying the kinetics, have been comprehensively studied and written in textbooks (1, 2). The importance of quantitative evaluation of enzymatic processes has been recognized in many fields of study, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and pharmaceutical sciences to name a few. In pharmaceutical sciences, the applications of enzyme kinetics range from hit finding efforts for new chemical entities on a pharmacological target to concentration effect relationships to large-scale biosynthesis. The study of the science of drug metabolism has two principal concepts-rate and extent. While understanding disposition pathways and identification of metabolites provides an insight into the extent of metabolism, kinetics of depletion of substrates (endogenous or exogenous) and formation of metabolites deals with the rate of metabolism. The current textbook specifically focuses on kinetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes, detailing specific enzyme classes, and discusses kinetics as they apply to drug transporters. This textbook also outlines additional factors that contribute to the kinetics of reactions catalyzed by these proteins such as variability in isoforms (pharmacogenomics) and experimental factors including key concepts such as alterations of substrate concentrations due to binding. Applications of these approaches in predicting kinetic parameters and alternative approaches for enzymes (systems biology) and transporters are also discussed. The final section focuses on real-life examples (case studies) to try and exemplify the applications of enzyme kinetic principles. This chapter provides a brief overview outlining some key concepts within each of the sections and the chapters within this textbook. PMID:24523105

  9. Enzyme Regulation& Catalysis in Carbon Fixation Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-12-14

    The overall long term goal of this program is the elucidation of molecular events in carbon assimilation. It has become axiomatic that control of flux through metabolic pathways is effectively imposed at irreversible reactions situated early in those pathways. The current focal point of this project is phosphoribulokinase (PRK), which catalyzes formation of the carbon dioxide acceptor, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. This reaction represents an early irreversible step unique to Calvin's reductive pentose phosphate pathway. Predictably, the PRK reaction represents an important control point in carbon fixation, regulated by a light dependent thiol/disulfide exchange in eukaryotes and by allosteric effectors in prokaryotes. Characterization of naturally occurring mutants as well as gene knockout experiments substantiate the importance of PRK to in vivo control of carbon assimilation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Thus, given the potential impact of enhancement or inhibition of PRK activity on energy (biomass/biofuel) production, elucidation of the molecular events that account for PRK activity is a significant scientific goal.

  10. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function: A Double-blind Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function.A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained.After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and -0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; -0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and -1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and -0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and -2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters.Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of GABA on BP

  11. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function: A Double-blind Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function.A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained.After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and -0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; -0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and -1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and -0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and -2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters.Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of GABA on BP

  12. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  13. Functional genomics and SNP analysis of human genes encoding proline metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Bart; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Khalil, Shadi; Wan, Guanghua; Valle, David

    2009-01-01

    Proline metabolism in mammals involves two other amino acids, glutamate and ornithine, and five enzymatic activities, Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (P5CR), proline oxidase, P5C dehydrogenase, P5C synthase and ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT). With the exception of OAT, which catalyzes a reversible reaction, the other 4 enzymes are unidirectional, suggesting that proline metabolism is purpose-driven, tightly regulated, and compartmentalized. In addition, this tri-amino-acid system also links with three other pivotal metabolic systems, namely the TCA cycle, urea cycle, and pentose phosphate pathway. Abnormalities in proline metabolism are relevant in several diseases: six monogenic inborn errors involving metabolism and/or transport of proline and its immediate metabolites have been described. Recent advances in the Human Genome Project, in silico database mining techniques, and research in dissecting the molecular basis of proline metabolism prompted us to utilize functional genomic approaches to analyze human genes which encode proline metabolic enzymes in the context of gene structure, regulation of gene expression, mRNA variants, protein isoforms, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:18506409

  14. How nutritional status signalling coordinates metabolism and lignocellulolytic enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-11-01

    The utilisation of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an abundant, renewable feedstock for green chemistries and biofuel production is inhibited by its recalcitrant nature. In the environment, lignocellulolytic fungi are naturally capable of breaking down plant biomass into utilisable saccharides. Nonetheless, within the industrial context, inefficiencies in the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes impede the implementation of green technologies. One of the primary causes of such inefficiencies is the tight transcriptional control of lignocellulolytic enzymes via carbon catabolite repression. Fungi coordinate metabolism, protein biosynthesis and secretion with cellular energetic status through the detection of intra- and extra-cellular nutritional signals. An enhanced understanding of the signals and signalling pathways involved in regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of lignocellulolytic enzymes is therefore of great biotechnological interest. This comparative review describes how nutrient sensing pathways regulate carbon catabolite repression, metabolism and the utilisation of alternative carbon sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ascomycete fungi. PMID:25011009

  15. How nutritional status signalling coordinates metabolism and lignocellulolytic enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-11-01

    The utilisation of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an abundant, renewable feedstock for green chemistries and biofuel production is inhibited by its recalcitrant nature. In the environment, lignocellulolytic fungi are naturally capable of breaking down plant biomass into utilisable saccharides. Nonetheless, within the industrial context, inefficiencies in the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes impede the implementation of green technologies. One of the primary causes of such inefficiencies is the tight transcriptional control of lignocellulolytic enzymes via carbon catabolite repression. Fungi coordinate metabolism, protein biosynthesis and secretion with cellular energetic status through the detection of intra- and extra-cellular nutritional signals. An enhanced understanding of the signals and signalling pathways involved in regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of lignocellulolytic enzymes is therefore of great biotechnological interest. This comparative review describes how nutrient sensing pathways regulate carbon catabolite repression, metabolism and the utilisation of alternative carbon sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ascomycete fungi.

  16. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  17. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels.

    PubMed

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  18. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  19. Dynamic Reorganization of Metabolic Enzymes into Intracellular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Zhao, Alice; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Both focused and large-scale cell biological and biochemical studies have revealed that hundreds of metabolic enzymes across diverse organisms form large intracellular bodies. These proteinaceous bodies range in form from fibers and intracellular foci—such as those formed by enzymes of nitrogen and carbon utilization and of nucleotide biosynthesis—to high-density packings inside bacterial microcompartments and eukaryotic microbodies. Although many enzymes clearly form functional mega-assemblies, it is not yet clear for many recently discovered cases whether they represent functional entities, storage bodies, or aggregates. In this article, we survey intracellular protein bodies formed by metabolic enzymes, asking when and why such bodies form and what their formation implies for the functionality—and dysfunctionality—of the enzymes that comprise them. The panoply of intracellular protein bodies also raises interesting questions regarding their evolution and maintenance within cells. We speculate on models for how such structures form in the first place and why they may be inevitable. PMID:23057741

  20. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  1. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  2. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  3. Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis-based enzyme engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Yuvaraj; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Lee, Chong-soon; Yun, Hyungdon

    2015-08-01

    Traditional enzyme engineering relies on substituting one amino acid by one of the other 19 natural amino acids to change the functional properties of an enzyme. However, incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) has been harnessed to engineer efficient enzymes for biocatalysis. Residue-specific and site-specific in vivo incorporation methods are becoming the preferred approach for producing enzymes with altered or improved functions. We describe the contribution of in vivo UAA incorporation methodologies to enzyme engineering as well as the future prospects for the field, including the integration of UAAs with other new advances in enzyme engineering.

  4. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens. PMID:11265593

  5. Metabolism of 14C-Labeled Photosynthate and Distribution of Enzymes of Glucose Metabolism in Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Reibach, Paul H.; Streeter, John G.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of translocated photosynthate by soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules was investigated by 14CO2-labeling studies and analysis of nodule enzymes. Plants were exposed to 14CO2 for 30 minutes, followed by 12CO2 for up to 5 hours. The largest amount of radioactivity in nodules was recovered in neutral sugars at all sampling times. The organic acid fraction of the cytosol was labeled rapidly. Although cyclitols and malonate were found in high concentrations in the nodules, they accumulated less than 10% of the radioactivity in the neutral and acidic fractions, respectively. Phosphate esters were found to contain very low levels of total label, which prohibited analysis of the radioactivity in individual compounds. The whole nodule-labeling patterns suggested the utilization of photosynthate for the generation of organic acids (principally malate) and amino acids (principally glutamate). The radioactivity in bacteroids as a percentage of total nodule label increased slightly with time, while the percentage in the cytosol fraction declined. The labeling patterns for the cytosol were essentially the same as whole nodule-labeling patterns, and they suggest a degradation of carbohydrates for the production of organic acids and amino acids. When it was found that most of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in sugars, the enzymes of glucose metabolism were surveyed. Bacteroids from nodules formed by Rhizobium japonicum strain 110 or strain 138 lacked activity for phosphofructokinase and NADP-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, key enzymes of glycolysis and the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathways. Enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were found in the cytosol fraction. In three experiments, bacteroids contained about 10 to 30% of the total radioactivity in nodules 2 to 5 hours after pulse-labeling of plants, and 60 to 65% of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in the neutral sugar fraction at all sampling times. This strongly

  6. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  7. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  8. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  9. Clinically Relevant Genetic Variations in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In the field of pharmacogenetics, we currently have a few markers to guide physicians as to the best course of therapy for patients. For the most part, these genetic variants are within a drug metabolizing enzyme that has a large effect on the degree or rate at which a drug is converted to its metabolites. For many drugs, response and toxicity are multi-genic traits and understanding relationships between a patient's genetic variation in drug metabolizing enzymes and the efficacy and/or toxicity of a medication offers the potential to optimize therapies. This review will focus on variants in drug metabolizing enzymes with predictable and relatively large impacts on drug efficacy and/or toxicity; some of these drug/gene variant pairs have impacted drug labels by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The challenges in identifying genetic markers and implementing clinical changes based on known markers will be discussed. In addition, the impact of next generation sequencing in identifying rare variants will be addressed. PMID:21453273

  10. Enzyme Recruitment and Its Role in Metabolic Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although more than 109 years have passed since the existence of the last universal common ancestor, proteins have yet to reach the limits of divergence. As a result, metabolic complexity is ever expanding. Identifying and understanding the mechanisms that drive and limit the divergence of protein sequence space impact not only evolutionary biologists investigating molecular evolution but also synthetic biologists seeking to design useful catalysts and engineer novel metabolic pathways. Investigations over the past 50 years indicate that the recruitment of enzymes for new functions is a key event in the acquisition of new metabolic capacity. In this review, we outline the genetic mechanisms that enable recruitment and summarize the present state of knowledge regarding the functional characteristics of extant catalysts that facilitate recruitment. We also highlight recent examples of enzyme recruitment, both from the historical record provided by phylogenetics and from enzyme evolution experiments. We conclude with a look to the future, which promises fruitful consequences from the convergence of molecular evolutionary theory, laboratory-directed evolution, and synthetic biology. PMID:24483367

  11. The enzymes of biotin dependent CO2 metabolism: What structures reveal about their reaction mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Waldrop, Grover L; Holden, Hazel M; Maurice, Martin St

    2012-01-01

    Biotin is the major cofactor involved in carbon dioxide metabolism. Indeed, biotin-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and are involved in a myriad of metabolic processes including fatty acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The cofactor, itself, is composed of a ureido ring, a tetrahydrothiophene ring, and a valeric acid side chain. It is the ureido ring that functions as the CO2 carrier. A complete understanding of biotin-dependent enzymes is critically important for translational research in light of the fact that some of these enzymes serve as targets for anti-obesity agents, antibiotics, and herbicides. Prior to 1990, however, there was a dearth of information regarding the molecular architectures of biotin-dependent enzymes. In recent years there has been an explosion in the number of three-dimensional structures reported for these proteins. Here we review our current understanding of the structures and functions of biotin-dependent enzymes. In addition, we provide a critical analysis of what these structures have and have not revealed about biotin-dependent catalysis. PMID:22969052

  12. Metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids.

    PubMed

    Cattoor, Ko; Dresel, Michael; De Bock, Lies; Boussery, Koen; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Keukeleire, Denis; Deforce, Dieter; Hofmann, Thomas; Heyerick, Arne

    2013-08-21

    In this study, in vitro metabolism of hop-derived bitter acids was investigated. Besides their well-known use as bitter compounds in beer, in several studies, bioactive properties have been related to these types of molecules. However, scientific data on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion aspects of these compounds are limited. More specific, in this study, α-acids, β-acids, and iso-α-acids were incubated with rabbit microsomes, and fractions were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for identification of oxidative biotransformation products. Metabolism of β-acids was mainly characterized by conversion into hulupones and the formation of a series of tricyclic oxygenated products. The most important metabolites of α-acids were identified as humulinones and hulupones. Iso-α-acids were found to be primarly metabolized into cis- and trans-humulinic acids, next to oxidized alloiso-α-acids. Interestingly, the phase I metabolites were highly similar to the oxidative degradation products in beer. These findings show a first insight into the metabolites of hop-derived bitter acids and could have important practical implications in the bioavailability aspects of these compounds, following ingestion of hop-based food products and nutraceuticals.

  13. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed.

  14. Enzymes to die for: exploiting nucleotide metabolizing enzymes for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ardiani, Andressa; Johnson, Adam J; Ruan, Hongmei; Sanchez-Bonilla, Marilyn; Serve, Kinta; Black, Margaret E

    2012-04-01

    Suicide gene therapy is an attractive strategy to selectively destroy cancer cells while minimizing unnecessary toxicity to normal cells. Since this idea was first introduced more than two decades ago, numerous studies have been conducted and significant developments have been made to further its application for mainstream cancer therapy. Major limitations of the suicide gene therapy strategy that have hindered its clinical application include inefficient directed delivery to cancer cells and the poor prodrug activation capacity of suicide enzymes. This review is focused on efforts that have been and are currently being pursued to improve the activity of individual suicide enzymes towards their respective prodrugs with particular attention to the application of nucleotide metabolizing enzymes in suicide cancer gene therapy. A number of protein engineering strategies have been employed and our discussion here will center on the use of mutagenesis approaches to create and evaluate nucleotide metabolizing enzymes with enhanced prodrug activation capacity and increased thermostability. Several of these studies have yielded clinically important enzyme variants that are relevant for cancer gene therapy applications because their utilization can serve to maximize cancer cell killing while minimizing the prodrug dose, thereby limiting undesirable side effects.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Blazeck, John; Hill, Andrew; Jamoussi, Mariam; Pan, Anny; Miller, Jarrett; Alper, Hal S

    2015-11-01

    Itaconic acid is a naturally produced organic acid with diverse applications as a replacement for petroleum derived products. However, its industrial viability as a bio-replacement has been restricted due to limitations with native producers. In this light, Yarrowia lipolytica is an excellent potential candidate for itaconic acid production due to its innate capacity to accumulate citric acid cycle intermediates and tolerance to lower pH. Here, we demonstrate the capacity to produce itaconic acid in Y. lipolytica through heterologous expression of the itaconic acid synthesis enzyme, resulting in an initial titer of 33 mg/L. Further optimizations of this strain via metabolic pathway engineering, enzyme localization, and media optimization strategies enabled 4.6g/L of itaconic acid to be produced in bioreactors, representing a 140-fold improvement over initial titer. Moreover, these fermentation conditions did not require additional nutrient supplementation and utilized a low pH condition that enabled the acid form of itaconic acid to be produced. Overall yields (0.058 g/g yield from glucose) and maximum productivity of 0.045 g/L/h still provide areas for future strain improvement. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that Y. lipolytica has the potential to serve as an industrially relevant platform for itaconic acid production.

  16. Metabolic priorities during starvation: enzyme sparing in liver and white muscle of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Lapointe, Dominique; Bédard, Martin; Dutil, Jean-Denis

    2003-06-01

    Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, respond to starvation first by mobilising hepatic lipids, then muscle and hepatic glycogen and finally muscle proteins. The dual role of proteins as functional elements and energetic reserves should lead to a temporal hierarchy of mobilisation where the nature of a function dictates its conservation during starvation. We examined (1) whether lysosomal and anti-oxidant enzymes in liver and white muscle are spared during prolonged starvation, (2) whether the responses of these enzymes in muscle vary longitudinally. Hepatic contents of lysosomal proteases decreased with starvation, whereas those of catalase (CAT) increased and lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not change. In white muscle, starvation decreased the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate degradation and doubled that of cathepsin D (CaD). The activity of anti-oxidant enzymes and acid phosphatase in muscle was unchanged with starvation. In white muscle neither lysosomal enzymes nor anti-oxidant enzymes varied significantly with sampling position. In cod muscle, antioxidant enzymes, CaD and acid phosphatase are spared during a period of starvation that decreases lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and decreases glycolytic enzyme activities. In cod liver, the anti-oxidant enzymes, CAT and GST, were also spared during starvation. PMID:12781835

  17. Activities of key metabolic enzymes in the heater organs of scombroid fishes.

    PubMed

    Tullis, A; Block, B A; Sidell, B D

    1991-11-01

    Maximal in vitro activities of key metabolic enzymes were measured in brain and eye heaters of five species of scombroid fishes. Istiophorid billfishes (blue marlin, striped marlin and Mediterranean spearfish), xiphiid billfishes (Pacific and Mediterranean stocks) and a scombrid fish (butterfly mackerel) were included in the analysis. Our main objectives were (1) to assess the maximum possible substrate flux in heater tissue, and (2) to determine what metabolic substrates could fuel heat production. Heater tissue of all scombroids examined showed extremely high oxidative capacity. Activities of citrate synthase, a commonly measured index of oxidative metabolism, included the highest value ever reported for vertebrate tissue. In most billfishes, citrate synthase activities were similar to or higher than those found for mammalian cardiac and avian flight muscle. Marker enzymes for aerobic carbohydrate metabolism (hexokinase) and fatty acid metabolism (carnitine palmitoyltransferase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) also displayed extraordinarily high activities. Activities of carnitine palmitoyltransferase measured in heater organs were among the highest reported for vertebrates. These results indicate that heat production could be fueled aerobically by either lipid or carbohydrate metabolism. Inter- and intraspecifically, heater organs of fishes from the colder Mediterranean waters had a higher aerobic capacity and, hence, a greater heat-generating potential, than fishes from the warmer waters of the Pacific. This difference may be attributed to different thermal environments or it may result from allometry, since fishes caught in the Mediterranean were considerably smaller than those caught in the Pacific.

  18. Exploring De Novo metabolic pathways from pyruvate to propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Stine, Andrew; Zhang, Miaomin; Ro, Soo; Clendennen, Stephanie; Shelton, Michael C; Tyo, Keith E J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Industrial biotechnology provides an efficient, sustainable solution for chemical production. However, designing biochemical pathways based solely on known reactions does not exploit its full potential. Enzymes are known to accept non-native substrates, which may allow novel, advantageous reactions. We have previously developed a computational program named Biological Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) to predict promiscuous enzyme activities and design synthetic pathways, using generalized reaction rules curated from biochemical reaction databases. Here, we use BNICE to design pathways synthesizing propionic acid from pyruvate. The currently known natural pathways produce undesirable by-products lactic acid and succinic acid, reducing their economic viability. BNICE predicted seven pathways containing four reaction steps or less, five of which avoid these by-products. Among the 16 biochemical reactions comprising these pathways, 44% were validated by literature references. More than 28% of these known reactions were not in the BNICE training dataset, showing that BNICE was able to predict novel enzyme substrates. Most of the pathways included the intermediate acrylic acid. As acrylic acid bioproduction has been well advanced, we focused on the critical step of reducing acrylic acid to propionic acid. We experimentally validated that Oye2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can catalyze this reaction at a slow turnover rate (10(-3) s(-1) ), which was unknown to occur with this enzyme, and is an important finding for further propionic acid metabolic engineering. These results validate BNICE as a pathway-searching tool that can predict previously unknown promiscuous enzyme activities and show that computational methods can elucidate novel biochemical pathways for industrial applications. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:303-311, 2016. PMID:26821575

  19. CYP450 Enzyme-Mediated Metabolism of TCAS and Its Inhibitory and Induced Effects on Metabolized Enzymes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guolin; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, Lili; Li, Lei; Chen, Huiming; Yu, Wenlian; Li, Haishan

    2015-09-02

    In this study, we investigated the enzymes catalyzing the phase I metabolism of thiacalixarene (TCAS) based on in vitro system including cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes, human liver microsomes plus inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. In addition, the inhibitory potential of TCAS on major CYP450 drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) was assessed. The results showed that CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 mediated TCAS hydroxylation. IC50 values for TCAS in rat and human liver microsomes were greater than 50 µM, and it demonstrated a weak inhibition of rat and human CYP450 enzymes. Finally, sandwiched hepatocytes were used to evaluate the induction of CYP1A and CYP3A to define the function of TCAS in vivo. The results showed that incubation of TCAS at different concentrations for 72 h failed to induce CYP1A and CYP3A. However, incubation of the cells with 50 and 100 µM TCAS caused a profound decrease in the activities of CYP1A and CYP3A, which was probably due to cytotoxic effects, suggesting that exposure to TCAS might be a health concern.

  20. CYP450 Enzyme-Mediated Metabolism of TCAS and Its Inhibitory and Induced Effects on Metabolized Enzymes in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guolin; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, Lili; Li, Lei; Chen, Huiming; Yu, Wenlian; Li, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the enzymes catalyzing the phaseⅠmetabolism of thiacalixarene (TCAS) based on in vitro system including cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes, human liver microsomes plus inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. In addition, the inhibitory potential of TCAS on major CYP450 drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) was assessed. The results showed that CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 mediated TCAS hydroxylation. IC50 values for TCAS in rat and human liver microsomes were greater than 50 µM, and it demonstrated a weak inhibition of rat and human CYP450 enzymes. Finally, sandwiched hepatocytes were used to evaluate the induction of CYP1A and CYP3A to define the function of TCAS in vivo. The results showed that incubation of TCAS at different concentrations for 72 h failed to induce CYP1A and CYP3A. However, incubation of the cells with 50 and 100 µM TCAS caused a profound decrease in the activities of CYP1A and CYP3A, which was probably due to cytotoxic effects, suggesting that exposure to TCAS might be a health concern. PMID:26404338

  1. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  2. Targeting drug-metabolizing enzymes for effective chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Hollie I; Njar, Vincent C O; Yu, Zhen; Castro, David J; Gonzalez, Frank J; Williams, David E; Huang, Ying; Kong, Ah-Ng T; Doloff, Joshua C; Ma, Jie; Waxman, David J; Scott, Emily E

    2010-04-01

    The primary focus of chemoprevention research is the prevention of cancer using pharmacological, biological, and nutritional interventions. Chemotherapeutic approaches that have been used successfully for both the prevention and treatment of a number of human malignancies have arisen from the identification of specific agents and appropriate molecular targets. Although drug-metabolizing enzymes have historically been targeted in attempts to block the initial, genotoxic events associated with the carcinogenic process, emerging evidence supports the idea that manipulating drug-metabolizing enzymes may also be an effective strategy to be used for treating tumor progression, invasion, and, perhaps, metastasis. This report summarizes a symposium that presents some recent progress in this area. One area of emphasis is the development of a CYP17 inhibitor for treatment of prostate cancer that may also have androgen-independent anticancer activity at higher concentrations. A second focus is the use of a mouse model to investigate the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Cyp1b1 status and chemopreventative agents on transplacental cancer. A third area of focus is the phytochemical manipulation of not only cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes but also phase II inflammatory and antioxidant enzymes via the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway to block tumor progression. A final highlight is the use of prodrugs activated by P450 enzymes to halt tumor growth and considerations of dosing schedule and targeted delivery of the P450 transgene to tumor tissue. In addition to highlighting recent successes in these areas, limitations and areas that should be targeted for further investigation are discussed. PMID:20233842

  3. Altered drug metabolism during pregnancy: Hormonal regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2013-01-01

    Importance of the field Medication use during pregnancy is prevalent, but pharmacokinetic information of most drugs used during pregnancy is lacking in spite of known effects of pregnancy on drug disposition. Accurate pharmacokinetic information is essential for optimal drug therapy in mother and fetus. Thus, understanding how pregnancy influences drug disposition is important for better prediction of pharmacokinetic changes of drugs in pregnant women. Areas covered in this review Pregnancy is known to affect hepatic drug metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Physiological changes accompanying pregnancy are likely responsible for the reported alteration in drug metabolism during pregnancy. These include elevated concentrations of various hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, placental growth hormones and prolactin. This review covers how these hormones influence expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, thus potentially responsible for altered drug metabolism during pregnancy. What the reader will gain The reader will gain a greater understanding of the altered drug metabolism in pregnant women and the regulatory effects of pregnancy hormones on expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Take home message In-depth studies in hormonal regulatory mechanisms as well as confirmatory studies in pregnant women are warranted for systematic understanding and prediction of the changes in hepatic drug metabolism during pregnancy. PMID:20367533

  4. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  5. Highlighting the Need for Systems-Level Experimental Characterization of Plant Metabolic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Martin K M

    2016-01-01

    The biology of living organisms is determined by the action and interaction of a large number of individual gene products, each with specific functions. Discovering and annotating the function of gene products is key to our understanding of these organisms. Controlled experiments and bioinformatic predictions both contribute to functional gene annotation. For most species it is difficult to gain an overview of what portion of gene annotations are based on experiments and what portion represent predictions. Here, I survey the current state of experimental knowledge of enzymes and metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as eleven economically important crops and forestry trees - with a particular focus on reactions involving organic acids in central metabolism. I illustrate the limited availability of experimental data for functional annotation of enzymes in most of these species. Many enzymes involved in metabolism of citrate, malate, fumarate, lactate, and glycolate in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. Furthermore, enzymes involved in key biosynthetic pathways which shape important traits in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. I argue for the development of novel high-throughput platforms with which limited functional characterization of gene products can be performed quickly and relatively cheaply. I refer to this approach as systems-level experimental characterization. The data collected from such platforms would form a layer intermediate between bioinformatic gene function predictions and in-depth experimental studies of these functions. Such a data layer would greatly aid in the pursuit of understanding a multiplicity of biological processes in living organisms.

  6. Enzymes of the central carbon metabolism: are they linkers between transcription, DNA replication, and carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Aleksandra; Szczepańska, Aneta; Sawiuk, Karolina; Łyżeń, Robert; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Dependence of carcinogenesis on disruption of DNA replication regulation is a well-known fact. There are also many reports demonstrating the interplay between transcription and DNA replication processes, particularly underlying the importance of promoter activities in the control of replication initiation. Recent findings have shown direct links between central carbon metabolism and DNA replication regulation. Here, we summarize previously published reports which indicated that enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, particularly those involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, may contribute to regulation of transcription and DNA transactions (replication and repair). In this light, we propose a hypothesis that some of these enzymes might be linkers between transcription, DNA replication, and carcinogenesis. If true, it may have a consequence in our understanding of causes and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Particularly, certain metabolic perturbations might directly (through central carbon metabolism enzymes) influence regulation of DNA transactions (replication control and fidelity), and thus facilitate carcinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, further studies will be necessary, which is discussed in the final part of this article.

  7. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  8. Enzymes of yeast polyphosphate metabolism: structure, enzymology and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is found in all living organisms. The known polyP functions in eukaryotes range from osmoregulation and virulence in parasitic protozoa to modulating blood coagulation, inflammation, bone mineralization and cellular signalling in mammals. However mechanisms of regulation and even the identity of involved proteins in many cases remain obscure. Most of the insights obtained so far stem from studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide a short overview of the properties and functions of known yeast polyP metabolism enzymes and discuss future directions for polyP research.

  9. Drug metabolizing enzyme systems in the houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata).

    PubMed

    Bailey, T A; John, A; Mensah-Brown, E P; Garner, A; Samour, J; Raza, H

    1998-10-01

    This study compared catalytic and immunochemical properties of drug metabolizing phase I and II enzyme systems in houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) liver and kidney and rat liver. P450 content in bustard liver (0.34 +/- 0.03 nmol mg-1 protein) was 50% lower than that of rat liver (0.70 +/- 0.02 nmol mg-1 protein). With the exception of aniline hydroxylase activity, monooxygenase activities using aminopyrine, ethoxyresorufin and ethoxycoumarin as substrates were all significantly lower than corresponding rat liver enzymes. As found in mammalian systems the P450 activities in the bird liver were higher than in the kidney. Immunohistochemical analysis of microsomes using antibodies to rat hepatic P450 demonstrated that bustard liver and kidney express P4502C11 homologous protein; no appreciable cross-reactivity was observed in bustards using antibodies to P4502E1, 1A1 or 1A2 isoenzymes. Glutathione content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in bustard liver were comparable with those of rat liver. GST activity in the kidney was 65% lower than the liver. Western blotting of liver and kidney cytosol with human GST isoenzyme-specific antibodies revealed that the expression of alpha-class of antibodies exceeds mu in the bustard. In contrast, the pi-class of GST was not detected in the bustard liver. This data demonstrates that hepatic and renal microsomes from the bustard have multiple forms of phase I and phase II enzymes. The multiplicity and tissue specific expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in bustards may play a significant role in determining the pharmacokinetics of drugs and susceptibility of the birds to various environmental pollutants and toxic insults.

  10. Carbohydrate-active enzymes exemplify entropic principles in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kartal, Önder; Mahlow, Sebastian; Skupin, Alexander; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Glycans comprise ubiquitous and essential biopolymers, which usually occur as highly diverse mixtures. The myriad different structures are generated by a limited number of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), which are unusual in that they catalyze multiple reactions by being relatively unspecific with respect to substrate size. Existing experimental and theoretical descriptions of CAZyme-mediated reaction systems neither comprehensively explain observed action patterns nor suggest biological functions of polydisperse pools in metabolism. Here, we overcome these limitations with a novel theoretical description of this important class of biological systems in which the mixing entropy of polydisperse pools emerges as an important system variable. In vitro assays of three CAZymes essential for central carbon metabolism confirm the power of our approach to predict equilibrium distributions and non-equilibrium dynamics. A computational study of the turnover of the soluble heteroglycan pool exemplifies how entropy-driven reactions establish a metabolic buffer in vivo that attenuates fluctuations in carbohydrate availability. We argue that this interplay between energy- and entropy-driven processes represents an important regulatory design principle of metabolic systems. PMID:22027553

  11. The RNA world and the origin of metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    An RNA world has been placed centre stage for explaining the origin of life. Indeed, RNA is the most plausible molecule able to form both a (self)-replicator and to inherit information, necessities for initiating genetics. However, in parallel with self-replication, the proto-organism had to obtain the ability to catalyse supply of its chemical constituents, including the ribonucleotide metabolites required to replicate RNA. Although the possibility of an RNA-catalysed metabolic network has been considered, it is to be questioned whether RNA molecules, at least on their own, possess the required catalytic capacities. An alternative scenario for the origin of metabolism involves chemical reactions that are based on environmental catalysts. Recently, we described a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway-like reactions catalysed by metal ions [mainly Fe(II)] and phosphate, simple inorganic molecules abundantly found in Archaean sediments. While the RNA world can serve to explain the origin of genetics, the origin of the metabolic network might thus date back to constraints of environmental chemistry. Interestingly, considering a metal-catalysed origin of metabolism gives rise to an attractive hypothesis about how the first enzymes could have formed: simple RNA or (poly)peptide molecules could have bound the metal ions, and thus increased their solubility, concentration and accessibility. In a second step, this would have allowed substrate specificity to evolve. PMID:25109990

  12. PLP-dependent enzymes as entry and exit gates of sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Florence; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are membrane constituents as well as signaling molecules involved in many essential cellular processes. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL), both PLP (pyridoxal 5′-phosphate)-dependent enzymes, function as entry and exit gates of the sphingolipid metabolism. SPT catalyzes the condensation of serine and a fatty acid into 3-keto-dihydrosphingosine, whereas SPL degrades sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) into phosphoethanolamine and a long-chain aldehyde. The recently solved X-ray structures of prokaryotic homologs of SPT and SPL combined with functional studies provide insight into the structure–function relationship of the two enzymes. Despite carrying out different reactions, the two enzymes reveal striking similarities in the overall fold, topology, and residues crucial for activity. Unlike their eukaryotic counterparts, bacterial SPT and SPL lack a transmembrane helix, making them targets of choice for biochemical characterization because the use of detergents can be avoided. Both human enzymes are linked to severe diseases or disorders and might therefore serve as targets for the development of therapeutics aiming at the modulation of their activity. This review gives an overview of the sphingolipid metabolism and of the available biochemical studies of prokaryotic SPT and SPL, and discusses the major similarities and differences to the corresponding eukaryotic enzymes. PMID:21710479

  13. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  14. Pharmacogenetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes in US Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Duconge, Jorge; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the Hispanic population is continuously growing in the United States, they are underrepresented in pharmacogenetic studies. This review addresses the need for compiling available pharmacogenetic data in US Hispanics, discussing the prevalence of clinically relevant polymorphisms in pharmacogenes encoding for drug-metabolizing enzymes. CYP3A5*3 (0.245–0.867) showed the largest frequency in a US Hispanic population. A higher prevalence of CYP2C9*3, CYP2C19*4, and UGT2B7 IVS1+985 A>Gwas observed in US Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic populations. We found interethnic and intraethnic variability in frequencies of genetic polymorphisms for metabolizing enzymes, which highlights the need to define the ancestries of participants in pharmacogenetic studies. New approaches should be integrated in experimental designs to gain knowledge about the clinical relevance of the unique combination of genetic variants occurring in this admixed population. Ethnic subgroups in the US Hispanic population may harbor variants that might be part of multiple causative loci or in linkage-disequilibrium with functional variants. Pharmacogenetic studies in Hispanics should not be limited to ascertain commonly studied polymorphisms that were originally identified in their parental populations. The success of the Personalized Medicine paradigm will depend on recognizing genetic diversity between and within US Hispanics and the uniqueness of their genetic backgrounds. PMID:25431893

  15. Effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on blood lipid metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Yan, Jingna; Luo, Liyong; Zhang, Dongying

    2015-06-01

    Disorders of blood lipid metabolism are the primary risk factors for many diseases. Recently, the effect of Pu-erh tea on blood lipid metabolism has received increasing attention. However, the mechanism underlying its ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism is unclear. We set out to study this through assessing the effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on the central enzymes of blood lipid metabolism, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and pancreatic lipase (PL). We find that the Lp-PLA2, HMRG and PL activities are inhibited by PTAE in a dose-dependent manner and that the LCAT activity tends to increase with increasing PTAE concentrations. Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses reveal that PTAE acts as a competitive inhibitor for HMGR and PL and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for Lp-PLA2. Moreover, we determine that its active ingredients include catechins, gallic acid, caffeine, free amino acids, and soluble sugar. However, the effect of each ingredient and whether any of them have synergistic effects are still unknown. The results suggest that Pu-erh tea has a potent ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism and knowledge of the mechanisms provides insights into its potential therapeutic application as an alternative hypolipidemic drug.

  16. Effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on blood lipid metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Yan, Jingna; Luo, Liyong; Zhang, Dongying

    2015-06-01

    Disorders of blood lipid metabolism are the primary risk factors for many diseases. Recently, the effect of Pu-erh tea on blood lipid metabolism has received increasing attention. However, the mechanism underlying its ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism is unclear. We set out to study this through assessing the effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on the central enzymes of blood lipid metabolism, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and pancreatic lipase (PL). We find that the Lp-PLA2, HMRG and PL activities are inhibited by PTAE in a dose-dependent manner and that the LCAT activity tends to increase with increasing PTAE concentrations. Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses reveal that PTAE acts as a competitive inhibitor for HMGR and PL and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for Lp-PLA2. Moreover, we determine that its active ingredients include catechins, gallic acid, caffeine, free amino acids, and soluble sugar. However, the effect of each ingredient and whether any of them have synergistic effects are still unknown. The results suggest that Pu-erh tea has a potent ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism and knowledge of the mechanisms provides insights into its potential therapeutic application as an alternative hypolipidemic drug. PMID:26018873

  17. Interplay of metabolizing enzymes and transporter of xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hwee Ying; Ho, Qin Shi; Wong, Kim Ping

    2016-01-01

    1. Xenobiotics are metabolized and eliminated through the coordinated interplay of their metabolizing enzymes and transporters. However, these two activities in vitro are measured separately, with the addition of ATP as a pre-requisite. 2. We propose a human renal cell-line model which integrates the sulfate and glutathione conjugation of xenobiotics with the efflux of their respective conjugates. Sulfation and glutathionylation represent two major Phase II detoxification of xenobiotics in man. The reactions are catalyzed, respectively, by phenolsulfotransferase and glutathione-S-transferase followed by extrusion of their respective conjugates. 3. Using Ko-143, a specific inhibitor of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, we identified this transporter to be responsible for the efflux of p-cresol sulfate, harmol sulfate and the glutathione conjugate of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. 4. The conjugation-cum-efflux was inhibited by oligomycin and uncouplers, which highlights the role of cellular mitochondria in providing ATP for the biosynthesis of their conjugating agents, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) and reduced glutathione as well as for the transport function of BCRP. 5. The human 786-O renal cell-line provides a "3-in-1" system linking ATP biosynthesis to metabolism of xenobiotics and their ultimate transport and elimination by BCRP; this integrated system was not apparent in other human cell-lines examined.

  18. Identification of metabolic pathways and enzyme systems involved in the in vitro human hepatic metabolism of dronedarone, a potent new oral antiarrhythmic drug

    PubMed Central

    Klieber, Sylvie; Arabeyre-Fabre, Catherine; Moliner, Patricia; Marti, Eric; Mandray, Martine; Ngo, Robert; Ollier, Céline; Brun, Priscilla; Fabre, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of dronedarone and its major metabolites has been studied in human liver microsomes and cryopreserved hepatocytes in primary culture through the use of specific or total cytochrome P450 (CYP) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The identification of the main metabolites and enzymes participating in their metabolism was also elucidated by using rhCYP, rhMAO, flavin monooxygenases (rhFMO) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (rhUGT) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) analysis. Dronedarone was extensively metabolized in human hepatocytes with a metabolic clearance being almost completely inhibited (98 ± 2%) by 1-aminobenzotriazole. Ketoconazole also inhibited dronedarone metabolism by 89 ± 7%, demonstrating the crucial role of CYP3A in its metabolism. CYP3A isoforms mostly contributed to N-debutylation while hydroxylation on the butyl-benzofuran moiety was catalyzed by CYP2D6. However, hydroxylation on the dibutylamine moiety did not appear to be CYP-dependent. N-debutyl-dronedarone was less rapidly metabolized than dronedarone, the major metabolic pathway being catalyzed by MAO-A to form propanoic acid-dronedarone and phenol-dronedarone. Propanoic acid-dronedarone was metabolized at a similar rate to that of N-debutyl-dronedarone and was predominantly hydroxylated by CYP2C8 and CYP1A1. Phenol-dronedarone was extensively glucuronidated while C-dealkyl-dronedarone was metabolized at a slow rate. The evaluation of the systemic clearance of each metabolic process together with the identification of both the major metabolites and predominant enzyme systems and isoforms involved in the formation and subsequent metabolism of these metabolites has enhanced the overall understanding of metabolism of dronedarone in humans. PMID:25505590

  19. Microbial metabolism of methanesulfonic acid

    PubMed

    Kelly; Murrell

    1999-12-01

    Methanesulfonic acid is a very stable strong acid and a key intermediate in the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur. It is formed in megatonne quantities in the atmosphere from the chemical oxidation of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (most of which is of biogenic origin) and deposited on the Earth in rain and snow, and by dry deposition. Methanesulfonate is used by diverse aerobic bacteria as a source of sulfur for growth, but is not known to be used by anaerobes either as a sulfur source, a fermentation substrate, an electron acceptor, or as a methanogenic substrate. Some specialized methylotrophs (including Methylosulfonomonas, Marinosulfonomonas, and strains of paragraph signHyphomicrobium and Methylobacterium) can use it as a carbon and energy substrate to support growth. Methanesulfonate oxidation is initiated by cleavage catalysed by methanesulfonate monooxygenase, the properties and molecular biology of which are discussed.

  20. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  1. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight conditions on the activities of certain enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rat liver are investigated in an attempt to account for the losses in body weight observed during space flight despite preflight caloric consumption. Liver samples were analyzed for the activities of 32 cytosolic and microsomal enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen and individual fatty acid levels for ground control rats and rats flown on board the Cosmos 936 biosatellite under normal space flight conditions and in centrifuges which were sacrificed upon recovery or 25 days after recovery. Significant decreases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in palmitoyl CoA desaturase are found in the flight stationary relative to the flight contrifuged rats upon recovery, with all enzymes showing alterations returning to normal values 25 days postflight. The flight stationary group is also observed to be characterized by more than twice the amount of liver glycogen of the flight centrifuged group as well as a significant increase in the ratio of palmitic to palmitoleic acid. Results thus indicate metabolic changes which may be involved in the mechanism of weight loss during weightlessness, and demonstrate the equivalence of centrifugation during space flight to terrestrial gravity.

  2. Gene expression of regulatory enzymes involved in the intermediate metabolism of sheep subjected to feed restriction.

    PubMed

    van Harten, S; Brito, R; Almeida, A M; Scanlon, T; Kilminster, T; Milton, J; Greeff, J; Oldham, C; Cardoso, L A

    2013-03-01

    The effect of feed restriction on gene expression of regulatory enzymes of intermediary metabolism was studied in two sheep breeds (Australian Merino and Dorper) subjected to two nutritional treatments: feed restriction (85% of daily maintenance requirements) and control (ad libitum feeding), during 42 days. The experimental animals (ram lambs) were divided into four groups, n = 5 (Australian Merino control (MC), Australian Merino Restriction (MR), Dorper control (DC) and Dorper Restriction (DR)). After the trial, animals were sacrificed and samples were taken from liver tissue to quantify glucose levels and gene expression of relevant intermediary metabolism enzymes (phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glycogen synthase (GS), fatty acid synthase (FAS), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and carbamoyl phosphate synthase (CPS)) through real-time PCR. During the experimental period, the MR animals lost 12.6% in BW compared with 5.3% lost by the Dorper lambs. MC and DC rams gained, respectively, 8.8% and 14% during the same period. Within the Dorper breed, restricted feed animals revealed a significant decrease over controls in the transcription of PFK (1.95-fold) and PK (2.26-fold), both glycolytic enzymes. The gluconeogenesis showed no change in the feed restricted animals of both breeds. DR feed group presented a significant decrease over the homologous Merino sheep group on GS. In both experimental breeds, FAS mRNA expression was decreased in restricted feed groups. GDH expression was decreased only in the DR animals (1.84-fold) indicating a reduced catabolism of amino acids in these animals. Finally, CPS was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the Dorper sheep, indicating a facilitated urea synthesis in this breed. These results indicate a better adaptation of metabolic intermediate regulatory enzymes and hepatic glucose production of Dorper sheep to feed restriction

  3. Fatty acid metabolism meets organelle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Walch, Laurence; Čopič, Alenka; Jackson, Catherine L

    2015-03-23

    Upon nutrient deprivation, cells metabolize fatty acids (FAs) in mitochondria to supply energy, but how FAs, stored as triacylglycerols in lipid droplets, reach mitochondria has been mysterious. Rambold et al. (2015) now show that FA mobilization depends on triacylglycerol lipolysis, whereas autophagy feeds the lipid droplet pool for continued fueling of mitochondria.

  4. Targeting amino acid metabolism in cancer growth and anti-tumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ananieva, Elitsa

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in amino acid metabolism have revealed that targeting amino acid metabolic enzymes in cancer therapy is a promising strategy for the development of novel therapeutic agents. There are currently several drugs in clinical trials that specifically target amino acid metabolic pathways in tumor cells. In the context of the tumor microenvironment, however, tumor cells form metabolic relationships with immune cells, and they often compete for common nutrients. Many tumors evolved to escape immune surveillance by taking advantage of their metabolic flexibility and redirecting nutrients for their own advantage. This review outlines the most recent advances in targeting amino acid metabolic pathways in cancer therapy while giving consideration to the impact these pathways may have on the anti-tumor immune response. PMID:26629311

  5. Dysregulation of hepatic fatty acid metabolism in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kyubok; Norris, Keith; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in hypertriglyceridemia which is largely due to impaired clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins occasioned by downregulation of lipoprotein lipase and very low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue and of hepatic lipase and LDL receptor-related protein in the liver. However, data on the effect of CKD on fatty acid metabolism in the liver is limited and was investigated here. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo 5/6 nephrectomy (CRF) or sham operation (control) and observed for 12 weeks. The animals were then euthanized and their liver tissue tested for nuclear translocation (activation) of carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol-responsive element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) which independently regulate the expression of key enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, i.e. fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) as well as nuclear Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) which regulates the expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation and transport, i.e. L-FABP and CPT1A. In addition, the expression of ATP synthase α, ATP synthase β, glycogen synthase and diglyceride acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) and DGAT2 were determined. Results Compared with controls, the CKD rats exhibited hypertriglyceridemia, elevated plasma and liver tissue free fatty acids, increased nuclear ChREBP and reduced nuclear SREBP-1 and PPARα, upregulation of ACC and FAS and downregulation of L-FABP, CPT1A, ATP synthase α, glycogen synthase and DGAT in the liver tissue. Conclusion Liver in animals with advanced CKD exhibits ChREBP-mediated upregulation of enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, downregulation of PPARα-regulated fatty acid oxidation system and reduction of DGAT resulting in reduced fatty acid incorporation in triglyceride. PMID:23045433

  6. Biochemistry and genetics of inherited disorders of peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism[S

    PubMed Central

    Van Veldhoven, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    In humans, peroxisomes harbor a complex set of enzymes acting on various lipophilic carboxylic acids, organized in two basic pathways, α-oxidation and β-oxidation; the latter pathway can also handle ω-oxidized compounds. Some oxidation products are crucial to human health (primary bile acids and polyunsaturated FAs), whereas other substrates have to be degraded in order to avoid neuropathology at a later age (very long-chain FAs and xenobiotic phytanic acid and pristanic acid). Whereas total absence of peroxisomes is lethal, single peroxisomal protein deficiencies can present with a mild or severe phenotype and are more informative to understand the pathogenic factors. The currently known single protein deficiencies equal about one-fourth of the number of proteins involved in peroxisomal FA metabolism. The biochemical properties of these proteins are highlighted, followed by an overview of the known diseases. PMID:20558530

  7. Cellular Metabolism of Unnatural Sialic Acid Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam D.; Fermaintt, Charles S.; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; McCombs, Janet E.; Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in addition to their metabolic functions, serve important roles as receptors, ligands, and structural molecules for diverse biological processes. Insight into carbohydrate biology and mechanisms has been aided by metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE). In MOE, unnatural carbohydrate analogs with novel functional groups are incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and used to probe biological systems. While MOE has expanded knowledge of carbohydrate biology, limited metabolism of unnatural carbohydrate analogs restricts its use. Here we assess metabolism of SiaDAz, a diazirine-modified analog of sialic acid, and its cell-permeable precursor, Ac4ManNDAz. We show that the efficiency of Ac4ManNDAz and SiaDAz metabolism depends on cell type. Our results indicate that different cell lines can have different metabolic roadblocks in the synthesis of cell surface SiaDAz. These findings point to roles for promiscuous intracellular esterases, kinases, and phosphatases during unnatural sugar metabolism and provide guidance for ways to improve MOE. PMID:25957566

  8. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based In Vitro Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Enzyme Expressions in Eicosanoid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyeon; Kim, Eung Ju; Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lee, Won-Yong; Chung, Bong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Eicosanoids are metabolites of arachidonic acid that are rapidly biosynthesized and degraded during inflammation, and their metabolic changes reveal altered enzyme expression following drug treatment. We developed an eicosanoid profiling method and evaluated their changes on drug treatment. Methods Simultaneous quantitative profiling of 32 eicosanoids in liver S9 fractions obtained from rabbits with carrageenan-induced inflammation was performed and validated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled to anion-exchange solid-phase purification. Results The limit of quantification for the devised method ranged from 0.5 to 20.0 ng/mg protein, and calibration linearity was achieved (R2>0.99). The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 4.7 to 10.3% and 88.4 to 110.9%, respectively, and overall recoveries ranged from 58.0 to 105.3%. Our method was then applied and showed that epitestosterone treatment reduced the levels of all eicosanoids that were generated by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. Conclusions Quantitative eicosanoid profiling combined with in vitro metabolic assays may be useful for evaluating metabolic changes affected by drugs during eicosanoid metabolism. PMID:27139607

  9. Something Old, Something New: Conserved Enzymes and the Evolution of Novelty in Plant Specialized Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Last, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of small molecules known as specialized metabolites, many of which are of economic and ecological importance. This remarkable variety is a consequence of the diversity and rapid evolution of specialized metabolic pathways. These novel biosynthetic pathways originate via gene duplication or by functional divergence of existing genes, and they subsequently evolve through selection and/or drift. Studies over the past two decades revealed that diverse specialized metabolic pathways have resulted from the incorporation of primary metabolic enzymes. We discuss examples of enzyme recruitment from primary metabolism and the variety of paths taken by duplicated primary metabolic enzymes toward integration into specialized metabolism. These examples provide insight into processes by which plant specialized metabolic pathways evolve and suggest approaches to discover enzymes of previously uncharacterized metabolic networks.

  10. Remarkable Reproducibility of Enzyme Activity Profiles in Tomato Fruits Grown under Contrasting Environments Provides a Roadmap for Studies of Fruit Metabolism1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biais, Benoît; Bénard, Camille; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Colombié, Sophie; Prodhomme, Duyên; Ménard, Guillaume; Bernillon, Stéphane; Gehl, Bernadette; Gautier, Hélène; Ballias, Patricia; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Sweetlove, Lee; Génard, Michel; Gibon, Yves

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’) plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels. PMID:24474652

  11. Remarkable reproducibility of enzyme activity profiles in tomato fruits grown under contrasting environments provides a roadmap for studies of fruit metabolism.

    PubMed

    Biais, Benot; Bénard, Camille; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Colombié, Sophie; Prodhomme, Duyên; Ménard, Guillaume; Bernillon, Stéphane; Gehl, Bernadette; Gautier, Hélène; Ballias, Patricia; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Sweetlove, Lee; Génard, Michel; Gibon, Yves

    2014-03-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Moneymaker') plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels.

  12. Cortisol-Metabolizing Enzymes in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Zeev; Kaidar, Gabi; Zuckerman-Levin, Nehama; Dumin, Elena; Knopf, Carlos; Hochberg, Ze’ev

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess the activity of cortisol-metabolizing enzymes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), using a fully quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) method. DESIGN We investigated the glucocorticoid degradation pathways that include 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1, 5α-reductase (5α-R) and 5β-reductase (5β-R), 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 20α- and 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20α-HSD and 20β-HSD, respectively) in young nonobese women with PCOS, using a fully quantitative GCMS method. SETTING This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital in Israel. PATIENTS This study group consisted of 13 young women, aged 20.1 ± 2.8 years (mean ± SD), with the body mass index (BMI) of 22.6 ± 3.7 kg/m2, diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria. The control group consisted of 14 healthy young women matched for weight, height, and BMI. INTERVENTIONS Urine samples were analyzed using GCMS. We measured urinary steroid metabolites that represent the products and substrates of the study enzymes and calculated the product/substrate ratios to represent enzyme activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The calculation of enzymatic activity, based on glucocorticoid degradation metabolites, was done by GCMS in PCOS vs. controls. RESULTS All glucocorticoid degradation metabolites were higher in the PCOS group than in controls. Of the adrenal enzymes, the activities of 21-hydroxylase and 17α-hydroxylase were reduced, whereas the activity of 17,20-lyase was enhanced in PCOS. Of the degradation enzymes, the activity of 11β-HSD type 1 was reduced in women with PCOS only when calculated from cortoles and cortolones ratios. The activities of 5α-R/5β-R were increased only when calculating the 11-hydroxy metabolites of androgens. The activity of 20α-HSD was elevated in the patients with PCOS and its relation with the substrate levels was lost. CONCLUSIONS We confirm PCOS

  13. The role of PARP-1 and PARP-2 enzymes in metabolic regulation and disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Péter; Cantó, Carles

    2012-09-01

    While originally described as DNA damage repair agents, recent data suggest a role for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes in metabolic regulation by influencing mitochondrial function and oxidative metabolism. Here we review how PARP activity has a major metabolic impact and the role of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in diverse metabolic complications.

  14. Assembly of Lipoic Acid on Its Cognate Enzymes: an Extraordinary and Essential Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2016-06-01

    Although the structure of lipoic acid and its role in bacterial metabolism were clear over 50 years ago, it is only in the past decade that the pathways of biosynthesis of this universally conserved cofactor have become understood. Unlike most cofactors, lipoic acid must be covalently bound to its cognate enzyme proteins (the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases and the glycine cleavage system) in order to function in central metabolism. Indeed, the cofactor is assembled on its cognate proteins rather than being assembled and subsequently attached as in the typical pathway, like that of biotin attachment. The first lipoate biosynthetic pathway determined was that of Escherichia coli, which utilizes two enzymes to form the active lipoylated protein from a fatty acid biosynthetic intermediate. Recently, a more complex pathway requiring four proteins was discovered in Bacillus subtilis, which is probably an evolutionary relic. This pathway requires the H protein of the glycine cleavage system of single-carbon metabolism to form active (lipoyl) 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The bacterial pathways inform the lipoate pathways of eukaryotic organisms. Plants use the E. coli pathway, whereas mammals and fungi probably use the B. subtilis pathway. The lipoate metabolism enzymes (except those of sulfur insertion) are members of PFAM family PF03099 (the cofactor transferase family). Although these enzymes share some sequence similarity, they catalyze three markedly distinct enzyme reactions, making the usual assignment of function based on alignments prone to frequent mistaken annotations. This state of affairs has possibly clouded the interpretation of one of the disorders of human lipoate metabolism. PMID:27074917

  15. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Edith E.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Feichtinger, Rene G.; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined OXPHOS and citrate synthase enzyme activities in HEK293 cells devoid of mtDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes partially encoded by mtDNA show reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also the entirely nuclear encoded complex II and citrate synthase exhibit reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of mtDNA induces a feedback mechanism that downregulates complex II and citrate synthase. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 {rho}{sup 0} cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in {rho}{sup 0} cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  16. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  17. Disturbances to neurotransmitter levels and their metabolic enzyme activity in a freshwater planarian exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-Pin; Li, Mei-Hui; Chen, Jhih-Sheng; Chung, Szu-Yao; Lee, Hui-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Using specific neurobehaviors as endpoints, previous studies suggested that planarian neurotransmission systems could be targets of Cd neurotoxicity. However, direct evidence for disturbed neurotransmission systems by Cd in treated planarians is still lacking. In planarians, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play critical roles in neuromuscular function, but little is known about their metabolic degradation. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to determine the appearances of DA, 5-HT, and their metabolic products in the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica, characterize the activity of enzymes involved in their metabolism, and investigate the effects of Cd on planarian 5-HTergic and DAergic neurotransmission systems. Only DA, 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were found in planarian tissues. Further enzymatic study revealed the activity of planarian monoamine oxidase (MAO) but not catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). These findings suggest that planarian MAO catalyzes the metabolism of 5-HT into 5-HIAA. However, DA metabolites from the MAO-involved metabolic pathway were not found, which might be due to a lack of COMT activity. Finally, in Cd-treated planarians, tissue levels of 5-HT and DA were decreased and MAO activity altered, suggesting that planarian neurotransmission systems are disturbed following Cd treatment.

  18. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  19. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus. PMID:24801744

  20. Cytochrome P450 enzymes from the metabolically diverse bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Stephen G. . E-mail: stephen.bell@chem.ox.ac.uk; Hoskins, Nicola; Xu Feng; Caprotti, Domenico; Rao Zihe; Wong, L.-L. . E-mail: luet.wong@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2006-03-31

    Four (CYP195A2, CYP199A2, CYP203A1, and CYP153A5) of the seven P450 enzymes, and palustrisredoxin A, a ferredoxin associated with CYP199A2, from the metabolically diverse bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris have been expressed and purified. A range of substituted benzenes, phenols, benzaldehydes, and benzoic acids was shown to bind to the four P450 enzymes. Monooxygenase activity of CYP199A2 was reconstituted with palustrisredoxin A and putidaredoxin reductase of the P450cam system from Pseudomonas putida. We found that 4-ethylbenzoate and 4-methoxybenzoate were oxidized to single products, and 4-methoxybenzoate was demethylated to form 4-hydroxybenzoate. Crystals of substrate-free CYP199A2 which diffracted to {approx}2.0 A have been obtained.

  1. Highlighting the Need for Systems-Level Experimental Characterization of Plant Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2016-01-01

    The biology of living organisms is determined by the action and interaction of a large number of individual gene products, each with specific functions. Discovering and annotating the function of gene products is key to our understanding of these organisms. Controlled experiments and bioinformatic predictions both contribute to functional gene annotation. For most species it is difficult to gain an overview of what portion of gene annotations are based on experiments and what portion represent predictions. Here, I survey the current state of experimental knowledge of enzymes and metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as eleven economically important crops and forestry trees – with a particular focus on reactions involving organic acids in central metabolism. I illustrate the limited availability of experimental data for functional annotation of enzymes in most of these species. Many enzymes involved in metabolism of citrate, malate, fumarate, lactate, and glycolate in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. Furthermore, enzymes involved in key biosynthetic pathways which shape important traits in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. I argue for the development of novel high-throughput platforms with which limited functional characterization of gene products can be performed quickly and relatively cheaply. I refer to this approach as systems-level experimental characterization. The data collected from such platforms would form a layer intermediate between bioinformatic gene function predictions and in-depth experimental studies of these functions. Such a data layer would greatly aid in the pursuit of understanding a multiplicity of biological processes in living organisms. PMID:27516767

  2. Highlighting the Need for Systems-Level Experimental Characterization of Plant Metabolic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Martin K M

    2016-01-01

    The biology of living organisms is determined by the action and interaction of a large number of individual gene products, each with specific functions. Discovering and annotating the function of gene products is key to our understanding of these organisms. Controlled experiments and bioinformatic predictions both contribute to functional gene annotation. For most species it is difficult to gain an overview of what portion of gene annotations are based on experiments and what portion represent predictions. Here, I survey the current state of experimental knowledge of enzymes and metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as eleven economically important crops and forestry trees - with a particular focus on reactions involving organic acids in central metabolism. I illustrate the limited availability of experimental data for functional annotation of enzymes in most of these species. Many enzymes involved in metabolism of citrate, malate, fumarate, lactate, and glycolate in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. Furthermore, enzymes involved in key biosynthetic pathways which shape important traits in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. I argue for the development of novel high-throughput platforms with which limited functional characterization of gene products can be performed quickly and relatively cheaply. I refer to this approach as systems-level experimental characterization. The data collected from such platforms would form a layer intermediate between bioinformatic gene function predictions and in-depth experimental studies of these functions. Such a data layer would greatly aid in the pursuit of understanding a multiplicity of biological processes in living organisms. PMID:27516767

  3. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  4. Method for Enzyme Design with Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the methodologies for the design of artificial enzymes with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids offer great promise for constructing artificial enzymes with novel activities. In our studies, the designs of artificial enzyme were divided into two steps. First, we considered the unnatural amino acids and the protein scaffold separately. The scaffold is designed by traditional protein design methods. The unnatural amino acids are inspired by natural structure and organic chemistry methods, and synthesized by either organic chemistry methods or enzymatic conversion. With the increasing number of published unnatural amino acids with various functions, we described an unnatural amino acids toolkit containing metal chelators, redox mediators, and click chemistry reagents. These efforts enable a researcher to search the toolkit for appropriate unnatural amino acids for the study, rather than design and synthesize the unnatural amino acids from the beginning. After the first step, the model enzyme was optimized by computational methods and directed evolution. Lastly, we describe a general method for evolving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and expressing unnatural amino acids incorporated into a protein. PMID:27586330

  5. Method for Enzyme Design with Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the methodologies for the design of artificial enzymes with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids offer great promise for constructing artificial enzymes with novel activities. In our studies, the designs of artificial enzyme were divided into two steps. First, we considered the unnatural amino acids and the protein scaffold separately. The scaffold is designed by traditional protein design methods. The unnatural amino acids are inspired by natural structure and organic chemistry methods, and synthesized by either organic chemistry methods or enzymatic conversion. With the increasing number of published unnatural amino acids with various functions, we described an unnatural amino acids toolkit containing metal chelators, redox mediators, and click chemistry reagents. These efforts enable a researcher to search the toolkit for appropriate unnatural amino acids for the study, rather than design and synthesize the unnatural amino acids from the beginning. After the first step, the model enzyme was optimized by computational methods and directed evolution. Lastly, we describe a general method for evolving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and expressing unnatural amino acids incorporated into a protein.

  6. Role of aldo-keto reductase family 1 (AKR1) enzymes in human steroid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rižner, Tea Lanišnik; Penning, Trevor M

    2014-01-01

    Human aldo-keto reductases AKR1C1-AKR1C4 and AKR1D1 play essential roles in the metabolism of all steroid hormones, the biosynthesis of neurosteroids and bile acids, the metabolism of conjugated steroids, and synthetic therapeutic steroids. These enzymes catalyze NADPH dependent reductions at the C3, C5, C17 and C20 positions on the steroid nucleus and side-chain. AKR1C1-AKR1C4 act as 3-keto, 17-keto and 20-ketosteroid reductases to varying extents, while AKR1D1 acts as the sole Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid-5β-reductase (steroid 5β-reductase) in humans. AKR1 enzymes control the concentrations of active ligands for nuclear receptors and control their ligand occupancy and trans-activation, they also regulate the amount of neurosteroids that can modulate the activity of GABAA and NMDA receptors. As such they are involved in the pre-receptor regulation of nuclear and membrane bound receptors. Altered expression of individual AKR1C genes is related to development of prostate, breast, and endometrial cancer. Mutations in AKR1C1 and AKR1C4 are responsible for sexual development dysgenesis and mutations in AKR1D1 are causative in bile-acid deficiency.

  7. Metabolism of chamaechromone in vitro with human liver microsomes and recombinant human drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yan; Hu, Haihong; Qiu, Yunqing; Zheng, Jinqi; Wang, Linrun; Zhang, Xingguo; Zeng, Su

    2014-04-01

    Chamaechromone is a major component in the dried roots of Stellera chamaejasme with antihepatitis B virus and insecticidal activity. In this study, metabolic profiles of chamaechromone were investigated in human liver microsomes. One monohydroxide and two monoglucuronides of chamaechromone were identified. The enzyme kinetics for both hydroxylation and glucuronidation were fitted to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The hydroxylation of chamaechromone was inhibited by α-naphthoflavone, and predominantly catalyzed by recombinant human cytochrome P450 1A2, whereas the glucuronidation was inhibited by quercetin, 1-naphthol, and fluconazole, and mainly catalyzed by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3, 1A7, 1A9, and 2B7.

  8. The Roles of Acids and Bases in Enzyme Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2007-01-01

    Many organic reactions are catalyzed by strong acids or bases that protonate or deprotonate neutral reactants leading to reactive cations or anions that proceed to products. In enzyme reactions, only weak acids and bases are available to hydrogen bond to reactants and to transfer protons in response to developing charges. Understanding this…

  9. The metabolism of aromatic acids by micro-organisms. Metabolic pathways in the fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cain, R. B.; Bilton, R. F.; Darrah, Josephine A.

    1968-01-01

    1. The metabolic pathways of aromatic-ring fission were examined in a range of fungal genera that utilize several compounds related to lignin. 2. Most of the genera, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate or compounds that are degraded to the latter (e.g. caffeate, ferulate or vanillate), rapidly oxidized these compounds, but not catechol. 3. Such genera possessed a protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase and accumulated β-carboxymuconate as the product of protocatechuate oxidation. This enzyme had a high pH optimum in most organisms; the Rhodotorula enzyme was competitively inhibited by catechol. 4. β-Carboxymuconate was converted by all competent fungi into β-carboxymuconolactone, which was isolated and characterized. None of the fungi produced or utilized at significant rates the corresponding bacterial intermediate γ-carboxymuconolactone. 5. The lactonizing enzymes of Rhodotorula and Neurospora crassa had a pH optimum near 5·5 and approximate molecular weights of 19000 and 190000 respectively. 6. The fungi did not degrade the isomeric (+)-muconolactone, γ-carboxymethylenebutanolide or β-oxoadipate enol lactone at significant rates, and thus differ radically from bacteria, where β-oxoadipate enol lactone is the precursor of β-oxoadipate in all strains examined. 7. The end product of β-carboxymuconolactone metabolism by extracts was β-oxoadipate. 8. Evidence for a coenzyme A derivative of β-oxoadipate was found during further metabolism of this keto acid. 9. A few anomalous fungi, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, had no protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase, but possessed all the enzymes of the catechol pathway. Catechol was detected in the growth medium in one instance. 10. A strain of Penicillium sp. formed pyruvate but no β-oxoadipate from protocatechuate, suggesting the existence also of a `meta' type of ring cleavage among fungi. PMID:5691754

  10. Plastid-localized amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Plantae are predominantly composed of non-cyanobacterial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Studies of photosynthetic eukaryotes have revealed that the evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria involved the recruitment of non-cyanobacterial proteins. Our phylogenetic survey of >100 Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded plastid enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis identified only 21 unambiguous cyanobacterial-derived proteins. Some of the several non-cyanobacterial plastid enzymes have a shared phylogenetic origin in the three Plantae lineages. We hypothesize that during the evolution of plastids some enzymes encoded in the host nuclear genome were mistargeted into the plastid. Then, the activity of those foreign enzymes was sustained by both the plastid metabolites and interactions with the native cyanobacterial enzymes. Some of the novel enzymatic activities were favored by selective compartmentation of additional complementary enzymes. The mosaic phylogenetic composition of the plastid amino acid biosynthetic pathways and the reduced number of plastid-encoded proteins of non-cyanobacterial origin suggest that enzyme recruitment underlies the recompartmentation of metabolic routes during the evolution of plastids. PMID:23233874

  11. Role of malic enzyme during fatty acid synthesis in the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Wang, Lei; Gu, Zhennan; Song, Yuanda; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2014-05-01

    The generation of NADPH by malic enzyme (ME) was postulated to be a rate-limiting step during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi, based primarily on the results from research focusing on ME in Mucor circinelloides. This hypothesis is challenged by a recent study showing that leucine metabolism, rather than ME, is critical for fatty acid synthesis in M. circinelloides. To clarify this, the gene encoding ME isoform E from Mortierella alpina was homologously expressed. ME overexpression increased the fatty acid content by 30% compared to that for a control. Our results suggest that ME may not be the sole rate-limiting enzyme, but does play a role, during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi.

  12. Prenyltransferases as key enzymes in primary and secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Winkelblech, Julia; Fan, Aili; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Attachment of isoprene units to various acceptors by prenylation plays an important role in primary and secondary metabolism of living organisms. Protein prenylation belongs to posttranslational modification and is involved in cellular regulation process. Prenylated secondary metabolites usually demonstrate promising biological and pharmacological activities. Prenyl transfer reactions catalyzed by prenyltransferases represent the key steps in the biosynthesis and contribute significantly to the structural and biological diversity of these compounds. In the last decade, remarkable progress has been achieved in the biochemical, molecular, and structural biological investigations of prenyltransferases, especially on those of the members of the dimethylallyltryptophan synthase (DMATS) superfamily. Until now, more than 40 of such soluble enzymes are identified and characterized biochemically. They catalyze usually regioselective and stereoselective prenylations of a series of aromatic substances including tryptophan, tryptophan-containing peptides, and other indole derivatives as well as tyrosine or even nitrogen-free substrates. Crystal structures of a number of prenyltransferases have been solved in the past 10 years and provide a solid basis for understanding the mechanism of prenyl transfer reactions.

  13. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  14. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  15. Phenotypic knockouts of selected metabolic pathways by targeting enzymes with camel-derived nanobodies (V(HH)s).

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José I; Fraile, Sofía; Zafra, Olga; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-07-01

    Surveying the dynamics of metabolic networks of Gram-negative bacteria often requires the conditional shutdown of enzymatic activities once the corresponding proteins have been produced. We show that given biochemical functions can be entirely suppressed in vivo with camel antibodies (VHHs, nanobodies) that target active sites of cognate enzymes expressed in the cytoplasm. As a proof of principle, we raised VHHs against 2,5-dihydroxypyridine dioxygenase (NicX) of Pseudomonas putida, involved in nicotinic acid metabolism. Once fused to a thioredoxin domain, the corresponding nanobodies inhibited the enzyme both in Escherichia coli and in P. putida cells, which then accumulated the metabolic substrate of NicX. VHHs were further engineered to track the antigen in vivo by C-terminal fusion to a fluorescent protein. Conditional expression of the resulting VHHs allows simultaneously to track and target proteins of interest and enables the design of transient phenotypes without mutating the genetic complement of the bacteria under study.

  16. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature.

    PubMed

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A; Turchini, Giovanni M

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad-time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  17. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  18. Omeprazole induces altered bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, K; Machida, M; Fukumura, M; Koide, K; Yamazaki, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—It has been reported that the acidity of gastric contents could be an important factor in regulating jejunal flora. 
Aims—To investigate the effects of omeprazole induced changes in gastric pH on jejunal flora and bile acid metabolism. 
Methods—Twenty one patients with gastric ulcer and 19 healthy volunteers were studied. Deconjugation of bile acids was detected using a bile acid breath test. Jejunal fluid was aspirated using a double lumen tube with a rubber cover on the tip and deconjugation was examined using thin layer chromatography. Fat malabsorption was detected by a triolein breath test. 
Results—In the bile acid breath test, expired breath samples from all patients and healthy volunteers showed significantly greater 14CO2 specific activity after omeprazole treatment (20 mg/day) than before treatment. Bacterial overgrowth was found in the jejunal fluid and gastric juice of both ulcer patients and healthy volunteers after omeprazole treatment. The following species were identified: Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, enterococcus, Lactobacillus bifidus, Bacteroides vulgatus, B uniformis, Eubacterium lentum, Eu parvum, and Corynebacterium granulosum. All of these species, except E coli and C albicans, deconjugate bile acids. There was a significant correlation between 14CO2 activity and gastric pH, both before and after omeprazole treatment in both groups. The triolein breath test revealed impaired fat absorption in both groups after omeprazole treatment. 
Conclusions—Both patients with gastric ulcer and healthy volunteers exhibited increased deconjugation of bile acids caused by bacterial overgrowth in the jejunum and fat malabsorption after omeprazole treatment. The bacterial overgrowth consisted of both anaerobes and aerobes with deconjugation ability and was probably associated with an omeprazole induced shift to neutral pH in the gastric juice. 

 Keywords: omeprazole; bacterial overgrowth; deconjugation; bile acid breath

  19. Enzymic synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-d-glucose. II. Metabolic characteristics of the enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leznicki, A. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-D-glucose from indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and uridine diphosphoglucose (UDPG) has been shown to be a reversible reaction with the equilibrium away from ester formation and toward formation of IAA. The enzyme occurs primarily in the liquid endosperm of the corn kernel but some activity occurs in the embryo. It is relatively specific showing no glucose ester formation with oxindole-3-acetic acid or 7-hydroxy-oxindole-3-acetic acid, and low activity with phenylpropene acids, such as rho-coumaric acid. The enzyme is also specific for the nucleotide sugar showing no activity with UDPGalactose or UDPXylose. The enzyme is inhibited by inorganic pyrophosphate, by phosphate esters and by phospholipids, particularly phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The enzyme is inhibited by zeatin, by 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid, by IAA-myo-inositol and IAA-glucan, but not by zeatin riboside, and only weakly by gibberellic acid, abscisic acid and kinetin. The reaction is slightly stimulated by both calcium and calmodulin and, in some cases, by thiol compounds. The role of this enzyme in the homeostatic control of indole-3-acetic acid levels in Zea mays is discussed.

  20. Simultaneous prediction of enzyme orthologs from chemical transformation patterns for de novo metabolic pathway reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Kotera, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolic pathways are an important class of molecular networks consisting of compounds, enzymes and their interactions. The understanding of global metabolic pathways is extremely important for various applications in ecology and pharmacology. However, large parts of metabolic pathways remain unknown, and most organism-specific pathways contain many missing enzymes. Results: In this study we propose a novel method to predict the enzyme orthologs that catalyze the putative reactions to facilitate the de novo reconstruction of metabolic pathways from metabolome-scale compound sets. The algorithm detects the chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs using chemical graph alignments, and constructs a set of enzyme-specific classifiers to simultaneously predict all the enzyme orthologs that could catalyze the putative reactions of the substrate–product pairs in the joint learning framework. The originality of the method lies in its ability to make predictions for thousands of enzyme orthologs simultaneously, as well as its extraction of enzyme-specific chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method by applying it to some ten thousands of metabolic compounds, and analyze the extracted chemical transformation patterns that provide insights into the characteristics and specificities of enzymes. The proposed method will open the door to both primary (central) and secondary metabolism in genomics research, increasing research productivity to tackle a wide variety of environmental and public health matters. Availability and Implementation: Contact: maskot@bio.titech.ac.jp PMID:27307627

  1. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  2. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  3. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Andrew W.; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z. X.; Baurley, James W.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Hall, Sharon M.; Baker, Timothy B.; Conti, David V.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Swan, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3’-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  4. NAD Malic Enzyme and the Control of Carbohydrate Metabolism in Potato Tubers1

    PubMed Central

    Jenner, Helen L.; Winning, Brenda M.; Millar, A. Harvey; Tomlinson, Kim L.; Leaver, Christopher J.; Hill, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants were transformed with a cDNA encoding the 59-kD subunit of the potato tuber NAD-dependent malic enzyme (NADME) in the antisense orientation. Measurements of the maximum catalytic activity of NADME in tubers revealed a range of reductions in the activity of this enzyme down to 40% of wild-type activity. There were no detrimental effects on plant growth or tuber yield. Biochemical analyses of developing tubers indicated that a reduction in NADME activity had no detectable effects on flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, there was an effect on glycolytic metabolism with significant increases in the concentration of 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate. These results suggest that alterations in the levels of intermediates toward the end of the glycolytic pathway may allow respiratory flux to continue at wild-type rates despite the reduction in NADME. There was also a statistically significant negative correlation between NADME activity and tuber starch content, with tubers containing reduced NADME having an increased starch content. The effect on plastid metabolism may result from the observed glycolytic perturbations. PMID:11457964

  5. Dynamic QTLs for sugars and enzyme activities provide an overview of genetic control of sugar metabolism during peach fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Desnoues, Elsa; Baldazzi, Valentina; Génard, Michel; Mauroux, Jehan-Baptiste; Lambert, Patrick; Confolent, Carole; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic control of sugar metabolism is essential to enhance fruit quality and promote fruit consumption. The sugar content and composition of fruits varies with species, cultivar and stage of development, and is controlled by multiple enzymes. A QTL (quantitative trait locus) study was performed on peach fruit [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], the model species for Prunus. Progeny derived from an interspecific cross between P. persica cultivars and P. davidiana was used. Dynamic QTLs for fresh weight, sugars, acids, and enzyme activities related to sugar metabolism were detected at different stages during fruit development. Changing effects of alleles during fruit growth were observed, including inversions close to maturity. This QTL analysis was supplemented by the identification of genes annotated on the peach genome as enzymes linked to sugar metabolism or sugar transporters. Several cases of co-locations between annotated genes, QTLs for enzyme activities and QTLs controlling metabolite concentrations were observed and discussed. These co-locations raise hypotheses regarding the functional regulation of sugar metabolism and pave the way for further analyses to enable the identification of the underlying genes. In conclusion, we identified the potential impact on fruit breeding of the modification of QTL effect close to maturity. PMID:27117339

  6. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  7. Intestinal amino acid metabolism in neonates.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; van der Schoor, Sophie R D; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G; Wattimena, Darcos; Schierbeek, Henk; Schaart, Maaike W; Riedijk, Maaike A; van der Lugt, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    The portal-drained viscera (stomach, intestine, pancreas and spleen) have a much higher rate of both energy expenditure and protein synthesis than can be estimated on the basis of their weight. A high utilization rate of dietary nutrients by the portal-drained viscera might result in a low systemic availability which determines whole-body growth. From studies in our multiple catheterized piglet model, we conclude that more than half of the dietary protein intake is utilized within the portal-drained viscera and that amino acids are a major fuel source for the visceral organs. Specific stable isotope studies reveal that there are large differences in the utilization rate amongst the different amino acids. The majority of the results obtained from the piglet studies can be extrapolated to the human (preterm) infant. First-pass, splanchnic uptake of lysine and threonine differ substantially, while non-essential amino acids are oxidized to a great extend in the human gut. Overall, these studies indicate that gut amino acid metabolism has a great impact on systemic availability and hence growth in the neonate.

  8. Production of Glucaric Acid from Hemicellulose Substrate by Rosettasome Enzyme Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles C; Kibblewhite, Rena E; Paavola, Chad D; Orts, William J; Wagschal, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    Hemicellulose biomass is a complex polymer with many different chemical constituents that can be utilized as industrial feedstocks. These molecules can be released from the polymer and transformed into value-added chemicals through multistep enzymatic pathways. Some bacteria produce cellulosomes which are assemblies composed of lignocellulolytic enzymes tethered to a large protein scaffold. Rosettasomes are artificial engineered ring scaffolds designed to mimic the bacterial cellulosome. Both cellulosomes and rosettasomes have been shown to facilitate much higher rates of biomass hydrolysis compared to the same enzymes free in solution. We investigated whether tethering enzymes involved in both biomass hydrolysis and oxidative transformation to glucaric acid onto a rosettasome scaffold would result in an analogous production enhancement in a combined hydrolysis and bioconversion metabolic pathway. Three different enzymes were used to hydrolyze birchwood hemicellulose and convert the substituents to glucaric acid, a top-12 DOE value added chemical feedstock derived from biomass. It was demonstrated that colocalizing the three different enzymes to the synthetic scaffold resulted in up to 40 % higher levels of product compared to uncomplexed enzymes. PMID:27198564

  9. Comprehensive Structural Characterization of the Bacterial Homospermidine Synthase-an Essential Enzyme of the Polyamine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Krossa, Sebastian; Faust, Annette; Ober, Dietrich; Scheidig, Axel J

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved bacterial homospermidine synthase (HSS) is a key enzyme of the polyamine metabolism of many proteobacteria including pathogenic strains such as Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; The unique usage of NAD(H) as a prosthetic group is a common feature of bacterial HSS, eukaryotic HSS and deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). The structure of the bacterial enzyme does not possess a lysine residue in the active center and thus does not form an enzyme-substrate Schiff base intermediate as observed for the DHS. In contrast to the DHS the active site is not formed by the interface of two subunits but resides within one subunit of the bacterial HSS. Crystal structures of Blastochloris viridis HSS (BvHSS) reveal two distinct substrate binding sites, one of which is highly specific for putrescine. BvHSS features a side pocket in the direct vicinity of the active site formed by conserved amino acids and a potential substrate discrimination, guiding, and sensing mechanism. The proposed reaction steps for the catalysis of BvHSS emphasize cation-π interaction through a conserved Trp residue as a key stabilizer of high energetic transition states. PMID:26776105

  10. Effects of methapyrilene on rat hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and liver morphology.

    PubMed

    Graichen, M E; Neptun, D A; Dent, J G; Popp, J A; Leonard, T B

    1985-02-01

    Short-term treatment of rats with hepatocarcinogens elicits a consistent pattern of phenotypic changes in hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes, the most striking of which is a marked increase in microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EH) activity. The antihistaminic drug methapyrilene induces a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in F-344 rats. The studies reported here were designed to assess the effects of methapyrilene on hepatic EH activity, cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function oxidase activities, liver morphology, and liver-derived serum enzymes. Male F-344 rats were treated with three daily oral doses of methapyrilene-HCl, up to 300 mg/kg/day, and were sacrificed 48 hr after the last dose. Hepatic microsomal EH and cytosolic DT-diaphorase activities were increased in a dose-related fashion, to 420 and 230% of control, respectively. Cytochrome P-450 content and benzphetamine-N-demethylase and ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activities were concomitantly decreased to 35-50% of control. Serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alanine aminotransferase activities were elevated 22- to 27-fold, and serum bile acids to 36-fold by treatment with methapyrilene. Periportal lesions, characterized by inflammation, nuclear and nucleolar enlargement, bile duct hyperplasia, and hepatocellular necrosis, were observed following methapyrilene administration. The severity of the periportal lesion correlated with elevations in the serum chemistry parameters. The increases noted in microsomal EH activity supports the suggestion that this enzyme may be a useful biochemical marker for exposure to hepatocarcinogens. PMID:2859228

  11. Comprehensive Structural Characterization of the Bacterial Homospermidine Synthase–an Essential Enzyme of the Polyamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krossa, Sebastian; Faust, Annette; Ober, Dietrich; Scheidig, Axel J.

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved bacterial homospermidine synthase (HSS) is a key enzyme of the polyamine metabolism of many proteobacteria including pathogenic strains such as Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; The unique usage of NAD(H) as a prosthetic group is a common feature of bacterial HSS, eukaryotic HSS and deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). The structure of the bacterial enzyme does not possess a lysine residue in the active center and thus does not form an enzyme-substrate Schiff base intermediate as observed for the DHS. In contrast to the DHS the active site is not formed by the interface of two subunits but resides within one subunit of the bacterial HSS. Crystal structures of Blastochloris viridis HSS (BvHSS) reveal two distinct substrate binding sites, one of which is highly specific for putrescine. BvHSS features a side pocket in the direct vicinity of the active site formed by conserved amino acids and a potential substrate discrimination, guiding, and sensing mechanism. The proposed reaction steps for the catalysis of BvHSS emphasize cation-π interaction through a conserved Trp residue as a key stabilizer of high energetic transition states. PMID:26776105

  12. Inhibitors of plant invertases do not affect the structurally related enzymes of fructan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Ute; Harms, Karsten; Rausch, Thomas; Greiner, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Plant fructan active enzymes (FAZYs), including the enzymes involved in inulin metabolism, namely sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST; EC 2.4.1.99), fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT; EC 2.4.1.100) and fructan 1-exohydrolase (1-FEH; EC 3.2.1.153), are evolutionarily related to acid invertases (AIs), that is, plant cell wall invertase (CWI) and vacuolar invertase (VI). Acid invertases are post-translationally controlled by proteinaceous inhibitors. Whether FAZYs are subject to similar controls is not known. To probe their possible interactions with invertase inhibitors, we transiently expressed chicory (Cichorium intybus) FAZYs, as well as several previously characterized invertase inhibitors from nonfructan species, and the C. intybus cell wall/vacuolar inhibitor of fructosidase (CiC/VIF), a putative invertase inhibitor of a fructan-accumulating plant, in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Leaf extracts containing recombinant, enzymatically active FAZYs were used to explore the interaction with invertase inhibitors. Neither heterologous inhibitors nor CiC/VIF affected FAZY activities. CiC/VIF was confirmed as an AI inhibitor with a stronger effect on CWI than on VI. Its expression in planta was developmentally regulated (high in taproots, and undetectable in leaves and flowers). In agreement with its target specificities, CiC/VIF was associated with the cell wall. It is concluded that subtle structural differences between AIs and FAZYs result in pronounced selectivity of inhibitor action.

  13. Significance of reductive metabolism in human intestine and quantitative prediction of intestinal first-pass metabolism by cytosolic reductive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishimuta, Haruka; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Nomura, Naruaki; Yabuki, Masashi

    2013-05-01

    The number of new drug candidates that are cleared via non-cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes has increased. However, unlike oxidation by P450, the roles of reductive enzymes are less understood. The metabolism in intestine is especially not well known. The purposes of this study were to investigate the significance of reductive metabolism in human intestine, and to establish a quantitative prediction method of intestinal first-pass metabolism by cytosolic reductive enzymes, using haloperidol, mebendazole, and ziprasidone. First, we estimated the metabolic activities for these compounds in intestine and liver using subcellular fractions. Metabolic activities were detected in human intestinal cytosol (HIC) for all three compounds, and the intrinsic clearance values were higher than those in human liver cytosol for haloperidol and mebendazole. These metabolic activities in HIC were NADPH- and/or NADH-dependent. Furthermore, the metabolic activities for all three compounds in HIC were largely inhibited by menadione, which has been used as a carbonyl reductase (CBR)-selective chemical inhibitor. Therefore, considering subcellular location, cofactor requirement, and chemical inhibition, these compounds might be metabolized by CBRs in human intestine. Subsequently, we tried to quantitatively predict intestinal availability (F(g)) for these compounds using human intestinal S9 (HIS9). Our prediction model using apparent permeability of parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and metabolic activities in HIS9 could predict F(g) in humans for the three compounds well. In conclusion, CBRs might have higher metabolic activities in human intestine than in human liver. Furthermore, our prediction method of human F(g) using HIS9 is applicable to substrates of cytosolic reductive enzymes.

  14. Revising the Representation of Fatty Acid, Glycerolipid, and Glycerophospholipid Metabolism in the Consensus Model of Yeast Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Hnin W.; Henry, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Genome-scale metabolic models are built using information from an organism's annotated genome and, correspondingly, information on reactions catalyzed by the set of metabolic enzymes encoded by the genome. These models have been successfully applied to guide metabolic engineering to increase production of metabolites of industrial interest. Congruity between simulated and experimental metabolic behavior is influenced by the accuracy of the representation of the metabolic network in the model. In the interest of applying the consensus model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism for increased productivity of triglycerides, we manually evaluated the representation of fatty acid, glycerophospholipid, and glycerolipid metabolism in the consensus model (Yeast v6.0). These areas of metabolism were chosen due to their tightly interconnected nature to triglyceride synthesis. Manual curation was facilitated by custom MATLAB functions that return information contained in the model for reactions associated with genes and metabolites within the stated areas of metabolism. Through manual curation, we have identified inconsistencies between information contained in the model and literature knowledge. These inconsistencies include incorrect gene-reaction associations, improper definition of substrates/products in reactions, inappropriate assignments of reaction directionality, nonfunctional β-oxidation pathways, and missing reactions relevant to the synthesis and degradation of triglycerides. Suggestions to amend these inconsistencies in the Yeast v6.0 model can be implemented through a MATLAB script provided in the Supplementary Materials, Supplementary Data S1 (Supplementary Data are available online at www.liebertpub.com/ind). PMID:24678285

  15. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Stols, L; Donnelly, M I

    1997-01-01

    NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The Km values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. PMID:9212416

  16. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5-50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans.

  17. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. PMID:25395831

  18. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5-50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. PMID:25395831

  19. Modeling the role of covalent enzyme modification in Escherichia coli nitrogen metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Philip B.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2010-03-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. GS is principally active when the cell is experiencing nitrogen limitation, and its activity is regulated by a bicyclic covalent modification cascade. The advantages of this bicyclic-cascade architecture are poorly understood. We analyze a simple model of the GS cascade in comparison to other regulatory schemes and conclude that the bicyclic cascade is suboptimal for maintaining metabolic homeostasis of the free glutamine pool. Instead, we argue that the lag inherent in the covalent modification of GS slows the response to an ammonium shock and thereby allows GS to transiently detoxify the cell, while maintaining homeostasis over longer times.

  20. Modeling the role of covalent enzyme modification in Escherichia coli nitrogen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Philip B

    2013-01-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. GS is principally active when the cell is experiencing nitrogen limitation, and its activity is regulated by a bicyclic covalent modification cascade. The advantages of this bicyclic-cascade architecture are poorly understood. We analyze a simple model of the GS cascade in comparison to other regulatory schemes and conclude that the bicyclic cascade is suboptimal for maintaining metabolic homeostasis of the free glutamine pool. Instead, we argue that the lag inherent in the covalent modification of GS slows the response to an ammonium shock and thereby allows GS to transiently detoxify the cell, while maintaining homeostasis over longer times. PMID:20057006

  1. Genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator increasing succinate excretion from unicellular cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Takashi; Shirai, Tomokazu; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Y.

    2015-01-01

    Succinate is a building block compound that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has declared as important in biorefineries, and it is widely used as a commodity chemical. Here, we identified the two genes increasing succinate production of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Succinate was excreted under dark, anaerobic conditions, and its production level increased by knocking out ackA, which encodes an acetate kinase, and by overexpressing sigE, which encodes an RNA polymerase sigma factor. Glycogen catabolism and organic acid biosynthesis were enhanced in the mutant lacking ackA and overexpressing sigE, leading to an increase in succinate production reaching five times of the wild-type levels. Our genetic and metabolomic analyses thus demonstrated the effect of genetic manipulation of a metabolic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator on succinate excretion from this cyanobacterium with the data based on metabolomic technique. PMID:26500619

  2. Induction of Arabidopsis tryptophan pathway enzymes and camalexin by amino acid starvation, oxidative stress, and an abiotic elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Williams, C C; Last, R L

    1998-01-01

    The tryptophan (Trp) biosynthetic pathway leads to the production of many secondary metabolites with diverse functions, and its regulation is predicted to respond to the needs for both protein synthesis and secondary metabolism. We have tested the response of the Trp pathway enzymes and three other amino acid biosynthetic enzymes to starvation for aromatic amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or methionine. The Trp pathway enzymes and cytosolic glutamine synthetase were induced under all of the amino acid starvation test conditions, whereas methionine synthase and acetolactate synthase were not. The mRNAs for two stress-inducible enzymes unrelated to amino acid biosynthesis and accumulation of the indolic phytoalexin camalexin were also induced by amino acid starvation. These results suggest that regulation of the Trp pathway enzymes under amino acid deprivation conditions is largely a stress response to allow for increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatments with the oxidative stress-inducing herbicide acifluorfen and the abiotic elicitor alpha-amino butyric acid induced responses similar to those induced by the amino acid starvation treatments. The role of salicylic acid in herbicide-mediated Trp and camalexin induction was investigated. PMID:9501110

  3. Sensor potency of the moonlighting enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton: the cytoskeleton as a metabolic sensor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence for the interaction of metabolic enzymes with the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The significance of these interactions is far from clear. Presentation of the hypothesis In the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis presented here, the cytoskeleton senses and integrates the general metabolic activity of the cell. This activity depends on the binding to the cytoskeleton of enzymes and, depending on the nature of the enzyme, this binding may occur if the enzyme is either active or inactive but not both. This enzyme-binding is further proposed to stabilize microtubules and microfilaments and to alter rates of GTP and ATP hydrolysis and their levels. Testing the hypothesis Evidence consistent with the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis is presented in the case of glycolysis. Several testable predictions are made. There should be a relationship between post-translational modifications of tubulin and of actin and their interaction with metabolic enzymes. Different conditions of cytoskeletal dynamics and enzyme-cytoskeleton binding should reveal significant differences in local and perhaps global levels and ratios of ATP and GTP. The different functions of moonlighting enzymes should depend on cytoskeletal binding. Implications of the hypothesis The physical and chemical effects arising from metabolic sensing by the cytoskeleton would have major consequences on cell shape, dynamics and cell cycle progression. The hypothesis provides a framework that helps the significance of the enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton be determined. PMID:23398642

  4. Dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression: Impact of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, P; Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-04-30

    The brain astrocyte glycogen reservoir is a vital energy reserve and, in the cerebral cortex, subject among other factors to noradrenergic control. The ovarian steroid estradiol potently stimulates nerve cell aerobic respiration, but its role in glial glycogen metabolism during energy homeostasis or mismatched substrate supply/demand is unclear. This study examined the premise that estradiol regulates hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression during normo- and hypoglycemia in vivo through dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine (CA)-dependent mechanisms. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH), arcuate hypothalamic (ARH), and paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats after insulin or vehicle injection, and pooled within each site. Stimulation [VMH, LHA] or suppression [PVH, ARH] of basal glycogen synthase (GS) protein expression by E was reversed in the former three sites by caudal fourth ventricular pretreatment with the CA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). E diminished glycogen phosphorylase (GP) protein profiles by CA-dependent [VMH, PVH] or -independent mechanisms [LHA]. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) increased GS expression in the PVH in OVX+E, but reduced this protein in the PVH, ARH, and LHA in OVX+O. Moreover, IIH augmented GP expression in the VMH, LHA, and ARH in OVX+E and in the ARH in OVX+O, responses that normalized by 6-OHDA. Results demonstrate site-specific effects of E on astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression in the female rat hypothalamus, and identify locations where dorsomedial hindbrain CA input is required for such action. Evidence that E correspondingly increases and reduces basal GS and GP in the VMH and LHA, but augments the latter protein during IIH suggests that E regulates

  5. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  6. Multi-objective optimization of enzyme manipulations in metabolic networks considering resilience effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Improving the synthesis rate of desired metabolites in metabolic systems is one of the main tasks in metabolic engineering. In the last decade, metabolic engineering approaches based on the mathematical optimization have been used extensively for the analysis and manipulation of metabolic networks. Experimental evidence shows that mutants reflect resilience phenomena against gene alterations. Although researchers have published many studies on the design of metabolic systems based on kinetic models and optimization strategies, almost no studies discuss the multi-objective optimization problem for enzyme manipulations in metabolic networks considering resilience phenomenon. Results This study proposes a generalized fuzzy multi-objective optimization approach to formulate the enzyme intervention problem for metabolic networks considering resilience phenomena and cell viability. This approach is a general framework that can be applied to any metabolic networks to investigate the influence of resilience phenomena on gene intervention strategies and maximum target synthesis rates. This study evaluates the performance of the proposed approach by applying it to two metabolic systems: S. cerevisiae and E. coli. Results show that the maximum synthesis rates of target products by genetic interventions are always over-estimated in metabolic networks that do not consider the resilience effects. Conclusions Considering the resilience phenomena in metabolic networks can improve the predictions of gene intervention and maximum synthesis rates in metabolic engineering. The proposed generalized fuzzy multi-objective optimization approach has the potential to be a good and practical framework in the design of metabolic networks. PMID:21929795

  7. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression in aging humans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of foreign compounds, metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate these xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will...

  8. Tissue of origin dictates branched-chain amino acid metabolism in mutant Kras-driven cancers.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Jared R; Torrence, Margaret E; Danai, Laura V; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Davidson, Shawn M; Bauer, Matthew R; Lau, Allison N; Ji, Brian W; Dixit, Purushottam D; Hosios, Aaron M; Muir, Alexander; Chin, Christopher R; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Jacks, Tyler; Wolpin, Brian M; Vitkup, Dennis; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2016-09-01

    Tumor genetics guides patient selection for many new therapies, and cell culture studies have demonstrated that specific mutations can promote metabolic phenotypes. However, whether tissue context defines cancer dependence on specific metabolic pathways is unknown. Kras activation and Trp53 deletion in the pancreas or the lung result in pancreatic ductal adenocarinoma (PDAC) or non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), respectively, but despite the same initiating events, these tumors use branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) differently. NSCLC tumors incorporate free BCAAs into tissue protein and use BCAAs as a nitrogen source, whereas PDAC tumors have decreased BCAA uptake. These differences are reflected in expression levels of BCAA catabolic enzymes in both mice and humans. Loss of Bcat1 and Bcat2, the enzymes responsible for BCAA use, impairs NSCLC tumor formation, but these enzymes are not required for PDAC tumor formation, arguing that tissue of origin is an important determinant of how cancers satisfy their metabolic requirements. PMID:27609895

  9. Tissue of origin dictates branched-chain amino acid metabolism in mutant Kras-driven cancers.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Jared R; Torrence, Margaret E; Danai, Laura V; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Davidson, Shawn M; Bauer, Matthew R; Lau, Allison N; Ji, Brian W; Dixit, Purushottam D; Hosios, Aaron M; Muir, Alexander; Chin, Christopher R; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Jacks, Tyler; Wolpin, Brian M; Vitkup, Dennis; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2016-09-01

    Tumor genetics guides patient selection for many new therapies, and cell culture studies have demonstrated that specific mutations can promote metabolic phenotypes. However, whether tissue context defines cancer dependence on specific metabolic pathways is unknown. Kras activation and Trp53 deletion in the pancreas or the lung result in pancreatic ductal adenocarinoma (PDAC) or non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), respectively, but despite the same initiating events, these tumors use branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) differently. NSCLC tumors incorporate free BCAAs into tissue protein and use BCAAs as a nitrogen source, whereas PDAC tumors have decreased BCAA uptake. These differences are reflected in expression levels of BCAA catabolic enzymes in both mice and humans. Loss of Bcat1 and Bcat2, the enzymes responsible for BCAA use, impairs NSCLC tumor formation, but these enzymes are not required for PDAC tumor formation, arguing that tissue of origin is an important determinant of how cancers satisfy their metabolic requirements.

  10. Development of radiometric assays for quantification of enzyme activities of the key enzymes of thyroid hormones metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, S

    2014-01-01

    We newly elaborated and adapted several radiometric enzyme assays for the determination of activities of the key enzymes engaged in the biosynthesis (thyroid peroxidase, TPO) and metabolic transformations (conjugating enzymes and iodothyronine deiodinases, IDs) of thyroid hormones (THs) in the thyroid gland and in peripheral tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT). We also elaborated novel, reliable radiometric methods for extremely sensitive determination of enzyme activities of IDs of types 1, 2 and 3 in microsomal fractions of different rat and human tissues, as well as in homogenates of cultured mammalian cells. The use of optimized TLC separation of radioactive products from the unconsumed substrates and film-less autoradiography of radiochromatograms, taking advantage of storage phosphor screens, enabled us to determine IDs enzyme activities as low as 10(-18) katals. In studies of the interaction of fluoxetine (Fluox) with the metabolism of THs, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT). Fluox is the most frequently used representative of a new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs--selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. We used the elaborated assays for quantification the effects of Fluox and for the assessment of the degree of potential induction of rat liver ST and/or UDP-GT enzyme activities by Fluox alone or in combination with T(3). Furthermore, we studied possible changes in IDs activities in murine adipose tissue under the conditions that promoted either tissue hypertrophy (obesogenic treatment) or involution (caloric restriction), and in response to leptin, using our newly developed radiometric enzyme assays for IDs. Our results suggest that deiodinase D1 has a functional role in WAT, with D1 possibly being involved in the control of adipose tissue metabolism and/or accumulation of the tissue. Significant positive correlation between

  11. Metabolism of cyclohexaneacetic acid and cyclohexanebutyric acid by Arthrobacter sp. strain CA1.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Trudgill, P W

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Arthrobacter was isolated by enrichment culture with cyclohexaneacetate as the sole source of carbon and grew with a doubling time of 4.2 h. In addition to growing with cyclohexaneacetate, the organism also grew with cyclohexanebutyrate at concentrations not above 0.05%, and with a variety of alicyclic ketones and alcohols. Oxidation of cyclohexaneacetate proceeded through formation of the coenzyme A (CoA) ester followed by initiation of a beta-oxidation cycle. beta-Oxidation was blocked before the second dehydrogenation step due to the formation of a tertiary alcohol, and the side chain was eliminated as acetyl-CoA by the action of (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetyl-CoA lyase. The cyclohexanone thus formed was degraded by a well-described route that involves ring-oxygen insertion by a biological Baeyer-Villiger oxygenase. All enzymes of the proposed metabolic sequence were demonstrated in cell-free extracts. Arthrobacter sp. strain CA1 synthesized constitutive beta-oxidative enzymes, but further induction of enzymes active toward cyclohexaneacetate and its metabolites could occur during growth with the alicyclic acid. Other enzymes of the sequence, (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetyl-CoA lyase and enzymes of cyclohexanone oxidation, were present at negligible levels in succinate-grown cells but induced by growth with cyclohexaneacetate. The oxidation of cyclohexanebutyrate was integrated into the pathway for cyclohexaneacetate oxidation by a single beta-oxidation cycle. Oxidation of the compound could be divided into two phases. Initial oxidation to (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate could be catalyzed by constitutive enzymes, whereas the further degradation of (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate was dependent on induced enzyme synthesis which could be inhibited by chloramphenicol with the consequent accumulation of cyclohexaneacetate and (1-hydroxycyclohexan-1-yl)acetate. PMID:7076617

  12. Metabolic switch during adipogenesis: From branched chain amino acid catabolism to lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Halama, Anna; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabriele; Möller, Gabriele; Kumar, Pankaj; Prehn, Cornelia; Laumen, Helmut; Hauner, Hans; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Suhre, Karsten; Adamski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Fat cell metabolism has an impact on body homeostasis and its proper function. Nevertheless, the knowledge about simultaneous metabolic processes, which occur during adipogenesis and in mature adipocytes, is limited. Identification of key metabolic events associated with fat cell metabolism could be beneficial in the field of novel drug development, drug repurposing, as well as for the discovery of patterns predicting obesity risk. The main objective of our work was to provide comprehensive characterization of metabolic processes occurring during adipogenesis and in mature adipocytes. In order to globally determine crucial metabolic pathways involved in fat cell metabolism, metabolomics and transcriptomics approaches were applied. We observed significantly regulated metabolites correlating with significantly regulated genes at different stages of adipogenesis. We identified the synthesis of phosphatidylcholines, the metabolism of even and odd chain fatty acids, as well as the catabolism of branched chain amino acids (BCAA; leucine, isoleucine and valine) as key regulated pathways. Our further analysis led to identification of an enzymatic switch comprising the enzymes Hmgcs2 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase) and Auh (AU RNA binding protein/enoyl-CoA hydratase) which connects leucine degradation with cholesterol synthesis. In addition, propionyl-CoA, a product of isoleucine degradation, was identified as a putative substrate for odd chain fatty acid synthesis. The uncovered crosstalks between BCAA and lipid metabolism during adipogenesis might contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of obesity and have potential implications in obesity prediction. PMID:26408941

  13. Metabolism of Very Long-Chain Fatty Acids: Genes and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Takayuki; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are highly diverse in terms of carbon (C) chain-length and number of double bonds. FAs with C>20 are called very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). VLCFAs are found not only as constituents of cellular lipids such as sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids but also as precursors of lipid mediators. Our understanding on the function of VLCFAs is growing in parallel with the identification of enzymes involved in VLCFA synthesis or degradation. A variety of inherited diseases, such as ichthyosis, macular degeneration, myopathy, mental retardation, and demyelination, are caused by mutations in the genes encoding VLCFA metabolizing enzymes. In this review, we describe mammalian VLCFAs by highlighting their tissue distribution and metabolic pathways, and we discuss responsible genes and enzymes with reference to their roles in pathophysiology. PMID:24753812

  14. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes. PMID:26362128

  15. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  16. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dadinova, Liubov A.; Shtykova, Eleonora V.; Konarev, Petr V.; Rodina, Elena V.; Snalina, Natalia E.; Vorobyeva, Natalia N.; Kurilova, Svetlana A.; Nazarova, Tatyana I.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2016-01-01

    The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i) class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB); (ii) inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase); (iii) 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI); and (iv) glutamate decarboxylase (GadA). The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin) metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques. PMID:27227414

  17. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  18. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dadinova, Liubov A; Shtykova, Eleonora V; Konarev, Petr V; Rodina, Elena V; Snalina, Natalia E; Vorobyeva, Natalia N; Kurilova, Svetlana A; Nazarova, Tatyana I; Jeffries, Cy M; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2016-01-01

    The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i) class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB); (ii) inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase); (iii) 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI); and (iv) glutamate decarboxylase (GadA). The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin) metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques. PMID:27227414

  19. Controlling enzyme inhibition using an expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun; Kwon, Inchan

    2013-09-01

    Enzyme inhibition plays an important role in drug development, metabolic pathway regulation, and biocatalysis with product inhibition. When an inhibitor has high structural similarities to the substrate of an enzyme, controlling inhibitor binding without affecting enzyme substrate binding is often challenging and requires fine-tuning of the active site. We hypothesize that an extended set of genetically encoded amino acids can be used to design an enzyme active site that reduces enzyme inhibitor binding without compromising substrate binding. As a model case, we chose murine dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR), substrate dihydrofolate, and inhibitor methotrexate. Structural models of mDHFR variants containing non-natural amino acids complexed with each ligand were constructed to identify a key residue for inhibitor binding and non-natural amino acids to replace the key residue. Then, we discovered that replacing the key phenylalanine residue with two phenylalanine analogs (p-bromophenylalanine (pBrF) and L-2-naphthylalanine (2Nal)) enhances binding affinity toward the substrate dihydrofolate over the inhibitor by 4.0 and 5.8-fold, respectively. Such an enhanced selectivity is mainly due to a reduced inhibitor binding affinity by 2.1 and 4.3-fold, respectively. The catalytic efficiency of the mDHFR variant containing pBrF is comparable to that of wild-type mDHFR, whereas the mDHFR variant containing 2Nal exhibits a moderate decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The work described here clearly demonstrates the feasibility of selectively controlling enzyme inhibition using an expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

  20. [Progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lu, Yayao; Peng, Bo; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and uridine 5-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are critical enzymes for drug metabolism. Both chemical drugs and traditional Chinese medicines are converted to more readily excreted compounds by drug metabolizing enzymes in human livers. Because of the disparate expression of CYP and UGT enzymes among different individuals, accurate quantification of these enzymes is essential for drug pharmacology, drug-drug interactions and drug clinical applications. The research progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes in the recent decade is reviewed. PMID:26536756

  1. [Progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lu, Yayao; Peng, Bo; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and uridine 5-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are critical enzymes for drug metabolism. Both chemical drugs and traditional Chinese medicines are converted to more readily excreted compounds by drug metabolizing enzymes in human livers. Because of the disparate expression of CYP and UGT enzymes among different individuals, accurate quantification of these enzymes is essential for drug pharmacology, drug-drug interactions and drug clinical applications. The research progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes in the recent decade is reviewed.

  2. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage and formation reactions in drug metabolism and the role of metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bolleddula, Jayaprakasam; Chowdhury, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Elimination of xenobiotics from the human body is often facilitated by a transformation to highly water soluble and more ionizable molecules. In general, oxidation-reduction, hydrolysis, and conjugation reactions are common biotransformation reactions that are catalyzed by various metabolic enzymes including cytochrome P450s (CYPs), non-CYPs, and conjugative enzymes. Although carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation and cleavage reactions are known to exist in plant secondary metabolism, these reactions are relatively rare in mammalian metabolism and are considered exceptions. However, various reactions such as demethylation, dealkylation, dearylation, reduction of alkyl chain, ring expansion, ring contraction, oxidative elimination of a nitrile through C-C bond cleavage, and dimerization, and glucuronidation through C-C bond formation have been reported for drug molecules. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions for drug molecules are primarily catalyzed by CYP enzymes, dimerization is mediated by peroxidases, and C-glucuronidation is catalyzed by UGT1A9. This review provides an overview of C-C bond cleavage and formation reactions in drug metabolism and the metabolic enzymes associated with these reactions.

  3. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  4. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B; Mishra, Sasmita; Ei-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J; Hill, R Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Housman, David E; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Morrow, Eric M

    2016-09-20

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  5. Mitigating role of baicalein on lysosomal enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme status during lung carcinogenesis of Swiss albino mice induced by benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Naveenkumar, Chandrashekar; Raghunandakumar, Subramanian; Asokkumar, Selvamani; Binuclara, John; Rajan, Balan; Premkumar, Thandavamoorthy; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2014-06-01

    The lungs mainly serve as a primary site for xenobiotic metabolism and constitute an important defense mechanism against inhalation of carcinogens. Our current study aimed to evaluate the chemotherapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) in Swiss albino mice exposed to tobacco-specific carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] for its ability to mitigate pulmonary carcinogenesis. Here, we report that altered activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes (cathepsin-D, cathepsin-B, acid phosphatase, β-D-galactosidase, β-D-glucuronidase, and β-D-N-acetyl glucosaminidase), phase I biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase), and phase II enzymes (glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronyl transferase, and DT-diaphorase) were observed in the B(a)P-induced mice. Treatment with BE significantly restored back the activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes, phase I and phase II biotransformation enzymes. Moreover, assessment of lysosomal abnormalities by transmission electron microscopic examination revealed that BE treatment effectively counteract B(a)P-induced oxidative damages. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot analysis of CYP1A1 revealed that BE treatment effectively negate B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of CYP1A1. Further analysis of scanning electron microscopic studies in lung was carried out to substantiate the anticarcinogenic effect of BE. The overall data suggest that BE treatment significantly inhibits lysosomal and microsomal dysfunction, thus revealing its potent anticarcinogenic effect.

  6. The evolution of metabolic enzymes in Plasmodium and trypanosomatids as compared to Saccharomyces and Schizosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Palenchar, Peter M; Palenchar, Jennifer B

    2012-07-01

    Understanding how the biological connectivity of genes and gene products affects evolution is an important aspect of understanding evolution. Genes encoding enzymes are frequently used to carry out such analyses. Interestingly, studies have shown that connectivity in the metabolic networks in parasitic protists, including Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei, have been substantially altered as compared to free living eukaryotes, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we have determined K(a) values, which are a measure of the non-synonymous substitution rate, and used them to examine the differences between the evolution of genes in T. brucei, P. falciparum, S. cerevisiae, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. All four organisms share similar traits with respect to the evolution of genes encoding metabolic enzymes. First, genes encoding metabolic enzymes have lower K(a) values than genes encoding non-metabolic proteins. In addition, perturbations of the metabolic network appear to have limited affects on the genes encoding enzymes near the perturbation. In most cases, there is a negative relationship between connectivity in the metabolic network of the gene product and the K(a) value for the gene, i.e. examining how much constraint there is on gene evolution when it is connected to many other genes. In addition, we find that the K(a) values of orthologs encoding for metabolic enzymes in each organism are significantly correlated, indicating similar patterns of non-synonymous substitutions. In total, our results indicate that the evolution of genes encoding metabolic enzymes do not tend to be greatly affected by changes in the metabolic network.

  7. Polyphenols rich fraction from Geoffroea decorticans fruits flour affects key enzymes involved in metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress and inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, M S; Zampini, I C; Alberto, M R; Cuello, S; Torres, S; Pérez, J; Quispe, C; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Isla, M I

    2016-01-01

    Geoffroea decorticans (chañar), is widely distributed throughout Northwestern Argentina. Its fruit is consumed as flour, arrope or hydroalcoholic beverage. The chañar fruits flour was obtained and 39 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified by HPLC-MS/MS(n). The compounds comprised caffeic acid glycosides, simple phenolics (protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid), a glycoside of vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid and its phenethyl ester as well as free and glycosylated flavonoids. The polyphenols enriched extract with and without gastroduodenal digestion inhibited enzymes associated with metabolic syndrome, including α-amylase, α-glucosidase, lipase and hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA reductase. The polyphenolic extract exhibited antioxidant activity by different mechanisms and inhibited the pro-inflammatory enzymes (ciclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2). The polyphenolic extract did not showed mutagenic effect by Ames test against Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. These findings add evidence that chañar fruit flour may be considered a functional food with preventive properties against diseases associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26212988

  8. Lipoic acid synthetase deficiency causes neonatal-onset epilepsy, defective mitochondrial energy metabolism, and glycine elevation.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Fauth, Christine; Bergheim, Christa; Meierhofer, David; Radmayr, Doris; Zschocke, Johannes; Koch, Johannes; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group of four mitochondrial enzymes involved in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and branched chain amino acids and in the glycine cleavage. Lipoic acid is synthesized stepwise within mitochondria through a process that includes lipoic acid synthetase. We identified the homozygous mutation c.746G>A (p.Arg249His) in LIAS in an individual with neonatal-onset epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and elevated glycine concentration in plasma and urine. Investigation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism showed reduced oxidation of pyruvate and decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. A pronounced reduction of the prosthetic group lipoamide was found in lipoylated proteins.

  9. Impact of metabolizing enzymes on drug response of endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saladores, Pilar H; Precht, Jana C; Schroth, Werner; Brauch, Hiltrud; Schwab, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer accounts for 75% of diagnosed breast cancers worldwide. There are currently two major options for adjuvant treatment: tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Variability in metabolizing enzymes determines their pharmacokinetic profile, possibly affecting treatment response. Therefore, prediction of therapy outcome based on genotypes would enable a more personalized medicine approach, providing optimal therapy for each patient. In this review, the authors will discuss the current evidence on the most important metabolizing enzymes in endocrine therapy, with a special focus on CYP2D6 and its role in tamoxifen metabolism.

  10. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  11. Liver Enzymes and Uric acid in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Farveh; Rafighdoost, Abbas Ali; Rafighdoost, Amir Hossein; Amin, Ahmad; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute heart failure (AHF) is defined as the new onset or recurrence of gradual or rapidly worsening signs and symptoms of heart failure, requiring urgent or emergent therapy. Objectives: This study attempts to assess the association of liver function tests (LFT) and uric acid level with in hospital outcome and echocardiography parameters, in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients (aged 16 - 90 years, 60% men) admitted with AHF were enrolled. LFTs and uric acid levels were assessed on first day and before discharge, and patients were followed for 3 months. Results: In-hospital outcomes were considered. Mean Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) was 35% (20 - 45%). Mean Uric acid level was 8.4 mg/dL, significantly higher than chronic HF and normal groups (P < 0.02). Elevated liver enzymes were seen in 52% patients, mostly (87%) in transaminases. Liver enzymes were decreased in 85% patients before discharge. LFT and uric acid levels were inversely and significantly correlated with LVEF on echocardiography (P = 0.02), but not with diastolic parameters. Although there was no significant correlation between uric acid level and in-hospital mortality, risk of intubation and rehospitalization in 3 months, enzyme levels increased in these groups. Increased aspartate transaminase (AST level) was associated with inotrope infusion in AHF patients (42 vs. 82 mg/dL, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Abnormal transaminases and uric acid levels are seen in AHF patients. Increased AST levels may be a predictor of the need for inotrope during hospital course in these patients. PMID:26528447

  12. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter S; Filippov, Mikhail; Dityatev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include chondroitinase ABC, heparin/heparan sulfate-mimicking oligosaccharides, ECM cross-linking antibodies, and drugs stimulating expression of ECM molecules. The amount or activity of ECM-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases can be modulated indirectly via the regulation of endogenous inhibitors like TIMPs and RECK or at the transcriptional and translational levels using, e.g., histone deacetylase inhibitors, synthetic inhibitors like Periostat, microRNA-interfering drugs like AC1MMYR2, and natural compounds like flavonoids, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, anacardic acid, and erythropoietin. Among drugs targeting the major ECM receptors, integrins, are the anticancer peptide cilengitide and anti-integrin antibodies, which have a potential for treatment of stroke, multiple sclerosis, and AD. The latter can be also potentially treated with modulators of CAMs, such as peptide mimetics derived from L1-CAM and NCAM1. PMID:25410365

  13. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  14. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  15. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-06-19

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco.

  16. Computational Prediction of Metabolism: Sites, Products, SAR, P450 Enzyme Dynamics, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism of xenobiotics remains a central challenge for the discovery and development of drugs, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and agrochemicals. Metabolic transformations are frequently related to the incidence of toxic effects that may result from the emergence of reactive species, the systemic accumulation of metabolites, or by induction of metabolic pathways. Experimental investigation of the metabolism of small organic molecules is particularly resource demanding; hence, computational methods are of considerable interest to complement experimental approaches. This review provides a broad overview of structure- and ligand-based computational methods for the prediction of xenobiotic metabolism. Current computational approaches to address xenobiotic metabolism are discussed from three major perspectives: (i) prediction of sites of metabolism (SOMs), (ii) elucidation of potential metabolites and their chemical structures, and (iii) prediction of direct and indirect effects of xenobiotics on metabolizing enzymes, where the focus is on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes, the cardinal xenobiotics metabolizing enzymes. For each of these domains, a variety of approaches and their applications are systematically reviewed, including expert systems, data mining approaches, quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs), and machine learning-based methods, pharmacophore-based algorithms, shape-focused techniques, molecular interaction fields (MIFs), reactivity-focused techniques, protein–ligand docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and combinations of methods. Predictive metabolism is a developing area, and there is still enormous potential for improvement. However, it is clear that the combination of rapidly increasing amounts of available ligand- and structure-related experimental data (in particular, quantitative data) with novel and diverse simulation and modeling approaches is accelerating the development of effective tools for

  17. Renal acid-base metabolism after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Holloway, J C; Phifer, T; Henderson, R; Welbourne, T C

    1986-05-01

    The response of the kidney to ischemia-induced cellular acidosis was followed over the immediate one hr post-ischemia reflow period. Clearance and extraction experiments as well as measurement of cortical intracellular pH (pHi) were performed on Inactin-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Arteriovenous concentration differences and para-aminohippurate extraction were obtained by cannulating the left renal vein. Base production was monitored as bicarbonate released into the renal vein and urine; net base production was related to the renal handling of glutamine and ammonia as well as to renal oxygen consumption and pHi. After a 15 min control period, the left renal artery was snared for one-half hr followed by release and four consecutive 15 min reflow periods. During the control period, cortical cell pHi measured by [14C]-5,5-Dimethyl-2,4-Oxazolidinedione distribution was 7.07 +/- 0.08, and Q-O2 was 14.1 +/- 2.2 micromoles/min; neither net glutamine utilization nor net bicarbonate generation occurred. After 30 min of ischemia, renal tissue pH fell to 6.6 +/- 0.15. However, within 45 min of reflow, cortical cell pH returned and exceeded the control value, 7.33 +/- 0.06 vs. 7.15 +/- 0.08. This increase in pHi was associated with a significant rise in cellular metabolic rate, Q-O2 increased to 20.3 +/- 6.4 micromoles/min. Corresponding with cellular alkalosis was a net production of bicarbonate and a net ammonia uptake and glutamine release; urinary acidification was abolished. These results are consistent with a nonexcretory renal metabolic base generating mechanism governing cellular acid base homeostasis following ischemia. PMID:3723929

  18. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  19. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive system called enzymes break proteins down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, and carbohydrates into simple ... for example, glucose). In addition to sugar, both amino acids and fatty acids can be used as energy ...

  20. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive system called enzymes break proteins down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, and carbohydrates into simple ... e.g., glucose). In addition to sugar, both amino acids and fatty acids can be used as energy ...

  1. Polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and susceptibility to cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, A

    1999-01-01

    The variation in individual responses to exogenous agents is exceptionally wide. It is because of this large diversity of responsiveness that risk factors to environmentally induced diseases have been difficult to pinpoint, particularly at low exposure levels. Opportunities now exist for studies of host factors in cancer or other diseases in which an environmental component can be presumed. Many of the studies have shown an elevated disease proneness for individuals carrying the potential at-risk alleles of metabolic genes, but a number of controversial results have also been reported. This article is an overview of the data published to date on metabolic genotypes related to individual susceptibility to cancer. PMID:10229705

  2. Impulsive mathematical modeling of ascorbic acid metabolism in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bachar, Mostafa; Raimann, Jochen G; Kotanko, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we develop an impulsive mathematical model of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) metabolism in healthy subjects for daily intake over a long period of time. The model includes the dynamics of ascorbic acid plasma concentration, the ascorbic acid absorption in the intestines and a novel approach to quantify the glomerular excretion of ascorbic acid. We investigate qualitative and quantitative dynamics. We show the existence and uniqueness of the global asymptotic stability of the periodic solution. We also perform a numerical simulation for the entire time period based on published data reporting parameters reflecting ascorbic acid metabolism at different oral doses of ascorbic acid.

  3. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  4. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  5. Metabolic engineering as a tool for enhanced lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Bikram P; DeVeaux, Linda C; Christopher, Lew P

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic engineering is a powerful biotechnological tool that finds, among others, increased use in constructing microbial strains for higher lactic acid productivity, lower costs and reduced pollution. Engineering the metabolic pathways has concentrated on improving the lactic acid fermentation parameters, enhancing the acid tolerance of production organisms and their abilities to utilize a broad range of substrates, including fermentable biomass-derived sugars. Recent efforts have focused on metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria as they produce high yields and have a small genome size that facilitates their genetic manipulation. We summarize here the current trends in metabolic engineering techniques and strategies for manipulating lactic acid producing organisms developed to address and overcome major challenges in the lactic acid production process.

  6. Lysine acetylation is a common post-translational modification of key metabolic pathway enzymes of the anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Catherine A; Veith, Paul D; Nieto, Matthew F; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2015-10-14

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe considered to be a keystone pathogen in the development of the bacterial-associated inflammatory oral disease chronic periodontitis. Although post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are commonly found to modify protein function in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, PTMs such as lysine acetylation have not been examined in P. gingivalis. Lysine acetylation is the addition of an acetyl group to a lysine which removes this amino acid's positive charge and can induce changes in a protein's secondary structure and reactivity. A proteomics based approach combining immune-affinity enrichment with high sensitivity Orbitrap mass spectrometry identified 130 lysine acetylated peptides from 92 P. gingivalis proteins. The majority of these peptides (71) were attributed to 45 proteins with predicted metabolic activity; these proteins could be mapped to several P. gingivalis metabolic pathways where enzymes catalysing sequential reactions within the same pathway were often found acetylated. In particular, the catabolic pathways of complex anaerobic fermentation of amino acids to produce energy had 12 enzymes lysine acetylated. The results suggest that lysine acetylation may be an important mechanism in metabolic regulation in P. gingivalis, which is vital for P. gingivalis survival and adaptation of its metabolism throughout infection. Statement of significance. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth. The ability of the pathogen to induce dysbiosis and disease is related to an array of specific virulence factors and metabolic regulation that enables the bacterium to proliferate in an inflamed periodontal pocket. The mechanisms P. gingivalis uses to adapt to a changing and hostile environment are poorly understood and here we show, for the first time, that enzymes of critical metabolic pathways for energy

  7. Correlation-based network analysis of metabolite and enzyme profiles reveals a role of citrate biosynthesis in modulating N and C metabolism in zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their ...

  8. Chemical characterization, antioxidant and inhibitory effects of some marine sponges against carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 15,000 marine products have been described up to now; Sponges are champion producers, concerning the diversity of products that have been found. Most bioactive compounds from sponges were classified into anti-inflammatory, antitumor, immuno- or neurosurpressive, antiviral, antimalarial, antibiotic, or antifouling. Evaluation of in vitro inhibitory effects of different extracts from four marine sponges versus some antioxidants indices and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes concerned with diabetes mellitus was studied. The chemical characterizations for the extracts of the predominating sponges; SP1 and SP3 were discussed. Methods All chemicals served in the biological study were of analytical grade and purchased from Sigma, Merck and Aldrich. All kits were the products of Biosystems (Spain), Sigma Chemical Company (USA), Biodiagnostic (Egypt). Carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes; α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and β-galactosidase (EC3.2.1.1, EC3.2.1.20, and EC3.2.1.23, respectively) were obtained from Sigma Chemical Company (USA). Results Four marine sponges; Smenospongia (SP1), Callyspongia (SP2), Niphates (SP3), and Stylissa (SP4), were collected from the Red Sea at Egyptian coasts, and taxonomically characterized. The sponges' extracts exhibited diverse inhibitory effects on oxidative stress indices and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in linear relationships to some extent with concentration of inhibitors (dose dependant). The extracts of sponges (3, 1, and 2) showed, respectively, potent-reducing power. Purification and Chemical characterization of sponge 1 using NMR and mass spectroscopy, recognized the existence of di-isobutyl phthalate (1), di-n-butyl phthalate (2), linoleic acid (3), β-sitosterol (4), and cholesterol (5). Sponge 3 produced bis-[2-ethyl]-hexyl-phthylester (6) and triglyceride fatty acid ester (7). Conclusion Marine sponges are promising sources for delivering of bioactive compounds. Four marine sponges, collected from

  9. MAFG is a transcriptional repressor of bile acid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R; Romanoski, Casey E; Lee, Richard G; Graham, Mark J; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis, and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG(+/-) mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR.

  10. MAFG Is a Transcriptional Repressor of Bile Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Lee, Richard G.; Graham, Mark J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway, and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG+/− mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-Seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR. PMID:25651182

  11. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in cells used for testing skin sensitization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Vogel, D; Blatz, V; Ramirez, T; Kolle, S; Eltze, T; van Ravenzwaay, B; Oesch, F; Landsiedel, R

    2013-09-01

    For ethical and regulatory reasons, in vitro tests for scoring potential toxicities of cosmetics are essential. A test strategy for investigating potential skin sensitization using two human keratinocytic and two human dendritic cell lines has been developed (Mehling et al. Arch Toxicol 86:1273–1295, 2012). Since prohaptens may be metabolically activated in the skin, information on xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) activities in these cell lines is of high interest. In this study, XME activity assays, monitoring metabolite or cofactor, showed the following: all three passages of keratinocytic (KeratinoSens® and LuSens) and dendritic (U937 und THP-1) cells displayed N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) activities (about 6–60 nmol/min/mg S9-protein for acetylation of para-aminobenzoic acid). This is relevant since reactive species of many cosmetics are metabolically controlled by cutaneous NAT1. Esterase activities of about 1–4 nmol fluorescein diacetate/min/mg S9-protein were observed in all passages of investigated keratinocytic and about 1 nmol fluorescein diacetate/min/mg S9-protein in dendritic cell lines. This is also of practical relevance since many esters and amides are detoxified and others activated by cutaneous esterases. In both keratinocytic cell lines, activities of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) were observed (5–17 nmol product/min/mg cytosolic protein). ALDH is relevant for the detoxication of reactive aldehydes. Activities of several other XME were below detection, namely the investigated cytochrome P450-dependent alkylresorufin O-dealkylases 7-ethylresorufin O-deethylase, 7-benzylresorufin O-debenzylase and 7-pentylresorufin O-depentylase (while NADPH cytochrome c reductase activities were much above the limit of quantification), the flavin-containing monooxygenase, the alcohol dehydrogenase as well as the UDP glucuronosyl transferase activities.

  12. Thyroid regulation of resting metabolic rate and intermediary metabolic enzymes in a lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    John-Alder, H B

    1990-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of physiological increments in plasma thyroxine (T4) at three levels of biological organization in thyroid-intact and thyroidectomized captive western fence lizards, Sceloporus occidentalis. Two doses of T4-loaded pellets elevated plasma T4 in thyroid-intact lizards from 4.8 +/- 0.47 to 10.7 +/- 2.25 and 20.4 +/- 5.77 ng/ml (mean +/- SE). Surgical thyroidectomy reduced T4 to 1.8 +/- 0.23 ng/ml, and subsequent T4 pellet implantation raised T4 to 14.8 +/- 4.30 ng/ml. Minimal resting metabolic rate (= standard metabolic rate; SMR), a common organismal metric of thyroid perturbation, was reduced 31% (P less than 0.0001) by thyroidectomy and was restored by T4 replacement but was not stimulated by T4 supplementation in thyroid-intact lizards. In T4-replaced, thyroidectomized lizards, SMR was significantly correlated with plasma T4 (r2 = 0.626, P = 0.003, n = 11). At the organ level, liver mass was not changed by any treatment; heart mass was decreased by thyroid deficiency and restored by T4 replacement. At the molecular level, citrate synthase activity was significantly reduced by thyroidectomy and was returned to control levels by T4 replacement in liver and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) but was not changed in cardiac muscle. Citrate synthase was not affected in any tissue by T4 supplementation in thyroid-intact lizards. Pyruvate kinase activity was not affected by any of the treatments in any of the tissues. Cytosolic alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase was significantly reduced in liver by all treatments and in skeletal muscle by T4 replacement after thyroidectomy. These results indicate that SMR and cardiac muscle mass in lizards are dependent on normal thyroid function and are expressed maximally in euthyroid animals. The stimulatory effect of T4 on SMR in thyroid-intact lizards, which has been reported previously by several investigators, is a nonphysiological response to pharmacological T4 levels, at least in these captive

  13. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Kye Sook; Kang, Keon Wook; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ki Ho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2011-08-15

    Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, it remains to be determined whether changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism occur in cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutic medications. We compared expression/activity of sulfur amino acid metabolizing enzymes and cellular levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites between normal MCF-7 cells and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Adr) cells. The S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in MCF-7/Adr cells decreased to {approx} 10% relative to that in MCF-7 cells, which may have resulted from down-regulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Expression of homocysteine-clearing enzymes, such as cystathionine beta-synthase, methionine synthase/methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, was up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells, suggesting that acquiring doxorubicin resistance attenuated methionine-dependence and activated transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine. Homocysteine was similar, which is associated with a balance between the increased expressions of homocysteine-clearing enzymes and decreased extracellular homocysteine. Despite an elevation in cysteine, cellular GSH decreased in MCF-7/Adr cells, which was attributed to over-efflux of GSH into the medium and down-regulation of the GSH synthesis enzyme. Consequently, MCF-7/Adr cells were more sensitive to the oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione than MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target for chemoresistant cancer cells. These results warrant further investigations to determine the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in acquiring anticancer drug resistance in cancer cells using chemical and biological regulators involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. - Research Highlights: > MCF-7/Adr cells showed decreases in cellular GSH

  14. The Conserved Rieske Oxygenase DAF-36/Neverland Is a Novel Cholesterol-metabolizing Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama-Yanagawa, Takuji; Enya, Sora; Shimada-Niwa, Yuko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuya, Takeshi; Shiomi, Kensuke; Sasakura, Yasunori; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2011-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in a wide variety of biological processes in multicellular organisms. The principal steroid hormones in nematodes and arthropods are dafachronic acids and ecdysteroids, respectively, both of which are synthesized from cholesterol as an indispensable precursor. The first critical catalytic step in the biosynthesis of these ecdysozoan steroids is the conversion of cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol. However, the enzymes responsible for cholesterol 7,8-dehydrogenation remain unclear at the molecular level. Here we report that the Rieske oxygenase DAF-36/Neverland (Nvd) is a cholesterol 7,8-dehydrogenase. The daf-36/nvd genes are evolutionarily conserved, not only in nematodes and insects but also in deuterostome species that do not produce dafachronic acids or ecdysteroids, including the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, the fish Danio rerio, and the frog Xenopus laevis. An in vitro enzymatic assay system reveals that all DAF-36/Nvd proteins cloned so far have the ability to convert cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol. Moreover, the lethality of loss of nvd function in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is rescued by the expression of daf-36/nvd genes from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the insect Bombyx mori, or the vertebrates D. rerio and X. laevis. These data suggest that daf-36/nvd genes are functionally orthologous across the bilaterian phylogeny. We propose that the daf-36/nvd family of proteins is a novel conserved player in cholesterol metabolism across the animal phyla. PMID:21632547

  15. Disturbed Amino Acid Metabolism in HIV: Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Becker, Kathrin; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:26236243

  16. Reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme preparations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amuro, Y; Yamade, W; Kudo, K; Yamamoto, T; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1989-01-01

    The formation of chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids from 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver preparations was examined in vitro. Liver preparations were incubated with 7-ketolithocholic acid at pH 5.5 in a sodium-potassium-phosphate buffer containing NADPH or NADH. The products formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids could be formed from 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme(s). The enzyme(s) required NADPH but not NADH as coenzyme and was localized largely in the microsomes. The conjugated 7-ketolithocholic acid, especially the taurine conjugated, was predominantly reduced to chenodeoxycholic acid, whereas the unconjugated 7-ketolithocholic acid was not reduced well to either chenodeoxycholic acid or ursodeoxycholic acid. Thus the reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme(s) was found to be dependent on whether the substrate was conjugated or not. PMID:2912152

  17. Proteomic analysis of B-aminobutyric acid priming and aba-induction of drought resistance in crabapple (Malus pumila): effect on general metabolism, the phenylpropanoid pathway and cell wall enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a variety of annual crops and model plants, the xenobiotic compound, DL-beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA), has been shown to enhance disease resistance and increase salt, drought, and thermotolerance. BABA does not activate stress genes directly but rather sensitizes plants to respond more quickly a...

  18. Metabolism of benzo(c)chrysene by rat liver enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, A.; Miyata, N.; Levin, W.; Jerina, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Metabolism of the weak carcinogen benzo(c)chrysene by microsomes and by a purified system reconstituted with cytochrome P-450c and epoxide hydrolase has been examined. With microsomes from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats, the hydrocarbon is metabolized at a rate of 6.9 nmoles/min/nmole of cytochrome P-450 as compared to 0.86 for control and 0.65 for phenobarbital-treated rats. Dihydrodiols are the major metabolites, accounting for 50-70% of the total metabolism. The K-region 7,8-dihydrodiol is the principal metabolite while the benzo-ring 1,2- and 9,10 dihydrodiols, precursors to potentially tumorigenic bay-region epoxides are formed in much smaller amounts. The bay-region 3,4-dihydrodiol accounts for 10% of the total metabolites, except in the case of the reconstituted system. The K-region 7,8-dihydrodiol and the benzo-ring 1,2- and 9,10-dihydrodiols are formed with highest enantiomeric purity by microsomes from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats. In the case of the K-region dihydrodiol, the (7S,8S)-enantiomer predominates, however in the benzo-ring dihydrodiols it is the (R,R)-enantiomer which predominates in all three microsomal preparations. Phenols at the 3-, 4- and 9-positions account for the balance of the metabolites.

  19. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Günter; Lünse, Christina; Suckling, Colin; Scott, Fraser

    2014-07-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  20. Oxidative metabolism of 5-o-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid), a bioactive natural product, by metalloporphyrin and rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Michel D; Martins, Patrícia R; dos Santos, Pierre A; Bortocan, Renato; Iamamoto, Y; Lopes, Norberto P

    2005-09-01

    Synthetic metalloporphyrins, in the presence of monooxygen donors, are known to mimic the various reactions of cytochrome P450 enzymes systems in the oxidation and oxygenation of various drugs and biologically active compounds. This paper reports an HPLC-MS-MS investigation of chlorogenic acid (CGA) oxidation by iodosylbenzene using iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride as catalyst. The oxidation products have been detected by sequential MS analyses. In addition, CGA was submitted to an in vitro metabolism assay employing isolated rat liver mitochondria. The single oxidized product obtained from mitochondrial metabolism corresponds to the major product formed by the metalloporphyrin-catalyzed reaction. These results indicate that biomimetic oxidation reactions, in addition to in vitro metabolism assays employing isolated organs/organelles, could replace some in vivo metabolism studies, thus minimizing the problems related to the use of a large number of living animals in experimental research.

  1. Plasmid control of 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer degradation enzymes of Flavobacterium sp. KI72.

    PubMed

    Negoro, S; Shinagawa, H; Nakata, A; Kinoshita, S; Hatozaki, T; Okada, H

    1980-07-01

    Flavobacterium sp. K172, which is able to grow on 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, and plasmid control of the responsible enzymes, 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer hydrolase and 6-aminohexanoic acid linear oligomer hydrolase, were studied. The wild strain of K172 harbors three kinds of plasmid, pOAD1 (26.2 megadaltons), pOAD2 (28.8 megadaltons), and pOAD3 (37.2 megadaltons). The wild strain K172 was readily cured of its ability to grow on the cyclic dimer by mitomycin C, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase could not be detected either as catalytic activity or by antibody precipitation. No reversion of the cured strains was detected. pOAD2 was not detected in every cured strain tested but was restored in a transformant. The transformant recovered both of the enzyme activities, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase of the transformant was immunologically identical with that of the wild strain. All of the strains tested, including the wild, cured, and transformant ones, possessed identical pOAD3 irrespective of the metabolizing activity. Some of the cured strains possessed pOAD1 identical with the wild strain, but the others harbored plasmids with partially altered structures which were likely to be derived from pOAD1 by genetic rearrangements such as deletion, insertion, or substitution. These results suggested that the genes of the enzymes were borne on pOAD2.

  2. Plasmid Control of 6-Aminohexanoic Acid Cyclic Dimer Degradation Enzymes of Flavobacterium sp. K172

    PubMed Central

    Negoro, Seiji; Shinagawa, Hideo; Nakata, Atsuo; Kinoshita, Shinichi; Hatozaki, Tomoya; Okada, Hirosuke

    1980-01-01

    Flavobacterium sp. K172, which is able to grow on 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, and plasmid control of the responsible enzymes, 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer hydrolase and 6-aminohexanoic acid linear oligomer hydrolase, were studied. The wild strain of K172 harbors three kinds of plasmid, pOAD1 (26.2 megadaltons), pOAD2 (28.8 megadaltons), and pOAD3 (37.2 megadaltons). The wild strain K172 was readily cured of its ability to grow on the cyclic dimer by mitomycin C, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase could not be detected either as catalytic activity or by antibody precipitation. No reversion of the cured strains was detected. pOAD2 was not detected in every cured strain tested but was restored in a transformant. The transformant recovered both of the enzyme activities, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase of the transformant was immunologically identical with that of the wild strain. All of the strains tested, including the wild, cured, and transformant ones, possessed identical pOAD3 irrespective of the metabolizing activity. Some of the cured strains possessed pOAD1 identical with the wild strain, but the others harbored plasmids with partially altered structures which were likely to be derived from pOAD1 by genetic rearrangements such as deletion, insertion, or substitution. These results suggested that the genes of the enzymes were borne on pOAD2. Images PMID:7400094

  3. Relevance of induction of human drug-metabolizing enzymes: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    PubMed Central

    PARK, B. K.; KITTERINGHAM, N. R.; PIRMOHAMED, M.; TUCKER, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    1Human drug-metabolizing systems can be induced, or activated, by a large number of exogenous agents including drugs, alcohol, components in the diet and cigarette smoke, as well as by endogenous factors. 2Such perturbation of enzyme activity undoubtedly contributes to both intra- and inter-individual variation both with respect to the rate and route of metabolism for a particular drug. Induction may, in theory, either attenuate the pharmacological response or exacerbate the toxicity of a particular drug, or both. 3The clinical impact of enzyme induction will depend upon the number of different enzyme isoforms affected and the magnitude of the inductive response within an individual, and also on the therapeutic indices of the affected substrates. 4The toxicological implications will be determined either by any change in the route of metabolism, or by a disturbance of the balance between activation and detoxication processes, which may be isozyme selective. PMID:8799511

  4. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP . PMID:26542446

  5. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP .

  6. Key Residues Controlling Phenacetin Metabolism By Human Cytochrome P450 2A Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, N.M.; Smith, B.D.; Urban, M.J.; Scott, E.E.

    2009-05-14

    Although the human lung cytochrome P450 2A13 (CYP2A13) and its liver counterpart cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) are 94% identical in amino acid sequence, they metabolize a number of substrates with substantially different efficiencies. To determine differences in binding for a diverse set of cytochrome P450 2A ligands, we have measured the spectral binding affinities (K{sub D}) for nicotine, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), coumarin, 2{prime}-methoxyacetophenone (MAP), and 8-methoxypsoralen. The differences in the K{sub D} values for CYP2A6 versus CYP2A13 ranged from 74-fold for 2{prime}-methoxyacetophenone to 1.1-fold for coumarin, with CYP2A13 demonstrating the higher affinity. To identify active site amino acids responsible for the differences in binding of MAP, PEITC, and coumarin, 10 CYP2A13 mutant proteins were generated in which individual amino acids from the CYP2A6 active site were substituted into CYP2A13 at the corresponding position. Titrations revealed that substitutions at positions 208, 300, and 301 individually had the largest effects on ligand binding. The collective relevance of these amino acids to differential ligand selectivity was verified by evaluating binding to CYP2A6 mutant enzymes that incorporate several of the CYP2A13 amino acids at these positions. Inclusion of four CYP2A13 amino acids resulted in a CYP2A6 mutant protein (I208S/I300F/G301A/S369G) with binding affinities for MAP and PEITC much more similar to those observed for CYP2A13 than to those for CYP2A6 without altering coumarin binding. The structure-based quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis using COMBINE successfully modeled the observed mutant-ligand trends and emphasized steric roles for active site residues including four substituted amino acids and an adjacent conserved Leu{sup 370}.

  7. Ecophysiology of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM)

    PubMed Central

    LÜTTGE, ULRICH

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Scope Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) as an ecophysiological modification of photosynthetic carbon acquisition has been reviewed extensively before. Cell biology, enzymology and the flow of carbon along various pathways and through various cellular compartments have been well documented and discussed. The present attempt at reviewing CAM once again tries to use a different approach, considering a wide range of inputs, receivers and outputs. • Input Input is given by a network of environmental parameters. Six major ones, CO2, H2O, light, temperature, nutrients and salinity, are considered in detail, which allows discussion of the effects of these factors, and combinations thereof, at the individual plant level (‘physiological aut‐ecology’). • Receivers Receivers of the environmental cues are the plant types genotypes and phenotypes, the latter including morphotypes and physiotypes. CAM genotypes largely remain ‘black boxes’, and research endeavours of genomics, producing mutants and following molecular phylogeny, are just beginning. There is no special development of CAM morphotypes except for a strong tendency for leaf or stem succulence with large cells with big vacuoles and often, but not always, special water storage tissues. Various CAM physiotypes with differing degrees of CAM expression are well characterized. • Output Output is the shaping of habitats, ecosystems and communities by CAM. A number of systems are briefly surveyed, namely aquatic systems, deserts, salinas, savannas, restingas, various types of forests, inselbergs and paramós. • Conclusions While quantitative census data for CAM diversity and biomass are largely missing, intuition suggests that the larger CAM domains are those systems which are governed by a network of interacting stress factors requiring versatile responses and not systems where a single stress factor strongly prevails. CAM is noted to be a strategy for variable, flexible and plastic

  8. Assembly and multiple gene expression of thermophilic enzymes in Escherichia coli for in vitro metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Pham Huynh; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In vitro reconstitution of an artificial metabolic pathway is an emerging approach for the biocatalytic production of industrial chemicals. However, several enzymes have to be separately prepared (and purified) for the construction of an in vitro metabolic pathway, thereby limiting the practical applicability of this approach. In this study, genes encoding the nine thermophilic enzymes involved in a non-ATP-forming chimeric glycolytic pathway were assembled in an artificial operon and co-expressed in a single recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Gene expression levels of the thermophilic enzymes were controlled by their sequential order in the artificial operon. The specific activities of the recombinant enzymes in the cell-free extract of the multiple-gene-expression E. coli were 5.0-1,370 times higher than those in an enzyme cocktail prepared from a mixture of single-gene-expression strains, in each of which a single one of the nine thermophilic enzymes was overproduced. Heat treatment of a crude extract of the multiple-gene-expression cells led to the denaturation of indigenous proteins and one-step preparation of an in vitro synthetic pathway comprising only a limited number of thermotolerant enzymes. Coupling this in vitro pathway with other thermophilic enzymes including the H2 O-forming NADH oxidase or the malate/lactate dehydrogenase facilitated one-pot conversion of glucose to pyruvate or lactate, respectively.

  9. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  10. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis. PMID:26398285

  11. Independent Effects of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase (GABAT) on Metabolic and Sleep Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Sarah E; Rhoades, Seth; Chen, Wen-Feng; Sengupta, Arjun; Yue, Zhifeng; Lim, Jason C; Mitchell, Claire H; Weljie, Aalim M; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-08-14

    Breakdown of the major sleep-promoting neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in the GABA shunt generates catabolites that may enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but it is unknown whether catabolic by-products of the GABA shunt actually support metabolic homeostasis. In Drosophila, the loss of the specific enzyme that degrades GABA, GABA transaminase (GABAT), increases sleep, and we show here that it also affects metabolism such that flies lacking GABAT fail to survive on carbohydrate media. Expression of GABAT in neurons or glia rescues this phenotype, indicating a general metabolic function for this enzyme in the brain. As GABA degradation produces two catabolic products, glutamate and succinic semialdehyde, we sought to determine which was responsible for the metabolic phenotype. Through genetic and pharmacological experiments, we determined that glutamate, rather than succinic semialdehyde, accounts for the metabolic phenotype of gabat mutants. This is supported by biochemical measurements of catabolites in wild-type and mutant animals. Using in vitro labeling assays, we found that inhibition of GABAT affects energetic pathways. Interestingly, we also observed that gaba mutants display a general disruption in bioenergetics as measured by altered levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, NAD(+)/NADH, and ATP levels. Finally, we report that the effects of GABAT on sleep do not depend upon glutamate, indicating that GABAT regulates metabolic and sleep homeostasis through independent mechanisms. These data indicate a role of the GABA shunt in the development of metabolic risk and suggest that neurological disorders caused by altered glutamate or GABA may be associated with metabolic disruption.

  12. PGC-1α-Mediated Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in the Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nagaike, Yuta; Morita, Akihito; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Ezaki, Osamu; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Kamei, Yasutomi; Miura, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a coactivator of various nuclear receptors and other transcription factors, which is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, thermogenesis, and other biological processes that control phenotypic characteristics of various organ systems including skeletal muscle. PGC-1α in skeletal muscle is considered to be involved in contractile protein function, mitochondrial function, metabolic regulation, intracellular signaling, and transcriptional responses. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism mainly occurs in skeletal muscle mitochondria, and enzymes related to BCAA metabolism are increased by exercise. Using murine skeletal muscle overexpressing PGC-1α and cultured cells, we investigated whether PGC-1α stimulates BCAA metabolism by increasing the expression of enzymes involved in BCAA metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing PGC-1α specifically in the skeletal muscle had increased the expression of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) 2, branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), which catabolize BCAA. The expression of BCKDH kinase (BCKDK), which phosphorylates BCKDH and suppresses its enzymatic activity, was unchanged. The amount of BCAA in the skeletal muscle was significantly decreased in the transgenic mice compared with that in the wild-type mice. The amount of glutamic acid, a metabolite of BCAA catabolism, was increased in the transgenic mice, suggesting the activation of muscle BCAA metabolism by PGC-1α. In C2C12 cells, the overexpression of PGC-1α significantly increased the expression of BCAT2 and BCKDH but not BCKDK. Thus, PGC-1α in the skeletal muscle is considered to significantly contribute to BCAA metabolism. PMID:24638054

  13. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    PubMed

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action.

  14. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25940300

  15. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

  16. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Bhawna; Subramaniyan, Mayavan; Malhotra, Karan; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Potlakayala, Shobha Devi; Kumar, Shashi

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  17. FAst MEtabolizer (FAME): A rapid and accurate predictor of sites of metabolism in multiple species by endogenous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kirchmair, Johannes; Williamson, Mark J; Afzal, Avid M; Tyzack, Jonathan D; Choy, Alison P K; Howlett, Andrew; Rydberg, Patrik; Glen, Robert C

    2013-11-25

    FAst MEtabolizer (FAME) is a fast and accurate predictor of sites of metabolism (SoMs). It is based on a collection of random forest models trained on diverse chemical data sets of more than 20 000 molecules annotated with their experimentally determined SoMs. Using a comprehensive set of available data, FAME aims to assess metabolic processes from a holistic point of view. It is not limited to a specific enzyme family or species. Besides a global model, dedicated models are available for human, rat, and dog metabolism; specific prediction of phase I and II metabolism is also supported. FAME is able to identify at least one known SoM among the top-1, top-2, and top-3 highest ranked atom positions in up to 71%, 81%, and 87% of all cases tested, respectively. These prediction rates are comparable to or better than SoM predictors focused on specific enzyme families (such as cytochrome P450s), despite the fact that FAME uses only seven chemical descriptors. FAME covers a very broad chemical space, which together with its inter- and extrapolation power makes it applicable to a wide range of chemicals. Predictions take less than 2.5 s per molecule in batch mode on an Ultrabook. Results are visualized using Jmol, with the most likely SoMs highlighted. PMID:24219364

  18. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  19. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1: Is It the Link between Sulfur Amino Acids and Lipid Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Poloni, Soraia; Blom, Henk J; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2015-06-03

    An association between sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine, homocysteine and taurine) and lipid metabolism has been described in several experimental and population-based studies. Changes in the metabolism of these amino acids influence serum lipoprotein concentrations, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. However, recent evidence has suggested that the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) may be the link between these two metabolic pathways. SCD-1 is a key enzyme for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Its main substrates C16:0 and C18:0 and products palmitoleic acid (C16:1) and oleic acid (C18:1) are the most abundant fatty acids in triglycerides, cholesterol esters and membrane phospholipids. A significant suppression of SCD-1 has been observed in several animal models with disrupted sulfur amino acid metabolism, and the activity of SCD-1 is also associated with the levels of these amino acids in humans. This enzyme also appears to be involved in the etiology of metabolic syndromes because its suppression results in decreased fat deposits (regardless of food intake), improved insulin sensitivity and higher basal energy expenditure. Interestingly, this anti-obesogenic phenotype has also been described in humans and animals with sulfur amino acid disorders, which is consistent with the hypothesis that SCD-1 activity is influenced by these amino acids, in particularly cysteine, which is a strong and independent predictor of SCD-1 activity and fat storage. In this narrative review, we discuss the evidence linking sulfur amino acids, SCD-1 and lipid metabolism.

  20. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  1. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  2. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A.; Beggs, Reena R.; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  3. Role of retinoic acid metabolizing cytochrome P450s, CYP26, in inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevison, Faith; Jing, Jing; Tripathy, Sasmita; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) and its active metabolite, all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), play critical roles in regulating the differentiation, growth and migration of immune cells. Similarly, as critical signaling molecules in the regulation of the cell cycle, retinoids are important in cancers. Concentrations of atRA are tightly regulated in tissues, predominantly by the availability of retinol, synthesis of atRA by ALDH1A enzymes and metabolism and clearance of atRA by CYP26 enzymes. The ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes are expressed in several cell types in the immune system and in cancer cells. In the immune system the ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes appear to modulate RA concentrations. Consequently, alterations in the activity of ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes are expected to change disease outcomes in inflammation. There is increasing evidence from various disease models of intestinal and skin inflammation that treatment with atRA has a positive effect on disease markers. However, whether aberrant atRA concentrations or atRA synthesis and metabolism play a role in inflammatory disease development and progression is not well understood. In cancers, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia and neuroblastoma, increasing intracellular concentrations of atRA appears to provide clinical benefit. Inhibition of the CYP26 enzymes to increase atRA concentrations and combat therapy resistance has been pursued as a drug target in these cancers. This chapter covers the current knowledge of how atRA and retinol regulate the immune system and inflammation, how retinol and atRA metabolism is altered in inflammation and cancer and what roles atRA metabolizing enzymes have in immune responses and cancers. PMID:26233912

  4. Increments and duplication events of enzymes and transcription factors influence metabolic and regulatory diversity in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  5. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  6. Increments and duplication events of enzymes and transcription factors influence metabolic and regulatory diversity in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected.

  7. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque. PMID:27545001

  8. Fatty acid metabolism: Implications for diet, genetic variation, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Gu, Zhennan; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.

    2014-01-01

    Cultures across the globe, especially Western societies, are burdened by chronic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Several factors, including diet, genetics, and sedentary lifestyle, are suspected culprits to the development and progression of these health maladies. Fatty acids are primary constituents of cellular physiology. Humans can acquire fatty acids by de novo synthesis from carbohydrate or protein sources or by dietary consumption. Importantly, regulation of their metabolism is critical to sustain balanced homeostasis, and perturbations of such can lead to the development of disease. Here, we review de novo and dietary fatty acid metabolism and highlight recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between dietary influences and genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism and their role in chronic diseases. PMID:24511462

  9. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  10. Metabolism and transport of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, D V; Tews, J K; Harper, A E; Suttie, J W

    1978-03-01

    gamma-Carboxyglutamic acid residues have beeh shown to be present in prothrombin, the other vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, and more recently in bone and kidney proteins. This amino acid is formed by a posttranslational vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of glutamyl residues in polypeptide precursors of these protens. It has now been demonstrated that this amino acid, either in the free or peptide-bound form, is not metabolically degraded by the rat, but is quantitatively excreted in the urine. In nephrectomized rats, the tissue concentration of intravenously administered gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is increased, but there is still no evidence of any oxidative metabolism of this amino acid. These amino acid is transported by kidney slices against a concentration gradient, but does not accumulate in liver, intestinal or brain tissues. Preliminary data suggest that gamma-carboxyglutamic acid may be concentrated by a carrier system different from that utilized by other amino acids. PMID:629998

  11. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Modifies Exercise-Induced Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David; Brogioli, Michael; Maier, Thomas; White, Andy; Waldron, Sarah; Rittweger, Jörn; Toigo, Marco; Wettstein, Jessica; Laczko, Endre; Flück, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A silencer region (I-allele) within intron 16 of the gene for the regulator of vascular perfusion, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is implicated in phenotypic variation of aerobic fitness and the development of type II diabetes. We hypothesised that the reportedly lower aerobic performance in non-carriers compared to carriers of the ACE I-allele, i.e. ACE-DD vs. ACE-ID/ACE-II genotype, is associated with alterations in activity-induced glucose metabolism and capillarisation in exercise muscle. Methods Fifty-three, not-specifically trained Caucasian men carried out a one-legged bout of cycling exercise to exhaustion and/or participated in a marathon, the aim being to identify and validate genotype effects on exercise metabolism. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER), serum glucose and lipid concentration, glycogen, and metabolite content in vastus lateralis muscle based on ultra-performance lipid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), were assessed before and after the cycling exercise in thirty-three participants. Serum metabolites were measured in forty subjects that completed the marathon. Genotype effects were assessed post-hoc. Results Cycling exercise reduced muscle glycogen concentration and this tended to be affected by the ACE I-allele (p = 0.09). The ACE-DD genotype showed a lower maximal RER and a selective increase in serum glucose concentration after exercise compared to ACE-ID and ACE-II genotypes (+24% vs. +2% and –3%, respectively). Major metabolites of mitochondrial metabolism (i.e. phosphoenol pyruvate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, L-Aspartic acid, glutathione) were selectively affected in vastus lateralis muscle by exercise in the ACE-DD genotype. Capillary-to-fibre ratio was 24%-lower in the ACE-DD genotype. Individuals with the ACE-DD genotype demonstrated an abnormal increase in serum glucose to 7.7 mM after the marathon. Conclusion The observations imply a genetically modulated role for ACE in control of

  12. The genes and enzymes of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are a heterogeneous group of plant isoprenoids primarily involved in photosynthesis. In plants the cleavage of carotenoids leads to the formation of the phytohormones abscisic acid and strigolactone, and C13-norisoprenoids involved in the characteristic flavour and aroma compounds in flowers and fruits and are of specific importance in the varietal character of grapes and wine. This work extends the previous reports of carotenoid gene expression and photosynthetic pigment analysis by providing an up-to-date pathway analysis and an important framework for the analysis of carotenoid metabolic pathways in grapevine. Results Comparative genomics was used to identify 42 genes putatively involved in carotenoid biosynthesis/catabolism in grapevine. The genes are distributed on 16 of the 19 chromosomes and have been localised to the physical map of the heterozygous ENTAV115 grapevine sequence. Nine of the genes occur as single copies whereas the rest of the carotenoid metabolic genes have more than one paralogue. The cDNA copies of eleven corresponding genes from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Pinotage were characterised, and four where shown to be functional. Microarrays provided expression profiles of 39 accessions in the metabolic pathway during three berry developmental stages in Sauvignon blanc, whereas an optimised HPLC analysis provided the concentrations of individual carotenoids. This provides evidence of the functioning of the lutein epoxide cycle and the respective genes in grapevine. Similarly, orthologues of genes leading to the formation of strigolactone involved in shoot branching inhibition were identified: CCD7, CCD8 and MAX1. Moreover, the isoforms typically have different expression patterns, confirming the complex regulation of the pathway. Of particular interest is the expression pattern of the three VvNCEDs: Our results support previous findings that VvNCED3 is likely the isoform linked to ABA content in berries. Conclusions The

  13. The effect of aspartame on the activity of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tutelyan, V A; Kravchenko, L V; Kuzmina, E E

    1990-01-01

    Male, Wistar rats were administered aspartame (40 or 4000 mg/kg body weight) in their diet for 90 days. By 45 days, the activities of three microsomal enzymes, epoxide hydrolase, carboxylesterase, and p-nitrophenyl-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, were significantly increased in rats consuming 4000 mg/kg of aspartame. By 90 days, however, the activity of the xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes of the rats given aspartame did not differ significantly from the activity of control animals. From these results, we conclude that the consumption of aspartame does not substantially alter the function of the hepatic microsomal enzymes which protect the organism from foreign compounds found in its environment and food.

  14. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets--"Sand Out and Gold Stays".

    PubMed

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: (1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune, and other tissues; (2) our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, and histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and (3) histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization/ differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of "Sand out and Gold stays," where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity. PMID:26746407

  15. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  16. Indoleacetic Acid and the Synthesis of Glucanases and Pectic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Datko, Anne Harmon; Maclachlan, G. A.

    1968-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA) and/or inhibitors of DNA, RNA or protein synthesis were added to the apex of decapitated seedlings of Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska. At various times up to 4 days, enzymic protein was extracted from a segment of epicotyl immediately below the apex and assayed for its ability to hydrolyse polysaccharides or their derivatives. With the exception of amylase, the total amounts per segment of all of the tested enzymes increased due to IAA treatment. The development of β-1,4-glucanase (cellulase) activity per unit of protein or fresh weight proceeded according to a typical sigmoid induction curve. Pectinase was formed for about 2 days in control segments and IAA treatment resulted in continued synthesis for at least another 2 days provided cell division took place. β-1,3-glucanase and pectinesterase activities were only enhanced by IAA to the extent that total protein levels increased. Reaction mechanisms for these effects and functions for the enzymes during growth are discussed. PMID:16656834

  17. Discovery of the curcumin metabolic pathway involving a unique enzyme in an intestinal microorganism.

    PubMed

    Hassaninasab, Azam; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2011-04-19

    Polyphenol curcumin, a yellow pigment, derived from the rhizomes of a plant (Curcuma longa Linn) is a natural antioxidant exhibiting a variety of pharmacological activities and therapeutic properties. It has long been used as a traditional medicine and as a preservative and coloring agent in foods. Here, curcumin-converting microorganisms were isolated from human feces, the one exhibiting the highest activity being identified as Escherichia coli. We are thus unique in discovering that E. coli was able to act on curcumin. The curcumin-converting enzyme was purified from E. coli and characterized. The native enzyme had a molecular mass of about 82 kDa and consisted of two identical subunits. The enzyme has a narrow substrate spectrum, preferentially acting on curcumin. The microbial metabolism of curcumin by the purified enzyme was found to comprise a two-step reduction, curcumin being converted NADPH-dependently into an intermediate product, dihydrocurcumin, and then the end product, tetrahydrocurcumin. We named this enzyme "NADPH-dependent curcumin/dihydrocurcumin reductase" (CurA). The gene (curA) encoding this enzyme was also identified. A homology search with the BLAST program revealed that a unique enzyme involved in curcumin metabolism belongs to the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. PMID:21467222

  18. Metabolic engineering of carbon and redox flow in the production of small organic acids.

    PubMed

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; Li, Wei; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2015-03-01

    The review describes efforts toward metabolic engineering of production of organic acids. One aspect of the strategy involves the generation of an appropriate amount and type of reduced cofactor needed for the designed pathway. The ability to capture reducing power in the proper form, NADH or NADPH for the biosynthetic reactions leading to the organic acid, requires specific attention in designing the host and also depends on the feedstock used and cell energetic requirements for efficient metabolism during production. Recent work on the formation and commercial uses of a number of small mono- and diacids is discussed with redox differences, major biosynthetic precursors and engineering strategies outlined. Specific attention is given to those acids that are used in balancing cell redox or providing reduction equivalents for the cell, such as formate, which can be used in conjunction with metabolic engineering of other products to improve yields. Since a number of widely studied acids derived from oxaloacetate as an important precursor, several of these acids are covered with the general strategies and particular components summarized, including succinate, fumarate and malate. Since malate and fumarate are less reduced than succinate, the availability of reduction equivalents and level of aerobiosis are important parameters in optimizing production of these compounds in various hosts. Several other more oxidized acids are also discussed as in some cases, they may be desired products or their formation is minimized to afford higher yields of more reduced products. The placement and connections among acids in the typical central metabolic network are presented along with the use of a number of specific non-native enzymes to enhance routes to high production, where available alternative pathways and strategies are discussed. While many organic acids are derived from a few precursors within central metabolism, each organic acid has its own special requirements for high

  19. Enzymes involved in crotonate metabolism in Syntrophomonas wolfei

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.; Wofford, N.Q.

    1992-12-31

    Cell-free extracts of Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. wolfei grown with crotonate in pure culture or in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei contained crotonyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase activity. This activity was not detected in cell-free extracts from the butyrate-grown coculture which suggests that the long lag times observed before S. wolfei grew with crotonate were initially due to the inability to activate crotonate. Cell-free extracts of S. wolfei grown in pure culture contained high specific activities of hydrogenase and very low levels of formate dehydrogenase. The low levels suggest a biosynthetic rather than a catabolic role for the latter enzyme when S. wolfei is grown in pure culture. CO dehydrogenase activity was not detected. S. wolfei can form butyrate using a CoA transferase activity, but not by a phosphotransbutyrylase or enoate reductase activity. A c-type cytochrome was detected in S. wolfei grown in pure culture or in coculture indicating the presence of an electron transport system. This is a characteristic which separates S. wolfei from other known crotonate-using bacteria.

  20. Elasticity analysis and design for large metabolic responses produced by changes in enzyme activities.

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Fernando; Acerenza, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis has been extensively used to describe how the sensitivity properties of the component enzymes in a metabolic pathway (represented by the elasticity coefficients) determine the way in which metabolic variables respond (described by the control coefficients). Similarly, metabolic control design addresses the inverse problem of obtaining the sensitivity properties of the component enzymes that are required for the system to show a pre-established pattern of responses. These formalisms, including what is called elasticity analysis and design, were developed for small, strictly speaking infinitesimal, changes. Here we extend them to large metabolic responses. The new approach can be applied to simple two-step pathways or to any arbitrary metabolic system divided into two groups linked by one intermediate. General expressions that relate control and elasticity coefficients for large changes are derived. Concentration and flux connectivity relationships are obtained. The relationships for large changes indicate that the pattern of responses is not necessarily the same as the one obtained with the traditional infinitesimal approach, in some cases the patterns being qualitatively different. The general analysis is used to study the control of ketogenesis in rat liver mitochondria, starting from data available in the literature. The control profile of the pathway subject to large changes shows both quantitative and qualitative differences from the one obtained from an analysis that is performed with infinitesimal coefficients. This exemplifies the type of errors that may be introduced when drawing conclusions about large metabolic responses from results obtained with an infinitesimal treatment. PMID:12084013

  1. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.

  2. Metabolic changes associated with tumor metastasis, part 2: Mitochondria, lipid and amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Porporato, Paolo E; Payen, Valéry L; Baselet, Bjorn; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic alterations are a hallmark of cancer controlling tumor progression and metastasis. Among the various metabolic phenotypes encountered in tumors, this review focuses on the contributions of mitochondria, lipid and amino acid metabolism to the metastatic process. Tumor cells require functional mitochondria to grow, proliferate and metastasize, but shifts in mitochondrial activities confer pro-metastatic traits encompassing increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS), enhanced resistance to apoptosis and the increased or de novo production of metabolic intermediates of the TCA cycle behaving as oncometabolites, including succinate, fumarate, and D-2-hydroxyglutarate that control energy production, biosynthesis and the redox state. Lipid metabolism and the metabolism of amino acids, such as glutamine, glutamate and proline are also currently emerging as focal control points of cancer metastasis.

  3. Tumour-selective targeting of drug metabolizing enzymes to treat metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wierdl, Monika; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Hatfield, M Jason; Potter, Philip M

    2016-10-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are ubiquitous enzymes responsible for the detoxification of ester-containing xenobiotics. This hydrolysis reaction results in the formation of the corresponding carboxylic acid and alcohol. Due to their highly plastic active site, CEs can hydrolyze structurally very distinct and complex molecules. Because ester groups significantly increase the water solubility of compounds, they are frequently used in the pharmaceutical industry to make relatively insoluble compounds more bioavailable. By default, this results in CEs playing a major role in the distribution and metabolism of these esterified drugs. However, this can be exploited to selectively improve compound hydrolysis, and using specific in vivo targeting techniques can be employed to generate enhanced drug activity. Here, we seek to detail the human CEs involved in esterified molecule hydrolysis, compare and contrast these with CEs present in small mammals and describe novel methods to improve drug therapy by specific delivery of CEs to cells in vivo. Finally, we will discuss the development of such approaches for their potential application towards malignant disease.

  4. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F.; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M.; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M.; Agbo, Eddy C.; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo 13C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast. PMID:23898325

  5. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M; Agbo, Eddy C; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo (13)C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast.

  6. Relevance of drug metabolizing enzyme activity modulation by tea polyphenols in the inhibition of esophageal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Maliakal, Pius; Sankpal, Umesh T; Basha, Riyaz; Maliakal, Cima; Ledford, Andrea; Wanwimolruk, Sompon

    2011-09-01

    Tea is a popular, socially accepted, drink that is enjoyed by millions of people. A growing body of evidence suggests that moderate consumption of tea may protect against several forms of cancer. It is also known that bioactivation of precarcinogens and detoxification of ultimate carcinogens is carried out mainly by drug metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP). The present study investigates the effect of tea consumption on modulating CYP and phase II conjugating enzymes, and their association in the chemopreventive effect against esophageal tumorigenesis using both in vitro and in vivo techniques. Female Wistar rats were given aqueous solutions (2% w/v) of six different teas, standard green tea extract (GTE) (0.5% w/v), and dandelion tea (2% w/v) as the sole source of fluid for two weeks prior to and during the entire period of tumour induction (12 weeks). Animals were gavaged with 0.5 mg/kg N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA) twice weekly for 12 weeks for esophageal tumor induction and the activities of different CYP isoforms and phase II enzymes were determined in the liver microsomes or cytosols. GTE, green tea and Dandelion tea caused decrease in tumour multiplication, tumour size and tumour volume; however, none of these tea preparations altered tumour incidence. No appreciable changes in drug metabolizing enzyme activity were observed in the treatment groups. Thus, the modulations in the activities of CYP 1A1/ 1A2 and CYP2E enzymes, by pre-treatment with green and dandelion teas, observed in our earlier experiments, seem to be compensated by the tumor inducing agent, NMBA. The balance between phase I carcinogen-activating enzymes and phase II detoxifying enzymes could be important in determining the risk of developing chemically-induced cancer and the present study in conjunction with the previous observations suggest a possible role of drug metabolizing enzymes in the anticancer effect of tea.

  7. Comparative investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the first NAT cloned and characterized from fun...

  8. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF CHANGES IN XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM ENZYME EXPRESSION DURING AGING USING COMPREHENSIVE TRANSCRIPT PROFILING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging leads to changes in the expression of enzymes and transporters important in the metabolism and fate of xenobiotics in liver, kidney and intestine. Most notable are the changes in a number of CYP and xenobiotic transporter genes regulated by the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR an...

  10. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  11. Combinatorial Effects of Fatty Acid Elongase Enzymes on Nervonic Acid Production in Camelina sativa

    PubMed Central

    Huai, Dongxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) with chain lengths of 20 carbons and longer provide feedstocks for various applications; therefore, improvement of VLCFA contents in seeds has become an important goal for oilseed enhancement. VLCFA biosynthesis is controlled by a multi-enzyme protein complex referred to as fatty acid elongase, which is composed of β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), β-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase (HCD) and enoyl reductase (ECR). KCS has been identified as the rate-limiting enzyme, but little is known about the involvement of other three enzymes in VLCFA production. Here, the combinatorial effects of fatty acid elongase enzymes on VLCFA production were assessed by evaluating the changes in nervonic acid content. A KCS gene from Lunaria annua (LaKCS) and the other three elongase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were used for the assessment. Five seed-specific expressing constructs, including LaKCS alone, LaKCS with AtKCR, LaKCS with AtHCD, LaKCS with AtECR, and LaKCS with AtKCR and AtHCD, were transformed into Camelina sativa. The nervonic acid content in seed oil increased from null in wild type camelina to 6-12% in LaKCS-expressing lines. However, compared with that from the LaKCS-expressing lines, nervonic acid content in mature seeds from the co-expressing lines with one or two extra elongase genes did not show further increases. Nervonic acid content from LaKCS, AtKCR and AtHCD co-expressing line was significantly higher than that in LaKCS-expressing line during early seed development stage, while the ultimate nervonic acid content was not significantly altered. The results from this study thus provide useful information for future engineering of oilseed crops for higher VLCFA production. PMID:26121034

  12. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  13. [Effect of Low-Intensity 900 MHz Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation on Rat Brain Enzyme Activities Linked to Energy Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, M S; Nersesova, L S; Gazaryants, M G; Meliksetyan, G O; Malakyan, M G; Bajinyan, S A; Akopian, J I

    2015-01-01

    The research deals with the effect of low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR), power density 25 μW/cm2, on the following rat brain and blood serum enzyme activities: creatine kinase (CK), playing a central role in the process of storing and distributing the cell energy, as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) that play a key role in providing the conjunction of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. The comparative analysis of the changes in the enzyme activity studied at different times following the two-hour single, as well as fractional, radiation equivalent of the total time showed that the most radiosensitive enzyme is the brain creatine kinase, which may then be recommended as a marker of the radio frequency radiation impact. According to the analysis of the changing dynamics of the CK, ALT and AST activity level, with time these changes acquire the adaptive character and are directed to compensate the damaged cell energy metabolism.

  14. The effect of exogenous calcium on mitochondria, respiratory metabolism enzymes and ion transport in cucumber roots under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    He, Lizhong; Li, Bin; Lu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Lingyun; Yang, Yanjuan; Yuan, Yinghui; Du, Jing; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia induces plant stress, particularly in cucumber plants under hydroponic culture. In plants, calcium is involved in stress signal transmission and growth. The ultimate goal of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous calcium on the mitochondrial antioxidant system, the activity of respiratory metabolism enzymes, and ion transport in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No. 2) roots under hypoxic conditions. Our experiments revealed that exogenous calcium reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria under hypoxia. Exogenous calcium also enhances the accumulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We utilized fluorescence and ultrastructural cytochemistry methods to observe that exogenous calcium increases the concentrations of Ca2+ and K+ in root cells by increasing the activity of plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and tonoplast H+-ATPase and H+-PPase. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxic stress has an immediate and substantial effect on roots. Exogenous calcium improves metabolism and ion transport in cucumber roots, thereby increasing hypoxia tolerance in cucumber. PMID:26304855

  15. The effect of exogenous calcium on mitochondria, respiratory metabolism enzymes and ion transport in cucumber roots under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    He, Lizhong; Li, Bin; Lu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Lingyun; Yang, Yanjuan; Yuan, Yinghui; Du, Jing; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia induces plant stress, particularly in cucumber plants under hydroponic culture. In plants, calcium is involved in stress signal transmission and growth. The ultimate goal of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous calcium on the mitochondrial antioxidant system, the activity of respiratory metabolism enzymes, and ion transport in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No. 2) roots under hypoxic conditions. Our experiments revealed that exogenous calcium reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria under hypoxia. Exogenous calcium also enhances the accumulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We utilized fluorescence and ultrastructural cytochemistry methods to observe that exogenous calcium increases the concentrations of Ca(2+) and K(+) in root cells by increasing the activity of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase and tonoplast H(+)-ATPase and H(+)-PPase. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxic stress has an immediate and substantial effect on roots. Exogenous calcium improves metabolism and ion transport in cucumber roots, thereby increasing hypoxia tolerance in cucumber. PMID:26304855

  16. Exogenous cannabinoids as substrates, inhibitors, and inducers of human drug metabolizing enzymes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stout, Stephen M; Cimino, Nina M

    2014-02-01

    Exogenous cannabinoids are structurally and pharmacologically diverse compounds that are widely used. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the data characterizing the potential for these compounds to act as substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of human drug metabolizing enzymes, with the aim of clarifying the significance of these properties in clinical care and drug interactions. In vitro data were identified that characterize cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450) enzymes as potential significant contributors to the primary metabolism of several exogenous cannabinoids: tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; CYPs 2C9, 3A4); cannabidiol (CBD; CYPs 2C19, 3A4); cannabinol (CBN; CYPs 2C9, 3A4); JWH-018 (CYPs 1A2, 2C9); and AM2201 (CYPs 1A2, 2C9). CYP-450 enzymes may also contribute to the secondary metabolism of THC, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases have been identified as capable of catalyzing both primary (CBD, CBN) and secondary (THC, JWH-018, JWH-073) cannabinoid metabolism. Clinical pharmacogenetic data further support CYP2C9 as a significant contributor to THC metabolism, and a pharmacokinetic interaction study using ketoconazole with oromucosal cannabis extract further supports CYP3A4 as a significant metabolic pathway for THC and CBD. However, the absence of interaction between CBD from oromucosal cannabis extract with omeprazole suggests a less significant role of CYP2C19 in CBD metabolism. Studies of THC, CBD, and CBN inhibition and induction of major human CYP-450 isoforms generally reflect a low risk of clinically significant drug interactions with most use, but specific human data are lacking. Smoked cannabis herb (marijuana) likely induces CYP1A2 mediated theophylline metabolism, although the role of cannabinoids specifically in eliciting this effect is questionable.

  17. Boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Fang, H; Sun, Jie; Wang, H; Liu, A; Sun, J; Wu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Since Bortezomib was approved by US FDA as the first drug to treat multiple myeloma, various boronic acid compounds have been developed as enzyme inhibitors. This paper reviewed the progress of boronic acid-based inhibitors against enzymes including proteasome, serine protease, HDACs and other enzymes in the past decade.

  18. Regional variation in muscle metabolic enzymes in individual American shad (Alosa sapidissima)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, J.B.K.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the activity of metabolic enzymes is often used to asses metabolic capacity at the tissue level, but the amount of regional variability within a tissue in an individual fish of a given species is frequently unknown. The activities of four enzymes (citrate synthase (CS), phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ??-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) were assayed in red and white muscle at 10 sites along the body of adult American shad (Alosa sapidissima). Red and white muscle HOAD and white muscle CS and LDH varied significantly, generally increasing posteriorly. Maximal variation occurs in red muscle HOAD (~450%) and white muscle LDH (~60%) activity. Differences between the sexes also vary with sampling location. This study suggests that the variability in enzyme activity may be linked to functional differences in the muscle at different locations, and also provides guidelines for sample collection in this species.

  19. Decreased consumption of branched chain amino acids improves metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Kasza, Ildiko; Schmidt, Brian A.; Cava, Edda; Spelta, Francesco; Tosti, Valeria; Syed, Faizan A.; Baar, Emma L.; Veronese, Nicola; Cottrell, Sara E.; Fenske, Rachel J.; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Brar, Harpreet K.; Pietka, Terri; Bullock, Arnold D.; Figenshau, Robert S.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Merrins, Matthew J.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Kimple, Michelle E.; Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Protein restricted, high carbohydrate diets improve metabolic health in rodents, yet the precise dietary components that are responsible for these effects have not been identified. Further, the applicability of these studies to humans is unclear. Here, we demonstrate in a randomized controlled trial that a moderately protein restricted (PR) diet also improves markers of metabolic health in humans. Intriguingly, we find that feeding mice a diet specifically reduced in branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) is sufficient to improve glucose tolerance and body composition equivalently to a PR diet, via metabolically distinct pathways. Our results highlight a critical role for dietary quality at the level of amino acids in the maintenance of metabolic health, and suggest that diets specifically reduced in BCAAs, or pharmacological interventions in this pathway, may offer a translatable way to achieve many of the metabolic benefits of a PR diet. PMID:27346343

  20. Odorant metabolism catalyzed by olfactory mucosal enzymes influences peripheral olfactory responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Veloso Da Silva, Stéphanie; Jakob, Ingrid; Sicard, Gilles; Chevalier, Joëlle; Ménétrier, Franck; Berdeaux, Olivier; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie; Le Bon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    A large set of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), esterases and transferases, are highly expressed in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM). These enzymes are known to catalyze the biotransformation of exogenous compounds to facilitate elimination. However, the functions of these enzymes in the olfactory epithelium are not clearly understood. In addition to protecting against inhaled toxic compounds, these enzymes could also metabolize odorant molecules, and thus modify their stimulating properties or inactivate them. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro biotransformation of odorant molecules in the rat OM and assessed the impact of this metabolism on peripheral olfactory responses. Rat OM was found to efficiently metabolize quinoline, coumarin and isoamyl acetate. Quinoline and coumarin are metabolized by CYPs whereas isoamyl acetate is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases. Electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings revealed that the hydroxylated metabolites derived from these odorants elicited lower olfactory response amplitudes than the parent molecules. We also observed that glucurono-conjugated derivatives induced no olfactory signal. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the local application of a CYP inhibitor on rat olfactory epithelium increased EOG responses elicited by quinoline and coumarin. Similarly, the application of a carboxylesterase inhibitor increased the EOG response elicited by isoamyl acetate. This increase in EOG amplitude provoked by XME inhibitors is likely due to enhanced olfactory sensory neuron activation in response to odorant accumulation. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that biotransformation of odorant molecules by enzymes localized to the olfactory mucosa may change the odorant's stimulating properties and may facilitate the clearance of odorants to avoid receptor saturation. PMID:23555703

  1. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Roberto, Francisco F; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-20

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  2. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Apel, William A.; Reed, David William; Lee, Brady D.; Thompson, David N.; Roberto, Francisco F.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-29

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  3. Genetic background of uric acid metabolism in a patient with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Petru, Lenka; Pavelcova, Katerina; Sebesta, Ivan; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2016-09-01

    Hyperuricemia depends on the balance of endogenous production and renal excretion of uric acid. Transporters for urate are located in the proximal tubule where uric acid is secreted and extensively reabsorbed: secretion is principally ensured by the highly variable ABCG2 gene. Enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) plays a central role in purine metabolism and its deficiency is an X-linked inherited metabolic disorder associated with clinical manifestations of purine overproduction. Here we report the case of a middle-aged man with severe chronic tophaceous gout with a poor response to allopurinol and requiring repeated surgical intervention. We identified the causal mutations in the HPRT1 gene, variant c.481G>T (p.A161S), and in the crucial urate transporter ABCG2, a heterozygous variant c.421C>A (p.Q141K). This case shows the value of an analysis of the genetic background of serum uric acid. PMID:27288985

  4. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  5. Mitochondrial regulators of fatty acid metabolism reflect metabolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Fritz, Tomas; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna; Osler, Megan E

    2012-02-01

    The delicate homeostatic balance between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in relation to whole-body energy regulation is influenced by mitochondrial function. We determined expression and regulation of mitochondrial enzymes including pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) 4, PDK2, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase in skeletal muscle from people with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from NGT (n = 79) or T2DM (n = 33) men and women matched for age and body mass index. A subset of participants participated in a 4-month lifestyle intervention program consisting of an unsupervised walking exercise. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for expression and DNA methylation status. Primary myotubes were derived from biopsies obtained from NGT individuals for metabolic studies. Cultured skeletal muscle was exposed to agents mimicking exercise activation for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression analysis. The mRNA expression of PDK4, PDK2, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase was increased in skeletal muscle from T2DM patients. Methylation of the PDK4 promoter was reduced in T2DM and inversely correlated with PDK4 expression. Moreover, PDK4 expression was positively correlated with body mass index, blood glucose, insulin, C peptide, and hemoglobin A(1c). A lifestyle intervention program resulted in increased PDK4 mRNA expression in NGT individuals, but not in those with T2DM. Exposure to caffeine or palmitate increased PDK4 mRNA in a cultured skeletal muscle system. Our findings reveal that skeletal muscle expression of PDK4 and related genes regulating mitochondrial function reflects alterations in substrate utilization and clinical features associated with T2DM. Furthermore, hypomethylation of the PDK4 promoter in T2DM coincided with an impaired response of PDK4 mRNA after exercise. PMID:21816445

  6. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  7. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  8. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, Satish C; Bier, Dennis M

    2008-01-01

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, thermogenesis, and a significant change in the mobilization and use of oxidative substrates. The development of safe, stable isotopic tracer methods has allowed the study of protein and amino acid metabolism not only in the healthy newborn but also in those born prematurely and of low birth weight. These studies have identified the unique and quantitative aspects of amino acid/protein metabolism in the neonate, thus contributing to rational nutritional care of these babies. The present review summarizes the contemporary data on some of the significant developments in essential and dispensable amino acids and their relationship to overall protein metabolism. Specifically, the recent data of kinetics of leucine, phenylalanine, glutamine, sulfur amino acid, and threonine and their relation to whole-body protein turnover are presented. Finally, the physiological rationale and the impact of nutrient (amino acids) interventions on the dynamics of protein metabolism are discussed.

  9. Resveratrol modulates drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in a healthy volunteer study.

    PubMed

    Chow, H-H Sherry; Garland, Linda L; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Vining, Donna R; Chew, Wade M; Miller, Jessica A; Perloff, Marjorie; Crowell, James A; Alberts, David S

    2010-09-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to exhibit cancer-preventive activities in preclinical studies. We conducted a clinical study to determine the effect of pharmacologic doses of resveratrol on drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. Forty-two healthy volunteers underwent baseline assessment of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and phase II detoxification enzymes. CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 enzyme activities were measured by the metabolism of caffeine, dextromethorphan, losartan, and buspirone, respectively. Blood lymphocyte glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and GST-pi level and serum total and direct bilirubin, a surrogate for UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) 1A1 activity, were measured to assess phase II enzymes. After the baseline evaluation, study participants took 1 g of resveratrol once daily for 4 weeks. Enzyme assessment was repeated upon intervention completion. Resveratrol intervention was found to inhibit the phenotypic indices of CYP3A4, CYP2D6, and CYP2C9 and to induce the phenotypic index of 1A2. Overall, GST and UGT1A1 activities were minimally affected by the intervention, although an induction of GST-pi level and UGT1A1 activity was observed in individuals with low baseline enzyme level/activity. We conclude that resveratrol can modulate enzyme systems involved in carcinogen activation and detoxification, which may be one mechanism by which resveratrol inhibits carcinogenesis. However, pharmacologic doses of resveratrol could potentially lead to increased adverse drug reactions or altered drug efficacy due to inhibition or induction of certain CYPs. Further clinical development of resveratrol for cancer prevention should consider evaluation of lower doses of resveratrol to minimize adverse metabolic drug interactions. PMID:20716633

  10. Metabolic Pathways of Inhaled Glucocorticoids by the CYP3A Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Chad D.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Orton, Christopher R.; Murai, Takahiro; Fidler, Trevor P.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Ward, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, for which the mainstay treatment has been inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs). Despite the widespread use of these drugs, approximately 30% of asthma sufferers exhibit some degree of steroid insensitivity or are refractory to inhaled GCs. One hypothesis to explain this phenomenon is interpatient variability in the clearance of these compounds. The objective of this research is to determine how metabolism of GCs by the CYP3A family of enzymes could affect their effectiveness in asthmatic patients. In this work, the metabolism of four frequently prescribed inhaled GCs, triamcinolone acetonide, flunisolide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate, by the CYP3A family of enzymes was studied to identify differences in their rates of clearance and to identify their metabolites. Both interenzyme and interdrug variability in rates of metabolism and metabolic fate were observed. CYP3A4 was the most efficient metabolic catalyst for all the compounds, and CYP3A7 had the slowest rates. CYP3A5, which is particularly relevant to GC metabolism in the lungs, was also shown to efficiently metabolize triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate. In contrast, flunisolide was only metabolized via CYP3A4, with no significant turnover by CYP3A5 or CYP3A7. Common metabolites included 6β-hydroxylation and Δ6-dehydrogenation for triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and flunisolide. The structure of Δ6-flunisolide was unambiguously established by NMR analysis. Metabolism also occurred on the D-ring substituents, including the 21-carboxy metabolites for triamcinolone acetonide and flunisolide. The novel metabolite 21-nortriamcinolone acetonide was also identified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and NMR analysis. PMID:23143891

  11. Metabolic pathways of inhaled glucocorticoids by the CYP3A enzymes.

    PubMed

    Moore, Chad D; Roberts, Jessica K; Orton, Christopher R; Murai, Takahiro; Fidler, Trevor P; Reilly, Christopher A; Ward, Robert M; Yost, Garold S

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, for which the mainstay treatment has been inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs). Despite the widespread use of these drugs, approximately 30% of asthma sufferers exhibit some degree of steroid insensitivity or are refractory to inhaled GCs. One hypothesis to explain this phenomenon is interpatient variability in the clearance of these compounds. The objective of this research is to determine how metabolism of GCs by the CYP3A family of enzymes could affect their effectiveness in asthmatic patients. In this work, the metabolism of four frequently prescribed inhaled GCs, triamcinolone acetonide, flunisolide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate, by the CYP3A family of enzymes was studied to identify differences in their rates of clearance and to identify their metabolites. Both interenzyme and interdrug variability in rates of metabolism and metabolic fate were observed. CYP3A4 was the most efficient metabolic catalyst for all the compounds, and CYP3A7 had the slowest rates. CYP3A5, which is particularly relevant to GC metabolism in the lungs, was also shown to efficiently metabolize triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate. In contrast, flunisolide was only metabolized via CYP3A4, with no significant turnover by CYP3A5 or CYP3A7. Common metabolites included 6β-hydroxylation and Δ(6)-dehydrogenation for triamcinolone acetonide, budesonide, and flunisolide. The structure of Δ(6)-flunisolide was unambiguously established by NMR analysis. Metabolism also occurred on the D-ring substituents, including the 21-carboxy metabolites for triamcinolone acetonide and flunisolide. The novel metabolite 21-nortriamcinolone acetonide was also identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and NMR analysis. PMID:23143891

  12. Phytanic acid metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Ronald J A; Komen, Jasper; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2011-09-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a branched-chain fatty acid which cannot be beta-oxidized due to the presence of the first methyl group at the 3-position. Instead, phytanic acid undergoes alpha-oxidation to produce pristanic acid (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecanoic acid) plus CO(2). Pristanic acid is a 2-methyl branched-chain fatty acid which can undergo beta-oxidation via sequential cycles of beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and mitochondria. The mechanism of alpha-oxidation has been resolved in recent years as reviewed in this paper, although some of the individual enzymatic steps remain to be identified. Furthermore, much has been learned in recent years about the permeability properties of the peroxisomal membrane with important consequences for the alpha-oxidation process. Finally, we present new data on the omega-oxidation of phytanic acid making use of a recently generated mouse model for Refsum disease in which the gene encoding phytanoyl-CoA 2-hydroxylase has been disrupted.

  13. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  14. Comparative metabolic profiling reveals the key role of amino acids metabolism in the rapamycin overproduction by Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohua; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Huanhuan; Huang, Di; Wen, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Rapamycin is an important natural macrolide antibiotic with antifungal, immunosuppressive and anticancer activity produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. In this study, a mutant strain obtained by ultraviolet mutagenesis displayed higher rapamycin production capacity compared to the wild-type S. hygroscopicus ATCC 29253. To gain insights into the mechanism of rapamycin overproduction, comparative metabolic profiling between the wild-type and mutant strain was performed. A total of 86 metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pattern recognition methods, including principal component analysis, partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis, were employed to determine the key biomarkers. The results showed that 22 potential biomarkers were closely associated with the increase of rapamycin production and the tremendous metabolic difference was observed between the two strains. Furthermore, metabolic pathway analysis revealed that amino acids metabolism played an important role in the synthesis of rapamycin, especially lysine, valine, tryptophan, isoleucine, glutamate, arginine and ornithine. The inadequate supply of amino acids, or namely "nitrogen starvation" occurred in the mutant strain. Subsequently, the exogenous addition of amino acids into the fermentation medium of the mutant strain confirmed the above conclusion, and rapamycin production of the mutant strain increased to 426.7 mg/L after adding lysine, approximately 5.8-fold of that in the wild-type strain. Finally, the results of real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays demonstrated that dihydrodipicolinate synthase involved with lysine metabolism played vital role in the biosynthesis of rapamycin. These findings will provide a theoretical basis for further improving production of rapamycin.

  15. Biosynthesis and metabolism of retinoic acid: roles of CRBP and CRABP in retinoic acid: roles of CRBP and CRABP in retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1993-02-01

    The enzymes that constitute the pathway of retinoic acid biosynthesis and metabolism may recognize retinoid binding proteins as effectors and substrates. Apocellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) stimulates a bile-salt independent membrane-bound retinyl ester hydrolase resulting in the hydrolysis of endogenous retinyl esters and the formation of holoCRBP. HoloCRBP delivers retinol to a microsomal nicotin-amide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent dehydrogenase, protects it from artifactual oxidation and denies enzymes that cannot recognize the binding protein access to retinol. The retinal synthesized may be transferred from the microsomes to the cytosol by CRBP. A cytosolic retinal dehydrogenase has been purified that produces retinoic acid from retinal generated by microsomes in the presence of CRBP and from the complex CRBP-retinal itself. Thus, CRBP(type I) seems to channel retinoids through the reactions of retinoic acid synthesis via a series of protein-protein interactions. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (type I) facilitates retinoic acid metabolism by sequestering it and by acting as a low Km substrate, thereby also modulating the steady-state concentrations of retinoic acid. PMID:8381481

  16. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Stäubert, Claudia; Broom, Oliver Jay; Nordström, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them. We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation. We found HCA1 and HCA3 mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid β-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death. Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy. PMID:25839160

  17. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stäubert, Claudia; Broom, Oliver Jay; Nordström, Anders

    2015-08-14

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them.We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation.We found HCA1 and HCA3 mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid β-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death.Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy.

  18. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  19. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  20. Filament formation by metabolic enzymes is a specific adaptation to an advanced state of cellular starvation

    PubMed Central

    Petrovska, Ivana; Nüske, Elisabeth; Munder, Matthias C; Kulasegaran, Gayathrie; Malinovska, Liliana; Kroschwald, Sonja; Richter, Doris; Fahmy, Karim; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the key questions in biology is how the metabolism of a cell responds to changes in the environment. In budding yeast, starvation causes a drop in intracellular pH, but the functional role of this pH change is not well understood. Here, we show that the enzyme glutamine synthetase (Gln1) forms filaments at low pH and that filament formation leads to enzymatic inactivation. Filament formation by Gln1 is a highly cooperative process, strongly dependent on macromolecular crowding, and involves back-to-back stacking of cylindrical homo-decamers into filaments that associate laterally to form higher order fibrils. Other metabolic enzymes also assemble into filaments at low pH. Hence, we propose that filament formation is a general mechanism to inactivate and store key metabolic enzymes during a state of advanced cellular starvation. These findings have broad implications for understanding the interplay between nutritional stress, the metabolism and the physical organization of a cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02409.001 PMID:24771766

  1. Mcy protein, a potential antidiabetic agent: evaluation of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Marella, Saritha; Maddirela, Dilip Rajasekhar; Kumar, E G T V; Tilak, Thandaiah Krishna; Badri, Kameswara Rao; Chippada, Apparao

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to elucidate the long-term effects of anti-hyperglycemic active principle, Mcy protein (MCP), isolated from the fruits of Momordica cymbalaria on carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative stress in experimental diabetic rats. We used streptozotocin induced diabetic rats for the current studies. Our studies showed that MCP (2.5mg/kg.b.w) treatment significantly normalized the deranged activities of critical carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase. In addition MCP showed inhibitory activity on α-glucosidase and aldose reductase enzymes in in vitro assays. Further MCP treatment improved the antioxidant defensive mechanism by preventing deleterious oxidative products of cellular metabolism, which initiates the lipid peroxidation and by normalizing the antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) activities. Additional structural studies using circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that MCP contains majorly α-helix. Our findings suggest MCP regulates blood glucose and better manage diabetes mellitus associated complications by regulating carbohydrate metabolism and by protecting from the deleterious effects of oxidative stress. PMID:26826289

  2. Spore Germination and Carbon Metabolism in Fusarium solani V. Changes in Anaerobic Metabolism and Related Enzyme Activities during Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Vincent W.; Cochrane, Jean C.

    1966-01-01

    Macroconidia of Fusarium solani f. phascoli have no detectable capacity to respire glucose anaerobically; germinated spores and mycelium, on the other hand, ferment glucose, although slowly. Extracts of ungerminated spores contain hexokinase, phosphohexoisomerase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, triose phosphate dehydrogenase, triose phosphate isomerase, phosphoglyceric kinase, enolase, phosphoglyceric mutase, pyruvate kinase, and pyruvate decarboxylase. It follows, therefore, that the appearance of fermentative capacity during spore germination cannot be ascribed to the de novo synthesis of any of these enzymes. During germination and mycelial development the specific activity of all of the enzymes named except phosphohexoisomerase and aldolase increases 2- to 8-fold. Specific activity of all of the enzymes is substantially higher than the fermentative capacity of intact cells, i.e., none is limiting to anaerobic respiration. The enzymatic assay data are consistent with a conclusion reached earlier on the basis of studies of aerobic glucose metabolism, that the process of germination involves an acceleration of pre-existing metabolic systems rather than an appearance of new pathways. PMID:16656324

  3. Liver enzymes and metabolic syndrome: a large-scale case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ma, Xiangyu; Jiang, Zhi; Zhang, Kejun; Zhang, Mengxuan; Li, Yafei; Zhao, Xiaolan; Xiong, Hongyan

    2015-09-29

    Previous studies suggested that elevated liver enzymes could be used as potential novel biomarkers of Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its clinical outcomes, although the results were inconsistent and the conclusions were underpowered. A case-control study with 6,268 MetS subjects and 6,330 frequency-matched healthy controls was conducted to systematically evaluated levels of four liver enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT and ALP), both in overall populations and in subjects with normal liver enzymes, with MetS risk using both quartiles and continuous unit of liver enzymes. We found significant associations were detected for all above analyses. Compared with quartile 1 (Q1), other quartiles have significant higher MetS risk, with ORs ranging from 1.15 to 18.15. The highest effected was detected for GGT, for which the OR value for the highest versus lowest quartile was 18.15 (95% CI: 15.7-20.9). Mutual adjustment proved the independence of the relations for all four liver enzymes. Sensitivity analyses didn't materially changed the trend. To the best of our knowledge, this study should be the largest, which aimed at evaluating the association between liver enzymes measures and MetS risk. The results can better support that liver enzyme levels could be used as clinical predictors of MetS.

  4. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  5. Characterization of two Streptomyces enzymes that convert ferulic acid to vanillin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenwen; Tang, Hongzhi; Ni, Jun; Wu, Qiulin; Hua, Dongliang; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Production of flavors from natural substrates by microbial transformation has become a growing and expanding field of study over the past decades. Vanillin, a major component of vanilla flavor, is a principal flavoring compound used worldwide. Streptomyces sp. strain V-1 is known to be one of the most promising microbial producers of natural vanillin from ferulic acid. Although identification of the microbial genes involved in the biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin has been previously reported, purification and detailed characterization of the corresponding enzymes with important functions have rarely been studied. In this study, we isolated and identified 2 critical genes, fcs and ech, encoding feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase, respectively, which are involved in the vanillin production from ferulic acid. Both genes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resting cell reactions for converting ferulic acid to vanillin were performed. The corresponding crucial enzymes, Fcs and Ech, were purified for the first time and the enzymatic activity of each purified protein was studied. Furthermore, Fcs was comprehensively characterized, at an optimal pH of 7.0 and temperature of 30°C. Kinetic constants for Fcs revealed the apparent Km, kcat, and Vmax values to be 0.35 mM, 67.7 s(-1), and 78.2 U mg(-1), respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) value of Fcs was 193.4 mM(-1) s(-1) for ferulic acid. The characterization of Fcs and Ech may be helpful for further research in the field of enzymatic engineering and metabolic regulation.

  6. Characterization of Two Streptomyces Enzymes That Convert Ferulic Acid to Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenwen; Tang, Hongzhi; Ni, Jun; Wu, Qiulin; Hua, Dongliang; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Production of flavors from natural substrates by microbial transformation has become a growing and expanding field of study over the past decades. Vanillin, a major component of vanilla flavor, is a principal flavoring compound used worldwide. Streptomyces sp. strain V-1 is known to be one of the most promising microbial producers of natural vanillin from ferulic acid. Although identification of the microbial genes involved in the biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin has been previously reported, purification and detailed characterization of the corresponding enzymes with important functions have rarely been studied. In this study, we isolated and identified 2 critical genes, fcs and ech, encoding feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase, respectively, which are involved in the vanillin production from ferulic acid. Both genes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resting cell reactions for converting ferulic acid to vanillin were performed. The corresponding crucial enzymes, Fcs and Ech, were purified for the first time and the enzymatic activity of each purified protein was studied. Furthermore, Fcs was comprehensively characterized, at an optimal pH of 7.0 and temperature of 30°C. Kinetic constants for Fcs revealed the apparent Km, kcat, and Vmax values to be 0.35 mM, 67.7 s−1, and 78.2 U mg−1, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) value of Fcs was 193.4 mM−1 s−1 for ferulic acid. The characterization of Fcs and Ech may be helpful for further research in the field of enzymatic engineering and metabolic regulation. PMID:23840666

  7. Stereochemical course, isotope effects, and enzyme inhibitor studies of glaucine metabolism in fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial transformation of the aporphine alkaloid glaucine by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030) proceeds with complete substrate stereoselectivity. The fungus F. solani metabolizes only S-(+)-glaucine (1) to dehydroglaucine (3), and A. flavipes metabolizes only R-(-)-glaucine (2) to dehydroglaucine. This facile microbiological reaction is useful in the destructive resolution of racemic mixtures of glaucine, and may provide a model for producing pure enantiomers (either R or S) of other aporphines from racemic mixtures. In order to extend the reaction to other aporphines and related alkaloids, the overall stereochemical course and enzyme(s) involved in the reaction, and the substrate requirements of the enzyme were investigated. The overall stereochemical course of the transformation was examined using C-7 methyl-blocked analogs of glaucine, cis- and trans-7-methylglaucine, as substrates for the fungi. Isolation and examination of residual substrates from semi-preparative scale incubations by MS, PMR, PMR with a chiral shift reagent, OR and ORD indicated that the transformation was enantioselective in the case of A. flavipes. However, only a 10% enrichment of 6aR,7R-cis-7-methylglaucine was observed in F. solani cultures. The oxidation of glaucine can be envisioned as proceeding through one of several mechanisms, each involving a different enzyme system. Deuterium isotope, induction and enzyme inhibitor experiments helped to distinguish between the three mechanisms.

  8. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  9. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  10. Physiological and Metabolic Effects of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid for Mitigating Salinity Stress in Creeping Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhimin; Chang, Zuoliang; Sun, Lihong; Yu, Jingjin; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether foliar application of a chlorophyll precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), could mitigate salinity stress damages in perennial grass species by regulating photosynthetic activities, ion content, antioxidant metabolism, or metabolite accumulation. A salinity-sensitive perennial grass species, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), was irrigated daily with 200 mM NaCl for 28 d, which were foliar sprayed with water or ALA (0.5 mg L−1) weekly during the experiment in growth chamber. Foliar application of ALA was effective in mitigating physiological damage resulting from salinity stress, as manifested by increased turf quality, shoot growth rate, leaf relative water content, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate. Foliar application of ALA also alleviated membrane damages, as shown by lower membrane electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation, which was associated with increases in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Leaf content of Na+ was reduced and the ratio of K+/Na+ was increased with ALA application under salinity stress. The positive effects of ALA for salinity tolerance were also associated with the accumulation of organic acids (α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and malic acid), amino acids (alanine, 5-oxoproline, aspartic acid, and γ -aminobutyric acid), and sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, lyxose, allose, xylose, sucrose, and maltose). ALA-mitigation of physiological damages by salinity could be due to suppression of Na+ accumulation and enhanced physiological and metabolic activities related to photosynthesis, respiration, osmotic regulation, and antioxidant defense. PMID:25551443

  11. Physiological and metabolic effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid for mitigating salinity stress in creeping bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhimin; Chang, Zuoliang; Sun, Lihong; Yu, Jingjin; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether foliar application of a chlorophyll precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), could mitigate salinity stress damages in perennial grass species by regulating photosynthetic activities, ion content, antioxidant metabolism, or metabolite accumulation. A salinity-sensitive perennial grass species, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), was irrigated daily with 200 mM NaCl for 28 d, which were foliar sprayed with water or ALA (0.5 mg L-1) weekly during the experiment in growth chamber. Foliar application of ALA was effective in mitigating physiological damage resulting from salinity stress, as manifested by increased turf quality, shoot growth rate, leaf relative water content, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate. Foliar application of ALA also alleviated membrane damages, as shown by lower membrane electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation, which was associated with increases in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Leaf content of Na+ was reduced and the ratio of K+/Na+ was increased with ALA application under salinity stress. The positive effects of ALA for salinity tolerance were also associated with the accumulation of organic acids (α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and malic acid), amino acids (alanine, 5-oxoproline, aspartic acid, and γ -aminobutyric acid), and sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, lyxose, allose, xylose, sucrose, and maltose). ALA-mitigation of physiological damages by salinity could be due to suppression of Na+ accumulation and enhanced physiological and metabolic activities related to photosynthesis, respiration, osmotic regulation, and antioxidant defense.

  12. Enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2014-09-01

    Fast, reliable and sensitive methods for nucleic acid detection are of growing practical interest with respect to molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious and genetic diseases. Currently, PCR-based and other target amplification strategies are most extensively used in practice. At the same time, such assays have limitations that can be overcome by alternative approaches. There is a recent explosion in the design of methods that amplify the signal produced by a nucleic acid target, without changing its copy number. This review aims at systematization and critical analysis of the enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) signal amplification technique. The approach uses nucleases to recognize and cleave the probe-target complex. Cleavage reactions produce a detectable signal. The advantages of such techniques are potentially low sensitivity to contamination and lack of the requirement of a thermal cycler. Nucleases used for EATR include sequence-dependent restriction or nicking endonucleases or sequence independent exonuclease III, lambda exonuclease, RNase H, RNase HII, AP endonuclease, duplex-specific nuclease, DNase I, or T7 exonuclease. EATR-based assays are potentially useful for point-of-care diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping and microRNA analysis. Specificity, limit of detection and the potential impact of EATR strategies on molecular diagnostics are discussed.

  13. Effects of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers on Metabolism of Arachidonic Acid via CYP2C8.

    PubMed

    Senda, Asuna; Mukai, Yuji; Toda, Takaki; Hayakawa, Toru; Yamashita, Miki; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) via cytochrome enzymes such as CYP 2C9, 2C8 and 2J2. EETs play a role in cardioprotection and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, adverse reactions such as sudden heart attack and fatal myocardial infarction were reported among patients taking angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). As some ARBs have affinity for these CYP enzymes, metabolic inhibition of AA by ARBs is a possible cause for the increase in cardiovascular events. In this study, we quantitatively investigated the inhibitory effects of ARBs on the formation of EETs and further metabolites, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), from AA via CYP2C8. In incubations with recombinant CYP2C8 in vitro, the inhibitory effects were compared by measuring EETs and DHETs by HPLC-MS/MS. Inhibition of AA metabolism by ARBs was detected in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of losartan (42.7 µM), telmisartan (49.5 µM), irbesartan (55.6 µM), olmesartan (66.2 µM), candesartan (108 µM), and valsartan (279 µM). Losartan, telmisartan and irbesartan, which reportedly accumulate in the liver and kidneys, have stronger inhibitory effects than other ARBs. The lower concentration of EETs leads to less protective action on the cardiovascular system and a higher incidence of adverse effects such as sudden heart attack and myocardial infarction in patients taking ARBs. PMID:26632190

  14. Genetic Control of Phosphate-Metabolizing Enzymes in NEUROSPORA CRASSA: Relationships among Regulatory Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Barbara S.; Chia, William; Metzenberg, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the phosphate-metabolizing enzymes are made during phosphate starvation, but not under phosphate sufficiency. The synthesis of these enzymes is controlled by three regulatory genes: pcon-nuc-2, preg and nuc-1. pcon-nuc-2 and preg are closely linked. A model of the hierarchical relationships among these regulatory genes is presented. Studies of double mutants and revertants confirm several predictions of the model. It has been found that nuc-2 (null) and pconc (constitutive) mutations reside in the same cistron. pregc (constitutive) mutations are epistatic to nuc-2 mutations. nuc-1 (null) mutations are epistatic to all others. PMID:123873

  15. Effects of phenol on metabolic activities and transcription profiles of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Chironomus kiinensis larvae.

    PubMed

    Cao, C W; Sun, L L; Niu, F; Liu, P; Chu, D; Wang, Z Y

    2016-02-01

    Phenol, also known as carbolic acid or phenic acid, is a priority pollutant in aquatic ecosystems. The present study has investigated metabolic activities and transcription profiles of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Chironomus kiinensis under phenol stress. Exposure of C. kiinensis larvae to three sublethal doses of phenol (1, 10 and 100 µM) inhibited cytochrome P450 enzyme activity during the 96 h exposure period. The P450 activity measured after the 24 h exposure to phenol stress could be used to assess the level (low or high) of phenol contamination in the environment. To investigate the potential of cytochrome P450 genes as molecular biomarkers to monitor phenol contamination, the cDNA of ten CYP6 genes from the transcriptome of C. kiinensis were identified and sequenced. The open reading frames of the CYP6 genes ranged from 1266 to 1587 bp, encoding deduced polypeptides composed of between 421 and 528 amino acids, with predicted molecular masses from 49.01 to 61.94 kDa and isoelectric points (PI) from 6.01 to 8.89. Among the CYP6 genes, the mRNA expression levels of the CYP6EW3, CYP6EV9, CYP6FV1 and CYP6FV2 genes significantly altered in response to phenol exposure; therefore, these genes could potentially serve as biomarkers in the environment. This study shows that P450 activity combined with one or multiple CYP6 genes could be used to monitor phenol pollution.

  16. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high performance microbes for production of succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Also, the key limitations and challenges in microbial organic acids production are discussed. PMID:26748037

  17. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are oxidized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases to PUFA epoxides which function as potent lipid mediators. The major metabolic pathways of PUFA epoxides are incorporation into phospholipids and hydrolysis to the corresponding PUFA diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase stabilize PUFA epoxides and potentiate their functional effects. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized from arachidonic acid produce vasodilation, stimulate angiogenesis, have anti-inflammatory actions, and protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. EETs produce these functional effects by activating receptor-mediated signaling pathways and ion channels. The epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids synthesized from eicosapentaenoic acid and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid are potent inhibitors of cardiac arrhythmias. Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids also inhibit angiogenesis, decrease inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and reduce tumor metastasis. These findings indicate that a number of the beneficial functions of PUFA may be due to their conversion to PUFA epoxides. PMID:25093613

  18. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in human skin and SkinEthic reconstructed human skin models.

    PubMed

    Eilstein, Joan; Léreaux, Guillaume; Arbey, Eric; Daronnat, Edwige; Wilkinson, Simon; Duché, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Skin metabolism is becoming a major consideration in the development of new cosmetic ingredients, skin being the first organ exposed to them. In order to replace limited samples of Excised human skin (EHS), in vitro engineered human skins have been developed. 3D models are daily used to develop and evaluate new cosmetic ingredients and have to be characterized and compared with EHS in terms of metabolic capabilities. This work presents the determination of apparent catalytic parameters (apparent Vmax, Km and the ratio Vmax/Km) in 3D models compared with EHS for cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase isoforms involved in drug metabolism, esterases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldehyde dehydrogenases, peroxidases, glutathione S-transferases, N-acetyl transferases, uridinyl diphosphate glucuronyl transferases and sulfotransferases. Results show that all these enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics are expressed and functional in the EHS and 3D models. Also, the Vmax/Km ratios (estimating the intrinsic metabolic clearances) show that the metabolic abilities are the most often comparable between the skin models and EHS. These results indicate that the 3D models can substitute themselves for EHS to select cosmetic ingredients on the basis of their metabolism, efficacy or/and safety. PMID:25808006

  19. Nitrogen-metabolizing enzymes of Diplodia maydis, a Zea mays L. stalk rot causing fungus.

    PubMed

    Bussard, J B; Larson, R L

    1979-02-01

    The nitrogen source available to Diplodia maydis in vivo is reported to affect the severity of stalk rot in maize. Nitrate and (or) ammonium salts were tested for their effect on the type of nitrogen metabolism found in Diplodia maydis in vitro. The level of glutamate dehydrogenase remained essentially constant on either nitrogen salt but nitrate reductase was induced by growth on nitrate salts and was not extractable on ammonium salts. Properties of nitrate reductase reported here are similar to those reported for the higher plant and Neurospora crassa enzymes. Thr relationship of nitrogen metabolism in Diplodia maydis to Zea mays L. stalk rot is discussed.

  20. Novel roles for the polyphenol oxidase enzyme in secondary metabolism and the regulation of cell death in walnut.

    PubMed

    Araji, Soha; Grammer, Theresa A; Gertzen, Ross; Anderson, Stephen D; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Veberic, Robert; Phu, My L; Solar, Anita; Leslie, Charles A; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Escobar, Matthew A

    2014-03-01

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) catalyzes the oxidation of phenolic compounds into highly reactive quinones. Polymerization of PPO-derived quinones causes the postharvest browning of cut or bruised fruit, but the native physiological functions of PPOs in undamaged, intact plant cells are not well understood. Walnut (Juglans regia) produces a rich array of phenolic compounds and possesses a single PPO enzyme, rendering it an ideal model to study PPO. We generated a series of PPO-silenced transgenic walnut lines that display less than 5% of wild-type PPO activity. Strikingly, the PPO-silenced plants developed spontaneous necrotic lesions on their leaves in the absence of pathogen challenge (i.e. a lesion mimic phenotype). To gain a clearer perspective on the potential functions of PPO and its possible connection to cell death, we compared the leaf transcriptomes and metabolomes of wild-type and PPO-silenced plants. Silencing of PPO caused major alterations in the metabolism of phenolic compounds and their derivatives (e.g. coumaric acid and catechin) and in the expression of phenylpropanoid pathway genes. Several observed metabolic changes point to a direct role for PPO in the metabolism of tyrosine and in the biosynthesis of the hydroxycoumarin esculetin in vivo. In addition, PPO-silenced plants displayed massive (9-fold) increases in the tyrosine-derived metabolite tyramine, whose exogenous application elicits cell death in walnut and several other plant species. Overall, these results suggest that PPO plays a novel and fundamental role in secondary metabolism and acts as an indirect regulator of cell death in walnut.

  1. Fatty acid metabolism in the regulation of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-02-01

    The specific regulation of cellular metabolic processes is of major importance for directing immune cell differentiation and function. We review recent evidence indicating that changes in basic cellular lipid metabolism have critical effects on T cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. While induction of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is essential for activation-induced proliferation and differentiation of effector T cells, FA catabolism via β-oxidation is important for the development of CD8(+) T cell memory as well as for the differentiation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells. We consider the influence of lipid metabolism and metabolic intermediates on the regulation of signaling and transcriptional pathways via post-translational modifications, and discuss how an improved understanding of FA metabolism may reveal strategies for manipulating immune responses towards therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25592731

  2. Metabolism of gambogic acid in rats: a rare intestinal metabolic pathway responsible for its final disposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ding, Li; Hu, Linlin; Qian, Wenjuan; Jin, Shaohong; Sun, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2011-04-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) is a promising natural anticancer candidate. Although the anticancer activity of GA has been well demonstrated, information regarding the metabolic fate of GA is limited. Previous studies suggested that GA is mainly excreted into intestinal tract in rats through bile after intravenous administration, whereas only traces appeared in the feces, suggesting that GA is metabolized extensively in the intestine. However, there has been no report about the intestinal metabolism of GA either in animals or humans. In this study, large amounts of two sulfonic acid metabolites of GA were found in the feces samples of rats after intravenous administration, and their structures were identified as 10-α sulfonic acid GA and 10-β sulfonic acid GA by comparison of the retention times and spectral data with those of synthesized reference substances using liquid chromatography-diode array detector-tandem mass spectrometry. This rare intestinal metabolic pathway mainly involves Michael addition of the sulfite ion to the 9,10 carbon-carbon double bond of α,β-unsaturated ketone. In addition, a more detailed metabolic profile in rats is proposed, according to the results of in vitro and in vivo studies. It was found that GA can be metabolized by a variety of routes, including monooxidation, hydration, glutathionylation, glucuronidation, and glucosidation in the liver of rats. These findings provide information on the major metabolic soft spot of GA in the intestine and liver of rats, which is not only useful in the future human metabolic study of this compound but also of value in the metabolic studies of GA analogs.

  3. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  4. Amino acid metabolism during prolonged starvation

    PubMed Central

    Felig, Philip; Owen, Oliver E.; Wahren, John; Cahill, George F.

    1969-01-01

    Plasma concentration, splanchnic and renal exchange, and urinary excretion of 20 amino acids were studied in obese subjects during prolonged (5-6 wk) starvation. Splanchnic amino acid uptake was also investigated in postabsorptive and briefly (36-48 hr) fasted subjects. A transient increase in plasma valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, and α-aminobutyrate was noted during the 1st wk of starvation. A delayed, progressive increase in glycine, threonine, and serine occurred after the 1st 5 days. 13 of the amino acids ultimately decreased in starvation, but the magnitude of this diminution was greatest for alanine which decreased most rapidly during the 1st week of fasting. In all subjects alanine was extracted by the splanchnic circulation to a greater extent than all other amino acids combined. Brief fasting resulted in an increased arterio-hepatic venous difference for alanine due to increased fractional extraction. After 5-6 wk of starvation, a marked falloff in splanchnic alanine uptake was attributable to the decreased arterial concentration. Prolonged fasting resulted in increased glycine utilization by the kidney and in net renal uptake of alanine. It is concluded that the marked decrease in plasma alanine is due to augmented and preferential splanchnic utilization of this amino acid in early starvation resulting in substrate depletion. Maintenance of the hypoalaninemia ultimately serves to diminish splanchnic uptake of this key glycogenic amino acid and is thus an important component of the regulatory mechanism whereby hepatic gluconeogenesis is diminished and protein catabolism is minimized in prolonged fasting. The altered renal extraction of glycine and alanine is not due to increased urinary excretion but may be secondary to the increased rate of renal gluconeogenesis observed in prolonged starvation. PMID:5773094

  5. Fatty acids from diet and microbiota regulate energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, Joe; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    A high-fat diet and elevated levels of free fatty acids are known risk factors for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and visceral obesity. Although these disease associations are well established, it is unclear how different dietary fats change the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Here, we review emerging evidence that insulin resistance and fat storage are linked to changes in the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, in turn, are highly influenced by the composition of fat in the diet. We review findings that certain fats (for example, long-chain saturated fatty acids) are associated with dysbiosis, impairment of intestinal barrier function, and metabolic endotoxemia. In contrast, other fatty acids, including short-chain and certain unsaturated fatty acids, protect against dysbiosis and impairment of barrier function caused by other dietary fats. These fats may promote insulin sensitivity by inhibiting metabolic endotoxemia and dysbiosis-driven inflammation. During dysbiosis, the modulation of metabolism by diet and microbiota may represent an adaptive process that compensates for the increased fuel demands of an activated immune system. PMID:27006755

  6. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  7. Impact of expression of EMP enzymes on glucose metabolism in Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rachel Ruizhen; Agrawal, Manoj; Mao, Zichao

    2013-06-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is the only known microorganism that utilizes the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway anaerobically. In this work, we investigated whether the overexpression of a phosphofructokinase (PFK), the only missing Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway enzyme, could establish the pathway in this organism. Introduction of a pyrophosphate-dependent PFK, along with co-expression of homologous fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and triosephosphate isomerase, did not result in an EMP flux to any appreciable level. However, the metabolism of glucose was impacted significantly. Eight percent of glucose was metabolized to form a new metabolite, dihydroxyacetone. Reducing flux through the ED pathway by as much as 40 % through antisense of a key enzyme, ED aldolase, did not result in a fully functional EMP pathway, suggesting that the ED pathway, especially the lower arm, downstream from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, is very rigid, possibly due to redox balance.

  8. The spectrum of enzymes involved in activation of 2-aminoanthracene varies with the metabolic system applied.

    PubMed

    Veres, Zsuzsa; Török, Géza; Tóth, Eva; Vereczkey, László; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the involvement of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in the metabolic activation of 2-aminoanthracene (2AA) by use of metabolic systems such as liver S9 or hepatocytes from untreated and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF)- or phenobarbital (PB)-treated rats. Metabolic activation was determined in the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test). Unexpectedly, both enzyme inducers, BNF and PB, significantly decreased the mutagenicity of 2AA activated by S9 fractions. 2AA mutagenicity was detected in the presence of cytochrome P450 inhibitors such as alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), clotrimazole and N-benzylimidazole to study the contribution of CYP isoenzymes to the activation process. ANF significantly decreased the activation of 2AA by S9 from untreated rats. In contrast, ANF significantly increased the metabolic activation of 2AA by S9 from BNF- and PB-treated rats. The enhanced mutagenicity was not altered by co-incubation with clotrimazole and ANF. Pre-incubation of 2AA in the presence of N-benzylimidazole significantly increased the activation of 2AA by S9 from BNF- and PB-treated rats, which suggests that CYPs play minor role in 2AA metabolic activation by rat liver S9 fractions. In contrast with the results described above, BNF treatment of rats significantly enhanced the activation of 2AA by hepatocytes. ANF attenuated the extent of this activation suggesting that different enzymes play a major role in the activation processes in these metabolic systems. Our results indicate that identification of mutagenic hazard by use of the Ames test may depend on the metabolic system applied.

  9. Fructan metabolism and expression of genes coding fructan metabolic enzymes during cold acclimation and overwintering in timothy (Phleum pratense).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ken-ichi; Sanada, Yasuharu; Tase, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Midori

    2014-07-01

    Metabolism of fructans in temperate grasses dynamically fluctuates before and during winter and is involved in the overwintering activity of plants. We monitored three candidate factors that may be involved in seasonal fructan metabolism in timothy (Phleum pratense): transcription levels of two fructosyltransferase (PpFT1 and PpFT2) genes and one fructan exohydrolase (Pp6-FEH1) gene during fall and winter and under artificially cold conditions. Functional analysis using a recombinant enzyme for PpFT2, a novel fructosyltransferase cDNA, revealed that it encoded sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase, with enzymatic properties different from previously characterized PpFT1. PpFT1 transcripts decreased from September to December as the amount of fructans increased, whereas PpFT2 transcripts increased in timothy crowns. PpFT2 was transcriptionally more induced than PpFT1 in response to cold and sucrose in timothy seedlings. A rapid increase in Pp6-FEH1 transcripts and increased monosaccharide content were observed in timothy crowns when air temperature was continuously below 0°C and plants were not covered by snow. Transcriptional induction of Pp6-FEH1 by exposure to -3°C was also observed in seedlings. These findings suggest Pp6-FEH1 involvement in the second phase of hardening. PpFT1 and PpFT2 transcription levels decreased under snow cover, whereas Pp6-FEH1 transcription levels were constant, which corresponded with the fluctuation of fructosyltransferase and fructan exohydrolase activities. Inoculation with snow mold fungi (Typhula ishikariensis) increased Pp6-FEH1 transcription levels and accelerated hydrolysis of fructans. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation of genes coding fructan metabolizing enzymes is partially involved in the fluctuation of fructan metabolism during cold acclimation and overwintering.

  10. Fructan metabolism and expression of genes coding fructan metabolic enzymes during cold acclimation and overwintering in timothy (Phleum pratense).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ken-ichi; Sanada, Yasuharu; Tase, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Midori

    2014-07-01

    Metabolism of fructans in temperate grasses dynamically fluctuates before and during winter and is involved in the overwintering activity of plants. We monitored three candidate factors that may be involved in seasonal fructan metabolism in timothy (Phleum pratense): transcription levels of two fructosyltransferase (PpFT1 and PpFT2) genes and one fructan exohydrolase (Pp6-FEH1) gene during fall and winter and under artificially cold conditions. Functional analysis using a recombinant enzyme for PpFT2, a novel fructosyltransferase cDNA, revealed that it encoded sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase, with enzymatic properties different from previously characterized PpFT1. PpFT1 transcripts decreased from September to December as the amount of fructans increased, whereas PpFT2 transcripts increased in timothy crowns. PpFT2 was transcriptionally more induced than PpFT1 in response to cold and sucrose in timothy seedlings. A rapid increase in Pp6-FEH1 transcripts and increased monosaccharide content were observed in timothy crowns when air temperature was continuously below 0°C and plants were not covered by snow. Transcriptional induction of Pp6-FEH1 by exposure to -3°C was also observed in seedlings. These findings suggest Pp6-FEH1 involvement in the second phase of hardening. PpFT1 and PpFT2 transcription levels decreased under snow cover, whereas Pp6-FEH1 transcription levels were constant, which corresponded with the fluctuation of fructosyltransferase and fructan exohydrolase activities. Inoculation with snow mold fungi (Typhula ishikariensis) increased Pp6-FEH1 transcription levels and accelerated hydrolysis of fructans. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation of genes coding fructan metabolizing enzymes is partially involved in the fluctuation of fructan metabolism during cold acclimation and overwintering. PMID:24913052

  11. Metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids and their tartaric acid esters by Brettanomyces and Pediococcus in red wines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids and their corresponding tartaric acid esters (caftaric, coutaric, and fertaric, respectively) are found in wines in varying concentrations. While Brettanomyces and Pediococcus can utilize the free acids, it is not known whether they can metabolize the correspon...

  12. Amino acid metabolism of Lemna minor L

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, D.; Rich, P.J.; Brunk, D.G. )

    1989-04-01

    A serious limitation to the use of N(O,S)-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl amino acid derivatives in the analysis of {sup 15}N-labeling kinetics of amino acids in plant tissues, is that the amides glutamine and asparagine undergo acid hydrolysis to glutamate and aspartate, respectively, during derivatization. This led us to consider an alternative procedure for derivatization of glutamine and asparagine with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide in pyridine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry yielded fragment ions (M-57) of mass 417 and 431 for the ({sup 14}N)asparagine and ({sup 14}N)glutamine derivatives, respectively, suitable for monitoring unlabeled, single-{sup 15}N- and double-{sup 15}N-labeled amide species from the ion clusters at mass to charge ratio (m/z) 415 to 423 for asparagine, and m/z 429 to 437 for glutamine. From separate analyses of the specific isotope abundance of the amino-N groups of asparagine and glutamine as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl derivatives, the specific amide-({sup 15}N) abundance of these amino acids was determined.

  13. Effect of geraniol, a plant derived monoterpene on lipids and lipid metabolizing enzymes in experimental hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Muthukumaran; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major, modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we have focused on the effect of different doses of geraniol (GOH) on the lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes in atherogenic diet (AD) fed hamsters. Male Syrian hamsters were grouped into seven: group 1 were control animals; group 2 were animals fed GOH alone (200 mg/kg b.w); group 3 were animals fed AD (10 % coconut oil, 0.25 % cholesterol, and 0.25 % cholic acid); group 4 were animals fed AD + corn oil (2.5 ml/kg b.w); and groups 5, 6, and 7 were fed AD as in group 3 + different doses of GOH (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg b.w), respectively, for 12 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and various assays were performed in the plasma and tissues. The AD hamsters showed marked changes in lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes. However, supplementation with GOH counteracted the hyperlipidemia by inhibiting HMG CoA reductase and suppressing lipogenesis. The antihyperlipidemic efficacy of GOH was found to be effective at the dose of 100 mg/kg b.w. This study illustrates that GOH is effective in lowering the risk of hyperlipidemia in AD fed hamsters.

  14. Post-uptake metabolism affects quantification of amino acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Warren, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    • The quantitative significance of amino acids to plant nutrition remains controversial. This experiment determined whether post-uptake metabolism and root to shoot export differ between glycine and glutamine, and examined implications for estimation of amino acid uptake. • Field soil containing a Eucalyptus pauciflora seedling was injected with uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labelled glycine or glutamine. I quantified (15)N and (13)C excess in leaves and roots and intact labelled amino acids in leaves, roots and stem xylem sap. A tunable diode laser quantified fluxes of (12)CO(2) and (13)CO(2) from leaves and soil. • 60-360 min after addition of amino acid, intact molecules of U-(13)C,(15)N glutamine were < 5% of (15)N excess in roots, whereas U-(13)C,(15)N glycine was 30-100% of (15)N excess in roots. Intact molecules of glutamine, but not glycine, were exported from roots to shoots. • Post-uptake metabolism and transport complicate interpretation of isotope labelling such that root and shoot contents of intact amino acid, (13)C and (15)N may not reflect rates of uptake. Future experiments should focus on reconciling discrepancies between intact amino acid, (13)C and (15)N by determining the turnover of amino acids within roots. Alternatively, post-uptake metabolism and transport could be minimized by harvesting plants within minutes of isotope addition.

  15. Metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids in chlorotic leaves of 'Honeycrisp' apple (Malus domestica Borkh) with excessive accumulation of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huicong; Ma, Fangfang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2010-07-01

    Metabolite profiles and activities of key enzymes in the metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids were compared between chlorotic leaves and normal leaves of 'Honeycrisp' apple to understand how accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates affects the metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids. Excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates and much lower CO(2) assimilation were found in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves, confirming feedback inhibition of photosynthesis in chlorotic leaves. Dark respiration and activities of several key enzymes in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, ATP-phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were significantly higher in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. However, concentrations of most organic acids including phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), pyruvate, oxaloacetate, 2-oxoglutarate, malate and fumarate, and activities of key enzymes involved in the anapleurotic pathway including PEP carboxylase, NAD-malate dehydrogenase and NAD-malic enzyme were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. Concentrations of soluble proteins and most free amino acids were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. Activities of key enzymes in nitrogen assimilation and amino acid synthesis, including nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase, ferredoxin and NADH-dependent glutamate synthase, and glutamate pyruvate transaminase were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. It was concluded that, in response to excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates, glycolysis and TCA cycle were up-regulated to "consume" the excess carbon available, whereas the anapleurotic pathway, nitrogen assimilation and amino acid synthesis were down-regulated to reduce the overall rate of amino acid and protein synthesis.

  16. Omega 3 fatty acids and inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Campos, Mercedes; Sanjurjo Crespo, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    A number of studies are investigating the role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in children with metabolic inborn errors, while the effects on visual and brain development in premature infants and neonates are well known. However, their function incertain chronic neurological, inflammatory and metabolic disorders is still under study. Standards should be established to help identify the need of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in conditions requiring a restricted diet resulting in an altered metabolism system, and find scientific evidence on the effects of such supplementation. This study reviews relevant published literature to propose adequate n-3 intake or supplementation doses for different ages and pathologies. The aim of this review is to examine the effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in preventing cognitive impairment or in retarding its progress, and to identify nutritional deficiencies, in children with inborn errors of metabolism. Trials were identified from a search of the Cochrane and MEDLINE databases in 2011. These databases include all major completed and ongoing double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, as well as all studies in which omega-3 supplementation was administered to children with inborn errors, and studies assessing omega-3 fatty acids status in plasma in these pathologies. Although few randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria of this review, some evidenced that most of children with inborn errors are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids, and demonstrated that supplementation might improve their neural function, or prevent the progression of neurological impairment. Nontheless, further investigations are needed on this issue.

  17. Design optimization for bioMEMS studies of enzyme-controlled metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaolong; Larios Berlin, Dean; Buckhout-White, Susan; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary W

    2008-12-01

    Biological microelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS) provide an attractive approach to understanding and modifying enzymatic pathways by separating and interrogating individual reaction steps at localized sites in a microfluidic network. We have previously shown that electrodeposited chitosan enables immobilization of an enzyme at a specific site while maintaining its catalytic activity. While promising as a methodology to replicate metabolic pathways and search for inhibitors as drug candidates, these investigations also revealed unintended (or parasitic) effects, including products generated by the enzyme either (1) in the homogeneous phase (in the liquid), or (2) nonspecifically bound to microchannel surfaces. Here we report on bioMEMS designs which significantly suppress these parasitic effects. To reduce homogeneous reactions we have developed a new packaging and assembly strategy which eliminates fluid reservoirs that are commonly used for fluidic interconnects with external tubing. To suppress reactions by nonspecifically bound enzyme on microchannel walls we have implemented a cross-flow microfluidic network design so that enzyme flow for assembly and substrate/product for reaction share only the region where the enzyme is immobilized at the intended reaction site. Our results show that the signal-to-background ratio of sequential enzymatic reactions increases from 0.72 to 1.28 by eliminating the packaging reservoirs, and increases to 2.43 by separating the flow direction of enzymatic reaction from that of enzyme assembly step. These techniques can be easily applied to versatile microfluidic devices to minimize parasitic reactions in sequential biochemical reactions. PMID:18626771

  18. Phytic acid and raffinose series oligosaccharides metabolism in developing chickpea seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhawar, Vikramjit Kaur; Kaur, Narinder; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Phytic acid and raffinose series oligosaccharides (RFOs) have anti-nutritional properties where phytic acid chelates minerals and reduces their bioavailability to humans and other animals, and RFOs cause flatulence. Both phytic acid and RFOs cannot be digested by monogastric animals and are released as pollutant-wastes. Efforts are being made to reduce the contents of these factors without affecting the viability of seeds. This will require a thorough understanding of their metabolism in different crops. Biosynthetic pathways of both metabolites though are interlinked but not well described. This study was made on metabolism of these two contents in developing chickpea (Cicer arietinum L cv GL 769) seeds. In this study, deposition of RFOs was found to occur before deposition of phytic acid. A decline in inorganic phosphorus and increase in phospholipid phosphorus and phytic acid was observed in seeds during development. Acid phosphatase was the major phosphatase in seed as well as podwall and its activity was highest at early stage of development, thereafter it decreased. Partitioning of (14) C label from (14) C-glucose and (14) C-sucrose into RFOs and phytic acid was studied in seeds in presence of inositol, galactose and iositol and galactose, which favored the view that galactinol synthase is not the key enzyme in RFOs synthesis.

  19. Utilization of Lactic Acid by Fusarium oxysporum var. lini: Regulation of Transport and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ieso M.; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.

    1994-01-01

    Lactic acid was transported in Fusarium oxysporum var. lini ATCC 10960 by a saturable transport system that had a half-saturation constant of 56.6 ± 7.5 μM and a maximum velocity of 0.61 ± 0.10 mmol h-1 g-1 (dry weight) at 26°C and pH 5.0. This transport system was inducible and was not expressed in the presence of a repressing substrate. Evidence is presented that the anionic form lactate- was taken up by the cells. Propionic, acetic, pyruvic, and bromoacetic acids but not succinic acid competitively inhibited the transport of lactic acid. Bromoacetic acid, which was not metabolized, was taken up to a steady-state level when intracellular and extracellular concentrations were identical, indicating that the transport system was not accumulative. The enzymatic activity that was physiologically more relevant in the metabolism of lactic acid was lactate: ferricytochrome c oxidase. This enzyme did not exhibit stereospecifity and was induced by lactic acid. PMID:16349143

  20. The effect of enzyme inhibition on the metabolism and activation of tacrine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Spaldin, V; Madden, S; Pool, W F; Woolf, T F; Park, B K

    1994-01-01

    1. Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine-hydrochloride: THA) underwent metabolism in vitro by a panel (n = 12) of human liver microsomes genotyped for CYP2D6, in the presence of NADPH, to both protein-reactive and stable metabolites. 2. There was considerable variation in the extent of THA metabolism amongst human livers. Protein-reactive metabolite formation showed a 10-fold variation (0.6 +/- 0.1%-5.2 +/- 0.8% of incubated radioactivity mg-1 protein) whilst stable metabolites showed a 3-fold variation (24.3 +/- 1.7%-78.6 +/- 2.6% of incubated radioactivity). 3. Using cytochrome P450 isoform specific inhibitors CYP1A2 was identified as the major enzyme involved in all routes of THA metabolism. 4. There was a high correlation between aromatic and alicyclic hydroxylation (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001) consistent with these biotransformations being catalysed by the same enzymes. 5. Enoxacin (ENOX), cimetidine (CIM) and chloroquine (CQ) inhibited THA metabolism by a preferential decrease in the bioactivation to protein-reactive, and hence potentially toxic, species. The inhibitory potency of ENOX and CIM was increased significantly upon pre-incubation with microsomes and NADPH. 6. Covalent binding correlated with 7-OH-THA formation before (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001) and after (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001) inhibition by CIM, consistent with a two-step mechanism in the formation of protein-reactive metabolite(s) via a 7-OH intermediate. 7. The use of enzyme inhibitors may provide a useful tool for examining the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of THA in vivo. PMID:7946932

  1. An overview of on-line systems using drug metabolizing enzymes integrated into capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2013-09-01

    Enzymatic assays using CE are now among the most noteworthy applications of this analytical technique in pharmacology-related investigations. Studies of metabolic pathways of new chemical entities mediated by drug metabolizing enzymes are attracting particular attention. Conventional CE-based enzymatic in vitro assays are generally restricted to the separation of reagents after incubation performed off-line. EMMA represents an alternative and fully prospective approach, allowing injection, reaction, separation, and detection to be conducted in a single capillary. Such an on-line system-in contrast to the standard approach-enables automation, miniaturization, and a significant reduction in reagent volumes, resulting in a very robust and cost-efficient method. Hence, EMMA could be a method of choice for the screening of new drugs, enzymatic inhibitors, and putative drug-drug interactions. This review provides a summary of reports covering the area of EMMA-based and related methods implemented into in vitro studies of drug metabolizing enzymes. A general description of the EMMA framework, enzyme families, and a concise discussion of the prognosis for the development of this methodology are given as well.

  2. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans.

  3. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans. PMID:25331933

  4. Higher plant metabolism and energetics in hypogravity: Amino acid metabolism in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazelis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory's investigation into the amino acid metabolism of dwarf marigolds exposed to an environment of simulated hypogravity is summarized. Using both in vivo, and/or in vitro studies, the following effects of hypogravitational stress have been shown: (1) increased proline incorporation into cell wall protein, (2) inhibition of amino acid decarboxylation, (3) decrease in glutamic acid decarboxylase activity; and (4) decrease in the relative amount of a number of soluble amino acids present in deproteinized extracts of marigold leaves. It is concluded from these data there are several rapid, major alterations in amino acid metabolism associated with hypogravitational stress in marigolds. The mechanism(s) and generality of these effects with regard to other species is still unknown.

  5. Oxidative bioelectrocatalysis: From natural metabolic pathways to synthetic metabolons and minimal enzyme cascades.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Shelley D

    2016-05-01

    Anodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells are more complex than cathodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells, because laccase and bilirubin oxidase can individually catalyze four electron reduction of oxygen to water, whereas most anodic enzymes only do a single two electron oxidation of a complex fuel (i.e. glucose oxidase oxidizing glucose to gluconolactone while generating 2 electrons of the total 24 electrons), so enzyme cascades are typically needed for complete oxidation of the fuel. This review article will discuss the lessons learned from natural metabolic pathways about multi-step oxidation and how those lessons have been applied to minimal or artificial enzyme cascades. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26334845

  6. Oxidative bioelectrocatalysis: From natural metabolic pathways to synthetic metabolons and minimal enzyme cascades.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Shelley D

    2016-05-01

    Anodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells are more complex than cathodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells, because laccase and bilirubin oxidase can individually catalyze four electron reduction of oxygen to water, whereas most anodic enzymes only do a single two electron oxidation of a complex fuel (i.e. glucose oxidase oxidizing glucose to gluconolactone while generating 2 electrons of the total 24 electrons), so enzyme cascades are typically needed for complete oxidation of the fuel. This review article will discuss the lessons learned from natural metabolic pathways about multi-step oxidation and how those lessons have been applied to minimal or artificial enzyme cascades. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  7. Intermediary metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum: levels of enzymes involved in the formation of acetate and butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmanis, M.G.N.; Gatenbeck, S.

    1984-06-01

    The levels of seven intermediary enzymes involved in acetate and butyrate formation from acetyl coenzyme A in the saccharolytic anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum were investigated as a function of time in solvent-producing batch fermentations. Phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, which are known to form acetate from acetyl coenzyme A, both showed a decrease in specific activity when the organism reached the solvent formation stage. The three consecutive enzymes thiolase, beta-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and crotonase exhibited a coordinate expression and a maximal activity after growth had ceased. Only low levels of butyryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity were found. Phosphate butyryltransferase activity rapidly decreased after 20 h from 5 to 11 U/mg of protein to below the detection limit (1 mU/mg). Butyrate no longer can be formed, and the metabolic flux may be diverted to butanol. Butyrate kinase showed a 2.5- to 10-fold increase in specific activity after phosphate butyryltransferase activity no longer could be detected. These results suggest that the uptake of acetate and butyrate during solvent formation can not proceed via a complete reversal of the phosphate transferase and kinase reactions. The activities of all enzymes investigated as a function of time in vitro are much higher than the metabolic fluxes through them in vivo. This indicates that none of the maximal activities of the enzymes assayed is rate limiting in C. acetobutylicum. (Refs. 46).

  8. A robust and efficient method for estimating enzyme complex abundance and metabolic flux from expression data.

    PubMed

    Barker, Brandon E; Sadagopan, Narayanan; Wang, Yiping; Smallbone, Kieran; Myers, Christopher R; Xi, Hongwei; Locasale, Jason W; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-12-01

    A major theme in constraint-based modeling is unifying experimental data, such as biochemical information about the reactions that can occur in a system or the composition and localization of enzyme complexes, with high-throughput data including expression data, metabolomics, or DNA sequencing. The desired result is to increase predictive capability and improve our understanding of metabolism. The approach typically employed when only gene (or protein) intensities are available is the creation of tissue-specific models, which reduces the available reactions in an organism model, and does not provide an objective function for the estimation of fluxes. We develop a method, flux assignment with LAD (least absolute deviation) convex objectives and normalization (FALCON), that employs metabolic network reconstructions along with expression data to estimate fluxes. In order to use such a method, accurate measures of enzyme complex abundance are needed, so we first present an algorithm that addresses quantification of complex abundance. Our extensions to prior techniques include the capability to work with large models and significantly improved run-time performance even for smaller models, an improved analysis of enzyme complex formation, the ability to handle large enzyme complex rules that may incorporate multiple isoforms, and either maintained or significantly improved correlation with experimentally measured fluxes. FALCON has been implemented in MATLAB and ATS, and can be downloaded from: https://github.com/bbarker/FALCON. ATS is not required to compile the software, as intermediate C source code is available. FALCON requires use of the COBRA Toolbox, also implemented in MATLAB.

  9. Isofunctional enzymes PAD1 and UbiX catalyze formation of a novel cofactor required by ferulic acid decarboxylase and 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fengming; Ferguson, Kyle L; Boyer, David R; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Marsh, E Neil G

    2015-04-17

    The decarboxylation of antimicrobial aromatic acids such as phenylacrylic acid (cinnamic acid) and ferulic acid by yeast requires two enzymes described as phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (PAD1) and ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC). These enzymes are of interest for various biotechnological applications, such as the production of chemical feedstocks from lignin under mild conditions. However, the specific role of each protein in catalyzing the decarboxylation reaction remains unknown. To examine this, we have overexpressed and purified both PAD1 and FDC from E. coli. We demonstrate that PAD1 is a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-containing protein. However, it does not function as a decarboxylase. Rather, PAD1 catalyzes the formation of a novel, diffusible cofactor required by FDC for decarboxylase activity. Coexpression of FDC and PAD1 results in the production of FDC with high levels cofactor bound. Holo-FDC catalyzes the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acid, coumaric acid and ferulic acid with apparent kcat ranging from 1.4-4.6 s(-1). The UV-visible and mass spectra of the cofactor indicate that it appears to be a novel, modified form of reduced FMN; however, its instability precluded determination of its structure. The E. coli enzymes UbiX and UbiD are related by sequence to PAD1 and FDC respectively and are involved in the decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid, an intermediate in ubiquinone biosynthesis. We found that endogenous UbiX can also activate FDC. This implies that the same cofactor is required for decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid by UbiD and suggests a wider role for this cofactor in metabolism.

  10. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources. PMID:24829223

  11. Sarcocystis fusiformis: some protein metabolic enzymes in various fractions of sarcocysts of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S; Kushwah, H S; Kushwah, A

    1993-01-01

    An investigation on the relative presence of some protein metabolic enzymes, namely aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), NAD+ and NADP+ dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and arginase in cyst wall (CW), cyst fluid (CF) and zoite (ZT) fractions of the sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis in the oesophageal muscles of Indian water buffalo was carried out. Both the transaminases were present in all the fractions of the cyst, although in variable amounts. There was a higher level of AST activity than of ALT activity. AST activity was the highest in ZT, whereas ALT activity was at a maximum in the CF fraction. The levels of activity of NAD+ and NADP+ dependent GLDH and arginase remained beyond detectable limits. The study revealed that the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism are linked to protein metabolism by transaminases. The possibility of concomitant removal of ammonia and its subsequent incorporation into the urea cycle is ruled out in this parasitic protozoan.

  12. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-06-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources.

  13. Amino acid metabolism in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, S; Azcón-Bieto, J; López-Soriano, F J; Miralpeix, M; Argilés, J M

    1988-01-01

    Mice bearing the Lewis lung carcinoma showed a high tumour glutaminase activity and significantly higher concentrations of most amino acids than in both the liver and the skeletal muscle of the host. Tumour tissue slices showed a marked preference for glutamine, especially for oxidation of its skeleton to CO2. It is proposed that the metabolism of this particular carcinoma is focused on amino acid degradation, glutamine being its preferred substrate. PMID:3342022

  14. Transcription factor networks regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Talianidis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of lipid levels is critical for cellular and organismal homeostasis, not only in terms of energy utilization and storage, but also to prevent potential toxicity. The liver utilizes a set of hepatic transcription factors to regulate the expression of genes implicated in all aspects of lipid metabolism including catabolism, transport, and synthesis. In this article, we will review the main transcriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. The principal regulatory pathways are composed of simple modules of transcription factor crosstalks, which correspond to building blocks of more complex regulatory networks. These transcriptional networks contribute to the regulation of proper lipid homeostasis in parallel to posttranslational mechanisms and end product-mediated modulation of lipid metabolizing enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  15. Evaluation of endogenous acidic metabolic products associated with carbohydrate metabolism in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Tumor cells have a high tolerance for acidic and hypoxic microenvironments, also producing abundant lactic acid through accelerated glycolysis in the presence or absence of O2. While the accumulation of lactate is thought to be a major contributor to the reduction of pH-circumscribing aggressive tumors, it is not known if other endogenous metabolic products contribute this acidity. Furthermore, anaerobic metabolism in cancer cells bears similarity to homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, however very little is known about an alternative pathway that may drive adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production independent of glycolysis. In this study, we quantify over 40 end-products (amines, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, or ketones) produced by malignant neuroblastoma under accelerated glycolysis (+glucose (GLU) supply 1–10 mM) ± mitochondrial toxin; 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+) to abate aerobic respiration to delineate differences between anaerobic vs. aerobic cell required metabolic pathways. The data show that an acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis prompts an expected reduction in extracellular pH (pHex) from neutral to 6.7±0.006. Diverse metabolic acids associated with this drop in acidity were quantified by ionic exchange liquid chromatography (LC), showing concomitant rise in lactate (Ctrls 7.5±0.5 mM; +GLU 12.35±1.3 mM; +GLU + MPP 18.1±1.8 mM), acetate (Ctrl 0.84±0.13 mM: +GLU 1.3±0.15 mM; +GLU + MPP 2.7±0.4 mM), fumarate, and a-ketoglutarate (<10μM) while a range of other metabolic organic acids remained undetected. Amino acids quantified by o-phthalaldehyde precolumn derivatization/electrochemical detection–LC show accumulation of L-alanine (1.6±.052 mM), L-glutamate (285±9.7μM), L-asparagine (202±2.1μM), and L-aspartate (84.2±4.9μM) produced during routine metabolism, while other amino acids remain undetected. In contrast, the data show no evidence for accumulation of acetaldehyde, aldehydes, or ketones (Purpald/2

  16. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  17. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  18. Dynamic modeling of lactic acid fermentation metabolism with Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euhlim; Lu, Mingshou; Park, Changhun; Park, Changhun; Oh, Han Bin; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Jinwon

    2011-02-01

    A dynamic model of lactic acid fermentation using Lactococcus lactis was constructed, and a metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and metabolic control analysis (MCA) were performed to reveal an intensive metabolic understanding of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The parameter estimation was conducted with COPASI software to construct a more accurate metabolic model. The experimental data used in the parameter estimation were obtained from an LC-MS/ MS analysis and time-course simulation study. The MFA results were a reasonable explanation of the experimental data. Through the parameter estimation, the metabolic system of lactic acid bacteria can be thoroughly understood through comparisons with the original parameters. The coefficients derived from the MCA indicated that the reaction rate of L-lactate dehydrogenase was activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and pyruvate, and pyruvate appeared to be a stronger activator of L-lactate dehydrogenase than fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Additionally, pyruvate acted as an inhibitor to pyruvate kinase and the phosphotransferase system. Glucose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate showed activation effects on pyruvate kinase. Hexose transporter was the strongest effector on the flux through L-lactate dehydrogenase. The concentration control coefficient (CCC) showed similar results to the flux control coefficient (FCC).

  19. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  20. Correlation-Based Network Analysis of Metabolite and Enzyme Profiles Reveals a Role of Citrate Biosynthesis in Modulating N and C Metabolism in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, David; Xue, Wentao; Zhang, Nengyi; Kremling, Karl; Gur, Amit; Pilosof, Shai; Gibon, Yves; Stitt, Mark; Buckler, Edward S.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Fait, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their variance within the population, consistently with their related enzymes. The overall higher CV values for metabolites as compared to the tested enzymes are indicative for their greater phenotypic plasticity. H2 tests revealed galactinol (1) and asparagine (0.91) as the highest scorers among metabolites and nitrate reductase (0.73), NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase (0.52), and phosphoglucomutase (0.51) among enzymes. The overall low H2 scores for metabolites and enzymes are suggestive for a great environmental impact or gene-environment interaction. Correlation-based network generation followed by community detection analysis, partitioned the network into three main communities and one dyad, (i) reflecting the different levels of phenotypic plasticity of the two molecular classes as observed for the CV values and (ii) highlighting the concerted changes between classes of chemically related metabolites. Community 1 is composed mainly of enzymes and specialized metabolites, community 2′ is enriched in N-containing compounds and phosphorylated-intermediates. The third community contains mainly organic acids and sugars. Cross-community linkages are supported by aspartate, by the photorespiration amino acids glycine and serine, by the metabolically related GABA and putrescine, and by citrate. The latter displayed the strongest node-betweenness value (185.25) of all nodes highlighting its fundamental structural role in the connectivity of the network by linking between different communities and to the also strongly connected enzyme aldolase. PMID:27462343

  1. Correlation-Based Network Analysis of Metabolite and Enzyme Profiles Reveals a Role of Citrate Biosynthesis in Modulating N and C Metabolism in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, David; Xue, Wentao; Zhang, Nengyi; Kremling, Karl; Gur, Amit; Pilosof, Shai; Gibon, Yves; Stitt, Mark; Buckler, Edward S; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fait, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their variance within the population, consistently with their related enzymes. The overall higher CV values for metabolites as compared to the tested enzymes are indicative for their greater phenotypic plasticity. H(2) tests revealed galactinol (1) and asparagine (0.91) as the highest scorers among metabolites and nitrate reductase (0.73), NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase (0.52), and phosphoglucomutase (0.51) among enzymes. The overall low H(2) scores for metabolites and enzymes are suggestive for a great environmental impact or gene-environment interaction. Correlation-based network generation followed by community detection analysis, partitioned the network into three main communities and one dyad, (i) reflecting the different levels of phenotypic plasticity of the two molecular classes as observed for the CV values and (ii) highlighting the concerted changes between classes of chemically related metabolites. Community 1 is composed mainly of enzymes and specialized metabolites, community 2' is enriched in N-containing compounds and phosphorylated-intermediates. The third community contains mainly organic acids and sugars. Cross-community linkages are supported by aspartate, by the photorespiration amino acids glycine and serine, by the metabolically related GABA and putrescine, and by citrate. The latter displayed the strongest node-betweenness value (185.25) of all nodes highlighting its fundamental structural role in the connectivity of the network by linking between different communities and to the also strongly connected enzyme aldolase. PMID:27462343

  2. Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids: Oxidised derivatives of linoleic acid and their role in inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vangaveti, Venkat N; Jansen, Holger; Kennedy, Richard Lee; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-15

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a major constituent of low-density lipoproteins. An essential fatty acid, LA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is oxidised by endogenous enzymes and reactive oxygen species in the circulation. Increased levels of low-density lipoproteins coupled with oxidative stress and lack of antioxidants drive the oxidative processes. This results in synthesis of a range of oxidised derivatives, which play a vital role in regulation of inflammatory processes. The derivatives of LA include, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, oxo-​octadecadienoic acids, epoxy octadecadecenoic acid and epoxy-keto-octadecenoic acids. In this review, we examine the role of LA derivatives and their actions on regulation of inflammation relevant to metabolic processes associated with atherogenesis and cancer. The processes affected by LA derivatives include, alteration of airway smooth muscles and vascular wall, affecting sensitivity to pain, and regulating endogenous steroid hormones associated with metabolic syndrome. LA derivatives alter cell adhesion molecules, this initial step, is pivotal in regulating inflammatory processes involving transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways, thus, leading to alteration of metabolic processes. The derivatives are known to elicit pleiotropic effects that are either beneficial or detrimental in nature hence making it difficult to determine the exact role of these derivatives in the progress of an assumed target disorder. The key may lie in understanding the role of these derivatives at various stages of development of a disorder. Novel pharmacological approaches in altering the synthesis or introduction of synthesised LA derivatives could possibly help drive processes that could regulate inflammation in a beneficial manner. Chemical Compounds: Linoleic acid (PubChem CID: 5280450), 9- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 5312830), 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 6443013), 9-oxo

  3. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V.; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Groen, Albert K.; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1−/−) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1−/− and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  4. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M Mahmood; Groen, Albert K; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-09-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1(-/-)) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1(-/-) and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia.

  5. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase: potential targets for metabolic engineering of microorganism oil.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Hao; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-04-01

    Oleaginous microorganism is becoming one of the most promising oil feedstocks for biodiesel production due to its great advantages in triglyceride (TAG) accumulation. Previous studies have shown that de novo TAG biosynthesis can be divided into two parts: the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (the upstream part which generates acyl-CoAs) and the glycerol-3-phosphate acylation pathway (the downstream part in which three acyl groups are sequentially added onto a glycerol backbone). This review mainly focuses on two enzymes in the G3P pathway, phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). The former catalyzes a dephosphorylation reaction, and the latter catalyzes a subsequent acylation reaction. Genes, functional motifs, transmembrane domains, action mechanism, and new studies of the two enzymes are discussed in detail. Furthermore, this review also covers diacylglycerol kinase, an enzyme that catalyzes the reverse reaction of diacylglycerol formation. In addition, PAP and DGAT are the conjunction points of the G3P pathway, the Kennedy pathway, and the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway (CDP-DAG pathway), and the mutual transformation between TAGs and phospholipids is discussed as well. Given that both the Kennedy and CDP-diacylglycerol pathways are in metabolic interlock (MI) with the G3P pathway, it is suggested that, via metabolic engineering, TAG accumulation can be improved by the two pathways based on the pivotal function of PAP and DGAT.

  6. Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Katavic, Vesna; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Barton, Dennis L; Giblin, E Michael; Reed, Darwin W; Taylor, David C

    2002-11-01

    Genomic fatty acid elongation 1 (FAE1) clones from high erucic acid (HEA) Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and low erucic acid (LEA) B. napus cv. Westar, were amplified by PCR and expressed in yeast cells under the control of the strong galactose-inducible promoter. As expected, yeast cells expressing the FAE1 genes from HEA Brassica spp. synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids that are not normally found in yeast, while fatty acid profiles of yeast cells expressing the FAE1 gene from LEA B. napus were identical to control yeast samples. In agreement with published findings regarding different HEA and LEA B. napus cultivars, comparison of FAE1 protein sequences from HEA and LEA Brassicaceae revealed one crucial amino acid difference: the serine residue at position 282 of the HEA FAE1 sequences is substituted by phenylalanine in LEA B. napus cv. Westar. Using site directed mutagenesis, the phenylalanine 282 residue was substituted with a serine residue in the FAE1 polypeptide from B. napus cv. Westar, the mutated gene was expressed in yeast and GC analysis revealed the presence of very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids (VLCMFAs), indicating that the elongase activity was restored in the LEA FAE1 enzyme by the single amino acid substitution. Thus, for the first time, the low erucic acid trait in canola B. napus can be attributed to a single amino acid substitution which prevents the biosynthesis of the eicosenoic and erucic acids.

  7. Carnitine is associated with fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Adenier, Hervé; Perrin, Yolande

    2007-12-01

    The finding of acylcarnitines alongside free carnitine in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography shows a link between carnitine and plant fatty acid metabolism. Moreover the occurrence of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines suggests that carnitine is connected to diverse fatty acid metabolic pathways in plant tissues. The carnitine and acylcarnitine contents in plant tissues are respectively a hundred and a thousand times lower than in animal tissues, and acylcarnitines represent less than 2% of the total carnitine pool whereas this percentage reaches 30% in animal tissues. These results suggest that carnitine plays a lesser role in lipid metabolism in plants than it does in animals.

  8. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism of Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Millet, Coralie O M; Lloyd, David; Coogan, Michael P; Rumsey, Joanna; Cable, Joanne

    2011-09-01

    The metabolism of Spironucleus vortens, a parasitic, diplomonad flagellate related to Giardia intestinalis, was investigated using a combination of membrane inlet mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, bioscreen continuous growth monitoring, and ion exchange chromatography. The products of glucose-fuelled and endogenous metabolism were identified by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR as ethanol, acetate, alanine and lactate. Mass spectrometric monitoring of gas metabolism in buffered cell suspensions showed that glucose and ethanol could be used by S. vortens as energy-generating substrates, but bioscreen automated monitoring of growth in culture medium, as well as NMR analyses, suggested that neither of these compounds are the substrates of choice for this organism. Ion-exchange chromatographic analyses of free amino-acid and amino-acid hydrolysate of growth medium revealed that, despite the availability of large pools of free amino-acids in the medium, S. vortens hydrolysed large amounts of proteins during growth. The organism produced alanine and aspartate, and utilised lysine, arginine, leucine, cysteine and urea. However, mass spectrometric and bioscreen investigations showed that addition of the utilised amino acids to diluted culture medium did not induce any significant increase in metabolic or growth rates. Moreover, as no significant amounts of ornithine were produced, and addition of arginine under aerobic conditions did not generate NO production, there was no evidence of the presence of an energy-generating, arginine dihydrolase pathway in S. vortens under in vitro conditions.

  9. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  10. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes.

  11. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I–IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  12. Nicotinamide metabolism in ferns: formation of nicotinic acid glucoside.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide was investigated in 9 fern species, Psilotum nudum, Angiopteris evecta, Lygodium japonicum, Acrostichum aureum, Asplenium antiquum, Diplazium subsinuatum, Thelypteris acuminate, Blechnum orientale and Crytomium fortune. All fern species produce a large quantity of nicotinic acid glucoside from [(14)C]nicotinamide, but trigonelline formation is very low. Increases in the release of (14)CO(2) with incubation time was accompanied by decreases in [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid glucoside. There was slight stimulation of nicotinic acid glucoside formation by 250 mM NaCl in mature leaves of the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum, but it is unlikely that this compound acts as a compatible solute. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid salvage for pyridine nucleotide synthesis was detected in all fern species, although this activity was always less than nicotinic acid glucoside synthesis. Predominant formation of nicotinic acid glucoside is characteristic of nicotinic acid metabolism in ferns. This reaction appears to act as a detoxication mechanism, removing excess nicotinic acid.

  13. The Effects of Space Flight on Some Liver Enzymes Concerned with Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1978-01-01

    The activities of about 30 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and the levels of glycogen and of individual fatty acids were measured in livers of rats ex- posed to prolonged space flight (18.5 days) aboard COSMOS 986 Biosatellite. When flight stationary, (FS) and flight centrifuged (FC) rats were compared at recovery (R(sub 0)), decrceases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha glycerphosphate, acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, acconitase and Epsilon-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were noted in the weightless group (FS). The significance of these findings was strengthened since all activities, showing alterations at R(sub 0), returned to normal 25 days post-flight. Differences were also seen in levels of two liver constituents. When glycogen and total fatty acids of the two groups of flight animals were determined, differences that could be attributed to reduced gravity were observed, the FS group at R(sub 0) contained, on the average, more than twice the amount of glycogen than did controls ad a remarkable shift in the ratio of palmitate to palmitoleate were noted. These metabolic alterations appear to be unique to the weightless condition. Our data justify the conclusion that centrifugation during space flight is equivalent to terrestrial gravity.

  14. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  15. Role of mitochondrial transamination in branched chain amino acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Fenstermacher, D.; Mahar, C.

    1988-03-15

    Oxidative decarboxylation and transamination of 1-/sup 14/C-branched chain amino and alpha-keto acids were examined in mitochondria isolated from rat heart. Transamination was inhibited by aminooxyacetate, but not by L-cycloserine. At equimolar concentrations of alpha-ketoiso(1-/sup 14/C)valerate (KIV) and isoleucine, transamination was increased by disrupting the mitochondria with detergent which suggests transport may be one factor affecting the rate of transamination. Next, the subcellular distribution of the aminotransferase(s) was determined. Branched chain aminotransferase activity was measured using two concentrations of isoleucine as amino donor and (1-/sup 14/C)KIV as amino acceptor. The data show that branched chain aminotransferase activity is located exclusively in the mitochondria in rat heart. Metabolism of extramitochondrial branched chain alpha-keto acids was examined using 20 microM (1-/sup 14/C)KIV and alpha-ketoiso(1-/sup 14/C)caproate (KIC). There was rapid uptake and oxidation of labeled branched chain alpha-keto acid, and, regardless of the experimental condition, greater than 90% of the labeled keto acid substrate was metabolized during the 20-min incubation. When a branched chain amino acid (200 microM) or glutamate (5 mM) was present, 30-40% of the labeled keto acid was transaminated while the remainder was oxidized. Provision of an alternate amino acceptor in the form of alpha-keto-glutarate (0.5 mM) decreased transamination of the labeled KIV or KIC and increased oxidation. Metabolism of intramitochondrially generated branched chain alpha-keto acids was studied using (1-/sup 14/C)leucine and (1-/sup 14/C)valine. Essentially all of the labeled branched chain alpha-keto acid produced by transamination of (1-/sup 14/C)leucine or (1-/sup 14/C)valine with a low concentration of unlabeled branched chain alpha-keto acid (20 microM) was oxidized.

  16. Drug-metabolizing enzymes, polymorphisms and interindividual response to environmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W

    2000-09-01

    Individual risk of toxicity or cancer reflects the amount of exposure to environmental agents, combined with one's underlying genetic predisposition. More than six dozen human ecogenetic polymorphisms have been described; whereas some of these have been demonstrated to be associated with altered risks of toxicity or cancer, others presently remain equivocal and require further study. Thus, genetic differences in the regulation, expression and activity of "environmental susceptibility genes" can be decisive in defining susceptibility to toxicity or cancer. "Drug-metabolizing enzymes" (DMEs) are regarded as one class of environmental susceptibility genes. DME genes have actually existed on this planet for more than 2.5 billion years, and might more appropriately be named "effector-metabolizing enzymes." Receptors controlling DME levels have been called "DME receptors." DMEs have functioned in many critical life processes in prokaryotes and, more recently, in countless basic functions in plants and animals - events that evolved long before the existence of pharmaceutical companies and apothecaries. DME genes exist in every eukaryotic cell and probably in all prokaryotes. Virtually all environmental agents act as either agonists or antagonists - in competing with endogenous ligands that bind to DME receptors and/or competing as substrates for the DMEs. Over the past decade it has become clear that each of us has our own "individual fingerprint" of unique alleles coding for DMEs. The underlying genetic predisposition of each patient will reflect combinations of poor- and extensive-metabolizer phenotypes; if these enzymes cooperate in the same metabolic pathway for any given drug or environmental agent, such ecogenetic variability might be synergistic and lead to as much as 30- or >40-fold differences in activation or degradation. The end result can be large interindividual differences in risk of environmentally caused toxicity or cancer.

  17. CO2-fixing enzymes and phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocio; Valero, Adela; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2009-07-23

    CO2 stimulates the development of many of the intestinal helminths that are able to fix CO2 by means of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), such as Hysterothylacium aduncum. We determined the activity of CO2-fixing enzymes such as PEPCK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), although no significant activity was detected for pyruvate carboxylase or carboxylating-malic enzyme. The former act on phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield oxalacetate. In the helminths studied, PEP has a vital role in glucidic metabolism. Consequently, we determined the activity of other enzymes involved in the crossroad of PEP, such as pyruvate kinase (PK), lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase. All enzymes detected showed significant variations in activity during the in vitro development of the parasite from the third larval stage to mature adult. Fixing of CO2 by PEPCK decreased during development (from 228 to 115 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), while that by PEPC increased (from 19 to 46 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein). This enzyme, which is rare in animals, could play a part in detecting levels of free phosphate, releasing it from PEP when required for processes such as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. PK, which showed increasing activity during development up to immature adult (from 56 to 82 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), could act in combination with PEPC to obtain energy in the cytosol (in the form of ATP) and in the mitochondria (possible destination of the pyruvate formed), compensating for the decrease in activity of PEPCK. PMID:19750810

  18. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease—age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network. PMID:26378592

  19. Increased Biomass Yield of Lactococcus lactis by Reduced Overconsumption of Amino Acids and Increased Catalytic Activities of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Seiman, Andrus; Vilu, Raivo

    2012-01-01

    Steady state cultivation and multidimensional data analysis (metabolic fluxes, absolute proteome, and transcriptome) are used to identify parameters that control the increase in biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis from 0.10 to 0.12 C-mol C-mol−1 with an increase in specific growth rate by 5 times from 0.1 to 0.5 h−1. Reorganization of amino acid consumption was expressed by the inactivation of the arginine deiminase pathway at a specific growth rate of 0.35 h−1 followed by reduced over-consumption of pyruvate directed amino acids (asparagine, serine, threonine, alanine and cysteine) until almost all consumed amino acids were used only for protein synthesis at maximal specific growth rate. This balanced growth was characterized by a high glycolytic flux carrying up to 87% of the carbon flow and only amino acids that relate to nucleotide synthesis (glutamine, serine and asparagine) were consumed in higher amounts than required for cellular protein synthesis. Changes in the proteome were minor (mainly increase in the translation apparatus). Instead, the apparent catalytic activities of enzymes and ribosomes increased by 3.5 times (0.1 vs 0.5 h−1). The apparent catalytic activities of glycolytic enzymes and ribosomal proteins were seen to follow this regulation pattern while those of enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism increased more than the specific growth rate (over 5.5 times). Nucleotide synthesis formed the most abundant biomonomer synthetic pathway in the cells with an expenditure of 6% from the total ATP required for biosynthesis. Due to the increase in apparent catalytic activity, ribosome translation was more efficient at higher growth rates as evidenced by a decrease of protein to mRNA ratios. All these effects resulted in a 30% decrease of calculated ATP spilling (0.1 vs 0.5 h−1). Our results show that bioprocesses can be made more efficient (using a balanced metabolism) by varying the growth conditions. PMID:23133574

  20. Combined effects of urinary phytoestrogens metabolites and polymorphisms in metabolic enzyme gene on idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yufeng; Du, Guizhen; Chen, Minjian; Hu, Weiyue; Lu, Chuncheng; Wu, Wei; Hang, Bo; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2014-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that may interact with estrogen receptors and mimic estrogenic effects. It remains unclear whether the individual variability in metabolizing phytoestrogens contributes to phytoestrogens-induced beneficial or detrimental effects. Our aim was to determine whether there is any interaction between metabolic rates (MR) of phytoestrogens and genetic polymorphisms in related xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genes. MR was used to assess phytoestrogen exposure and individual metabolic ability. The amount of phytoestrogens in urine was measured by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 600 idiopathic infertile male patients and 401 controls. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform combined with the Taqman method. Prototypes and metabolites of secoisolariciresinol (SEC) have inverse effects on male reproduction. It was found that low MR of SEC increased the risk of male infertility (OR 2.49, 95 % CI 1.78, 3.48, P trend = 8.00 × 10(-8)). Novel interactions were also observed between the MR of SEC and rs1042389 in CYP2B6, rs1048943 in CYP1A1, and rs1799931 in NAT2 on male infertility (P inter = 1.06 × 10(-4), 1.14 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-3), respectively). By analyzing the relationships between urinary phytoestrogen concentrations, their metabolites and male infertility, we found that individual variability in metabolizing SEC contributed to the interpersonal differences in SEC's effects on male reproduction.

  1. Carbohydrate metabolism in Archaea: current insights into unusual enzymes and pathways and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Bräsen, Christopher; Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette; Siebers, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many "classical" pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of "new," unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented.

  2. Retinol metabolism in LLC-PK1 Cells. Characterization of retinoic acid synthesis by an established mammalian cell line.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1986-10-15

    Specific assays, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography, were used to quantify the conversion of retinol and retinal into retinoic acid by the pig kidney cell line LLC-PK1. Retinoic acid synthesis was linear for 2-4 h as well as with graded amounts of either substrate to at least 50 microM. Retinoic acid concentrations increased through 6-8 h, but decreased thereafter because of substrate depletion (t1/2 of retinol = 13 h) and product metabolism (1/2 = 2.3 h). Retinoic acid metabolism was accelerated by treating cells with 100 nM retinoic acid for 10 h (t1/2 = 1.7 h) and was inhibited by the antimycotic imidazole ketoconazole. Feedback inhibition was not indicated since retinoic acid up to 100 nM did not inhibit its own synthesis. Retinol dehydrogenation was rate-limiting. The reduction and dehydrogenation of retinal were 4-8-fold and 30-60-fold faster, respectively. Greater than 95% of retinol was converted into metabolites other than retinoic acid, whereas the major metabolite of retinal was retinoic acid. The synthetic retinoid 13-cis-N-ethylretinamide inhibited retinoic acid synthesis, but 4-hydroxylphenylretinamide did not. 4'-(9-Acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide, an inhibitor of aldehyde oxidase, and ethanol did not inhibit retinoic acid synthesis. 4-Methylpyrazole was a weak inhibitor: disulfiram was a potent inhibitor. These data indicate that retinol dehydrogenase is a sulfhydryl group-dependent enzyme, distinct from ethanol dehydrogenase. Homogenates of LLC-PK1 cells converted retinol into retinoic acid and retinyl palmitate and hydrolyzed retinyl palmitate. This report suggests that substrate availability, relative to enzyme activity/amount, is a primary determinant of the rate of retinoic acid synthesis, identifies inhibitors of retinoic acid synthesis, and places retinoic acid synthesis into perspective with several other known pathways of retinoid metabolism. PMID:3759984

  3. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin modulates xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Nath, Niharika; Street, Cherease R; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Boring, Daniel; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-15

    The balance between phase-I carcinogen-activating and phase-II detoxifying xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes is critical to determining an individual's risk for cancer. We evaluated the effect of Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin (HS-ASA) on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in HT-29 human colon and Hepa 1c1c7 mouse liver adenocarcinoma cells and in Wistar rats. HS-ASA inhibited the growth of HT-29 and Hepa 1c1c7 cells, with an IC(50) of 3.2 ± 0.3 μM and 4.2 ± 0.4 μM, respectively. The IC(50) for ASA in both cell lines was greater than 5000 μM at 24h. In these cell lines, HS-ASA caused a dose-dependent increase in activity and expression of the phase-II enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinoneoxireductase (NQO1). It also caused an increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression. The levels of CYP 1A1 a phase-I enzyme was increased by HS-ASA in both cell lines. Pretreatment of cells with NaF, an esterase inhibitor, abrogated the HS-ASA-mediated increases in NQO1 enzyme activity. HS-ASA increased the protein levels of the transcription factor Nrf2, which is a regulator of the phase-II enzymes. In vivo, HS-ASA at 100mg/kg/day had no effect on rat's weights; it induced a 3.4-fold and 1.4-fold increase in hepatic GST and NQO1 enzyme activities, respectively. GST and NQO1 protein levels were also increased. In contrast to that in cultured cells, CYP 1A1 protein levels were not altered in vivo. Therefore, HS-ASA induces phase-II enzymes, at least in part, through the action of H(2)S and by modulating Nrf2; these effects may be part of its mechanism of action against carcinogenesis.

  4. Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

    2014-10-28

    This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

  5. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  6. Biological definition of multiple chemical sensitivity from redox state and cytokine profiling and not from polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, Chiara; Scordo, Maria G.; Cesareo, Eleonora; Pastore, Saveria; Mariani, Serena; Maiani, Gianluca; Stancato, Andrea; Loreti, Beatrice; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lubrano, Carla; Raskovic, Desanka; De Padova, Luigia; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a poorly clinically and biologically defined environment-associated syndrome. Although dysfunctions of phase I/phase II metabolizing enzymes and redox imbalance have been hypothesized, corresponding genetic and metabolic parameters in MCS have not been systematically examined. Objectives: We sought for genetic, immunological, and metabolic markers in MCS. Methods: We genotyped patients with diagnosis of MCS, suspected MCS and Italian healthy controls for allelic variants of cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A5), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1), and glutathione S-transferases (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1). Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, antioxidant (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and glutathione metabolizing (GST, glutathione peroxidase (Gpx)) enzymes, whole blood chemiluminescence, total antioxidant capacity, levels of nitrites/nitrates, glutathione, HNE-protein adducts, and a wide spectrum of cytokines in the plasma were determined. Results: Allele and genotype frequencies of CYPs, UGT, GSTM, GSTT, and GSTP were similar in the Italian MCS patients and in the control populations. The activities of erythrocyte catalase and GST were lower, whereas Gpx was higher than normal. Both reduced and oxidised glutathione were decreased, whereas nitrites/nitrates were increased in the MCS groups. The MCS fatty acid profile was shifted to saturated compartment and IFNgamma, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, PDGFbb, and VEGF were increased. Conclusions: Altered redox and cytokine patterns suggest inhibition of expression/activity of metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in MCS. Metabolic parameters indicating accelerated lipid oxidation, increased nitric oxide production and glutathione depletion in combination with increased plasma inflammatory cytokines should be considered in biological definition and diagnosis of MCS.

  7. Pharmacogenetic profile of xenobiotic enzyme metabolism in survivors of the Spanish toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ladona, M G; Izquierdo-Martinez, M; Posada de la Paz, M P; de la Torre, R; Ampurdanés, C; Segura, J; Sanz, E J

    2001-01-01

    In 1981, the Spanish toxic oil syndrome (TOS) affected more than 20,000 people, and over 300 deaths were registered. Assessment of genetic polymorphisms on xenobiotic metabolism would indicate the potential metabolic capacity of the victims at the time of the disaster. Thus, impaired metabolic pathways may have contributed to the clearance of the toxicant(s) leading to a low detoxification or accumulation of toxic metabolites contributing to the disease. We conducted a matched case-control study using 72 cases (54 females, 18 males) registered in the Official Census of Affected Patients maintained by the Spanish government. Controls were nonaffected siblings (n =72) living in the same household in 1981 and nonaffected nonrelatives (n = 70) living in the neighborhood at that time, with no ties to TOS. Genotype analyses were performed to assess the metabolic capacity of phase I [cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), CYP2D6] and phase II [arylamine N-acetyltransferase-2 (NAT2), GSTM1 (glutathione S-transferase M1) and GSTT1] enzyme polymorphisms. The degree of association of the five metabolic pathways was estimated by calculating their odds ratios (ORs) using conditional logistic regression analysis. In the final model, cases compared with siblings (72 pairs) showed no differences either in CYP2D6 or CYP1A1 polymorphisms, or in conjugation enzyme polymorphisms, whereas cases compared with the unrelated controls (70 pairs) showed an increase in NAT2 defective alleles [OR = 6.96, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.46-33.20] adjusted by age and sex. Glutathione transferase genetic polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1) showed no association with cases compared with their siblings or unrelated controls. These findings suggest a possible role of impaired acetylation mediating susceptibility in TOS. PMID:11335185

  8. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  9. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan. PMID:16415214

  10. Ameliorative effects of oleanolic acid on fluoride induced metabolic and oxidative dysfunctions in rat brain: Experimental and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chaitali; Pal, Sudipta; Das, Niranjan; Dinda, Biswanath

    2014-04-01

    Beneficial effects of oleanolic acid on fluoride-induced oxidative stress and certain metabolic dysfunctions were studied in four regions of rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with sodium fluoride at a dose of 20 mg/kg b.w./day (orally) for 30 days. Results indicate marked reduction in acidic, basic and neutral protein contents due to fluoride toxicity in cerebrum, cerebellum, pons and medulla. DNA, RNA contents significantly decreased in those regions after fluoride exposure. Activities of proteolytic enzymes (such as cathepsin, trypsin and pronase) were inhibited by fluoride, whereas transaminase enzyme (GOT and GPT) activities increased significantly in brain tissue. Fluoride appreciably elevated brain malondialdehyde level, free amino acid nitrogen, NO content and free OH radical generation. Additionally, fluoride perturbed GSH content and markedly reduced SOD, GPx, GR and CAT activities in brain tissues. Oral supplementation of oleanolic acid (a plant triterpenoid), at a dose of 5mg/kgb.w./day for last 14 days of fluoride treatment appreciably ameliorated fluoride-induced alteration of brain metabolic functions. Appreciable counteractive effects of oleanolic acid against fluoride-induced changes in protein and nucleic acid contents, proteolytic enzyme activities and other oxidative stress parameters indicate that oleanolic acid has potential antioxidative effects against fluoride-induced oxidative brain damage.

  11. [The retrospection of nucleic acids metabolism research before the 1950s].

    PubMed

    Zhang, He

    2015-09-01

    People found the guanine in the 1840s and the nucleic acid in the 1860s. But they did not know the relationship between them. Later, people found various bases, confirmed the relationship between bases and nucleic acids, and understood the three basic processes of katabolic metabolism of nucleic acids by a number of scientists, especially with Kossel's efforts. In the 1940s, Kalckar isolated and identified some key enzymes of nucleotides metabolism, as well as Buchanan and Greenberg found the two processes of synthesis of nucleotides. The model of DNA double helix came out in 1953. Kornberg proved DNA is self-replicating in 1956. Stahl, Meselson and Vinograd found the semiconservative replication mechanism of DNA in 1958. At the same time, Ochoa found the polynucleotide phosphorylase, the enzyme can catalyze the synthesis of RNA, and synthesized RNA in 1955. Kornberg synthesized DNA on the basis of Ochoa's work in 1956. So far people found the processes of genetic information flow from DNA to RNA. It contributed to the comprehensive recognition and exploration of the pathways of genetic information and made the research of gene expression and regulation possible.

  12. Bladder cancer risk from the perspective of genetic polymorphisms in the carcinogen metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Antonova, Olga; Toncheva, Draga; Grigorov, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a socially significant healthcare problem. A diverse array of aromatic and heterocyclic amines, derived from the chemical and transport industry, diet, and cigarette smoke are considered carcinogens for the bladder. To exert their carcinogenic effect and to initiate the carcinogenic response, the arylamines require a metabolic activation by the host enzymes to