Science.gov

Sample records for acid methyl ether

  1. Chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloromethyl methyl ether ( CMME ) ; CASRN 107 - 30 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments fo

  2. Lacinilene C 7-methyl ether

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lacinilene C 7-methyl ether is an antimicrobial compound produced by the cotton plant in response to attack by pathogens. For the first time, we now report the crystal structure of this compound. This may prove useful in studies on the interaction of the compound with pathogenic fungal cells....

  3. Desoxyhemigossypol-6-methyl-ether

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desoxyhemigossypol-6-methyl ether is an antimicrobial compound produced by the cotton plant in response to attack by pathogens. For the first time, we now report the crystal structure of this compound. This may prove useful in studies on the interaction of the compound with pathogenic fungal cells...

  4. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for enhanced stability and cellular internalization.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick V; Mäkilä, Ermei; Correia, Alexandra; Ferreira, Mónica P A; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-03-01

    Currently, developing a stable nanocarrier with high cellular internalization and low toxicity is a key bottleneck in nanomedicine. Here, we have developed a successful method to covalently conjugate poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE-MA) copolymer on the surface of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-functionalized thermally carbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (APSTCPSi NPs), forming a surface negatively charged nanovehicle with unique properties. This polymer conjugated NPs could modify surface smoothness, charge, and hydrophilicity of the developed NPs, leading to considerable improvement in the colloidal and plasma stabilities via enhanced suspensibility and charge repulsion. Furthermore, despite the surface negative charge of the polymer-conjugated NPs, the cellular internalization was increased in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These results provide a proof-of-concept evidence that such polymer-based PSi nanocomposite can be extensively used as a promising candidate for intracellular drug delivery.

  5. Synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether catalyzed by acidic ion-exchange resins. Influence of the proton activity

    SciTech Connect

    Panneman, H.J.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1995-12-01

    The catalytic activity of various strong acid ion-exchange resins on the synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) from methanol and isobutene has been investigated. Relative to Amberlyst 15, Kastel CS 381 and Amberlyst CSP have similar rate constants, whereas Duolite ES 276 and Amberlyst XE 307 have significantly higher and Duolite C26 and Duolite C16P substantially lower rate constants. All resins show a great decrease in catalytic activity if part of the protons is exchanged by sodium ions. At 10% proton capacity the rate constants per equivalent acid are reduced by a factor of 9 (for Amberlyst Xe 307 and Kastel Cs 381) to more than a factor 20 for Amberlyst 15 and Duolite ES 276, resulting in 100--200 times lower MtBE production rates. Depending on the catalyst applied, mass transfer limitations start to occur between 50 and 80 C. Values of the effective diffusion coefficient of isobutene varied between 0.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} and 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m{sup 2}/s at 80 C.

  6. Prolonged Hypocalcemic Effect by Pulmonary Delivery of Calcitonin Loaded Poly(Methyl Vinyl Ether Maleic Acid) Bioadhesive Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, J.; Minaiyan, M.; Forghanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design a pulmonary controlled release system of salmon calcitonin (sCT). Therefore, poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) [P(MVEMA)] nanoparticles were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Fe2+ and Zn2+ ions. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The stability of sCT in the optimized nanoparticles was studied by electrophoretic gel method. Plasma calcium levels until 48 h were determined in rats as pulmonary-free sCT solution or nanoparticles (25 μg·kg−1), iv solution of sCT (5 μg·kg−1), and pulmonary blank nanoparticles. The drug remained stable during fabrication and tests on nanoparticles. The optimized nanoparticles showed proper physicochemical properties. Normalized reduction of plasma calcium levels was at least 2.76 times higher in pulmonary sCT nanoparticles compared to free solution. The duration of hypocalcemic effect of pulmonary sCT nanoparticles was 24 h, while it was just 1 h for the iv solution. There was not any significant difference between normalized blood calcium levels reduction in pulmonary drug solution and iv injection. Pharmacological activity of nanoparticles after pulmonary delivery was 65% of the iv route. Pulmonary delivery of P(MVEMA) nanoparticles of sCT enhanced and prolonged the hypocalcemic effect of the drug significantly. PMID:24701588

  7. Conformations and Barriers to Methyl Group Internal Rotation in Two Asymmetric Ethers: Propyl Methyl Ether and Butyl Methyl Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Dechirico, F.; Cooke, S. A.

    2012-06-01

    The conformational preferences of the O-C-C-C unit are important in many biological systems with the unit generally preferring a gauche configuration compared to an anti configuration. Butyl methyl ether and propyl methyl ether provide very simple systems for this phenomenom to manifest. Pure rotational spectra of the title molecules have been recorded using chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW). In the case of butyl methyl ether, only one conformer has been observed. This conformer has torsional angles of COCC = 180°, OCCC = 62° and CCCC = 180° (anti-gauche-anti) and rotational constants of A = 10259.4591(33) MHz, B = 1445.6470(13) MHz, and C = 1356.2944(14) MHz. The rotational spectrum was doubled and has been analyzed to produce an effective barrier to methyl group internal rotation of 780(35) cm-1. A prior rotational spectroscopic study on propyl methyl ether had focused only on the high energy anti-anti conformer. We have analyzed spectra from the lowest energy anti-gauche conformer and the spectroscopic constants will be presented. A summary of the differences in conformational energies and methyl group internal rotation barriers for the class of aliphatic asymmetric ethers will be presented. K. N. Houk, J. E. Eksterowicz, Y.-D. Wu, C. D. Fuglesang, D. B. Mitchell. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115 (4170), 1993. Hiroshi Kato, Jun Nakagawa, Michiro Hayashi. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 80 (272), 1980.

  8. Reactive Poly(Amic Acid)/ Poly(Glycidyl Methacrylate-r-Poly(ethylene Glycol) Methyl Ether Methacrylate) Blends as Gas Permeation Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Michael; Watkins, James

    2012-02-01

    Polymers containing polar moieties, such as ether groups show an affinity for acidic gases, such as CO2 due to dipole-quadrapole interactions. Polymer blends in which one of the components is poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have been studied extensively in literature as a CO2/light gas permeation membrane, but due to the crystallization and poor mechanical properties have been difficult to incorporate PEG above 60wt%. In this study, a series of random copolymers containing both glycidyl methacrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate in different ratios are blended with a poly(amic acid) prepolymer made from 4, 4'-oxydianiline and pyromellitic dianhydride to create gas permeation membranes. By using a reactive blend PEG loadings above 70% have been realized with sufficient mechanical properties, and since the side chain on the PEGMA is short these blends do not suffer from crystallization.

  9. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl tert - butyl ether ( MTBE ) ; CASRN 1634 - 04 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments f

  10. Cross-Linked Hydrogels Formed through Diels-Alder Coupling of Furan- and Maleimide-Modified Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid).

    PubMed

    Stewart, S Alison; Backholm, Matilda; Burke, Nicholas A D; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-02-23

    The Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition between furan- and maleimide-functional polyanions was used to form cross-linked synthetic polymer hydrogels. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) was reacted with furfurylamine or N-(2-aminoethyl)maleimide in acetonitrile to form pairs of furan- and maleimide-functionalized poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)s. Mixtures of these mutually reactive polyanions in water gelled within 15 min to 18 h, depending on degree of functionalization and polymer concentrations. Solution and magic-angle spinning (1)H NMR were used to confirm the formation of the Diels-Alder adduct, to analyze competing hydrolytic side reactions, and demonstrate postgelation functionalization. The effect of the degree of furan and maleimide functionalization, polymer concentration, pH, and calcium ion concentration, on gelation time, gel mechanical properties, and equilibrium swelling, are described. Release of dextran as a model drug was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of gel composition and calcium treatment. PMID:26800849

  11. Short and stereoselective total synthesis of furano lignans (+/-)-dihydrosesamin, (+/-)-lariciresinol dimethyl ether, (+/-)-acuminatin methyl ether, (+/-)-sanshodiol methyl ether, (+/-)-lariciresinol, (+/-)-acuminatin, and (+/-)-lariciresinol monomethyl ether and furofuran lignans (+/-)-sesamin, (+/-)-eudesmin, (+/-)-piperitol methyl ether, (+/-)-pinoresinol, (+/-)-piperitol, and (+/-)-pinoresinol monomethyl ether by radical cyclization of epoxides using a transition-metal radical source.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhas Chandra; Rana, Kalyan Kumar; Guin, Chandrani

    2002-05-17

    Intramolecular radical cyclization of suitably substituted epoxy ethers 4a-g using bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(III) chloride as the radical source resulted in trisubstituted tetrahydrofurano lignans and 2,6-diaryl-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane lignans depending on the reaction conditions. The titanium(III) species was prepared in situ from commercially available titanocene dichloride and activated zinc dust in THF. Upon radical cyclization followed by acidic workup, epoxy olefinic ethers 4a-g afforded furano lignans dihydrosesamin 1a, lariciresinol dimethyl ether 1b, acuminatin methyl ether 1e, and sanshodiol methyl ether 1g directly and lariciresinol 1h, acuminatin 1i, and lariciresinol monomethyl ether 1j after removal of the benzyl protecting group by controlled hydrogenolysis of the corresponding cyclized products. The furofuran lignans sesamin 2a, eudesmin 2b, and piperitol methyl ether 2e were also prepared directly by using the same precursors 4a-f on radical cyclization followed by treatment with iodine and pinoresinol 2h, piperitol 2i, and pinoresinol monomethyl ether 2j after controlled hydrogenolysis of the benzyl protecting group of the corresponding cyclized products. Two naturally occurring acyclic lignans, secoisolariciresinol 5h and secoisolariciresinol dimethyl ether 5b, have also been prepared by exhaustive hydrogenolysis of 2h and 2b, respectively.

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1106 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1926.1106 Section 1926.1106 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1106 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1915.1006 Section 1915.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1106 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1926.1106 Section 1926.1106 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1106 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1910.1006 Section 1910.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Substances § 1910.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens....

  16. 29 CFR 1910.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1910.1006 Section 1910.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Substances § 1910.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens....

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1915.1006 Section 1915.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  18. Preparation and characterization of mucoadhesive nanoparticles of poly (methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) containing glycyrrhizic acid intended for vaginal administration.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Llera-Rojas, Viridiana; Ganem-Rondero, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Traditional vaginal preparations reside in the vaginal cavity for relatively a short period of time, requiring multiple doses in order to attain the desired therapeutic effect. Therefore, mucoadhesive systems appear to be appropriate to prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity. In the current study, mucoadhesive nanoparticles based on poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) intended for vaginal delivery of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) (a drug with well-known antiviral properties) were prepared and characterized. Nanoparticles were generated by a solvent displacement method. Incorporation of GA was performed during nanoprecipitation, followed by adsorption of drug once nanoparticles were formed. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, Z-potential, morphology, drug loading, interaction of GA with PVM/MA (by differential scanning calorimetry) and the in vitro interaction of nanoparticles with pig mucin (at two pH values, 3.6 and 5; with and without GA adsorbed). The preparation method led to nanoparticles of a mean diameter of 198.5 ± 24.3 nm, zeta potential of -44.8 ± 2.8 mV and drug loading of 15.07 ± 0.86 µg/mg polymer. The highest mucin interaction resulted at pH 3.6 for nanoparticles without GA adsorbed. The data obtained suggest the promise of using mucoadhesive nanoparticles of PVM/MA for intravaginal delivery of GA.

  19. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Ghazzavi, Jila

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a targeted anti-cancer drug delivery system for breast cancer. Therefore, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Zn(2+) ions. To optimise the effect of DOX/polymer ratio, Zn/polymer ratio, and stirrer rate a full factorial design was used and their effects on particle size, zeta potential, loading efficiency (LE, %), and release efficiency in 72 h (RE72, %) were studied. Targeted NPs were prepared by chemical coating of tiptorelin/polyallylamin conjugate on the surface of NPs by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboiimid HCl as cross-linking agent. Conjugation efficiency was measured by Bradford assay. Conjugated triptorelin and targeted NPs were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in targeted NPs and non-targeted ones were studied on MCF-7 cells which overexpress luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors and SKOV3 cells as negative LHRH receptors using Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. The best results obtained from NPs prepared by DOX/polymer ratio of 5%, Zn/polymer ratio of 50%, and stirrer rate of 960 rpm. FTIR spectrum confirmed successful conjugation of triptorelin to NPs. The conjugation efficiency was about 70%. The targeted NPs showed significantly less IC50 for MCF-7 cells compared to free DOX and non-targeted NPs. PMID:27463791

  20. Methyl substituted polyimides containing carbonyl and ether connecting groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides with novel aromatic diamines having carbonyl and ether groups connecting aromatic rings containing pendant methyl groups. The methyl substituent polyimides exhibit good solubility and form tough, strong films. Upon exposure to ultraviolet irradiation and/or heat, the methyl substituted polyimides crosslink to become insoluble.

  1. High strength of physical hydrogels based on poly(acrylic acid)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether: role of chain architecture on hydrogel properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Gong, Cheng; Shi, Fu-Kuan; Xie, Xu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    This investigation was to study the connections between polymer branch architecture of physical hydrogels and their properties. The bottle-brush-like polymer chains of poly(acrylic acid)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether (PAA-g-mPEG) with PAA as backbones and mPEG as branch architecture were synthesized and in situ grafted from silica nanoparticles (SNs) to construct hydrogels cross-linked networks in aqueous solutions. The structural variables to be discussed included molecular weight and molar ratio of branch chains, and new aspects of the formation mechanism of physical hydrogels with branch structure in the absence of organic cross-links were present. The results indicated that the differences of polymer chain architecture could be distinguished via their different interactions that are present by gelation process and mature gel properties, such as gel strength and swelling ratio. The gelation occurred at the critical polymer concentration and molecular weight, respectively, and the inorganic/organic (SNs/PAA-g-mPEG) nanoparticles began to entangle and construct the cross-linking networks afterward. The gel-to-sol transition temperature (T(g-s)) and radii of SNs that were encapsulated by polymer chains as a function of time for chains' disentanglement were monitored according to the observation of the dissolution process, and the molecular weight between two consecutive entanglements (M(e)) was calculated thereafter. This study showed that the introduction of branch chain onto the linear backbone significantly promoted the chain interactions and increased entanglement density, which contributed to the hydrogels' network integrity and rigidity, thus illustrating greater elongation at break and tensile strength than the hydrogels formulated with linear polymer chains.

  2. Carbon isotopic fractionation during anaerobic biotransformation of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-amyl methyl ether.

    PubMed

    Somsamak, Piyapawn; Richnow, Hans H; Häggblom, Max M

    2005-01-01

    The fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been frequently detected in groundwater and surface water. Since contaminated sites are often subsurface, anaerobic degradation of MTBE will likely be significant for remediation. As traditional approaches to evaluate biodegradation generally involve laboratory microcosm studies which require time and resources, innovative approaches are needed to demonstrate active in situ biodegradation of MTBE. This study was conducted to gather information at the laboratory level to evaluate the potential of applying carbon isotope fractionation as an indicator for in situ biodegradation of the fuel oxygenates MTBE and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). In this study, MTBE utilization was observed in a methanogenic sediment microcosm after a lengthy lag period of about 400 days. MTBE utilization was sustained upon refeeding and subculturing. tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA) was found to accumulate after propagation of cultures. The MTBE-grown cultures also utilized TAME and produced tert-amyl alcohol (TAA). The detection of TBA and TAA indicated that ether bond cleavage was the initial step in degradation for both compounds. Carbon isotope fractionation during anaerobic MTBE and TAME degradation was studied, and isotopic enrichment factors (epsilon) with 95% confidence intervals of -15.6 +/-4.1% and -13.7+/-4.5% were estimated for anaerobic MTBE and TAME degradation, respectively. Addition of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of methanogenesis, substantially prolonged the lag period before transformation, but did not influence carbon isotope fractionation. Our experiment provided strong evidence of significant carbon isotope fractionation during anaerobic MTBE and TAME degradation, demonstrating that this technique can be used as an indicator for in situ MTBE and TAME degradation.

  3. REDUCTIVE ACTIVATION OF DIOXYGEN FOR DEGRADATION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER BY BIFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is prepared by sulfating aluminum metal with sulfuric acid. The use of bifunctional aluminum to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the presence of dioxygen has been examined using batch systems. Primary degradation products were tert-butyl alcohol, ...

  4. Methyl tertiary hexyl ether and methyl tertiary octyl ether as gasoline oxygenates: assessing risks from atmospheric dispersion and deposition.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Jeff; Barnett, Mark O; Zhao, Dongye; Arey, J Samuel

    2006-10-01

    Methyl tertiary hexyl ether (MtHxE) and methyl tertiary octyl ether (MtOcE) are currently being developed as replacement oxygenates for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MtBE) in gasoline. As was the case with MtBE, the introduction of these ethers into fuel supplies guarantees their introduction into the environment as well. In this study, a screening-level risk assessment was performed by comparing predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) of these ethers to concentrations that might cause adverse effects to humans or ecosystems. A simple box model that has successfully estimated urban air concentrations of MtBE was adapted to predict atmospheric concentrations of MtHxE and MtOcE. Expected atmospheric concentrations of these ethers were also estimated using the European Union System for the Evaluation of Substances (EUSES) multimedia fate model, which simultaneously calculates PECs in the various environmental compartments of air, water, soil, and sediment. Because little or no data are available on the physicochemical, environmental, and toxicological properties of MtHxE and MtOcE, estimation methods were used in conjunction with EUSES to predict both the PECs and the concentrations at which these ethers might pose a threat. The results suggest that these ethers would contaminate the air of a moderately sized U.S. city (Boston, MA) at levels similar to those found previously for MtBE. The risk assessment module in EUSES predicted risk characterization ratios of 10(-3) and 10(-2) for MtHxE and MtOcE, respectively, in Boston, and 10(-2) and 10(-1) in very large urban centers, suggesting that these ethers pose only a minimal threat to ecosystems at the anticipated environmental concentrations. The assessment also indicates that these compounds are possible human carcinogens and that they may be present in urban air at concentrations that pose an unacceptable cancer risk. Therefore, testing of the toxicological properties of these compounds is recommended before they

  5. Pyrrolidone - a new solvent for the methylation of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Pinckney, D.J.; Booker, S.E.

    1975-01-01

    In the past, humic acid has been methylated by suspending it in a solution of diazomethane in diethyl ether, and degrading the partly methylated humic acid to release those parts of the molecule that were methylated. Only small fragments of the molecule have been identified by this technique. In the procedure described here the humic acid is dissolved in 2-pyrrolidone and methylated by the addition of diazomethane in diethyl ether and ethanol to the solution. Because the humic acid is completely dissolved in the reaction medium, disaggregation of the humic acid particles takes place and much more complete methylation is obtained. The methylated products may be fractionated by countercurrent distribution and analyzed by mass spectrometry.

  6. Evaluation of alternariol and alternariol methyl ether for mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.M.; Stack, M.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Alternariol and alternariol methyl ether were tested in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay, and both were shown, with and without metabolic activation, to be nonmutagenic to strains TA98 and TA100. The finding of other investigators that alternariol methyl ether is weakly mutagenic to Ta98 without metabolic activation could have resulted from the presence of a small amount of one of the highly mutagenic altertoxins in the alternariol methyl ether originally tested. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. New MTBE design now commercial. [Methyl tertiary butyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Huddleston, M.N.

    1982-03-01

    MTBE is considered by many to be the most promising octane booster to replace lead in gasoline during the 1980s. MTBE (methyl tetriary butyl ether) is made by combining methanol and isobutylene. The economic attractiveness for making this gasoline component is greatly improved by using a patented catalyst support system to give simultaneous reaction and distillation in a standard carbon steel distillation tower. The description of the process is accompanied by a simplified flow diagram and followed by the description of process variables affecting good reaction kinetics, catalyst life, and corrosion prevention. It is demonstrated that by using the technology described the production of high purity MTBE from dilute refinery streams is now economically feasible.

  8. Determination of underivatised sterols and bile acid trimethyl silyl ether methyl esters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-single ion monitoring in faeces.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sylvia; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2004-12-25

    A method for quantification of total faecal sterols and bile acids (BAs) in human stool by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-single ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) is described. Cholesterol, coprostanol, coprostanone, cholestanol, iso-lithocholic acid (iso-LCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), iso-deoxycholic acid (iso-DCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), cholic acid (CA), and 12-oxo-deoxycholic acid (12-oxo-DCA) in faeces of 86 healthy subjects were determined. The sample preparation for sterol analysis requires hydrolysis and liquid extraction from matrix, but no derivatisation. The GC-flame ionisation detection (FID) and total ion current (TIC) in GC-MS were not sufficient for sterol and BA determination, whereas selectivity and specificity of the GC-MS-SIM ensured the analysis of sterols and BAs in faeces. PMID:15556534

  9. Alternariol 9-methyl ether from the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. Samif01 and its bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jingfeng; Yu, Ruiting; Wang, Xiaohan; Mao, Ziling; Fu, Linyun; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Ligang

    2016-01-01

    One bioactive compound, identified as alternariol 9-methyl ether, was isolated from the crude extract of the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. Samif01 residing in the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. Alternariol 9-methyl ether was active against bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 25 to 75 μg/mL and median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 16.00 to 38.27 μg/mL. The IC50 value of alternariol 9-methyl ether against spore germination of Magnaporthe oryzae was 87.18 μg/mL. Alternariol 9-methyl ether also showed antinematodal activity against Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Caenorhabditis elegans with IC50 values of 98.17 μg/mL and 74.62 μg/mL, respectively. This work is the first report on alternariol 9-methyl ether and its biological activities from the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. Samif01 derived from S. miltiorrhiza Bunge. The results indicate the potential of Alternaria sp. Samif01 as a source of alternariol 9-methyl ether and also support that alternariol 9-methyl ether is a natural compound with high potential bioactivity against microorganisms. PMID:26887231

  10. Separation of methyl t-butyl ether from close boiling C[sub 5] hydrocarbons by extractive distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, L.

    1993-07-20

    A method for recovering methyl t-butyl ether from a mixture of methyl t-butyl ether and 1-pentene which comprises distilling a mixture of methyl t-butyl ether and 1-pentene in the presence of about one part of an extractive agent per part of methyl t-butyl ether -- 1-pentene mixture, recovering the 1-pentene as overhead product and obtaining the methyl t-butyl ether and the extractive agent from the still pot, wherein said extractive agent consists of one material selected from the group consisting of sulfolane, nitroethane, t-butanol, ethylene glycol diacetate, 1-methoxy-2-propanol acetate, methyl isoamyl ketone, ethylene glycol methyl ether, propylene glycol phenyl ether and diethyl malonate.

  11. Methyl-tert-hexyl ether and methyl-tert-octyl ether as gasoline oxygenates: anticipating widespread risks to community water supply wells.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Jeff; Barnett, Mark O; Zhao, Dongye; Arey, J Samuel

    2007-11-01

    The widespread contamination of groundwater resources associated with methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) use has prompted a search for replacement oxygenates in gasoline. Among the alternatives currently under development are higher methyl-tert-alkyl ethers, notably methyl-tert-hexyl ether (MtHxE) and methyl-tert-octyl ether (MtOcE). As was the case with MtBE, the introduction of these ethers into fuel supplies guarantees their migration into groundwater resources. In the present study, a screening-level risk assessment compared predicted well water concentrations of these ethers to concentrations that might cause adverse effects. A physicochemical model which has been successfully applied to the prediction of MtBE concentrations in community water supply wells (CSWs) was used to predict well water concentrations of MtHxE and MtOcE. The results indicate that these ethers are likely to contaminate water supply wells at slightly lower levels than MtBE as a result of migrating from leaking underground fuel tanks to CSWs. Because very little data is available on the physicochemical and environmental properties of MtHxE and MtOcE, estimation methods were employed in conjunction with the model to predict well water concentrations. Model calculations indicated that MtHxE and MtOcE will be present in many CSWs at concentrations approaching the concentrations that have caused widespread public health concern for MtBE. Based on these results and the possibility that MtHxE and MtOcE are potential carcinogens, testing of the toxicological properties of these ethers is recommended before they are used to replace MtBE in gasoline.

  12. Searching for trans ethyl methyl ether in Orion KL⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; López, A.; Brouillet, N.; Kolesniková, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the tentative detection of trans ethyl methyl ether (tEME), t-CH3CH2OCH3, through the identification of a large number of rotational lines from each one of the spin states of the molecule towards Orion KL. We also search for gauche-trans-n-propanol, Gt-n-CH3CH2CH2OH, an isomer of tEME in the same source. We have identified lines of both species in the IRAM 30 m line survey and in the ALMA Science Verification data. We have obtained ALMA maps to establish the spatial distribution of these species. Whereas tEME mainly arises from the compact ridge component of Orion, Gt-n-propanol appears at the emission peak of ethanol (south hot core). The derived column densities of these species at the location of their emission peaks are ≤(4.0 ± 0.8) × 1015 cm-2 and ≤(1.0 ± 0.2) × 1015 cm-2 for tEME and Gt-n-propanol, respectively. The rotational temperature is ~100 K for both molecules. We also provide maps of CH3OCOH, CH3CH2OCOH, CH3OCH3, CH3OH, and CH3CH2OH to compare the distribution of these organic saturated O-bearing species containing methyl and ethyl groups in this region. Abundance ratios of related species and upper limits to the abundances of non-detected ethers are provided. We derive an abundance ratio N(CH3OCH3)/N(tEME) ≥ 150 in the compact ridge of Orion. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of Korea), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The Joint ALMA Observatory is operated by ESO, AUI/NRAO, and NAOJ. This work was also based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Exposure to methyl tertiary-butyl ether from oxygenated gasoline in Stamford, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.C.; Johnson, C.A.; Ashley, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    In 1993, state health officials in Connecticut invited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to assist in an investigation of exposure to methyl tertiary-butyl ether in oxygenated gasoline in Stamford, Connecticut. Venous blood samples were collected from 14 commuters and from 30 other persons who worked in the vicinity of traffic or automobiles, and the samples were analyzed for methyl tertiary-butyl ether, tertiary-butyl alcohol, benzene, m-/p-xylene, o-xylene, and toluene. The highest levels of methyl tertiary-butyl ether in blood were measured among gasoline service station attendants (median = 15 {mu}g/l, range = 7.6-28.9 {mu}g/l). Blood levels of methyl tertiary-butyl ether were highly variable among persons who worked in car-repair shops (median = 1.73 {mu}g/l, range = 0.17-36.7 {mu}/l) and were generally lowest among commuters (median = 0.11 {mu}g/l, range = <0.05-2.60 {mu}g/l). Blood levels of methyl tertiary-butyl ether were correlated strongly with personal-breathing-zone samples of methyl tertiary-butyl ether and blood levels of other volatile organic compounds. This exposure information should prove useful to a future risk analysis of this high-volume chemical. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Optimisation of a 5-[3-phenyl-(2-cyclic-ether)-methyl-ether]-4-aminopyrrolopyrimidine series of IGF-1R inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Robin A; Marsilje, Thomas H; Stutz, Stefan; Boos, Andreas; Niklaus, Michel; Chen, Bei; Jiang, Songchun; Lu, Wenshuo; Furet, Pascal; McCarthy, Clive; Stauffer, Frédéric; Guagnano, Vito; Vaupel, Andrea; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Schnell, Christian; Jeay, Sébastien

    2016-04-15

    Taking the pyrrolopyrimidine derived IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 as the starting point, the benzyl ether back-pocket binding moiety was replaced with a series of 2-cyclic ether methyl ethers leading to the identification of novel achiral [2.2.1]-bicyclic ether methyl ether containing analogues with improved IGF-1R activities and kinase selectivities. Further exploration of the series, including a fluorine scan of the 5-phenyl substituent, and optimisation of the sugar-pocket binding moiety identified compound 33 containing (S)-2-tetrahydrofuran methyl ether 6-fluorophenyl ether back-pocket, and cis-N-Ac-Pip sugar-pocket binding groups. Compound 33 showed improved selectivity and pharmacokinetics compared to NVP-AEW541, and produced comparable in vivo efficacy to linsitinib in inhibiting the growth of an IGF-1R dependent tumour xenograft model in the mouse.

  15. Laboratory Method for Analysis of Small Concentrations of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and Other Ether Gasoline Oxygenates in Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Donna L.; Connor, Brooke F.; Abney, Sonja R.; Raese, Jon W.

    1998-01-01

    This Fact Sheet presents data for analysis of nanogram-per-liter concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and three other ether gasoline oxygenates, including methyl tert-pentyl ether (TAME), diisopropyl ether (DIPE), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), by purge- and-trap capillary-column gas chromatography. Long-term method detection levels (LT-MDLs) for MTBE, TAME, DIPE, and ETBE ranged from 15 to 83 nanograms per liter (0.015 to 0.083 microgram per liter). Nanogram-per-liter-concentration detections are reported if all of the identification criteria are met, whereas previous methods censored detections at a pre-determined method reporting level. The reporting level for this method is defined as two times the LT-MDL, does not censor detections at less than this concentration, and is referred to as the nondetection value (NDV). Bias and variability data from multiple analyses, analysts, and instruments over a 60-day period show the oxygenate recoveries ranging from 100 to 109 percent, with 6 to 8 percent relative standard deviation. MTBE, TAME, DIPE, and ETBE were not detected in the analysis of 225 laboratory reagent blanks from January to December 1997. A preservation study in ground water and surface water indicates that all the oxygenates are stable at pH 2 for up to 216 days, with recoveries ranging from 94 to 115 percent on day 216, and relative standard deviations ranging from 5 to 9 percent for the duration of the study.

  16. Aliphatic polycarbonates based on carbon dioxide, furfuryl glycidyl ether, and glycidyl methyl ether: reversible functionalization and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Jeannette; Scharfenberg, Markus; Poon, Jeffrey; Moers, Christian; Frey, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Well-defined poly((furfuryl glycidyl ether)-co-(glycidyl methyl ether) carbonate) (P((FGE-co-GME)C)) copolymers with varying furfuryl glycidyl ether (FGE) content in the range of 26% to 100% are prepared directly from CO2 and the respective epoxides in a solvent-free synthesis. All materials are characterized by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The furfuryl-functional samples exhibit monomodal molecular weight distributions with Mw/Mn in the range of 1.16 to 1.43 and molecular weights (Mn) between 2300 and 4300 g mol(-1). Thermal properties reflect the amorphous structure of the polymers. Both post-functionalization and cross-linking are performed via Diels-Alder chemistry using maleimide derivatives, leading to reversible network formation. This transformation is shown to be thermally reversible at 110 °C.

  17. Aliphatic polycarbonates based on carbon dioxide, furfuryl glycidyl ether, and glycidyl methyl ether: reversible functionalization and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Jeannette; Scharfenberg, Markus; Poon, Jeffrey; Moers, Christian; Frey, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Well-defined poly((furfuryl glycidyl ether)-co-(glycidyl methyl ether) carbonate) (P((FGE-co-GME)C)) copolymers with varying furfuryl glycidyl ether (FGE) content in the range of 26% to 100% are prepared directly from CO2 and the respective epoxides in a solvent-free synthesis. All materials are characterized by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The furfuryl-functional samples exhibit monomodal molecular weight distributions with Mw/Mn in the range of 1.16 to 1.43 and molecular weights (Mn) between 2300 and 4300 g mol(-1). Thermal properties reflect the amorphous structure of the polymers. Both post-functionalization and cross-linking are performed via Diels-Alder chemistry using maleimide derivatives, leading to reversible network formation. This transformation is shown to be thermally reversible at 110 °C. PMID:25407342

  18. Human gallbladder morphology after gallstone dissolution with methyl tert-butyl ether.

    PubMed

    vanSonnenberg, E; Zakko, S; Hofmann, A F; D'Agostino, H B; Jinich, H; Hoyt, D B; Miyai, K; Ramsby, G; Moossa, A R

    1991-06-01

    The effects of methyl tert-butyl ether exposure on the human gallbladder in five patients who were treated for gallstones by contact dissolution is described. Two patients underwent cholecystectomy within 1 week of methyl tert-butyl ether treatment, one patient 2 weeks after, another 10 weeks after, and one 12 weeks after. Indications for cholecystectomy were bilirubinate stones (resistant to methyl tert-butyl ether), catheter dislodgement, bile leakage, and gallstone recurrence (2 patients). Gallstones were dissolved completely in three patients, there was approximately 50% stone reduction in one patient, and no dissolution occurred in the fifth patient. Each gallbladder was examined grossly and histologically. Electron microscopic evaluation was performed in one cases. Typical inflammatory findings of chronic cholecystitis were observed in each gallbladder and were most conspicuous in the submucosa; the mucosal and serosal surfaces were intact. Mild acute inflammatory changes were noted in the submucosa in the two patients with the shortest interval between methyl tert-butyl ether administration and cholecystectomy. There were no ulcerations in the mucosa and no unusual wall thickening or fibrosis in any patient. These observations support the safety of methyl tert-butyl ether perfusion in the human gallbladder; the mild acute changes may be a transient and reversible phenomenon.

  19. Isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid (IMPA)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid ( IMPA ) ; CASRN 1832 - 54 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assess

  20. Thermodynamic properties and ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for 2-aminoisobutyric acid (2-methylalanine), acetic acid, (Z)-5-ethylidene-2-norbornene, mesityl oxide (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one), 4-methylpent-1-ene, 2,2{prime}-bis(phenylthio)propane, and glycidyl phenyl ether (1,2-epoxy-3-phenoxypropane)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Cowell, A.B.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.

    1997-11-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of group-contribution methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of acetic acid, (Z)-5-ethylidene-2-norbornene, mesityl oxide (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one), 4-methylpent-1-ene, glycidyl phenyl ether (1,2-epoxy-3-phenoxypropane), and 2,2{prime}-bis(phenylthio)propane are reported. An enthalpy of formation of 2-aminoisobutyric acid (2-methylalanine) in the crystalline phase was determined. Using a literature value for the enthalpy of sublimation of 2-aminoisobutyric acid, a value for the ideal-gas enthalpy of formation was derived. An enthalpy of fusion was determined for 2,2{prime}-bis(phenylthio)propane. Two-phase (solid + vapor) or (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined from 300 K to the critical region or earlier decomposition temperature for all the compounds except acetic acid. For mesityl oxide and 4-methylpent-1-ene, critical temperatures and critical densities were determined from the DSC results and corresponding critical pressures derived from the fitting procedures. Group-additivity parameters and ring strain energies useful in the application of group-contribution correlations were derived.

  1. Microwave Spectroscopy of Trans-Ethyl Methyl Ether in the Torsionally Excited State 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Murata, Keigo; Tsunekawa, Shozo; Ohashi, Nobukimi

    2010-06-01

    The trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) has two methyl group internal rotors which are equivalent to the two vibrational motions, ν28 and ν29. There is another low-lying torsional motion which is a skeltal torsion (ν30) and does not cause splitting. The microwave spectra of the trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule in the ν28 = 1, ν29 = 1, and ν30 = 1 have been studied and interactions between these states were discussed. In this paper we report results on the ν30 = 2, and 3 state. The analysis based on Hougen's tunneling matrix formulation considering two methyl groups are used. We try to interpret tunneling parameters obtained in the present analysis quantitatively from the viewpoint of torsion-torsion interaction.

  2. Method for determination of methyl tert-butyl ether and its degradation products in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, C.D.; Isabelle, L.M.; Pankow, J.F.; Rose, D.L.; Tratnyek, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method is described that can detect the major alkyl ether compounds that are used as gasoline oxygenates (methyl tert-butyl ether, MTBE; ethyl tert-butyl ether, ETBE; and tert-amyl methyl ether, TAME) and their most characteristic degradation products (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA; tert-butyl formate, TBF; and tert-amyl alcohol, TAA) in water at sub-ppb concentrations. The new method involves gas chromatography (GC) with direct aqueous injection (DAI) onto a polar column via a splitless injector, coupled with detection by mass spectrometry (MS). DAI-GC/MS gives excellent agreement with conventional purge-and-trap methods for MTBE over a wide range of environmentally relevant concentrations. The new method can also give simultaneous identification of polar compounds that might occur as degradation products of gasoline oxygenates, such as TBA, TBF, TAA, methyl acetate, and acetone. When the method was applied to effluent from a column microcosm prepared with core material from an urban site in New Jersey, conversion of MTBE to TBA was observed after a lag period of 35 days. However, to date, analyses of water samples from six field sites using the DAI-GC/MS method have not produced evidence for the expected products of in situ degradation of MTBE.An analytical method is described that can detect the major alkyl ether compounds that are used as gasoline oxygenates (methyl tert-butyl ether, MTBE; ethyl tert-butyl ether, ETBE; and tert-amyl methyl ether, TAME) and their most characteristic degradation products (tert-butyl alcohol, TBA; tert-butyl formate, TBF; and tert-amyl alcohol, TAA) in water at sub-ppb concentrations. The new method involves gas chromatography (GC) with direct aqueous injection (DAI) onto a polar column via a splitless injector, coupled with detection by mass spectrometry (MS). DAI-GC/MS gives excellent agreement with conventional purge-and-trap methods for MTBE over a wide range of environmentally relevant concentrations. The new method

  3. INHALATION EXPOSURE TO METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND DIBROMOCHLOROMETHANE (DBCM) USING CONTINUOUS BREATH ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been added to gasoline to help meet national ambient air quality standards in those parts of the U.S. that are non-compliant for carbon monoxide. Although MTBE has provided important health benefits in terms of reduced haza...

  4. Enhanced diisobutene production in the presence of methyl tertiary butyl ether

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1983-01-01

    In the liquid phase reaction of isobutene in the presence of resin cation exchange resins with itself in a C.sub.4 hydrocarbon stream to form dimers, the formation of higher polymers, oligomers, and co-dimer by-products is suppressed by the presence of 0.0001 to 1 mole per mole of isobutene of methyl tertiary butyl ether.

  5. STRUCTURES AND BINDING ENERGIES OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER-WATER COMPLEXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a well-known environmental contaminant owing to its high solubility in water. Since the early 1990s, MTBE has been added to gasoline to improve air quality in some metropolitan areas of the United States. Improved air quality was, however, achiev...

  6. Enhanced diisobutene production in the presence of methyl tertiary butyl ether

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    In the liquid phase reaction of isobutene in the presence of resin cation exchange resins with itself in a C[sub 4] hydrocarbon stream to form dimers, the formation of higher polymers, oligomers, and co-dimer by-products is suppressed by the presence of 0.0001 to 1 mole per mole of isobutene of methyl tertiary butyl ether. 1 fig.

  7. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION OF METHYL-TERT-BUTYL ETHER FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photo-oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water was investigated to determine the feasibility of using photocatalysis for the treatment of MTBE-contaminated drinking water. The feasibility assessment was conducted using slurries of titanium dioxide in both a photo-...

  8. DERMAL, ORAL AND INHALATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive used to increase octane and reduce carbon monoxide emissions and ozone precursors, has contaminated drinking water and can lead to exposure by oral, inhalation, and dermal routes. To determine its dermal, oral, and inhal...

  9. DERMAL, ORAL, AND INHALATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive, used to increase octane and reduce carbon monoxide emissions and ozone precursors has contaminated drinking water leading to exposure by oral, inhalation, and dermal routes. To determine its dermal, oral, and inhalation ki...

  10. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  11. ATTENUATION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER IN WATER USING SUNLIGHT AND A PHOTOCATALYST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a gasoline additive has resulted in increasing pollution of ground water. Most of the conventional treatment technologies are inefficient or costly when the initial concentration of MTBE is low (<200 ug/L). In order to find an eco-frie...

  12. TREATMENT OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER CONTAMINATED WATER USING PHOTOCATALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of photo-oxidation treatment of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water was investigated in three ways, 1) using a slurry falling film photo-reactor, 2) a batch solar reactor system, and 3) a combination of air-stripping and gas phase photooxidation system. MTBE-c...

  13. REFINED PBPK MODEL OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggregate (multiple pathway) exposures to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in air and water occur via dermal, inhalation, and oral routes. Previously, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to quantify the kinetic behavior of MTBE and its primary met...

  14. BIODEGRADATION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER USING AN INNOVATIVE BIOMASS CONCENTRATOR REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was investigated using a pilot-scale Biomass Concentrator Reactor (BCR). The reactor was operated for a year at a flow rate of 2500 L/d of Cincinnati dechlorinated tap water and an influent MTBE concentration o...

  15. BIODEGRADATION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER AND BTEX AT VARYING HYDRAULIC RETENTION TIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biologically degrading methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contaminated groundwater is dependent on the ability to degrade MTBE and its byproducts in the presence of other gasoline contaminants. This study investigates a mixed culture degrading both MTBE and benzene...

  16. INFLUENCE OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) ON LAKE WATER ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as an octane booster in gasoline in the United States since the 1970s. MTBE use increased greatly in the 1990s with the implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The MTBE enhanced a more complete combustion of fuel hydroc...

  17. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing Chen Jingyuan

    2009-04-15

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  18. Biodegradation of methyl t-butyl ether by aerobic granules under a cosubstrate condition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L L; Chen, J M; Fang, F

    2008-03-01

    Aerobic granules efficient at degrading methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) with ethanol as a cosubstrate were successfully developed in a well-mixed sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Aerobic granules were first observed about 100 days after reactor startup. Treatment efficiency of MTBE in the reactor during stable operation exceeded 99.9%, and effluent MTBE was in the range of 15-50 microg/L. The specific MTBE degradation rate was observed to increase with increasing MTBE initial concentration from 25 to 500 mg/L, which peaked at 22.7 mg MTBE/g (volatile suspended solids).h and declined with further increases in MTBE concentration as substrate inhibition effects became significant. Microbial-community deoxyribonucleic acid profiling was carried out using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The reactor was found to be inhabited by several diverse bacterial species, most notably microorganisms related to the genera Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Hyphomicrobium vulgare. These organisms were previously reported to be associated with MTBE biodegradation. A majority of the bands in the reactor represented a group of organisms belonging to the Flavobacteria-Proteobacteria-Actinobacteridae class of bacteria. This study demonstrates that MTBE can be effectively degraded by aerobic granules under a cosubstrate condition and gives insight into the microorganisms potentially involved in the process. PMID:18183384

  19. U.S. Geological Survey laboratory method for methyl tert-Butyl ether and other fuel oxygenates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raese, Jon W.; Rose, Donna L.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was found in shallow ground-water samples in a study of 8 urban and 20 agricultural areas throughout the United States in 1993 and 1994 (Squillace and others, 1995, p. 1). The compound is added to gasoline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase the octane level and to reduce carbon monoxide and ozone levels in the air. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL), near Denver, uses state-of-the-art technology to analyze samples for MTBE as part of the USGS water-quality studies. In addition, the NWQL offers custom analyses to determine two other fuel oxygenates--ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). The NWQL was not able to obtain a reference standard for tert-amyl ethyl ether (TAEE), another possible fuel oxygenate (Shelley and Fouhy, 1994, p. 63). The shallow ground-water samples were collected as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These samples were collected from 211 urban wells or springs and 562 agricultural wells sampled by the USGS in 1993 and 1994. The wells were keyed to specific land-use areas to assess the effects of different uses on ground-water quality (Squillace and others, 1995, p. 2). Ground-water samples were preserved on site to pH less than or equal to 2 with a solution of 1:1 hydrochloric acid. All samples were analyzed at the NWQL within 2 weeks after collection. The purpose of this fact sheet is to explain briefly the analytical method implemented by the USGS for determining MTBE and other fuel oxygenates. The scope is necessarily limited to an overview of the analytical method (instrumentation, sample preparation, calibration and quantitation, identification, and preservation of samples) and method performance (reagent blanks, accuracy, and precision).

  20. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested.

  1. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested. PMID:27623064

  2. Rotational Investigation of the Adducts of Formic Acid with Alcohols, Ethers and Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Spada, Lorenzo; Li, Weixing; Caminati, Walther

    2016-06-01

    Mixtures of formic acid with methyl alcohol, with isopropyl alcohol, with tert-butyl alcohol, with dimethylether and with isopropylformiate have been supersonically expanded as pulsed jets. The obtained cool plumes have been analyzed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. It has been possible to assign the rotational spectra of the 1:1 adducts of formic acid with tert-butyl alcohol, with dimethyl ether and with isopropylformiate. The conformational shapes and geometries of these adducts, as well as the topologies of their itermolecular hydrogen bonds will be presented. An explanation is given of the failure of the assignments of the rotational spectra of the adducts of formic acid with methyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol.

  3. Metabolism of Diethyl Ether and Cometabolism of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, L. K.; Curry, S. S.; Ciuffetti, L. M.; Hyman, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, evidence for two novel metabolic processes catalyzed by a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. strain ATCC 58400, is presented. First, our results indicate that this Graphium sp. can utilize the widely used solvent diethyl ether (DEE) as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The kinetics of biomass accumulation and DEE consumption closely followed each other, and the molar growth yield on DEE was indistinguishable from that with n-butane. n-Butane-grown mycelia also immediately oxidized DEE without the extracellular accumulation of organic oxidation products. This suggests a common pathway for the oxidation of both compounds. Acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated gaseous hydrocarbons completely inhibited the growth of this Graphium sp. on DEE and DEE oxidation by n-butane-grown mycelia. Second, our results indicate that gaseous n-alkane-grown Graphium mycelia can cometabolically degrade the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The degradation of MTBE was also completely inhibited by acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated hydrocarbons and was strongly influenced by n-butane. Two products of MTBE degradation, tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were detected. The kinetics of product formation suggest that TBF production temporally precedes TBA accumulation and that TBF is hydrolyzed both biotically and abiotically to yield TBA. Extracellular accumulation of TBA accounted for only a maximum of 25% of the total MTBE consumed. Our results suggest that both DEE oxidation and MTBE oxidation are initiated by cytochrome P-450-catalyzed reactions which lead to scission of the ether bonds in these compounds. Our findings also suggest a potential role for gaseous n-alkane-oxidizing fungi in the remediation of MTBE contamination. PMID:16535667

  4. Determination of low level methyl tert-butyl ether, ethyl tert-butyl ether and methyl tert-amyl ether in human urine by HS-SPME gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scibetta, Licia; Campo, Laura; Mercadante, Rosa; Foà, Vito; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) are oxygenated compounds added to gasoline to enhance octane rating and to improve combustion. They may be found as pollutants of living and working environments. In this work a robotized method for the quantification of low level MTBE, ETBE and TAME in human urine was developed and validated. The analytes were sampled in the headspace of urine by SPME in the presence of MTBE-d12 as internal standard. Different fibers were compared for their linearity and extraction efficiency: carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane, polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene, and polydimethylsiloxane. The first, although highly efficient, was discarded due to deviation of linearity for competitive displacement, and the polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fiber was chosen instead. The analysis was performed by GC/MS operating in the electron impact mode. The method is very specific, with range of linearity 30-4600 ng L(-1), within- and between-run precision, as coefficient of variation, <22 and <16%, accuracy within 20% the theoretical level, and limit of detection of 6 ng L(-1) for all the analytes. The influence of the matrix on the quantification of these ethers was evaluated analysing the specimens of seven traffic policemen exposed to autovehicular emissions: using the calibration curve and the method of standard additions comparable levels of MTBE (68-528 ng L(-1)), ETBE (<6 ng L(-1)), and TAME (<6 ng L(-1)) were obtained.

  5. Methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol degradation by Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Reyes, Miguel; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2005-11-01

    Fusarium solani degraded methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other oxygenated compounds from gasoline including tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). The maximum degradation rate of MTBE was 16 mg protein h and 46 mg/g protein h for TBA. The culture transformed 77% of the total carbon to 14CO2. The estimated yield for MTBE was 0.18 g dry wt/g MTBE. PMID:16314973

  6. Methyl t-Butyl Ether Mineralization in Surface-Water Sediment Microcosms under Denitrifying Conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Mineralization of [U-14C] methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) to 14CO2 without accumulation of t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was observed in surface-water sediment microcosms under denitrifying conditions. Methanogenic activity and limited transformation of MTBE to TBA were observed in the absence of denitrification. Results indicate that bed sediment microorganisms can effectively degrade MTBE to nontoxic products under denitrifying conditions.

  7. Facile cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers using o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) without affecting tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yikang; Huang, Jia-Hui; Shen, Xin; Hu, Qi; Tang, Chao-Jun; Li, Liang

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] In DMSO cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers by o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) was significantly faster than cleavage of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers or further oxidation into carbonyl compounds. In most cases, TES protecting groups could be removed in good to excellent yields within 1 h, whereas similar TBS protecting groups remained intact under the same conditions. The procedure also could be adapted for direct one-pot conversion of TES ethers into carbonyl compounds.

  8. Ketene as a Reaction Intermediate in the Carbonylation of Dimethyl Ether to Methyl Acetate over Mordenite.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Dominik B; Christensen, Jakob M; Temel, Burcin; Studt, Felix; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Riisager, Anders; Jensen, Anker D

    2015-06-15

    Unprecedented insight into the carbonylation of dimethyl ether over Mordenite is provided through the identification of ketene (CH2CO) as a reaction intermediate. The formation of ketene is predicted by detailed DFT calculations and verified experimentally by the observation of doubly deuterated acetic acid (CH2DCOOD), when D2O is introduced in the feed during the carbonylation reaction. PMID:25967363

  9. Induction of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE)-Oxidizing Activity in Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 by MTBE

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erika L.; Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Alkane-grown cells of Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 cometabolically degrade the gasoline oxygenate methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) through the activities of an alkane-inducible monooxygenase and other enzymes in the alkane oxidation pathway. In this study we examined the effects of MTBE on the MTBE-oxidizing activity of M. vaccae JOB5 grown on diverse nonalkane substrates. Carbon-limited cultures were grown on glycerol, lactate, several sugars, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, both in the presence and absence of MTBE. In all MTBE-containing cultures, MTBE consumption occurred and tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) and tertiary butyl formate accumulated in the culture medium. Acetylene, a specific inactivator of alkane- and MTBE-oxidizing activities, fully inhibited MTBE consumption and product accumulation but had no other apparent effects on culture growth. The MTBE-dependent stimulation of MTBE-oxidizing activity in fructose- and glycerol-grown cells was saturable with respect to MTBE concentration (50% saturation level = 2.4 to 2.75 mM), and the onset of MTBE oxidation in glycerol-grown cells was inhibited by both rifampin and chloramphenicol. Other oxygenates (TBA and tertiary amyl methyl ether) also induced the enzyme activity required for their own degradation in glycerol-grown cells. Presence of MTBE also promoted MTBE oxidation in cells grown on organic acids, compounds that are often found in anaerobic, gasoline-contaminated environments. Experiments with acid-grown cells suggested induction of MTBE-oxidizing activity by MTBE is subject to catabolite repression. The results of this study are discussed in terms of their potential implications towards our understanding of the role of cometabolism in MTBE and TBA biodegradation in gasoline-contaminated environments. PMID:14766585

  10. Biotransformation of methyl tert-butyl ether by human cytochrome P450 2A6.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Miran Beigi, Ali Akbar; Teymouri, Mohammad; Poursaberi, Tahereh; Mostafavi, S Mojtaba; Soleimani, Parviz; Chitsazian, Fereshteh; Tash, Shahram Abolhassan

    2012-04-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is widely used as gasoline oxygenate and octane number enhancer for more complete combustion in order to reduce the air pollution caused by motor vehicle exhaust. The possible adverse effects of MTBE on human health are of major public concern. However, information on the metabolism of MTBE in human tissues is scarce. The present study demonstrates that human cytochrome P450 2A6 is able to metabolize MTBE to tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), a major circulating metabolite and marker for exposure to MTBE. As CYP2A6 is known to be constitutively expressed in human livers, we infer that it may play a significant role in metabolism of gasoline ethers in liver tissue. PMID:21915685

  11. Synthesis, optical and electrochemical properties of substituted 2-cinnamoyl-1, 3-indandione O-methyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malina, Ilze; Kampars, Valdis; Turovska, Baiba

    2016-07-01

    Seven new 2-cinnamoyl-1,3-indandione (2CID) O-methyl ethers with different substituents (R = -H, -CH3, -OCH3, -N(C6H5)2, -N(CH2CH2CN)2, julolidyl, -N(CH3)2) in 4-position of the cinnamoyl moiety were synthesized. The methylation with dimethylsulfate occurred at the oxygen atom of the exocyclic enol group with high selectivity. The synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, IR, UV-Vis and luminescence spectroscopy, their electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained results indicates that introducing an electron donating substituents in the 4-position of cinnamoyl moiety facilitates electrochemical oxidation, remarkably shifts absorption and emission bands to longer wavelengths, simultaneously increases extinction coefficient (ε). O-methyl ethers with strong electron donating groups (R = -N(C6H5)2, -N(CH2CH2CN)2, julolidyl, -N(CH3)2) in molecule are characterized by luminescence with maximum in range from 547 to 647 nm and absolute photoluminescence quantum yields from 0.02 to 0.32. Quantum yield (QY) of chromophore containing julolidyl fragment is solvent dependent. It was 0.32 in chloroform and decreased in other polar (ethanol, acetone) solvents.

  12. Thermo-responsive devices using poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, R.; Ichijo, H.; Hirasa, O.

    1993-10-01

    Aqueous solution of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) shows phase transition around 38 C. PVME hydrogel cross-linked by gamma-ray irradiation is also a thermally responsive hydrogel and undergoes volume change at the same temperature; it swells below and shrinks above 38 C. PVME hydrogel prepared near phase transition temperature has heterogeneous and macroporous structure. The volume change of the macroporous hydrogel takes place rapidly with changing temperature. An attempt has been made to develop thermally activated chemomechanical devices such as an artificial muscle model, an automatic separation system, an artificial finger model, and a photo-responsive device.

  13. Measurement of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) in raw drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L; Koester, C J; Moran, J E

    1999-10-14

    In order to assess the pathways for human exposure to methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) and to understand the extent of MTBE contamination in watersheds, a purge and trap gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method to measure part-per-trillion (ppt) concentrations of MTBE in environmental waters was developed. A variety of California's raw drinking waters were analyzed. No detectable MTBE was found in deep groundwater (>1000 feet). However shallow groundwater ({approx}250 feet) contained MTBE concentrations of non-detect to 1300 ppt. MTBE concentrations measured in rivers and lakes ranged from non-detect to 3500 ppt. East (San Francisco) Bay area rain water contained approximately 80 ppt MTBE.

  14. New corrosion inhibitor acrylamide methyl ether for mild steel in 1 M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinyu; Jiang, Xiaohui; Xia, Shuwei; Shan, Mingli; Li, Xia; Yu, Liangmin; Tang, Qunwei

    2016-05-01

    Pursuit of good inhibition performance has been a persistent objective for advanced inhibitor industry. Here we demonstrate the experimental realization of a new corrosion inhibitor acrylamide methyl ether (AAME) from N-Methylol acrylamide (N-MAM) for mild steel in 1 M HCl. The resultant adsorption films have inhibition efficiency as high as 96.2%. Moreover, a theoretical investigation is also launched to demonstrate the potential mechanism behind the promising corrosion behaviors. This work represents a significant step forward, as it demonstrates how to make scalable AAME inhibitors as well as to enhance inhibition performances for high-efficiency and cost-effective corrosion inhibition platforms.

  15. Effects of 2,3-Dehydrosilybin and Its Galloyl Ester and Methyl Ether Derivatives on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Karas, Daniel; Gažák, Radek; Valentová, Kateřina; Chambers, Christopher S; Pivodová, Veronika; Biedermann, David; Křenková, Alena; Oborná, Ivana; Kuzma, Marek; Cvačka, Josef; Ulrichová, Jitka; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-04-22

    The effects in vitro of 2,3-dehydrosilybin and several galloyl esters and methyl ethers on the viability, proliferation, and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated. The monogalloyl esters were synthesized by a chemoselective esterification method or by Steglich esterification of suitably protected 2,3-dehydrosilybin (1) with protected gallic acid. 2,3-Dehydrosilybin (1) displayed more potent cytotoxic, antiproliferative, and antimigratory activities (IC50 12.0, 5.4, and 12.2 μM, respectively) than silybin. The methylated derivatives were less active, with the least potent being 3,7-di-O-methyl-2,3-dehydrosilybin (6). On the other hand, galloylation at C-7 OH and C-23 OH markedly increased the cytotoxicity and the effects on the proliferation and migration of HUVECs. The most active derivative was 7-O-galloyl-2,3-dehydrosilybin (13; IC50 value of 3.4, 1.6, and 4.7 μM in the cytotoxicity, inhibition of proliferation, and antimigratory assays, respectively). Overall, this preliminary structure-activity relationship study demonstrated the importance of a 2,3-double bond, a C-7 OH group, and a galloyl moiety in enhancing the activity of flavonolignans toward HUVECs.

  16. Coupled torsional and bending motions in s-cis methyl vinyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Rolf; Ha, Tae-Kyu; Oldani, Markus; Caminati, Walther

    1987-02-01

    New microwave measurements on s-cis methyl vinyl ether and a study of the interactions among skeletal and methyl torsions and COC bending are reported. Using pulsed microwave Fourier transform spectroscopy, the small methyl torsional A-E splitting (0.16 MHz) in the vibrational ground state has been resolved for the first time. Large splittings are observed in the first excited states of skeletal torsion and COC bending. Ab initio results on the torsional coupling, allowing for structural relaxation, are reported and used to specify, in part, a flexible model for the torsional and bending motions. The spectroscopic properties of this three-dimensional model sytem, as estimated from the results for the one-dimensional and two-dimensional subsystems, explain the relevant experimental data. The gearing type torsional interaction predicted ab initio is confirmed by this treatment. The adjusted potential function as well as the structural relaxations upon torsion suggest repulsive interaction between the methyl hydrogen atoms and the methylenic hydrogen atom next to the methyl group.

  17. Copoly(arlene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Robertson, Gilles; Guiver, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The P AE and PAEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sP AE and sP AEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (DS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v}(wet) (volume-based, wet state)) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm{sup 3}, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5-51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the area of outstanding properties in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based). Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  18. Occurrence and Sources of Triterpenoid Methyl Ethers and Acetates in Sediments of the Cross-River System, Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oyo-Ita, Orok E.; Ekpo, Bassey O.; Oros, Daniel R.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Pentacyclic triterpenol methyl ethers (PTMEs), germanicol methyl ether (miliacin), 3-methoxyfern-9(11)-ene (arundoin), β-amyrin methyl ether (iso-sawamilletin), and 3-methoxytaraxer-14-ene (sawamilletin or crusgallin) were characterized in surface sediments of the Cross-River system using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Triterpenol esters (mainly α- and β-amyrinyl acetates and hexanoates, and lupeyl acetate and hexanoate) were also found. These distinct compounds are useful for assessing diagenesis that can occur during river transport of organic detritus. Poaceae, mainly Gramineae and Elaeis guineensis higher plant species, are proposed as primary sources for the PTMEs and esters in the sediments. PTMEs are biomarkers of specific higher plant subspecies, while the triterpenol esters are indicators of early diagenetic alteration of higher plant detritus. PMID:20414350

  19. Ochnaflavone and ochnaflavone 7-O-methyl ether two antibacterial biflavonoids from Ochna pretoriensis (Ochnaceae).

    PubMed

    Makhafola, Tshepiso J; Samuel, Babatunde B; Elgorashi, Esameldin E; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2012-12-01

    The acetone extract of Ochna pretoriensis was evaluated for antibacterial activity using bioautography and serial microplate dilution methods against four nosocomial bacterial pathogens namely: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extract led to the isolation of two antibacterial biflavonoids, ochnaflavone and ochnaflavone 7-O-methyl ether. Gram-negative bacteria were more sensitive to the isolated compounds than the Gram-positive bacteria (MIC values: 31.3 microg/mL for P. aeruginosa and 62.5 microg/mL for S. aureus). In addition, the isolated compounds were assessed for their potential toxic effects in the MTT toxicity assay using monkey kidney vero cells and Ames genotoxicity test using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. LC50 values were 125.9 microg/mL for ochnaflavone and 162.0/microg/mL for ochnaflavone 7-O-methyl ether. The isolated compounds have selectivity index values ranging from 1.29 to 4.03. Selectivity index values higher than one indicate that test samples are less toxic to the host cells than to the pathogens. The biflavonoids did not have any mutagenic effects in the Salmonella/microsome assay without metabolic activation.

  20. Microwave Spectroscopy of Trans-Ethyl Methyl Ether in the Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Sakai, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shozo; Miyamoto, Taihei; Fujitake, Masaharu; Ohashi, Nobukimi

    2013-06-01

    The trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) has two inequivalent methyl group internal rotors which corresponds to the two vibrational motions, ν_{28} and ν_{29}. Due to these internal rotations, a rotational transition could be split into maximum five components. The skeletal torsion (ν_{30}) is another low-lying state (ν_{30}) that interacts with the ν_{28} and ν_{29} modes. The microwave spectra of the trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule in the ν_{28} = 1, ν_{29} = 1, and ν_{30} = 1, 2 and 3 have been extensively studied by using Hougen's tunneling matrix formalism. The microwave spectroscopy in the ground state was studied by several groups. The splitting due to the ν_{28} mode (C-CH_3 internal rotation) is small in the ground state and was not fully resolved in most of the previous studied rotational transitions. In this paper, we report the results of the pulsed nozzle-jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy so as to measure the fully resolved spectra. The submillmeter wave spectroscopy was also carried out. Our analysis including the previously reported transitions would be useful for astronomical observations. K. Kobayashi, T. Matsui, N. Mori, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi J. Mol. Spectrosc. {269}, 242 2011. K. Kobayashi, T. Matsui, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi J. Mol. Spectrosc. {255}, 164 2009. K. Kobayashi, T. Matsui, N. Mori, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi J. Mol. Spectrosc.{251}, 301 2008. K. Kobayashi, K. Murata, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi Int. Symposium on Mol. Spectrosc., 65th Meeting TH15 2010.} M. Hayashi, and K. Kuwada J. Mol. Structure {28}, 147 1975. M. Hayashi, and M. Adachi J. Mol. Structure {78}, 53 1982. S. Tsunekawa, Y. Kinai, Y. Kondo, H. Odashima, and K. Takagi Molecules {8}, 103 2003. U. Fuchs, G. Winnewisser, P. Groner, F. C. De Lucia, and E. Herbst Astrophys. J. Suppl. {144}, 277 2003.

  1. Copoly(arylene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Dae Sik, Kim; Yu Seung, Kim; Gilles, Robertson; Guiver, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The PAE and P AEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sPAE and sPAEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (OS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v})(wet) (volume-based, wet state) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm3, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5 -51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the upper left-hand corner in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based), i.e., high proton conductivity and low water uptake. Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  2. Identification of a Polyketide Synthase Required for Alternariol (AOH) and Alternariol-9-Methyl Ether (AME) Formation in Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debjani; Fetzner, Ramona; Burkhardt, Britta; Podlech, Joachim; Metzler, Manfred; Dang, Ha; Lawrence, Christopher; Fischer, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Alternaria alternata produces more than 60 secondary metabolites, among which alternariol (AOH) and alternariol-9-methyl ether (AME) are important mycotoxins. Whereas the toxicology of these two polyketide-based compounds has been studied, nothing is known about the genetics of their biosynthesis. One of the postulated core enzymes in the biosynthesis of AOH and AME is polyketide synthase (PKS). In a draft genome sequence of A. alternata we identified 10 putative PKS-encoding genes. The timing of the expression of two PKS genes, pksJ and pksH, correlated with the production of AOH and AME. The PksJ and PksH proteins are predicted to be 2222 and 2821 amino acids in length, respectively. They are both iterative type I reducing polyketide synthases. PksJ harbors a peroxisomal targeting sequence at the C-terminus, suggesting that the biosynthesis occurs at least partly in these organelles. In the vicinity of pksJ we found a transcriptional regulator, altR, involved in pksJ induction and a putative methyl transferase, possibly responsible for AME formation. Downregulation of pksJ and altR caused a large decrease of alternariol formation, suggesting that PksJ is the polyketide synthase required for the postulated Claisen condensations during the biosynthesis. No other enzymes appeared to be required. PksH downregulation affected pksJ expression and thus caused an indirect effect on AOH production. PMID:22792370

  3. DERMAL EXPOSURE TO METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND DIBROMOCHLOROMETHANE (DBCM) WHILE BATHING WITH CONTAMINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been added to gasoline to help meet national ambient air quality standards in those parts of the U.S. that are non-compliant for carbon monoxide. Although MTBE has provided important health benefits in terms of reduced hazardous a...

  4. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  5. WATER QUALITY AT FIVE MARINAS IN LAKE TEXOMA AS RELATED TO METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in five marinas was monitored between June 1999 and November 2000 in Lake Texoma located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas. MTBE is a commonly used gasoline additive and a suspected carcinogen. Lake water was collected at locations i...

  6. EVALUATION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AS AN INTERFERENCE ON COMMERCIAL BREATH-ALCOHOL ANALYZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anecdotal reports suggest that high environmental or occupational exposures to the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) may result in breath concentrations that are sufficiently elevated to cause a false positive on commercial breath-alcohol analyzers. We evaluated th...

  7. REMOVAL OF METHYL T-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) FROM WATER BY PERVAPORATION: BENCH-SCALE AND PILOT SCALE EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of pervaporation to remove methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) from water was evaluated at bench- and pilot-scales. Process parameters studied included flow rate, temperature, MTBE concentration, membrane module type, and permeate pressure. Pervaporation performance was ass...

  8. CO-OCCURRENCE OF METHYL- TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND BTEX COMPOUNDS AT MARINAS IN A LARGE RESEVOIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is released into the environment as one of some gasoline components, not as a pure compound. BTEX compounds (benzene, tolune, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) are major volatile constituents found in gasoline and are water soluble and mobile. This study...

  9. INTERACTION OF METHYL-TERT BUTYL ETHER AND WATER STRESS ON SEED GERMINATION AND SEEDLING GROWTH IN SOIL MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widespread contaminant in surface and ground water in the United States. Frequently irrigation is used to water fields to germinate planted seeds and sustain plant growth. A likely possibility exists that water used may have some MTBE. Our s...

  10. TOXICITY OF METHYL-TERT BYTYL ETHER (MTBE) TO PLANTS (AVENA SATIVA, ZEA MAYS, TRITICUM AESTIVUM, AND LACTUCA SATIVA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the germination of seeds and growth of the plant were studied in some laboratory experiments. Test plants were wild oat (Avena sative), sweet corn (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Seed germination,...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF PHYSIOLOGICAL-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DERMAL ABSORPTION NAD PENETRATION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic chemical that is added to gasoline as an octane booster and to reduce vehicular emissions of carbon monoxide. MTBE is introduced into the environment through fuel spills, leakage of storage tanks, and evaporat...

  12. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in finished drinking water in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Axel; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2006-03-01

    In the present study 83 finished drinking water samples from 50 cities in Germany were analyzed for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) content with a detection limit of 10 ng/L. The detection frequency was 46% and the concentrations ranged between 17 and 712 ng/L. Highest concentrations were found in the community water systems (CWSs) of Leuna and Spergau in Saxony-Anhalt. These CWSs are supplied with water possibly affected by MTBE contaminated groundwater. MTBE was detected at concentrations lower than 100 ng/L in drinking water supplied by CWSs using bank filtered water from Rhine and Main Rivers. The results from Leuna and Spergau show that large groundwater contaminations in the vicinity of CWSs pose the highest risk for MTBE contamination in drinking water. CWSs using bank filtered water from Rhine and Main Rivers are susceptible to low MTBE contaminations in finished drinking water. All measured MTBE concentrations were below proposed limit values for drinking water.

  13. Evaluation of methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether as inhibitors of aerobic methane oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ~100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor.

  14. California`s cleaner burning gasoline and methyl tertiary butyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, J.; Mazur, L.

    1995-12-31

    As of June 1, 1996, California is required to use cleaner-burning gasoline to help meet federal ambient air quality standards and reduce ambient air toxics. Cleaner-burning gasoline reduces smog-forming emissions from motor vehicles by 15% and air pollution by over three million pounds per day. This is equivalent to removing 3.5 million cars from California`s roads. To enhance combustion and thus reduce emissions, California cleaner burning gasoline is required to contain 2.0% oxygen by weight. This is achieved by addition of oxygenates, such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Ambient air data of MTBE derived from motor vehicle emissions and refueling activities has been measured in several pilot studies and at 22 urban sites as part of California`s Air Resources Board statewide toxics monitoring network. These activities have only recently been initiated and this paper will describe data collected to date.

  15. Degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water by glow discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shaoping; Ni, Yanyan; Shen, Chensi; Wen, Yuezhong; Jiang, Xuanzhen

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the glow discharge plasma (GDP) technique to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in an aqueous solution. The results showed that a large amount of hydrogen peroxide and highly active *OH free radicals were produced during the treatment. Various experimental parameters including discharge current, initial MTBE concentration and initial pH played significant roles on MTBE degradation. In addition, Fe2+ had a catalytic effect on the degradation of MTBE, which is potentially attributable to the reaction between Fe3+ and the hydrated electron. It was also confirmed that GDP was comparable to electrocatalytic oxidation and high-density plasma and more efficient than photocatalytic degradation techniques. These results suggest that GDP may become a competitive MTBE wastewater treatment technology. PMID:22049704

  16. Bioremediation of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) by an innovative biofilter.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Acuna-Askar, K; Englande, A J

    2004-01-01

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) is a synthetic chemical used in unleaded gasoline as an additive to reduce levels of ozone and carbon monoxide from auto exhaust. Due to its chemical and recalcitrant properties, MTBE has caused groundwater contamination worldwide. A laboratory-scale biofilter made of a natural fiber (kenaf) mat and inoculated with MTBE-degrading microorganisms, was evaluated for MTBE removal efficiency. Operational parameters of oxygen flow rate, hydraulic retention time (HRT), yeast extract and initial MTBE concentration were varied and MTBE removal efficiencies determined. Four kinetic models were evaluated to describe the MTBE removal in the reactor. Formaldehyde and tertiary butyl alcohol (the most two reported MTBE biodegradation byproducts) were not found in the effluent; instead, carbon dioxide was monitored as the end product based on the results of a metabolic mass balance evaluation. Toxicity of treated effluent was evaluated by employing the Microtox acute toxicity test and comparing that to the influent.

  17. Searching for trans ethyl methyl ether in Orion KL★,★★

    PubMed Central

    Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; López, A.; Brouillet, N.; Kolesniková, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the tentative detection of trans ethyl methyl ether (tEME), t-CH3CH2OCH3, through the identification of a large number of rotational lines from each one of the spin states of the molecule towards Orion KL. We also search for gauche-trans-n-propanol, Gt-n-CH3CH2CH2OH, an isomer of tEME in the same source. We have identified lines of both species in the IRAM 30 m line survey and in the ALMA Science Verification data. We have obtained ALMA maps to establish the spatial distribution of these species. Whereas tEME mainly arises from the compact ridge component of Orion, Gt-n-propanol appears at the emission peak of ethanol (south hot core). The derived column densities of these species at the location of their emission peaks are ≤(4.0 ± 0.8) × 1015 cm−2 and ≤(1.0 ± 0.2)× 1015 cm−2 for tEME and Gt-n-propanol, respectively. The rotational temperature is ~100 K for both molecules. We also provide maps of CH3OCOH, CH3CH2OCOH, CH3OCH3, CH3OH, and CH3CH2OH to compare the distribution of these organic saturated O-bearing species containing methyl and ethyl groups in this region. Abundance ratios of related species and upper limits to the abundances of non-detected ethers are provided. We derive an abundance ratio N(CH3OCH3)/N(tEME) ≥ 150 in the compact ridge of Orion. PMID:26869726

  18. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) degradation by a microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Fortin, N Y; Morales, M; Nakagawa, Y; Focht, D D; Deshusses, M A

    2001-06-01

    The widespread use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a gasoline additive has resulted in a large number of cases of groundwater contamination. Bioremediation is often proposed as the most promising alternative after treatment. However, MTBE biodegradation appears to be quite different from the biodegradation of usual gasoline contaminants such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX). In the present paper, the characteristics of a consortium degrading MTBE in liquid cultures are presented and discussed. MTBE degradation rate was fast and followed zero order kinetics when added at 100 mg l(-1). The residual MTBE concentration in batch degradation experiments ranged from below the detection limit (1 microg l(-1)) to 50 microg l(-1). The specific activity of the consortium ranged from 7 to 52 mgMTBE g(dw)(-1) h(-1) (i.e. 19-141 mgCOD g(dw) (-1) h(-1)). Radioisotope experiments showed that 79% of the carbon-MTBE was converted to carbon-carbon dioxide. The consortium was also capable of degrading a variety of hydrocarbons, including tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and gasoline constituents such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX). The consortium was also characterized by a very slow growth rate (0.1 d(-1)), a low overall biomass yield (0.11 gdw g(-1)MTBE; i.e. 0.040 gdw gCOD(-1)), a high affinity for MTBE and a low affinity for oxygen, which may be a reason for the slow or absence of MTBE biodegradation in situ. Still, the results presented here show promising perspectives for engineering the in situ bioremediation of MTBE.

  19. Speciated hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on methyl tertiary butyl ether-containing fuels.

    PubMed

    Poulopoulos, S G; Philippopoulos, C J

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, engine and tailpipe (after a three-way catalytic converter) emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on two oxygenated blend fuels [containing 2 and 11% weight/weight (w/w) methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)] and on a nonoxygenated base fuel were characterized. The engine (OPEL 1.6 L) was operated under various conditions, in the range of 0-20 HP. Total unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, methane, hexane, ethylene, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-propanol, benzene, toluene, 1,3-butadiene, acetic acid, and MTBE were measured at each engine operating condition. As concerns the total HC emissions, the use of MTBE was beneficial from 1.90 to 3.81 HP, which were by far the most polluting conditions. Moreover, CO emissions in tailpipe exhaust were decreased in the whole operation range with increasing MTBE in the fuel. The greatest advantage of MTBE addition to gasoline was the decrease in ethylene, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and acetic acid emissions in engine exhaust, especially when MTBE content in the fuel was increased to 11% w/w. In tailpipe exhaust, the catalyst operation diminished the observed differences. Ethylene, methane, and acetaldehyde were the main compounds present in exhaust gases. Ethylene was easily oxidized over the catalyst, while acetaldehyde and methane were quite resistant to oxidation.

  20. Immobilization of saccharides and peptides on 96-well microtiter plates coated with methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride copolymer.

    PubMed

    Satoh, A; Kojima, K; Koyama, T; Ogawa, H; Matsumoto, I

    1998-06-15

    We have previously reported a method to immobilize protein ligands on microtiter plates coated with methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride copolymer (MMAC) [Isosaki, K., et al. (1992) J. Chromatogr. 597, 123-128]. In this study, we improved the MMAC method to efficiently immobilize not only small ligands such as peptides and oligosaccharides, which could not be efficiently immobilized previously, but also heparin via its reducing end. Amino and hydrazino groups were introduced to MMAC-coated microtiter plate wells by coupling to acid anhydride groups of MMAC with 1,6-hexamethylenediamine and adipic acid dihydrazide, respectively. The amino groups introduced were allowed to react with peptides by use of divalent cross-linkers. Hydrazino groups were allowed to react with formyl groups of saccharides by reductive amination. Peptides and oligosaccharides were immobilized in a dose-dependent manner by these methods. In the case of the angiotensin peptide thus immobilized, the detection limit by monoclonal antibodies was as low as 0.1-1 fmol peptide per well. Application of 20-200 nmol oligosaccharides to the well was sufficient to immobilize and subsequently detect lectins. Furthermore, heparin immobilized on the hydrazinocoated wells was successfully used for the binding assay of annexin IV. PMID:9648659

  1. Degradation mechanism of t-butyl methyl ether (MTBE) in atmospheric droplets.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Chantal; Charton, Nathalie; Pichat, Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about the degradation of t-butyl methyl ether (MTBE; (CH(3))(3)C-O-CH(3)) in atmospheric water droplets (rain, clouds, fog). These water droplets contain hydrogen peroxide and iron ions, which are a source of the powerful oxidising radical OH degrees, particularly under solar irradiation (photo-Fenton reaction). MTBE was chosen for this work because of its current use as an oxygenated additive in gasoline. In this study we found that MTBE is not stable in the atmosphere. More than 15 intermediate products were identified, five of which were quantified (t-butyl formate (TBF), methyl acetate (MA), t-butyl alcohol (TBA), acetone (AC), formaldehyde). The evaluation of the disappearance kinetic of the main intermediate compounds shows the following activity pattern k((TBA))>k((MTBE))>k((TBF)),k>((AC)). Acetone was found to be about 15 times more stable than MTBE in atmospheric conditions. The degradation pathways are discussed on the basis of these identifications and on the degradation of the main intermediate products in similar conditions to MTBE.

  2. Genes involved in the methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) metabolic pathway of Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012.

    PubMed

    Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas; Labbé, Diane; Monot, Frédéric; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2006-05-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a persistent pollutant of surface and groundwater, and the reasons for its low biodegradability are poorly documented. Using one of the rare bacterial strains able to grow in the presence of MTBE, Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012, the protein profiles of crude extracts after growth in the presence of MTBE and glucose were compared by SDS-PAGE. Ten proteins with molecular masses of 67, 64, 63, 55, 50, 27, 24, 17, 14 and 11 kDa were induced after growth in the presence of MTBE. Partial amino acid sequences of N-terminal and internal peptide fragments of the 64 kDa protein were used to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers to amplify total DNA by PCR, yielding a DNA fragment that was used as a probe for cloning. A two-step cloning procedure was performed to obtain a 10 327 bp genomic DNA fragment containing seven ORFs, including a putative regulator, mpdR, and four genes, mpdC, orf1, mpdB and orf2, in the same cluster. The MpdB protein (64 kDa) was related to a flavoprotein of the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family, and the MpdC protein (55 kDa) showed a high similarity with NAD(P) aldehyde dehydrogenases. Heterologous expression of these gene products was performed in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155. The recombinant strain was able to degrade an intermediate of MTBE biodegradation, 2-methyl 1,2-propanediol, to hydroxyisobutyric acid. This is believed to be the first report of the cloning and characterization of a cluster of genes specifically involved in the MTBE biodegradation pathway of M. austroafricanum IFP 2012.

  3. 2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxyacetic acid ( MCPA ) ; CASRN 94 - 74 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard

  4. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  5. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  7. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  8. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  9. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Blom, Henk J.

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s) underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects. PMID:24048206

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid, Methyl Salicylate, and Methyl Jasmonate from Ulmus pumila Leaves by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Zhi-Li; Shi, Bao-Lin; Wei, Dong; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wang, Su-Li; Gao, Bao-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate are important phytohormones and defensive signaling compounds, so it is of great importance to determine their levels rapidly and accurately. The study uses Ulmus pumila leaves infected by Tetraneura akinire Sasaki at different stages as materials; after extraction with 80% methanol and ethyl acetate and purification with primary secondary amine (PSA) and graphitized carbon blacks (GCB), the contents of signal compounds salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the level of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate increased remarkably in U. pumila once infected by T. akinire Sasaki, but the maximums of these four compounds occurred at different times. Salicylic acid level reached the highest at the early stage, and jasmonic acid level went to the maximum in the middle stage; by contrast, change of content of methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate was the quite opposite. PMID:26457083

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid, Methyl Salicylate, and Methyl Jasmonate from Ulmus pumila Leaves by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-hong; Wang, Zhi-li; Shi, Bao-lin; Wei, Dong; Chen, Jian-xin; Wang, Su-li; Gao, Bao-jia

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate are important phytohormones and defensive signaling compounds, so it is of great importance to determine their levels rapidly and accurately. The study uses Ulmus pumila leaves infected by Tetraneura akinire Sasaki at different stages as materials; after extraction with 80% methanol and ethyl acetate and purification with primary secondary amine (PSA) and graphitized carbon blacks (GCB), the contents of signal compounds salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the level of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate increased remarkably in U. pumila once infected by T. akinire Sasaki, but the maximums of these four compounds occurred at different times. Salicylic acid level reached the highest at the early stage, and jasmonic acid level went to the maximum in the middle stage; by contrast, change of content of methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate was the quite opposite. PMID:26457083

  12. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria in the systems methyl 1,1-dimethylethyl ether + hexane and + heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniak, J.; Magen, E.; Shachar, M.; Zeroni, I.; Segura, H.; Reich, R.

    1997-03-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium at 94 kPa has been determined for the binary systems of methyl 1,1-dimethylethyl ether (MTBE) with hexane and with heptane. Both systems deviate slightly from ideal behavior, can be described as regular solutions, and do not present an azeotrope. The activity coefficients and boiling point of the solutions were correlated with its composition by the Redlich-Kister, Wohl, Wilson, UNIQUAC, NRTL, and Wisniak-Tamir equations.

  13. 2-Methyl-aspartic acid monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Butcher, Ray J

    2013-11-30

    The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water mol-ecules while extensive N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array. PMID:24454270

  14. Electrochemical simulation of metabolic reactions of the secondary fungal metabolites alternariol and alternariol methyl ether.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hannah; Hoffmann, Grete; Hübner, Florian; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary plant metabolites that have been found to cause severe diseases in humans and livestock. Exposure can take place on a daily basis since mycotoxins can be found not only in food, animal food, and dietary supplements but also in materials used in buildings. For this work, the Alternaria toxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol methyl ether (AME) are chosen as representatives for this relevant compound class and are investigated regarding their oxidative phase I metabolism using a combination of electrochemical (EC) oxidation and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS). This previously established method has been proven to be a valuable tool for the electrochemical simulation of certain phase I metabolic reactions. A comparison of the electrochemically generated products with those formed during microsomal incubation demonstrates the potential of the method for the successful prediction of the main phase I metabolic reactions of mycotoxins. It can thus find use as a supportive method in the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of various mycotoxins.

  15. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C₅-C₈), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  16. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by a Bacterial Pure Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jessica R.; Ackerman, Corinne E.; Scow, Kate M.

    1999-01-01

    A bacterial strain, PM1, which is able to utilize methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as its sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from a mixed microbial consortium in a compost biofilter capable of degrading MTBE. Initial linear rates of MTBE degradation by 2 × 106 cells ml−1 were 0.07, 1.17, and 3.56 μg ml−1 h−1 for initial concentrations of 5, 50, and 500 μg MTBE ml−1, respectively. When incubated with 20 μg of uniformly labeled [14C]MTBE ml−1, strain PM1 converted 46% to 14CO2 and 19% to 14C-labeled cells within 120 h. This yield is consistent with the measurement of protein accumulation at different MTBE concentrations from which was estimated a biomass yield of 0.18 mg of cells mg MTBE−1. Strain PM1 was inoculated into sediment core material collected from a contaminated groundwater plume at Port Hueneme, California, in which there was no evidence of MTBE degradation. Strain PM1 readily degraded 20 μg of MTBE ml−1 added to the core material. The rate of MTBE removal increased with additional inputs of 20 μg of MTBE ml−1. These results suggest that PM1 has potential for use in the remediation of MTBE-contaminated environments. PMID:10543787

  17. Environmental behavior and fate of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Pankow, James F.; Korte, Nic E.; Zogorski, John S.

    1996-01-01

    When gasoline that has been oxygenated with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) comes in contact with water, large amounts of MTBE can dissolve; at 25 degrees Celsius the water solubility of MTBE is about 5,000 milligrams per liter for a gasoline that is 10 percent MTBE by weight. In contrast, for a nonoxygenated gasoline, the total hydrocarbon solubility in water is typically about 120 milligrams per liter. MTBE sorbs only weakly to soil and aquifer materials; therefore, sorption will not significantly retard MTBE's transport by ground water. In addition, MTBE generally resists degradation in ground water. The half-life of MTBE in the atmosphere can be as short as 3 days in a regional airshed. MTBE in the air tends to partition into atmospheric water, including precipitation. However, washout of gas-phase MTBE by precipitation would not, by itself, greatly alter the gas-phase concentration of the compound in the air. The partitioning of MTBE to precipitation is nevertheless strong enough to allow for up to 3 micrograms per liter or more inputs of MTBE to surface and ground water.

  18. Toxicity of methyl tertiary butyl ether to Daphnia magna and photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Lin, Y.J.

    1995-10-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is a liquid organic compound added to gasoline to increase its oxygen content and to reduce the emission of carbon monoxide during combustion in many urban areas. In order to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, gasoline must contain 2.7% oxygen (by weight) or 15% (by volume) of MTBE in gasoline to meet the regulations for the control of carbon monoxide emissions. Health effects caused by inhalation of MTBE include headaches, dizziness, irritated eyes and nausea; MTBE is one of cancer--causing chemicals. Intracaval injection of MTBE (0.2 mg/kg) caused the highest mortality (100%) in rats. General anesthetic effect induced by MTBE was found at or above 1200 mg/kg body weight; Rosenkranz and Klopman (1991) predicted that MTBE is neither a genotoxicant nor a carcinogen. Nevertheless, the safety of using MTBE in oxygenated fuels is now being questioned from its potential as groundwater pollutant. This study measures the toxicity of MTBE to Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum. 13 refs.

  19. The effect of materials selection on metals reduction in propylene glycol methyl ether acetate, PGMEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezarian, Majid; Geiger, Bob

    2016-03-01

    The trend in microelectronics fabrication is to produce nano-features measuring down to 10 nm and finer. The PPT levels of organic and inorganic contaminants in the photoresist, solvent and cleaning solutions are becoming a major processing variable affecting the process capability and defectivity. The photoresist usually contains gels, metals, and particulates that could interfere with the lithography process and cause microbridging defects. Nano filters of 5 nm polypropylene, 5 nm polyethylene, and 10 nm natural nylon were used to filter propylene glycol methyl ether acetate PGMEA containing 50 ppb of Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb. All filters were effective in removing trivalent Al, Cr, and Fe metals indicating the mechanism for their removal as mechanical sieving. However, the nylon was also very effective in removing the divalent metals showing adsorptive properties. Furthermore, the metal removal of the nylon membrane was studied as a function of surface chemistry. Natural and charged 40 nm nylon membranes were tested and found that charged nylon is more effective for metal removal.

  20. Effect of methyl tert-butyl ether in standard tests for mutagenicity and environmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vosahlikova, Miluse; Cajthaml, Tomas; Demnerova, Katerina; Pazlarova, Jarmila

    2006-12-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a synthetic compound that is used as a technological solution to problems created by air pollution from vehicle emissions. An important source of MTBE in the environment is leakage from underground storage tanks at gasoline stations or accidents during gasoline transport. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of MTBE leakage for the environment using the Microtox (Vibrio fischeri) toxicity test, Lactuca sativa seed germination test, and Ames bacterial mutagenicity test with Salmonella typhimurium his(-) strains TA98, TA100, YG1041, and YG1042, using both standard plate and preincubation protocols. The result of Microtox expressed as EC(50) was 33 mg (MTBE)/L. The effect of all tested MTBE concentration (0.05, 0.50, and 1.00% v/v) on Lactuca sativa roots elongation was negative and proved its toxicity. The highest tested concentration of MTBE that could be tested in Ames test was 3 mg (MTBE)/plate, because of cytotoxicity. No mutagenic response was observed at this or lower concentrations in any of the four strains used. PMID:17091504

  1. Cometabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether by a new microbial consortium ERS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Li, Danni; Yan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The release of methyl tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) into the environment has increased the worldwide concern about the pollution of MTBE. In this paper, a microbial consortium was isolated from the soil sample near an oil station, which can degrade MTBE directly with a low biomass yield and MTBE degrading efficiency. Further research has indicated that this consortium can degrade MTBE efficiently when grown on n-octane as the cometabolic substrate. The results of 16S rDNA based on phylogenetic analysis of the selected operating taxonomic units (OTUs) involved in the consortium revealed that one OTU was related to Pseudomonas putida GPo1, which could cometabolically degrade MTBE on the growth of n-octane. This may help explain why n-octane could be the optimal cometabolic substrate of the consortium for MTBE degradation. Furthermore, the degradation of MTBE was observed along with the consumption of n-octane. Different K s values for MTBE were observed for cells grown with or without n-octane, suggesting that different enzymes are responsible for the oxidation of MTBE in cells grown on n-octane or MTBE. The results are discussed in terms of their impacts on our understanding of MTBE biodegradation and cometabolism.

  2. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  3. Potential ecotoxicological implication of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) spills in the environment.

    PubMed

    Bonjar, G H Shahidi

    2004-10-01

    Streptomyceticidal activity of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) elucidated for the first time. Adverse effect of MTBE, the gasoline additive, against 11 soil inhabitant Streptomyces spp. isolates was investigated. MTBE, an octane enhancer is added to gasoline to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon monoxide and ozone. It contaminates soil and groundwater by fuel leaks and spills. Streptomyces spp. are of the major contributors to the biological buffering of soils by exerting beneficial and antagonistic activity against wide range of bacteria and fungi. To evaluate anti-streptomycetidal activity of MTBE, it was tested against 11 soil isolates of Streptomyces isolates and also a plant-root bacterial pathogen, Erwinia carotovora and a plant-root fungal pathogen, Fusarium solani. MTBE did not reveal any growth inhibitory activity against E. carotovora and F. solani, but showed strong inhibitory effect against Streptomyces isolates. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) on Streptomyces isolates was 1/800 of the original MTBE. Fuel leaks and spills have the potential to suppress or eliminate the Streptomyces role in the soil causing alteration in the balance of soil micro flora. This change can promote the domination of microorganisms with adverse biological or ecotoxicological effects.

  4. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a bacterial pure culture.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J R; Ackerman, C E; Scow, K M

    1999-11-01

    A bacterial strain, PM1, which is able to utilize methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as its sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from a mixed microbial consortium in a compost biofilter capable of degrading MTBE. Initial linear rates of MTBE degradation by 2 x 10(6) cells ml(-1) were 0.07, 1.17, and 3.56 microg ml(-1) h(-1) for initial concentrations of 5, 50, and 500 microg MTBE ml(-1), respectively. When incubated with 20 microg of uniformly labeled [(14)C]MTBE ml(-1), strain PM1 converted 46% to (14)CO(2) and 19% to (14)C-labeled cells within 120 h. This yield is consistent with the measurement of protein accumulation at different MTBE concentrations from which was estimated a biomass yield of 0.18 mg of cells mg MTBE(-1). Strain PM1 was inoculated into sediment core material collected from a contaminated groundwater plume at Port Hueneme, California, in which there was no evidence of MTBE degradation. Strain PM1 readily degraded 20 microg of MTBE ml(-1) added to the core material. The rate of MTBE removal increased with additional inputs of 20 microg of MTBE ml(-1). These results suggest that PM1 has potential for use in the remediation of MTBE-contaminated environments.

  5. Measurement of Henry's law constant for methyl tert-butyl ether using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bierwagen, B G; Keller, A A

    2001-08-01

    Increasing groundwater contamination with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) requires more efficient remediation technologies. Accurate measurement of MTBE's air-water partitioning coefficient (Henry's law constant, H) is important for the design and optimization of removal efficiency for many treatment systems as well as for predicting its fate and transport. Previously published data for MTBE appear to have some unusual nonlinearity at lower temperatures (15-30 degrees C), and a wide range of values exists for dimensionless H at 25 degrees C, from 0.0216 to 0.1226 in the published literature. We measured H for MTBE using headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and a static method that considers equilibrium partitioning in a closed system, for temperatures between 15 and 4 degrees C. To validate our methods, we measured H for benzene, toluene, and trichloroethylene and compared our results to previously published values, with excellent agreement. The Arrhenius plot for MTBE indicates that ln(HMBTE) = 6.85 - 2,900 T(-1), with T in K. At 25 degrees C, HMBTE = 0.0555 +/- 0.0122.

  6. Attenuation of methyl tert-butyl ether in water using sunlight and a photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Sahle-Demessie, E; Enriquez, J; Gupta, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a gasoline additive has resulted in increasing pollution of groundwater. Most of the conventional treatment technologies are inefficient or costly when the initial concentration of MTBE is low (< 200 microg/L). To find an ecology friendly and inexpensive method for MTBE remediation, we used solar radiation with titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a photocatalyst. For synthetic samples, almost complete degradation (99+%) of MTBE was observed at the end of 5-hour test run with 0.05 g/L of slurry TiO2. Intermediate products detected were tertiary butyl formate, tertiary butyl alcohol, and trace amounts of acetone. Studies conducted using contaminated groundwater samples with TiO2 and sunlight showed that aromatic organic species benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) were degraded up to a factor of 10 times faster than MTBE. However, dissolved metals (Fe2+) and chloride ions in contaminated waters decreased the photo-activity of TiO2 for the degradation of MTBE. Reducing the pH of the groundwater samples increased the MTBE degradation rate threefold. Photocatalysis accelerates the solar degradation of MTBE and reduces its half-life by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The study indicated that solar degradation is a low-cost and effective alternative to attenuate MTBE in drinking water supplies.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10556 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-15-alkyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-15-alkyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-15-alkyl ethers (PMN P-06-450; CAS...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10557 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C10-16-alkyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C10-16-alkyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C10-16-alkyl ethers (PMN P-06-451; CAS...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10556 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-15-alkyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-15-alkyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-15-alkyl ethers (PMN P-06-450; CAS...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10558 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-16-alkyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-16-alkyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-16-alkyl ethers (PMN P-06-452; CAS...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10557 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C10-16-alkyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C10-16-alkyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C10-16-alkyl ethers (PMN P-06-451; CAS...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10558 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-16-alkyl ethers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-16-alkyl ethers. (a) Chemical substance...-ethanediyl), .alpha.- (2-methyl-2-propen-1-yl) -.omega.-hydroxy-,C12-16-alkyl ethers (PMN P-06-452; CAS...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6980 - Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols polyglycidyl ethers (generic name). 721.6980... Substances § 721.6980 Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky... reporting. (1) The chemical substance dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6980 - Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols polyglycidyl ethers (generic name). 721.6980... Substances § 721.6980 Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky... reporting. (1) The chemical substance dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6980 - Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols polyglycidyl ethers (generic name). 721.6980... Substances § 721.6980 Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky... reporting. (1) The chemical substance dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol...

  16. Quercetin-3-methyl ether inhibits lapatinib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cell growth by inducing G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jixia; Zhu, Feng; Lubet, Ronald A; De Luca, Antonella; Grubbs, Clinton; Ericson, Marna E; D'Alessio, Amelia; Normanno, Nicola; Dong, Zigang; Bode, Ann M

    2013-02-01

    Lapatinib, an oral, small-molecule, reversible inhibitor of both EGFR and HER2, is highly active in HER2 positive breast cancer as a single agent and in combination with other therapeutics. However, resistance against lapatinib is an unresolved problem in clinical oncology. Recently, interest in the use of natural compounds to prevent or treat cancers has gained increasing interest because of presumed low toxicity. Quercetin-3-methyl ether, a naturally occurring compound present in various plants, has potent anticancer activity. Here, we found that quercetin-3-methyl ether caused a significant growth inhibition of lapatinib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cells. Western blot data showed that quercetin-3-methyl ether had no effect on Akt or ERKs signaling in resistant cells. However, quercetin-3-methyl ether caused a pronounced G(2)/M block mainly through the Chk1-Cdc25c-cyclin B1/Cdk1 pathway in lapatinib-sensitive and -resistant cells. In contrast, lapatinib produced an accumulation of cells in the G(1) phase mediated through cyclin D1, but only in lapatinib-sensitive cells. Moreover, quercetin-3-methyl ether induced significant apoptosis, accompanied with increased levels of cleaved caspase 3, caspase 7, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both cell lines. Overall, these results suggested that quercetin-3-methyl ether might be a novel and promising therapeutic agent in lapatinib-sensitive or -resistant breast cancer patients. PMID:22086611

  17. Low-Temperature Thermodynamics of Fatty Acid Methyl Ethers (FAME)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most common form of biodiesel is made by transesterification reaction of vegetable oil or fat with methanol. Although biodiesel is attractive as an alternative diesel fuel or extender, depending on its feedstock it may be very susceptible to cause start up and operability problems during cold w...

  18. Microbial degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Torsten C; Schirmer, Mario; Weiss, Holger; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2004-06-01

    The fate of fuel oxygenates such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the subsurface is governed by their degradability under various redox conditions. The key intermediate in degradation of MTBE and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) is tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) which was often found as accumulating intermediate or dead-end product in lab studies using microcosms or isolated cell suspensions. This review discusses in detail the thermodynamics of the degradation processes utilizing various terminal electron acceptors, and the aerobic degradation pathways of MTBE and TBA. It summarizes the present knowledge on MTBE and TBA degradation gained from either microcosm or pure culture studies and emphasizes the potential of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for identification and quantification of degradation processes of slowly biodegradable pollutants such as MTBE and TBA. Microcosm studies demonstrated that MTBE and TBA may be biodegradable under oxic and nearly all anoxic conditions, although results of various studies are often contradictory, which suggests that site-specific conditions are important parameters. So far, TBA degradation has not been shown under methanogenic conditions and it is currently widely accepted that TBA is a recalcitrant dead-end product of MTBE under these conditions. Reliable in situ degradation rates for MTBE and TBA under various geochemical conditions are not yet available. Furthermore, degradation pathways under anoxic conditions have not yet been elucidated. All pure cultures capable of MTBE or TBA degradation isolated so far use oxygen as terminal electron acceptor. In general, compared with hydrocarbons present in gasoline, fuel oxygenates biodegrade much slower, if at all. The presence of MTBE and related compounds in groundwater therefore frequently limits the use of in situ biodegradation as remediation option at gasoline-contaminated sites. Though degradation of MTBE and TBA in field studies has been reported under oxic

  19. Methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation by indigenous aquifer microorganisms under natural and artificial oxic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.; Herlong, H.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial communities indigenous to a shallow groundwater system near Beaufort, SC, degraded milligram per liter concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under natural and artificial oxic conditions. Significant MTBE biodegradation was observed where anoxic, MTBE-contaminated groundwater discharged to a concrete-lined ditch. In the anoxic groundwater adjacent to the ditch, concentrations of MTBE were > 1 mg/L. Where groundwater discharge occurs, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations beneath the ditch exceeded 1.0 mg/L to a depth of 1.5 m, and MTBE concentrations decreased to <1 ??g/L prior to discharge. MTBE mass flux calculations indicate that 96% of MTBE mass loss occurs in the relatively small oxic zone prior to discharge. Samples of a natural microbial biofilm present in the oxic zone beneath the ditch completely degraded [U-14C]MTBE to [14C]CO2 in laboratory liquid culture studies, with no accumulation of intermediate compounds. Upgradient of the ditch in the anoxic, MTBE and BTEX-contaminated aquifer, addition of a soluble oxygen release compound resulted in oxic conditions and rapid MTBE biodegradation by indigenous microorganisms. In an observation well located closest to the oxygen addition area, DO concentrations increased from 0.4 to 12 mg/L in <60 days and MTBE concentrations decreased from 20 to 3 mg/L. In the same time period at a downgradient observation well, DO increased from <0.2 to 2 mg/L and MTBE concentrations decreased from 30 to <5 mg/L. These results indicate that microorganisms indigenous to the groundwater system at this site can degrade milligram per liter concentrations of MTBE under natural and artificial oxic conditions.

  20. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cold-adapted mixed and pure bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, G M; Uotila, J S; Häggblom, M M

    2007-04-01

    An aerobic mixed bacterial culture (CL-EMC-1) capable of utilizing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as the sole source of carbon and energy with a growth temperature range of 3 to 30 degrees C and optimum of 18 to 22 degrees C was enriched from activated sludge. Transient accumulation of tert-butanol (TBA) occurred during utilization of MTBE at temperatures from 3 degrees C to 14 degrees C, but TBA did not accumulate above 18 degrees C. The culture utilized MTBE at a concentration of up to 1.5 g l(-1) and TBA of up to 7 g l(-1). The culture grew on MTBE at a pH range of 5 to 9, with an optimum pH of 6.5 to 7.1. The specific growth rate of the CL-EMC-1 culture on 0.1 g l(-1) of MTBE at 22 degrees C and pH 7.1 was 0.012 h(-1), and the growth yield was 0.64 g (dry weight) g(-1). A new MTBE-utilizing bacterium, Variovorax paradoxus strain CL-8, isolated from the mixed culture utilized MTBE, TBA, 2-hydroxy isobutyrate, lactate, methacrylate, and acetate as sole sources of carbon and energy but not 2-propanol, acetone, methanol, formaldehyde, or formate. Two other isolates, Hyphomicrobium facilis strain CL-2 and Methylobacterium extorquens strain CL-4, isolated from the mixed culture were able to grow on C(1) compounds. The combined consortium could thus utilize all of the carbon of MTBE. PMID:17146651

  1. Thin-layer chromatography to monitor cholesterol gallstone dissolution by methyl tert-butyl ether.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, H B; vanSonnenberg, E; Schteingart, C D; Hofmann, A F; Casola, G; Mathieson, J R

    1991-07-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive method of monitoring methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) dissolution of cholesterol gallstones with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in 10 patients. TLC is a routine semiquantitative laboratory method that can be used to measure the cholesterol concentration present in the MTBE and bile mixture aspirated through the cholecystostomy catheter during gallstone dissolution. TLC is practical in the clinical setting because it can be used to determine if gallstone dissolution is occurring and when MTBE lavage is no longer effective. TLC is performed in the laboratory with routine material and is completed in 15 min. Each TLC measurement costs about $1. The procedure provides objective and specific chemical information on effectiveness and progression of gallstone dissolution, apart from the radiologic and sonographic studies. In our study, TLC signaled effective dissolution in the initial phase of gallstone dissolution by detecting large amounts of cholesterol in the MTBE and bile mixture even before a visible change in size or shape of the stone became apparent by transcatheter cholecystography or by sonography (six of 10 patients). Conversely, lack of cholesterol on TLC after 1 hr or more of MTBE infusion indicates that the stones are pigmented or contain substantial calcium. This means that dissolution with MTBE will be ineffective and that solvent infusion should be terminated. In those cases in which dissolution is progressing well, when TLC shows decreasing amounts of cholesterol in the effluent, only residual fragments insoluble to MTBE remain or the stone is sequestered from MTBE; at this point, solvent infusion should be discontinued or the catheter must be repositioned. Monitoring the rate of cholesterol dissolution by TLC provides important complementary information to cholecystography and sonography during gallstone treatment with MTBE. PMID:2048533

  2. Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether and benzene among service station attendants and operators.

    PubMed Central

    Hartle, R

    1993-01-01

    Concerns for atmospheric pollution from auto exhaust have led to the blending of "oxygenates" with motor fuels. The most common oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is currently required within several metropolitan areas (Denver and Phoenix) in the range of 12% of the motor fuel. Amendments to the Clean Air Act may expand this requirement to as many as 44 other areas of the United States in the near future. In consideration of the magnitude of potential uncontrolled exposures from its extensive use and a related concern involving the potential influence of MTBE blending on exposures to other constituents of gasoline (particularly benzene), an evaluation of exposures among service station attendants and operators was undertaken at the request, and in cooperation with, the American Petroleum Institute during the latter part of 1990. For application of the survey results to a broad audience, three categories or types of service stations were identified with regard to MTBE use and exposure potential: a) service stations that do not use MTBE or use it only as an octane enhancer, b) service stations with seasonal requirements to use 12-15% MTBE (the Denver, Colorado, and Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan areas), and c) service stations equipped with stage II (active) vapor recovery systems (several coastal areas, most notably Southern California). At the two sampled service stations that use only minimal amounts of MTBE (less than 1%), only 1 of 32 personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples from attendants was above the analytical limit of detection, reported at 0.16 ppm. The geometric mean concentration of benzene among this same population (n = 32) was 0.04 ppm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8020445

  3. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen motions in an aqueous poly(vinyl methyl ether) solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, S.; Arbe, A.; Cerveny, S.; Busselez, R.; Frick, B.; Embs, J. P.; Colmenero, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) investigation of the component dynamics in an aqueous Poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) solution (30% water content in weight). In the glassy state, an important shift in the Boson peak of PVME is found upon hydration. At higher temperatures, the diffusive-like motions of the components take place with very different characteristic times, revealing a strong dynamic asymmetry that increases with decreasing T. For both components, we observe stretching of the scattering functions with respect to those in the bulk and non-Gaussian behavior in the whole momentum transfer range investigated. To explain these observations we invoke a distribution of mobilities for both components, probably originated from structural heterogeneities. The diffusive-like motion of PVME in solution takes place faster and apparently in a more continuous way than in bulk. We find that the T-dependence of the characteristic relaxation time of water changes at T ≲ 225 K, near the temperature where a crossover from a low temperature Arrhenius to a high temperature cooperative behavior has been observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) [S. Cerveny, J. Colmenero and A. Alegría, Macromolecules, 38, 7056 (2005), 10.1021/ma050811t]. This observation might be a signature of the onset of confined dynamics of water due to the freezing of the PVME dynamics, that has been selectively followed by these QENS experiments. On the other hand, revisiting the BDS results on this system we could identify an additional "fast" process that can be attributed to water motions coupled with PVME local relaxations that could strongly affect the QENS results. Both kinds of interpretations, confinement effects due to the increasing dynamic asymmetry and influence of localized motions, could provide alternative scenarios to the invoked "strong-to-fragile" transition.

  4. Methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation by indigenous aquifer microorganisms under natural and artificial oxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Landmeyer, J E; Chapelle, F H; Herlong, H H; Bradley, P M

    2001-03-15

    Microbial communities indigenous to a shallow groundwater system near Beaufort, SC, degraded milligram per liter concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under natural and artificial oxic conditions. Significant MTBE biodegradation was observed where anoxic, MTBE-contaminated groundwater discharged to a concrete-lined ditch. In the anoxic groundwater adjacent to the ditch, concentrations of MTBE were > 1 mg/L. Where groundwater discharge occurs, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations beneath the ditch exceeded 1.0 mg/Lto a depth of 1.5 m, and MTBE concentrations decreased to <1 microg/L prior to discharge. MTBE mass flux calculations indicate that 96% of MTBE mass loss occurs in the relatively small oxic zone prior to discharge. Samples of a natural microbial biofilm present in the oxic zone beneath the ditch completely degraded [U-14C]MTBE to [14C]CO2 in laboratory liquid culture studies, with no accumulation of intermediate compounds. Upgradient of the ditch in the anoxic, MTBE- and BTEX-contaminated aquifer, addition of a soluble oxygen release compound resulted in oxic conditions and rapid MTBE biodegradation by indigenous microorganisms. In an observation well located closest to the oxygen addition area, DO concentrations increased from 0.4 to 12 mg/L in <60 days and MTBE concentrations decreased from 20 to 3 mg/L. In the same time period at a downgradient observation well, DO increased from <0.2 to 2 mg/L and MTBE concentrations decreased from 30 to <5 mg/L. These results indicate that microorganisms indigenous to the groundwater system at this site can degrade milligram per liter concentrations of MTBE under natural and artificial oxic conditions. PMID:11347923

  5. Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether and benzene among service station attendants and operators.

    PubMed

    Hartle, R

    1993-12-01

    Concerns for atmospheric pollution from auto exhaust have led to the blending of "oxygenates" with motor fuels. The most common oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is currently required within several metropolitan areas (Denver and Phoenix) in the range of 12% of the motor fuel. Amendments to the Clean Air Act may expand this requirement to as many as 44 other areas of the United States in the near future. In consideration of the magnitude of potential uncontrolled exposures from its extensive use and a related concern involving the potential influence of MTBE blending on exposures to other constituents of gasoline (particularly benzene), an evaluation of exposures among service station attendants and operators was undertaken at the request, and in cooperation with, the American Petroleum Institute during the latter part of 1990. For application of the survey results to a broad audience, three categories or types of service stations were identified with regard to MTBE use and exposure potential: a) service stations that do not use MTBE or use it only as an octane enhancer, b) service stations with seasonal requirements to use 12-15% MTBE (the Denver, Colorado, and Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan areas), and c) service stations equipped with stage II (active) vapor recovery systems (several coastal areas, most notably Southern California). At the two sampled service stations that use only minimal amounts of MTBE (less than 1%), only 1 of 32 personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples from attendants was above the analytical limit of detection, reported at 0.16 ppm. The geometric mean concentration of benzene among this same population (n = 32) was 0.04 ppm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8020445

  6. Microbial toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) determined with fluorescent and luminescent bioassays.

    PubMed

    Roslev, Peter; Lentz, Trine; Hesselsoe, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of the fuel additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and potential degradation products tert-butanol (TBA) and formaldehyde was examined using mixed microbial biomass, and six strains of bioluminescent bacteria and yeast. The purpose was to assess microbial toxicity with quantitative bioluminescent and fluorescent endpoints, and to identify sensitive proxies suitable for monitoring MTBE contamination. Bioluminescent Aliivibrio fischeri DSM 7151 (formerly Vibrio fischeri) appeared highly sensitive to MTBE exposure, and was a superior test organisms compared to lux-tagged Escherichia coli DH5α, Pseudomonas fluorescens DF57-40E7 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BLYR. EC10 and EC50 for acute MTBE toxicity in A. fischeri were 1.1 and 10.9 mg L(-1), respectively. Long term (24h) MTBE exposure resulted in EC10 values of 0.01 mg L(-1). TBA was significantly less toxic with EC10 and EC50 for acute and chronic toxicity >1000 mg L(-1). Inhibition of bioluminescence was generally a more sensitive endpoint for MTBE toxicity than measuring intracellular ATP levels and heterotrophic CO2 assimilation. A weak estrogenic response was detected for MTBE at concentrations ⩾ 3.7 g L(-1) using an estrogen inducible bioluminescent yeast strain (S. cerevisiae BLYES). Microbial hydrolytic enzyme activity in groundwater was affected by MTBE with EC10 values of 0.5-787 mg L(-1), and EC50 values of 59-3073 for alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, beta-1,4-glucanase, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, and leucine-aminopeptidase. Microbial alkaline phosphatase and beta-1,4-glucanase activity were most sensitive to MTBE exposure with EC50 ⩽ 64.8 mg L(-1). The study suggests that bioassays with luminescent A. fischeri, and fluorescent assays targeting hydrolytic enzyme activity are good candidates for monitoring microbial MTBE toxicity in contaminated water.

  7. Methyl tert butyl ether targets developing vasculature in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bonventre, Josephine A.; White, Lori A.; Cooper, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling during early development results in abnormal angiogenesis and increased vascular lesions. Embryonic exposure to 0.625 to 10 mM methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE), a highly water soluble gasoline additive, resulted in a dose dependent increase in pooled blood in the common cardinal vein (CCV), cranial hemorrhages and abnormal intersegmental vessels (ISVs). The EC50s for the lesions ranked in terms of likelihood to occur with MTBE exposure were: pooled blood in the CCV, 3.2 mM [95 % CI: 2.2 – 4.7] > cranial hemorrhage, 11 mM [5.9 – 20.5] > abnormal ISV, 14.5 mM [6.5 – 32.4]. Organ systems other than the vascular system appear to develop normally, which suggests MTBE toxicity targets developing blood vessels. Equal molar concentrations (0.625 to 10 mM) of the primary metabolites, tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) and formaldehyde, did not result in vascular lesions, which suggested that the parent compound is responsible for the toxicity. Stage specific exposures were carried out to determine the developmental period most sensitive to MTBE vascular disruption. Embryos treated until 6-somites or treated after Prim-5 stages did not exhibit a significant increase in lesions, while embryos treated between 6-somites and Prim-5 had a significant increase in vascular lesions (p ≤ 0.05). During the critical window for MTBE-induced vascular toxicity, expression of vegfa, vegfc, and flk1/kdr were significantly decreased 50, 70 and 40%, respectively. This is the first study to characterize disruption in vascular development following embryonic exposure to MTBE. The unique specificity of MTBE to disrupt angiogenesis may be mediated by the down regulation of critical genes in the VEGF pathway. PMID:21684239

  8. Uptake, metabolism, and toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in weeping willows.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2006-10-11

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a high volume production chemical and the most commonly used gasoline oxygenate. Uptake, metabolism and toxicity of MTBE in trees were investigated in this study. Pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with MTBE and incubated at 25.0+/-1 degrees C for 168 h. The normalized relative transpiration (NRT) rate of weeping willows was used to determine toxicity. MTBE and possible intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in solution, tissues of aerial parts of plants, and air were analyzed. Results from the toxicity test showed that severe signs of toxicity (the reduction of the NRT >or=35%) were only found at the treatment group with high doses of MTBE 400 mg L(-1). Neither chlorosis of leaves nor large reduction in the NRT was observed at MTBE exposure to weeping willows

  9. Anaerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA).

    PubMed

    Finneran, K T; Lovley, D R

    2001-05-01

    The potential for anaerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) was investigated in laboratory incubations of sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer and in aquatic sediments. The addition of humic substances (HS) stimulated the anaerobic degradation of MTBE in aquifer sediments in which Fe(III) was available as an electron acceptor. This is attributed to the fact that HS and other extracellular quinones can stimulate the activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms by acting as an electron shuttle between Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms and insoluble Fe(III) oxides. MTBE was not degraded in aquifer sediments without Fe(III) and HS. [14C]-MTBE added to aquatic sediments adapted for anaerobic MTBE degradation was converted to 14CO2 in the presence or absence of HS or the HS analog, anthraquione-2,6-disulfonate. Unamended aquatic sediments produced 14CH4 as well as 14CO2 from [14C]-MTBE. The aquatic sediments also rapidly consumed TBA under anaerobic conditions and converted [14C]-TBA to 14CH4 and 14CO2. An adaptation period of ca. 250-300 days was required prior to the most rapid anaerobic MTBE degradation in both sediment types, whereas TBA was metabolized in the aquatic sediments without a lag. These results demonstrate that, under the appropriate conditions, MTBE and TBA can be degraded in the absence of oxygen. This suggests that it may be possible to design strategies for the anaerobic remediation of MTBE in petroleum-contaminated subsurface environments.

  10. Uptake, metabolism, and toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in weeping willows.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2006-10-11

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a high volume production chemical and the most commonly used gasoline oxygenate. Uptake, metabolism and toxicity of MTBE in trees were investigated in this study. Pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with MTBE and incubated at 25.0+/-1 degrees C for 168 h. The normalized relative transpiration (NRT) rate of weeping willows was used to determine toxicity. MTBE and possible intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in solution, tissues of aerial parts of plants, and air were analyzed. Results from the toxicity test showed that severe signs of toxicity (the reduction of the NRT >or=35%) were only found at the treatment group with high doses of MTBE 400 mg L(-1). Neither chlorosis of leaves nor large reduction in the NRT was observed at MTBE exposure to weeping willows

  11. Risk characterization of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in tap water.

    PubMed

    Stern, B R; Tardiff, R G

    1997-12-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) can enter surface water and groundwater through wet atmospheric deposition or as a result of fuel leaks and spills. About 30% of the U.S. population lives in areas where MTBE is in regular use. Ninety-five percent of this population is unlikely to be exposed to MTBE in tap water at concentrations exceeding 2 ppb, and most will be exposed to concentrations that are much lower and may be zero. About 5% of this population may be exposed to higher levels of MTBE in tap water, resulting from fuel tank leaks and spills into surface or groundwater used for potable water supplies. This paper describes the concentration ranges found and anticipated in surface and groundwater, and estimates the distribution of doses experienced by humans using water containing MTBE to drink, prepare food, and shower/bathe. The toxic properties (including potency) of MTBE when ingested, inhaled, and in contact with the skin are summarized. Using a range of human toxic potency values derived from animal studies, margins of exposure (MOE) associated with alternative chronic exposure scenarios are estimated to range from 1700 to 140,000. Maximum concentrations of MTBE in tap water anticipated not to cause adverse health effects are determined to range from 700 to 14,000 ppb. The results of this analysis demonstrate that no health risks are likely to be associated with chronic and subchronic human exposures to MTBE in tap water. Although some individuals may be exposed to very high concentrations of MTBE in tap water immediately following a localized spill, these exposures are likely to be brief in duration due to large-scale dilution and rapid volatilization of MTBE, the institution of emergency response and remediation measures to minimize human exposures, and the low taste and odor thresholds of MTBE which ensure that its presence in tap water is readily detected at concentrations well below the threshold for human injury.

  12. Metabolism of the bile acid analogues 7 beta-methyl-cholic acid and 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, S.; Mosbach, E.H.; Cohen, B.I.; McSherry, C.K.

    1987-04-01

    The metabolism of two new bile acid analogues, 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate, was compared with that of cholate in the hamster. After intraduodenal administration of /sup 14/C-labeled compounds into bile fistula hamsters, radioactivity was exclusively recovered in bile; the more hydrophobic bile acid was absorbed more rapidly. Hepatic extraction of intravenously infused compounds was efficient and administered analogues became major biliary bile acids. Amidation of cholate was essentially complete, whereas 39% of 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 65% of 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate were secreted in unconjugated form. After intragastric administration of the compounds, radioactivity was quantitatively recovered in feces. Cholate was 7-dehydroxylated to deoxycholate, whereas 31% of 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 78% of 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate were recovered unchanged. Fifty percent of 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 15% of 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate were transformed into ketonic derivatives, without loss of the 7-hydroxyl group. It is concluded that the introduction of the 7-methyl group did not interfere with intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction, and biliary secretion but did affect enzymatic amidation and bacterial 7-dehydroxylation of the analogues.

  13. Gas Phase Conformations and Methyl Internal Rotation for 2-PHENYLETHYL Methyl Ether and its Argon Van Der Waals Complex from Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurusinghe, Ranil M.; Tubergen, Michael

    2015-06-01

    A mini-cavity microwave spectrometer was used to record the rotational spectra arising from 2-phenylethyl methyl ether and its weakly bonded argon complex in the frequency range of 10.5 - 22 GHz. Rotational spectra were found for two stable conformations of the monomer: anti-anti and gauche-anti, which are 1.4 kJ mol-1 apart in energy at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level. Doubled rotational transitions, arising from internal motion of the methyl group, were observed for both conformers. The program XIAM was used to fit the rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and barrier to internal rotation to the measured transition frequencies of the A and E internal rotation states. The best global fit values of the rotational constants for the anti-anti conformer are A= 3799.066(3) MHz, B= 577.95180(17) MHz, C= 544.7325(3) MHz and the A state rotational constants of the gauche-anti conformer are A= 2676.1202(7) MHz, B= 760.77250(2) MHz, C= 684.78901(2) MHz. The rotational spectrum of 2-phenylethyl methyl ether - argon complex is consistent with the geometry where argon atom lies above the plane of the benzene moiety of gauche-anti conformer. Tunneling splittings were too small to resolve within experimental accuracy, likely due to an increase in three fold potential barrier when the argon complex is formed. Fitted rotational constants are A= 1061.23373(16) MHz, B= 699.81754(7) MHz, C= 518.33553(7) MHz. The lowest energy solvated ether - water complex with strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding has been identified theoretically. Progress on the assignment of the water complex will also be presented.

  14. Metal-organic frameworks constructed from crown ether-based 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng-Hao; Schneemann, Andreas; Fischer, Roland A; Cohen, Seth M

    2016-02-21

    A series of unprecedented crown ether- and thiacrown ether-derivatized benzene dicarboxylic acid (H2bdc) ligands has been synthesized and incorporated into the prototypical isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) and UiO-66 materials. In the case of UiO-66, only MOFs comprised from a mixed-ligand composition, requiring both unsubstituted bdc and crown ether containing ligands, could be prepared. These are among the few ligand derivatives, and resulting MOFs, that incorporate a macrocyclic group directly on the bdc ligand, providing a new, modular platform for exploring new supramolecular and coordination chemistry within MOFs.

  15. Metal-organic frameworks constructed from crown ether-based 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng-Hao; Schneemann, Andreas; Fischer, Roland A; Cohen, Seth M

    2016-02-21

    A series of unprecedented crown ether- and thiacrown ether-derivatized benzene dicarboxylic acid (H2bdc) ligands has been synthesized and incorporated into the prototypical isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) and UiO-66 materials. In the case of UiO-66, only MOFs comprised from a mixed-ligand composition, requiring both unsubstituted bdc and crown ether containing ligands, could be prepared. These are among the few ligand derivatives, and resulting MOFs, that incorporate a macrocyclic group directly on the bdc ligand, providing a new, modular platform for exploring new supramolecular and coordination chemistry within MOFs. PMID:26765588

  16. Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; West; Ryan M.

    2011-06-14

    A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

  17. [Chemical analytical aspects of hygiene safety of the use of methyl tertiary-butyl ether in the production of gasoline].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, A G; Rastyannikov, E G; Kozlova, N Yu; Artyushina, I Yu

    2014-01-01

    There was developed, certified and recommended for the practical application the technique for control in the water used as a high-octane oxygenated gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether with the use of chromatography-mass spectrometry method with a sensitivity of (0.005 mg/dm3) below the level of existing foreign regulations. Technique is introduced into the Federal Information Fund to ensure the unity of measurements. The possibility of applying the proposed method of analysis for monitoring chemical contamination of water sources and the quality control and safety of drinking water has been shown.

  18. Methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation by microbial consortia obtained from soil samples of gasoline-polluted sites in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Morales, Marcia; Velázquez, Elia; Jan, Janet; Revah, Sergio; González, Uriel; Razo-Flores, Elías

    2004-02-01

    Microbial consortia obtained from soil samples of gasoline-polluted sites were individually enriched with pentane, hexane, isooctane and toluene. Cometabolism with methyl tert-butyl ether, (MTBE), gave maximum degradation rates of 49, 12, 32 and 0 mg g(-1)protein h(-1), respectively. MTBE was fully degraded even when pentane was completely depleted with a cometabolic coefficient of 1 mgMTBE mg(-1)pentane. The analysis of 16S rDNA from isolated microorganisms in the pentane-adapted consortia showed that microorganisms could be assigned to Pseudomonas. This is the first work reporting the cometabolic mineralization of MTBE by consortium of this genus.

  19. Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2011-05-01

    Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

  20. 3-(Imidazolyl methyl)-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-6-yl)methyl ethers: a novel series of mGluR2 positive allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Rogers, Bruce N; Duplantier, Allen J; McHardy, Stanley F; Efremov, Ivan; Berke, Helen; Qian, Weimin; Zhang, Andy Q; Maklad, Noha; Candler, John; Doran, Angela C; Lazzaro, John T; Ganong, Alan H

    2008-10-15

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a novel series of 3-(imidazolyl methyl)-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-6-yl)methyl ethers, derived from a high throughput screening (HTS), are described. Subsequent optimization led to identification of potent, metabolically stable and orally available mGluR2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs).

  1. Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Ground Water, Air, and Precipitation at North Windham, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Martha G.; Peckenham, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-one monitoring wells in the Windham aquifer in North Windham, Maine, were sampled for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) from July 1998 to May 1999. MTBE was detected in 35 percent of the wells sampled in the Windham aquifer. MTBE was detected in 64 percent of wells in the high-yielding part of the aquifer; these wells account for 82 percent of all wells with detectable MTBE. Land cover also was found to be associated with MTBE in the wells in the study area, with the urban and low-density residential areas having more MTBE than undeveloped areas. The median concentration in wells with detectable MTBE was 1.13 micrograms per liter. Air and precipitation samples were collected in North Windham along with ground-water samples. Air samples were collected every 10 days from December 1998 to July 1999 (20 samples). MTBE was present in all 20 air samples collected, at concentrations ranging from 0.03 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) to 1.0 ppbv. Before Maine opted out of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) program in the spring of 1999, median concentrations in air at the North Windham site were 0.25 ppbv. After Maine stopped using RFG, the median concentration in air dropped to 0.09 ppbv. No MTBE was detected in four samples of precipitation at North Windham. The lack of rainfall during the study period prevented the collection of an adequate number of samples, and technical difficulties negated the results of some of the analyses of the samples that were collected. Based on the equilibrium partitioning of MTBE from the air into rain, the hypothetical average concentration of MTBE in rainfall during months when recharge typically occurs (March-April and October-December) would be approximately 0.3 to 0.4 micrograms per liter during the time that RFG was being used in Maine. After the phaseout of RFG, the maximum average concentration of MTBE in rainfall during these months would be approximately 0.1 micrograms per liter. The distribution and concentrations of MTBE that

  2. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in urban and rural precipitation in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achten, Christine; Kolb, Axel; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    The use of the oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in gasoline has led to detectable concentrations in urban and rural air up to 160 ppbV. Results from MTBE measurement in precipitation have not been reported so far. In the present study, 120 samples of precipitation collected at 17 sampling locations all over Germany have been analyzed for their MTBE content. Analysis is performed by a combination of headspace-solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A 75 μm poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Carboxene fiber and a cryostat is used for SPME. The detection limit is 10 ng/l. In precipitation samples, MTBE was detected in wintertimes only with a maximum concentration of 85 ng/l. Measurement at Frankfurt/M City from 6 September 2000 to 12 March 2001 provided for 49% of the data concentrations in the range of 30-85 ng/l ( n=17). Sampling in winter 2000/2001 at several German cities and rural locations showed that MTBE is more often detectable in urban (86%, n=78) than in rural (18%, n=42) precipitation. By comparing the results with corresponding temperatures and amounts of precipitation it can be concluded that the detection of MTBE in urban precipitation is observed at ambient temperatures lower than about 10-15°C. Moreover, the first precipitation after a dry period accumulates more MTBE than precipitation during or at the end of a wet period (wash-out effect). Highest concentrations occurred in snow samples. Corresponding mean air equilibrium concentrations of 0.04 ppbV (urban samples) and 0.01 ppbV (rural samples) are calculated. This is about one magnitude lower than year round and summertime measurements in the US and in Switzerland. Urban runoff ( n=12) and corresponding precipitation sampling indicate that urban runoff might be composed of about 20% MTBE that is already transported by air and precipitation, whereas about 80% may be attributed to direct uptake of vehicle emissions and leakage near the road during

  3. Divinyl ether fatty acid synthesis in late blight-diseased potato leaves.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Chételat, A; Caldelari, D; Farmer, E E

    1999-03-01

    We conducted a study of the patterns and dynamics of oxidized fatty acid derivatives (oxylipins) in potato leaves infected with the late-blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Two 18-carbon divinyl ether fatty acids, colneleic acid and colnelenic acid, accumulated during disease development. To date, there are no reports that such compounds have been detected in higher plants. The divinyl ether fatty acids accumulate more rapidly in potato cultivar Matilda (a cultivar with increased resistance to late blight) than in cultivar Bintje, a susceptible cultivar. Colnelenic acid reached levels of up to approximately 24 nmol (7 microgram) per g fresh weight of tissue in infected leaves. By contrast, levels of members of the jasmonic acid family did not change significantly during pathogenesis. The divinyl ethers also accumulated during the incompatible interaction of tobacco with tobacco mosaic virus. Colneleic and colnelenic acids were found to be inhibitory to P. infestans, suggesting a function in plant defense for divinyl ethers, which are unstable compounds rarely encountered in biological systems.

  4. Aberrant 5’-CpG Methylation of Cord Blood TNFα Associated with Maternal Exposure to Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobin; Tang, Wan-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that maternal exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals during pregnancy may lead to poor pregnancy outcomes and increased fetal susceptibility to adult diseases. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are ubiquitously used flame-retardants, could leach into the environment; and become persistent organic pollutants via bioaccumulation. In the United States, blood PBDE levels in adults range from 30–100 ng/g- lipid but the alarming health concern revolves around children who have reported blood PBDE levels 3 to 9-fold higher than adults. PBDEs disrupt endocrine, immune, reproductive and nervous systems. However, the mechanism underlying its adverse health effect is not fully understood. Epigenetics is a possible biological mechanism underlying maternal exposure-child health outcomes by regulating gene expression without changes in the DNA sequence. We sought to examine the relationship between maternal exposure to environmental PBDEs and promoter methylation of a proinflammatory gene, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). We measured the maternal blood PBDE levels and cord blood TNFα promoter methylation levels on 46 paired samples of maternal and cord blood from the Boston Birth Cohort (BBC). We showed that decreased cord blood TNFα methylation associated with high maternal PBDE47 exposure. CpG site-specific methylation showed significantly hypomethylation in the girl whose mother has a high blood PBDE47 level. Consistently, decreased TNFα methylation associated with an increase in TNFα protein level in cord blood. In conclusion, our finding provided evidence that in utero exposure to PBDEs may epigenetically reprogram the offspring’s immunological response through promoter methylation of a proinflammatory gene. PMID:26406892

  5. Aberrant 5'-CpG Methylation of Cord Blood TNFα Associated with Maternal Exposure to Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tyna; Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Xiaobin; Tang, Wan-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that maternal exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals during pregnancy may lead to poor pregnancy outcomes and increased fetal susceptibility to adult diseases. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are ubiquitously used flame-retardants, could leach into the environment; and become persistent organic pollutants via bioaccumulation. In the United States, blood PBDE levels in adults range from 30-100 ng/g- lipid but the alarming health concern revolves around children who have reported blood PBDE levels 3 to 9-fold higher than adults. PBDEs disrupt endocrine, immune, reproductive and nervous systems. However, the mechanism underlying its adverse health effect is not fully understood. Epigenetics is a possible biological mechanism underlying maternal exposure-child health outcomes by regulating gene expression without changes in the DNA sequence. We sought to examine the relationship between maternal exposure to environmental PBDEs and promoter methylation of a proinflammatory gene, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). We measured the maternal blood PBDE levels and cord blood TNFα promoter methylation levels on 46 paired samples of maternal and cord blood from the Boston Birth Cohort (BBC). We showed that decreased cord blood TNFα methylation associated with high maternal PBDE47 exposure. CpG site-specific methylation showed significantly hypomethylation in the girl whose mother has a high blood PBDE47 level. Consistently, decreased TNFα methylation associated with an increase in TNFα protein level in cord blood. In conclusion, our finding provided evidence that in utero exposure to PBDEs may epigenetically reprogram the offspring's immunological response through promoter methylation of a proinflammatory gene. PMID:26406892

  6. An alternative mechanism for guanidinoacetic acid to affect methylation cycle.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2014-12-01

    Guanidinoacetic acid (also known as glycocyamine; GAA) is an endogenous substance which occurs in humans and plays a central role in the biosynthesis of creatine. The formation of creatine from GAA consumes methyl groups, and increases production of homocysteine. GAA may have the potential to stimulate insulin secretion. Insulin reduces plasma homocysteine and raises methyl group supply. It is possible that the ability of GAA to trigger the insulin secretion modulates methyl group metabolism, and comparatively counterbalance for the direct effect of GAA on increased methylation demand. Possible insulinotropic effect of GAA may contribute to total in vivo methylation demand during biotransformation. PMID:25468046

  7. Comparison of chiral separations of aminophosphonic acids and their aminocarboxylic acid analogs using a crown ether column.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Wesley W; Xia, Xiaoyang; Jensen, Randy; Gahm, Kyung H

    2013-07-01

    Crown ethers are capable of complexing with primary amines and have been utilized in chromatography to separate amino acid racemates. This application has been extended to resolve (1-amino-1-phenylmethyl)phosphonic acid and (1-aminoethyl)phosphonic acid racemates, along with their aminocarboxylic acid analogs (2-phenylglycine and alanine, respectively), via a ChiroSil RCA crown ether based chiral stationary phase. Effects of the organic modifier, temperature, and acid type and concentration on retention and selectivity were also investigated. Trends in retention and selectivity varied between aminophosponic acids and their aminocarboxylic analogs. Computer modeling and (1)H NMR analyses were performed to potentially gain a better understanding of interactions of the aforementioned molecules with the ChiroSil RCA chiral stationary phase. Theoretical predictions of the most stable conformations for (R)- and (S)-enantiomers were compared to elution order; it was found that the elution order agreed with molecular modeling such that the longest retention correlated with the predicted most stable complex between the enantiomer and crown ether. (1)H NMR demonstrated interactions of aminophosphonic and aminocarboxylic racemates with (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid in solution and was utilized to determine enantiomeric excess of (1-amino-1-phenylmethyl)phosphonic acid after its enantioenrichment via crystallization through diastereomeric salt formation with the crown ether followed by filtration. PMID:23703726

  8. Comparison of chiral separations of aminophosphonic acids and their aminocarboxylic acid analogs using a crown ether column.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Wesley W; Xia, Xiaoyang; Jensen, Randy; Gahm, Kyung H

    2013-07-01

    Crown ethers are capable of complexing with primary amines and have been utilized in chromatography to separate amino acid racemates. This application has been extended to resolve (1-amino-1-phenylmethyl)phosphonic acid and (1-aminoethyl)phosphonic acid racemates, along with their aminocarboxylic acid analogs (2-phenylglycine and alanine, respectively), via a ChiroSil RCA crown ether based chiral stationary phase. Effects of the organic modifier, temperature, and acid type and concentration on retention and selectivity were also investigated. Trends in retention and selectivity varied between aminophosponic acids and their aminocarboxylic analogs. Computer modeling and (1)H NMR analyses were performed to potentially gain a better understanding of interactions of the aforementioned molecules with the ChiroSil RCA chiral stationary phase. Theoretical predictions of the most stable conformations for (R)- and (S)-enantiomers were compared to elution order; it was found that the elution order agreed with molecular modeling such that the longest retention correlated with the predicted most stable complex between the enantiomer and crown ether. (1)H NMR demonstrated interactions of aminophosphonic and aminocarboxylic racemates with (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid in solution and was utilized to determine enantiomeric excess of (1-amino-1-phenylmethyl)phosphonic acid after its enantioenrichment via crystallization through diastereomeric salt formation with the crown ether followed by filtration.

  9. Complexation of lanthanides with crown ether carboxylic acids and its applications in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jian.

    1989-01-01

    The extraction characteristics of trivalent lanthanides by three crown ether carboxylic acids of different lipophilicities were investigated. Extraction was found to be independent of anions and strongly dependent on pH. Quantitative extraction of lanthanides was observed in the pH range of 6-8 by all three crown ether carboxylic acids: sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5 oxyacetic acid (I), 2-(sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxy)hexanoic acid (II), and 2-(sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxy)stearic acid (III). Results of competitive experiments indicated that this extraction system was highly selective for lanthanides relative to other major ionic species, such as the alkali metal ions, the alkaline earth metal ions, and transition metal ions. The extraction method has been applied to the determination of low levels of lanthanides in natural waters and in biological materials. Sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxyacetic acid had insufficient lipophilicity to remain in the organic phase when the pH of the aqueous phase was high and the organic to aqueous phase ratio was small. Extraction efficiency increased with the increasing lipophilicity of the crown ether carboxylic acids, which followed the order I < II < III. Using 2-(sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxy)hexanoic acid as an extractant, lanthanides in some natural water and biological samples were determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Uranium can also be extracted by the three crown ether carboxylic acids with high efficiency. 2-(Sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxy)hexanoic acid was utilized to extract uranyl ions from seawater and river water samples into chloroform, followed by back-extraction with a pH 2 nitric acid solution prior to NAA. The extraction method combined with NAA provides a sensitive method for the determination of uranium in natural waters.

  10. Densities of mixtures of heptane + methyl 1,1-dimethylethyl ether at temperatures between 243.16 and 333.14 K

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnick, H.R. Jr.; Falling, C.L.; Allred, G.C.; Parrish, W.R.

    1995-07-01

    With government mandates for including oxygenates (alcohols or ethers) in motor fuels, there is a need to develop accurate density tables for custody transfer purposes. This paper reports densities and excess volumes of binary mixtures of heptane and methyl 1,1-dimethylethyl ether (methyl tert-butyl ether, MTBE) at 243.16, 278.15, 288.17, 293,10, 313.14, and 333.14 K. Data were obtained at 0.34, 1.72, and 4.83 MPa. Mixture compositions were between 5 and 95 mol %. Equimolar excess volumes are about 0.4 cm{sup 3}/mol and are weak functions of temperature and pressure.

  11. HIGH LEVELS OF MONOAROMATIC COMPOUNDS LIMIT THE USE OF SOLID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER AND TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, two papers reported the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with polydimethylsiloxane(PDMS)/Carboxen fibers to determine trace levels of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary butyl alcohol (tBA) in water. Attempts were made to apply this technique to th...

  12. CONCENTRATIONS, SOURCES, AND FATE OF THE GASOLINE OXYGENATE METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN A MULTIPLE-USE LAKE. (R826282)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discovery of the fuel additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in
    drinking water supplies is of concern to public health officials, water
    suppliers, and the public. Despite recent policy decisions, few published
    studies exist on the concentrations, sources, a...

  13. PRODUCTS OF THE GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF THE OH RADICAL WITH N-BUTYL METHYL ETHER AND 2-ISOPROPOXYETHANOL: REACTIONS OF ROC(O)< RADICALS. (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The products of the gas-phase reactions of the OH radical with n-butyl methyl ether and 2-isopropoxyethanol in the presence of NO have been investigated at 298 ? 2 K and 740 Torr total pressure of air by gas chromatography and in situ atmospheric pressure ionization...

  14. Solubility of anthracene in binary alkane + methyl tert-butyl ether solvent mixtures at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    McHale, M.E.R.; Kauppila, A.S.M.; Acree, W.E. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Experimental solubilities are reported for anthracene dissolved in seven binary mixtures containing methyl tert-butyl ether (also called 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane) with hexane, heptane, octane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, and tert-butylcyclohexane (also called (1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclohexane) at 25 C. Results of these measurements are used to test two mathematical representations based upon the combined nearly ideal binary solvent (NIBS)/Redlich-Kister equation and modified Wilson model. For the seven systems studied, both equations were found to provide an accurate mathematical representation of the experimental data, with an overall average absolute deviation between measured and calculated values being on the order of 0.5%.

  15. A comparative study of biodiesel production using methanol, ethanol, and tert-butyl methyl ether (MTBE) under supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Farobie, Obie; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2015-09-01

    In this study, biodiesel production under supercritical conditions among methanol, ethanol, and tert-butyl methyl ether (MTBE) was compared in order to elucidate the differences in their reaction behavior. A continuous reactor was employed, and experiments were conducted at various reaction temperatures (270-400 °C) and reaction times (3-30 min) and at a fixed pressure of 20 MPa and an oil-to-reactant molar ratio of 1:40. The results showed that under the same reaction conditions, the supercritical methanol method provided the highest yield of biodiesel. At 350 °C and 20 MPa, canola oil was completely converted to biodiesel after 10, 30, and 30 min in the case of - supercritical methanol, ethanol, and MTBE, respectively. The reaction kinetics of biodiesel production was also compared for supercritical methanol, ethanol, and MTBE.

  16. Energy analysis for the production of biodiesel in a spiral reactor using supercritical tert-butyl methyl ether (MTBE).

    PubMed

    Farobie, Obie; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2015-11-01

    In this study, energy analysis was conducted for the production of biodiesel in a spiral reactor using supercritical tert-butyl methyl ether (MTBE). This study aims to determine the net energy ratio (NER) and energy efficiency for the production of biodiesel using supercritical MTBE and to verify the effectiveness of the spiral reactor in terms of heat recovery efficiency. The analysis results revealed that the NER for this process was 0.92. Meanwhile, the energy efficiency was 0.98, indicating that the production of biodiesel in a spiral reactor using supercritical MTBE is an energy-efficient process. By comparing the energy supply required for biodiesel production between spiral and conventional reactors, the spiral reactor was more efficient than the conventional reactor.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a wetland constructed for benzene-, methyl tert-butyl ether- and ammonia-contaminated groundwater bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Fester, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which are present in most natural environments, have demonstrated capacity to promote biodegradation of organic pollutants in the greenhouse. However, it is not certain whether AMF can spontaneously establish in phytoremediation systems constructed to decontaminate groundwater, because of the unusual conditions during the construction and operation of such systems. To assess this possibility, root samples from a wetland constructed for the phytoremediation of groundwater contaminated with benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether and ammonia were analysed. Substantial AMF colonization was observed in plant roots sampled close to the inlet of a basin filled with fine gravel and planted with Phragmites australis. In addition, analysis of a fragment of the nuclear large ribosomal subunit, amplified by nested PCR, revealed the presence of AMF molecular operational taxonomic units closely related to Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis in the samples. These findings demonstrate the capacity of generalist AMF strains to establish spontaneously, rapidly and extensively in groundwater bioremediation technical installations. PMID:22846140

  18. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of oxime ether strobilurin derivatives containing indole moiety as novel fungicide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ya-Qiang; Huang, Zi-Long; Yan, Hui-Dong; Li, Jun; Ye, Li-Yi; Che, Li-Ming; Tu, Song

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-one novel oxime ether strobilurins containing indole moiety, which employed an indole group to stabilize the E-styryl group in Enoxastrobin, were designed and synthesized. The biological assay indicated that most compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activities. The structure-activity relationship study demonstrated that the synthesized methyl 3-methoxypropenoate oxime ethers 7b-e exhibited remarkably high activities among all the synthesized oxime ether compounds 7. Moreover, the fungicidal activities of methyl α-(methoxyimino)benzeneacetate oxime ethers compounds 7f-i and N-methoxy-carbamic acid methyl esters compounds 7j-m showed significant differences compared to the corresponding products of ammonolysis. PMID:25346294

  19. Anaerobic degradation of veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether and guaiacoxyacetic acid by mixed rumen bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Supanwong, K; Ohmiya, K; Shimizu, S; Kawakami, H

    1985-01-01

    Veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether (0.2 g/liter), a lignin model compound, was found to be degraded by mixed rumen bacteria in a yeast extract medium under strictly anaerobic conditions to the extent of 19% within 24 h. Guaiacoxyacetic acid, 2-(o-methoxyphenoxy)ethanol, vanillic acid, and vanillin were detected as degradation products of veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether by thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Guaiacoxyacetic acid (0.25 g/liter), when added into the medium as a substrate, was entirely degraded within 36 h, resulting in the formation of phenoxyacetic acid, guaiacol, and phenol. These results suggest that the beta-arylether bond, an important intermonomer linkage in lignin, can be cleaved completely by these rumen anaerobes. PMID:3841472

  20. Biocatalytic potential of lipase from Staphylococcus sp. MS1 for transesterification of jatropha oil into fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Singh, Shelley Sardul; Maan, Pratibha; Sharma, Rohit

    2014-11-01

    An extracellular lipase producing isolate Staphylococcus sp. MS1 was optimized for lipase production and its biocatalytic potential was assessed. Medium with tributyrin (0.25 %) and without any exogenous inorganic nitrogen source was found to be optimum for lipase production from Staphylococcus sp. MS1. The optimum pH and temperature for lipase production were found to be pH 7 and 37 °C respectively, showing lipase activity of 37.91 U. It showed good lipase production at pH 6-8. The lipase was found to be stable in organic solvents like hexane and petroleum ether, showing 98 and 88 % residual activity respectively. The biotransformation using the concentrated enzyme in petroleum ether resulted in the synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters like methyl oleate, methyl palmitate and methyl stearate. Thus, the lipase under study has got the potential to bring about transesterification of oils into methyl esters which can be exploited for various biotechnological applications. PMID:25115850

  1. 40 CFR 721.10326 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, methyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate, ethyl 2-propenoate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate, ethyl 2-propenoate, zinc 2-methyl-2-propenoate (1:2) and zinc 2... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, methyl ester, polymer with butyl 2-propenoate, ethyl 2-propenoate, zinc 2-methyl-2-propenoate (1:2) and zinc 2-propenoate (1:2), 2,2'-(1,2-diazenediyl)bis - and...

  2. Distribution of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and selected water-quality constituents in the surficial aquifer at the Dover National Test Site, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Marie; Guertal, William R.; Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; McHale, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    A joint study by the Dover National Test Site, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, and the U.S. Geological Survey was conducted from June 27 through July 18, 2001, to determine the spatial distribution of the gasoline oxygenate additive methyl tert-butyl ether and selected water-quality constituents in the surficial aquifer underlying the Dover National Test Site. This report provides a summary assessment of the distribution of methyl tert-butyl ether and a preliminary screening of selected constituents that may affect natural attenuation and remediation demonstrations at the Dover National Test Site. The information gathered during this study is designed to assist potential remedial investigators who are considering conducting a methyl tert-butyl ether remedial demonstration at the test site. In addition, the study supported a planned enhanced bioremediation demonstration and assisted the Dover National Test Site in identifying possible locations for future methyl tert-butyl ether remediation demonstrations. A direct-push drill rig was used to collect a total of 147 ground-water samples (115 VOC samples and 32 quality-assurance samples) at varying depths. Volatile organic compounds were above the method reporting limits in 59 of the 115 ground-water samples. The concentrations ranged from below detection limits to maximum values of 12.4 micrograms per liter of cis-1,2-dichloro-ethene, 1.14 micrograms per liter of trichloro-ethene, 2.65 micrograms per liter of tetrachloro-ethene, 1,070 micrograms per liter of methyl tert-butyl ether, 4.36 micrograms per liter of benzene, and 1.8 micrograms per liter of toluene. Vinyl chloride, ethylbenzene, p,m-xylene, and o-xylene were not detected in any of the samples collected during this investigation. Methyl tert-butyl ether was detected in 47 of the 115 ground-water samples. The highest concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether were detected in the surficial aquifer from ?4.6 to 6.4 feet mean sea level; however, methyl tert

  3. Exploring and expanding the structural diversity of self-assembling dendrons through combinations of AB, constitutional isomeric AB2, and AB3 biphenyl-4-methyl ether building blocks.

    PubMed

    Percec, Virgil; Holerca, Marian N; Nummelin, Sami; Morrison, John J; Glodde, Martin; Smidrkal, Jan; Peterca, Mihai; Rosen, Brad M; Uchida, Satoshi; Balagurusamy, Venkatachalapathy S K; Sienkowska, Monika J; Heiney, Paul A

    2006-08-16

    General, efficient and inexpensive methods for the synthesis of dendritic building blocks methyl 3',4'-dihydroxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate, 3',5'-dihydroxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate, and methyl 3',4',5'-trihydroxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate were elaborated. In all syntheses the major step involved an inexpensive Ni(II)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction. These three building blocks were employed together with methyl 4'-hydroxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate in a convergent iterative strategy to synthesize seven libraries containing up to three generations of 3',4'-, 3',5'-, and 3',4',5'-substituted biphenyl-4-methyl ether based amphiphilic dendrons. These dendrons self-assemble into supramolecular dendrimers that self-organize into periodic assemblies. Structural and retrostructural analysis of their assemblies demonstrated that these dendrons self-assemble into hollow and non-hollow supramolecular dendrimers exhibiting dimensions of up to twice those reported for architecturally related dendrons based on benzyl ether repeat units. These new dendrons expand the structural diversity and demonstrate the generality of the concept of self-assembling dendrons based on amphiphilic arylmethyl ethers.

  4. Two-year drinking water carcinogenicity study of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Darol; Willson, Gabrielle; Parkinson, Horace; Bermudez, Edilberto

    2013-07-01

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to reduce tailpipe emissions and its use has been discontinued. There remains a concern that drinking water sources have been contaminated with MTBE. A two-year drinking water carcinogenicity study of MTBE was conducted in Wistar rats (males, 0, 0.5, 3, 7.5 mg ml(-1); and females, 0, 0.5, 3, and 15 mg ml(-1)). Body weights were unaffected and water consumption was reduced in MTBE-exposed males and females. Wet weights of male kidneys were increased at the end of two years of exposure to 7.5 mg ml(-1) MTBE. Chronic progressive nephropathy was observed in males and females, was more severe in males, and was exacerbated in the high MTBE exposure groups. Brain was the only tissue with a statistically significant finding of neoplasms. One astrocytoma (1/50) was found in a female rat (15 mg ml(-1)). The incidence of brain astrocytomas in male rats was 1/50, 1/50, 1/50 and 4/50 for the 0, 0.5, 3 and 7.5 mg ml(-1) exposure groups, respectively. This was a marginally significant statistical trend, but not statistically significant when pairwise comparisons were made or when multiple comparisons were taken into account. The incidence of astrocytoma fell within historical control ranges for Wistar rats, and the brain has not been identified as a target organ following chronic administration of MTBE, ethyl tert-butyl ether, or tertiary butyl alcohol (in drinking water) to mice and rats. We conclude that the astrocytomas observed in this study are not associated with exposure to MTBE.

  5. Solid-supported acids as mild and versatile reagents for the deprotection of aromatic ethers.

    PubMed

    Ploypradith, Poonsakdi; Cheryklin, Pannarin; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Bertoni, Daniel R; Ruchirawat, Somsak

    2007-07-01

    p-Toluene sulfonic acid (p-TsOH) immobilized either on polystyrene (PS) or silica (Si) was found to be effective in cleaving aromatic ethers containing isopropyl, tert-butyl, allyl, and benzyl groups, as well as mono-, di-, and trimethoxylated benzyl groups, in moderate to excellent yields (54-95%). These protecting groups could be selectively deprotected when they were simultaneously present on the same or different aromatic rings in a substrate.

  6. Cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolites on HL-60 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G.H.; Shen, Y.; Shen, H.M.

    1996-12-31

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used oxygenate in unleaded gasoline; however, few studies have been conducted on the toxicity of this compound. This study evaluates the cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of MTBE and its metabolites in a human haemopoietic cell line, HL-60. The metabolites of MTBE studied include tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA), and formaldehyde. Comet assay is used to assess DNA damage, and the cytotoxicity is investigated by lactate dehydrogenease (LDH) release. The results show no significant cytotoxic effects of MTBE, TBA, and HIBA over a concentration ranging from 1 to 30 mM. Formaldehyde, in contrast, causes a substantial LDH release at a concentration of 5 {mu}M. Hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative agent, at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, produces a significant dose-related increase in DNA damage, whereas a much higher concentration of MTBE (1 to 30 mM) is required to produce a similar observation. The genotoxic effects of TBA and HIBA appear to be identical to that of MTBE. Conversely, DNA damage is observed for formaldehyde at a relatively low concentration range (5 to 100 {mu}M). These findings suggest that MTBE and its metabolites, except formaldehyde, have relatively low cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-amyl methyl ether by purge and trap-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry: method evaluation and application.

    PubMed

    Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Stephan, Manuel; Jochmann, Maik A; Krajenke, Karen; Haas, Joe; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2010-01-01

    In order to monitor the behaviour of contaminants in the aqueous environment effective enrichment techniques often have to be employed due to their low concentrations. In this work a robust and sensitive purge and trap-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of fuel oxygenates in water is presented. The method evaluation included the determination of method detection limits, accuracy and reproducibility of deltaD and delta(13)C values. Lowest concentrations at which reliable delta(13)C values could be determined were 5 microg L(-1) and 28 microg L(-1) for TAME and MTBE, respectively. Stable deltaD values for MTBE and TAME could be achieved for concentrations as low as 25 and 50 microg L(-1). Good long-term reproducibility of delta(13)C and deltaD values was obtained for all target compounds. But deltaD values varying more than 5 per thousand were observed using different thermal conversion tubes. Thus, a correction of deltaD values in the analysis of groundwater samples was necessary to guarantee comparability of the results. The applicability of this method was shown by the analysis of groundwater samples from a gasoline contaminated site. By two dimensional isotope analysis two locations within this site were identified at which anaerobic and aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether occurred.

  8. Naturally occurring hybrids derived from γ-amino acids and sugars with potential tail to tail ether-bonds

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zi-ming; Zhan, Zhi-lai; Yang, Ya-nan; Jiang, Jian-shuang; Zhang, Pei-cheng

    2016-01-01

    The basic substances of life include various amino acids and sugars. To search such molecules is the precondition to understand the essential nature. Here we reported four unprecedented hybrids of γ-amino acids and sugars from the roots of Ranunculus ternatus, which possess potential tail to tail ether-connected (6,6-ether-connected) modes in the sugar moiety. The structures of these hybrids were elucidated by extensive analyses of spectra and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) method. PMID:27166276

  9. Naturally occurring hybrids derived from γ-amino acids and sugars with potential tail to tail ether-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zi-Ming; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Yang, Ya-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The basic substances of life include various amino acids and sugars. To search such molecules is the precondition to understand the essential nature. Here we reported four unprecedented hybrids of γ-amino acids and sugars from the roots of Ranunculus ternatus, which possess potential tail to tail ether-connected (6,6-ether-connected) modes in the sugar moiety. The structures of these hybrids were elucidated by extensive analyses of spectra and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) method.

  10. Ether production

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a multistage process for etherifying a mixed C{sub 4} + olefinic hydrocarbon feedstock containing isoalkene. It comprises: contacting the olefinic feedstock and aliphatic alcohol in a first reaction stage under partial etherification conditions with a regenerable inorganic metal oxide acid solid catalyst to convert a major amount of the isoalkene to C{sub 5} + tertiary-alkyl ether; recovering a reactant effluent from the first stage containing ether product, unreacted alcohol and unreacted olefin including isoalkene; charging the first stage effluent to a second stage catalytic distillation column containing solid acid resin etherification catalyst in a plurality of fixed bed catalysis-distillation zones to complete substantially full etherification of isoalkene; recovering C{sub 5} + ether as a liquid from the catalytic distillation column; regenerating the first stage catalyst to remove feedstock impurity and coke and to acid activity; and continuing ether production with regenerated catalyst.

  11. Methyl ether derivatives of p-tert-Butyl[3.1.3.1]homooxacalixarene. Formation, structure, and complexes with quaternary ammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Masci, Bernardo; Mortera, Stefano Levi; Persiani, Daniela; Thuéry, Pierre

    2006-01-20

    [structure: see text] The whole set (five compounds) of partially O-methylated products of p-tert-butyl[3.1.3.1]homooxacalixarene, currently named p-tert-butyltetrahomodioxacalix[4]arene, have been prepared. Their structure has been investigated in solution through NMR techniques and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. A systematic investigation, extended to the parent tetraphenol and to the tetramethyl ether derivative, has been carried out on the complexation of tetramethylammonium, acetylcholine, N-methylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium picrate in CDCl3. The observed trends in the binding and in the selectivity of the strictly related hosts could be analyzed on the basis of the varying importance of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and its effects on the conformation of the free and of the complexed ligands. On increasing the number of methyl ether functions, the cone conformation appears to be relatively less stable but deeper, so small organic cations can be more effectively encircled.

  12. Associations between Serum Perfluoroalkyl Acids and LINE-1 DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Deborah J.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Butler, Rondi A.; Bartell, Scott M.; Fletcher, Tony; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are persistent, synthetic compounds that are used in a number of consumer products. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, and changes in gene expression and DNA methylation in animals and cellular systems. However, whether PFAA exposure is associated with LINE-1 DNA methylation, a potential marker of cardiovascular risk, in humans remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the cross-sectional associations between serum PFAAs and LINE-1 DNA methylation in a population highly exposed to PFOA. We measured serum PFAAs twice four to five years apart in 685 adult participants (47% male, mean age ± SD=42 ± 11 years). We measured percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at the second time point (follow-up), and estimated absolute differences in LINE-1 methylation associated with an interquartile (IQR) shift in mean PFAA serum levels. IQR increases in mean serum PFOA, PFOS, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) were associated with differences of −0.04 (p=0.16), 0.20 (p=0.001), 0.06 (p=0.19), and 0.02 (p=0.57), respectively, in % LINE-1 methylation at follow-up after adjustment for potential confounders. We observed a monotonic increase in LINE-1 DNA methylation across tertiles of PFOS and PFNA (ptrend=0.02 for both associations), but not across tertiles of PFOA or PFHxS (ptrend=0.71 and 0.44, respectively). In summary, serum PFOS was associated with LINE-1 methylation, while serum PFOA, PFHxS, and PFNA were not. Additional research is needed to more precisely determine whether these compounds are epigenetically active. PMID:24263140

  13. Selective inhibition of ammonium oxidation and nitrification-linked N2O formation by methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Coutlakis, M.D.; Oremland, R.S.; Ward, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (CH3F) and dimethyl ether (DME) inhibited nitrification in washed-cell suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea and in a variety of oxygenated soils and sediments. Headspace additions of CH3F (10% [vol/vol]) and DME (25% [vol/vol]) fully inhibited NO2- and N2O production from NH4+ in incubations of N. europaea, while lower concentrations of these gases resulted in partial inhibition. Oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by N. europaea and oxidation of NO2- by a Nitrobacter sp. were unaffected by CH3F or DME. In nitrifying soils, CH3F and DME inhibited N2O production. In field experiments with surface flux chambers and intact cores, CH3F reduced the release of N2O from soils to the atmosphere by 20- to 30-fold. Inhibition by CH3F also resulted in decreased NO3- + NO2- levels and increased NH4+ levels in soils. CH3F did not affect patterns of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia in cell suspensions of a nitrate- respiring bacterium, nor did it affect N2O metabolism in denitrifying soils. CH3F and DME will be useful in discriminating N2O production via nitrification and denitrification when both processes occur and in decoupling these processes by blocking NO2- and NO3- production.

  14. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cometabolism with hexane in biofilters inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Margarita; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) vapors by cometabolism with gaseous hexane (n-hexane > 95%) was investigated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizing short chain aliphatic hydrocarbon (C(5)-C(8)). Kinetic batch experiments showed that MTBE was degraded even when hexane was completely exhausted with a cometabolic coefficient of 1.06 ± 0.16 mg MTBE mg hexane(-1). Intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) accumulation was observed followed by its gradual consumption. A maximum MTBE elimination capacity (EC(MAX)) of 35 g m(-3) h(-1) and removal efficiency (RE) of 70% were attained in mineral medium amended biofilters having an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 1 min. For these experimental conditions, a maximum hexane EC of approximately 60 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained at a load of 75 g m(-3) h(-1). Experiments under transient conditions revealed a competitive substrate interaction between MTBE and hexane. Biomass densities between 5.8 and 12.6 g L(biofilter) (-1) were obtained. Nevertheless, production of biopolymers caused non-uniform distribution flow rates that reduced the performance. Residence time distribution profiles showed an intermediate dispersion flow rate with a dispersion coefficient of 0.8 cm(2) s(-1). PMID:22486671

  15. Alveolar breath sampling and analysis to assess exposures to methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) during motor vehicle refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, A.B.; Pleil, J.D.

    1996-07-01

    In this study we present a sampling and analytical methodology that can be used to assess consumers` exposures to methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) that may result from routine vehicle refueling operations. The method is based on the collection of alveolar breath samples using evacuated one-liter stainless steel canisters and analysis using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer equipped with a patented `valveless` cryogenic preconcentrator. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, a series of breath samples was collected from two individuals (the person pumping the fuel and a nearby observer) immediately before and for 64 min after a vehicle was refueled with premium grade gasoline. Results demonstrate low levels of MTBE in both subjects` breaths before refueling, and levels that increased by a factor of 35 to 100 after the exposure. Breath elimination models fitted to the post exposure measurements indicate that the half-life of MTBE in the first physiological compartment was between 1.3 and 2.9 min. Analysis of the resulting models suggests that breath elimination of MTBE during the 64 min monitoring period was approximately 155 {mu}g for the refueling subject while it was only 30 {mu}g for the nearby observer. This analysis also shows that the post exposure breath elimination of other gasoline constituents was consistent with previously published observations. 20 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Health Risk Assessment for Inhalation Exposure to Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether at Petrol Stations in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dalin; Yang, Jianping; Liu, Yungang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Peng, Xiaowu; Wei, Qinzhi; Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-02-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a well known gasoline additive, is used in China nationwide to enhance the octane number of gasoline and reduce harmful exhaust emissions, yet little is known regarding the potential health risk associated with occupational exposure to MTBE in petrol stations. In this study, 97 petrol station attendants (PSAs) in southern China were recruited for an assessment of the health risk associated with inhalation exposure to MTBE. The personal exposure levels of MTBE were analyzed by Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction GC/MS, and the demographic characteristics of the PSAs were investigated. Cancer and non-cancer risks were calculated with the methods recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The results showed that the exposure levels of MTBE in operating workers were much higher than among support staff (p < 0.01) and both were lower than 50 ppm (an occupational threshold limit value). The calculated cancer risks (CRs) at the investigated petrol stations was 0.170 to 0.240 per 10⁶ for operating workers, and 0.026 to 0.049 per 10⁶ for support staff, which are below the typical target range for risk management of 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-4); The hazard quotients (HQs) for all subjects were <1. In conclusion, our study indicates that the MTBE exposure of PSAs in southern China is in a low range which does not seem to be a significant health risk. PMID:26861375

  17. Methyl tert-butyl ether occurrence and related factors in public and private wells in Southeast New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Argue, D.M.; McGarry, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water from public wells in New Hampshire has increased steadily over the past several years. Using a laboratory reporting level of 0.2 ??g/L, 40% of samples from public wells and 21% from private wells in southeast New Hampshire have measurable concentrations of MTBE. The rate of occurrence of MTBE varied significantly for public wells by establishment type; for example, 63% of public wells serving residential properties have MTBE concentrations above 0.2 ??g/L, whereas lower rates were found for schools (21%). MTBE concentrations correlate strongly with urban factors, such as population density. Surprisingly, MTBE was correlated positively with well depth for public supply wells. Well depth is inversely related to yield in New Hampshire bedrock wells, which may mean that there is less opportunity for dilution of MTBE captured by deep wells. Another possibility is that the source(s) of water to low-yield wells may be dominated by leakage from potentially contaminated shallow groundwater through near-surface fractures or along the well casing. These wells may also have relatively large contributing areas (due to low recharge at the bedrock surface) and therefore have a greater chance of intersecting MTBE sources. This finding is significant because deep bedrock wells are often considered to be less vulnerable to contamination than shallow wells, and in southeast New Hampshire, wells are being drilled deeper in search of increased supply.

  18. Enhanced cometabolic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a Pseudomonas sp. strain grown on n-pentane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. S.; Wang, S.; Yan, W.

    2016-08-01

    When methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is added as oxygenates it increases the octane number and decreases the release of nitric oxide from the incomplete combustion of reformulated gasoline. The extensive use of MTBE allowed it to be detectable as a pollutant in both ground-level and underground water worldwide. The present study focuses on the isolation and characterization of MTB-degrading microorganisms by cometabolism based on the results of growth on different carbon sources. It also focuses on the kinetic analysis and the continuous degradation of MTBE. A bacterial strain WL1 that can grow on both n-alkanes (C5-C8) and aromatics was isolated and named Pseudomonas sp. WL1 according to the 16S rDNA sequencing analysis. Strain WL1 could cometabolically degrade MTBE in the presence of n-alkanes with a desirable degradation rate. Diverse n-alkanes with different lengths of carbon chains showed significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When strain WL1 cometabolically degraded MTBE in the presence of n-pentane, higher MTBE-degrading rate and lower TBA-accumulation were observed (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotei, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L). In the continuous degrading experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. WL1 did not show any obvious decrease after five subsequent additions.

  19. The efficient photocatalytic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether under Pd/ZnO and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Seddigi, Zaki S; Ahmed, Saleh A; Bumajdad, Ali; Danish, Ekram Y; Shawky, Ahmed M; Gondal, Mohammed A; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether is a commonly used fuel oxygenate that is present in gasoline. It was introduced to eliminate the use of leaded gasoline and to improve the octane quality because it aids in the complete combustion of fuel by supplying oxygen during the combustion process. Over the past decade, the use of MTBE has increased tremendously worldwide. For obvious reasons relating to accidental spillage, MTBE started to appear as an environmental and human health threat because of its nonbiodegradable nature and carcinogenic potential, respectively. In this work, MTBE was degraded with the help of an advanced oxidation process through the use of zinc oxide as a photocatalyst in the presence of visible light. A mixture of 200 mg of zinc oxide in 350 mL of 50 ppm MTBE aqueous solution was irradiated with visible light for a given time. The complete degradation of MTBE was recorded, and approximately 99% photocatalytic degradation of 100 ppm MTBE solution was observed. Additionally, the photoactivity of 1% Pd-doped ZnO was tested under similar conditions to understand the effect of Pd doping on ZnO. Our results obtained under visible light irradiation are very promising, and they could be further explored for the degradation of several nondegradable environmental pollutants.

  20. Histologic and histomorphometric changes of testis following oral exposure to methyl tertiary-butyl ether in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Gholami, S; Ansari-Lari, M; Khalili, L

    2015-01-01

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) is used to reduce carbon monoxide and ozone in urban air and to boost fuel octane. There is a lack of knowledge in the literature about the histomorphometric changes of the testis following exposure to MTBE. Therefore, this experimental study was performed to determine the effect of oral exposure to MTBE on histologic and histomorphometric changes of testis in adult rat. A total of 25 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five equal experimental groups: control, almond oil and three treatment groups which received 400, 800 and 1600 mg/kg/day MTBE in almond oil by gavages for 30 consecutive days. Histomorphometric analysis showed no significant difference in absolute and relative testis weight, connective tissue thickness, germinal epithelium height, tunica albuginea thickness and Sertoli cell numbers between experimental groups (P>0.05). However, trend analysis showed that the seminiferous tubule diameter increased and interstitial cell numbers as well as spermatocyte and spermatid cell numbers decreased significantly in MTBE treated groups (P<0.05). It may be concluded that MTBE could exert adverse effects on spermatogenic cells in adult rat. Whether the observed changes in the present study are due to the direct effect of MTBE via passing blood-testis barrier or its indirect effect through another mechanism should be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27175191

  1. Method detection limit determination and application of a convenient headspace analysis method for methyl tert-butyl ether in water.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Dennis T; Rochette, Elizabeth A; Ramsey, Philip J

    2002-11-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a common groundwater contaminant, introduced to the environment by leaking petroleum storage tanks, urban runoff, and motorized watercraft. In this study. a simplified (static) headspace analysis method was adapted for determination of MTBE in water samples and soil water extracts. The MDL of the headspace method was calculated to be 2.0 microg L(-1) by the EPA single-concentration design method(1) and 1.2 microg L(-1) by a calibration method developed by Hubaux and Vos (Hubaux, A.; Vos, G. Anal. Chem. 1970,42, 849-855). The MDL calculated with the Hubaux and Vos method was favored because it considers both a true positive and a false positive. The static headspace method was applied to analysis of a tap water sample and a monitoring well sample from a gasoline service station, a river sample, and aqueous extracts from soil excavated during removal of a leaking underground storage tank (LUST). The water samples examined in this study had MTTBE concentrations ranging from 6 to 19 microg L(-1). Aqueous extracts of a soil sample taken from the LUST site had 8 microg L(-1) MTBE.

  2. Health Risk Assessment for Inhalation Exposure to Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether at Petrol Stations in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dalin; Yang, Jianping; Liu, Yungang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Peng, Xiaowu; Wei, Qinzhi; Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-02-06

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a well known gasoline additive, is used in China nationwide to enhance the octane number of gasoline and reduce harmful exhaust emissions, yet little is known regarding the potential health risk associated with occupational exposure to MTBE in petrol stations. In this study, 97 petrol station attendants (PSAs) in southern China were recruited for an assessment of the health risk associated with inhalation exposure to MTBE. The personal exposure levels of MTBE were analyzed by Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction GC/MS, and the demographic characteristics of the PSAs were investigated. Cancer and non-cancer risks were calculated with the methods recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The results showed that the exposure levels of MTBE in operating workers were much higher than among support staff (p < 0.01) and both were lower than 50 ppm (an occupational threshold limit value). The calculated cancer risks (CRs) at the investigated petrol stations was 0.170 to 0.240 per 10⁶ for operating workers, and 0.026 to 0.049 per 10⁶ for support staff, which are below the typical target range for risk management of 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-4); The hazard quotients (HQs) for all subjects were <1. In conclusion, our study indicates that the MTBE exposure of PSAs in southern China is in a low range which does not seem to be a significant health risk.

  3. Identification of a Ruminococcaceae Species as the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) Degrading Bacterium in a Methanogenic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Ahn, Hyeri; Sun, Weimin; McGuinness, Lora R; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-02-01

    The widespread use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has caused major contamination of groundwater sources and is a concern due to its taste and odor problems, as well as its toxicity. MTBE can be degraded anaerobically which makes bioremediation of contaminated aquifers a potential solution. Nevertheless, the organisms and mechanisms that are responsible for anaerobic MTBE degradation are still unknown. The aim of our research was to identify the organisms actively degrading MTBE. For this purpose we characterized an anaerobic methanogenic culture enriched with MTBE as the sole carbon source from the New Jersey Arthur Kill intertidal strait sediment. The cultures were analyzed using stable isotope probing (SIP) combined with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), high-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The sequence data indicated that phylotypes belonging to the Ruminococcaceae in the Firmicutes were predominant in the methanogenic cultures. SIP experiments also showed sequential incorporation of the (13)C labeled MTBE by the bacterial community with a bacterium most closely related to Saccharofermentans acetigenes identified as the bacterium active in O-demethylation of MTBE. Identification of the microorganisms responsible for the activity will help us better understand anaerobic MTBE degradation processes in the field and determine biomarkers for monitoring natural attenuation. PMID:26727046

  4. Fast detection of methyl tert-butyl ether from water using solid phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Marjaana; Holopainen, Sanna; Puton, Jaroslaw; Sillanpää, Mika

    2011-05-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly used as chemical additive to increase oxygen content and octane rating of reformulated gasoline. Despite its impact on enhancing cleaner combustion of gasoline, MTBE poses a threat to surface and ground water when gasoline is released into the environment. Methods for onsite analysis of MTBE in water samples are also needed. A less common technique for MTBE detection from water is ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). We describe a method for fast sampling and screening of MTBE from water by solid phase microextraction (SPME) and IMS. MTBE is adsorbed from the head space of a sample to the coating of SPME fiber. The interface containing a heated sample chamber, which couples SPME and IMS, was constructed and the SPME fiber was introduced into the sample chamber for thermal desorption and IMS detection of MTBE vapors. The demonstrated SPME-IMS method proved to be a straightforward method for the detection of trace quantities of MTBE from waters including surface and ground water. We determined the relative standard deviation of 8.3% and detection limit of 5 mg L(-1) for MTBE. Because of short sampling, desorption, and detection times, the described configuration of combined SPME and IMS is a feasible method for the detection of hazardous substances from environmental matrices.

  5. Methyl tert-butyl ether occurrence and related factors in public and private wells in southeast New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Joseph D; Argue, Denise M; McGarry, Frederick J

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water from public wells in New Hampshire has increased steadily over the past several years. Using a laboratory reporting level of 0.2 microg/L, 40% of samples from public wells and 21% from private wells in southeast New Hampshire have measurable concentrations of MTBE. The rate of occurrence of MTBE varied significantly for public wells by establishmenttype; for example, 63% of public wells serving residential properties have MTBE concentrations above 0.2 microg/L, whereas lower rates were found for schools (21%). MTBE concentrations correlate strongly with urban factors, such as population density. Surprisingly, MTBE was correlated positively with well depth for public supply wells. Well depth is inversely related to yield in New Hampshire bedrock wells, which may mean that there is less opportunity for dilution of MTBE captured by deep wells. Another possibility is that the source(s) of water to low-yield wells may be dominated by leakage from potentially contaminated shallow groundwater through near-surface fractures or along the well casing. These wells may also have relatively large contributing areas (due to low recharge at the bedrock surface) and therefore have a greater chance of intersecting MTBE sources. This finding is significant because deep bedrock wells are often considered to be less vulnerable to contamination than shallow wells, and in southeast New Hampshire, wells are being drilled deeper in search of increased supply.

  6. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cometabolism with hexane in biofilters inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Margarita; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) vapors by cometabolism with gaseous hexane (n-hexane > 95%) was investigated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizing short chain aliphatic hydrocarbon (C(5)-C(8)). Kinetic batch experiments showed that MTBE was degraded even when hexane was completely exhausted with a cometabolic coefficient of 1.06 ± 0.16 mg MTBE mg hexane(-1). Intermediate tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) accumulation was observed followed by its gradual consumption. A maximum MTBE elimination capacity (EC(MAX)) of 35 g m(-3) h(-1) and removal efficiency (RE) of 70% were attained in mineral medium amended biofilters having an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 1 min. For these experimental conditions, a maximum hexane EC of approximately 60 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained at a load of 75 g m(-3) h(-1). Experiments under transient conditions revealed a competitive substrate interaction between MTBE and hexane. Biomass densities between 5.8 and 12.6 g L(biofilter) (-1) were obtained. Nevertheless, production of biopolymers caused non-uniform distribution flow rates that reduced the performance. Residence time distribution profiles showed an intermediate dispersion flow rate with a dispersion coefficient of 0.8 cm(2) s(-1).

  7. Identification of a Ruminococcaceae Species as the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) Degrading Bacterium in a Methanogenic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Ahn, Hyeri; Sun, Weimin; McGuinness, Lora R; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-02-01

    The widespread use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has caused major contamination of groundwater sources and is a concern due to its taste and odor problems, as well as its toxicity. MTBE can be degraded anaerobically which makes bioremediation of contaminated aquifers a potential solution. Nevertheless, the organisms and mechanisms that are responsible for anaerobic MTBE degradation are still unknown. The aim of our research was to identify the organisms actively degrading MTBE. For this purpose we characterized an anaerobic methanogenic culture enriched with MTBE as the sole carbon source from the New Jersey Arthur Kill intertidal strait sediment. The cultures were analyzed using stable isotope probing (SIP) combined with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), high-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The sequence data indicated that phylotypes belonging to the Ruminococcaceae in the Firmicutes were predominant in the methanogenic cultures. SIP experiments also showed sequential incorporation of the (13)C labeled MTBE by the bacterial community with a bacterium most closely related to Saccharofermentans acetigenes identified as the bacterium active in O-demethylation of MTBE. Identification of the microorganisms responsible for the activity will help us better understand anaerobic MTBE degradation processes in the field and determine biomarkers for monitoring natural attenuation.

  8. The fungal phytotoxin alternariol 9-methyl ether and some of its synthetic analogues inhibit the photosynthetic electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Demuner, Antonio Jacinto; Barbosa, Luiz Cláudio Almeida; Miranda, Ana Cristina Mendes; Geraldo, Guilherme Carvalho; da Silva, Cleiton Moreira; Giberti, Samuele; Bertazzini, Michele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2013-12-27

    Alternariol and monomethylalternariol are natural phytotoxins produced by some fungal strains, such as Nimbya and Alternaria. These substances confer virulence to phytopathogens, yet no information is available concerning their mode of action. Here we show that in the micromolar range alternariol 9-methyl ether is able to inhibit the electron transport chain (IC50 = 29.1 ± 6.5 μM) in isolated spinach chloroplasts. Since its effectiveness is limited by poor solubility in water, several alternariol analogues were synthesized using different aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized 6H-benzo[c]cromen-6-ones, 5H-chromene[4,3-b]pyridin-5-one, and 5H-chromene[4,3-c]pyridin-5-one also showed inhibitory properties, and three 6H-benzo[c]cromen-6-ones were more effective (IC50 = 12.8-22.8 μM) than the lead compound. Their addition to the culture medium of a cyanobacterial model strain was found to inhibit algal growth, with a relative effectiveness that was consistent with their activity in vitro. In contrast, the growth of a nonphotosynthetic plant cell culture was poorly affected. These compounds may represent a novel lead for the development of new active principles targeting photosynthesis.

  9. Toxicity of methyl tert-butyl ether to plants (Avena sativa, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum, and Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    An, Youn-Joo; Kampbell, Donald H; McGill, Mary E

    2002-08-01

    Influence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the germination of seeds and growth of seedling plants were studied in laboratory experiments. Test plants were wild oats (Avena sativa), sweet corn (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Seed germination, shoot growth, and root growth of plants exposed to different concentrations of MTBE in a moist soil were examined. Seed germination and seedling growth in MTBE-contaminated soil were markedly reduced in all test plants. The median lethal concentration values for seed germination tests and the median effective concentration values for shoot or root growth were calculated. The values for lettuce, wild oats, wheat, and sweet corn were in the range of 18 to 91, 362 to 459, 432 to 751, and 672 to 964 mg MTBE/kg soil as dry weight, respectively. Lettuce was most sensitive to MTBE, followed (in order of decreasing sensitivity) by wild oats, wheat, and sweet corn. Because MTBE can be readily absorbed by plants due to its high solubility in water, plant growth was a more sensitive endpoint than seed germination. Shoot length was more reduced in MTBE-contaminated soil than was the root length, which indicated that MTBE might be transported within the plant from the roots to the shoots. PMID:12152769

  10. Anaerobic Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Microorganisms Identified in Wastewater Treatment Plant Samples by Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weimin; Sun, Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) degradation potential was investigated in samples from a range of sources. From these 22 experimental variations, only one source (from wastewater treatment plant samples) exhibited MTBE degradation. These microcosms were methanogenic and were subjected to DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) targeted to both bacteria and archaea to identify the putative MTBE degraders. For this purpose, DNA was extracted at two time points, subjected to ultracentrifugation, fractioning, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP). In addition, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed. The SIP experiments indicated bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes (family Ruminococcaceae) and Alphaproteobacteria (genus Sphingopyxis) were the dominant MTBE degraders. Previous studies have suggested a role for Firmicutes in anaerobic MTBE degradation; however, the putative MTBE-degrading microorganism in the current study is a novel MTBE-degrading phylotype within this phylum. Two archaeal phylotypes (genera Methanosarcina and Methanocorpusculum) were also enriched in the heavy fractions, and these organisms may be responsible for minor amounts of MTBE degradation or for the uptake of metabolites released from the primary MTBE degraders. Currently, limited information exists on the microorganisms able to degrade MTBE under anaerobic conditions. This work represents the first application of DNA-based SIP to identify anaerobic MTBE-degrading microorganisms in laboratory microcosms and therefore provides a valuable set of data to definitively link identity with anaerobic MTBE degradation. PMID:22327600

  11. Seasonal and daily variations in concentrations of methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) at Cranberry Lake, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toran, L.; Lipka, C.; Baehr, A.; Reilly, T.; Baker, R.

    2003-01-01

    Methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an additive used to oxygenate gasoline, has been detected in lakes in northwestern New Jersey. This occurrence has been attributed to the use of gasoline-powered watercraft. This paper documents and explains both seasonal and daily variations in MTBE concentrations at Cranberry Lake. During a recent boating season (late April to September 1999), concentrations of MTBE typically exceeded 20??g/L. MTBE concentrations varied daily from 12 to 24??g/L over a 2-week period that included the Labor Day holiday. Concentrations were highest on weekends when there is more boat traffic, which had an immediate effect on MTBE mass throughout the lake. MTBE concentrations decreased to about 2??g/L shortly after the end of the summer recreational season. The loss of MTBE can be accounted for by volatilization, with a half-life on the order of 10 days. The volatilization rate was modeled with the daily decrease in MTBE then the modeled rate was validated using the data from the seasonal decline. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in public and private wells in New Hampshire: occurrence, factors, and possible implications.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Joseph D; Argue, Denise M; McGarry, Frederick J; Degnan, James R; Hayes, Laura; Flanagan, Sarah M; Helsel, Dennis R

    2008-02-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations > or = 0.2 /microg/L were found in samples of untreated water in 18% of public-supply wells (n = 284) and 9.1% of private domestic wells (n = 264) sampled in 2005 and 2006 in New Hampshire. In counties that used reformulated gasoline (RFG), MTBE occurred at or above 0.2 microg/L in 30% of public- and 17% of private-supply wells. Additionally, 52% of public-supply wells collocated with fuel storage and 71% of mobile home park wells had MTBE. MTBE occurrence in public-supply wells was predicted by factors such as proximity to sources of fuel, land use, and population density, as well as low pH and distance from mapped lineaments. RFG use, land-use variables, and pH were important predictors of private-well MTBE occurrence. Variables representing sources of MTBE, such as the distance to known fuel sources, were not significant predictors of MTBE occurrence in private-supply wells. It is hypothesized that private wells may become contaminated from the collective effects of sources in high population areas and from undocumented incidental releases from onsite or proximal gasoline use. From 2003 to 2005, MTBE occurrence decreased in 63 public-supply wells and increased in 60 private-supply wells, but neither trend was statistically significant.

  13. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in public and private wells in New Hampshire: Occurrence, factors, and possible implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Argue, D.M.; McGarry, F.J.; Degnan, J.R.; Hayes, L.; Flanagan, S.M.; Helsel, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations ???0.2 ??g/L were found in samples of untreated water in 18% of public-supply wells (n = 284) and 9.1% of private domestic wells (n = 264) sampled in 2005 and 2006 in New Hampshire. In counties that used reformulated gasoline (RFG), MTBE occurred at or above 0.2 ??g/L in 30% of public- and 17% of private-supply wells. Additionally, 52% of public-supply wells collocated with fuel storage and 71% of mobile home park wells had MTBE. MTBE occurrence in public-supply wells was predicted by factors such as proximity to sources of fuel, land use, and population density, as well as low pH and distance from mapped lineaments. RFG use, land-use variables, and pH were important predictors of private-well MTBE occurrence. Variables representing sources of MTBE, such as the distance to known fuel sources, were not significant predictors of MTBE occurrence in private-supply wells. It is hypothesized that private wells may become contaminated from the collective effects of sources in high population areas and from undocumented incidental releases from onsite or proximal gasoline use. From 2003 to 2005, MTBE occurrence decreased in 63 public-supply wells and increased in 60 private-supply wells, but neither trend was statistically significant. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  14. Health Risk Assessment for Inhalation Exposure to Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether at Petrol Stations in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dalin; Yang, Jianping; Liu, Yungang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Peng, Xiaowu; Wei, Qinzhi; Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a well known gasoline additive, is used in China nationwide to enhance the octane number of gasoline and reduce harmful exhaust emissions, yet  little is known regarding the potential health risk associated with occupational exposure to MTBE in petrol stations. In this study, 97 petrol station attendants (PSAs) in southern China were recruited for an assessment of the health risk associated with inhalation exposure to MTBE. The personal exposure levels of MTBE were analyzed by Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction GC/MS, and the demographic characteristics of the PSAs were investigated. Cancer and non-cancer risks were calculated with the methods recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The results showed that the exposure levels of MTBE in operating workers were much higher than among support staff (p < 0.01) and both were lower than 50 ppm (an occupational threshold limit value). The calculated cancer risks (CRs) at the investigated petrol stations was 0.170 to 0.240 per 106 for operating workers, and 0.026 to 0.049 per 106 for support staff, which are below the typical target range for risk management of 1 × 10−6 to 1 × 10−4; The hazard quotients (HQs) for all subjects were <1. In conclusion, our study indicates that the MTBE exposure of PSAs in southern China is in a low range which does not seem to be a significant health risk. PMID:26861375

  15. O3/H2O2 treatment of methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Safarzadeh-Amiri, A

    2001-10-01

    The kinetics and efficiency of oxidation of methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated water employing O3/H2O2 advanced oxidation process is presented in this paper. Kinetic simulation is based on the model mechanism published in literature (Staehelin and Hoigne, Environ. Sci. Technol. 16 (1982) 676; Glaze and Kang, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 26 (1989) 1573) indicates that the oxidation of MTBE is primarily induced by the hydroxyl radical. The degradation of MTBE can be described by a pseudo-first-order kinetics in two phases. The first-phase covers MTBE concentrations greater than 10 mg L(-1) and the second-phase covers MTBE concentrations below 10 mg L(-1). The rate of oxidation of MTBE (at least in the first-phase) is limited by ozone mass transfer and increases with increasing ozone gas flow rate. The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant varies from 2.0 x 10(-3) to 5.4 x 10(-3) s(-1) over the range of ozone gas flow rate employed in this investigation. An efficiency index is defined and its value for the oxidation of MTBE in different water is provided. The data provided show that remediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater by O3/H2O2 process is more efficient and less costly than by the UV/H2O2 process.

  16. Arginine-responsive terbium luminescent hybrid sensors triggered by two crown ether carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lasheng; Tang, Ke; Ding, Xiaoping; Wang, Qianming; Zhou, Zhan; Xiao, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Crown ether carboxylic acids constitute main building blocks for the synthesis of terbium containing covalent cross-linked luminescent materials. Both the complexes and the hybrid nanomaterials could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water. More importantly, they were found to have a profound effect on the luminescence responses to arginine compared with glutamic acid, histidine, tryptophan, threonine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in aqueous environment. The present study provided the possibility of using a host-guest mechanism as a way of signal transduction based on lanthanide supramolecular hybrid materials.

  17. Novel fatty acid methyl esters from the actinomycete Micromonospora aurantiaca

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Hilke; Riclea, Ramona

    2011-01-01

    Summary The volatiles released by Micromonospora aurantiaca were collected by means of a closed-loop stripping apparatus (CLSA) and analysed by GC–MS. The headspace extracts contained more than 90 compounds from different classes. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) comprised the major compound class including saturated unbranched, monomethyl and dimethyl branched FAMEs in diverse structural variants: Unbranched, α-branched, γ-branched, (ω−1)-branched, (ω−2)-branched, α- and (ω−1)-branched, γ- and (ω−1)-branched, γ- and (ω−2)-branched, and γ- and (ω−3)-branched FAMEs. FAMEs of the last three types have not been described from natural sources before. The structures for all FAMEs have been suggested based on their mass spectra and on a retention index increment system and verified by the synthesis of key reference compounds. In addition, the structures of two FAMEs, methyl 4,8-dimethyldodecanoate and the ethyl-branched compound methyl 8-ethyl-4-methyldodecanoate were deduced from their mass spectra. Feeding experiments with isotopically labelled [2H10]leucine, [2H10]isoleucine, [2H8]valine, [2H5]sodium propionate, and [methyl-2H3]methionine demonstrated that the responsible fatty acid synthase (FAS) can use different branched and unbranched starter units and is able to incorporate methylmalonyl-CoA elongation units for internal methyl branches in various chain positions, while the methyl ester function is derived from S-adenosyl methionine (SAM). PMID:22238549

  18. Effects of high-melting methyl esters on crystallization properties of fatty acid methyl ester mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is a renewable alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils and animal fats. The most common form of biodiesel in the United States are fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from soybean, canola, and used cooking oils, waste greases, and tallow. Cold flow properties of biodiesel depend on th...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6980 - Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene... Substances § 721.6980 Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky... reporting. (1) The chemical substance dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6980 - Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene... Substances § 721.6980 Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky... reporting. (1) The chemical substance dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol...

  4. Evaluating peats for their capacities to extract methyl tertiary butyl ether from contaminated water using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rizzuti, Anthony M; Cohen, Arthur D; Nguyen, Dung D

    2008-02-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), the most common fuel additive used to oxygenate gasoline, is being detected more frequently in drinking water supplies. This research investigates the capacities of 10 different types of highly characterized peats to extract MTBE from contaminated water. Peat samples were slurried for 24 hours under controlled conditions in aqueous solutions of MTBE. Liquid portions of the samples were analyzed for MTBE concentrations using a Solid-phase Microextraction GC/MS (SPME-GC/MS) method and were compared to samples of the MTBE solution (without peat addition) to determine the peats' MTBE sorption capacities. The SPME-GC/MS results indicate that all peats tested worked well at extracting MTBE from an aqueous solution. Although this was so, some peats tended to work better than others. The Loxahatchee Nymphaea and the Maine Sphagnum peats worked best, producing 92 and 88% MTBE reductions, respectively, while the Okefenokee Taxodium and the New York peats achieved the poorest results, producing only 50 and 47% MTBE reductions, respectively. In addition, the peats derived from herbaceous vegetation worked better than those derived from woody plants (except for the woody North Carolina peat). Overall, the peats that were the most effective at extracting MTBE from water tended to have higher hydraulic conductivities, microporosities, macroporosities, total porosities, and water holding capacities, but lower bulk densities, total ash contents, Ti contents, P contents, Si contents, K contents, Al contents, fulvic acid contents, total guaiacyl lignin contents, and total other ketones contents. Peats with higher MTBE extraction capacities also had humic acids contents that ranged between 4.6-7.1%. These results suggest that peats could be used as filtration, or sorption, media to remediate surface water or groundwater that is contaminated with MTBE. SPME-GC/MS analysis was found to be a reasonably inexpensive and efficient way to evaluate MTBE

  5. Direct acid methylation for extraction of fatty acid content from microalgae cells.

    PubMed

    Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin D; Wang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Direct acid methylation was examined as a means for both analysis of fatty acid content in microalgal cells and biodiesel production without pretreatment. Microalgal cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Dunaliella tertiolecta were prepared and examined. It appeared that direct acid methylation extracted higher fatty acid content than the solvent-based Soxhlet extraction process. It also revealed that the latter was prone to extract a significant amount of nonlipid hydrophobic impurities, including hydrophobic proteins and phytol-type compounds, while direct methylation produces essentially pure ester product. This work demonstrates that direct acid methylation provides superior fatty acid extraction, promising an efficient process for either quantification of lipid content or production of biodiesel. PMID:24838798

  6. 40 CFR 721.1578 - 1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis[[4-[(ethenyloxy)methyl] cyclohexyl] methyl] ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cyclohexyl] methyl] ester. 721.1578 Section 721.1578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...] methyl] ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis cyclohexyl] methyl] ester (PMN P-98-1164; CAS...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1576 - 1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis[[4-[(ethenyloxy)methyl] cyclohexyl] methyl] ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cyclohexyl] methyl] ester. 721.1576 Section 721.1576 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...] methyl] ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis cyclohexyl] methyl] ester (PMN P-98-1162; CAS...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1578 - 1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis[[4-[(ethenyloxy)methyl] cyclohexyl] methyl] ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cyclohexyl] methyl] ester. 721.1578 Section 721.1578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...] methyl] ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis cyclohexyl] methyl] ester (PMN P-98-1164; CAS...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1578 - 1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis[[4-[(ethenyloxy)methyl] cyclohexyl] methyl] ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cyclohexyl] methyl] ester. 721.1578 Section 721.1578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...] methyl] ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis cyclohexyl] methyl] ester (PMN P-98-1164; CAS...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1576 - 1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis[[4-[(ethenyloxy)methyl] cyclohexyl] methyl] ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cyclohexyl] methyl] ester. 721.1576 Section 721.1576 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...] methyl] ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis cyclohexyl] methyl] ester (PMN P-98-1162; CAS...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1576 - 1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis[[4-[(ethenyloxy)methyl] cyclohexyl] methyl] ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cyclohexyl] methyl] ester. 721.1576 Section 721.1576 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...] methyl] ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis cyclohexyl] methyl] ester (PMN P-98-1162; CAS...

  12. 2-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (MCPP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) propionic acid ( MCPP ) ; CASRN 93 - 65 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( H

  13. 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid (MCPB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( MCPB ) ; CASRN 94 - 81 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Hea

  14. Aerobic Copper-Catalyzed O-Methylation with Methylboronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Clare E; Martinez-Muñoz, Noelia; Gorin, David J

    2015-07-17

    The oxidative coupling of alkylboronic acids with oxygen nucleophiles offers a strategy for replacing toxic, electrophilic alkylating reagents. Although the Chan-Lam reaction has been widely applied in the arylation of heteroatom nucleophiles, O-alkylation with boronic acids is rare. We report a Cu-catalyzed nondecarboxylative methylation of carboxylic acids with methylboronic acid that proceeds in air with no additional oxidant. An isotope-labeling study supports an oxidative cross-coupling mechanism, in analogy to that proposed for Chan-Lam arylation. PMID:26111825

  15. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil-refining and petrochemical industry--Part XXII: Health hazards from exposure to gasoline containing methyl tertiary butyl ether: study of New Jersey residents.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, M A

    1996-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether has caused the following cancers in rats and mice: kidney, testicular, liver, lymphomas, and leukemias. Thus, in the absence of adequate data on humans, it is biologically plausible and prudent to regard methyl tertiary butyl ether-for which there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals-as a probable human carcinogen. This means that some humans are at extreme risk of contracting cancers resulting from their exposure to oxygenated gasoline containing methyl tertiary butyl ether. Immediately after the introduction of methyl tertiary butyl ether into gasoline, many consumers of this product in New Jersey, New York, Alaska, Maine, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Arizona, Montana, Massachusetts, California, and other areas, experienced a variety of neurotoxic, allergic, and respiratory illnesses. These illnesses were similar to those suffered by refinery workers from the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers Union who mixed methyl tertiary butyl ether with gasoline. Additionally, these illnesses occurred following exposure to extremely low levels of methyl tertiary butyl ether in gasoline, particularly when compared to the adverse health effects that occurred only after exposure to very high levels of conventional gasoline. Thus, gasoline containing methyl tertiary butyl ether exhibited substantially more toxicity in humans than gasoline without this additive. A number of oil industry-sponsored or influenced reports alleged that these illnesses were either unrelated to exposure to reformulated gasoline or were characteristic of some yet-to-be-identified communicable disease. These studies further alleged that the widespread concern was not about illness, but was merely a reaction to the odor and the five cent increase in the price of gasoline. To clarify the significance of this issue, it is important to note that consumers have been using gasoline for many decades, with complaints only occurring following exposure to high

  16. IRON(III) NITRATE-CATALYZED FACILE SYNTHESIS OF DIPHENYLMETHYL (DPM) ETHERS FROM ALCOHOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diphenyl methyl (DPM) ethers constitute important structural portion of some pharmaceutical entities and also as protective group for hydroxyl groups in synthetic chemistry. DPM ethers are normally prepared using concentrated acids or base as catalysts, which may result in the fo...

  17. Evaluation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as an interference on commercial breath-alcohol analyzers.

    PubMed

    Buckley, T J; Pleil, J D; Bowyer, J R; Davis, J M

    2001-12-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that high environmental or occupational exposures to the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) may result in breath concentrations that are sufficiently elevated to cause a false positive on commercial breath-alcohol analyzers. We evaluated this possibility in vitro by establishing a response curve for simulated breath containing MTBE in ethanol. Two types of breath-alcohol analyzers were evaluated. One analyzer's principle of operation involves in situ wet chemistry (oxidation of ethanol in a potassium dichromate solution) and absorption of visible light. The second instrument uses a combination of infrared absorption and an electrochemical sensor. Both types of instruments are currently used, although the former method represents older technology while the latter method represents newer technology.The percent blood alcohol response curve was evaluated over a breath concentration range thought to be relevant to high-level environmental or occupational exposure (0-361 microg/l). Results indicate that MTBE positively biases the response of the older technology Breathalyzer when evaluated as a single constituent or in combination with ethanol. We conclude that a false positive is possible on this instrument if the MTBE exposure is very high, recent with respect to testing, and occurs in combination with ethanol consumption. The interference can be identified on the older technology instrument by a time dependent post-reading increase in the instrument response that does not occur for ethanol alone. In contrast, the newer technology instrument using infrared and electrochemical detectors did not respond to MTBE at lower levels (0-36 microg/l), and at higher levels (>72 microg/l) the instrument indicated an "interference" or "error". For this instrument, a false positive does not occur even at high MTBE levels in the presence of ethanol. PMID:11728735

  18. Sorption of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) to synthetic resins.

    PubMed

    Bi, Erping; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2005-10-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used gasoline oxygenate. Contamination of MTBE and its major degradation product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in groundwater and surface water has received great attention. However, sorption affinity and sorption mechanisms of MTBE and TBA to synthetic resins, which can be potentially used in removal of these contaminants from water, in passive sampling, or in enrichment of bacteria, have not been studied systemically. In this study, kinetic and equilibrium sorption experiments (single solute and binary mixtures) on four synthetic resins were conducted. The sorption affinity of the investigated sorbents for MTBE and TBA decreases in the order Ambersorb 563>Optipore L493>Amberlite XAD4>Amberlite XAD7, and all show higher sorption affinity for MTBE than for TBA. Binary experiments with o-xylene, a major compound of gasoline as co-contaminant, imply that all resins preferentially sorb o-xylene over MTBE or TBA, i.e., there is sorption competition. In the equilibrium aqueous concentration (Ceq) range (0.1-139.0 mg/L for MTBE, and 0.01-48.4 mg/L for TBA), experimental and modeling results as well as sorbent characteristics indicate that micropore filling and/or some other type of adsorption process (e.g., adsorption to specific sites of high sorption potential at low concentrations) rather than partitioning were the dominant sorption mechanisms. Optipore L493 has favourable sorption and desorption characteristics, and is a suitable sorbent, e.g., in bacteria enrichment or passive sampling for moderately polar compounds. However, for highly polar compounds such as TBA, Ambersorb 563 might be a better choice, especially in water treatment.

  19. 4-Hydroxybenzyl methyl ether improves learning and memory in mice via the activation of dopamine D1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Eun; Lee, Young Woo; Park, Se Jin; Jeon, Se Jin; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Sunhee; Han, Ah-Reum; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-05-01

    The phenolic compound 4-hydroxybenzyl methyl ether (HBME) is isolated from Gastrodia elata Blume (Orchidaceae). In the present study, we investigated the effect of HBME on three stages of memory (acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval) using the step-through passive avoidance task. HBME was administered at 3 time points; 1 h before the acquisition trial, immediately after the acquisition trial, and 1h before the retention trial, respectively. HBME (10 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly increased the step-through latency compared with the vehicle-treated control at all stages of memory. To clarify the mechanism of the memory-enhancing effect of HBME, an antagonism study and Western blot analysis were performed. The enhancing effects of HBME on each phase were reversed by the sub-effective dose of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.0125 mg/kg, s.c.), or the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonist H-89 (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.). In addition, the administration of HBME (10 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased the phosphorylation of the cortical and hippocampal PKA/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and was reversed by the co-administration of SCH23390. HBME (10 mg/kg, p.o.) also ameliorated the memory impairment induced by SCH23390 or scopolamine. Taken together, these results suggest that the effect of HBME on cognitive functions may be partly involved in dopaminergic neurotransmitter signaling and that HBME could be a potential therapeutic agent for treating the cognitive dysfunction induced by dopaminergic or cholinergic neurotransmitter system deficits.

  20. Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether, benzene, and total hydrocarbons at the Singapore-Malaysia causeway immigration checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.; Ong, H.Y.; Kok, P.W.

    1996-12-31

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the extent and levels of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile emissions in a group of immigration officers at a busy cross-border checkpoint. A majority (80%) of the workers monitored were exposed to benzene at levels between 0.01 and 0.5 ppm, with only 1.2% exceeding the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration occupational exposure limit of 1 ppm. The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 8-hr time-weighted average exposure were 0.03 ppm, 0.9 ppm, and 2.46 ppm for methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene, and total hydrocarbons (THC), respectively. The highest time-weighted average concentrations measured were 1.05 ppm for MTBE, 2.01 ppm for benzene, and 34 ppm for THC. It was found that motorbikes emitted a more significant amount of pollutants compared with motor cars. On average, officers at the motorcycle booths were exposed to four to five times higher levels of VOCs (GMs of 0.07 ppm, 0.23 ppm, and 4.7 ppm for MTBE, benzene, and THC) than their counterparts at the motor car booths (GMs of 0.01 ppm, 0.05 ppm, and 1.5 ppm). The airborne concentrations of all three pollutants correlated with the flow of vehicle traffic. Close correlations were also noted for the concentrations in ambient air for the three pollutants measured. Benzene and MTBE had a correlation coefficient of 0.97. The overall findings showed that the concentrations of various VOCs were closely related to the traffic density, suggesting that they were from a common source, such as exhaust emissions from the vehicles. The results also indicated that although benzene, MTBE, and THC are known to be volatile, a significant amount could still be detected in the ambient environment, thus contributing to our exposure to these compounds. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Mineralization of methyl tert-butyl ether and other gasoline oxygenates by Pseudomonads using short n-alkanes as growth source.

    PubMed

    Morales, Marcia; Nava, Verónica; Velásquez, Elia; Razo-Flores, Elías; Revah, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by cometabolism has shown to produce recalcitrant metabolic intermediates that often accumulate. In this work, a consortium containing Pseudomonads was studied for its ability to fully degrade oxygenates by cometabolism. This consortium mineralized MTBE and TBA with C3-C7 n-alkanes. The highest degradation rates for MTBE (75 +/- 5 mg g(protein) (-1) h(-1)) and TBA (86.9 +/- 7.3 mg g(protein) (-1) h(-1)) were obtained with n-pentane and n-propane, respectively. When incubated with radiolabeled MTBE and n-pentane, it converted more than 96% of the added MTBE to (14)C-CO(2). Furthermore, the consortium degraded tert-amyl methyl ether, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), tert-amyl alcohol, ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) when n-pentane was used as growth source. Three Pseudomonads were isolated but only two showed independent MTBE degradation activity. The maximum degradation rates were 101 and 182 mg g(protein) (-1) h(-1) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas citronellolis, respectively. The highest specific affinity (a degrees (MTBE)) value of 4.39 l g(protein) (-1) h(-1) was obtained for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and complete mineralization was attained with a MTBE: n-pentane ratio (w/w) of 0.7. This is the first time that Pseudomonads have been reported to fully mineralize MTBE by cometabolic degradation. PMID:18814038

  2. Enhancing proton conduction under low humidity by incorporating core-shell polymeric phosphonic acid submicrospheres into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Lingli; Wang, Jingtao; Xu, Tao; Dong, Hao; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2012-09-01

    Polymeric phosphonic acid submicrospheres (PPASs) with carboxylic acid cores and phosphonic acid shells are synthesized by distillation-precipitation polymerization. The structure and composition of PPASs are confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The PPASs are then incorporated into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) to fabricate composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The incorporated PPASs enlarge the ion-channel size of the composite membranes as testified by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), affording significantly enhanced water uptake and water retention. Compared with the membrane containing the polymeric carboxylic acid submicrospheres (PCASs), the PPASs-filled membrane exhibits higher proton conductivity owing to the higher water uptake and water retention of the PPASs and stronger acidity of phosphonic acid. The composite membrane with 15 wt.% PPASs displays the highest proton conductivity of 0.0187 S cm-1 at room temperature and 100% relative humidity (RH). At the RH as low as 20%, this membrane acquires a proton conductivity of 0.0066 S cm-1, 5 times higher than that of the SPEEK control membrane (0.0011 S cm-1) after 90 min testing, at 40 °C.

  3. Fragrance material review on carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10448 - Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). 721.10448 Section 721.10448 Protection... Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as acetic acid, hydroxymethoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

  5. Synthesis of ethers by GaBr3 -catalyzed reduction of carboxylic acid esters and lactones by siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Ursula; Metzger, Jürgen O

    2014-02-01

    Ethers were synthesized by reduction of the respective esters catalyzed by gallium bromide (GaBr3 ) and using siloxanes, preferentially 1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane, as reductant. Methyl oleate, triglycerides, that is, tributyrine and glyceryl triundec-10-enoate as well as γ- and δ-lactones were converted into the respective ethers in high to moderate yields. γ-Lactones were reduced with high selectivity in the presence of a methyl ester functionality. The reduction has been carried out at room temperature or moderately elevated temperature of up to 60 °C using stoichiometric amounts of the reductant and 0.005-0.01 equiv of GaBr3 as catalyst per ester functionality without any solvent added. After a reaction time of 1-4 h the conversion of the substrate was 100 %. The product was separated from polymeric siloxanes formed as coupled product by simple distillation. PMID:24488681

  6. Synthesis of ethers by GaBr3 -catalyzed reduction of carboxylic acid esters and lactones by siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Ursula; Metzger, Jürgen O

    2014-02-01

    Ethers were synthesized by reduction of the respective esters catalyzed by gallium bromide (GaBr3 ) and using siloxanes, preferentially 1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane, as reductant. Methyl oleate, triglycerides, that is, tributyrine and glyceryl triundec-10-enoate as well as γ- and δ-lactones were converted into the respective ethers in high to moderate yields. γ-Lactones were reduced with high selectivity in the presence of a methyl ester functionality. The reduction has been carried out at room temperature or moderately elevated temperature of up to 60 °C using stoichiometric amounts of the reductant and 0.005-0.01 equiv of GaBr3 as catalyst per ester functionality without any solvent added. After a reaction time of 1-4 h the conversion of the substrate was 100 %. The product was separated from polymeric siloxanes formed as coupled product by simple distillation.

  7. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to address nonlinear kinetics and changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation in deriving reference values for propylene glycol methyl ether and propylene glycol methyl ether acetate.

    SciTech Connect

    Kirman, C R.; Sweeney, Lisa M.; Corley, Rick A.; Gargas, M L.

    2005-04-01

    Reference values, including an oral reference dose (RfD) and an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), were derived for propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), and an oral RfD was derived for its acetate (PGMEA). These values were based upon transient sedation observed in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice during a two-year inhalation study. The dose-response relationship for sedation was characterized using internal dose measures as predicted by a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for PGME and its acetate. PBPK modeling was used to account for changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation, based on data collected during weeks 1, 2, 26, 52, and 78 of a chronic inhalation study. The peak concentration of PGME in richly perfused tissues was selected as the most appropriate internal dose measure based upon a consideration of the mode of action for sedation and similarities in tissue partitioning between brain and other richly perfused tissues. Internal doses (peak tissue concentrations of PGME) were designated as either no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) or lowest-observed-adverse-effect levels (LOAELs) based upon the presence or absence of sedation at each time-point, species, and sex in the two year study. Distributions of the NOAEL and LOAEL values expressed in terms of internal dose were characterized using an arithmetic mean and standard deviation, with the mean internal NOAEL serving as the basis for the reference values, which was then divided by appropriate uncertainty factors. Where data were permitting, chemical-specific adjustment factors were derived to replace default uncertainty factor values of ten. Nonlinear kinetics are were predicted by the model in all species at PGME concentrations exceeding 100 ppm, which complicates interspecies and low-dose extrapolations. To address this complication, reference values were derived using two approaches which differ with respect to the order in which these extrapolations

  8. Biosynthesis of seven carbon-13 labeled Alternaria toxins including altertoxins, alternariol, and alternariol methyl ether, and their application to a multiple stable isotope dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An unprecedented stable isotope dilution assay for the genotoxic altertoxins along with exposure data of consumers is presented to enable a first risk assessment of these Alternaria toxins in foods. Altertoxins were produced as the most abundant Alternaria toxins in a modified Czapek-Dox medium with a low level of glucose as the carbon source and ammonium sulfate as the sole nitrogen source. Labeled altertoxins were synthesized in the same way using [(13)C6]glucose. Moreover, labeled alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, altenuene, and alternuisol were biosynthesized in another modified medium containing [(13)C6]glucose and sodium [(13)C2]acetate. A stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was developed and used for food analysis. For altertoxin I, altertoxin II, alterperylenol, alternariol, and alternariol methyl ether, the limits of detection ranged from 0.09 to 0.53 μg kg(-1). The inter-/intra-day (n = 3 × 6) relative standard deviations of the method were below 13%, and the recoveries ranged between 96 and 109%. Among the various commercial food samples, some of the organic whole grains revealed low-level contamination with altertoxin I and alterperylenol, and paprika powder, which was heavily loaded with alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, and tentoxin, showed higher contamination level of altertoxin I and alterperylenol. Altertoxin II and III and stemphyltoxin III were not detectable. In addition, if the food was contaminated with altertoxins, it was likely to be co-contaminated with the other Alternaria toxins, but not necessarily vice versa. Maximum concentrations of altertoxin I and alterperylenol were detected in sorghum feed samples containing 43 and 58 μg kg(-1), respectively. This was significantly higher than that in the measured food samples.

  9. Novel sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanohybrid membrane by an in situ method for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Cao, Ying; Li, Zhen; He, Guangwei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanohybrid membranes are prepared by an in situ method using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) as inorganic precursor and amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) as modifier. Phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanoparticles with a uniform particle size of ∼50 nm are formed and dispersed homogeneously in the SPEEK matrix with good interfacial compatibility. Accordingly, the nanohybrid membranes display remarkably enhanced proton conduction property due to the incorporation of additional sites for proton transport and the formation of well-connected channels by bridging the hydrophilic domains in SPEEK matrix. The nanohybrid membrane with 6 wt. % of phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanoparticles exhibits the highest proton conductivity of 0.334 S cm-1 at 65 °C and 100% RH, which is 63.7% higher than that of pristine SPEEK membrane. Furthermore, the as-prepared nanohybrid membranes also show elevated thermal and mechanical stabilities as well as decreased methanol permeability.

  10. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1111, LB4823_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1111, LB4823_V)' providing data from direct low-pressure measurement of mass density at variable mole fraction and constant temperature, in the single-phase region(s).

  11. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1511, LB4833_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1511, LB4833_V)' providing data from direct measurement of low-pressure thermodynamic speed of sound at variable mole fraction and constant temperature, in the single-phase region(s).

  12. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1212, LB4828_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1212, LB4828_V)' providing data by calculation of molar excess volume from low-pressure density measurements at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  13. Syntheses of all the possible monomethyl ethers and several deoxyhalo analogues of methyl beta-lactoside as ligands for the Ricinus communis lectins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J; Martín-Lomas, M

    1994-02-17

    The synthesis of all the possible monomethyl ethers of methyl beta-lactoside (1) has been performed from 1 in a straightforward way, making use of the different reactivity of the hydroxyl groups in alkylation and stannylation reactions. In addition, the deoxyfluoro derivatives of 1 at positions, 6,3',4',epi-4', and 6' have been prepared by reaction of the appropriate substrates with diethylaminosulfur trifluoride or tetrabutylammonium fluoride. Finally, the 6-deoxyiodo and 6'-bromodeoxy analogues of 1 have also been prepared. PMID:8180997

  14. The conformation of the monomethyl ethers of methyl beta-lactoside in D2O and Me2SO-d6 solutions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J

    1993-10-01

    The solution conformations of all the possible monomethyl ethers of methyl beta-lactoside have been analysed using molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance data (variable temperature and NOE experiments). The overall shape of all the compounds studied is fairly similar and may be described by conformers included in a low-energy region with phi = -100 +/- 40 degrees and psi = -135 +/- 35 degrees, which is ca. 5% of the total potential energy surface for the glycosidic linkages of the disaccharides. PMID:8252531

  15. The conformation of the monomethyl ethers of methyl beta-lactoside in D2O and Me2SO-d6 solutions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J

    1993-10-01

    The solution conformations of all the possible monomethyl ethers of methyl beta-lactoside have been analysed using molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance data (variable temperature and NOE experiments). The overall shape of all the compounds studied is fairly similar and may be described by conformers included in a low-energy region with phi = -100 +/- 40 degrees and psi = -135 +/- 35 degrees, which is ca. 5% of the total potential energy surface for the glycosidic linkages of the disaccharides.

  16. Syntheses of all the possible monomethyl ethers and several deoxyhalo analogues of methyl beta-lactoside as ligands for the Ricinus communis lectins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J; Martín-Lomas, M

    1994-02-17

    The synthesis of all the possible monomethyl ethers of methyl beta-lactoside (1) has been performed from 1 in a straightforward way, making use of the different reactivity of the hydroxyl groups in alkylation and stannylation reactions. In addition, the deoxyfluoro derivatives of 1 at positions, 6,3',4',epi-4', and 6' have been prepared by reaction of the appropriate substrates with diethylaminosulfur trifluoride or tetrabutylammonium fluoride. Finally, the 6-deoxyiodo and 6'-bromodeoxy analogues of 1 have also been prepared.

  17. Manipulation of the HIF–Vegf pathway rescues methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-induced vascular lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonventre, Josephine A.; Kung, Tiffany S.; White, Lori A.; Cooper, Keith R.

    2013-12-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been shown to be specifically anti-angiogenic in piscine and mammalian model systems at concentrations that appear non-toxic in other organ systems. The mechanism by which MTBE targets developing vascular structures is unknown. A global transcriptome analysis of zebrafish embryos developmentally exposed to 0.00625–5 mM MTBE suggested that hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-regulated pathways were affected. HIF-driven angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor (vegf) is essential to the developing vasculature of an embryo. Three rescue studies were designed to rescue MTBE-induced vascular lesions: pooled blood in the common cardinal vein (CCV), cranial hemorrhages (CH), and abnormal intersegmental vessels (ISV), and test the hypothesis that MTBE toxicity was HIF–Vegf dependent. First, zebrafish vegf-a over-expression via plasmid injection, resulted in significantly fewer CH and ISV lesions, 46 and 35% respectively, in embryos exposed to 10 mM MTBE. Then HIF degradation was inhibited in two ways. Chemical rescue by N-oxaloylglycine significantly reduced CCV and CH lesions by 30 and 32% in 10 mM exposed embryos, and ISV lesions were reduced 24% in 5 mM exposed zebrafish. Finally, a morpholino designed to knock-down ubiquitin associated von Hippel–Lindau protein, significantly reduced CCV lesions by 35% in 10 mM exposed embryos. In addition, expression of some angiogenesis related genes altered by MTBE exposure were rescued. These studies demonstrated that MTBE vascular toxicity is mediated by a down regulation of HIF–Vegf driven angiogenesis. The selective toxicity of MTBE toward developing vasculature makes it a potentially useful chemical in the designing of new drugs or in elucidating roles for specific angiogenic proteins in future studies of vascular development. - Highlights: • Global gene expression of MTBE exposed zebrafish suggested altered HIF1 signaling. • Over expression of zebrafish vegf-a rescues MTBE

  18. Isolate PM1 populations are dominant and novel methyl tert-butyl ether-degrading bacterial in compost biofilter enrichments.

    PubMed

    Bruns, M A; Hanson, J R; Mefford, J; Scow, K M

    2001-03-01

    The gasoline additive MTBE, methyl tert-butyl ether, is a widespread and persistent groundwater contaminant. MTBE undergoes rapid mineralization as the sole carbon and energy source of bacterial strain PM1, isolated from an enrichment culture of compost biofilter material. In this report, we describe the results of microbial community DNA profiling to assess the relative dominance of isolate PM1 and other bacterial strains cultured from the compost enrichment. Three polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based profiling approaches were evaluated: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 230 bp 16S rDNA fragments; thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) analysis of 575 bp 16S rDNA fragments; and non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 300-1,500 bp fragments containing 16S/23S ribosomal intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Whereas all three DNA profiling approaches indicated that PM1-like bands predominated in mixtures from MTBE-grown enrichments, ITS profiling provided the most abundant and specific sequence data to confirm strain PM1's presence in the enrichment. Moreover, ITS profiling did not produce non-specific PCR products that were observed with T/DGGE. A further advantage of ITS community profiling over other methods requiring restriction digestion (e.g. terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms) was that it did not require an additional digestion step or the use of automated sequencing equipment. ITS bands, excised from similar locations in profiles of the enrichment and PM1 pure culture, were 99.9% identical across 750 16S rDNA positions and 100% identical across 691 spacer positions. BLAST comparisons of nearly full-length 16S rDNA sequences showed 96% similarity between isolate PM1 and representatives of at least four different genera in the Leptothrix subgroup of the beta-Proteobacteria (Aquabacterium, Leptothrix, Rubrivivax and Ideonella). Maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses of 1,249 nucleotide

  19. Folic acid, methylation and neural tube closure in humans.

    PubMed

    Blom, Henk J

    2009-04-01

    This review provides a brief description of folate use and folic acid metabolism in relation to neural tube defect (NTD) risk. First, a meta-analysis of reduction in NTD recurrence and occurrence risk with periconceptional folic acid supplementation is presented. Second, an overview of the complex folate metabolism is given. Third, SNPs for genes involved in folate and homocysteine metabolism that have been studied in relation to NTD riskare discussed. Fourth, the questions whether folate receptor autoantibodies or hampered methylation are mechanisms underlying NTDs are briefly discussed.

  20. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  1. Properties investigation of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/polyacrylonitrile acid-base blend membrane for vanadium redox flow battery application.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohua; Dai, Wenjing; Yu, Lihong; Liu, Le; Xi, Jingyu; Qiu, Xinping; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-12

    Acid-base blend membrane prepared from sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was detailedly evaluated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application. SPEEK/PAN blend membrane exhibited dense and homogeneous cross-section morphology as scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy images show. The acid-base interaction of ionic cross-linking and hydrogen bonding between SPEEK and PAN could effectively reduce water uptake, swelling ratio, and vanadium ion permeability, and improve the performance and stability of blend membrane. Because of the good balance of proton conductivity and vanadium ion permeability, blend membrane with 20 wt % PAN (S/PAN-20%) showed higher Coulombic efficiency (96.2% vs 91.1%) and energy efficiency (83.5% vs 78.4%) than Nafion 117 membrane at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) when they were used in VRFB single cell. Besides, S/PAN-20% membrane kept a stable performance during 150 cycles at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) in the cycle life test. Hence the SPEEK/PAN acid-base blend membrane could be used as promising candidate for VRFB application. PMID:25315399

  2. Properties investigation of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/polyacrylonitrile acid-base blend membrane for vanadium redox flow battery application.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohua; Dai, Wenjing; Yu, Lihong; Liu, Le; Xi, Jingyu; Qiu, Xinping; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-12

    Acid-base blend membrane prepared from sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was detailedly evaluated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application. SPEEK/PAN blend membrane exhibited dense and homogeneous cross-section morphology as scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy images show. The acid-base interaction of ionic cross-linking and hydrogen bonding between SPEEK and PAN could effectively reduce water uptake, swelling ratio, and vanadium ion permeability, and improve the performance and stability of blend membrane. Because of the good balance of proton conductivity and vanadium ion permeability, blend membrane with 20 wt % PAN (S/PAN-20%) showed higher Coulombic efficiency (96.2% vs 91.1%) and energy efficiency (83.5% vs 78.4%) than Nafion 117 membrane at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) when they were used in VRFB single cell. Besides, S/PAN-20% membrane kept a stable performance during 150 cycles at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) in the cycle life test. Hence the SPEEK/PAN acid-base blend membrane could be used as promising candidate for VRFB application.

  3. Use of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether for the Treatment of Refractory Intrahepatic Biliary Strictures and Bile Casts: A Modern Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gregory; Malayaman, Saninuj N; Green, Michael Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is a prevalent problem in the United States with 14% or more adults affected. Definitive treatment of cholelithiasis is cholecystectomy. When cholecystectomy yields minimal resolution treatment options include expectant management of asymptomatic gallstones or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram. We present a case of intrahepatic biliary casts where surgical option was not possible, interventional radiology was unsuccessful, and methyl tert-butyl ether was used to dissolve the biliary obstruction. Dissolution therapy of gallstones was first reported in 1722 when Vollisnieri used turpentine in vitro. While diethyl ether has excellent solubilizing capacity, its low boiling point limited its use surgically as it vaporizes immediately. Diethyl ether can expand 120-fold during warming to body temperature after injection into the biliary system making it impractical for routine use. The use of dissolution is out of favor due to the success of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Epidemiological studies have shown the general population should have minimal concerns from passive exposure. Dissolution using MTBE remains a viable option if surgical or endoscopic options are not available. However, because of risks involved to both the patient and the staff, careful multidisciplinary team approach must be undertaken to minimize the risks and provide the best possible care to the patient. PMID:26236535

  4. Long-chain ethers as solvents can amplify the enantioselectivity of the Carica papaya lipase-catalyzed transesterification of 2-(substituted phenoxy)propanoic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Toshifumi; Iguchi, Wakana

    2013-10-01

    The enantioselectivity of the transesterification of the 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl esters of 2-(substituted phenoxy)propanoic acids, as catalyzed by the lipase from Carica papaya, was greatly improved by using long-chain ethers, such as di-n-hexyl ether, as solvents instead of the conventional diisopropyl ether. Thus, for example, the E value was enhanced from 21 [in diisopropyl ether (0.8 ml)] to 57 [in di-n-hexyl ether (0.8 ml)] in the reaction of 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl(RS)-2-phenoxypropanoate (0.1 mmol) with methanol (0.4 mmol) in the presence of the plant lipase preparation (10 mg); it was also improved from 13 (in diisopropyl ether) to 44 (in di-n-hexyl ether) in the reaction of 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl(RS)-2-(2-chlorophenoxy)propanoate with methanol under the same reaction conditions.

  5. 40 CFR 721.522 - Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.522 Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3...) The chemical substance identified as oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.522 - Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.522 Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3...) The chemical substance identified as oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane,...

  7. 40 CFR 721.522 - Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.522 Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3...) The chemical substance identified as oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.522 - Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.522 Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3...) The chemical substance identified as oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.522 - Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.522 Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3...) The chemical substance identified as oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2078 - 1-Piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2-[(dichloro-hydroxy-carbomonocycle)hydrazono]-, methyl ester...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...- -, methyl ester (generic). 721.2078 Section 721.2078 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2078 1-Piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2- -, methyl ester... generically identified as 1-piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2- -, methyl ester (PMN P-96-756) is subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2078 - 1-Piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2-[(dichloro-hydroxy-carbomonocycle)hydrazono]-, methyl ester...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...- -, methyl ester (generic). 721.2078 Section 721.2078 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2078 1-Piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2- -, methyl ester... generically identified as 1-piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2- -, methyl ester (PMN P-96-756) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2078 - 1-Piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2-[(dichloro-hydroxy-carbomonocycle)hydrazono]-, methyl ester...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...- -, methyl ester (generic). 721.2078 Section 721.2078 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2078 1-Piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2- -, methyl ester... generically identified as 1-piperidinecarboxylic acid, 2- -, methyl ester (PMN P-96-756) is subject...

  13. Using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to address nonlinear kinetics and changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation in deriving reference values for propylene glycol methyl ether and propylene glycol methyl ether acetate.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Sweeney, L M; Corley, R; Gargas, M L

    2005-04-01

    Reference values, including an oral reference dose (RfD) and an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), were derived for propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), and an oral RfD was derived for its acetate (PGMEA). These values were based on transient sedation observed in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice during a two-year inhalation study. The dose-response relationship for sedation was characterized using internal dose measures as predicted by a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for PGME and its acetate. PBPK modeling was used to account for changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation, based on data collected during Weeks 1, 2, 26, 52, and 78 of a chronic inhalation study. The peak concentration of PGME in richly perfused tissues (i.e., brain) was selected as the most appropriate internal dose measure based on a consideration of the mode of action for sedation and similarities in tissue partitioning between brain and other richly perfused tissues. Internal doses (peak tissue concentrations of PGME) were designated as either no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) or lowest-observed-adverse-effect levels (LOAELs) based on the presence or the absence of sedation at each time point, species, and sex in the two-year study. Distributions of the NOAEL and LOAEL values expressed in terms of internal dose were characterized using an arithmetic mean and standard deviation, with the mean internal NOAEL serving as the basis for the reference values, which was then divided by appropriate uncertainty factors. Where data were permitting, chemical-specific adjustment factors were derived to replace default uncertainty factor values of 10. Nonlinear kinetics, which was predicted by the model in all species at PGME concentrations exceeding 100 ppm, complicate interspecies, and low-dose extrapolations. To address this complication, reference values were derived using two approaches that differ with respect to the order in which these

  14. Sulfobutyl ether β-cyclodextrin (Captisol(®) ) and methyl β-cyclodextrin enhance and stabilize fluorescence of aqueous indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    DeDora, Daniel J; Suhrland, Cassandra; Goenka, Shilpi; Mullick Chowdhury, Sayan; Lalwani, Gaurav; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2016-10-01

    As the only FDA-approved near-infrared fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG) is commonly used to image vasculature in vivo. ICG degrades rapidly in solution, which limits its usefulness in certain applications, including time-sensitive surgical procedures. We propose formulations that address this shortcoming via complexation with β-cyclodextrin derivatives (β-CyD), which are known to create stabilizing inclusion complexes with hydrophobic molecules. Here, we complexed ICG with highly soluble methyl β-CyD and FDA-approved sulfobutyl ether β-CyD (Captisol(®) ) in aqueous solution. We measured the fluorescence of the complexes over 24 h. We found that both CyD+ICG complexes exhibit sustained fluorescence increases of >2.0× versus ICG in water and >20.0× in PBS. Using transmission electron microscopy, we found evidence of reduced aggregation in complexes versus ICG alone. We thus conclude that this reduction in aggregation helps mitigate fluorescence autoquenching of CyD+ICG complexes compared in ICG alone. We also found that while ICG complexed with methyl β-CyD severely reduced the viability of MRC-5 fibroblasts, ICG complexed with sulfobutyl ether β-CyD had no effect on viability. These results represent an important first step toward enhancing the utility of aqueous ICG by reducing aggregation-dependent fluorescence degradation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1457-1464, 2016.

  15. Poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels at temperatures below the freezing point of water-molecular interactions and states of water.

    PubMed

    Pastorczak, Marcin; Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Okrasa, Lidia; Pyda, Marek; Kozanecki, Marcin; Kadlubowski, Slawomir; Rosiak, Janusz M; Ulanski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Water interacting with a polymer reveals a number of properties very different to bulk water. These interactions lead to the redistribution of hydrogen bonds in water. It results in modification of thermodynamic properties of water and the molecular dynamics of water. That kind of water is particularly well observable at temperatures below the freezing point of water, when the bulk water crystallizes. In this work, we determine the amount of water bound to the polymer and of the so-called pre-melting water in poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels with the use of Raman spectroscopy, dielectric spectroscopy, and calorimetry. This analysis allows us to compare various physical properties of the bulk and the pre-melting water. We also postulate the molecular mechanism responsible for the pre-melting of part of water in poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels. We suggest that above -60 °C, the first segmental motions of the polymer chain are activated, which trigger the process of the pre-melting.

  16. Intramolecular CH⋯π and CH⋯O interactions in the conformational stability of benzyl methyl ether studied by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin-ya, Kei; Takahashi, Osamu; Katsumoto, Yukiteru; Ohno, Keiichi

    2007-02-01

    Contributions of the intramolecular CH⋯π and CH⋯O interactions to the molecular conformation of benzyl methyl ether (BME) have been investigated by matrix-isolation infrared (IR) spectroscopy combined with quantum chemical calculations. Comparative investigations have been carried out for propylbenzene. Quantum chemical calculations predict that there are two conformers for BME; for the ET conformer the methyl ether and the phenyl groups lie in the plane of the benzene ring, while for the AG conformer they are out of the plane. Comparison between the observed and calculated spectra for BME reveals that the ET and AG conformers coexist in an Ar matrix. By measuring matrix-isolation IR spectra of BME deposited at different gas temperatures, the enthalpy difference (Δ H (AG - ET)) between ET and AG conformers was determined to be -1.03 ± 0.06 kJ mol -1. The experimental and calculation results indicate that the AG conformer of BME is stabilized by the intramolecular CH⋯π and CH⋯O interactions.

  17. N-(2-Methyl­phen­yl)succinamic acid

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, B. Thimme; Foro, Sabine; Saraswathi, B. S.; Fuess, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, C11H13NO3, the conformations of the N—H and C=O bonds in the amide segment are anti to each other and that of the amide H atom is syn to the ortho-methyl group in the benzene ring. In the crystal, O—H⋯O interactions lead to carboxylic acid inversion dimers and inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into infinite chains. In addition, the crystal structure exhibits inter­molecular C—H⋯π inter­actions between one of the methyl H atoms and the benzene ring of neighbouring mol­ecules. PMID:21580719

  18. Phase and extraction equilibria in water-polyethyleneglycol ethers of monoethanolamides of synthetic fatty acid-ammonium chloride systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnov, A. E.; Golovkina, A. V.; Kudryashova, O. S.; Denisova, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    Phase equilibria in layering systems of water, polyethyleneglycol ethers of monoethanolamides of synthetic fatty acids (SFAs) (synthamide-5), and ammonium chloride are studied. The possibility of using such systems for the liquid extraction of metal ions is evaluated. The effect the nature of salting-out agents has on the processes of segregation of the systems has been considered.

  19. Selective Nickel- and Manganese-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Cross Coupling of Some α,β-Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids with Cyclic Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Wang, Yan-Jing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Nai-Xing; Bai, Cui-Bing; Xing, Ya-Lan; Li, Yi-He; Wen, Jia-Long

    2014-01-01

    A nickel- and manganese-catalyzed decarboxylative cross coupling of α, β-unsaturated carboxylic acids with cyclic ethers such as tetrahydrofuran and 1, 4-dioxane was developed. Oxyalkylation was achieved when nickel acetate was used as catalyst, while manganese acetate promoted the reaction of alkenylation. PMID:25502282

  20. Kinetic study of the OH, NO3 radicals and Cl atom initiated atmospheric photo-oxidation of iso-propenyl methyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccone, Raúl Alberto; Moreno, Alberto; Colmenar, Inmaculada; Salgado, Sagrario; Martín, María Pilar; Cabañas, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Rate coefficients at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for the reaction of isopropenyl methyl ether (i-PME) (CH2dbnd C(CH3)OCH3), with OH and NO3 radicals and with Cl atoms have been determined in a 50 L Pyrex glass reaction chamber in conjunction with Fourier Transform Infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) as a detection technique. The chamber is equipped with a White-type multiple-reflection mirror system with a total optical path length of ≈200 m. Additional experiments were carried out using evacuable Teflon-coated bags (volume 150 L) and a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-time of flight (GC-TOF MS) detection system. This is the first kinetic study carried out to date for these reactions. The rate coefficients k (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) obtained are: (1.14 ± 0.10) × 10-10 for the OH reaction, (2.41 ± 0.50) × 10-11, for the NO3 reaction and (7.03 ± 0.67) × 10-10 for the Cl reaction. A mechanism is proposed from the observed reaction products. The atmospheric lifetimes of the studied ether is estimated considering the rate coefficients of the reactions with OH and NO3 radicals and Cl atom. Calculated atmospheric lifetimes reveal that the dominant loss process for i-PME is clearly the night-time reaction with the NO3 radical. The radiative efficiency (RE) is obtained from the infrared spectra of the ether and the global warming potential (GWP) is then estimated. Atmospheric implications of the ether emission are discussed.

  1. [Separation mechanism of chiral stationary phase based on quinine and crown ether for the direct stereoselective separation of amino acids].

    PubMed

    Wu, Haixia; Wang, Dongqiang; Zhao, Jianchao; Ke, Yanxiong; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    A novel chiral stationary phase combining quinine and crown ether (QN-CR CSP) was developed to separate amino acid enantiomers. This CSP showed good enantioselectivity for some amino acids. Since the synergistic effect of ion exchange and complexation in chiral recognition of amino acids, a new adsorption isotherm was built. Using the method of frontal analysis by characteristic point (FACP), the adsorption isotherms of tryptophan (Trp) under different mobile phase conditions were determined and fitted the proposed adsorption isotherm model well. With the increase of the competition between metal cationic and amino to crown ether, the equilibrium constant of complexing adsorption was found increased. The chiral separation ability was decreased. The adsorption isotherm improved the understanding of the retention behavior of amino acids on QN-CR CSP, which was also benefit to optimize the structure of the stationary phase.

  2. [Separation mechanism of chiral stationary phase based on quinine and crown ether for the direct stereoselective separation of amino acids].

    PubMed

    Wu, Haixia; Wang, Dongqiang; Zhao, Jianchao; Ke, Yanxiong; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    A novel chiral stationary phase combining quinine and crown ether (QN-CR CSP) was developed to separate amino acid enantiomers. This CSP showed good enantioselectivity for some amino acids. Since the synergistic effect of ion exchange and complexation in chiral recognition of amino acids, a new adsorption isotherm was built. Using the method of frontal analysis by characteristic point (FACP), the adsorption isotherms of tryptophan (Trp) under different mobile phase conditions were determined and fitted the proposed adsorption isotherm model well. With the increase of the competition between metal cationic and amino to crown ether, the equilibrium constant of complexing adsorption was found increased. The chiral separation ability was decreased. The adsorption isotherm improved the understanding of the retention behavior of amino acids on QN-CR CSP, which was also benefit to optimize the structure of the stationary phase. PMID:27319166

  3. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  4. Ether- and ester-bound iso-diabolic acid and other lipids in members of acidobacteria subdivision 4.

    PubMed

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Hopmans, Ellen C; Foesel, Bärbel U; Wüst, Pia K; Overmann, Jörg; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Dunfield, Peter F; Houghton, Karen; Stott, Matthew B

    2014-09-01

    Recently, iso-diabolic acid (13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid) has been identified as a major membrane-spanning lipid of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum within the Bacteria. This finding pointed to the Acidobacteria as a potential source for the bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers that occur ubiquitously in peat, soil, lakes, and hot springs. Here, we examined the lipid composition of seven phylogenetically divergent strains of subdivision 4 of the Acidobacteria, a bacterial group that is commonly encountered in soil. Acid hydrolysis of total cell material released iso-diabolic acid derivatives in substantial quantities (11 to 48% of all fatty acids). In contrast to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, 6 out of the 7 species of subdivision 4 (excepting "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum") contained iso-diabolic acid ether bound to a glycerol in larger fractional abundance than iso-diabolic acid itself. This is in agreement with the analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs) by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), which showed the dominance of mixed ether-ester glycerides. iso-Diabolic acid-containing IPLs were not identified, because these IPLs are not released with a Bligh-Dyer extraction, as observed before when studying lipid compositions of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria. The presence of ether bonds in the membrane lipids does not seem to be an adaptation to temperature, because the five mesophilic isolates contained a larger amount of ether lipids than the thermophile "Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum." Furthermore, experiments with Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes did not reveal a major influence of growth temperature over the 50 to 69°C range. PMID:24928878

  5. Ether- and Ester-Bound iso-Diabolic Acid and Other Lipids in Members of Acidobacteria Subdivision 4

    PubMed Central

    Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Foesel, Bärbel U.; Wüst, Pia K.; Overmann, Jörg; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.; Dunfield, Peter F.; Houghton, Karen; Stott, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, iso-diabolic acid (13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid) has been identified as a major membrane-spanning lipid of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum within the Bacteria. This finding pointed to the Acidobacteria as a potential source for the bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers that occur ubiquitously in peat, soil, lakes, and hot springs. Here, we examined the lipid composition of seven phylogenetically divergent strains of subdivision 4 of the Acidobacteria, a bacterial group that is commonly encountered in soil. Acid hydrolysis of total cell material released iso-diabolic acid derivatives in substantial quantities (11 to 48% of all fatty acids). In contrast to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, 6 out of the 7 species of subdivision 4 (excepting “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum”) contained iso-diabolic acid ether bound to a glycerol in larger fractional abundance than iso-diabolic acid itself. This is in agreement with the analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs) by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), which showed the dominance of mixed ether-ester glycerides. iso-Diabolic acid-containing IPLs were not identified, because these IPLs are not released with a Bligh-Dyer extraction, as observed before when studying lipid compositions of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria. The presence of ether bonds in the membrane lipids does not seem to be an adaptation to temperature, because the five mesophilic isolates contained a larger amount of ether lipids than the thermophile “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum.” Furthermore, experiments with Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes did not reveal a major influence of growth temperature over the 50 to 69°C range. PMID:24928878

  6. DIPPR Project 871 For 1995 - Thermodynamic Properties and Ideal-Gas Enthalpies of Formation for Methyl Benzoate, Ethyl Benzoate, (R)-(+)-Limonene, Tert-Amyl Methyl Ether, Trans-Crotonaldehyde, and

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.

    2002-07-01

    Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of methyl benzoate, ethyl benzoate, (R)-(+)-limonene, tert-amyl methyl ether, trans-crotonaldehyde, and diethylene glycol are reported. The standard energy of combustion and hence standard enthalpy of formation of each compound in the liquid phase has been measured using an oxygen rotating-bomb calorimeter without rotation. Vapor pressures were measured to a pressure limit of 270 kPa or the lower decomposition point for each of the six compounds using a twin ebulliometric apparatus. Liquid-phase densities along the saturation line were measured for each compound over a range of temperature (ambient to a maximum of 548 K). A differential scanning calorimeter was used to measure two-phase (liquid + vapor) heat capacities for each compound in the temperature region ambient to the critical temperature or lower decomposition point. For methyl benzoate and tert-amyl methyl ether, critical temperatures and critical densities were determined from the DSC results and corresponding critical pressures derived from the fitting procedures. Fitting procedures were used to derive critical temperatures, critical pressures, and critical densities for each of the remaining compounds. The results of the measurements were combined to derive a series of thermophysical properties including critical temperature, critical density, critical pressure, acentric factor, enthalpies of vaporization (restricted to within {+-}50 K of the temperature region of the experimentally determined vapor pressures), and heat capacities along the saturation line. Wagner-type vapor-pressure equations were derived for each compound. All measured and derived values were compared with those obtained in a search of the literature. Recommended critical parameters are listed for each of the compounds studied. Group-additivity parameters, useful in the application of the Benson gas-phase group-contribution correlations, were derived.

  7. Complexes of polyadenylic acid and the methyl esters of amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaled, M. A.; Mulins, D. W., Jr.; Swindle, M.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A study of amino acid methyl esters binding to polyadenylic acid supports the theory that the genetic code originated through weak but selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides. NMR, insoluble complex analysis, and ultraviolet spectroscopy are used to illustrate a correlation between the hydrophybicities of A amino acids and their binding constants, which, beginning with the largest, are in the order of Phe (having nominally a hydrophobic AAA anticodon), Ile, Leu, Val and Gly (having a hydrophilic anticodon with no A). In general, the binding constants are twice the values by Reuben and Polk (1980) for monomeric AMP, which suggests that polymer amino acids are interacting with only one base. No real differences are found betwen poly A binding for free Phe, Phe methyl ester or Phe amide, except that the amide value is slightly lower.

  8. Studies of a pyridino-crown ether-based chiral stationary phase on the enantioseparation of biogenic chiral aralkylamines and α-amino acid esters by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lévai, Sándor; Németh, Tamás; Fődi, Tamás; Kupai, József; Tóth, Tünde; Huszthy, Péter; Balogh, György Tibor

    2015-11-10

    This paper reports the enantioseparation ability of a pyridino-18-crown-6 ether-based chiral stationary phase [(S,S)-CSP-1]. The enantiomeric discrimination of chiral stationary phase (S,S)-CSP-1 was evaluated by HPLC using the mixtures of enantiomers of various protonated primary aralkylamines [1-phenylethylamine hydrogen perchlorate (PEA), 2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-amine (1-aminoindan), 2,2'-(1,2-diaminoethane-1,2-diyl) diphenol (HPEN)] and perchlorate salts of α-amino acid esters [alanine benzyl ester (Ala-OBn), phenylalanine benzyl ester (Phe-OBn), phenylalanine methyl ester (Phe-OMe), phenylglycine methyl ester (PhGly-OMe), glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (Glu-diOBn), and valine benzyl ester (Val-OBn)]. The best enantioseparation was achieved in the case of PEA. The high enantioselectivity was rationalized by the strong π-π interaction of the extended π system of the aryl-substituted pyridine unit.

  9. Studies of a pyridino-crown ether-based chiral stationary phase on the enantioseparation of biogenic chiral aralkylamines and α-amino acid esters by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lévai, Sándor; Németh, Tamás; Fődi, Tamás; Kupai, József; Tóth, Tünde; Huszthy, Péter; Balogh, György Tibor

    2015-11-10

    This paper reports the enantioseparation ability of a pyridino-18-crown-6 ether-based chiral stationary phase [(S,S)-CSP-1]. The enantiomeric discrimination of chiral stationary phase (S,S)-CSP-1 was evaluated by HPLC using the mixtures of enantiomers of various protonated primary aralkylamines [1-phenylethylamine hydrogen perchlorate (PEA), 2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-amine (1-aminoindan), 2,2'-(1,2-diaminoethane-1,2-diyl) diphenol (HPEN)] and perchlorate salts of α-amino acid esters [alanine benzyl ester (Ala-OBn), phenylalanine benzyl ester (Phe-OBn), phenylalanine methyl ester (Phe-OMe), phenylglycine methyl ester (PhGly-OMe), glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (Glu-diOBn), and valine benzyl ester (Val-OBn)]. The best enantioseparation was achieved in the case of PEA. The high enantioselectivity was rationalized by the strong π-π interaction of the extended π system of the aryl-substituted pyridine unit. PMID:26218505

  10. The O-Methyltransferase SrsB Catalyzes the Decarboxylative Methylation of Alkylresorcylic Acid during Phenolic Lipid Biosynthesis by Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Chiaki; Funa, Nobutaka; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces griseus contains the srs operon, which is required for phenolic lipid biosynthesis. The operon consists of srsA, srsB, and srsC, which encode a type III polyketide synthase, an O-methyltransferase, and a flavoprotein hydroxylase, respectively. We previously reported that the recombinant SrsA protein synthesized 3-(13′-methyltetradecyl)-4-methylresorcinol, using iso-C16 fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) as a starter substrate and malonyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA as extender substrates. An in vitro SrsA reaction using [13C3]malonyl-CoA confirmed that the order of extender substrate condensation was methylmalonyl-CoA, followed by two extensions with malonyl-CoA. Furthermore, SrsA was revealed to produce an alkylresorcylic acid as its direct product rather than an alkylresorcinol. The functional SrsB protein was produced in the membrane fraction in Streptomyces lividans and used for the in vitro SrsB reaction. When the SrsA reaction was coupled, SrsB produced alkylresorcinol methyl ether in the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). SrsB was incapable of catalyzing the O-methylation of alkylresorcinol, indicating that alkylresorcylic acid was the substrate of SrsB and that SrsB catalyzed the conversion of alkylresorcylic acid to alkylresorcinol methyl ether, namely, by both the O-methylation of the hydroxyl group (C-6) and the decarboxylation of the neighboring carboxyl group (C-1). O-methylated alkylresorcylic acid was not detected in the in vitro SrsAB reaction, although it was presumably stable, indicating that O-methylation did not precede decarboxylation. We therefore postulated that O-methylation was coupled with decarboxylation and proposed that SrsB catalyzed the feasible SAM-dependent decarboxylative methylation of alkylresorcylic acid. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a methyltransferase that catalyzes decarboxylative methylation. PMID:22247507

  11. MEASUREMENT OF EXHALED BREATH AND VENOUS BLOOD TO DEVELOP A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER AND THE PRODUCTION OF THE BIOMARKER TERTIARY-BUTYL ALCOHOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) is a common fuel additive used to increase the availability of oxygen in gasoline to reduce winter-time carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles. Also, MTBE boosts gasoline "octane" rating and, as such, allows reduction of benzene...

  12. Densities and excess volumes of methyl 1,1-dimethylpropyl ether + benzene, or cyclohexane, or an alkane (C{sub 6}--C{sub 16}) at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Witek, M.; Goldon, A.; Hofman, T.; Domanska, U.

    1997-01-01

    Densities and excess volumes of {l_brace}methyl 1,1-dimethylpropyl ether (TAME) + (benzene or cyclohexane or hexane or octane or decane or dodecane or tetradecane or hexadecane){r_brace} at 298.15 K are presented. The observed influence of the n-alkane length can be predicted qualitatively by the Flory equation of state.

  13. 21 CFR 573.640 - Methyl esters of higher fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.640 Methyl esters of higher fatty acids. The food additive methyl... prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by reaction of methyl alcohol with...

  14. 21 CFR 573.640 - Methyl esters of higher fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.640 Methyl esters of higher fatty acids. The food additive methyl... prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is manufactured by reaction of methyl alcohol with...

  15. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ethers in air to 300 C. 2: Organic acid additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with three C-ether (modified polyphenyl ether) formulations in dry and moist air. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, a 17-meter/minute surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C (77 to 572 F) disk temperature range. The three C-ether formulations yielded better boundary lubricating characteristics than the Type 2 ester under most test conditions. All C-ether formulations exhibited higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C (302 to 572 F) and similar or lower values from 25 to 150 C (77 to 302 F).

  16. Use of anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride)-coated beads for capture of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Tsukamoto, Megumi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2009-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the single most important cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children, and a major public health concern in pediatrics. However, current diagnostic methods for RSV are not sufficiently sensitive. In addition, there is no simple method for enhancing RSV detection. Here, a method for capturing RSV from nasal fluid has been developed using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). The beads were incubated with RSV-infected nasal fluid, then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnet field and washed. The adsorption [corrected] of RSV by the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which indicated the presence of nucleocapsid protein, fusion protein, and the viral genome of RSV on the incubated beads. Therefore, this capture method will contribute to the improvement of RSV detection.

  17. Immobilization of xylanase on poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether 5000 and its self-extractive bioconversion for the production of xylo-oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Shan, Zongxing; Song, Xiangyang; Ouyang, Jia; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2014-02-01

    Endo-β-1,4-xylanase derived from Trichoderma reesei was covalently immobilized on poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether 5000 (mPEG5000), and the resulting immobilized enzyme had a residual activity of 72.4 % with 82.9 % of PEGylated amino groups. Compared with the free enzyme, the immobilized xylanase was stable at pH values in the range of 4.0-6.0 and temperatures in the range of 50-65 °C. A self-extractive bioconversion system composed of immobilized xylanase, mPEG5000, and sodium citrate was used to produce xylo-oligosaccharides and provided a better distribution of the xylo-oligosaccharides than the free enzyme. Furthermore, the immobilized xylanase could be effectively recovered in situ following the hydrolysis reaction. PMID:24326682

  18. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) detected in abnormally high concentrations in postmortem blood and urine from two persons found dead inside a car containing a gasoline spill.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Morild, Inge; Johnsen, Lene; Le Nygaard, Ilah; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2013-09-01

    Two deep frozen persons, a female and a male, were found dead in a car. There had been an explosive fire inside the car which had extinguished itself. On the floor inside the car were large pools of liquid which smelled of gasoline. The autopsy findings and routine toxicological analyses could not explain the cause of death. Carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood samples were <10%. Analysis with a headspace gas chromatography revealed methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations of 185 mg/L (female victim) and 115 mg/L (male victim) in peripheral blood. The urine MTBE concentrations were 150 mg/L and 256 mg/L, respectively. MTBE is a synthetic chemical which is added to gasoline as a fuel oxygenate. Gasoline poisoning is likely to be the cause of the death in these two cases, and MTBE can be a suitable marker of gasoline exposure, when other volatile components have vaporized. PMID:23879346

  19. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) detected in abnormally high concentrations in postmortem blood and urine from two persons found dead inside a car containing a gasoline spill.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Morild, Inge; Johnsen, Lene; Le Nygaard, Ilah; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2013-09-01

    Two deep frozen persons, a female and a male, were found dead in a car. There had been an explosive fire inside the car which had extinguished itself. On the floor inside the car were large pools of liquid which smelled of gasoline. The autopsy findings and routine toxicological analyses could not explain the cause of death. Carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood samples were <10%. Analysis with a headspace gas chromatography revealed methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations of 185 mg/L (female victim) and 115 mg/L (male victim) in peripheral blood. The urine MTBE concentrations were 150 mg/L and 256 mg/L, respectively. MTBE is a synthetic chemical which is added to gasoline as a fuel oxygenate. Gasoline poisoning is likely to be the cause of the death in these two cases, and MTBE can be a suitable marker of gasoline exposure, when other volatile components have vaporized.

  20. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  1. Decreased toxicity to terrestrial plants associated with a mixture of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolite tert-butyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    An, Youn-Joo; Lee, Woo-Mi

    2007-08-01

    The influence of the main fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and its key metabolite, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), on the growth of a plant seedling was studied separately and in combination. The test plants were mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), wheat (Triticum aestivum), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), kale (Brassica alboglabra), Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris), and sweet corn (Zea mays). The growth of all the plants was adversely affected by TBA and MTBE. The 5-d median effective concentration (EC50) for the plants exposed to MTBE and TBA were in the range of 680 to 1,000 mg MTBE/kg soil (dry wt) and 1,200 to 3,500 mg TBA/kg soil (dry wt), respectively. The relative order of the sensitivity rankings is almost the same for MTBE and TBA. Methyl tert-butyl ether is more toxic than TBA to most of the test species. Based on the EC50 values, MTBE is approximately 1.5 to 3 times more potent than TBA. The sum of the toxic unit (TU) at 50% inhibition of the mixture (EC50mix) was calculated from the dose (TU-based)-response relationships using the trimmed Spearman-Karber method. The combined effect of MTBE + TBA on the plant growth was less than additive because the EC50mix values were greater than I TU. This phenomenon may be due to the competition of MTBE and TBA in terms of their intake by plants. The combined effects of MTBE and TBA should be taken into account to assess their risk in gasoline-contaminated sites.

  2. Evaluation of a rapid method for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Misir, R; Laarveld, B; Blair, R

    1985-08-30

    The major limitation to fatty acid analysis by gas-liquid chromatography is associated with preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In the present study, FAME preparations were made from plant oils (corn, olive, sunflower), sunflower oil margarine, lard and various animal tissue fats by a rapid transesterification involving tetramethylammonium hydroxide in methanol, and also by a longer conventional saponification-esterification method. Fats from animal (beef, mutton, pork) adipose tissues were extracted by a simpler modified procedure and also by the Folch method prior to the rapid and the conventional FAME preparations, respectively. FAME analysis on a gas-liquid chromatograph equipped with a Silar 10C glass capillary column indicated similar fatty acid composition of a given fat or oil, whether FAME was prepared by the rapid or the longer conventional method. The data obtained by both methods were very highly correlated for all the fats (r = 0.9895 - 0.9999). However, the rapid method showed a tendency for enhanced recoveries of lower chain fatty acids (e.g. 14:0), and also of unsaturated C18 isomers. Possibly, losses of fatty acids that occurred during the lengthy fat extraction, fatty acid esterification or ether-evaporation FAME concentration steps (conventional method) were minimised by the single transesterification step (rapid method). This rapid transesterification method appears to be an attractive alternative to FAME preparation from a wide variety of different fats for gas-liquid chromatographic analysis. PMID:4044736

  3. Human Exposure and Elimination Kinetics of Chlorinated Polyfluoroalkyl Ether Sulfonic Acids (Cl-PFESAs).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Vestergren, Robin; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Chuangxiu; Liang, Yong; Cai, Yaqi

    2016-03-01

    The incomplete mass-balance of organic fluorine in human serum indicates the existence of unknown per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) with persistent and bioaccumulative properties. Here we characterized human exposure and elimination kinetics of chlorinated polyfluoroalkyl ether sulfonic acids (Cl-PFESAs) in metal plating workers (n = 19), high fish consumers (n = 45), and background controls (n = 8). Cl-PFESAs were detected in >98% of the sampled individuals with serum concentrations ranging <0.019-5040 ng/mL. Statistically higher median serum levels were observed in high fish consumers (93.7 ng/mL) and metal plating workers (51.5 ng/mL) compared to the background control group (4.78 ng/mL) (Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, p < 0.01). Cl-PFESAs could account for 0.269 to 93.3% of ∑PFASs in human serum indicating that this compound class may explain a substantial fraction of previously unidentified organic fluorine in the Chinese population. Estimated half-lives for renal clearance (median 280 years; range 7.1-4230 years) and total elimination (median 15.3 years; range 10.1-56.4 years) for the eight carbon Cl-PFESA suggest that this is the most biopersistent PFAS in humans reported to date. The apparent ubiquitous distribution and slow elimination kinetics in humans underscore the need for more research and regulatory actions on Cl-PFESAs and PFAS alternatives with similar chemical structures.

  4. Tartaric Acid-based Amphiphilic Macromolecules with Ether Linkages Exhibit Enhanced Repression of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Dalia; Zhang, Yingue; Lewis, Daniel R.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Welsh, William J.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease initiates with the atherogenic cascade of scavenger receptor- (SR-) mediated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. Resulting foam cell formation leads to lipid-rich lesions within arteries. We designed amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) to inhibit these processes by competitively blocking oxLDL uptake via SRs, potentially arresting atherosclerotic development. In this study, we investigated the impact of replacing ester linkages with ether linkages in the AM hydrophobic domain. We hypothesized that ether linkages would impart flexibility for orientation to improve binding to SR binding pockets, enhancing anti-atherogenic activity. A series of tartaric acid-based AMs with varying hydrophobic chain lengths and conjugation chemistries were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for bioactivity. 3-D conformations of AMs in aqueous conditions may have significant effects on anti-atherogenic potency and were simulated by molecular modeling. Notably, ether-linked AMs exhibited significantly higher levels of inhibition of oxLDL uptake than their corresponding ester analogues, indicating a dominant effect of linkage flexibility on pharmacological activity. The degradation stability was also enhanced for ether-linked AMs. These studies further suggested that alkyl chain length (i.e., relative hydrophobicity), conformation (i.e., orientation), and chemical stability play a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake, and guide the design of innovative cardiovascular therapies. PMID:25890704

  5. Green chromatography determination of fatty acid methyl esters in biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Carlos Molina; Alayón, Andrea Brito; García Rodríguez, María Teresa; Jiménez Abizanda, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Francisco Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a green, simple and rapid chromatographic methodology for separation and determination of a group of 13 fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) by using a capillary gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The method was successfully applied for the determination of FAMEs in biodiesel samples from commercial and waste cooking oils, synthesized by homogeneous catalysis. Detection and quantification limits were in the μg L(-1) level. Direct injection of sample solution was compared with solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction procedures, giving similar results. The lower analysis time represent considerable improvement compared with other papers. The described methodology is especially suitable for process control applications. The samples analysed showed total contents of FAMEs higher than 96.5%, which verifies the European regulations. PMID:25666201

  6. Effect of methyl jasmonate application to grapevine leaves on grape amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Portu, Javier; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar

    2016-07-15

    Over the last few years, considerable attention has been paid to the application of elicitors to vineyard. However, research about the effect of elicitors on grape amino acid content is scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of foliar application of methyl jasmonate on must amino acid content. Results revealed that total amino acid content was not modified by the application of methyl jasmonate. However, the individual content of certain amino acids was increased as consequence of methyl jasmonate foliar application, i.e., histidine, serine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, asparagine, methionine, and lysine. Among them, phenylalanine content was considerably increased; this amino acid is precursor of phenolic and aromatic compounds. In conclusion, foliar application of methyl jasmonate improved must nitrogen composition. This finding suggests that methyl jasmonate treatment might be conducive to obtain wines of higher quality since must amino acid composition could affect the wine volatile composition and the fermentation kinetics.

  7. Effect of methyl jasmonate application to grapevine leaves on grape amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Portu, Javier; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar

    2016-07-15

    Over the last few years, considerable attention has been paid to the application of elicitors to vineyard. However, research about the effect of elicitors on grape amino acid content is scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of foliar application of methyl jasmonate on must amino acid content. Results revealed that total amino acid content was not modified by the application of methyl jasmonate. However, the individual content of certain amino acids was increased as consequence of methyl jasmonate foliar application, i.e., histidine, serine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, asparagine, methionine, and lysine. Among them, phenylalanine content was considerably increased; this amino acid is precursor of phenolic and aromatic compounds. In conclusion, foliar application of methyl jasmonate improved must nitrogen composition. This finding suggests that methyl jasmonate treatment might be conducive to obtain wines of higher quality since must amino acid composition could affect the wine volatile composition and the fermentation kinetics. PMID:26948648

  8. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration. PMID:25227993

  9. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration.

  10. Methylation variation at IGF2 differentially methylated regions and maternal folic acid use before and during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoyo, Cathrine; Murtha, Amy P; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Jirtle, Randy L; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Forman, Michele R; Iversen, Edwin S; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Overcash, Francine; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K

    2011-07-01

    Folic acid (FA) supplementation before and during pregnancy has been associated with decreased risk of neural tube defects although recent reports suggest it may also increase the risk of other chronic diseases. We evaluated exposure to maternal FA supplementation before and during pregnancy in relation to aberrant DNA methylation at two differentially methylated regions (DMRs) regulating Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) expression in infants. Aberrant methylation at these regions has been associated with IGF2 deregulation and increased susceptibility to several chronic diseases. Using a self-administered questionnaire, we assessed FA intake before and during pregnancy in 438 pregnant women. Pyrosequencing was used to measure methylation at two IGF2 DMRs in umbilical cord blood leukocytes. Mixed models were used to determine relationships between maternal FA supplementation before or during pregnancy and DNA methylation levels at birth. Average methylation at the H19 DMR was 61.2%. Compared to infants born to women reporting no FA intake before or during pregnancy, methylation levels at the H19 DMR decreased with increasing FA intake (2.8%, p=0.03, and 4.9%, p=0.04, for intake before and during pregnancy, respectively). This methylation decrease was most pronounced in male infants (p=0.01). Methylation alterations at the H19 DMR are likely an important mechanism by which FA risks and/or benefits are conferred in utero. Because stable methylation marks at DMRs regulating imprinted genes are acquired before gastrulation, they may serve as archives of early exposures with the potential to improve our understanding of developmental origins of adult disease.

  11. 40 CFR 721.2075 - Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, compound with methanamine (1:1). 721.2075 Section 721.2075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2075 Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with... substance identified generically as carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2075 - Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, compound with methanamine (1:1). 721.2075 Section 721.2075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2075 Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with... substance identified generically as carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2075 - Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, compound with methanamine (1:1). 721.2075 Section 721.2075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2075 Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with... substance identified generically as carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2075 - Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, compound with methanamine (1:1). 721.2075 Section 721.2075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2075 Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with... substance identified generically as carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2075 - Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, compound with methanamine (1:1). 721.2075 Section 721.2075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2075 Carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with... substance identified generically as carbamodithioic acid, methyl-, compound with methanamine (1:1)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10365 - Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, ethyl ester. 721.10365 Section 721.10365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10365 Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester (PMN P-10-56; CAS No. 888021-82-7) is subject to...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10133 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer. 721.10133 Section 721.10133 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10133 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester... identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer (PMN P-07-401; CAS No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.10365 - Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, ethyl ester. 721.10365 Section 721.10365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10365 Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester (PMN P-10-56; CAS No. 888021-82-7) is subject to...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10133 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer. 721.10133 Section 721.10133 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10133 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester... identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer (PMN P-07-401; CAS No....

  20. 40 CFR 721.10133 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer. 721.10133 Section 721.10133 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10133 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester... identified as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, homopolymer (PMN P-07-401; CAS No....

  1. 40 CFR 721.10365 - Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, ethyl ester. 721.10365 Section 721.10365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10365 Butanoic acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester. (a) Chemical... acid, 3-mercapto-2-methyl-, ethyl ester (PMN P-10-56; CAS No. 888021-82-7) is subject to...

  2. Molecular recognition of amino acids with some fluorescent ditopic pyrylium- and pyridinium-based crown ether receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, A.; Maddah, B.; Yari, A.; Shamsipur, M.; Boostani, M.; Fall Rastegar, M.; Ghaderi, A. R.

    2005-10-01

    The molecular recognition of L-amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, lysine and arginine with some crownpyryliums, CP's, and a crownpyridinium compound, as receptors, were examined in methanol. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the structural stability of the receptors in the presence of the amino acids. The fluorimetric titration of the receptors by specified amino acids, other than arginine, was followed within a few minutes and the stoichiometry and stability of the resulting amino acid complexes were evaluated. The data analysis clearly demonstrated the critical role of the terminal amino group to carboxylic acid distance of amino acids for their proper fixation on the receptor molecules. Ion pairing for the two oppositely charged carboxylate anion and pyrylium (or pyridinium) cation, as well as the hydrogen bonding between crown ethers' oxygens and ammonium hydrogens are expected as the main interaction sources in the host-guest complexations.

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 Exposed to the Fuel Oxygenates Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and Ethanol▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Krassimira R.; Schmidt, Radomir; Chakicherla, Anu Y.; Legler, Tina C.; Wu, Janice; Chain, Patrick S.; Scow, Kate M.; Kane, Staci R.

    2007-01-01

    High-density whole-genome cDNA microarrays were used to investigate substrate-dependent gene expression of Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1, one of the best-characterized aerobic methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-degrading bacteria. Differential gene expression profiling was conducted with PM1 grown on MTBE and ethanol as sole carbon sources. Based on microarray high scores and protein similarity analysis, an MTBE regulon located on the megaplasmid was identified for further investigation. Putative functions for enzymes encoded in this regulon are described with relevance to the predicted MTBE degradation pathway. A new unique dioxygenase enzyme system that carries out the hydroxylation of tert-butyl alcohol to 2-methyl-2-hydroxy-1-propanol in M. petroleiphilum PM1 was discovered. Hypotheses regarding the acquisition and evolution of MTBE genes as well as the involvement of IS elements in these complex processes were formulated. The pathways for toluene, phenol, and alkane oxidation via toluene monooxygenase, phenol hydroxylase, and propane monooxygenase, respectively, were upregulated in MTBE-grown cells compared to ethanol-grown cells. Four out of nine putative cyclohexanone monooxygenases were also upregulated in MTBE-grown cells. The expression data allowed prediction of several hitherto-unknown enzymes of the upper MTBE degradation pathway in M. petroleiphilum PM1 and aided our understanding of the regulation of metabolic processes that may occur in response to pollutant mixtures and perturbations in the environment. PMID:17890343

  4. Folic acid, polymorphism of methyl-group metabolism genes, and DNA methylation in relation to GI carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing Yuan; Xiao, Shu Dong

    2003-01-01

    DNA methylation is the main epigenetic modification after replication in humans. DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to C5 of cytosine within CpG dinucleotide sequences in the genomic DNA of higher eukaryotes. There is considerable evidence that aberrant DNA methylation plays an integral role in carcinogenesis. Folic acid or folate is crucial for normal DNA synthesis and can regulate DNA methylation, and through this, it affects cellular SAM levels. Folate deficiency results in DNA hypomethylation. Epidemiological studies have indicated that folic acid protects against gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MS) are the enzymes involved in folate metabolism and are thought to influence DNA methylation. MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level. Two common MTHFR polymorphisms, 677CT (or 677TT) and A1298C, and an MS polymorphism, A-->G at 2756, have been identified. Most studies support an inverse association between folate status and the rate of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. During human GI carcinogenesis, MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level, as well as aberrant methylation.

  5. Inhibition of DNA methylation by caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid, two common catechol-containing coffee polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jun; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2006-02-01

    We studied the modulating effects of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid (two common coffee polyphenols) on the in vitro methylation of synthetic DNA substrates and also on the methylation status of the promoter region of a representative gene in two human cancer cells lines. Under conditions that were suitable for the in vitro enzymatic methylation of DNA and dietary catechols, we found that the presence of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the DNA methylation catalyzed by prokaryotic M.SssI DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and human DNMT1. The IC50 values of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid were 3.0 and 0.75 microM, respectively, for the inhibition of M.SssI DNMT-mediated DNA methylation, and were 2.3 and 0.9 microM, respectively, for the inhibition of human DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation. The maximal in vitro inhibition of DNA methylation was approximately 80% when the highest concentration (20 microM) of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid was tested. Kinetic analyses showed that DNA methylation catalyzed by M.SssI DNMT or human DNMT1 followed the Michaelis-Menten curve patterns. The presence of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid inhibited DNA methylation predominantly through a non-competitive mechanism, and this inhibition was largely due to the increased formation of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH, a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation), resulting from the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated O-methylation of these dietary catechols. Using cultured MCF-7 and MAD-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, we also demonstrated that treatment of these cells with caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid partially inhibited the methylation of the promoter region of the RARbeta gene. The findings of our present study provide a general mechanistic basis for the notion that a variety of dietary catechols can function as inhibitors of DNA methylation through increased formation of SAH during the COMT-mediated O-methylation of these dietary

  6. Nucleophilic Difluoromethylenation of Ketones Using Diethyl (Difluoro(trimethylsilyl)methyl)phosphonate Mediated by 18-Crown-6 Ether/KOAc.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hui; Cao, Zhong-Yan; Zhou, Jian

    2016-09-01

    We report a general difluoromethylenation of various types of ketones using diethyl (difluoro(trimethylsilyl)methyl)phosphonate mediated by the combination of 18-crown-6 and KOAc. It provides facile access to structurally diverse β-hydroxy-α,α-difluorophosphonates as interesting targets for medicinal research. PMID:27500746

  7. Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Semelsberger

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

  8. Widespread occurrence of bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers, p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens), benzophenone type-UV filters, triclosan, and triclocarban in human urine from Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-02-01

    Biomonitoring of human exposure to bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers (BADGEs; resin coating for food cans), p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens; preservatives), benzophenone-type UV filters (BP-UV filters; sunscreen agents), triclosan (TCS; antimicrobials), and triclocarban (TCC; antimicrobials) has been investigated in western European countries and North America. Nevertheless, little is known about the exposure of Greek populations to these environmental chemicals. In this study, 100 urine samples collected from Athens, Greece, were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) for the determination of total concentrations of five derivatives of BADGEs, six parabens and their metabolite (ethyl-protocatechuate), five derivatives of BP-UV filters, TCS, and TCC. Urinary concentrations of BADGEs, parabens, ethyl-protocatechuate, BP-UV filters, TCS and TCC (on a volume basis) ranged 0.3-20.9 (geometric mean: 0.9), 1.6-1010 (24.2), <2-71.0 (2.1), 0.5-1120 (4.4), <0.5-2580 (8.0) and <0.5-1.9 (0.6) ng/mL, respectively. All 19 target chemicals were found in urine, and the highest detection rates were observed for methyl paraben (100%), bisphenol A bis (2,3-dihydroxypropyl) ether (90%), ethyl paraben (87%), 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (78%), propyl paraben (72%), and TCS (71%). Estimated daily intakes (EDIurine), calculated on the basis of the measured urinary concentrations, ranged from 0.023 μg/kg bw/day for Σ5BADGEs to 31.4 μg/kg bw/day for Σ6Parabens.

  9. Functional analysis of a tomato salicylic acid methyl transferase and its role in synthesis of the flavor volatile methyl salicylate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl salicylate (MeSA) is a volatile plant secondary metabolite that is an important contributor to taste and scent of many fruits and flowers. It is synthesized from salicylic acid (SA), a phytohormone that contributes to plant pathogen defense. MeSA is synthesized by members of a family of O-met...

  10. Occurrence and temporal variability of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other volatile organic compounds in select sources of drinking water : results of the focused survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delzer, Gregory C.; Ivahnenko, Tamara

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale use of the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and its high solubility, low soil adsorption, and low biodegradability, has resulted in its detection in ground water and surface water in many places throughout the United States. Studies by numerous researchers, as well as many State and local environmental agencies, have discovered high levels of MTBE in soils and ground water at leaking underground gasoline-storage-tank sites and frequent occurrence of low to intermediate levels of MTBE in reservoirs used for both public water supply and recreational boating.In response to these findings, the American Water Works Association Research Foundation sponsored an investigation of MTBE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Nation?s sources of drinking water. The goal of the investigation was to provide additional information on the frequency of occurrence, concentration, and temporal variability of MTBE and other VOCs in source water used by community water systems (CWSs). The investigation was completed in two stages: (1) reviews of available literature and (2) the collection of new data. Two surveys were associated with the collection of new data. The first, termed the Random Survey, employed a statistically stratified design for sampling source water from 954 randomly selected CWSs. The second, which is the focus of this report, is termed the Focused Survey, which included samples collected from 134 CWS source waters, including ground water, reservoirs, lakes, rivers, and streams, that were suspected or known to contain MTBE. The general intent of the Focused Survey was to compare results with the Random Survey and provide an improved understanding of the occurrence, concentration, temporal variability, and anthropogenic factors associated with frequently detected VOCs. Each sample collected was analyzed for 66 VOCs, including MTBE and three other ether gasoline oxygenates (hereafter termed gasoline oxygenates). As part of

  11. Catalytic Consequences of Acid Strength in the Conversion of Methanol to Dimethyl Ether

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Robert T.; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-02-14

    The effects of acid identity on CH{sub 3}OH dehydration are examined here using density functional theory (DFT) estimates of acid strength (as deprotonation energies, DPE) and reaction energies, combined with rate data on Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) clusters and zeolite H-BEA. Measured first-order (k{sub mono}) and zero-order (k{sub dimer}) CH3OH dehydration rate constants depend exponentially on DPE for POM clusters; the value of k{sub mono} depends more strongly on DPE than k{sub dimer} does. The chemical significance of these rate parameters and the basis for their dependences on acid strength were established by using DFT to estimate the energies of intermediates and transition states involved in elementary steps that are consistent with measured rate equations. We conclude from this treatment that CH{sub 3}OH dehydration proceeds via direct reactions of co-adsorbed CH{sub 3}OH molecules for relevant solid acids and reaction conditions. Methyl cations formed at ion-pair transition states in these direct routes are solvated by H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}OH more effectively than those in alternate sequential routes involving methoxide formation and subsequent reaction with CH{sub 3}OH. The stability of ion-pairs, prevalent as intermediates and transition states on solid acids, depends sensitively on DPE because of concomitant correlations between the stability of the conjugate anionic cluster and DPE. The chemical interpretation of k{sub mono} and k{sub dimer} from mechanism-based rate equations, together with thermochemical cycles of their respective transition state formations, show that similar charge distributions in the intermediate and transition state involved in k{sub dimer} cause its weaker dependence on DPE. Values of k{sub mono} involve uncharged reactants and the same ion-pair transition state as k{sub dimer}; these species sense acid strength differently and cause the larger effects of DPE on k{sub mono}. Confinement effects in H-BEA affect the value of

  12. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  13. 76 FR 69659 - Methacrylic Acid-Methyl Methacrylate-Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether Methacrylate Graft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...-5805. II. Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of Friday, August 26, 2011 (76 FR... and Review (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review under... Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001)...

  14. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  15. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  16. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  17. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  18. A new sesquiterpene lactone glycoside and a new quinic acid methyl ester from Patrinia villosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Fen; Ma, Hong-Mei; Chen, Gang; Wang, Hai-Feng; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Qing-Mei; Hua, Hui-Ming; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2016-10-01

    A new sesquiterpene lactone glycoside (1) and a new quinic acid methyl ester (2) were isolated from Patrinia villosa, together with another two known compounds chlorogenic acid n-butyl ester (3), 3, 4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid methyl ester (4). Their structures were established using 1D/2D-NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and comparing with spectroscopic data reported in the literature. PMID:27156969

  19. A new sesquiterpene lactone glycoside and a new quinic acid methyl ester from Patrinia villosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Fen; Ma, Hong-Mei; Chen, Gang; Wang, Hai-Feng; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Qing-Mei; Hua, Hui-Ming; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2016-10-01

    A new sesquiterpene lactone glycoside (1) and a new quinic acid methyl ester (2) were isolated from Patrinia villosa, together with another two known compounds chlorogenic acid n-butyl ester (3), 3, 4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid methyl ester (4). Their structures were established using 1D/2D-NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and comparing with spectroscopic data reported in the literature.

  20. A relationship between vitamin B sub 12 , folic acid, ascorbic acid, and mercury uptake and methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, N.E.; Smith, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    Ingestion of megadoses of certain vitamins appears to influence the in vivo methylation of mercuric chloride in guinea pigs. The addition of megadoses of vitamin B{sub 12} fed either singularly or in combination with folic acid resulted in increased methylmercury concentrations in the liver. Moreover, percent methylmercury levels were significantly increased with B{sub 12} treatment in the liver (B{sub 12} only and B{sub 12}/folic acid) and brain (B{sub 12}/vitamin C). Incorporation of high levels of folic acid into the dietary regime also increased the methylmercury concentration particularly in the liver and hair tissues. The addition of vitamin C in the diet, particularly in combination with B{sub 12} (brain) or folic acid (muscle) resulted in increased methylmercury levels in these tissues and percent methylmercury values with B{sub 12} in the muscle and brain tissue.

  1. Identifying the usage patterns of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other oxygenates in gasoline using gasoline surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, M.J.; Clawges, R.M.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Data on the volumes of oxygenates and other compounds in gasoline are available from several sources collectively referred as gasoline surveys. The gasoline surveys provide the most definitive knowledge of which oxygenate, if any, and what volumes of that oxygenate are being used in various areas of the country. This information is important in water-quality assessments for relating the detection of MTBE in water to patterns of usage of MTBE in gasoline. General information on three surveys that have been conducted by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association, and the EPA was presented. The samples were tested for physical properties and constituents including octane number, specific gravity, and volumes of olefins, aromatics, benzene, alcohols, and various ether oxygenates. The data in each survey had its own utility based on the type of assessment that is undertaken. Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Using NAWQA data, the percent occurrence of MTBE in ground water in metropolitan areas that use substantial amounts of MTBE (> 5% by vol) was ??? 21%, compared to ??? 2% in areas that do not use substantial amounts of MTBE (< 5% by vol). When several other factors are considered in a logistic regression model including MTBE usage in RFG or OXY gasoline areas (??? 3% by vol) as a factor, a 4-6 fold increase in the detection frequency of MTBE in ground water was found when compared to areas that do not use MTBE or use it only for octane enhancement (< 3% by vol).

  2. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Inhibition of radical reactions for an improved potassium tert-butoxide-promoted (11) C-methylation strategy for the synthesis of α-(11) C-methyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chie; Kato, Koichi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Arano, Yasushi; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-03-01

    α-(11) C-Methyl amino acids are useful tools for biological imaging studies. However, a robust procedure for the labeling of amino acids has not yet been established. In this study, the (11) C-methylation of Schiff-base-activated α-amino acid derivatives has been optimized for the radiosynthesis of various α-(11) C-methyl amino acids. The benzophenone imine analog of methyl 2-amino butyrate was (11) C-methylated with [(11) C]methyl iodide following its initial deprotonation with potassium tert-butoxide (KOtBu). The use of an alternative base such as tetrabutylammonium fluoride, triethylamine, and 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene did not result in the (11) C-methylated product. Furthermore, the KOtBu-promoted (11) C-methylation of the Schiff-base-activated amino acid analog was enhanced by the addition of 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene or 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and inhibited by the addition of 1,10-phenanthroline. These results suggest that inhibition of radical generation induced by KOtBu improves the α-(11) C-methylation of the Schiff-base-activated amino acids. The addition of a mixture of KOtBu and TEMPO to a solution of Schiff-base-activated amino acid ester and [(11) C]methyl iodide provided optimal results, and the tert-butyl ester and benzophenone imine groups could be readily hydrolyzed to give the desired α-(11) C-methyl amino acids with a high radiochemical conversion. This strategy could be readily applied to the synthesis of other α-(11) C-methyl amino acids.

  4. Anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride)-coated beads-based capture of human influenza A and B virus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Tsukamoto, Megumi; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Okada, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Kawashita, Norihito; Takagi, Tatsuya; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2009-01-15

    An anionic magnetic beads-based method was developed for the capture of human influenza A and B viruses from nasal aspirates, allantoic fluid and culture medium. A polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydride) [poly(MVE-MA)], was used to endow magnetic beads with a negative charge and bioadhesive properties. After incubation with samples containing human influenza virus, the beads were separated from supernatants by applying a magnetic field. The adsorption [corrected] of the virus by the beads was confirmed by hemagglutinin assay, immunochromatography, Western blotting, egg infection, and cell infection. Successful capture was proved using 5 H1N1 influenza A viruses, 10 H3N2 influenza A viruses, and 6 influenza B viruses. Furthermore, the infectivity in chicken embryonated eggs and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells of the captured human influenza virus was similar to that of the total viral quantity of starting materials. Therefore, this method of capture using magnetic beads coated with poly(MVE-MA) can be broadly used for the recovery of infectious human influenza viruses.

  5. Expression Levels of Some Detoxification Genes in Liver and Testis of Rats Exposed to a Single Dose of Methyl-Tertiary Butyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Ahmad Ali; Saadat, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), a well-known gasoline oxygenate compound, is still used in several countries. Several studies investigated the effects of MTBE on the activity of phase II metabolism enzymes. There is no published data on the effect(s) of short-term exposure to MTBE on mRNA levels of antioxidant genes. Therefore, the present study was carried out. METHODS: A total of 15 adults male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five equal experimental groups. They received a single dose of 0, 400, 800 and 1600 mg/Kg MTBE in peanut oil by gavages. The final group received no MTBE and peanut oil. After 24 hr animals were slaughtered then livers and testis were removed to extract the total RNA. Real-time PCR was done to detect the gene expressions of glutathione S-transferase family (Gstt1, Gstm1, and Gstp1). RESULTS: The mRNAs levels of the examined genes neither in liver nor in testis showed a significant difference between the exposed groups and control rats. CONCLUSIONS: The present data revealed that exposure to a single dose of MTBE has no significant effect on the mRNA levels of the Gstt1, Gstm1, and Gstp1 genes. PMID:27335592

  6. Response surface analysis of photocatalytic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by core/shell Fe3O4/ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was investigated in the aqueous solution of coated ZnO onto magnetite nanoparticale based on an advanced photocatalytic oxidation process. The photocatalysts were synthesized by coating of ZnO onto magnetite using precipitation method. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM). Besides, specific surface area was also determined by BET method. The four effective factors including pH of the reaction mixture, Fe3O4/ZnO magnetic nanoparticles concentration, initial MTBE concentration and molar ratio of [H2O2]/ [MTBE] were optimized using response surface modeling (RSM). Using the four-factor-three-level Box–Behnken design, 29 runs were designed considering the effective ranges of the influential factors. The optimized values for the operational parameters under the respective constraints were obtained at PH of 7.2, Fe3O4/ZnO concentration of 1.78 g/L, initial MTBE concentration of 89.14 mg/L and [H2O2]/ [MTBE] molar ratio of 2.33. Moreover, kinetics of MTBE degradation was determined under optimum condition. The study about core/shell magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) recycling were also carried out and after about four times, the percentage of the photocatalytic degradation was about 70%. PMID:24393372

  7. Thickness Dependence of Bovine Serum Albumin Adsorption on Thin Thermoresponsive Poly(diethylene glycol) Methyl Ether Methacrylate Brushes by Surface Plasmon Resonance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Wassel, Ekram; Jiang, Siyu; Song, Qimeng; Vogt, Stephan; Nöll, Gilbert; Druzhinin, Sergey I; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-09-13

    This study reports on the dependence of the temperature-induced changes in the properties of thin thermoresponsive poly(diethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PDEGMA) layers of end-tethered chains on polymer thickness and grafting density. PDEGMA layers with a dry ellipsometric thickness of 5-40 nm were synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization on gold. To assess the temperature-induced changes, the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated systematically as a function of film thickness, temperature, and grafting density by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), complemented by wettability and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measurements. BSA adsorption on PDEGMA brushes is shown to differ significantly above and below an apparent transition temperature. This surface transition temperature was found to depend linearly on the PDEGMA thickness and changed from 35 °C at 5 nm thickness to 48 °C at 23 nm. Similarly, a change of the grafting density enables the adjustment of this transition temperature presumably via a transition from the mushroom to the brush regime. Finally, BSA that adsorbed irreversibly on polymer brushes at temperatures above the transition temperature can be desorbed by reducing the temperature to 25 °C, underlining the reversibly switchable properties of PDEGMA brushes in response to temperature changes.

  8. The study of binding of methyl tert-butyl ether to human telomeric G-quadruplex and calf thymus DNA by gas chromatography, a thermodynamic discussion.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Sahar; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2014-11-15

    Methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is widely used as an antiknock additive for increasing octane number of gasoline. Recently, the in vivo studies demonstrated that MTBE has genotoxic potential and able to form adducts with DNA. In the work, the interactions of MTBE with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and the Na(+) form of G-quadruplex DNA (wtTel22) were studied by using of head space-solid phase microextraction technique coupled to gas chromatography. The binding equilibrium constants were measured through the equilibriums of a four phase system. In addition, the MTBE Henry's law constants for two different buffers in the temperature range of 283-303K were measured. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the complexation of MTBE to both DNAs is enthalpy favored and entropy disfavored. The thermodynamic results revealed that MTBE may have interaction with ct-DNA via the minor groove of DNA. Also, MTBE may be complexed into the basket of G-quadruplex structure. In addition, the low difference in the binding constants of MTBE for both different DNA targets may confirm that MTBE is poorly selective for different conformations of DNA. PMID:25280162

  9. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE. PMID:25432418

  10. Interaction of insulin with methyl tert-butyl ether promotes molten globule-like state and production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Valipour, Masoumeh; Maghami, Parvaneh; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Sadeghpour, Mostafa; Khademian, Mohamad Ali; Mosavi, Khadijeh; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-09-01

    Interaction of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) with proteins is a new look at its potential adverse biological effects. When MTBE is released to the environment it enters the blood stream through inhalation, and could affect the properties of various proteins. Here we investigated the interaction of MTBE with insulin and its effect on insulin structural changes. Our results showed that insulin formed a molten globule (MG)-like structure in the presence of 8 μM MTBE under physiological pH. The insulin structural changes were studied using spectroscopy methods, viscosity calculation, dynamic light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. To delineate the mechanisms involved in MTBE-protein interactions, the formation of reactive oxygen specious (ROS) and formation of protein aggregates were measured. The chemiluminscence experiments revealed an increase in ROS production in the presence of MTBE especially in the MG-like state. These results were further confirmed by the aggregation tests, which indicated more aggregation of insulin at 40 μM MTBE compared with 8 μM. Thus, the formation of initial aggregates and exposure of the hydrophobic patches upon formation of the MG-like state in the presence of MTBE drives protein oxidation and ROS generation.

  11. Methyl tert-butyl ether degradation in the unsaturated zone and the relation between MTBE in the atmosphere and shallow groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baehr, Arthur L.; Charles, Emmanuel G.; Baker, Ronald J.

    2001-02-01

    Atmospheric methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations in southern New Jersey generally exceeded concentrations in samples taken from the unsaturated zone. A simple unsaturated zone transport model indicates that MTBE degradation can explain the attenuation with half-lives from a few months to a couple of years. Tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), a possible degradation product of MTBE, was detected in unsaturated-zone samples at concentrations exceeding atmospheric levels at some sites, suggesting the possible conversion of MTBE to TBA. At sites where MTBE was detected in shallow groundwater, the concentration was typically higher than the overlying unsaturated-zone concentration. This observation is consistent with outgassing from the aquifer and combined with the unsaturated-zone attenuation suggests some of the MTBE detections in shallow groundwater are nonatmospheric in origin, coming from leaking tanks, road runoff, or other sources. The identification of sources of MTBE in groundwater and attenuation mechanisms through the hydrologic cycle is critical in developing an understanding of the long-term effect of MTBE releases.

  12. Short-term fish reproduction assays with methyl tertiary butyl ether with zebrafish and fathead minnow: Implications for evaluation of potential for endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Mihaich, Ellen; Erler, Steffen; Le Blanc, Gerald; Gallagher, Sean

    2015-09-01

    The authors report on short-term fish reproduction assays in zebrafish and fathead minnow conducted to examine the potential for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to cause effects on the endocrine system. Both studies were performed under good laboratory practice and in accordance with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and US Environmental Protection Agency test guidelines. The results of the first study demonstrated that exposure to a high test concentration (147 mg/L) of MTBE impaired reproductive output of female zebrafish, evident by a reduction in fecundity. Based on the endpoints evaluated in the present study however, there was no supporting evidence to indicate that this effect was caused by disruption of or interaction with the endocrine system. In the second study, fathead minnows exposed to a wider but lower range of test concentrations showed no effects on any reproductive parameter of male or female fish, at the maximum recommended testing concentration of 100 mg/L (62 mg/L measured). The results of these 2 guideline studies indicate that MTBE does not interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of zebrafish or fathead minnow. PMID:25866897

  13. Concentrations and potential health risks of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in air and drinking water from Nanning, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li'e; Qin, Jian; Zhang, Zhiyong; Li, Qin; Huang, Jiongli; Peng, Xiaowu; Qing, Li; Liang, Guiqiang; Liang, Linhan; Huang, Yuman; Yang, Xiaobo; Zou, Yunfeng

    2016-01-15

    Levels of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in occupational air, ambient air, and drinking water in Nanning, South China, were investigated, and then their potential health risks to occupational workers and the general public were evaluated. Results show that the MTBE concentration in occupational air from 13 service stations was significantly higher than that in ambient air from residential areas (p<0.0001); both are far lower than the threshold limit value-time weighted average of MTBE regulated in the United States (US). The drinking water samples from household taps yielded detectable MTBE in the range of 0.04-0.33 μg/L, which is below the US drinking water standard of 20-40 μg/L. The non-carcinogenic risk of MTBE from air inhalation may be negligible because the calculated hazard quotient was less than 1. The mean MTBE lifetime cancer risk was within the acceptable limit of 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-4), but the lifetime cancer risk of refueling workers in the urban service station at the 95th percentile slightly exceeded the maximum acceptable carcinogen risk (1 × 10(-4)), indicating the potential carcinogenic health effects on the population highly exposed to MTBE in this region. The hazard index and carcinogenic risk of MTBE in drinking water were significantly lower than the safe limit of US Environmental Protection Agency, suggesting that drinking water unlikely poses significant health risks to the residents in Nanning.

  14. The study of binding of methyl tert-butyl ether to human telomeric G-quadruplex and calf thymus DNA by gas chromatography, a thermodynamic discussion.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Sahar; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2014-11-15

    Methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is widely used as an antiknock additive for increasing octane number of gasoline. Recently, the in vivo studies demonstrated that MTBE has genotoxic potential and able to form adducts with DNA. In the work, the interactions of MTBE with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and the Na(+) form of G-quadruplex DNA (wtTel22) were studied by using of head space-solid phase microextraction technique coupled to gas chromatography. The binding equilibrium constants were measured through the equilibriums of a four phase system. In addition, the MTBE Henry's law constants for two different buffers in the temperature range of 283-303K were measured. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the complexation of MTBE to both DNAs is enthalpy favored and entropy disfavored. The thermodynamic results revealed that MTBE may have interaction with ct-DNA via the minor groove of DNA. Also, MTBE may be complexed into the basket of G-quadruplex structure. In addition, the low difference in the binding constants of MTBE for both different DNA targets may confirm that MTBE is poorly selective for different conformations of DNA.

  15. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE.

  16. Aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether in a closed symbiotic system containing a mixed culture of Chlorella ellipsoidea and Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weihong; Li, Yixiao; Sun, Kedan; Jin, Jing; Li, Xuanzhen; Zhang, Fuming; Chen, Jianmeng

    2011-01-30

    The contamination of groundwater by methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is one of the most serious environmental problems around the world. MTBE degradation in a closed algal-bacterial symbiotic system, containing a mixed culture of Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 and Chlorella ellipsoidea, was investigated. The algal-bacterial symbiotic system showed increased MTBE degradation. The MTBE-degradation rate in the mixed culture (8.808 ± 0.007 mg l(-1) d(-1)) was higher than that in the pure bacterial culture (5.664 ± 0.017 mg l(-1) d(-1)). The level of dissolved oxygen was also higher in the mixed culture than that in the pure bacterial culture. However, the improved efficiency of MTBE degradation was not in proportional to the biomass of the alga. The optimal ratio of initial cell population of bacteria to algae was 100:1. An immobilized culture of mixed bacteria and algae also showed higher MTBE degradation rate than the immobilized pure bacterial culture. A mixed culture with algae and PM1 immobilized separately in different gel beads showed higher degradation rate (8.496 ± 0.636 mg l(-1) d(-1)) than that obtained with algae and PM1 immobilized in the same gel beads (5.424 ± 0.010 mg l(-1) d(-1)).

  17. Methyl tert-butyl ether degradation in the unsaturated zone and the relation between MTBE in the atmosphere and shallow groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Charles, E.G.; Baker, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations in southern New Jersey generally exceeded concentrations in samples taken from the unsaturated zone. A simple unsaturated zone transport model indicates that MTBE degradation can explain the attenuation with half-lives from a few months to a couple of years. Tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), a possible degradation product of MTBE, was detected in unsaturated-zone samples at concentrations exceeding atmospheric levels at some sites, suggesting the possible conversion of MTBE to TBA. At sites where MTBE was detected in shallow groundwater, the concentration was typically higher than the overlying unsaturated-zone concentration. This observation is consistent with outgassing from the aquifer and combined with the unsaturated-zone attenuation suggests some of the MTBE detections in shallow groundwater are nonatmospheric in origin, coming from leaking tanks, road runoff, or other sources. The identification of sources of MTBE in groundwater and attenuation mechanisms through the hydrologic cycle is critical in developing an understanding of the long-term effect of MTBE releases.

  18. Gene mdpC plays a regulatory role in the methyl-tert-butyl ether degradation pathway of Methylibium petroleiphilum strain PM1

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Geetika; Schmidt, Radomir; Scow, Kate M.; Denison, Michael S.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2015-01-01

    Among the few bacteria known to utilize methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a sole carbon source, Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 is a well-characterized organism with a sequenced genome; however, knowledge of the genetic regulation of its MTBE degradation pathway is limited. We investigated the role of a putative transcriptional activator gene, mdpC, in the induction of MTBE-degradation genes mdpA (encoding MTBE monooxygenase) and mdpJ (encoding tert-butyl alcohol hydroxylase) of strain PM1 in a gene-knockout mutant mdpC−. We also utilized quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR assays targeting genes mdpA, mdpJ and mdpC to determine the effects of the mutation on transcription of these genes. Our results indicate that gene mdpC is involved in the induction of both mdpA and mdpJ in response to MTBE and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) exposure in PM1. An additional independent mechanism may be involved in the induction of mdpJ in the presence of TBA. PMID:25724531

  19. Substantial production of drosophilin A methyl ether (tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene) by the lignicolous basidiomycete Phellinus badius in the heartwood of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) trees.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Laurence A J; Wilkens, Barry; Groy, Thomas L; Glaeser, Jessie A

    2015-04-01

    Toxic organohalogen pollutants produced as by-products of industrial processes, such as chloroform and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, also have significant natural sources. A substantial terrestrial source of halogenated organics originates from fungal decay of wood and leaf litter. Here we show that the lignicolous basidiomycete Phellinus badius deposits up to 30,000 mg of the halogenated metabolite drosophilin A methyl ether (DAME, tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene) per kilogram of decayed heartwood in the mesquite Prosopis juliflora. DAME occurs as clusters of glassy crystals up to 1 mm long within the decayed heartwood. In addition, the Phellinus badius basidiocarps contain an average of 24,000 mg DAME/kg dried fruiting body, testifying to the significant translocation and accumulation of Cl accompanied by DAME biosynthesis. The high DAME concentrations attest to the substantial Cl content of the heartwood, which averages near 5,000 ppm, with Cl/K near 1:1, consistent with an inorganic chloride precursor. Phellinus badius has a circumglobal distribution in the tropics and subtropics, where it is widely distributed on hardwoods and commonly associated with decay of mesquite. There is the potential for extensive DAME formation within decayed heartwood worldwide given the extensive range of Phellinus badius and its propensity to form DAME within mesquites. Further, DAME production is not limited to Phellinus badius but occurs in a range of lignicolous basidiomycetes, suggesting a significant natural reservoir for this chloroaromatic with potential environmental implications.

  20. Naturally Occurring Bacteria Similar to the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-Degrading Strain PM1 Are Present in MTBE-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Krassimira; Gebreyesus, Binyam; Mackay, Douglas; Scow, Kate M.

    2003-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widespread groundwater contaminant that does not respond well to conventional treatment technologies. Growing evidence indicates that microbial communities indigenous to groundwater can degrade MTBE under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Although pure cultures of microorganisms able to degrade or cometabolize MTBE have been reported, to date the specific organisms responsible for MTBE degradation in various field studies have not be identified. We report that DNA sequences almost identical (99% homology) to those of strain PM1, originally isolated from a biofilter in southern California, are naturally occurring in an MTBE-polluted aquifer in Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), Lompoc, California. Cell densities of native PM1 (measured by TaqMan quantitative PCR) in VAFB groundwater samples ranged from below the detection limit (in anaerobic sites) to 103 to 104 cells/ml (in oxygen-amended sites). In groundwater from anaerobic or aerobic sites incubated in microcosms spiked with 10 μg of MTBE/liter, densities of native PM1 increased to approximately 105 cells/ml. Native PM1 densities also increased during incubation of VAFB sediments during MTBE degradation. In controlled field plots amended with oxygen, artificially increasing the MTBE concentration was followed by an increase in the in situ native PM1 cell density. This is the first reported relationship between in situ MTBE biodegradation and densities of MTBE-degrading bacteria by quantitative molecular methods. PMID:12732529

  1. Combined toxicities of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolite tert-butyl alcohol on earthworms via different exposure routes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Mi; Yoon, Youngdae; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) are among the major soil contaminants that threaten the health of soil ecosystems. Many MTBE-contaminated sites accumulate TBA, because TBA is the intermediate of MTBE biodegradation. To access the risk of MTBE and TBA in soil, we investigated the combined toxicities of MTBE and TBA using two earthworm species, Perionyx excavatus and Eisenia andrei, as well as the toxic effects via different exposure routes. The combined toxicity showed weak antagonistic effects (LC50mix values were slightly greater than 1.0), and sensitivity toward same pollutants differed in the two earthworm species. Moreover, the toxicity of MTBE and TBA was also affected by the exposure route; both filter paper and artificial soil tests showed that dermal-only exposure to MTBE had an even greater toxic effect than combined dermal and oral exposure. Thus, we suggest that diverse environmental factors including organic materials, the physicochemical properties of the contact media, and the exposure routes of the organism, should be taken into consideration when assessing the effects of pollutants on organisms in diverse environmental systems.

  2. Substantial production of drosophilin A methyl ether (tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene) by the lignicolous basidiomycete Phellinus badius in the heartwood of mesquite ( Prosopis juliflora) trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Wilkens, Barry; Groy, Thomas L.; Glaeser, Jessie A.

    2015-04-01

    Toxic organohalogen pollutants produced as by-products of industrial processes, such as chloroform and polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins, also have significant natural sources. A substantial terrestrial source of halogenated organics originates from fungal decay of wood and leaf litter. Here we show that the lignicolous basidiomycete Phellinus badius deposits up to 30,000 mg of the halogenated metabolite drosophilin A methyl ether (DAME, tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene) per kilogram of decayed heartwood in the mesquite Prosopis juliflora. DAME occurs as clusters of glassy crystals up to 1 mm long within the decayed heartwood. In addition, the Phellinus badius basidiocarps contain an average of 24,000 mg DAME/kg dried fruiting body, testifying to the significant translocation and accumulation of Cl accompanied by DAME biosynthesis. The high DAME concentrations attest to the substantial Cl content of the heartwood, which averages near 5,000 ppm, with Cl/K near 1:1, consistent with an inorganic chloride precursor. Phellinus badius has a circumglobal distribution in the tropics and subtropics, where it is widely distributed on hardwoods and commonly associated with decay of mesquite. There is the potential for extensive DAME formation within decayed heartwood worldwide given the extensive range of Phellinus badius and its propensity to form DAME within mesquites. Further, DAME production is not limited to Phellinus badius but occurs in a range of lignicolous basidiomycetes, suggesting a significant natural reservoir for this chloroaromatic with potential environmental implications.

  3. Short-term fish reproduction assays with methyl tertiary butyl ether with zebrafish and fathead minnow: Implications for evaluation of potential for endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Mihaich, Ellen; Erler, Steffen; Le Blanc, Gerald; Gallagher, Sean

    2015-09-01

    The authors report on short-term fish reproduction assays in zebrafish and fathead minnow conducted to examine the potential for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to cause effects on the endocrine system. Both studies were performed under good laboratory practice and in accordance with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and US Environmental Protection Agency test guidelines. The results of the first study demonstrated that exposure to a high test concentration (147 mg/L) of MTBE impaired reproductive output of female zebrafish, evident by a reduction in fecundity. Based on the endpoints evaluated in the present study however, there was no supporting evidence to indicate that this effect was caused by disruption of or interaction with the endocrine system. In the second study, fathead minnows exposed to a wider but lower range of test concentrations showed no effects on any reproductive parameter of male or female fish, at the maximum recommended testing concentration of 100 mg/L (62 mg/L measured). The results of these 2 guideline studies indicate that MTBE does not interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of zebrafish or fathead minnow.

  4. Thickness Dependence of Bovine Serum Albumin Adsorption on Thin Thermoresponsive Poly(diethylene glycol) Methyl Ether Methacrylate Brushes by Surface Plasmon Resonance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Wassel, Ekram; Jiang, Siyu; Song, Qimeng; Vogt, Stephan; Nöll, Gilbert; Druzhinin, Sergey I; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-09-13

    This study reports on the dependence of the temperature-induced changes in the properties of thin thermoresponsive poly(diethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PDEGMA) layers of end-tethered chains on polymer thickness and grafting density. PDEGMA layers with a dry ellipsometric thickness of 5-40 nm were synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization on gold. To assess the temperature-induced changes, the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated systematically as a function of film thickness, temperature, and grafting density by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), complemented by wettability and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measurements. BSA adsorption on PDEGMA brushes is shown to differ significantly above and below an apparent transition temperature. This surface transition temperature was found to depend linearly on the PDEGMA thickness and changed from 35 °C at 5 nm thickness to 48 °C at 23 nm. Similarly, a change of the grafting density enables the adjustment of this transition temperature presumably via a transition from the mushroom to the brush regime. Finally, BSA that adsorbed irreversibly on polymer brushes at temperatures above the transition temperature can be desorbed by reducing the temperature to 25 °C, underlining the reversibly switchable properties of PDEGMA brushes in response to temperature changes. PMID:27531168

  5. Omega-functionalized fatty acids, alcohols, and ethers via olefin metathesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl 17-hydroxy stearate was converted to methyl octadec-16-enoate using copper sulfate adsorbed on silica gel. This compound, possessing unsaturation at the opposite end of the chain from the carboxylate, served as a useful substrate for the olefin metathesis reaction. As a result, several fatt...

  6. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical analysis of Isonicotinic acid methyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoba, D.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.; Gayathri, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, an organic compound Isonicotinic acid methyl ester (INAME) was structurally characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, and NMR and UV spectroscopy. The optimized geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible conformers of INAME are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. There are three conformers (SI, SII-1, and SII-2) for this molecule (ground state). The most stable conformer of INAME is SI conformer. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of INAME in the ground state have been calculated by using HF and density functional method (B3LYP) 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. Detailed vibrational spectral analysis has been carried out and assignments of the observed fundamental bands have been proposed on the basis of peak positions and relative intensities. The computed vibrational frequencies were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time independent DFT approach. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. The electric dipole moment (μ) and first hyper polarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule were computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculated results show that the INAME molecule may have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non zero values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  7. AVOIDING PITFALLS IN THE DETERMINATION OF HALOCARBOXYLIC ACIDS: THE PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Haloethanoic (haloacetic) acids are formed during chlorination of drinking water and are regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These compounds are normally quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD) ad the methyl esters. EPA Meth...

  8. Design and biological properties of iodine-123 labeled. beta. -methyl-branched fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The synthetic strategy, synthesis, preclinical evaluation and potential clinical applications of 3-methyl-branched radioiodinated iodophenyl- and iodovinyl-substituted fatty acids are reviewed for use as myocardial imaging agents. 50 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  9. Conversion of alcohols to ether-rich gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a continuous process for converting crude methanol to methyl tertiary-alkyl ether. It comprises contacting a crude methanolic feedstock containing a minor amount of water with a liquid olefinic C{sub 4}-C{sub 5} hydrocarbon extraction stream rich in C{sub 4} or C{sub 5} iso-alkene hydrocarbon or mixtures thereof under extraction conditions favorable to selective extraction of the methanol, thereby providing an extract liquid stream containing sufficient methanol for etherification and an aqueous raffinate stream lean in methanol; reacting liquid hydrocarbon extractant and extracted methanol substantially free of water in a first catalytic reaction zone in contact with acid etherification catalyst under etherification process conditions to convert methanol and iso-alkene hydrocarbon to predominantly methyl tertiary-alkyl ether; fractionating the etherification effluent to recover liquid product containing methyl tertiary-alkyl ether; catalytically converting methanol in the raffinate stream at elevated temperature in contact with acid zeolite catalyst to produce predominantly lower olefins rich in propene, isobutylene and isoamylenes; reacting propene from methanol conversion with water to product di-isopropyl ether; and recovering the isobutylene and isoamylenes produced by catalytic conversion of methanol in a C{sub 4}-C{sub 5} liquid stream for recycle as liquid extractant.

  10. 40 CFR 721.1729 - Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with... identified as boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1729...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1729 - Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with... identified as boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1729...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1729 - Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with... identified as boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1729...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1729 - Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with... identified as boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1729...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1729 - Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with... identified as boric acid (H3BO3), mixed esters with polyethylene glycol mono-Bu ether and polyethylene glycol... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1729...

  15. A versatile pathway to end-functionalized cellulose ethers for click chemistry applications.

    PubMed

    Kamitakahara, Hiroshi; Suhara, Ryo; Yamagami, Mao; Kawano, Haruko; Okanishi, Ryoko; Asahi, Tomoyuki; Takano, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-20

    This paper describes a versatile pathway to heterobifunctional/telechelic cellulose ethers, such as tri-O-methyl cellulosyl azide and propargyl tri-O-methyl celluloside, having one free C-4 hydroxyl group attached to the glucosyl residue at the non-reducing end for the use in Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The one-step end-functionalization of cellulose ethers for molecular rod synthesis involves the introduction of two reactive groups at both ends of the cellulose molecule, and can afford linear triblock copolymers via CuAAC and further reactions. We were able to tailor the degree of polymerization of end-functionalized cellulose ethers with controlled amounts of a Lewis acid, namely SnCl4. Chemical structures of the above cellulose ethers and the reaction conditions for controlling molecular length are discussed.

  16. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino... substance identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester (PMN P-85-1211) is subject... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino... substance identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester (PMN P-85-1211) is subject... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid,...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino... substance identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester (PMN P-85-1211) is subject... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid,...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino... substance identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester (PMN P-85-1211) is subject... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino... substance identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester (PMN P-85-1211) is subject... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid,...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1645 - Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono[(C10-16-alkyloxy)methyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2,2,4(or 2,4,4)-trimethyl-1,6-hexanediamine. 721.1645... Substances § 721.1645 Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1645 - Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono[(C10-16-alkyloxy)methyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2,2,4(or 2,4,4)-trimethyl-1,6-hexanediamine. 721.1645... Substances § 721.1645 Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1645 - Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono[(C10-16-alkyloxy)methyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2,2,4(or 2,4,4)-trimethyl-1,6-hexanediamine. 721.1645... Substances § 721.1645 Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1645 - Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono[(C10-16-alkyloxy)methyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2,2,4(or 2,4,4)-trimethyl-1,6-hexanediamine. 721.1645... Substances § 721.1645 Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1645 - Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono[(C10-16-alkyloxy)methyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2,2,4(or 2,4,4)-trimethyl-1,6-hexanediamine. 721.1645... Substances § 721.1645 Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products with oxirane mono derivatives and 2... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, reaction products...

  6. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans.

    PubMed

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5'UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  7. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans

    PubMed Central

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J. Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E.; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F. Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5’UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  8. Simultaneous determination of methyl tert.-butyl ether and its degradation products, other gasoline oxygenates and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in Catalonian groundwater by purge-and-trap-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Mònica; Lacorte, Sílvia; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià

    2003-05-01

    In Catalonia (northeast Spain), a monitoring program was carried out to determine methyl tert.-butyl ether (MTBE), its main degradation products, tert.-butyl alcohol (TBA), tert.-butyl formate (TBF), and other gasoline additives, the oxygenate dialkyl ethers ethyl tert.-butyl ether, tert.-amyl methyl ether and diisopropyl ether and the aromatic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in 21 groundwater wells that were located near different gasoline point sources (a gasoline spill and underground storage tank leakage). Purge-and-trap coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was optimised for the simultaneous determination of the above mentioned compounds and enabled to detect concentrations at ng/l or sub-microg/l concentrations. Special attention was given to the determination of polar MTBE degradation products, TBA and TBF, since not much data on method performance and environmental levels are given on these compounds in groundwater. All samples analysed contained MTBE at levels between 0.3 and 70 microg/l. Seven contaminated hot spots were identified with levels up to US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water advisory (20-40 microg/l) and a maximum concentration of 670 microg/l (doubling the Danish suggested toxicity level of 350 microg/l). Samples with high levels of MTBE contained 0.1-60 microg/l of TBA, indicating (but not proving) in situ degradation of parent compound. In all cases, BTEX was at low concentrations or not detected showing less solubility and persistence than MTBE. This fact confirms the suitability of MTBE as a tracer or indicator of long-term gasoline contamination than the historically used BTEX.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10122 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1′-[2-ethyl-2-[[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propen-1-yl)oxy]methyl]- 1,3...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1â²- methyl]- 1,3-propanediyl] ester, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, ethenylbenzene and 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate. 721.10122 Section 721.10122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10122 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1′-[2-ethyl-2-[[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propen-1-yl)oxy]methyl]- 1,3...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1â²- methyl]- 1,3-propanediyl] ester, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, ethenylbenzene and 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate. 721.10122 Section 721.10122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10122 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1′-[2-ethyl-2-[[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propen-1-yl)oxy]methyl]- 1,3...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1â²- methyl]- 1,3-propanediyl] ester, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, ethenylbenzene and 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate. 721.10122 Section 721.10122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10122 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1′-[2-ethyl-2-[[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propen-1-yl)oxy]methyl]- 1,3...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1â²- methyl]- 1,3-propanediyl] ester, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, ethenylbenzene and 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate. 721.10122 Section 721.10122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10122 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1′-[2-ethyl-2-[[(2-methyl-1-oxo-2-propen-1-yl)oxy]methyl]- 1,3...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1â²- methyl]- 1,3-propanediyl] ester, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, ethenylbenzene and 2-hydroxyethyl 2-methyl-2-propenoate. 721.10122 Section 721.10122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL...

  14. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  15. Automated determination of fatty acid methyl ester and cis/trans methyl ester composition of fats and oils.

    PubMed

    de Koning, S; van der Meer, B; Alkema, G; Janssen, H G; Brinkman, U A

    2001-07-13

    The determination of the fatty acid composition (as methyl esters, FAMEs) of fats and oils and their cis/trans (CTME) distribution requires a simple, but manual and time-consuming sample preparation. The so-called BF3 method is often the preferred procedure. Because FAME/CTME analyses are encountered very frequently in the food industry, an automated, robot-based alternative is proposed which uses the sodium methylate procedure. After sample weighing and the (manual) addition of heptane (2 min), a XYZ robotic autosampler is used for all remaining work, which includes reagent addition, agitation, sample settling and the final injection into the gas chromatograph (10 min). The performance of the sodium methylate and BF3 methods are compared by analysing some 30 oil and fat samples. The novel procedure is much faster (less than 15 min versus ca. 1 h) and manual sample handling is drastically decreased. The experimental results obtained with the two methods frequently are the same, while small differences can be explained by (known) differences of the two methods in the conversion of minor oil/fat constituents, such as free fatty acids, wax esters and sterol esters. In case of FAME analyses, a hot injection is to be preferred over a cold injection. The RSDs of the peak areas were 1.5% for the major fatty acids to 11% for peaks that were just above the noise level. The detection limit were approximately 0.03%.

  16. Electrochemistry for biofuel generation: transformation of fatty acids and triglycerides to diesel-like olefin/ether mixtures and olefins.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Tatiane R; Harnisch, Falk; Nilges, Peter; Schröder, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    Electroorganic synthesis can be exploited for the production of biofuels from fatty acids and triglycerides. With Coulomb efficiencies (CE) of up to 50 %, the electrochemical decarboxylation of fatty acids in methanolic and ethanolic solutions leads to the formation of diesel-like olefin/ether mixtures. Triglycerides can be directly converted in aqueous solutions by using sonoelectrochemistry, with olefins as the main products (with a CE of more than 20 %). The latter reaction, however, is terminated at around 50 % substrate conversion by the produced side-product glycerol. An energy analysis shows that the electrochemical olefin synthesis can be an energetically competitive, sustainable, and--in comparison with established processes--economically feasible alternative for the exploitation of fats and oils for biofuel production.

  17. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  18. A probe on the intermolecular forces in diisopropyl ether-n-butyric acid mixture by dielectric, FTIR studies and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Arivazhagan, G; Shanmugam, R; Elangovan, A

    2013-03-15

    The results of FTIR spectral measurement on equimolar diisopropyl ether-butyric acid binary mixture and quantum chemical calculations on the complex molecule have been presented. Dielectric studies have been carried out on the binary mixture over the entire composition range and at four different temperatures 303 K, 308 K, 313 K and 318 K. n-Butyric acid seems to prefer less polar ether to interact with it. It appears that the usual interpretation of variation of static dielectric constant and positive deviation of excess permittivity from ideal mixture behavior needs to be relooked.

  19. Synthesis of oxacyclic scaffolds via dual ruthenium hydride/Brønsted acid-catalyzed isomerization/cyclization of allylic ethers.

    PubMed

    Ascic, Erhad; Ohm, Ragnhild G; Petersen, Rico; Hansen, Mette R; Hansen, Casper L; Madsen, Daniel; Tanner, David; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2014-03-17

    A ruthenium hydride/Brønsted acid-catalyzed tandem sequence is reported for the synthesis of 1,3,4,9-tetrahydropyrano[3,4-b]indoles (THPIs) and related oxacyclic scaffolds. The process was designed on the premise that readily available allylic ethers would undergo sequential isomerization, first to enol ethers (Ru catalysis), then to oxocarbenium ions (Brønsted acid catalysis) amenable to endo cyclization with tethered nucleophiles. This methodology provides not only an attractive alternative to the traditional oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction for the synthesis of THPIs, but also convenient access to THPI congeners and other important oxacycles such as acetals. PMID:24616060

  20. Biosorption of methyl blue onto tartaric acid modified wheat bran from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tartaric acid modified wheat bran was utilized as adsorbent to remove methyl blue, a basic dye from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of various experimental parameters such as initial solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage, on dye adsorption. The results showed that the modification of wheat bran by tartaric acid significantly improved its adsorption capacity, and made this material a suitable adsorbent to remove methyl blue. The adsorption capacity of modified wheat bran was about 1.6 times higher than that of unmodified one. The amount of methyl blue adsorbed was found to vary with initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial methyl blue concentration. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of methyl blue was illustrated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the data was tested. Both models adequately described the experimental data of the biosorption of methyl blue. The maximum adsorption capacity for methyl blue calculated from Langmuir model was 25.18 mg/g. The study has shown the effectiveness of modified wheat bran in the removal of methyl blue, and that it can be considered as an attractive alternative to the more expensive technologies used in wastewater treatment. PMID:23369295

  1. Self-assembly of brush-like poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] synthesized via aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hazrat; Mya, Khine Yi; He, Chaobin

    2008-12-01

    Self-assembly of brush-like well-defined poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] homopolymers, abbreviated as P(PEGMA-475) and P(PEGMA-1100) is investigated in aqueous solution by employing dynamic/static light scattering (DLS/SLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas 475 and 1100 is molar mass of the respective PEGMA macromonomer. The mentioned brush-like homopolymers are synthesized by aqueous ATRP at room temperature. The critical association concentration (CAC) of the synthesized polymers in water depends on the length of the PEG side chains but not on the overall molar mass of the polymer. Thus, approximately the same CAC of approximately 0.35 mg/mL is estimated for various P(PEGMA-1100) samples, and approximately 0.7 mg/mL is estimated for P(PEGMA-475) series. All the investigated P(PEGMA-1100) samples form multimolecular micelles in aqueous solution, where the hydrodynamic size (Rh) and the aggregation number (Nagg) of micelles decreases as the molecular weight of P(PEGMA-1100) increases. This can be attributed to the increased steric hindrances between the PEG side chains in corona of micelles formed by higher molar mass P(PEGMA-1100). The tendency of micelle formation by samples of P(PEGMA-475) series is significantly lower than that of P(PEGMA-1100) series, as demonstrated by their significantly higher CAC and micelles of lower Nagg. The Rh of micelles does not depend strongly on polymer concentration, which suggests that these micelles are formed via the closed association model. Micelles formed by P(PEGMA-1100) series slightly shrink with increase in temperature from 25 to 60 degrees C, while those of P(PEGMA-475) series are found to be insensitive to the same temperature variation. Finally, TEM is carried out to visualize the formed micelles after transferring the aqueous solution to carbon film. PMID:18986178

  2. In vitro evaluation of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) methyl ether copolymer coating effects on cells adhesion and proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusen, Laurentiu; Neacsu, Patricia; Cimpean, Anisoara; Valentin, Ion; Brajnicov, Simona; Dumitrescu, L. N.; Banita, Janina; Dinca, Valentina; Dinescu, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and controlling natural and synthetic biointerfaces is known to be the key to a wide variety of application within cell culture and tissue engineering field. As both material characteristics and methods are important in tailoring biointerfaces characteristics, in this work we explore the feasibility of using Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique for obtaining synthetic copolymeric biocoatings (i.e. poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) methyl ether) for evaluating in vitro Vero and MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts cell response. Characterization and evaluation of the coated substrates were carried out using different techniques. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data demonstrated that the main functional groups in the MAPLE-deposited films remained intact. Atomic Force Microscopy images showed the coatings to be continuous, with the surface roughness depending on the deposition parameters. Moreover, the behaviour of the coatings in medium mimicking the pH and temperature of the human body was studied and corelated to degradation. Spectro-ellipsometry (SE) and AFM measurements revealed the degradation trend during immersion time by the changes in coating thickness and roughness. In vitro biocompatibility was studied by indirect contact tests on Vero cells in accordance with ISO 10993-5/2009. The results obtained in terms of cell morphology (phase contrast microscopy) and cytotoxicity (LDH and MTT assays) proved biocompatibility. Furthermore, direct contact assays on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts demonstrated the capacity of all analyzed specimens to support cell adhesion, normal cellular morphology and growth.

  3. Characterization of the Initial Reactions during the Cometabolic Oxidation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Propane-Grown Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The initial reactions in the cometabolic oxidation of the gasoline oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), by Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 have been characterized. Two products, tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), rapidly accumulated extracellularly when propane-grown cells were incubated with MTBE. Lower rates of TBF and TBA production from MTBE were also observed with cells grown on 1- or 2-propanol, while neither product was generated from MTBE by cells grown on casein-yeast extract-dextrose broth. Kinetic studies with propane-grown cells demonstrated that TBF is the dominant (≥80%) initial product of MTBE oxidation and that TBA accumulates from further biotic and abiotic hydrolysis of TBF. Our results suggest that the biotic hydrolysis of TBF is catalyzed by a heat-stable esterase with activity toward several other tert-butyl esters. Propane-grown cells also oxidized TBA, but no further oxidation products were detected. Like the oxidation of MTBE, TBA oxidation was fully inhibited by acetylene, an inactivator of short-chain alkane monooxygenase in M. vaccae JOB5. Oxidation of both MTBE and TBA was also inhibited by propane (Ki = 3.3 to 4.4 μM). Values for Ks of 1.36 and 1.18 mM and for Vmax of 24.4 and 10.4 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 were derived for MTBE and TBA, respectively. We conclude that the initial steps in the pathway of MTBE oxidation by M. vaccae JOB5 involve two reactions catalyzed by the same monooxygenase (MTBE and TBA oxidation) that are temporally separated by an esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TBF to TBA. These results that suggest the initial reactions in MTBE oxidation by M. vaccae JOB5 are the same as those that we have previously characterized in gaseous alkane-utilizing fungi. PMID:12570997

  4. Effect of Ethanol and Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether on Monoaromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation: Response Variability for Different Aquifer Materials Under Various Electron-Accepting Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Aguilar, G L; Fernandez-Sanchez, J M; Kane, S R; Kim, D; Alvarez, P J

    2003-10-06

    Aquifer microcosms were used to determine how ethanol and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MtBE) affect monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation under different electron-accepting conditions commonly found in contaminated sites experiencing natural attenuation. Response variability was investigated by using aquifer material from four sites with different exposure history. The lag phase prior to BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and ethanol degradation was typically shorter in microcosms with previously contaminated aquifer material, although previous exposure did not always result in high degradation activity. Toluene was degraded in all aquifer materials and generally under a broader range of electron-accepting conditions compared to benzene, which was degraded only under aerobic conditions. MtBE was not degraded within 100 days under any condition, and it did not affect BTEX or ethanol degradation patterns. Ethanol was often degraded before BTEX compounds, and had a variable effect on BTEX degradation as a function of electron-accepting conditions and aquifer material source. An occasional enhancement of toluene degradation by ethanol occurred in denitrifying microcosms with unlimited nitrate; this may be attributable to the fortuitous growth of toluene-degrading bacteria during ethanol degradation. Nevertheless, experiments with flow-through aquifer columns showed that this beneficial effect could be eclipsed by an ethanol-driven depletion of electron acceptors, which significantly inhibited BTEX degradation and is probably the most important mechanism by which ethanol could hinder BTEX natural attenuation. A decrease in natural attenuation could increase the likelihood that BTEX compounds reach a receptor as well as the potential duration of exposure.

  5. Controlled human exposure to methyl tertiary butyl ether in gasoline: symptoms, psychophysiologic and neurobehavioral responses of self-reported sensitive persons.

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, N; Kelly-McNeil, K; Mohr, S; Lehrer, P; Opiekun, R E; Lee, C; Wainman, T; Hamer, R; Weisel, C; Edelberg, R; Lioy, P J

    2000-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act mandated oxygenation of gasoline in regions where carbon monoxide standards were not met. To achieve this standard, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was increased to 15% by volume during winter months in many locations. Subsequent to the increase of MTBE in gasoline, commuters reported increases in symptoms such as headache, nausea, and eye, nose, and throat irritation. The present study compared 12 individuals selected based on self-report of symptoms (self-reported sensitives; SRSs) associated with MTBE to 19 controls without self-reported sensitivities. In a double-blind, repeated measures, controlled exposure, subjects were exposed for 15 min to clean air, gasoline, gasoline with 11% MTBE, and gasoline with 15% MTBE. Symptoms, odor ratings, neurobehavioral performance on a task of driving simulation, and psychophysiologic responses (heart and respiration rate, end-tidal CO(2), finger pulse volume, electromyograph, finger temperature) were measured before, during, and immediately after exposure. Relative to controls, SRSs reported significantly more total symptoms when exposed to gasoline with 15% MTBE than when exposed to gasoline with 11% MTBE or to clean air. However, these differences in symptoms were not accompanied by significant differences in neurobehavioral performance or psychophysiologic responses. No significant differences in symptoms or neurobehavioral or psychophysiologic responses were observed when exposure to gasoline with 11% MTBE was compared to clean air or to gasoline. Thus, the present study, although showing increased total symptoms among SRSs when exposed to gasoline with 15% MTBE, did not support a dose-response relationship for MTBE exposure nor the symptom specificity associated with MTBE in epidemiologic studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10964796

  6. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers based on poly(vinyl methyl ether)—the effect of biomolecular ligands to balance cell adhesion and stimulated detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Juliane; Nitschke, Mirko; Pette, Dagmar; Valtink, Monika; Gramm, Stefan; Härtel, Frauke V.; Noll, Thomas; Funk, Richard H. W.; Engelmann, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    Two established material systems for thermally stimulated detachment of adherent cells were combined in a cross-linked polymer blend to merge favorable properties. Through this approach poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) with its superior switching characteristic was paired with a poly(vinyl methyl ether)-based composition that allows adjusting physico-chemical and biomolecular properties in a wide range. Beyond pure PNiPAAm, the proposed thermo-responsive coating provides thickness, stiffness and swelling behavior, as well as an apposite density of reactive sites for biomolecular functionalization, as effective tuning parameters to meet specific requirements of a particular cell type regarding initial adhesion and ease of detachment. To illustrate the strength of this approach, the novel cell culture carrier was applied to generate transplantable sheets of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC). Sheets were grown, detached, and transferred onto planar targets. Cell morphology, viability and functionality were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and determination of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) before and after sheet detachment and transfer. HCEC layers showed regular morphology with appropriate TEER. Cells were positive for function-associated marker proteins ZO-1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and paxillin, and extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV before and after transfer. Sheet detachment and transfer did not impair cell viability. Subsequently, a potential application in ophthalmology was demonstrated by transplantation onto de-endothelialized porcine corneas in vitro. The novel thermo-responsive cell culture carrier facilitates the generation and transfer of functional HCEC sheets. This paves the way to generate tissue engineered human corneal endothelium as an alternative transplant source for endothelial keratoplasty.

  7. Toxicity of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) following exposure of Wistar Rats for 13 weeks or one year via drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Edilberto; Willson, Gabrielle; Parkinson, Horace; Dodd, Darol

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen-week and one-year toxicity studies of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) administered in drinking water to Wistar rats were conducted. Male and female rats were exposed to MTBE in drinking water at 0.5, 3, 7.5 and 15 mg ml(-1) for 13 weeks and at 0.5, 3 and 7.5 (males) or 0.5, 3 and 15 mg ml(-1) (females) for 1 year. Body weights were reduced only in males following 13 weeks of exposure. Reduced water consumption and urine output were observed in males and females exposed to MTBE. Kidney cell replication and α(2u)-globulin levels in males were increased at 1 and 4 weeks of MTBE exposure and tubular cell regeneration was increased in male kidneys exposed to MTBE concentrations of 7.5 mg ml(-1) or greater for 13 weeks. Wet weights of male kidneys were increased following 13 weeks, 6 months and 1 year of exposure to MTBE concentrations of 7.5 mg ml(-1) or greater. Kidney wet weights were increased in females at MTBE concentrations of 15 mg ml(-1) for 13 weeks. Tertiary-butyl alcohol blood levels increased linearly with dose in males and females following 1 year of exposure. Chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN), of minimal to mild severity, increased in males, but not females, with 1 year of MTBE exposure. In summary, exposure of Wistar rats to MTBE in the drinking water resulted in minimal exposure-related effects including limited renal changes in male rats suggestive of α(2u)-globulin nephropathy following 13 weeks of exposure and an exacerbation of CPN in males at the end of 1 year of exposure. PMID:22833177

  8. Groundwater remediation by an in situ biobarrier: a bench scale feasibility test for methyl tert-butyl ether and other gasoline compounds.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Sabrina; Negri, Marco; Sezenna, Elena; Bonomo, Luca; Sorlini, Claudia

    2009-08-15

    Most gasoline contains high percentages of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as an additive. The physico-chemical properties of this substance (high water solubility, low sorption in soil) result in high mobility and dissolved concentrations in soil. In situ permeable biological barriers (biobarriers, BBs) can remediate MTBE polluted groundwater by allowing pure cultures or microbial consortia to degrade MTBE when aerobic conditions are present, either by direct metabolism or cometabolism. Lab-scale batch and column tests were carried out to assess a selected microbial consortium in biodegrading MTBE and other gasoline compounds (benzene B, toluene T, ethylbenzene E, xylenes X) and to measure the parameters affecting the efficacy of a BB treatment of polluted groundwater. During the aerobic phase of the batch tests, the simultaneous biodegradation of MTBE, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), B, T, E and o-X was observed. The rapid biodegradation of BTEXs resulted in decreased oxygen availability, but MTBE degradation was nevertheless measured in the presence of BTEXs. Stationary concentrations of MTBE and TBA were measured when anoxic conditions occurred in the systems. Values for a first order kinetic removal process were obtained for MTBE (0.031+/-0.001 d(-1)), B (0.045+/-0.002 d(-1)) and T (0.080+/-0.004 d(-1)) in the inoculated column tests. The estimate of the BB design parameters suggested that inoculation could significantly modify (double) the longitudinal dispersivity value of the biomass support medium. No effect was observed in the retardation factors for MTBE, B and T. PMID:19200654

  9. Comparison of biostimulation versus bioaugmentation with bacterial strain PM1 for treatment of groundwater contaminated with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE).

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda E; Hristova, Krassimira; Wood, Isaac; Mackay, Doug M; Lory, Ernie; Lorenzana, Dale; Scow, Kate M

    2005-03-01

    Widespread contamination of groundwater by methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) has triggered the exploration of different technologies for in situ removal of the pollutant, including biostimulation of naturally occurring microbial communities or bioaugmentation with specific microbial strains known to biodegrade the oxygenate. After laboratory studies revealed that bacterial strain PM1 rapidly and completely biodegraded MTBE in groundwater sediments, the organism was tested in an in situ field study at Port Hueneme Naval Construction Battalion Center in Oxnard, California. Two pilot test plots (A and B) in groundwater located down-gradient from an MTBE source were intermittently sparged with pure oxygen. Plot B was also inoculated with strain PM1. MTBE concentrations up-gradient from plots A and B initially varied temporally from 1.5 to 6 mg MTBE/L. Six months after treatment began, MTBE concentrations in monitoring wells down-gradient from the injection bed decreased substantially in the shallow zone of the groundwater in plots A and B, thus even in the absence of the inoculated strain PM1. In the deeper zone, downstream MTBE concentrations also decreased in plot A and to a lesser extent in plot B. Difficulties in delivery of oxygen to the deeper zone of plot B, evidenced by low dissolved oxygen concentrations, were likely responsible for low rates of MTBE removal at that location. We measured the survival and movement of strain PM1 in groundwater samples using two methods for detection of DNA sequences specific to strain PM1: TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and internal transcribed spacer region analysis. A naturally occurring bacterial strain with > 99% 16S rDNA sequence similarity to strain PM1 was detected in groundwater collected at various locations at Port Hueneme, including outside the plots where the organism was inoculated. Addition of oxygen to naturally occurring microbial populations was sufficient to stimulate MTBE removal at this site

  10. Toxicity of methyl tert butyl ether to soil invertebrates (springtails: Folsomia candida, Proisotoma minuta, and Onychiurus folsomi) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    Dodd, Matthew; Addison, Janet A

    2010-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the toxicity of methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) to three species of Collembola (Proisotoma minuta, Folsomia candida, and Onychiurus folsomi) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) using an artificial Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) soil and field-collected sandy loam and silt loam soil samples. Soil invertebrate tests were carried out in airtight vials to prevent volatilization of MTBE out of the test units and to allow for direct head-space sampling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis for residual MTBE. The use of the airtight vial protocol proved to be very successful, in that the measured MTBE concentrations at the beginning of the experiments were within 95% of nominal concentrations. The test methods used in this study could be used to test the toxicity of other volatile organic compounds to Collembola. The soil invertebrates tested had inhibitory concentration (ICx) and lethal concentration (LCx) values that ranged from 242 to 844 mg MTBE/kg dry soil. When the three test species of Collembola were tested under identical conditions in the artificial OECD soil, O. folsomi was the most sensitive collembolan, with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50; reproduction) of 296 mg MTBE/kg dry soil. The most sensitive endpoint for lettuce was an IC50 for root length of 81 mg MTBE/kg dry soil after 5 d of germination in OECD soil. Data on the loss of MTBE from the three test soils over time indicated that MTBE was retained in the silt loam soil longer than in either the sandy loam or the artificial OECD soil. PMID:20821452

  11. N-acetylcolchinol O-methyl ether and thiocolchicine, potent analogs of colchicine modified in the C ring. Evaluation of the mechanistic basis for their enhanced biological properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, G.J.; Getahun, Z.; Muzaffar, A.; Brossi, A.; Hamel, E. )

    1990-06-25

    Two colchicine analogs with modifications only in the C ring are better inhibitors than colchicine of cell growth and tubulin polymerization. Radiolabeled thiocolchicine (with a thiomethyl instead of a methoxy group at position C-10) and N-acetylcolchinol O-methyl ether (NCME) (with a methoxy-substituted benzenoid instead of the methoxy-substituted tropone C ring) were prepared for comparison with colchicine. Scatchard analysis indicated a single binding site with KD values of 1.0-2.3 microM. Thiocolchicine was bound 2-4 times as rapidly as colchicine, but the activation energies of the reactions were nearly identical (18 kcal/mol for colchicine, 20 kcal/mol for thiocolchicine). NCME bound to tubulin in a biphasic reaction. The faster phase was 60 times as fast as colchicine binding at 37 degrees C, and a substantial reaction occurred at 0 degrees C. The rate of the faster phase of NCME binding changed relatively little as a function of temperature, so the activation energy was only 7.0 kcal/mol. Dissociation reactions were also evaluated, and at 37 degrees C the half-lives of the tubulin-drug complexes were 11 min for NCME, 24 h for thiocolchicine, and 27 h for colchicine. Relative dissociation rates as a function of temperature varied little among the drug complexes. Activation energies for the dissociation reactions were 30 kcal/mol for thiocolchicine, 27 kcal/mol for NCME, and 24 kcal/mol for colchicine. Comparison of the activation energies of association and dissociation yielded free energies for the binding reactions of -20 kcal/mol for NCME, -10 kcal/mol for thiocolchicine, and -6 kcal/mol for colchicine. The greater effectiveness of NCME and thiocolchicine as compared with colchicine in biological assays probably derives from their more rapid binding to tubulin and the lower free energies of their binding reactions.

  12. Toxicity of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) following exposure of Wistar Rats for 13 weeks or one year via drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Edilberto; Willson, Gabrielle; Parkinson, Horace; Dodd, Darol

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen-week and one-year toxicity studies of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) administered in drinking water to Wistar rats were conducted. Male and female rats were exposed to MTBE in drinking water at 0.5, 3, 7.5 and 15 mg ml(-1) for 13 weeks and at 0.5, 3 and 7.5 (males) or 0.5, 3 and 15 mg ml(-1) (females) for 1 year. Body weights were reduced only in males following 13 weeks of exposure. Reduced water consumption and urine output were observed in males and females exposed to MTBE. Kidney cell replication and α(2u)-globulin levels in males were increased at 1 and 4 weeks of MTBE exposure and tubular cell regeneration was increased in male kidneys exposed to MTBE concentrations of 7.5 mg ml(-1) or greater for 13 weeks. Wet weights of male kidneys were increased following 13 weeks, 6 months and 1 year of exposure to MTBE concentrations of 7.5 mg ml(-1) or greater. Kidney wet weights were increased in females at MTBE concentrations of 15 mg ml(-1) for 13 weeks. Tertiary-butyl alcohol blood levels increased linearly with dose in males and females following 1 year of exposure. Chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN), of minimal to mild severity, increased in males, but not females, with 1 year of MTBE exposure. In summary, exposure of Wistar rats to MTBE in the drinking water resulted in minimal exposure-related effects including limited renal changes in male rats suggestive of α(2u)-globulin nephropathy following 13 weeks of exposure and an exacerbation of CPN in males at the end of 1 year of exposure.

  13. Novel RAFT amphiphilic brush copolymer steric stabilisers for cubosomes: poly(octadecyl acrylate)-block-poly(polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate).

    PubMed

    Chong, Josephine Y T; Mulet, Xavier; Postma, Almar; Keddie, Daniel J; Waddington, Lynne J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2014-09-21

    Copolymers, particularly Pluronics®, are typically used to sterically stabilise colloidal nanostructured particles composed of a lyotropic liquid crystalline bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes). There is a need to design and assess new functionalisable stabilisers for these colloidal drug delivery systems. Six amphiphilic brush copolymers, poly(octadecyl acrylate)-block-poly(polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate) (P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe)), synthesised by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT), were assessed as novel steric stabilisers for cubosomes. It was found that increasing the density of PEG on the nanostructured particle surface by incorporating a PEG brush design (i.e., brush copolymer), provided comparable and/or increased stabilisation effectiveness compared to a linear PEG structure, Pluronic® F127, which is extensively used for steric stabilisation of cubosomes. Assessment was conducted both prior to and following the removal of the dodecyl trithiocarbonate end-group, by free radical-induced reduction. The reduced (P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe) copolymers were more effective steric stabilisers for phytantriol and monoolein colloidal particle dispersions than their non-reduced analogues. High throughput characterisation methodologies, including an accelerated stability assay (ASA) and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), were implemented in this study for the rapid assessment of steric stabiliser effectiveness and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase identification. Phytantriol cubosomes stabilised with P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe) copolymers exhibited a double diamond cubic phase (Q(2)(D)), whilst monoolein cubosomes exhibited a primitive cubic phase (Q(2)(P)), analogous to those formed using Pluronic® F127. PMID:25058647

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of p-coumaryl alcohol-γ-O-methyl ether is mediated through modulation of interferon-γ production in Th cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E-S; Min, H-J; Lee, K; Lee, M-S; Nam, J-W; Seo, E-K; Hong, J-H; Hwang, E-S

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: p-Coumaryl alcohol-γ-O-methyl ether (CAME) was isolated from Alpinia galanga and shown to contain a phenylpropanoid structure similar to p-coumaryl diacetate (CDA). CDA is known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, but the biochemical activities of CAME are unknown. Inflammation is mediated by inflammatory cytokine production, in particular, by CD4+ T helper cells (Th cells), but it is unclear whether phenylpropanoids affect cytokine production in Th cells. In this study, we decided to investigate the functions of CAME and CDA in CD4+ Th cells. Experimental approach: Mouse CD4+ Th cells were isolated from C57BL6 mice and stimulated with an antibody against T cell receptors in the presence of phenylpropanoids. Cytokine production was measured by elisa and intracellular cytokine staining. Gene knockout mice and tetracycline-inducible transgenic mice were used to examine the molecular mechanisms of phenylpropanoids on modulation of cytokine production. Key results: CAME potently reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species in Th cells, as does CDA. However, although CDA was cytotoxic, CAME selectively and potently suppresses interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in CD4+ Th cells, without toxicity. This effect was caused by attenuated expression of the transcription factor, T-box protein expressed in T cells (T-bet), and T-bet was essential for CAME to inhibit IFNγ production in CD4+ Th cells. Conclusions and implications: CAME selectively and substantially suppresses IFNγ production in CD4+ Th cells by decreasing T-bet expression. As increased IFNγ production by CD4+ Th cells can mediate inflammatory immune responses, a selective IFNγ suppressor, such as CAME may be an effective, naturally occurring, compound for modulating inflammatory immune disorders. PMID:19226286

  15. Groundwater remediation by an in situ biobarrier: a bench scale feasibility test for methyl tert-butyl ether and other gasoline compounds.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Sabrina; Negri, Marco; Sezenna, Elena; Bonomo, Luca; Sorlini, Claudia

    2009-08-15

    Most gasoline contains high percentages of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as an additive. The physico-chemical properties of this substance (high water solubility, low sorption in soil) result in high mobility and dissolved concentrations in soil. In situ permeable biological barriers (biobarriers, BBs) can remediate MTBE polluted groundwater by allowing pure cultures or microbial consortia to degrade MTBE when aerobic conditions are present, either by direct metabolism or cometabolism. Lab-scale batch and column tests were carried out to assess a selected microbial consortium in biodegrading MTBE and other gasoline compounds (benzene B, toluene T, ethylbenzene E, xylenes X) and to measure the parameters affecting the efficacy of a BB treatment of polluted groundwater. During the aerobic phase of the batch tests, the simultaneous biodegradation of MTBE, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), B, T, E and o-X was observed. The rapid biodegradation of BTEXs resulted in decreased oxygen availability, but MTBE degradation was nevertheless measured in the presence of BTEXs. Stationary concentrations of MTBE and TBA were measured when anoxic conditions occurred in the systems. Values for a first order kinetic removal process were obtained for MTBE (0.031+/-0.001 d(-1)), B (0.045+/-0.002 d(-1)) and T (0.080+/-0.004 d(-1)) in the inoculated column tests. The estimate of the BB design parameters suggested that inoculation could significantly modify (double) the longitudinal dispersivity value of the biomass support medium. No effect was observed in the retardation factors for MTBE, B and T.

  16. Methyl-branched poly(hydroxyalkanoate) biosynthesis from 13- methyltetradecanoic acid and mixed isostearic acid isomer substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas resinovorans, a known medium-chain-length (mcl-) poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) producer, was grown on 13-methyltetradecanoic acid (13-MTDA) and a mixture of isostearic acid (IA) isomers to produce methyl-branched mcl-PHA polymers. Shake flask experiments revealed polymer productivities (...

  17. Selective microbial degradation of saturated methyl branched chain fatty acid isomers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas bacteria were screened for their capabilities of degrading chemically synthesized saturated branched-chain fatty acids (sbc-FAs). Mixtures of sbc-FAs with the methyl-branch located at various locales along the fatty acid were used as a carbon feedstock in shake-flask cu...

  18. Low-temperature phase behavior of fatty acid methyl esters by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) mixtures have many uses including biodiesel, lubricants, metal-working fluids, surfactants, polymers, coatings, green solvents and phase-change materials. The physical properties of a FAME mixture depends on the fatty acid concentration (FAC) profile. Some products hav...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10424 - Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, methyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10424 Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, methyl. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10424 - Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, methyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10424 Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, methyl. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10424 - Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, methyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10424 Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, methyl. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  2. Coriander Seed Oil Methyl Esters as Biodiesel Fuel: Unique Fatty Acid Composition and Excellent Oxidative Stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid (FA) hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt %) acid. Most of the remaining FA...

  3. Fabrication of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)-based hybrid proton-conducting membranes containing carboxyl or amino acid-functionalized titania by in situ sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongheng; Xu, Tao; He, Guangwei; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wu, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized titania are used as fillers to modify the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane for improved proton conductivity and methanol barrier property. The functionalized titania sol which contains proton conductive carboxylic acid groups or amino acid groups are derived from a facile chelation method using different functional additives. Then the novel SPEEK/carboxylic acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TC) and SPEEK/amino acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TNC) hybrid membranes are fabricated via in situ sol-gel method. The anti-swelling property and thermal stability of hybrid membranes are enhanced owing to the formation of electrostatic force between SPEEK and titania nanoparticles. The hybrid membranes exhibit higher proton conductivity than plain SPEEK membrane because more proton transfer sites are provided by the functionalized titania nanoparticles. Particularly, the proton conductivity of SPEEK/TNC membrane with 15% filler content reaches up to 6.24 × 10-2 S cm-1, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the pure SPEEK membrane. For methanol permeability, the SPEEK/TNC membranes possess the lowest values because the acid-base interaction between sulfonic acid groups in SPEEK and amino groups in functionalized titania leads to a more compact membrane structure.

  4. DNA methylation landscape of fat deposits and fatty acid composition in obese and lean pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunhua; Shen, Linyuan; Xia, Yudong; Yang, Qiong; Li, Xuewei; Tang, Guoqing; Jiang, Yanzhi; Wang, Jinyong; Li, Mingzhou; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Obese and lean type pig breeds exhibit differences in their fat deposits and fatty acid composition. Here, we compared the effect of genome-wide DNA methylation on fatty acid metabolism between Landrace pigs (LP, leaner) and Rongchang pigs (RP, fatty). We found that LP backfat (LBF) had a higher polyunsaturated fatty acid content but a lower adipocyte volume than RP backfat (RBF). LBF exhibited higher global DNA methylation levels at the genome level than RBF. A total of 483 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were located in promoter regions, mainly affecting olfactory and sensory activity and lipid metabolism. In LBF, the promoters of genes related to ATPase activity had significantly stronger methylation. This fact may suggest lower energy metabolism levels, which may result in less efficient lipid synthesis in LBF. Furthermore, we identified a DMR in the miR-4335 and miR-378 promoters and validated their methylation status by bisulfite sequencing PCR. The hypermethylation of the promoters of miR-4335 and miR-378 in LBF and the resulting silencing of the target genes may result in LBF’s low content in saturated fatty acids and fat deposition capacity. This study provides a solid basis for exploring the epigenetic mechanisms affecting fat deposition and fatty acid composition. PMID:27721392

  5. The molecular structure of thio-ether fatty acids influences PPAR-dependent regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lund, Jenny; Stensrud, Camilla; Rajender; Bohov, Pavol; Thoresen, G Hege; Berge, Rolf K; Wright, Michael; Kamal, Ahmed; Rustan, Arild C; Miller, Andrew D; Skorve, Jon

    2016-03-15

    Thio-ether fatty acids (THEFAs), including the parent 2-(tetradecylthio)acetic acid (TTA), are modified fatty acids (FAs) that have profound effects on lipid metabolism given that they are blocked for β-oxidation, and able to act as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists. Therefore, TTA in particular has been tested clinically for its therapeutic potential against metabolic syndrome related disorders. Here, we describe the preparation of THEFAs based on the TTA scaffold with either a double or a triple bond. These are tested in cultured human skeletal muscle cells (myotubes), either as free acid or following esterification as phospholipids, lysophospholipids or monoacylglycerols. Metabolic effects are assessed in terms of cellular bioavailabilities in myotubes, by FA substrate uptake and oxidation studies, and gene regulation studies with selected PPAR-regulated genes. We note that the inclusion of a triple bond promotes THEFA-mediated FA oxidation. Furthermore, esterification of THEFAs as lysophospholipids also promotes FA oxidation effects. Given that the apparent clinical benefits of TTA administration were offset by dose limitation and poor bioavailability, we discuss the possibility that a selection of our latest THEFAs and THEFA-containing lipids might be able to fulfill the therapeutic potential of the parent TTA while minimizing required doses for efficacy, side-effects and adverse reactions. PMID:26874397

  6. 40 CFR 721.4097 - 7-Oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4097 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester. (a) Chemical...-oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester (PMN P-98-101) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4097 - 7-Oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4097 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester. (a) Chemical...-oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester (PMN P-98-101) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4097 - 7-Oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4097 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester. (a) Chemical...-oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester (PMN P-98-101) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4097 - 7-Oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4097 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester. (a) Chemical...-oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester (PMN P-98-101) is subject to reporting under this...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4097 - 7-Oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4097 7-Oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester. (a) Chemical...-oxabicyclo heptane-3-carboxylic acid, methyl ester (PMN P-98-101) is subject to reporting under this...

  11. 40 CFR 721.304 - Acetic acid, [(5-chloro-8-quinolinyl)oxy-], 1-methyl hexyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester... Substances § 721.304 Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as acetic acid, -, 1-methylhexyl ester (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.304 - Acetic acid, [(5-chloro-8-quinolinyl)oxy-], 1-methyl hexyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester... Substances § 721.304 Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as acetic acid, -, 1-methylhexyl ester (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  18. 40 CFR 721.304 - Acetic acid, [(5-chloro-8-quinolinyl)oxy-], 1-methyl hexyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester... Substances § 721.304 Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as acetic acid, -, 1-methylhexyl ester (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.304 - Acetic acid, [(5-chloro-8-quinolinyl)oxy-], 1-methyl hexyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester... Substances § 721.304 Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as acetic acid, -, 1-methylhexyl ester (PMN...

  20. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  1. Luminal Nalpha-methyl histamine stimulates gastric acid secretion in duodenal ulcer patients via releasing gastrin.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Sito, E; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Bielanski, W; Hahn, E G

    2001-01-26

    Nalpha-methyl histamine is an unusual histamine metabolite which is produced in the stomach infected by Helicobacter pylori and which was shown in animals to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to release gastrin in vitro isolated G-cells, but no information is available regarding its influence on gastric secretion and gastrin release in duodenal ulcer patients before and after H. pylori eradication. In this study, we compared the effects of intragastric administration of single or graded doses of Nalpha-methyl histamine on gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels in 16 male duodenal ulcer patients (aging from 35 to 48 years and weighing 65-82 kg) before and after the eradication of H. pylori. Furthermore, the gastric luminal histamine and gastrin contents were determined before and after H. pylori eradication. In H. pylori-infected duodenal ulcer patients, the intragastric application of Nalpha-methyl histamine failed to affect gastric acid secretion or plasma gastrin levels. Following eradication of H. pylori, gastric luminal histamine and gastrin, and both basal gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels, were significantly reduced. Nalpha-methyl histamine given intragastrically in graded doses to such H. pylori-eradicated duodenal ulcer patients was found to increase dose-dependently gastric acid output reaching at a dose of 5 mg, about 80% of histamine maximum induced by i.v. infusion of 25 microg/kg h of histamine dihydrochloride. We conclude that Nalpha-methyl histamine is a potent luminally active stimulant of gastrin release and gastric acid secretion in H. pylori-eradicated patients when luminal histamine is low but is not effective in H. pylori infected patients when luminal histamine is enhanced, possibly due to desensitization of gastrin (G-cells) and acid-producing (parietal) cells by Nalpha-methyl histamine produced excessively in H. pylori-infected stomach.

  2. National survey of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and other Volatile Organic Compounds in drinking-water sources: Results of the random source-water survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grady, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was detected in source water used by 8.7 percent of randomly selected community water systems (CWSs) in the United States at concentrations that ranged from 0.2 to 20 micrograms per liter (?g/L). The Random Survey conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the Oregon Health & Science University, was designed to provide an assessment of the frequency of detection, concentration, and distribution of MTBE, three other ether gasoline oxygenates, and 62 other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground- and surface-water sources used for drinking-water supplies. The Random Survey was the first of two components of a national assessment of the quality of source water supplying CWSs sponsored by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation. A total of 954 CWSs were selected for VOC sampling from the population of nearly 47,000 active, self-supplied CWSs in all 50 States, Native American Lands, and Puerto Rico based on a statistical design that stratified on CWS size (population served), type of source water (ground and surface water), and geographic distribution (State).At a reporting level of 0.2 ?g/L, VOCs were detected in 27 percent of source-water samples collected from May 3, 1999 through October 23, 2000. Chloroform (in 13 percent of samples) was the most frequently detected of 42 VOCs present in the source-water samples, followed by MTBE. VOC concentrations were generally less than 10 ?g/L?95 percent of the 530 detections?and 63 percent were less than 1.0 ?g/L. Concentrations of 1,1-dichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, vinyl chloride, and total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), however, exceeded drinking-water regulations in eight samples.Detections of most VOCs were more frequent in surface-water sources than in ground-water sources, with gasoline compounds collectively and MTBE individually detected significantly more often in surface

  3. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10220 - Phosphoric acid, polymer with cycloaliphatic diglycidyl ether, alkylethers (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, polymer with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10220 Phosphoric acid, polymer with... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphoric acid, polymer...

  7. A Mild Synthesis of New Aryl Vinyl Ethers and Diethyl 1-[(Alkyl)(cyano)methyl]vinylphosphonates via the Substitution of a 2,3-Difunctional Allyl Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Ben Kraïem, Jihène; Arfaoui, Aïcha; Amri, Hassen

    2014-01-01

    A novel class of aryl vinyl ethers 3 and diethyl 3-cyano-3-alkylprop-1-en-2-ylphosphonates 4 has been prepared, respectively, from coupling reaction of diethyl 1-(bromomethyl)-2-cyanovinylphosphonate 2 with phenols and Gilman reagents. PMID:24688373

  8. Relationship between Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Exposure and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study among Petrol Station Attendants in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianping; Wei, Qinzhi; Peng, Xiaochun; Peng, Xiaowu; Yuan, Jianhui; Hu, Dalin

    2016-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)-A well known gasoline additive substituting for lead alkyls-causes lipid disorders and liver dysfunctions in animal models. However, whether MTBE exposure is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains uncertain. We evaluate the possible relationship between MTBE exposure and the prevalence of NAFLD among 71 petrol station attendants in southern China. The personal exposure concentrations of MTBE were analyzed by Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction GC/MS. NAFLD was diagnosed by using abdominal ultrasonography according to the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD suggested by the Chinese Hepatology Association. Demographic and clinical characteristics potentially associated with NAFLD were investigated. Mutivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to measure odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The result showed that the total prevalence of NAFLD was 15.49% (11/71) among the study subjects. The average exposure concentrations of MTBE were 292.98 ± 154.90 μg/m³ and 286.64 ± 122.28 μg/m³ in NAFLD and non-NAFLD groups, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between them (p > 0.05). After adjusting for age, gender, physical exercise, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), white blood cell (WBC), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the odds ratios were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.85-1.54; p > 0.05), 1.14 (95% CI: 0.81-1.32; p > 0.05), 1.52 (95% CI: 0.93-1.61; p > 0.05) in the groups (including men and women) with exposure concentrations of MTBE of 100-200 μg/m³, 200-300 μg/m³, and ≥300 μg/m³, respectively, as compared to the group (including men and women) ≤100 μg/m³. Our investigation indicates that exposure to MTBE does not seem to be a significant risk factor for the prevalence of NAFLD

  9. Multifunctional Poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride)-graft-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin Amphiphilic Copolymer as an Oral High-Performance Delivery Carrier of Tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Pan, Xiaolei; Wang, Shang; Zhai, Yinglei; Guan, Jibin; Fu, Qiang; Hao, Xiaoli; Qi, Wanpeng; Wang, Yingli; Lian, He; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Yongjun; Sun, Yinghua; He, Zhonggui; Sun, Jin

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve oral bioavailability of tacrolimus (FK506), a novel poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride)-graft-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin amphiphilic copolymer (CD-PVM/MA) is developed, combining the bioadhesiveness of PVM/MA, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and cytochrome P450-inhibitory effect of CD into one. The FK506-loaded nanoparticles (CD-PVM/MA-NPs) were obtained by solvent evaporation method. The physiochemical properties and intestinal absorption mechanism of FK506-loaded CD-PVM/MA-NPs were characterized, and the pharmacokinetic behavior was investigated in rats. FK506-loaded CD-PVM/MA-NPs exhibited nanometer-sized particles of 273.7 nm, with encapsulation efficiency as high as 73.3%. FK506-loaded CD-PVM/MA-NPs maintained structural stability in the simulated gastric fluid, and about 80% FK506 was released within 24 h in the simulated intestinal fluid. The permeability of FK506 was improved dramatically by CD-PVM/MA-NPs compared to its solution, probably due to the synergistic inhibition effect of P-gp and cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). The intestinal biodistribution of fluorescence-labeled CD-PVM/MA-NPs confirmed its good bioadhesion to the rat intestinal wall. Two endocytosis pathways, clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were involved in the cellular uptake of CD-PVM/MA-NPs. The important role of lymphatic transport in nanoparticles' access to the systemic circulation, about half of the contribution to oral bioavailability, was observed in mesenteric lymph duct ligated rats. The AUC0-24 of FK506 loaded in nanoparticles was enhanced up to 20-fold compared to FK506 solutions after oral administration. The present study suggested that the novel multifunctional CD-PVM/MA is a promising efficient oral delivery carrier for FK506, due to its ability in solubilization, inhibitory effects on both P-gp and CYP 3A, high bioadhesion, and sustained release capability. PMID:26024817

  10. Phase Behavior of Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) in Alcohol-Water System: Coexistence of LCST and UCST.

    PubMed

    Kuila, Atanu; Maity, Nabasmita; Chatterjee, Dhruba P; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-03-10

    A thermoresponsive polymer poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PMeO2MA) is grafted from poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) backbone by using a combined ATRC and ATRP technique with a high conversion (69%) of the monomer to produce the graft copolymer (PD). It is highly soluble polymer and its solution property is studied by varying polarity in pure solvents (water, methanol, isopropanol) and also in mixed solvents (water-methanol and water-isopropanol) by measuring the hydrodynamic size (Z-average) of the particles by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The variation of Z-average size with temperature of the PD solution (0.2%, w/v) indicates a lower critical solution temperature (LCST)-type phase transition (T(PL)) in aqueous medium, an upper critical solution temperature (UCST)-type phase transition (T(PU)) in isopropanol medium, and no such phase transition for methanol solution. In the mixed solvent (water + isopropanol) at 0-20% (v/v) isopropanol the TPL increases, whereas the T(PU) decreases at 92-100% with isopropanol content. For the mixture 20-90% isopropanol, PD particles having larger sizes (400-750 nm) exhibit neither any break in Z-average size-temperature plot nor any cloudiness, indicating their dispersed swelled state in the medium. In the methanol + water mixture with methanol content of 0-30%, T(PL) increases, and at 40-60% both UCST- and LCST-type phase separations occur simultaneously, but at 70-90% methanol the swelled state of the particles (size 250-375 nm) is noticed. For 50 vol % methanol by varying polymer concentration (0.07-0.2% w/v) we have drawn a quasibinary phase diagram that indicates an approximate inverted hourglass phase diagram where a swelled state exists between two single phase boundary produced from LCST- and UCST-type phase transitions. An attempt is made to understand the phase separation process by temperature-dependent (1)H NMR spectroscopy along with transmission electron microscopy. PMID:26859626

  11. Relationship between Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Exposure and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study among Petrol Station Attendants in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianping; Wei, Qinzhi; Peng, Xiaochun; Peng, Xiaowu; Yuan, Jianhui; Hu, Dalin

    2016-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)-A well known gasoline additive substituting for lead alkyls-causes lipid disorders and liver dysfunctions in animal models. However, whether MTBE exposure is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains uncertain. We evaluate the possible relationship between MTBE exposure and the prevalence of NAFLD among 71 petrol station attendants in southern China. The personal exposure concentrations of MTBE were analyzed by Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction GC/MS. NAFLD was diagnosed by using abdominal ultrasonography according to the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD suggested by the Chinese Hepatology Association. Demographic and clinical characteristics potentially associated with NAFLD were investigated. Mutivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to measure odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The result showed that the total prevalence of NAFLD was 15.49% (11/71) among the study subjects. The average exposure concentrations of MTBE were 292.98 ± 154.90 μg/m³ and 286.64 ± 122.28 μg/m³ in NAFLD and non-NAFLD groups, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between them (p > 0.05). After adjusting for age, gender, physical exercise, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), white blood cell (WBC), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the odds ratios were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.85-1.54; p > 0.05), 1.14 (95% CI: 0.81-1.32; p > 0.05), 1.52 (95% CI: 0.93-1.61; p > 0.05) in the groups (including men and women) with exposure concentrations of MTBE of 100-200 μg/m³, 200-300 μg/m³, and ≥300 μg/m³, respectively, as compared to the group (including men and women) ≤100 μg/m³. Our investigation indicates that exposure to MTBE does not seem to be a significant risk factor for the prevalence of NAFLD

  12. Quercetin 3-O-methyl ether protects FL83B cells from copper induced oxidative stress through the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsiao-Ling; Li, Chia-Jung; Huang, Lin-Huang; Chen, Chun-Yao; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Lin, Chun-Nan; Hsu, Hsue-Yin

    2012-10-01

    Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that exhibits several biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Quercetin 3-O-methyl ether (Q3) is a natural product reported to have pharmaceutical activities, including antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, little is known about the mechanism by which it protects cells from oxidative stress. This study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which Q3 protects against Cu{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity. Exposure to Cu{sup 2+} resulted in the death of mouse liver FL83B cells, characterized by apparent apoptotic features, including DNA fragmentation and increased nuclear condensation. Q3 markedly suppressed Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and PARP cleavage, in Cu{sup 2+}-exposed cells. The involvement of PI3K, Akt, Erk, FOXO3A, and Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was shown to be critical to the survival of Q3-treated FL83B cells. The liver of both larval and adult zebrafish showed severe damage after exposure to Cu{sup 2+} at a concentration of 5 μM. Hepatic damage induced by Cu{sup 2+} was reduced by cotreatment with Q3. Survival of Cu{sup 2+}-exposed larval zebrafish was significantly increased by cotreatment with 15 μM Q3. Our results indicated that Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis in FL83B cells occurred via the generation of ROS, upregulation and phosphorylation of Erk, overexpression of 14-3-3, inactivation of Akt, and the downregulation of FOXO3A and MnSOD. Hence, these results also demonstrated that Q3 plays a protective role against oxidative damage in zebrafish liver and remarked the potential of Q3 to be used as an antioxidant for hepatocytes. Highlights: ► Protective effects of Q3 on Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. ► Cu{sup 2+} induced apoptosis in FL83B cells via ROS and the activation of Erk. ► Q3 abolishes Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt and MAPK

  13. Relationship between Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Exposure and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study among Petrol Station Attendants in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianping; Wei, Qinzhi; Peng, Xiaochun; Peng, Xiaowu; Yuan, Jianhui; Hu, Dalin

    2016-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)—A well known gasoline additive substituting for lead alkyls—causes lipid disorders and liver dysfunctions in animal models. However, whether MTBE exposure is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains uncertain. We evaluate the possible relationship between MTBE exposure and the prevalence of NAFLD among 71 petrol station attendants in southern China. The personal exposure concentrations of MTBE were analyzed by Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction GC/MS. NAFLD was diagnosed by using abdominal ultrasonography according to the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD suggested by the Chinese Hepatology Association. Demographic and clinical characteristics potentially associated with NAFLD were investigated. Mutivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to measure odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The result showed that the total prevalence of NAFLD was 15.49% (11/71) among the study subjects. The average exposure concentrations of MTBE were 292.98 ± 154.90 μg/m3 and 286.64 ± 122.28 μg/m3 in NAFLD and non-NAFLD groups, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between them (p > 0.05). After adjusting for age, gender, physical exercise, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), white blood cell (WBC), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the odds ratios were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.85–1.54; p > 0.05), 1.14 (95% CI: 0.81–1.32; p > 0.05), 1.52 (95% CI: 0.93–1.61; p > 0.05) in the groups (including men and women) with exposure concentrations of MTBE of 100–200 μg/m3, 200–300 μg/m3, and ≥300 μg/m3, respectively, as compared to the group (including men and women) ≤100 μg/m3. Our investigation indicates that exposure to MTBE does not seem to be a significant risk factor for the prevalence of

  14. In vitro antiproliferative activity of 2'-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2'-thiazoline-4'-carboxylic acid and its methyl ester on L1210 and P388 murine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Elliot, G T; Kelly, K F; Bonna, R L; Wardlaw, T R; Burns, E R

    1988-01-01

    The activity of three iron chelators, methyl [2'-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2'-thiazoline-4'-carboxylate] (MTL); 2'-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2'-thiazoline-4'-carboxylic acid (TFAL); and 2-hydroxyphenyl-imido-ethyl-ether (Imidate), regarding antiproliferative, cytocidal, and cell-cycle effects are reported and compared with hydroxyurea (HU). In vitro, against L1210 and P388 murine neoplasms, MTL and TFAL displayed substantially greater antiproliferative activity than HU, although Imidate displayed no appreciable activity. MTL also induced a statistically more complete G1/S cell-boundary block than did HU at equimolar concentrations (100 microM). The IC50 values produced by MTL and TFAL were low enough (less than or equal to 20 microM) to warrant further testing of these chelators as potential antineoplastic agents.

  15. Biodegradation of gasoline ether oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Ether oxygenates such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) are added to gasoline to improve fuel combustion and decrease exhaust emissions. Ether oxygenates and their tertiary alcohol metabolites are now an important group of groundwater pollutants. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the microorganisms, enzymes and pathways involved in both the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of these compounds. This review also aims to illustrate how these microbiological and biochemical studies have guided, and have helped refine, molecular and stable isotope-based analytical approaches that are increasingly being used to detect and quantify biodegradation of these compounds in contaminated environments.

  16. Separation of calcium-48 isotope by crown ether chromatography using ethanol/hydrochloric acid mixed solvent.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Shin; Umehara, Saori; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Masao; Kaneshiki, Toshitaka; Ozawa, Masaki; Kishimoto, Tadafumi

    2015-10-01

    Benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin embedded in porous silica beads was synthesized and used as the packing material for chromatographic separation of (48)Ca isotope. The aim of the present work is to develop efficient isotope enrichment process for double β decay nuclide (48)Ca. To this end, ethanol/HCl mixed solvent was selected as the medium for the chromatographic separation. Adsorption of calcium on the resin was studied at different HCl concentrations and different ethanol mixing ratios in batch-wise experiments. A very interesting phenomenon was observed; Ca adsorption is controlled not by the overall HCl concentration of the mixed solvent, but by the initial concentration of added HCl solution. Calcium break-through chromatography experiments were conducted by using 75v/v% ethanol/25v/v% 8M HCl mixed solvent at different flow rates. The isotope separation coefficient between (48)Ca and (40)Ca was determined as 3.8×10(-3), which is larger than that of pure HCl solution system. Discussion is extended to the chromatographic HETP, height equivalent to a theoretical plate. PMID:26358563

  17. An enhanced procedure for measuring organic acids and methyl esters in PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Duan, F.; He, K.; Ma, Y.; Rahn, K. A.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed an enhanced analytical procedure to measure organic acids and methyl esters in fine aerosol with much greater specificity and sensitivity than previously available. This capability is important because of these species and their low concentrations, even in highly polluted atmospheres like Beijing, China. The procedure first separates the acids and esters from the other organic compounds with anion-exchange solid- phase extraction (SPE), then, quantifies them by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. This allows us to accurately quantify the C4-C11 dicarboxylic and the C8-C30 monocarboxylic acids. Then the acids are separated from the esters on an aminopropyl SPE cartridge, whose weak retention isolates and enriches the acids from esters prevents the fatty acids and dimethyl phthalate from being overestimated. The resulting correlations between the aliphatic acids and fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) suggest that FAMEs had sources similar to those of the carboxylic acids, or were formed by esterifying carboxylic acids, or that aliphatic acids were formed by hydrolyzing FAMEs. In all, 17 aromatic acids were identified and quantified using this procedure coupled with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, including the five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) acids 2-naphthoic, biphenyl-4-carboxylic, 9-oxo-9H-fluorene-1-carboxylic, biphenyl-4,4´-dicarboxylic, and phenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid, plus 1,8-naphthalic anhydride. Correlations between the PAH-acids and the dicarboxylic and aromatic acids indicated that the first three acids and 1,8-naphthalic anhydride were mainly secondary, the last two mainly primary.

  18. A 13C NMR study of the structure of four cinnamic acids and their methyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. M. S.; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Silva, V. L. M.

    2001-09-01

    The 13C NMR spectra, both in DMSO solution and in the solid state of four cinnamic acids ( p-methoxy, p-hydroxy, p-methyl, p-chloro) and their corresponding methyl esters have been recorded. The two main results in the solid state are: (i) the only significant difference between acids and esters chemical shifts concerns the CO group which, on average, appears at 173 ppm in the acids and 168 ppm in the esters; (ii) the signals of the ortho and meta carbons both in the acids and the esters are splitted. The two 'anomalies' disappear in DMSO solution. These observations can be rationalized using simple GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G ∗ calculations.

  19. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from edible fats and oils. 172.225 Section 172.225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to...

  20. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from edible fats and oils. 172.225 Section 172.225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to...

  1. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from edible fats and oils. 172.225 Section 172.225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to...

  2. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from edible fats and oils. 172.225 Section 172.225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  8. HPLC enantioseparation of beta2-homoamino acids using crown ether-based chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Berkecz, Róbert; Ilisz, István; Misicka, Aleksandra; Tymecka, Dagmara; Fülöp, Ferenc; Choi, Hee Jung; Hyun, Myung Ho; Péter, Antal

    2009-04-01

    RP high-performance liquid chromatographic methods were developed for the enantioseparation of eleven unusual beta(2)-homoamino acids. The underivatized analytes were separated on a chiral stationary phase containing (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid as chiral selector. The effects of organic (alcoholic) and acidic modifiers, the mobile phase composition and temperature on the separation were investigated. The structures of the substituents in the alpha-position of the analytes substantially influenced the retention and resolution. The elution sequence was determined in some cases: the S enantiomers eluted before the R enantiomers.

  9. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  10. Esterification and transesterification of greases to fatty acid methyl esters with highly active diphanylammonium salts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have conducted an investigation designed to identify alternate catalysts for the production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) to be used as biodiesel. Diphenylammonium sulfate (DPAS) and diphenylammonium chloride (DPA-HCl) salts were found to be highly active homogeneous catalysts for the simu...

  11. Esterification and Transesterification of greases to fatty acid methyl esters with highly active diphenylamine salts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diphenylamine sulfate (DPAS) and diphenylamine hydrochloride (DPACl) salts were found to be highly active catalysts for esterification and transesterification of inexpensive greases to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In the presence of catalytic amounts of DPAS or DPACl and excess methanol, the fr...

  12. Cold flow properties of fatty acid methyl esters: Additives versus diluents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is typically composed of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) converted from agricultural lipids. Common feedstocks include soybean oil, canola oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, and palm oil. Recent debate on the conversion of edible oils into non-food products has created opportunities to deve...

  13. 75 FR 78243 - Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ...This notice announces the availability of EPA's final registration review decisions for the pesticides propionic acid and salts, case no. 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213, methidathion, case no. 0034, and methyl parathion, case no. 0153. Registration review is EPA's periodic review of pesticide registrations to ensure that each pesticide continues to satisfy the statutory standard for......

  14. Catalytic synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters from extremely low quality greases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel (BD) is a renewable fuel for compression ignition engines that is composed of the simple alkyl esters, usually methyl-, of fatty acids (FAME). It is typically produced via base-catalyzed transesterification between refined vegetable oil or animal fat (e.g., soybean oil, tallow) and an alc...

  15. Chemically Modified Fatty Acid Methyl Esters: Potential as Lubricant and Surfactant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewable raw materials are going to play a noteworthy role in the development of sustainable green chemistry because of their eco-friendly and non-toxic nature. A novel process was developed for the production of biodegradable lubricant base stocks from epoxidized fatty acid methyl esters and comm...

  16. Beyond fatty acid methyl esters: Expanding the renewable carbon profile with alkenones from Isochrysis sp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to characteristic fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), biodiesel produced from Isochrysis sp. contains a significant amount (14% dry weight) of predominantly C37 and C38 longchain alkenones. These compounds are members of a class of lipids known collectively as polyunsaturated long-chain al...

  17. 21 CFR 573.640 - Methyl esters of higher fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl esters of higher fatty acids. 573.640 Section 573.640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER...

  18. 21 CFR 573.640 - Methyl esters of higher fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl esters of higher fatty acids. 573.640 Section 573.640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER...

  19. 21 CFR 573.640 - Methyl esters of higher fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methyl esters of higher fatty acids. 573.640 Section 573.640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER...

  20. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  1. An enhanced procedure for measuring organic acids and methyl esters in PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Duan, F. K.; He, K. B.; Ma, Y. L.; Rahn, K. A.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-11-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) pretreatment procedure allowing organic acids to be separated from methyl esters in fine aerosol has been developed. The procedure first separates the organic acids from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and other nonacid organic compounds by aminopropyl-based SPE cartridge and then quantifies them by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The procedure prevents the fatty acids and dimethyl phthalate from being overestimated, and so allows us to accurately quantify the C4-C11 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) and the C8-C30 monocarboxylic acids (MCAs). Results for the extraction of DCAs, MCAs, and AMAs in eluate and FAMEs in effluate by SAX and NH2 SPE cartridges exhibited that the NH2 SPE cartridge gave higher extraction efficiency than the SAX cartridge. The recoveries of analytes ranged from 67.5 to 111.3 %, and the RSD ranged from 0.7 to 10.9 %. The resulting correlations between the aliphatic acids and FAMEs suggest that the FAMEs had sources similar to those of the carboxylic acids, or were formed by esterifying carboxylic acids, or that aliphatic acids were formed by hydrolyzing FAMEs. Through extraction and cleanup using this procedure, 17 aromatic acids in eluate were identified and quantified by gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, including five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH): acids 2-naphthoic, biphenyl-4-carboxylic, 9-oxo-9H-fluorene-1-carboxylic, biphenyl-4,4´-dicarboxylic, and phenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid, plus 1,8-naphthalic anhydride. Correlations between the PAH acids and the dicarboxylic and aromatic acids suggested that the first three acids and 1,8-naphthalic anhydride were secondary atmospheric photochemistry products and the last two mainly primary.

  2. DNA methylation in Folbp1 knockout mice supplemented with folic acid during gestation.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Richard H; Spiegelstein, Ofer; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Triplett, Aleata; Pogribny, Igor P; Melnyk, Stepan; James, Jill S

    2002-08-01

    Periconceptional folic acid supplementation has been shown to prevent up to 70% of neural tube and other birth defects in humans; however, the mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we tested whether defective intracellular folate transport, as achieved by inactivation of the murine folate-binding protein 1 (Folbp1), affects global DNA methylation in the liver and brain from gestational day (GD) 15 embryos. Complete Folbp1 inactivation is embryolethal but can be reversed by maternal folinic acid (FA) supplementation, and thus we also tested the effect of FA supplementation on DNA methylation in Folbp1 fetuses. Overall, the extent of global DNA methylation seems to be similar across all genotypes in unsupplemented control Folbp1 mice; however, explicit conclusions regarding Folbp1(-/-) fetuses were not possible because only a single living unsupplemented fetus was viable at GD 15. FA supplementation induced global DNA hypomethylation across all genotypes. FA-induced hypomethylation is most likely due to its ability to inhibit the enzyme glycine hydroxymethyltransferase, thereby inhibiting the homocysteine remethylation cycle necessary to regenerate S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor for DNA methyltransferases. Our hypothesis was that due to defective folate transport in Folbp1(-/-) embryos and fetuses, DNA would be hypomethylated, thereby altering the temporal expression of critical genes necessary for normal embryonic development. However, these results suggest that an extended examination of changes in DNA methylation prior to GD 15 is required to unequivocally prove or disprove the hypothesis. PMID:12163711

  3. A novel methyltransferase from the intracellular pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae methylates salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Jülke, Sabine; Geiß, Kathleen; Richter, Franziska; Mithöfer, Axel; Šola, Ivana; Rusak, Gordana; Keenan, Sandi; Bulman, Simon

    2015-05-01

    The obligate biotrophic pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae causes clubroot disease in Arabidopsis thaliana, which is characterized by large root galls. Salicylic acid (SA) production is a defence response in plants, and its methyl ester is involved in systemic signalling. Plasmodiophora brassicae seems to suppress plant defence reactions, but information on how this is achieved is scarce. Here, we profile the changes in SA metabolism during Arabidopsis clubroot disease. The accumulation of SA and the emission of methylated SA (methyl salicylate, MeSA) were observed in P. brassicae-infected Arabidopsis 28 days after inoculation. There is evidence that MeSA is transported from infected roots to the upper plant. Analysis of the mutant Atbsmt1, deficient in the methylation of SA, indicated that the Arabidopsis SA methyltransferase was not responsible for alterations in clubroot symptoms. We found that P. brassicae possesses a methyltransferase (PbBSMT) with homology to plant methyltransferases. The PbBSMT gene is maximally transcribed when SA production is highest. By heterologous expression and enzymatic analyses, we showed that PbBSMT can methylate SA, benzoic and anthranilic acids.

  4. Experimental and Computational Study on the Molecular Energetics of 2-Pyrrolecarboxylic Acid and 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolecarboxylic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Ana Filipa L. O. M.; Silva, Manuel A. V. Ribeiro Da

    2009-08-01

    This paper reports a combined thermochemical experimental and computational study of 2-pyrrolecarboxylic acid and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolecarboxylic acid. Static bomb combustion calorimetry and Knudsen mass-loss effusion technique were used to determine the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of combustion, ΔcHm°, and sublimation, ΔcrgHm°, respectively, from which the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation, in the gaseous phase, at T = 298.15 K, were derived. The values obtained were -(286.3 ± 1.7) and -(291.6 ± 1.7) kJ·mol for 2-pyrrolecarboxylic acid and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolecarboxylic acid, respectively. For comparison purposes, the gas-phase enthalpies of formation of these two compounds were estimated by G3(MP2)//B3LYP and MP2 approaches, using a set of gas-phase working reactions; the results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. G3(MP2)//B3LYP computations were also extended to the calculation of N-H bond dissociation enthalpies, gas-phase acidities and basicities, proton and electron affinities and adiabatic ionization enthalpies. Moreover, the results are also discussed in terms of the energetic effects of the addition of a carboxylic and of a methyl groups to the pyrrole ring and compared with structurally similar compounds.

  5. Tailoring acidity of HZSM-5 nanoparticles for methyl bromide dehydrobromination by Al and Mg incorporation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of HZSM-5 nanoparticles with different acidity were tailored by impregnating MgO or varying Si/Al ratios. Both the textural and acidic properties of the as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR or Py-FTIR). It was found that the intensity of Lewis acid sites with weak strength was enhanced by impregnating MgO or reducing Al concentration, and such an enhancement could be explained by the formation of Mg(OH)+ or charge unbalance of the MgO framework on the surface of HZSM-5 support. The effect of HZSM-5 nanoparticles' acidity on methyl bromide dehydrobromination as catalyst was evaluated. As the results, MgHZ-360 catalyst with the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites showed excellent stability, which maintained methyl bromide conversion of up 97% in a period of 400 h on stream. Coke characterization by BET measurements and TGA/DTA and GC/MS analysis revealed that polymethylated naphthalenes species were formed outside the channels of the catalyst with higher acid intensity and higher Brønsted acid concentration during the initial period of reaction, while graphitic carbon formed in the channels of catalyst with lower acid intensity and higher Lewis acid concentration during the stable stage. PMID:25328502

  6. High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Final technical report, September 25, 1990--December 24, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of the research was to develop the methodology for the catalytic synthesis of ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. The last stage of the synthesis involves direct coupling of synthesis gas-derived methanol and isobutanol that has been previously demonstrated by us to occur over superacid catalysts to yield MIBE and smaller amounts of MTBE at moderate pressures and a mixture of methanol and isobutene at low pressures. A wide range of organic resin catalysts and inorganic oxide and zeolite catalysts have been investigated for activity and selectivity in directly coupling alcohols, principally methanol and isobutanol, to form ethers and in the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in the presence of methanol. All of these catalysts are strong acids, and it was found that the organic and inorganic catalysts operate in different, but overlapping, temperature ranges, i.e. mainly 60--120{degrees}C for the organic resins and 90--175{degrees}C for the inorganic catalysts. For both types of catalysts, the presence of strong acid centers is required for catalytic activity, as was demonstrated by lack of activity of fully K{sup +} ion exchanged Nafion resin and zirconia prior to being sulfated by treatment with sulfuric acid.

  7. Catalytic esterification of methacrylic acid with methyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Lunin, A.F.; Zheleznaya, L.L.; Karakhanov, R.A.; Meshcheryakov, S.V.; Magadov, R.S.; Mkrtychan, V.R.; Fomin, V.A.

    1987-08-10

    The authors contend that virtually all methods for the production of methacrylic acid esters suffer from the drawbacks of low conversion, dependence on costly catalysts, low feed rates, and the need to use inhibitors in the process. To eliminate these drawbacks, they propose and test a new catalyst, sulfopolyphenyl ketone, which contains an extensive conjugated bond system together with ionic hydroxide groups. The catalytic esterification rate and yield is given for this catalyst and chromatography is performed for the resulting esters.

  8. Thermochemistry of C-O, (CO)-O, and (CO)-C bond breaking in fatty acid methyl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Osmont, Antoine; Yahyaoui, Mohammed; Catoire, Laurent; Goekalp, Iskender; Swihart, Mark T.

    2008-10-15

    Density functional theory quantum chemical calculations corrected with empirical atomic increments have been used to examine C-O, (CO)-O, and (CO)-C bond scission enthalpies in gas-phase fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) present in biodiesel derived from rapeseed oil methyl ester and soybean oil methyl ester. Mechanistic information, currently not available elsewhere for these large species, is obtained based on thermochemical considerations and compared to thermochemical considerations reported for methyl butanoate, a small methyl ester sometimes used as a model for FAMEs. These results are compared to previously reported C-C and C-H bond scissions in these FAMEs, derived using this same protocol. (author)

  9. Adsorption of methyl violet in aqueous solutions by poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şolpan, D.; Duran, S.; Saraydin, D.; Güven, O.

    2003-02-01

    In this study, Acrylamide(AAm)/Acrylic Acid(AAc) monomer mixtures which contain different quantities of acrylic acid have been irradiated to form hydrogels with γ-radiation. Acrylamide/Acrylic Acid (AAm/AAc) monomer mixtures which contain 15%, 20%, 30% AAm and irradiated with 8.0 kGy were used for swelling and diffusion studies in water and solutions of methyl violet. Diffusions of water and methyl violet within the hydrogels were found to be non-Fickian in character. In experiments on the adsorption of methyl violet, Type-S adsorption was found. Poly(AAm-co-AAc) hydrogel adsorbed methyl violet, while poly(AAm) hydrogel did not adsorb any dye. (Δ H) Heat of adsorption, (Δ G) Free energy of adsorption, (Δ S) Entropy of adsorption were calculated. These results show that poly(AAm-co-AAc) hydrogels can be used as a sorbent for water pollutants such as dyes and treatment of these organic contaminants from wastewater.

  10. Development of Stereocontrolled Palladium(II)-Catalyzed Domino Heck/Suzuki β,α-Diarylation Reactions with Chelating Vinyl Ethers and Arylboronic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Trejos, Alejandro; Odell, Luke R; Larhed, Mats

    2012-01-01

    A stereoselective and 1,4-benzoquinone-mediated palladium(II)-catalyzed Heck/Suzuki domino reaction involving metal coordinating cyclic methylamino vinyl ethers and a number of electronically diverse arylboronic acids has been developed and studied. Diastereomeric ratios up to 39:1 and 78 % isolated yields were obtained. The stereoselectivity of the reaction was found to be highly dependent on the nature of the arylboronic acid and the amount of water present in the reaction mixture. Thus, a domino β,α-diarylation–reduction of chelating vinyl ethers can now be accomplished and stereochemically controlled, given that optimized conditions and an appropriate chiral auxiliary are used. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first example of a stereoselective, oxidative Heck/Suzuki domino reaction in the literature. PMID:24551492

  11. Gas chromatography-vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy for analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Smuts, Jonathan; Bai, Ling; Walsh, Phillip; Armstrong, Daniel W; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    A new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography was recently developed and applied to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. VUV detection features full spectral acquisition in a wavelength range of 115-240nm, where virtually all chemical species absorb. VUV absorption spectra of 37 FAMEs, including saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated types were recorded. Unsaturated FAMEs show significantly different gas phase absorption profiles than saturated ones, and these classes can be easily distinguished with the VUV detector. Another advantage includes differentiating cis/trans-isomeric FAMEs (e.g. oleic acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester isomers) and the ability to use VUV data analysis software for deconvolution of co-eluting signals. As a universal detector, VUV also provides high specificity, sensitivity, and a fast data acquisition rate, making it a powerful tool for fatty acid screening when combined with gas chromatography. The fatty acid profile of several food oil samples (olive, canola, vegetable, corn, sunflower and peanut oils) were analyzed in this study to demonstrate applicability to real world samples.

  12. Monounsaturated fatty acid ether oligomers formed during heating of virgin olive oil show agglutination activity against human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Patrikios, Ioannis S; Mavromoustakos, Thomas M

    2014-01-29

    The present work focuses on the characterization of molecules formed when virgin olive oil is heated at 130 °C for 24 h open in air, which are found to be strong agglutinins. The hemagglutinating activity of the newly formed molecule isolated from the heated virgin olive oil sample was estimated against human red blood cells (RBCs). Dimers and polymers (high molecular weight molecules) were identified through thin layer chromatography (TLC) of the oil mixture. (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were the methods used for structural characterization. Among others, oligomerization of at least two monounsaturated fatty acids (FA) by an ether linkage between the hydrocarbon chains is involved. Light microscopy was used to characterize and visualize the agglutination process. Agglutination without fusion or lysis was observed. It was concluded that the heating of virgin olive oil open in air, among other effects, produces oligomerization as well as polymerization of unsaturated FA, possibly of monohydroxy, monounsaturated FA that is associated with strong hemagglutinating activity against human RBCs. The nutritional value and the effects on human health of such oligomers are not discussed in the literature and remain to be investigated. PMID:24410166

  13. Determination of the specific radioactivity of fatty acids separated as their methyl esters by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bishop, C; Glascock, R F; Newell, E M; Welch, V A

    1971-11-01

    Free or combined (3)H-labeled fatty acids are converted to their methyl-(14)C esters or, if labeled with (14)C, to their methyl-(3)H esters. For a given specific radioactivity of the methyl group, the nuclide ratio in the esters separated by GLC is a direct measure of the specific radioactivity of the fatty acids, and quantitative collection is unnecessary. Methods of methylation with minimum quantities of labeled methanol, and of deriving nuclide ratios from channel ratios in a scintillation spectrometer, are given. PMID:5124543

  14. Lewis acid catalyzed [2+2] cycloaddition of ynamides and propargyl silyl ethers: synthesis of alkylidenecyclobutenones and their reactivity in ring-opening and ring expansion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Cao, Jian; Xu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhan-Jiang; Cui, Yu-Ming; Xu, Li-Wen

    2016-07-21

    A family of four-membered enones, polysubstituted alkylidenecyclobutenones, were easily prepared by a Lewis acid catalyzed [2+2] cycloaddition of ynamides and propargyl silyl ethers. This challenging regioselective [2+2] cycloaddition enables the efficient construction and conversion of four-membered enones, which provides high-value and structurally diverse products through the unexpected ring-opening and ring expansion of alkylidenecyclobutenone with Grignard reagents, organolithium, primary amines, and water. PMID:27387596

  15. Radiation synthesis of hydrogels based on copolymers of vinyl ethers of monoethanolamine and ethyleneglycol and their interaction with poly(acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, G. A.; Nurkeeva, Z. S.; Khutoryanskiy, V. V.; Yermukhambetova, B. B.; Koblanov, S. M.; Arkhipova, I. A.

    2003-08-01

    Novel hydrogels of cationic nature were synthesized by gamma-radiation copolymerization of vinyl ethers of monoethanolamine and ethyleneglycol in the presence of cross-linking agent. The effect of absorbed dose on the gel fraction and equilibrium swelling degree of hydrogels in water is shown. It was demonstrated that the hydrogels are able to bind poly(acrylic acid) to form polyelectrolyte complexes with swelling properties typical for polyampholytes.

  16. Preparation of sphingolipid fatty acid methyl esters for determination by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    MacGee, J; Williams, M G

    1981-01-30

    Sphingolipid fatty acids are first converted to a mixture of free acids and their n-butyl esters by heating the specimen at 85 degree C in aqueous butanolic hydrogen chloride; the butyl esters are then saponified with methanolic potassium hydroxide. After acidification and extraction into hexane, the fatty acids are extracted into a very small volume of aqueous trimethyl(m-trifluorotolyl)ammonium hydroxide (TMTFTH), injection of an aliquot of the TMTFTH extract into the gas chromatograph yields the fatty acid methyl esters by pyrolytic methylation of the quaternary ammonium salts of the fatty acids. The preparation of a specimen ready for the gas--liquid chromatographic (GLC) analysis with quantitative recovery of the sphingolipid fatty acids can be accomplished in less than 2 h. By comparison, none of a number of well-accepted techniques for the release of sphingomyelin fatty acids by hydrolysis or methanolysis released the fatty acids quantitatively in less than 3 h, and all required additional manipulations before GLC analysis. PMID:7217267

  17. Boswellic acid induces epigenetic alterations by modulating DNA methylation in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Takahashi, Masanobu; Byun, Hyang-Min; Link, Alexander; Sharma, Nupur; Balaguer, Francesc; Leung, Hon-Chiu; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that chemopreventive effects of some dietary polyphenols may in part be mediated by their ability to influence epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells. Boswellic acids, derived from the plant Boswellia serrata, have long been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases due to their potent anti-inflammatory activities. Recent preclinical studies have also suggested that this compound has anti-cancer potential against various malignancies. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer effects remain elusive. Herein, we report that boswellic acids modulate DNA methylation status of several tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We treated RKO, SW48 and SW480 CRC cell lines with the active principle present in boswellic acids, acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA). Using genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression microarray analyses, we discovered that AKBA induced a modest genome-wide demethylation that permitted simultaneous re-activation of the corresponding tumor suppressor genes. The quantitative methylation-specific PCR and RT-PCR validated the gene demethylation and re-expression in several putative tumor suppressor genes including SAMD14 and SMPD3. Furthermore, AKBA inhibited DNMT activity in CRC cells. Taken together, these results lend further support to the growing notion that anti-cancer effect of boswellic acids may in part be due to its ability to demethylate and reactivate methylation-silenced tumor suppressor genes. These results suggest that not only boswellic acid might be a promising epigenetic modulator in the chemoprevention and treatment of CRC, but also provide a rationale for future investigations on the usefulness of such botanicals for epigenetic therapy in other human malignancies. PMID:22415137

  18. Effect of a synthetic folic acid analogue, 9-methyl-pteroylglutamic acid, on fetal chondrogenesis: ultrastructural observations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R R; Slobodian, S A; Chepenik, K P; Cotler, J M

    1983-01-01

    Maternally administered folic acid antagonists (x-methyl-PGA and 9-methyl-PGA) are known to produce various skeletal malformations in the neonate. These defects are thought to be due in part to abnormal metabolism and/or deposition of various extracellular matrix components, i.e., collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Experimental reduction of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis in vitro has been shown previously to alter the spatial orientation and normal pattern of collagen fibrillogenesis. Furthermore, dietary withdrawal of folic acid concomitant with maternal administration of 9-methyl-PGA has been shown to result in abnormal collagen, uronic acid, and hexosamine metabolism by fetal limbs. In the present study pregnant rats were exposed to a transitory folic acid deficiency from day 11 to 14 of gestation and fetal tibias (mid-diaphyseal region) were examined with the electron microscope on day 18 of gestation. Although we were unable to ascertain any aberrant patterns of fibrillogenesis and orientation with respect to collagen, this particular teratogenic regimen resulted in an altered pattern of chondrocyte development when observed at the ultrastructural level.

  19. 3-methyl-2-oxazolidone as a solvent for acid-base titrations.

    PubMed

    Taphorn, J E; Davies, G M; Caruso, J A

    1975-07-01

    3-Methyl-2-oxazolidone has been evaluated as a solvent for the titration of various weak carboxylic acids and phenols. Its high dielectric constant and wide liquid range contribute to its outstanding solvent properties. Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide was the titrant. End-points were determined potentiometrically with a glass-calomel electrode system. FORTRAN computer programs were used to evaluate the results, and relative acid strengths were determined and related to the aqueous acidity. The accuracies obtained are comparable to those for other solvent media. An 800-mV potential span is available in this solvent, which may allow differentiating titrations to be performed. No titrations of acid mixtures were attempted, but it was found possible to distinguish both neutralization steps for salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid.

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid, aging and coronary artery disease are associated with ABCA1 DNA methylation in men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that DNA methylation contributes to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk variability. DNA hypermethylation at the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene, an important modulator of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reverse cholesterol transport, has been previously associated with plasma lipid levels, aging and CAD, but the association with CAD has yet to be replicated. Results ABCA1 DNA methylation levels were measured in leucocytes of 88 men using bis-pyrosequencing. We first showed that DNA methylation at the ABCA1 gene promoter locus is associated with aging and CAD occurrence in men (P < 0.05). The latter association is stronger among older men with CAD (≥61 years old; n = 19), who showed at least 4.7% higher ABCA1 DNA methylation levels as compared to younger men with CAD (<61 years old; n = 19) or men without CAD (n = 50; P < 0.001). Higher ABCA1 DNA methylation levels in older men were also associated with higher total cholesterol (r = 0.34, P = 0.03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.32, P = 0.04) and triglyceride levels (r = 0.26, P = 0.09). Furthermore, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid therapy is associated with 3.6% lower ABCA1 DNA methylation levels (P = 0.006), independent of aging and CAD status of patients. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that the ABCA1 epigenetic profile is associated with CAD and aging, and highlights that epigenetic modifications might be a significant molecular mechanism involved in the pathophysiological processes associated with CAD. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment for CAD prevention might involve epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:25093045