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Sample records for acid mma dimethylarsinic

  1. Anaerobic biotransformation of organoarsenical pesticides monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Yenal, U.; Feld, J.A.; Kopplin, M.; Gandolfi, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) are extensively utilized as pesticides, introducing large quantities of arsenic into the environment. Once released into the environment, these organoarsenicals are subject to microbial reactions. Aerobic biodegradation of MMAV and DMAV has been evaluated, but little is known about their fate in anaerobic environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biotransformation of MMAV and DMAV in anaerobic sludge. Biologically mediated conversion occurred under methanogenic or sulfate-reducing conditions but not in the presence of nitrate. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) was consistently observed as an important metabolite of MMAV degradation, and it was recovered in molar yields ranging from 5 to 47%. The main biotransformation product identified from DMAV metabolism was MMAV, which was recovered in molar yields ranging from 8 to 65%. The metabolites indicate that reduction and demethylation are important steps in the anaerobic bioconversion of MMAV and DMAV, respectively. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  2. Determination of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos Reyes, M. N.; Cervera, M. L.; Campos, R. C.; de la Guardia, M.

    2007-09-01

    A fast, sensitive and simple non-chromatographic analytical method was developed for the speciation analysis of toxic arsenic species in cereal samples, namely rice and wheat semolina. An ultrasound-assisted extraction of the toxic arsenic species was performed with 1 mol L - 1 H 3PO 4 and 0.1% (m/v) Triton XT-114. After extraction, As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) concentrations were determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using a series of proportional equations corresponding to four different experimental reduction conditions. The detection limits of the method were 1.3, 0.9, 1.5 and 0.6 ng g - 1 for As(III), As(V), DMA and MMA, respectively, expressed in terms of sample dry weight. Recoveries were always greater than 90%, and no species interconversion occurred. The speciation analysis of a rice flour reference material certified for total arsenic led to coherent results, which were also in agreement with other speciation studies made on the same certified reference material.

  3. Effects of dimethylarsinic and dimethylarsinous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of young and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Katharina Repges, Hendrik; Hippler, Joerg; Hartmann, Louise M.; Hirner, Alfred V.; Straub, Heidrun; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2007-11-15

    In this study, the effects of pentavalent dimethylarsinic acid ((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}AsO(OH); DMA{sup V}) and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid ((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}As(OH); DMA{sup III}) on synaptic transmission generated by the excitatory Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse were tested in hippocampal slices of young (14-21 day-old) and adult (2-4 month-old) rats. Both compounds were applied in concentrations of 1 to 100 {mu}mol/l. DMA{sup V} had no effect on the amplitudes of evoked fEPSPs or the induction of LTP recorded from the CA1 dendritic region either in adult or in young rats. However, application of DMA{sup III} significantly reduced the amplitudes of evoked fEPSPs in a concentration-dependent manner with a total depression following application of 100 {mu}mol/l DMA{sup III} in adult and 10 {mu}mol/l DMA{sup III} in young rats. Moreover, DMA{sup III} significantly affected the LTP-induction. Application of 10 {mu}mol/l DMA{sup III} resulted in a complete failure of the postsynaptic potentiation of the fEPSP amplitudes in slices taken both from adult and young rats. The depressant effect was not reversible after a 30-min washout of the DMA{sup III}. In slices of young rats, the depressant effects of DMA{sup III} were more pronounced than in those taken from adult ones. Compared to the (absent) effect of DMA{sup V} on synaptic transmission, the trivalent compound possesses a considerably higher neurotoxic potential.

  4. A CONCISE REVIEW OF THE TOXICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) has been used as an herbicide (cacodylic acid) and is the major metabolite formed after exposure to tri- (arsenite) or pentavalent (arsenate) inorganic arsenic (iAs) via ingestion or inhalation in both humans and rodents. Once viewed simply as a detoxi...

  5. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR intravenous and ingested DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMAV) IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the organoarsenical dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) was developed in mice. The model was calibrated using tissue time course data from multiple tissues in mice administered DMA(V) intravenously. The final model structure was ...

  6. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  7. TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE
    AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    Michael F. Hughes, Ph.D., Brenda C. Edwards, Carol T. Mitchell and Elaina M. Kenyon, Ph.D. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Nation...

  8. COMPARISON OF GENE EXPRESSION IN KIDNEY AND URINARY BLADDER FROM RATS TREATED WITH DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is widespread in the environment and a human carcinogen. A major metabolite of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in most species, including humans, is dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which is also used as a pesticide. Unlike iAs, DMA induces urinary bladder tumors in rats. DMA is belie...

  9. Tissue distribution and urinary excretion of dimethylated arsenic and its metabolites in dimethylarsinic acid- or arsenate-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, Blakely M.; Moore, Tanya; Conklin, Sean D.; Creed, John T.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Thomas, David J. . E-mail: thomas.david@epa.gov

    2007-07-15

    Adult female Fisher 344 rats received drinking water containing 0, 4, 40, 100, or 200 parts per million of dimethylarsinic acid or 100 parts per million of arsenate for 14 days. Urine was collected during the last 24 h of exposure. Tissues were then taken for analysis of dimethylated and trimethylated arsenicals; urines were analyzed for these arsenicals and their thiolated derivatives. In dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats, highest concentrations of dimethylated arsenic were found in blood. In lung, liver, and kidney, concentrations of dimethylated arsenic exceeded those of trimethylated species; in urinary bladder and urine, trimethylated arsenic predominated. Dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide were present in urine of dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats. Concentrations of dimethylated arsenicals were similar in most tissues of dimethylarsinic acid- and arsenate-treated rats, including urinary bladder which is the target for dimethylarsinic acid-induced carcinogenesis in the rat. Mean concentration of dimethylated arsenic was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in urine of dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than in arsenate-treated rats, suggesting a difference between treatment groups in the flux of dimethylated arsenic through urinary bladder. Concentrations of trimethylated arsenic concentrations were consistently higher in dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than in arsenate-treated rats; these differences were significant (P < 0.05) in liver, urinary bladder, and urine. Concentrations of dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide were higher in urine from dimethylarsinic acid-treated rats than from arsenate-treated rats. Dimethylarsinic acid is extensively metabolized in the rat, yielding significant concentrations of trimethylated species and of thiolated derivatives. One or more of these metabolites could be the species causing alterations of cellular function that lead to tumors in the urinary bladder.

  10. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Koike, Shota; Pan, Li Qiang; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ►ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ►Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ►ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in

  11. Identifiability of PBPK models with applications to dimethylarsinic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ramon I; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Wambaugh, John F; Kenyon, Elaina M; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2015-12-01

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss different types of identifiability that occur in PBPK models and give reasons why they occur. We particularly focus on how the mathematical structure of a PBPK model and lack of appropriate data can lead to statistical models in which it is impossible to estimate at least some parameters precisely. Methods are reviewed which can determine whether a purely linear PBPK model is globally identifiable. We propose a theorem which determines when identifiability at a set of finite and specific values of the mathematical PBPK model (global discete identifiability) implies identifiability of the statistical model. However, we are unable to establish conditions that imply global discrete identifiability, and conclude that the only safe approach to analysis of PBPK models involves Bayesian analysis with truncated priors. Finally, computational issues regarding posterior simulations of PBPK models are discussed. The methodology is very general and can be applied to numerous PBPK models which can be expressed as linear time-invariant systems. A real data set of a PBPK model for exposure to dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA(V)) is presented to illustrate the proposed methodology. PMID:26194069

  12. Silicic acid competes for dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) immobilization by the iron hydroxide plaque mineral goethite.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Michael; Daus, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    A surface complexation modeling approach was used to extend the knowledge about processes that affect the availability of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in the soil rhizosphere in presence of a strong sorbent, e.g., Fe plaques on rice roots. Published spectroscopic and molecular modeling information suggest for the organoarsenical agent to form bidentate-binuclear inner-sphere surface complexes with Fe hydroxides similar to the inorganic As oxyanions. However, since also the ubiquitous silicic acid oxyanion form the same bidentate binuclear surface complexes, our hypothesis was that it may have an effect on the adsorption of DMA by Fe hydroxides in soil. Our experimental batch equilibrium data show that DMA is strongly adsorbed in the acidic pH range, with a steep adsorption edge in the circumneutral pH region between the DMA acidity constant (pKa=6.3) and the point of zero charge value of the goethite adsorbent (pHpzc=8.6). A 1-pK CD-MUSIC surface complexation model was chosen to fit the experimental adsorption vs. pH data. The same was done for silicic acid batch equilibrium data with our goethite adsorbent. Both model parameters for individual DMA and silicic acid adsorption were then merged into one CD-MUSIC model to predict the binary DMA+Si adsorption behavior. Silicic acid (500 μM) was thus predicted by the model to strongly compete for DMA with up to 60% mobilization of the latter at a pH6. This model result could be verified subsequently by experimental batch equilibrium data with zero adjustable parameters. The thus quantified antagonistic relation between DMA and silicic acid is discussed as one of factors to explain the increase of the DMA proportion in rice grains as observed upon silica fertilization of rice fields. PMID:25478657

  13. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR THE PESTICIDE MONOMETHYLARSONIC ACID (MMA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The monosodium salt of monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] is a widely used organoarsenical herbicide. In lifetime feeding studies with MMA(V), the large intestine (focal muscosal ulceration) was the primary target organ in both male and female mice and rats and no treatment-related...

  14. Tissue Distribution and Urinary Excretion of Dimethylated Arsenic and Its Metabolites in Dimethylarsinic acid- or Arsenate-treated Rats - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult female Fisher 344 rats received drinking water containing 0, 4, 40, 100, or 200 parts per million of dimethylarsinic acid or 100 parts per million of arsenate for 14 days. Urine was collected during the last 24 h of exposure. Tissues were then taken for analysis of dimethy...

  15. A NOVEL PNYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A NOVEL PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMA): THE LUNG AS A STORAGE COMPARTMENT. Evans, M.V., Hughes, M.F., and Kenyon, E.M. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    DMA is the major methylated metabolite of inorganic arsenic, a kno...

  16. A novel approach for the analysis of dimethylarsinic acid in various liquid samples by WDXRF combined to pre-concentration with solid phase extraction disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, J.; Kim, J.; Kong, M.; Kim, K.; Yoon, H.

    2012-12-01

    Once dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was considered to a product of detoxification (biomethylation) of inorganic arsenicals in organisms, it is now thought to have severe health risk. Since DMA had been widely employed in industrial and agricultural fields (e.g., pesticides and herbicides), it was one of the most often determined species in the published literatures for last decades. In the present study, DMA was pre-concentrated from various liquid samples with strong cation exchange (SCX) disk functionalized with sulfonic groups, and then analyzed by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). While arsenate (iAsV), arsenite (iAsIII), and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were not retained on the SCX disk at all, DMA was perfectly adsorbed onto the surface of SCX disk. We optimized analytical conditions of SCX-WDXRF system and its calibration curve exhibited a strong linearity (R2 = 0.9996). Limit of detection (LOD) was achieved to 0.254 μg/L if a 1 L of liquid sample was used. We aimed to achieve improved instrumental sensitivity and the LOD for the analysis of DMA in liquid samples compared to high performance liquid chromatography linked to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS) conventionally used in arsenic speciation researches. Spike tests for iAsV, iAsIII, MMA, and DMA in three types of liquid samples (i.e., deionized water, synthetic seawater and landfill leachate) showed quantitative recoveries (i.e., 95-105%) when the line overlap between As-Kα and Pb-Lα was corrected. This system highlights a very good option in arsenic speciation fields due to its extreme simplicity of operation and low cost.

  17. Effects of water management on cadmium and arsenic accumulation and dimethylarsinic acid concentrations in Japanese rice.

    PubMed

    Arao, Tomohito; Kawasaki, Akira; Baba, Koji; Mori, Shinsuke; Matsumoto, Shingo

    2009-12-15

    Rice consumption is a major source of cadmium and arsenic for the population of Asia. We investigated the effects of water management in rice paddy on levels of cadmium and arsenic in Japanese rice grains. Flooding increased arsenic concentrations in rice grains, whereas aerobic treatment increased the concentration of cadmium. Flooding for 3 weeks before and after heading was most effective in reducing grain cadmium concentrations, but this treatment increased the arsenic concentration considerably, whereas aerobic treatment during the same period was effective in reducing arsenic concentrations but increased the cadmium concentration markedly. Flooding treatment after heading was found to be more effective than flooding treatment before heading in reducing rice grain cadmium without a concomitant increase in total arsenic levels, although it increased inorganic arsenic levels. Concentrations of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in grain were very low under aerobic conditions but increased under flooded conditions. DMA accounted for 3-52% of the total arsenic concentration in grain grown in soil with a lower arsenic concentration and 10-80% in soil with a higher arsenic concentration. A possible explanation for the accumulation of DMA in rice grains is that DMA translocates from shoots/roots to the grains more readily than does inorganic arsenic. PMID:20000530

  18. Dimethylarsinic acid in drinking water changed the morphology but not the expression of DNA repair genes of bladder transitional epithelium in F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic increases urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma in humans. In laboratory animals, it is dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], a major arsenic metabolite in the urine of inorganic arsenic-exposed people, that increases transitional cell carcinoma, namely in F344 r...

  19. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Meno, Sarah R.; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J.; Self, William T.

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA{sup III} is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA{sup III} on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA{sup III} resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA{sup III} treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA{sup III}, as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA{sup III} induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA{sup III} alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  20. Speciation measurements by HPLC-HGAAS of dimethylarsinic acid and arsenobetaine in three candidate lyophilized urine reference materials.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, R; Zhang, X; Mees, L; Christensen, J M; Byrialsen, K; Dyrschel, C

    1998-12-01

    Speciation measurements of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenobetaine (AsB) in three candidate lyophilized urine reference materials are described. The measurements were based on cation-exchange liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with on-line digestion of the organic. As species by alkaline persulfate solution aided by ultraviolet radiation. Arsenic concentrations as DMA were significantly different in the three samples. The mean values for the three samples were 4.1 +/- 0.3, 55.3 +/- 1.2 and 134.1 +/- 1.5 micrograms l-1, respectively. No significant differences in AsB concentrations were observed among the three samples. The mean As concentrations as AsB in the three samples were 17.4 +/- 0.4, 17.7 +/- 0.2 and 17.5 +/- 0.3 micrograms l-1, respectively. By off-line digestion of the urine samples, total As concentrations in the three materials were also obtained. The mean values were 23.4 +/- 0.3, 76.6 +/- 1.6 and 151.3 +/- 1.8 micrograms l-1, respectively. These results correlated well with the results obtained by neutron activation analysis in our laboratory (r = 0.999; p < 0.0001). PMID:10435351

  1. Toxicological properties of the thiolated inorganic arsenic and arsenosugar metabolite thio-dimethylarsinic acid in human bladder cells.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Franziska; Leffers, Larissa; Weber, Till; Berndt, Svenia; Mangerich, Aswin; Beneke, Sascha; Bürkle, Alexander; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2014-04-01

    Thio-dimethylarsinic acid (thio-DMA(V)) has recently been identified as human metabolite after exposure toward both the human carcinogen inorganic arsenic and arsenosugars, which are the major arsenical constituents of marine algae. This study aims to get further insight in the toxic modes of action of thio-DMA(V) in cultured human urothelial cells. Among others effects of thio-DMA(V) on eight cell death related endpoints, cell cycle distribution, genotoxicity, cellular bioavailability as well as for the first time its impact on DNA damage induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation were investigated and compared to effects induced by arsenite. The data indicate that thio-DMA(V) exerts its cellular toxicity in a similar or even lower concentration range, however most likely via different mechanisms, than arsenite. Most interestingly, thio-DMA(V) decreased damage-induced cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by 35,000-fold lower concentrations than arsenite. The inhibition of this essential DNA-damage induced and DNA-repair related signaling reaction might contribute to inorganic arsenic induced toxicity, at least in the bladder. Therefore, and also because thio-DMA(V) is to date by far the most toxic human metabolite identified after arsenosugar intake, thio-DMA(V) should contemporary be fully (also in vivo) toxicologically characterized, to assess risks to human health related to inorganic arsenic but especially arsenosugar dietary intake. PMID:23994116

  2. DNA-strand breaks induced by dimethylarsinic acid, a metabolite of inorganic arsenics, are strongly enhanced by superoxide anion radicals.

    PubMed

    Rin, K; Kawaguchi, K; Yamanaka, K; Tezuka, M; Oku, N; Okada, S

    1995-01-01

    We previously reported that dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), a major metabolite of inorganic arsenics, induced DNA single-strand breaks (ssb) both in vivo and in cultured alveolar type II (L-132) cells in vitro, possibly via the production of dimethylarsenic peroxyl radicals. Here, the interaction of superoxide anion radicals (O2-) in the induction of ssb in L-132 cells was investigated using paraquat, an O2(-)-producing agent. A significant enhancement of ssb formation was observed in the DMAA-exposed cells when coexposed to paraquat. This enhancement occurred even when post-exposed to DMAA after washing, suggesting that the DMAA exposure caused some modification of DNA such as DNA-adducts, which was recognized by active oxygens to form ssb. An experiment with UV-irradiation, which was likely to induce ssb at the modified region, supported the possibility of DNA modification by DMAA exposure. An ESR study indicated that O2- produced by paraquat in DMAA-exposed cells was more consumed than in non-exposed cells, assumingly through the reaction with the dimethylarsenic-modified region of DNA. The species of active oxygens were estimated by using diethyldithiocarbamate, aminotriazole, diethylmaleate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), gamma-irradiation and ethanol. O2- but neither H2O2 nor hydroxyl radicals was very likely to contribute to the ssb-enhancing action of paraquat. PMID:7735248

  3. The mechanisms of detoxification of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and As(V) in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pantoja Munoz, L; Purchase, D; Jones, H; Raab, A; Urgast, D; Feldmann, J; Garelick, H

    2016-06-01

    The response of Chlorella vulgaris when challenged by As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was assessed through experiments on adsorption, efflux and speciation of arsenic (reduction, oxidation, methylation and chelation with glutathione/phytochelatin [GSH/PC]). Our study indicates that at high concentrations of phosphate (1.62mM of HPO4(2-)), upon exposure to As(V), cells are able to shift towards methylation of As(V) rather than PC formation. Treatment with As(V) caused a moderate decrease in intracellular pH and a strong increase in the concentration of free thiols (GSH). Passive surface adsorption was found to be negligible for living cells exposed to DMA and As(V). However, adsorption of As(III) was observed to be an active process in C. vulgaris, because it did not show saturation at any of the exposure periods. Chelation of As(III) with GS/PC and to a lesser extent hGS/hPC is a major detoxification mechanism employed by C. vulgaris cells when exposed to As(III). The increase of bound As-GS/PC complexes was found to be strongly related to an increase in concentration of As(III) in media. C. vulgaris cells did not produce any As-GS/PC complex when exposed to As(V). This may indicate that a reduction step is needed for As(V) complexation with GSH/PC. C. vulgaris cells formed DMAS(V)-GS upon exposure to DMA independent of the exposure period. As(III) triggers the formation of arsenic complexes with PC and homophytochelatins (hPC) and their compartmentalisation to vacuoles. A conceptual model was devised to explain the mechanisms involving ABCC1/2 transport. The potential of C. vulgaris to bio-remediate arsenic from water appeared to be highly selective and effective without the potential hazard of reducing As(V) to As(III), which is more toxic to humans. PMID:26994369

  4. DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID ALTERS EXPRESSION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DNA REPAIR GENES IN A DOSE DEPENDENT MANNER IN THE TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM OF THE URINARY BLADDER FROM FEMALE F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-dependent alteration of oxidative stress and DNA repair gene expression by Dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] in transitional epithelium of urinary bladder from female F344 rats.
    Arsenic (As) is a major concern as millions of people are at risk from drinking arsenic contaminat...

  5. GENE EXPRESSION CAN DIFFERENTIATE CARCINOGENIC FROM NON-CARCINOGENIC DOSES OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMAv) IN THE TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM OF THE URINARY BLADDER FROM FEMALE F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is an environmental concern worldwide, and drinking arsenic contaminated water has been associated with increased incidences of skin, lung and bladder cancer. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMAv) is a major metabolite of inorganic arsenic in rodents and humans and is the predomina...

  6. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) over-production and autocrine cell activation are key factors in monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]-induced malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Wu, T.; Camarillo, J.M.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The association between chronic human exposure to arsenicals and bladder cancer development is well recognized; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully determined. We propose that inflammatory responses can play a pathogenic role in arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis. In previous studies, it was demonstrated that chronic exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsenous acid [MMA(III)] leads to malignant transformation of an immortalized model of urothelial cells (UROtsa), with only 3 mo of exposure necessary to trigger the transformation-related changes. In the three-month window of exposure, the cells over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8), consistent with the sustained activation of NFKβ and AP1/c-jun, ERK2, and STAT3. IL-8 was over-expressed within hours after exposure to MMA(III), and sustained over-expression was observed during chronic exposure. In this study, we profiled IL-8 expression in UROtsa cells exposed to 50 nM MMA(III) for 1 to 5 mo. IL-8 expression was increased mainly in cells after 3 mo MMA(III) exposure, and its production was also found increased in tumors derived from these cells after heterotransplantation in SCID mice. UROtsa cells do express both receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, suggesting that autocrine cell activation could be important in cell transformation. Supporting this observation and consistent with IL-8 over-expression, CXCR1 internalization was significantly increased after three months of exposure to MMA(III). The expression of MMP-9, cyclin D1, bcl-2, and VGEF was significantly increased in cells exposed to MMA(III) for 3 mo, but these mitogen-activated kinases were significantly decreased after IL-8 gene silencing, together with a decrease in cell proliferation rate and in anchorage-independent colony formation. These results suggest a relevant role of IL-8 in MMA(III)-induced UROtsa cell transformation. -- Highlights: ► IL-8 is over-expressed in human MMA(III)-exposed urothelial

  7. Human monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) reductase is a member of the glutathione-S-transferase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zakharyan, R A; Sampayo-Reyes, A; Healy, S M; Tsaprailis, G; Board, P G; Liebler, D C; Aposhian, H V

    2001-08-01

    The drinking of water containing large amounts of inorganic arsenic is a worldwide major public health problem because of arsenic carcinogenicity. Yet an understanding of the specific mechanism(s) of inorganic arsenic toxicity has been elusive. We have now partially purified the rate-limiting enzyme of inorganic arsenic metabolism, human liver MMA(V) reductase, using ion exchange, molecular exclusion, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. When SDS-beta-mercaptoethanol-PAGE was performed on the most purified fraction, seven protein bands were obtained. Each band was excised from the gel, sequenced by LC-MS/MS and identified according to the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL Protein Sequence databases. Human liver MMA(V) reductase is 100% identical, over 92% of sequence that we analyzed, with the recently discovered human glutathione-S-transferase Omega class hGSTO 1-1. Recombinant human GSTO1-1 had MMA(V) reductase activity with K(m) and V(max) values comparable to those of human liver MMA(V) reductase. The partially purified human liver MMA(V) reductase had glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. MMA(V) reductase activity was competitively inhibited by the GST substrate, 1-chloro 2,4-dinitrobenzene and also by the GST inhibitor, deoxycholate. Western blot analysis of the most purified human liver MMA(V) reductase showed one band when probed with hGSTO1-1 antiserum. We propose that MMA(V) reductase and hGSTO 1-1 are identical proteins. PMID:11511179

  8. Unusual Mn(III/IV)4 Cubane and Mn(III)16M4 (M = Ca, Sr) Looplike Clusters from the Use of Dimethylarsinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Chakov, Nicole E; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Rheingold, Arnold L; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2016-09-01

    Three complexes are reported from the initial use of dimethylarsinic acid (Me2AsO2H) in Mn(III/IV) cluster chemistry, [Mn4O4(O2AsMe2)6] (3; 2Mn(III), 2Mn(IV)), and [Mn16X4O8(O2CPh)16(Me2AsO2)24] (X = Ca(2+) (4) or Sr(2+) (5); 16Mn(III)). They were obtained from reactions with [Mn12O12(O2CR)16(H2O)4] (R = Me, Ph) either without (3) or with (4 and 5) the addition of X(2+) salts. Complex 3 contains a [Mn4O4](6+) cubane, whereas isostructural 4 and 5 contain a planar loop structure comprising four Mn4 asymmetric "butterfly" units linked by alternating anti,anti μ-O2AsMe2 and {X2(O2AsMe2)(O2CPh)2} units. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility (χM) data were collected on dried microcrystalline samples of 3-5 in the 5.0-300 K range in a 0.1 T (1000 G) direct-current (dc) magnetic field. Data for 3 were fit to the appropriate Van Vleck equation (using the [Formula: see text] = -2JŜi·Ŝj convention) for a cubane of virtual C2v symmetry, giving J33 = 0.0(1) cm(-1), J34 = -3.4(4) cm(-1), J44 = -9.8(2) cm(-1), and g = 1.99(1), where the Jij subscripts refer to the oxidation states of the interacting Mn atoms. The ground state thus consists of two coupled Mn(IV) and two essentially noninteracting Mn(III). For 4 and 5, low-lying excited states from the high nuclearity and weak couplings prevent fits of dc magnetization data, but in-phase alternating current susceptibility χ'MT data down to 1.8 K indicate them to possess S = 4 ground states, if considered single Mn16 units. If instead they are treated as tetramers of weakly coupled Mn4 units, then each of the latter has an S = 2 ground state. Complexes 4 and 5 also exhibit very weak out-of-phase χ″M signals characteristic of slow relaxation, and magnetization versus dc field scans on a single crystal of 4·15MeCN at T ≥ 0.04 K showed hysteresis loops but with unusual features suggesting the magnetization relaxation barrier consists of more than one contribution. PMID:27504743

  9. Determination of monomethylarsonous acid, a key arsenic methylation intermediate, in human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Le, X C; Ma, M; Cullen, W R; Aposhian, H V; Lu, X; Zheng, B

    2000-01-01

    In this study we report on the finding of monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] in human urine. This newly identified arsenic species is a key intermediate in the metabolic pathway of arsenic biomethylation, which involves stepwise reduction of pentavalent to trivalent arsenic species followed by oxidative addition of a methyl group. Arsenic speciation was carried out using ion-pair chromatographic separation of arsenic compounds with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Speciation of the inorganic arsenite [As(III)], inorganic arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)], dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], and MMA(III) in a urine sample was complete in 5 min. Urine samples collected from humans before and after a single oral administration of 300 mg sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS) were analyzed for arsenic species. MMA(III) was found in 51 out of 123 urine samples collected from 41 people in inner Mongolia 0-6 hr after the administration of DMPS. MMA(III )in urine samples did not arise from the reduction of MMA(V) by DMPS. DMPS probably assisted the release of MMA(III) that was formed in the body. Along with the presence of MMA(III), there was an increase in the relative concentration of MMA(V) and a decrease in DMA(V) in the urine samples collected after the DMPS ingestion. PMID:11102289

  10. Arsenic speciation and identification of monomethylarsonous acid and monomethylthioarsonic acid in a complex matrix.

    PubMed

    Yathavakilla, Santha Ketavarapu V; Fricke, Michael; Creed, Patricia A; Heitkemper, Douglas T; Shockey, Nohora V; Schwegel, Carol; Caruso, Joseph A; Creed, John T

    2008-02-01

    Anion-exchange chromatography was utilized for speciation of arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), and the new As species monomethylthioarsonic acid (MMTA), using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) detection. MMA(III) and MMTA were identified for the first time in freeze-dried carrot samples that were collected over 25 years ago as part of a joint U.S. EPA, U.S. FDA, and USDA study on trace elements in agricultural crops. The discovery of MMA(III) and MMTA in terrestrial foods necessitated the analytical characterization of synthetic standards of both species, which were used for standard addition in carrot extracts. The negative ion mode, high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) data produced molecular ions of m/z 122.9418 and 154.9152 for MMA(III) and MMTA, respectively. However, ESI-MS was not sensitive enough to directly identify MMA(III) and MMTA in the carrot extracts. Therefore, to further substantiate the identification of MMA(III) and MMTA, two additional separations using an Ion-120 column were developed using the more sensitive ICPMS detection. The first separation used 20 mM tetramethylammonium hydroxide at pH 12.2 with MMA(III) eluting in less than 7 min. In the second separation, MMTA eluted at 11.2 min by utilizing 40 mM ammonium carbonate at pH 9.0. Oxidation of MMA(III) and MMTA to MMA(V) with hydrogen peroxide was observed for standards and carrot extracts alike. Several samples of carrots collected from local markets in 2006 were also analyzed and found to contain low levels of inorganic arsenic species. PMID:18181583

  11. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  12. DIMETHYLARSINE AND TRIMETHYLARSINE ARE POTENT GENOTOXINS IN VITRO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsine and Trimethylarsine are potent genotoxins in vitro
    Andrewes, P; Kitchin, KT; and Wallace, KA

    Abstract
    The mechanism of arsenic carcinogenesis is unclear. A complicating factor receiving increasing attention is that arsenic is biomethylated to form vari...

  13. Effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid on the risk of arsenic-associated carotid atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.-M.; Chiou, H.-Y. . E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Hong, C.-T.; Su, C.-L.; Chang, S.-F.; Huang, W.-L.; Wang, H.-T.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-J.

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic-contaminated well water has been shown to increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Because of involving S-adenosylmethionine, homocysteine may modify the risk by interfering with the biomethylation of ingested arsenic. In this study, we assessed the effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) on the risk of atherosclerosis associated with arsenic. In total, 163 patients with carotid atherosclerosis and 163 controls were studied. Lifetime cumulative arsenic exposure from well water for study subjects was measured as index of arsenic exposure. Homocysteine level was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Proportion of MMA{sup V} (MMA%) was calculated by dividing with total arsenic species in urine, including arsenite, arsenate, MMA{sup V}, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). Results of multiple linear regression analysis show a positive correlation of plasma homocysteine levels to the cumulative arsenic exposure after controlling for atherosclerosis status and nutritional factors (P < 0.05). This correlation, however, did not change substantially the effect of arsenic exposure on the risk of atherosclerosis as analyzed in a subsequent logistic regression model. Logistic regression analyses also show that elevated plasma homocysteine levels did not confer an independent risk for developing atherosclerosis in the study population. However, the risk of having atherosclerosis was increased to 5.4-fold (95% CI, 2.0-15.0) for the study subjects with high MMA% ({>=}16.5%) and high homocysteine levels ({>=}12.7 {mu}mol/l) as compared to those with low MMA% (<9.9%) and low homocysteine levels (<12.7 {mu}mol/l). Elevated homocysteinemia may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure in individuals with high levels of MMA% in urine.

  14. Effects of monomethylarsonic and monomethylarsonous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of adult and young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Katharina Straub, Heidrun; Hirner, Alfred V.; Hippler, Joerg; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    Arsenite and its metabolites, dimethylarsinic or dimethylarsinous acid, have previously been shown to disturb synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices of rats (Krueger, K., Gruner, J., Madeja, M., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2006a. Blockade and enhancement of glutamate receptor responses in Xenopus oocytes by methylated arsenicals. Arch. Toxicol. 80, 492-501, Krueger, K., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2006b. Effects of arsenite on long-term potentiation in hippocampal slices from adult and young rats. Toxicol. Lett. 165, 167-173, Krueger, K., Repges, H., Hippler, J., Hartmann, L.M., Hirner, A.V., Straub, H., Binding, N., Mu{beta}hoff, U., 2007. Effects of dimethylarsinic and dimethylarsinous acid on evoked synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices of young and adult rats. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 225, 40-46). The present experiments investigate, whether the important arsenic metabolites monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) also influence the synaptic functions of the hippocampus. In hippocampal slices of young (14-21 days-old) and adult (2-4 months-old) rats, evoked synaptic field potentials from the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse were measured under control conditions and during and after 30 and 60 min of application of the arsenic compounds. MMA{sup V} had no effect on the synapse functions neither in slices of adult nor in those from young rats. However, MMA{sup III} strongly influenced the synaptic transmission: it totally depressed the amplitudes of fEPSPs at concentrations of 50 {mu}mol/l (adult rats) and 25 {mu}mol/l (young rats) and LTP amplitudes at concentrations of 25 {mu}mol/l (adult rats) and 10 {mu}mol/l (young rats), respectively. In contrast, application of 1 {mu}mol/l MMA{sup III} led to an enhancement of the LTP amplitude in young rats, which is interpretable by an enhancing effect on NMDA receptors and a lack of the blocking effect on AMPA receptors at

  15. Identifiability of PBPK Models with Applications to Dimethylarsinic Acid Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss diff...

  16. Arsenite and its metabolites, MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}, modify CYP3A4, PXR and RXR alpha expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Medina-Diaz, I.M.; Estrada-Muniz, E.; Reyes-Hernandez, O.D.; Ramirez, P.; Vega, L.; Elizondo, G.

    2009-09-01

    Arsenic is an environmental pollutant that has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cancer and several other diseases through alterations of cellular homeostasis and hepatic function. Cytochrome P450 (P450) modification may be one of the factors contributing to these disorders. Several reports have established that exposure to arsenite modifies P450 expression by decreasing or increasing mRNA and protein levels. Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the predominant P450 expressed in the human liver and intestines, which is regulated mainly by the Pregnane X Receptor-Retinoid X Receptor alpha (PXR-RXR alpha) heterodimer, contributes to the metabolism of approximately half the drugs in clinical use today. The present study investigates the effect of sodium arsenite and its metabolites monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) on CYP3A4, PXR, and RXR alpha expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice. Sodium arsenite treatment increases mRNA, protein and CYP3A4 activity in a dose-dependent manner. However, the increase in protein expression was not as marked as compared to the increase in mRNA levels. Arsenite treatment induces the accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates, indicating that the activation of this mechanism may explain the differences observed between the mRNA and protein expression of CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with 0.05 mg/kg of DMA{sup III} induces CYP3A4 in a similar way, while treatment with 0.05 mg/kg of MMA{sup III} increases mostly mRNA, and to a lesser degree, CYP3A4 activity. Sodium arsenite and both its metabolites increase PXR mRNA, while only DMA{sup III} induces RXR alpha expression. Overall, these results suggest that sodium arsenite and its metabolites induce CYP3A4 expression by increasing PXR expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice.

  17. Arsenite and its metabolites, MMA(III) and DMA(III), modify CYP3A4, PXR and RXR alpha expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Medina-Díaz, I M; Estrada-Muñiz, E; Reyes-Hernández, O D; Ramírez, P; Vega, L; Elizondo, G

    2009-09-01

    Arsenic is an environmental pollutant that has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cancer and several other diseases through alterations of cellular homeostasis and hepatic function. Cytochrome P450 (P450) modification may be one of the factors contributing to these disorders. Several reports have established that exposure to arsenite modifies P450 expression by decreasing or increasing mRNA and protein levels. Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the predominant P450 expressed in the human liver and intestines, which is regulated mainly by the Pregnane X Receptor-Retinoid X Receptor alpha (PXR-RXR alpha) heterodimer, contributes to the metabolism of approximately half the drugs in clinical use today. The present study investigates the effect of sodium arsenite and its metabolites monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) on CYP3A4, PXR, and RXR alpha expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice. Sodium arsenite treatment increases mRNA, protein and CYP3A4 activity in a dose-dependent manner. However, the increase in protein expression was not as marked as compared to the increase in mRNA levels. Arsenite treatment induces the accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates, indicating that the activation of this mechanism may explain the differences observed between the mRNA and protein expression of CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with 0.05 mg/kg of DMA(III) induces CYP3A4 in a similar way, while treatment with 0.05 mg/kg of MMA(III) increases mostly mRNA, and to a lesser degree, CYP3A4 activity. Sodium arsenite and both its metabolites increase PXR mRNA, while only DMA(III) induces RXR alpha expression. Overall, these results suggest that sodium arsenite and its metabolites induce CYP3A4 expression by increasing PXR expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice. PMID:19084030

  18. The proteome of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA): the elucidation of altered pathways in patient livers.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marianna; Chandler, Randy J; Sloan, Jennifer L; Dorko, Kenneth; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; Ingenito, Laura; Strom, Stephen C; Imperlini, Esther; Scolamiero, Emanuela; Venditti, Charles P; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2016-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is a heterogeneous and severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism most commonly caused by the deficient activity of the vitamin B12 dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT). The main treatment for MMA patients is the dietary restriction of propiogenic amino acids and carnitine supplementation. Despite treatment, the prognosis for vitamin B12 non-responsive patients remains poor and is associated with neonatal lethality, persistent morbidity and decreased life expectancy. While multi-organ pathology is a feature of MMA, the liver is severely impacted by mitochondrial dysfunction which likely underlies the metabolic instability experienced by the patients. Liver and/or combined liver/kidney transplantation is therefore sometimes performed in severely affected patients. Using liver specimens from donors and MMA patients undergoing elective liver transplantation collected under a dedicated natural history protocol (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00078078), we employed proteomics to characterize the liver pathology and impaired hepatic metabolism observed in the patients. Pathway analysis revealed perturbations of enzymes involved in energy metabolism, gluconeogenesis and Krebs cycle anaplerosis. Our findings identify new pathophysiologic and therapeutic targets that could be valuable for designing alternative therapies to alleviate clinical manifestations seen in this disorder. PMID:26672496

  19. Efficient conversion of dimethylarsinate into arsenic and its simultaneous adsorption removal over FeCx/N-doped carbon fiber composite in an electro-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huachun; Li, Jianfei; Sun, Meng; An, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a FeCx/N-doped carbon fiber composite (FeCx/NCNFs) was developed via an electrospinning method. According to the characterization results of XRD, TEM and XPS, FeCx (a mixture of Fe7C3 and Fe3C) was either embedded in or attached to the NCNFs. It was used for the first time as a catalyst for dimethylarsinate (DMA) degradation and as an absorbent for inorganic arsenic (As (V)), with degradation and adsorption occurring simultaneously, in an electro-Fenton process. The effects of catalyst dosage, initial DMA concentration, solution pH, and applied current on the treatment efficiency and the corresponding H2O2 generation were systematically investigated. The results showed that DMA could be efficiently oxidized into As(V). 96% of DMA was degraded after reaction time of 360 min and the residual As(V) concentration in solution was below the allowable limit of 0.01 mg/L under the optimum treatment conditions. Based on an ESR and radical scavenger experiment, OH was proven to be the sole reactive oxygen species involved in the degradation process of DMA. DMA was oxidized to MMA as the primary oxidation product, which was subsequently oxidized to inorganic arsenic, As (V). TOC was also efficiently removed at the same time. The DMA removal mechanism for simultaneous degradation of dimethylarsinate and adsorption of arsenic over FeCx/NCNFs in the electro-Fenton process was also proposed based on the experimental results. PMID:27179339

  20. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  1. MMA, A Computer Code for Multi-Model Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poeter, Eileen P.; Hill, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the Multi-Model Analysis (MMA) computer code. MMA can be used to evaluate results from alternative models of a single system using the same set of observations for all models. As long as the observations, the observation weighting, and system being represented are the same, the models can differ in nearly any way imaginable. For example, they may include different processes, different simulation software, different temporal definitions (for example, steady-state and transient models could be considered), and so on. The multiple models need to be calibrated by nonlinear regression. Calibration of the individual models needs to be completed before application of MMA. MMA can be used to rank models and calculate posterior model probabilities. These can be used to (1) determine the relative importance of the characteristics embodied in the alternative models, (2) calculate model-averaged parameter estimates and predictions, and (3) quantify the uncertainty of parameter estimates and predictions in a way that integrates the variations represented by the alternative models. There is a lack of consensus on what model analysis methods are best, so MMA provides four default methods. Two are based on Kullback-Leibler information, and use the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) or AICc (second-order-bias-corrected AIC) model discrimination criteria. The other two default methods are the BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) and the KIC (Kashyap Information Criterion) model discrimination criteria. Use of the KIC criterion is equivalent to using the maximum-likelihood Bayesian model averaging (MLBMA) method. AIC, AICc, and BIC can be derived from Frequentist or Bayesian arguments. The default methods based on Kullback-Leibler information have a number of theoretical advantages, including that they tend to favor more complicated models as more data become available than do the other methods, which makes sense in many situations. Many applications of MMA will

  2. Dentin bonding performance and interface observation of an MMA-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Junichi; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bonding performance and dentin interface acid resistance using a 4-META/MMA-TBB based restorative material (BF) compared to a conventional 4-META/MMA-TBB resin cement (SB), and the effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) addition to the materials. Dentin surfaces were treated with 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3) or 4-META containing self-etching primer (TP), followed by application of BF or SB polymer powders with or without NaF, to evaluate microtensile bond strength (µTBS) in six experimental groups; 10-3/SB, 10-3/BF, TP/SB, TP/BF, TP/SB/NaF and TP/BF/NaF. SEM observation of the resin-dentin interface was performed after acid-base challenge to evaluate interfacial dentin resistance to acid attack. TP/BF showed highest µTBS, while NaF polymers decreased µTBS. TP/BF showed funnel-shaped erosion at the interface, however, NaF polymers improved acid resistance of interface. In conclusion, BF demonstrated high µTBSs and low acid-resistance at the interface. NaF addition enhanced acid resistance but decreased µTBS. PMID:27335135

  3. MMA, A Computer Code for Multi-Model Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eileen P. Poeter and Mary C. Hill

    2007-08-20

    This report documents the Multi-Model Analysis (MMA) computer code. MMA can be used to evaluate results from alternative models of a single system using the same set of observations for all models. As long as the observations, the observation weighting, and system being represented are the same, the models can differ in nearly any way imaginable. For example, they may include different processes, different simulation software, different temporal definitions (for example, steady-state and transient models could be considered), and so on. The multiple models need to be calibrated by nonlinear regression. Calibration of the individual models needs to be completed before application of MMA. MMA can be used to rank models and calculate posterior model probabilities. These can be used to (1) determine the relative importance of the characteristics embodied in the alternative models, (2) calculate model-averaged parameter estimates and predictions, and (3) quantify the uncertainty of parameter estimates and predictions in a way that integrates the variations represented by the alternative models. There is a lack of consensus on what model analysis methods are best, so MMA provides four default methods. Two are based on Kullback-Leibler information, and use the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) or AICc (second-order-bias-corrected AIC) model discrimination criteria. The other two default methods are the BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) and the KIC (Kashyap Information Criterion) model discrimination criteria. Use of the KIC criterion is equivalent to using the maximum-likelihood Bayesian model averaging (MLBMA) method. AIC, AICc, and BIC can be derived from Frequentist or Bayesian arguments. The default methods based on Kullback-Leibler information have a number of theoretical advantages, including that they tend to favor more complicated models as more data become available than do the other methods, which makes sense in many situations.

  4. Evaluation of urinary speciated arsenic in NHANES: Issues in interpretation in the context of potential inorganic arsenic exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) are among the commonly used biomarkers for inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure, but may also arise from seafood consumption and organoarsenical pesticide applications. We examined speciated urinary arsenic data from...

  5. Performance evaluation of the Personal Mobility and Manipulation Appliance (PerMMA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Xu, Jijie; Grindle, Garrett; Vazquez, Juan; Salatin, Ben; Kelleher, Annmarie; Ding, Dan; Collins, Diane M; Cooper, Rory A

    2013-11-01

    The Personal Mobility and Manipulation Appliance (PerMMA) is a recently developed personal assistance robot created to provide people with severe physical disabilities enhanced assistance in both mobility and manipulation. PerMMA aims to improve functional independence when a personal care attendant is not available on site. PerMMA integrates both a smart powered wheelchair and two dexterous robotic arms to assist its users in completing essential mobility and manipulation tasks during basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL). Two user interfaces were developed: a local control interface and a remote operator controller. This paper reports on the evaluation of PerMMA with end users completing basic ADL tasks. Participants with both lower and upper extremity impairments (N=15) were recruited to operate PerMMA and complete up to five ADL tasks in a single session of no more than two hours (to avoid fatigue or frustration of the participants). The performance of PerMMA was evaluated by participants completing ADL tasks with two different control modes: local mode and cooperative control. The users' task completion performance and answers on pre/post-evaluation questionnaires demonstrated not only the ease in learning and usefulness of PerMMA, but also their attitudes toward assistance from advanced technology like PerMMA. As a part of the iterative development process, results of this work will serve as supporting evidence to identify design criteria and other areas for improvement of PerMMA. PMID:23769146

  6. Identification of the major arsenic-binding protein in rat plasma as the ternary dimethylarsinous-hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2008-03-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic causes a wide range of diseases such as hyperkeratosis, cardiovascular diseases, and skin, lung, and bladder cancers, and millions of people are chronically exposed to arsenic worldwide. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying these toxic actions. The metabolism of arsenic is essential for understanding the toxic actions. Here, we identified the major arsenic-binding protein (As-BP) in the plasma of rats after oral administration of arsenite by the use of two different HPLC columns, gel filtration and anion exchange ones, coupled with an inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometer (ICP MS). The molecular mass of the As-BP was estimated to be 90 kDa based on results using the former column, and arsenic bound to this protein only in the form of dimethylarsinous acid (DMA (III)) in the plasma in vivo. In addition, the purified As-BP was shown to consist of two different proteins, haptoglobin (Hp) of 37 kDa (three bands) and the hemoglobin (Hb) alpha chain of 14 kDa (single band), using sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), respectively, suggesting that the As-BP was the ternary DMA (III)-Hb-Hp complex. To confirm the present observations, an arsenic-binding assay was carried out in vitro . Although DMA (III) bound directly to fresh rat plasma proteins, they were different from that identified in vivo. However, when a DMA (III)-exposed rat RBC lysate (DMA (III) binds to Hb in rat RBCs) was added to control rat plasma, a new arsenic peak increased at the expense of the arsenic-Hb one. Furthermore, this new arsenic peak was consistent with the As-BP identified in the plasma in vivo, suggesting that arsenic bound to Hb further binds to haptoglobin (Hp), forming the ternary As-Hb-Hp complex. PMID:18247522

  7. A critical reappraisal of dietary practices in methylmalonic acidemia raises concerns about the safety of medical foods. Part 1: Isolated methylmalonic acidemias (MMA)

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Myles, Jennifer; Sloan, Jennifer L.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Venditti, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Medical foods for methylmalonic and propionic acidemias (MMA/PA) contain minimal valine, isoleucine, methionine and threonine, but have been formulated with increased leucine. We aimed to assess the effects of imbalanced branched-chain amino acid intake on metabolic and growth parameters in a cohort of MMA patients ascertained via a natural history study. METHODS Cross-sectional anthropometric and body composition measurements were correlated with diet content and disease-related biomarkers in 61 patients with isolated MMA (46 mut, 9 cblA and 6 cblB). RESULTS Patients with MMA tolerated close to the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of complete protein (mut0: 99.45 ± 32.05% RDA). However, 85% received medical foods, the protein-equivalent in which often exceeded complete protein intake (35%). Medical food consumption resulted in low plasma valine and isoleucine concentrations, prompting paradoxical supplementation with these propiogenic amino acids. Weight and height–for age Z-scores correlated negatively with the leucine/valine intake ratio (r=−0.453, P=0.014, R2=0.209 and r=−0.341, P=0.05, R2=0.123, respectively). CONCLUSION Increased leucine intake in patients with MMA resulted in iatrogenic amino acid deficiencies and was associated with adverse growth outcomes. Medical foods for propionate oxidation disorders need to be redesigned and studied prospectively, to ensure efficacy and safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION This clinical study is registered in www.clinicaltrials.gov with the ID: NCT00078078. Study URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00078078 PMID:26270765

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Poly(HEMA-co-MMA) by Utilizing Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bach, Long Giang; Cao, Xuan Thang; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Jeong, Yeon Tae; Kim, Jong Su; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid material consisting of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-co-methylmethacrylate) [poly(HEMA-co-MMA)] was synthesized by a combination of RAFT and Click chemistry. In the primary stage, the copolymer poly(HEMA-co-MMA) was prepared by applying RAFT technique. Alkynyl side groups were incorporated onto the poly(HEMA-co-MMA) backbone by esterification reaction. Then, MWNTs-N3 was prepared by treating MWNTs with 4-azidobutylamine. The click coupling reaction between azide-functionalized MWNTs (MWNTs-N3) and the alkyne-functionalized random copolymer ((HEMA-co-MMA)-Alkyne) with the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3+2] Huisgen cycloaddition afforded the hybrid compound. The structure and properties of poly(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-MWNTs were investigated by FT-IR, EDX and TGA measurements. The copolymer brushes were observed to be immobilized onto the functionalized MWNTs by SEM and TEM analysis. PMID:27455744

  9. Engineering Issue Paper: Biotransformation Pathways of Dimethylarsinic (Cacodylic) Acid in the Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This EIP summarizes the state of the science regarding the biotransformation of DMA(V) and was developed from peer-reviewed literature, scientific documents, EPA reports, internet sources, input from experts in the field, and other pertinent sources. This EIP includes a review o...

  10. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF RESPONSES TO DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN FEMALE F344 RAT UROTHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen and epidemiologic evidence implicates it in the development of urinary bladder cancer. Even though several mechanisms have been proposed for arsenic carcinogenicity, the mode of action of inorganic arsenic (iAs) is confounded by the limited availabil...

  11. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  12. Evaluation of MMA-4-META-TBB resin as a dental adhesive material.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y S

    1984-04-01

    A new adhesive resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) was prepared, and its application to hard tooth tissues and metals was studied. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the average length of 4-META resin tags in enamel and dentin was 22 mu and 40 mu respectively. The tensile adhesive strength between 4-META resin and enamel was about 130 kg/cm2 after etching with 65% phosphoric acid. Its bond strength to dentin treated with a cleaning solution of 10% citric acid and 3% ferric chloride was about 190 kg/cm2. In precious alloys heated at 500 degrees C for 5-10 minutes, a bond strength of more than 100 kg/cm2 was obtained. The precious alloys containing Au, Ag, Pt and Cu should be selected especially for dental restorations. In polished non-precious alloys, the bond strength was greater than 100 kg/cm2. If non-precious alloys were oxidized with HNO3, the bond strength increased to 150-200 kg/cm2. The results suggest that the nickel-chromium alloy used in fixed prosthodontics must be treated chemically before adhesion with 4-META resin, but cobalt-chromium alloy used in removable partial dentures bonds well with 4-META resin without chemical treatment. In conclusion, MMA-4-META-TBB resin seems to be a promising adhesive material in dentistry. PMID:6571588

  13. Effect of MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber on mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Huang, P Y; Yang, M C; Lo, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers were treated with argon plasma for 5 min, followed by uv irradiation in methyl methacrylate (MMA)-chloroform solution for 5 h to obtain MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber. The grafting content was estimated by the titration of esterification method. The grafting amount of 5280 nmol/g was the largest for the MMA concentration at 18.75 vol%. To improve the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement, pure UHMWPE fiber and MMA-g-UHMWPE fiber were added to the surgical Simplex. P radiopaque bone cement. The mechanical properties including tensile strength, tensile modulus, compressive strength, bending strength, and bending stiffness were measured. Dynamic mechanical analysis was also performed. By comparing the effect of the pure UHMWPE fiber and MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement, it was found that the acrylic bone cement with MMA-g-UHMWPE grafted fiber had a more significant reinforcing effect than that with untreated UHMWPE fiber. This might be due to the improvement of the interfacial bonding between the grafted fibers and the acrylic bone cement matrix. PMID:9421758

  14. Studies on MMA-tBB resin. I. Comparison of TBB and other initiators in the polymerization of PMMA/MMA resin.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Chiemi; Imai, Yohji

    2002-12-01

    Polymerization characteristics of poly (methyl methacrylate)(PMMA)/(methyl methacrylate) (MMA) resin initiated by tributylborane (TBB) were compared with those by benzoyl peroxide (BPO)/N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine and camphorquinone (CQ)/N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate from the aspects of temporal changes of residual MMA and molecular weight up to 4 weeks at 37 degrees C. Residual MMA 30 min after polymerization decreased from 8.15% for TBB resin, 8.39% for the BPO resin, and 9.19% for the CQ resin to 0.48%, 3.54%, and 6.79%, respectively, after 4 weeks. The molecular weights at 30 min and 4 weeks after polymerization were 409 x 10(3) and 247 x 10(3) for TBB resin, 297 x 10(3) and 282 x 10(3) for the BPO resin, and 267 x 10(3) and 231 x 10(3) for the CQ resin, respectively. The present results revealed that the TBB-initiated polymerization had unique and different characteristics compared with those initiated by the other common initiators: (1) The decrease in residual MMA was fast, sustained for a long time and resulted in very low value; (2) high molecular weight PMMA was formed first and then decreased with time. PMID:12608421

  15. Seafood Intake and Urine Concentrations of Total Arsenic, Dimethylarsinate and Arsenobetaine in the US Population

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Guallar, Eliseo

    2010-01-01

    Background Seafood is the main source of organic arsenic exposure (arsenobetaine, arsenosugars and arsenolipids) in the population. Arsenosugars and arsenolipids are metabolized to several species including dimethylarsinate (DMA). Objective Evaluate the association of seafood intake with spot urine arsenic concentrations in the 2003–2006 National Health Nutrition and Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods We studied 4276 participants ≥6 y. Total arsenic was measured using inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Urine DMA and arsenobetaine were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ICPMS. Results Participants reporting seafood in the past 24-h had higher urine concentrations of total arsenic (median 24.5 vs. 7.3 µg/L), DMA (6.0 vs. 3.5 µg/L), arsenobetaine (10.2 vs. 0.9 µg/L) and total arsenic minus arsenobetaine (11.0 vs. 5.5 µg/L). Participants reporting seafood ≥2/wk vs. never during the past year had 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.9, 2.7), 1.4 (1.2, 1.6), 6.0 (4.6, 7.8) and 1.7 (1.4, 2.0) times higher (p-trend <0.001) concentrations of total arsenic, DMA, arsenobetaine and total arsenic minus arsenobetaine, respectively. In participants without detectable arsenobetaine and in analyses adjusted for arsenobetaine, seafood consumption in the past year was not associated with total arsenic or DMA concentrations in urine. Conclusion Seafood intake was a major determinant of increased urine concentrations of total arsenic, DMA, arsenobetaine and total arsenic minus arsenobetaine in the US population. Epidemiologic studies that use total arsenic, DMA, the sum of inorganic arsenic, methylarsonate and DMA, and total arsenic minus arsenobetaine as markers of inorganic arsenic exposure and/or metabolism need to address seafood intake. PMID:21093857

  16. Thio-dimethylarsinate is a common metabolite in urine samples from arsenic-exposed women in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Raml, Reingard; Rumpler, Alice; Goessler, Walter; Vahter, Marie; Li Li; Ochi, Takafumi; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2007-08-01

    Over the last 6 years, much work on arsenic species in urine samples has been directed toward the determination of the reduced dimethylated arsenic species, DMA(III), because of its high toxicity and perceived key role in the metabolism of inorganic arsenic. Recent work, however, has suggested that DMA(III) may at times have been misidentified because its chromatographic properties can be similar to those of thio-dimethylarsinate (thio-DMA). We analyzed by HPLC-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) urine samples from 75 arsenic-exposed women from Bangladesh with total arsenic concentrations ranging from 8 to 1034 {mu}g As/L and found that thio-DMA was present in 44% of the samples at concentrations ranging mostly from trace amounts to 24 {mu}g As/L (one sample contained 123 {mu}g As/L). Cytotoxicity testing with HepG2 cells derived from human hepatocarcinoma indicated that thio-DMA was about 10-fold more cytotoxic than dimethylarsinate (DMA). The widespread occurrence of thio-DMA in urine from these arsenic-exposed women suggests that this arsenical may also be present in other urine samples and has so far escaped detection. The work highlights the need for analytical methods providing specific determinations of arsenic compounds in future studies on arsenic metabolism and toxicology.

  17. Studies on MMA-TBB resin II. The effect of dual use of TBB and other initiators on polymerization of PMMA/MMA resin.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Chiemi

    2003-03-01

    The effects of dual use of tributylborane (TBB) and benzoyl peroxide/ N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (BPO/DMPT) or camphorquinone/N,N-dimethyaminoethyl methacrylate (CQ/DMAEMA), as well as BPO/DMPT and CQ/DMAEMA for comparison purposes, on postpolymerization of PMMA/MMA resin were examined from the view point of long term changes of residual MMA and molecular weight. Each resin was polymerized and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. The effect of dual use of TBB and BPO/DMPT or CQ/DMAEMA on polymerization of PMMA/MMA resin was additive in nature and each initiator system worked rather independently without little interaction between the two. TBB was effective especially during the period of postpolymerization. On the other hand, BPO/DMPT used in combination with CQ/DMAEMA had a limited effect only during the initial period and little effect during postpolymerization. It was suggested that TBB was most suitable as a chemically accelerated initiator component for a dual cure system. PMID:12790296

  18. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  19. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer. PMID:26876684

  20. Demultiplexing based on frequency-domain joint decision MMA for MDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caili, Gong; Li, Li; Guijun, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a demultiplexing method based on frequency-domain joint decision multi-modulus algorithm (FD-JDMMA) for mode division multiplexing (MDM) system. The performance of FD-JDMMA is compared with frequency-domain multi-modulus algorithm (FD-MMA) and frequency-domain least mean square (FD-LMS) algorithm. The simulation results show that FD-JDMMA outperforms FD-MMA in terms of BER and convergence speed in the cases of mQAM (m=4, 16 and 64) formats. And it is also demonstrated that FD-JDMMA achieves better BER performance and converges faster than FD-LMS in the cases of 16QAM and 64QAM. Furthermore, FD-JDMMA maintains similar computational complexity as the both equalization algorithms.

  1. Changes of Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA) in New Orleans Soil: Preliminary Evaluation of Differences between Survey I (1992) and Survey II (2000)

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Howard W.; Gonzales, Christopher; Powell, Eric; MielkeJr, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Soil metal surveys were conducted in Baltimore, MD (1976–1979), Minnesota (1981–1988) and most recently, New Orleans, LA (1989-present). The unique characteristic of New Orleans is that it has two surveys; Survey I was completed in 1992 and Survey II was completed in 2000. This paper seeks to determine if there is a perceptible change in the amount of metals during less than a decade that separated these surveys. The Survey I collection was 4,026 samples stratified by 283 census tracts. All samples were collected in residential neighborhoods at least one block from a busy street. The Survey II collection was 5,467 samples stratified by 286 census tracts (plus City Park). The Survey II collection included busy streets as a category of samples. For comparison, the busy street category of 1,078 samples was excluded from Survey II for a total of 4,388 samples. The extraction methods of the two surveys used the same protocol for strength of acid (1 M HNO3), shaker-time (2 hours), and room temperature (~22ºC). However, Survey II differed in amount of sample used in extraction. For Surveys I and II, 4.0g and 0.4g were used respectively. The same ICP-AES was used to measure 8 metals in both surveys. To evaluate the analytical results of the two methods, reference soil samples (n=36) from the Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories, International Soil-analytical Exchange (WEPAL; ISE) were used. The relationship between the 4.0 and 0.4 g results were linear and the Survey I results were adjusted for sample:acid ratio. Further evaluation was done by creating interpolated Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA) maps based on the median MMA for each census tract. A new map was created by dividing Survey II MMA by Survey I MMA. The ratio indicates increases of soil metals in the inner city and decreases of soil metals in the outlying areas of Metropolitan New Orleans. Comparing fresh parent alluvium from the Mississippi River with urban soil metal quantities

  2. ELEVATED METHYLMALOIC ACID CONCENTRATIONS ARE COMMON AMONG ELDERLY AMERICANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To describe serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentrations of elderly Americans and examine relations between serum MMA and other factors, we used surplus sera collected from elderly (n=1,145) and young-adult (n=1,026) participants in Phase 2 of the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Sur...

  3. High-Throughput Analysis of Methylmalonic Acid in Serum, Plasma, and Urine by LC-MS/MS. Method for Analyzing Isomers Without Chromatographic Separation.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Mark M; Nelson, Gordon J; Frank, Elizabeth L; Rockwood, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of methylmalonic acid (MMA) plays an important role in the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 is an essential cofactor for the enzymatic carbon rearrangement of methylmalonyl-CoA (MMA-CoA) to succinyl-CoA (SA-CoA), and the lack of vitamin B12 leads to elevated concentrations of MMA. Presence of succinic acid (SA) complicates the analysis because mass spectra of MMA and SA are indistinguishable, when analyzed in negative ion mode and the peaks are difficult to resolve chromatographically. We developed a method for the selective analysis of MMA that exploits the significant difference in fragmentation patterns of di-butyl derivatives of the isomers MMA and SA in a tandem mass spectrometer when analyzed in positive ion mode. Tandem mass spectra of di-butyl derivatives of MMA and SA are very distinct; this allows selective analysis of MMA in the presence of SA. The instrumental analysis is performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in positive ion mode, which is, in combination with selective extraction of acidic compounds, is highly selective for organic acids with multiple carboxyl groups (dicarboxylic, tricarboxylic, etc.). In this method organic acids with a single carboxyl group are virtually undetectable in the mass spectrometer; the only organic acid, other than MMA, that is detected by this method is its isomer, SA. Quantitative measurement of MMA in this method is performed using a deconvolution algorithm, which mathematically resolves the signal corresponding to MMA and does not require chromatographic resolution of the MMA and SA peaks. Because of its high selectivity, the method utilizes isocratic chromatographic separation; reconditioning and re-equilibration of the chromatographic column between injections is unnecessary. The above features of the method allow high-throughput analysis of MMA with analysis cycle time of 1 min. PMID:26602128

  4. Biochemical Differences Between Official and Simulated Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) Matches

    PubMed Central

    Silveira Coswig, Victor; Hideyoshi Fukuda, David; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Boscolo Del Vecchio, Fabricio

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the goals for training in combat sports is to mimic real situations. For mixed martial arts (MMA), simulated sparring matches are a frequent component during training, but a there is a lack of knowledge considering the differences in sparring and competitive environments. Objectives The main objective of this study was to compare biochemical responses to sparring and official MMA matches. Materials and Methods Twenty five male professional MMA fighters were evaluated during official events (OFF = 12) and simulated matches (SIM = 13). For both situations, blood samples were taken before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) matches. For statistical analysis, two-way analysis of variance (time x group and time x winner) were used to compare the dependent parametric variables. For non-parametric data, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used and differences were confirmed by Mann-Whitney tests. Results No significant differences were observed among the groups for demographic variables. The athletes were 26.5 ± 5 years with 80 ± 10 kg, 1.74 ± 0.05 m and had 39.4 ± 25 months of training experience. Primary results indicated higher blood glucose concentration prior to fights for OFF group (OFF= 6.1 ± 1.2 mmol/L and SIM= 4.4 ± 0.7 mmol/L; P < 0.01) and higher ALT values for OFF group at both time points (OFF: PRE = 41.2 ± 12 U/L, POST = 44.2 ± 14.1 U/L; SIM: PRE = 28.1 ± 13.8 U/L, POST = 30.5 ± 12.5 U/L; P = 0.001). In addition, the blood lactate showed similar responses for both groups (OFF: PRE= 4 [3.4 - 4.4] mmol/L, POST= 16.9 [13.8 - 23.5] mmol/L; SIM: PRE = 3.8 [2.8 - 5.5] mmol/L, POST= 16.8 [12.3 - 19.2] mmol/L; P < 0.001). Conclusions In conclusion, MMA official and simulated matches induce similar high intensity glycolytic demands and minimal changes to biochemical markers of muscle damage immediately following the fights. Glycolytic availability prior to the fights was raised exclusively in response to official matches. PMID:27625756

  5. EVALUATION OF INTERSPECIES DIFFERENCES IN PHARMACOKINETICS (PK) USING A PBPK MODEL FOR THE PESTICIDE DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID (DMAV)

    EPA Science Inventory

    DMAV is an organoarsenical pesticide registered for use on certain citrus crops and as a cotton defoliant. In lifetime oral route studies in rodents, DMAV causes statistically significant increases in bladder tumors in rats, but not in mice. We have developed a PBPK model for D...

  6. Preparation of poly(BMA-co-MMA) particles by soap-free emulsion polymerization and its optical properties as photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Chang; Choo, Hun-Seung

    2014-11-01

    Narrowly dispersed poly(BMA-co-MMA) and PBMA latices with particle diameters ranging within 216-435 nm were synthesized successfully by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization with KPS and AIBA. The average particle diameter and particle size distribution, average molecular weight and its distribution, glass transition temperature, reflectance spectra in visible wavelength, and refractive indices for the respective poly(BMA-co-MMA) latices and their photonic crystals were systematically investigated in terms of BMA/MMA ratio, BMA content, polymerization temperature, and DVB effect. The rate of polymerization increased with increasing MMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio. The particle diameter increased with BMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio. The molecular weight increased with BMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio and monomer concentration. The drying of the latices offered self-assembled shiny colloidal crystal films showing the characteristic structural colors in visible wavelength. All the poly(BMA-co-MMA) latices prepared in the study were fallen within the range of photonic grade microspheres. The reflectance measurement on the colloidal photonic crystals having different particle diameters clearly exhibited narrow stopbands. The reflection maxima (λ(max)) measured in this study were well close to the λ(max) calculated, derived from the Bragg's equation. The refractive indices of poly(BMA-co-MMA) photonic crystals were found to be almost same as the theoretical values and increased proportionally from 1.50 to 1.57 with BMA content in BMA/MMA ratios. It was, thus, found that the optical reflectance properties of the poly(BMA-co-MMA) colloidal photonic crystals can be controlled easily by adjusting the reaction conditions and BMA/MMA ratio in soap-free emulsion copolymerization of BMA and MMA. PMID:25958515

  7. Genomic-wide analysis of BEAS-2B cells exposed to Trivalent Arsenicals and Dimethylthioarsinic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans by both oral and inhalation routes. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsinous acid (D...

  8. Hydrophobic modification of wood via surface-initiated ARGET ATRP of MMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanchun; Li, Gang; Yu, Haipeng; Liu, Yixing

    2012-01-01

    To convert the hydrophilic surface of wood into a hydrophobic surface, the present study investigated activators regenerated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) as a method of grafting methyl methacrylate (MMA) onto the wood surface. The wood treated with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide and with the subsequently attached MMA via ARGET ATRP under different polymerization times (2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h) were examined using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. All the analyses confirmed that PMMA had been grafted onto the wood surface. Water contact angle measurement proved that the covering layer of PMMA on wood made the surface hydrophobic. Polymerization time had a positive influence on the contact angle value and higher contact angle can be produced with the prolongation of the polymerization time. When the reaction time was extended to 8 h, the contact angle of treated wood surface reached 130° in the beginning, and remained at 116° after 60 s. The ARGET ATRP method may raise an alteration on the wood surface modification.

  9. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  10. An optimized method for measuring methylmalonic acid in low volumes of serum using UPLC-MS/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a metabolic intermediate which is transformed to succinic acid (SA) by a vitamin B12-dependent catalytic step. MMA is broadly used as a clinical biomarker of functional vitamin B12 status. However, currently validated protocols use between 100 -1000 µL of se...

  11. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory


    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  12. Delineating the spectrum of impairments, disabilities, and rehabilitation needs in methylmalonic acidemia (MMA).

    PubMed

    Ktena, Yiouli P; Paul, Scott M; Hauser, Natalie S; Sloan, Jennifer L; Gropman, Andrea; Manoli, Irini; Venditti, Charles P

    2015-09-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia patients have complex rehabilitation needs that can be targeted to optimize societal independence and quality of life. Thirty-seven individuals with isolated MMA (28 mut, 5 cblA, 4 cblB), aged 2-33 years, were enrolled in a natural history study, and underwent age-appropriate clinical assessments to characterize impairments and disabilities. Neurological examination and brain imaging studies were used to document movement disorders and the presence of basal ganglia injury. A range of impairments and disabilities were identified by a team of physical medicine experts. Movement disorders, such as chorea and tremor, were common (n = 31, 83%), even among patients without evidence of basal ganglia injury. Joint hypermobility (n = 24, 69%) and pes planus (n = 22, 60%) were frequent and, in many cases, under-recognized. 23 (62%) patients required gastrostomy feedings. 18/31 patients >4 years old (58%) had difficulties with bathing and dressing. 16 of 23 school-aged patients received various forms of educational support. Five of the 10 adult patients were employed or in college; three lived independently. Unmet needs were identified in access to rehabilitation services, such as physical therapy (unavailable to 14/31), and orthotics (unavailable to 15/22). We conclude that patients with MMA are challenged by a number of functional limitations in essential activities of mobility, self-care, and learning, in great part caused by movement disorders and ligamentous laxity. Early assessment, referral, and implementation of age-appropriate rehabilitation services should significantly improve independence and quality of life. PMID:25959030

  13. Design of starch functionalized biodegradable P(MAA-co-MMA) as carrier matrix for l-asparaginase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Ahmet; Koytepe, Suleyman; Ates, Burhan

    2016-11-20

    We prepared biodegradable P(MAA-co-MMA)-starch composite as carrier matrix for the immobilization of l-asparaginase (l-ASNase), an important chemotherapeutic agent in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Chemical characteristics and thermal stability of the prepared composites were determined by FT-IR, TGA, DTA and, DSC, respectively. Also, biodegradability measurements of P(MAA-co-MMA)-starch composites were carried out to examine the effects of degradation of the starch. Then, l-ASNase was immobilized on the P(MAA-co-MMA)-starch composites. The surface morphology of the composite before and after immobilization was characterized by SEM, EDX, and AFM. The properties of the immobilized l-ASNase were investigated and compared with the free enzyme. The immobilized l-ASNase had better showed thermal and pH stability, and remained stable after 30days of storage at 25°C. Thus, based on the findings of the present work, the P(MAA-co-MMA)-starch composite can be exploited as the biocompatible matrix used for l-ASNase immobilization for medical applications due to biocompatibility and biodegradability. PMID:27561529

  14. High sensitivity and accuracy dissolved oxygen (DO) detection by using PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Honglin; Wang, Ying; Tian, Yanqing; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Fluorinated acrylate polymer has received great interest in recent years due to its extraordinary characteristics such as high oxygen permeability, good stability, low surface energy and refractive index. In this work, platinum octaethylporphyrin/poly(methylmethacrylate-co-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA)) oxygen sensing film was prepared by the immobilizing of PtOEP in a poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) matrix and the technological readiness of optical properties was established based on the principle of luminescence quenching. It was found that the oxygen-sensing performance could be improved by optimizing the monomer ratio (MMA/TFEMA=1:1), tributylphosphate(TBP, 0.05mL) and PtOEP (5μg) content. Under this condition, the maximum quenching ratio I0/I100 of the oxygen sensing film is obtained to be about 8.16, Stern-Volmer equation is I0/I=1.003+2.663[O2] (R(2)=0.999), exhibiting a linear relationship, good photo-stability, high sensitivity and accuracy. Finally, the synthesized PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film was used for DO detection in different water samples. PMID:27450122

  15. Europe Agrees on Common Strategy to Initiate Study of LSA/MMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    Council Specifies ESO's Role in Planning In an extraordinary meeting at the ESO Headquarters, the ESO Council today endorsed ESO's involvement in the planning of a major new astronomical facility in the southern hemisphere. Some years from now, the Large Southern Array/Millimetre Array (LSA/MMA) may become the world's prime sub-mm/mm radio observatory [1] at a pristine site at 5000 m altitude in the Chilean Andes, not very far from the VLT Paranal Observatory. Background One of the highest-priority items in astronomy today is a large millimetre-wavelength array. This would be a millimetre counterpart to the ESO VLT and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with similar scientific objectives and comparable high angular resolution and sensitivity. An antenna array with about 10,000 m 2 area would provide very high sensitivity and angular resolution, compatible with that of the VLT and HST. Such a large collecting area implies an array with many antennas and baselines, which give the added advantage of fast, high-quality images. The site must be high, dry, large, and flat - a high plateau in the Atacama desert is ideal, and has the great advantage of being in the southern hemisphere, important for compatibility with the VLT. Thus, discussions in Europe have focussed on a "Large Southern Array" (LSA) . The scientific case for such a telescope is overwhelming. It would be able to study the origins of galaxies and stars: the epoch of first galaxy formation and the evolution of galaxies at later stages, including the dust-obscured star-forming galaxies that the HST and VLT cannot see, and all phases of star formation hidden away in dusty molecular clouds. But the LSA will go far beyond these main science drivers - it will have a major impact on virtually all areas of astronomy, and make millimetre astronomy accessible to all astronomers. It may well have as big a user community as the VLT itself. European involvement in millimetre astronomy Europe already has a

  16. ESR study of MMA polymerization by a peroxide/amine system: bone cement formation.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, F F; Yasuda, H K

    1999-03-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to gain insight at the molecular level into the curing of bone cement. Methyl methacrylate was polymerized using a N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (TD)/benzoyl peroxide (BPO) redox system in the presence of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) powder. The conventional nine-line ESR spectrum for the growing polymer radical was detected at the gel stage of polymerization. While the optimum free radical concentration was observed near the equimolar amine/BPO concentration, excess amine led to a change in the chemical structure of the trapped radical and inhibited the polymerization process. At a high amine/BPO ratio the nine-line signal disappeared and a three-line nitroxide-based radical appeared. The appearance of this nitroxide signal seems to depend on the amine/BPO molar ratio and on the presence of PMMA. An excess amount of amine with respect to BPO was found to inhibit the polymerization process. When BPO was removed, the system still polymerized but with a longer gelation time and a lower radical concentration. These results demonstrate that trapped free radicals in the bulk polymerization of MMA convert to polymeric peroxides that act as initiators in bone cement. When the accelerator 4-dimethylamino phenethyl alcohol (TDOH) was used, a higher radical concentration was observed in the polymerizing system. TDOH shows potential for being a more effective accelerator than TD for bone cement curing. PMID:10397948

  17. Methylmalonic acid quantification in low serum volumes by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Theresa L; Keyes, William R; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Allen, Lindsay H; Newman, John W

    2011-06-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a metabolic intermediate transformed to succinic acid (SA) by a vitamin B(12)-dependent catalytic step, and is broadly used as a clinical biomarker of functional vitamin B12 status. However, reported methods use between 100 and 1000 μL of serum or plasma making them sub-optimal for sample-limited studies, including those with neonates and infants. LC-MS/MS based protocols to measure MMA as n-butyl esters in the presence of tri-deuterated MMA (MMA-d(3)) were modified for use with 25 μL of human serum by scaling down sample processing volumes and analysis by UPLC-MS/MS. Plasma-based calibration solutions were found to be unnecessary, and chromatographic resolution and peak shape of SA and MMA was optimized in <4 min with isocratic 53:47 methanol/1.67 mM (pH 6.5) ammonium formate. Additionally, 1-cyclohexyl-urido-3-dodecanoic acid (CUDA) was included as internal standard allowing direct assessment of MMA recovery. Sample concentrations in the low normal range produced a signal:noise of >100:1. MMA intra- and inter-assay variability was under 10%. MMA-d(3) surrogate recovery averaged 93±14%. MMA stability exceeded three years in frozen samples and was unaffected by up to five freeze/thaw cycles. In conclusion, we report that methylmalonic acid can be measured with 25 μL of serum using water based standards. The assay signal:noise per concentration indicates that the method could perform as implemented with as little as 5 μL of serum. The reported method is applicable for studies of functional B12 status in sample limited experiments including investigations of nutritional status in neonates and in studies where low normal MMA levels are expected. PMID:21497144

  18. Subtilomycin: A New Lantibiotic from Bacillus subtilis Strain MMA7 Isolated from the Marine Sponge Haliclona simulans

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Robert W.; Barret, Matthieu; Cotter, Paul D.; O’Connor, Paula M.; Chen, Rui; Morrissey, John P.; Dobson, Alan D. W.; O’Gara, Fergal; Barbosa, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriocins are attracting increased attention as an alternative to classic antibiotics in the fight against infectious disease and multidrug resistant pathogens. Bacillus subtilis strain MMA7 isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans displays a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, which includes Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, as well as several pathogenic Candida species. This activity is in part associated with a newly identified lantibiotic, herein named as subtilomycin. The proposed biosynthetic cluster is composed of six genes, including protein-coding genes for LanB-like dehydratase and LanC-like cyclase modification enzymes, characteristic of the class I lantibiotics. The subtilomycin biosynthetic cluster in B. subtilis strain MMA7 is found in place of the sporulation killing factor (skf) operon, reported in many B. subtilis isolates and involved in a bacterial cannibalistic behaviour intended to delay sporulation. The presence of the subtilomycin biosynthetic cluster appears to be widespread amongst B. subtilis strains isolated from different shallow and deep water marine sponges. Subtilomycin possesses several desirable industrial and pharmaceutical physicochemical properties, including activity over a wide pH range, thermal resistance and water solubility. Additionally, the production of the lantibiotic subtilomycin could be a desirable property should B. subtilis strain MMA7 be employed as a probiotic in aquaculture applications. PMID:23736764

  19. Application of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin for fixation of membrane to tooth in guided tissue regeneration in dog.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Miyakoshi, Shoichi; Shimono, Masaki; Yamada, Satoru

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 4-META/MMA-TBB resin as an alternative to sling sutures for fixation of membrane to tooth in GTR in terms of its effect on tissue regeneration. Dehiscence periodontal defects were created in 6 dogs which were divided at random into two groups, 3 dogs in each group: an experimental group, in which non-absorbable or absorbable membrane was fixed to the teeth with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin; and a control group, in which sling sutures were applied to fix the two types of membrane. Histologic and histometric evaluation was carried out at 8 weeks post-operatively to determine healing response in each group. Both methods of achieving membrane fixation to tooth were effective in inhibiting epithelial migration and encouraging formation of regenerated periodontal tissues around the root surfaces. These results suggest that 4-META/MMA-TBB resin is as effective as sling sutures in achieving membrane fixation in GTR and is, moreover, easier to apply. PMID:21099162

  20. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF MOUSE SKIN AND PAPILLOMAS FOLLOWING CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO MONOMETHYLARSONOUS ACID IN K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], a common metabolite of inorganic arsenic metabolism, increases tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice following a chronic exposure. To characterize gene expression profiles predictive of MMA(III) exposure and mode of action of carcin...

  1. Inhibition of enamel demineralization and bond-strength properties of bioactive glass containing 4-META/MMA-TBB-based resin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Naohisa; Iijima, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Toshima, Hirokazu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the enamel demineralization-prevention ability and shear bond strength (SBS) properties of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride/methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butyl borane (4-META/MMA-TBB)-based resin containing various amounts (0-50%) of bioactive glass (BG). Disk-shaped specimens were immersed in distilled water and ions released were analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy. Samples were also immersed in lactic acid solution (pH 4.6) to estimate acid-neutralizing ability. Brackets were bonded to human premolars with BG-containing resins and the bonded teeth were alternately immersed in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 d. The enamel hardness was determined by nanoindentation testing at twenty equidistant distances from the external surface. The SBS for each sample was examined. The amounts of ions released [calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), silicon (Si), and boron (B)] and the acid-neutralizing ability increased with increasing BG content. After alternating immersion, the specimens bonded with the BG-containing resin with high BG content were harder than those in the other groups in some locations 1-18.5 μm from the enamel surface. Bioactive glass-containing (10-40%) resin had bond strength equivalent to the control specimen. Thus, the SBS obtained for BG-containing resin (6.5-9.2 MPa) was clinically acceptable, suggesting that this material has the ability to prevent enamel demineralization. PMID:25903115

  2. Kinetics of mercury ions removal from synthetic aqueous solutions using by novel magnetic p(GMA-MMA-EGDMA) beads.

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülay; Arica, M Yakup

    2007-06-01

    Poly(glycidylmethacrylate-methylmethacrylate), p(GMA-MMA-EGDMA), magnetic beads were prepared via suspension polymerization in the presence of ferric ions. The epoxy groups of the beads were converted into amino groups via ring opening reaction of the ammonia and, the aminated magnetic beads were used for the removal of Hg(II) ions from aqueous solution in a batch experiment and in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed reactor (MFB). The magnetic p(GMA-MMA-EGDMA) beads were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), FT-IR and ESR spectrophotometers. The optimum removal of Hg(II) ions was observed at pH 5.5. The maximum adsorption capacity of Hg(II) ions by using the magnetic beads was 124.8+/-2.1 mgg(-1) beads. In the continuous MFB reactor, Hg(II) ions adsorption capacity of the magnetic beads decreased with an increase in the flow-rate. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic beads in the MFB reactor was 139.4+/-1.4 mgg(-1). The results indicate that the magnetic beads are promising for use in MFB for removal of Hg(II) ions from aqueous solution and/or waste water treatment. PMID:17118552

  3. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ~6500 unique proteins quantified, ~300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. PMID:24625837

  4. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  5. Determination of arsenic metabolic complex excreted in human urine after administration of sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhilong; Jiang, Guifeng; Cullen, William R; Aposhian, H Vasken; Le, X Chris

    2002-10-01

    Sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS) has been used to treat acute arsenic poisoning. Presumably DMPS functions by chelating some arsenic species to increase the excretion of arsenic from the body. However, the excreted complex of DMPS with arsenic has not been detected. Here we describe a DMPS complex with monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a key trivalent arsenic in the arsenic methylation process, and show the presence of the DMPS-MMA(III) complex in human urine after the administration of DMPS. The DMPS-MMA(III) complex was characterized using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and determined by using HPLC separation with hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection (HGAFD). The DMPS-MMA(III) complex did not form a volatile hydride with borohydride treatment. On-line digestion with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide following HPLC separation decomposed the DMPS-MMA(III) complex and allowed for the subsequent quantification by hydride generation atomic fluorescence. Arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), MMA(III), and DMPS-MMA(III) complex were analyzed in urine samples from human subjects collected after the ingestion of 300 mg of DMPS. The administration of DMPS resulted in a decrease of the DMA(V) concentration and an increase of the MMA(V) concentration excreted in the urine, confirming the previous results. The finding of the DMPS-MMA(III) complex in human urine after DMPS treatment provides an explanation for the inhibition of arsenic methylation by DMPS. Because MMA(III) is the substrate for the biomethylation of arsenic from MMA(V) to DMA(V), the formation of DMPS-MMA(III) complex would reduce the availability of MMA(III) for the subsequent biomethylation. PMID:12387631

  6. Controlled atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on the grafting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxides (GO) through controlled radical polymerization (CRP). To increase the density of surface grafting, GO was first diazotized (DGO), followed by esterification with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, which resulted in an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator-functionalized DGO-Br. The functionalized DGO-Br was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and XRD patterns. PMMA chains were then grafted onto the DGO-Br surface through a ‘grafting from’ technique using ATRP. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results revealed that polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) follows CRP. Thermal studies show that the resulting graphene-PMMA nanocomposites have higher thermal stability and glass transition temperatures (Tg) than those of pristine PMMA. PMID:25114639

  7. Controlled atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Chung, Jin Suk; Hur, Seung Hyun

    2014-07-01

    We report on the grafting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxides (GO) through controlled radical polymerization (CRP). To increase the density of surface grafting, GO was first diazotized (DGO), followed by esterification with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, which resulted in an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator-functionalized DGO-Br. The functionalized DGO-Br was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and XRD patterns. PMMA chains were then grafted onto the DGO-Br surface through a `grafting from' technique using ATRP. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results revealed that polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) follows CRP. Thermal studies show that the resulting graphene-PMMA nanocomposites have higher thermal stability and glass transition temperatures ( T g) than those of pristine PMMA.

  8. Cardiac Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Is Blocked by Monomethylarsonous Acid (III)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianfang; Barnett, Joey V.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic exposure during embryonic development can cause ischemic heart pathologies later in adulthood which may originate from impairment in proper blood vessel formation. The arsenic-associated detrimental effects are mediated by arsenite (iAsIII) and its most toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid [MMA (III)]. The impact of MMA (III) on coronary artery development has not yet been studied. The key cellular process that regulates coronary vessel development is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During cardiac EMT, activated epicardial progenitor cells transform to mesenchymal cells to form the cellular components of coronary vessels. Smad2/3 mediated TGFβ2 signaling, the key regulator of cardiac EMT, is disrupted by arsenite exposure. In this study, we compared the cardiac toxicity of MMA (III) with arsenite. Epicardial progenitor cells are 15 times more sensitive to MMA (III) cytotoxicity when compared with arsenite. MMA (III) caused a significant blockage in epicardial cellular transformation and invasion at doses 10 times lower than arsenite. Key EMT genes including TGFβ ligands, TβRIII, Has2, CD44, Snail1, TBX18, and MMP2 were down regulated by MMA (III) exposure. MMA (III) disrupted Smad2/3 activation at a dose 20 times lower than arsenite. Both arsenite and MMA (III) significantly inhibited Erk1/2 and Erk5 phosphorylation. Nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and Erk5 was also blocked by arsenical exposure. However, p38 activation, as well as smooth muscle differentiation, was refractory to the inhibition by the arsenicals. Collectively, these findings revealed that MMA (III) is a selective disruptor of cardiac EMT and as such may predispose to arsenic-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25145660

  9. Cardiac epithelial-mesenchymal transition is blocked by monomethylarsonous acid (III).

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianfang; Barnett, Joey V; Camenisch, Todd D

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic exposure during embryonic development can cause ischemic heart pathologies later in adulthood which may originate from impairment in proper blood vessel formation. The arsenic-associated detrimental effects are mediated by arsenite (iAs(III)) and its most toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid [MMA (III)]. The impact of MMA (III) on coronary artery development has not yet been studied. The key cellular process that regulates coronary vessel development is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During cardiac EMT, activated epicardial progenitor cells transform to mesenchymal cells to form the cellular components of coronary vessels. Smad2/3 mediated TGFβ2 signaling, the key regulator of cardiac EMT, is disrupted by arsenite exposure. In this study, we compared the cardiac toxicity of MMA (III) with arsenite. Epicardial progenitor cells are 15 times more sensitive to MMA (III) cytotoxicity when compared with arsenite. MMA (III) caused a significant blockage in epicardial cellular transformation and invasion at doses 10 times lower than arsenite. Key EMT genes including TGFβ ligands, TβRIII, Has2, CD44, Snail1, TBX18, and MMP2 were down regulated by MMA (III) exposure. MMA (III) disrupted Smad2/3 activation at a dose 20 times lower than arsenite. Both arsenite and MMA (III) significantly inhibited Erk1/2 and Erk5 phosphorylation. Nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and Erk5 was also blocked by arsenical exposure. However, p38 activation, as well as smooth muscle differentiation, was refractory to the inhibition by the arsenicals. Collectively, these findings revealed that MMA (III) is a selective disruptor of cardiac EMT and as such may predispose to arsenic-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25145660

  10. Arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid in drinking water did not affect DNA damage repair in urinary bladder transitional cells or micronuclei in bone marrow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized human skin, lung, and urinary bladder carcinogen, and may act as a cocarcinogen in the urinary bladder (with cigarette smoking) and skin (with UV light exposure). Possible modes of action of arsenic carcinogenesis/cocarcinogenesis include induction of DNA ...

  11. QUANTIFICATION OF AMMONIA, MMA, DMA, TMA AND TMAO IN FISH PROCESSING BY-PRODUCTS FROM DIFFERENT COLD WATER MARINE SPECIES BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determinations of the total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N) are routinely used to evaluate fish quality. TVB-N consists of ammonia, monomethylamine (MMA), dimethylamine (DMA), and trimethylamine (TMA), the levels of which are altered during spoilage by bacterial or enzymic degradation of trimethylami...

  12. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and cell-cycle disruptive effects of thio-dimethylarsinate in cultured human cells and the role of glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Ochi, Takafumi Kita, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshihide; Rumpler, Alice; Goessler, Walter; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2008-04-01

    Thio-dimethylarsinate (thio-DMA), a recently discovered urine metabolite in humans, was investigated for its cytotoxic, genotoxic and cell-cycle disruptive effects in the cultured human hepatocarcinoma cell line, HepG2, and Syrian hamster embryo cells. In addition, the role of glutathione (GSH) on the cytotoxic effects of thio-DMA was investigated in terms of the effects of GSH depletion and the effects of exogenously added GSH. LC{sub 50} values of arsenicals for cells incubated for 48 h were 0.026 mM for thio-DMA, 0.343 mM for DMA and 3.66 mM for dithio-DMA. Depletion of cell GSH reduced the cytotoxic effects of thio-DMA. The cytotoxic effects of 0.02 mM and 0.05 mM thio-DMA were enhanced markedly when used in combination with 1 to 3 mM GSH, but decreased again when combined with 5 mM GSH. These results suggested that cytotoxic intermediates were generated by the interaction of thio-DMA with GSH, while an excessive amount of GSH suppressed the generation of these intermediates. Flow-cytometry showed that thio-DMA was an inducer of cells with 4N DNA and hypo 2N DNA. The results also demonstrated that cells arrested in the mitotic phase had abnormalities in their spindle organization and centrosome integrity. In addition, cells arrested in mitosis by thio-DMA had chromosome structural aberrations, such as chromatid gaps, chromatid breaks and chromatid exchanges. Moreover, the cytotoxic effects of thio-DMA may in part be associated with an apoptotic mode of cell death that was evaluated by the appearance of nucleosome level DNA fragmentations and an 85-kDa cleavage fragment of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. These findings suggest that the presence of thio-DMA in human urine has implications for human health in terms of arsenic metabolism and toxicity.

  13. Addition of antibacterial agents to MMA-TBB dentin bonding systems--influence on tensile bond strength and antibacterial effect.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Y; Obara, K; Kawashima, T; Kubota, M; Abe, S; Endo, T; Komatsu, M; Okuda, R

    2000-03-01

    To produce a bonding system which has both high bond strength and antibacterial properties, an antibacterial agent (vancomycin: VCM or metronidazol: MN) was added to the PMMA powder of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (CB). The influence of the addition of an antibacterial agent on tensile bond strength to dentin and the antibacterial effect were investigated in this study. Forty-seven freshly extracted bovine first or second incisors were used to measure the tensile bond strength to dentin. The bond strengths to bovine dentin were not significantly decreased by addition of VCM (1%, 2%, 5%), or MN (1%) to CB (p < 0.05). The antibacterial effect of CB containing antibacterial agent on six strains of bacteria was investigated by the agar plate diffusion method, analyzing the appearance of the inhibition zone around a resin disk following anaerobic culturing. The resin disks containing VCM showed antibacterial effects on all of the strains examined; the widths of the inhibition zones were 4-15 mm. The resin disks containing MN showed antibacterial effects on three strains; the widths of the inhibition zones were 0-4 mm. It was thus possible to produce a bonding system with both antibacterial effect and high tensile bond strength by addition of VCM to PMMA powder. PMID:11219091

  14. A neuronal disruption in redox homeostasis elicited by ammonia alters the glycine/glutamate (GABA) cycle and contributes to MMA-induced excitability.

    PubMed

    Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Gabbi, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Della-Pace, Iuri Domingues; Rodrigues, Fernanda Silva; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Paula; da Silveira Junior, Mauro Eduardo Porto; da Silva, Luís Roberto Hart; Grisólia, Alan Barroso Araújo; Braga, Danielle Valente; Dobrachinski, Fernando; da Silva, Anderson Manoel Herculano Oliveira; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Marchesan, Sara; Furian, Ana Flavia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2016-06-01

    Hyperammonemia is a common finding in children with methylmalonic acidemia. However, its contribution to methylmalonate-induced excitotoxicty is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms by which ammonia influences in the neurotoxicity induced by methylmalonate (MMA) in mice. The effects of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl 3, 6, and 12 mmol/kg; s.c.) on electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral convulsions induced by MMA (0.3, 0.66, and 1 µmol/2 µL, i.c.v.) were observed in mice. After, ammonia, TNF-α, IL1β, IL-6, nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Methyl-Tetrazolium (MTT) reduction, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity levels were measured in the cerebral cortex. The binding of [(3)H]flunitrazepam, release of glutamate-GABA; glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and neuronal damage [opening of blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cellular death volume] were also measured. EEG recordings showed that an intermediate dose of NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) increased the duration of convulsive episodes induced by MMA (0.66 μmol/2 μL i.c.v). NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) administration also induced neuronal ammonia and NOx increase, as well as mitochondrial ROS generation throughout oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) to DCF-RS, followed by GS and GAD inhibition. The NH4Cl plus MMA administration did not alter cytokine levels, plasma fluorescein extravasation, or neuronal damage. However, it potentiated DCF-RS levels, decreased the ΔΨ potential, reduced MTT, inhibited SDH activity, and increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. NH4Cl also altered the GABA cycle characterized by GS and GAD activity inhibition, [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding, and GABA release after MMA injection. On the basis of our findings, the changes in ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) levels elicited by ammonia alter the glycine

  15. Reactive oxygen species-dependent HSP90 protein cleavage participates in arsenical As{sup +3}- and MMA{sup +3}-induced apoptosis through inhibition of telomerase activity via JNK activation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.-C.; Yang, L.-Y.; Lin, H.-Y.; Wu, C.-Y.; Su, T.-H.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2008-06-01

    The effects of six arsenic compounds including As{sup +3}, MMA{sup +3}, DMA{sup +3}, As{sup +5}, MMA{sup +5}, and DMA{sup +5} on the viability of NIH3T3 cells were examined. As{sup +3} and MMA{sup +3}, but not the others, exhibited significant cytotoxic effects in NIH3T3 cells through apoptosis induction. The apoptotic events such as DNA fragmentation and chromosome condensation induced by As{sup +3} and MMA{sup +3} were prevented by the addition of NAC and CAT, and induction of HO-1 gene expression in accordance with cleavage of the HSP90 protein, and suppression of telomerase activity were observed in NIH3T3 cells under As{sup +3} and MMA{sup +3} treatments. An increase in the intracellular peroxide level was examined in As{sup +3}- and MMA{sup +3}-treated NIH3T3 cells, and As{sup +3}- and MMA{sup +3}-induced apoptotic events were blocked by NAC, CAT, and DPI addition. HSP90 inhibitors, GA and RD, significantly attenuated the telomerase activity in NIH3T3 cells with an enhancement of As{sup +3}- and MMA{sup +3}-induced cytotoxicity. Suppression of JNKs significantly inhibited As{sup +3}- and MMA{sup +3}-induced apoptosis by blocking HSP90 protein cleavage and telomerase reduction in NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, Hb, SnPP, and dexferosamine showed no effect against As{sup +3}- and MMA{sup +3}-induced apoptosis, and overexpression of HO-1 protein or inhibition of HO-1 protein expression did not affect the apoptosis induced by As{sup +3} or MMA{sup +3}. These data provide the first evidence to indicate that apoptosis induced by As{sup +3} and MMA{sup +3} is mediated by an ROS-dependent degradation of HSP90 protein and reduction of telomerase via JNK activation, and HO-1 induction might not be involved.

  16. The influence of lithium fluoride on in vitro biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium aluminate-pMMA composite cement.

    PubMed

    Oh, S H; Choi, S Y; Choi, S H; Lee, Y K; Kim, K N

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the influence of lithium fluoride on in vitro biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium aluminate (CA)-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composite cement exhibiting quick setting time ( < 15 min), low exothermic temperature (< 47 degrees C), and high compressive strength (> 100 MPa). The biocompatibility was measured by examining cytotoxicity tests such as the agar diffusion test with L929 cell line and the hemolysis test with fresh rabbit blood. To estimate the bioactivity of CA-PMMA composite cement, we determined hydroxyapatite (HAp) formation on the surface of composite cement in the simulated body (SBF) solution by using thin-film XRD, XPS, SEM, EPMA and ICP-AES. The results of biocompatibility tests indicated that all experimental compositions of this study had no cytotoxicity and no hemolysis so that there was no cytotoxicity with regard to non-reacted monomers (MMA and TEGDMA) and lithium fluoride. The results of bioactivity tests revealed that CA-PMMA composite cement without lithium fluoride did not form HAp on its surface after 60 days of soaking in the SBF. On the other hand, LiAl2(OH)7 . 2H2O and HAp were formed on the surface of CA-PMMA composite cement including 1.0% by weight of lithium fluoride after 7 and 15 days of soaking in the SBF, respectively. The 5 microm of LiAl2(OH)7 . 2H2O and HAp mixed layers were formed on the surface of specimen after 60 days of soaking in the SBF. PMID:15338588

  17. Suitability of methylmalonic acid and total homocysteine analysis in dried bloodspots.

    PubMed

    de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G M; van der Ham, Maria; Jans, Judith J; Visser, Gepke; van Hasselt, Peter M; Prinsen, Hubertus C M T; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHCYS) concentrations are used to detect acquired and inborn errors of cobalamin (vitamin B12, Cbl) metabolism and to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions. Dried blood spot sampling offers a patient-friendly and easy alternative to plasma sampling. However, dried blood spot concentrations are not necessarily equal to plasma concentrations. Therefore, the objective of this work was to establish the relationship between MMA and tHYS dried blood spot and plasma concentrations to facilitate clinical implementation of dried blood spot sampling. MMA and tHCYS in both plasma and DBS were validated on ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). While position of the punch (in DBS) did affect tHCYS concentration, no influence of hematocrit (Ht) and blood volume on both MMA and tHCYS concentrations was observed. The plasma assay performed better than the DBS assay by most criteria. However, the DBS matrix was superior for tHCYS stability. Paired plasma and DBS samples were obtained from patients suspected for Cbl deficiency and from patients with a known inborn error of metabolism affecting MMA or tHCYS concentration. Based on the strong correlation of tHCYS in both matrices (y=0.46±1.12 (r(2)=0.91)), determination of tHCYS in plasma can be replaced by tHCYS in DBS. However, for MMA, a correlation in the higher (pathological) range of MMA exist, but no correlation was observed in the lower ranges. Therefore the added value of MMA concentrations in DBS is currently unknown and should be further investigated. PMID:25467488

  18. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  19. Arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid generate oxidative stress response in human bladder cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Eblin, K.E. . E-mail: eblin@pharmacy.arizona.edu; Bowen, M.E.; Cromey, D.W.; Bredfeldt, T.G.; Mash, E.A.; Lau, S.S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2006-11-15

    Arsenicals have commonly been seen to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can lead to DNA damage and oxidative stress. At low levels, arsenicals still induce the formation of ROS, leading to DNA damage and protein alterations. UROtsa cells, an immortalized human urothelial cell line, were used to study the effects of arsenicals on the human bladder, a site of arsenical bioconcentration and carcinogenesis. Biotransformation of As(III) by UROtsa cells has been shown to produce methylated species, namely monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], which has been shown to be 20 times more cytotoxic. Confocal fluorescence images of UROtsa cells treated with arsenicals and the ROS sensing probe, DCFDA, showed an increase of intracellular ROS within five min after 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M As(III) treatments. In contrast, 50 and 500 nM MMA(III) required pretreatment for 30 min before inducing ROS. The increase in ROS was ameliorated by preincubation with either SOD or catalase. An interesting aspect of these ROS detection studies is the noticeable difference between concentrations of As(III) and MMA(III) used, further supporting the increased cytotoxicity of MMA(III), as well as the increased amount of time required for MMA(III) to cause oxidative stress. These arsenical-induced ROS produced oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by an increase in 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) with either 50 nM or 5 {mu}M MMA(III) exposure. These findings provide support that MMA(III) cause a genotoxic response upon generation of ROS. Both As(III) and MMA(III) were also able to induce Hsp70 and MT protein levels above control, showing that the cells recognize the ROS and respond. As(III) rapidly induces the formation of ROS, possibly through it oxidation to As(V) and further metabolism to MMA(III)/(V). These studies provide evidence for a different mechanism of MMA(III) toxicity, one that MMA(III) first interacts with cellular components before an ROS response is generated, taking longer

  20. Monomethylarsonous acid, but not inorganic arsenic, is a mitochondria-specific toxicant in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pace, Clare; Banerjee, Tania Das; Welch, Barrett; Khalili, Roxana; Dagda, Ruben K; Angermann, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer, yet the role mitochondrial dysfunction plays in the cellular mechanisms of pathology is largely unknown. To investigate arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we exposed rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) to inorganic arsenic (iAs(III)) and its metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and compared their effects on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that MMA(III) is significantly more toxic to mitochondria than iAs(III). Exposure of VSMCs to MMA(III), but not iAs(III), significantly decreased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates and concomitantly increased compensatory extracellular acidification rates, a proxy for glycolysis. Treatment with MMA(III) significantly increased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels compared to iAs(III). Exposure to MMA(III) resulted in significant decreases in mitochondrial ATP, aberrant perinuclear clustering of mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial content. Mechanistically, we observed that mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contribute to mitochondrial toxicity, as treatment of cells with MnTBAP (a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic) and catalase significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration deficits and cell death induced by both arsenic compounds. Overall, our data demonstrates that MMA(III) is a mitochondria-specific toxicant that elevates mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources of ROS. PMID:27327130

  1. Glutathione-S-transferase-omega [MMA(V) reductase] knockout mice: Enzyme and arsenic species concentrations in tissues after arsenate administration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Uttam K.; Zakharyan, Robert A.; Hernandez, Alba; Avram, Mihaela D.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Aposhian, H. Vasken . E-mail: aposhian@u.arizona.edu

    2006-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human carcinogen to which millions of people are exposed via their naturally contaminated drinking water. Its molecular mechanisms of carcinogenicity have remained an enigma, perhaps because arsenate is biochemically transformed to at least five other arsenic-containing metabolites. In the biotransformation of inorganic arsenic, GSTO1 catalyzes the reduction of arsenate, MMA(V), and DMA(V) to the more toxic + 3 arsenic species. MMA(V) reductase and human (hGSTO1-1) are identical proteins. The hypothesis that GST-Omega knockout mice biotransformed inorganic arsenic differently than wild-type mice has been tested. The livers of male knockout (KO) mice, in which 222 bp of Exon 3 of the GSTO1 gene were eliminated, were analyzed by PCR for mRNA. The level of transcripts of the GSTO1 gene in KO mice was 3.3-fold less than in DBA/1lacJ wild-type (WT) mice. The GSTO2 transcripts were about two-fold less in the KO mouse. When KO and WT mice were injected intramuscularly with Na arsenate (4.16 mg As/kg body weight); tissues removed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h after arsenate injection; and the arsenic species measured by HPLC-ICP-MS, the results indicated that the highest concentration of the recently discovered and very toxic MMA(III), a key biotransformant, was in the kidneys of both KO and WT mice. The highest concentration of DMA(III) was in the urinary bladder tissue for both the KO and WT mice. The MMA(V) reducing activity of the liver cytosol of KO mice was only 20% of that found in wild-type mice. There appears to be another enzyme(s) other than GST-O able to reduce arsenic(V) species but to a lesser extent. This and other studies suggest that each step of the biotransformation of inorganic arsenic has an alternative enzyme to biotransform the arsenic substrate.

  2. Disruption of redox homeostasis and brain damage caused in vivo by methylmalonic acid and ammonia in cerebral cortex and striatum of developing rats.

    PubMed

    Viegas, C M; Zanatta, Â; Grings, M; Hickmann, F H; Monteiro, W O; Soares, L E; Sitta, Â; Leipnitz, G; de Oliveira, F H; Wajner, M

    2014-06-01

    Hyperammonemia is a common finding in children with methylmalonic acidemia and propionic acidemia, but its contribution to the development of the neurological symptoms in the affected patients is poorly known. Considering that methylmalonic acid (MMA) and propionic acid (PA) predominantly accumulate in these disorders, we investigated the effects of hyperammonemia induced by urease treatment in 30-day-old rats receiving an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of MMA or PA on important parameters of redox homeostasis in cerebral cortex and striatum. We evaluated glutathione (GSH) concentrations, sulfhydryl content, nitrate and nitrite concentrations, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. MMA decreased GSH concentrations and sulfhydryl content and increased nitrate and nitrite concentrations in cerebral cortex and striatum from hyperammonemic rats, whereas MMA or ammonia per se did not alter these parameters. MMA plus hyperammonemia also decreased glutathione reductase activity in rat cerebral cortex, but did not affect catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, neither DCFH oxidation. Furthermore, ICV PA administration alone or combined with hyperammonemia did not alter any of the evaluated parameters. We also found that pre-treatment with antioxidants prevented GSH reduction and sulfhydryl oxidation, whereas N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) prevented the increased nitrate and nitrite concentrations provoked by MMA plus ammonia treatments. Histological alterations, including vacuolization, ischemic neurons, and pericellular edema, were observed in brain of hyperammonemic rats injected with MMA. The data indicate a synergistic effect of MMA and ammonia disturbing redox homeostasis and causing morphological brain abnormalities in rat brain. PMID:24580146

  3. Drug release kinetics and fronts movement studies from methyl methacrylate (MMA) copolymer matrix tablets: effect of copolymer type and matrix porosity.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, C; Bravo, I; Jiménez-Castellanos, M R

    2003-09-19

    Several methyl methacrylate (MMA) copolymers have recently been proposed as an alternative for the formulation of controlled-release matrix tablets. Copolymers were synthesised by free radical copolymerisation of methyl methacrylate with starch or cellulose derivatives and were alternatively dried by oven or freeze-drying techniques. Both the chemical composition and the drying technique were demonstrated to have a considerable influence on the physical properties of the copolymers. The present investigation was focused on the elucidation of the drug release mechanism from MMA copolymer matrices, using anhydrous theophylline as model drug. Drug release experiments were performed from free tablets. Radial drug release and fronts movement were also evaluated using special devices consisting of two Plexiglass discs joined by means of four stainless steel screws. Mathematical analysis of release data was performed using Higuchi, Korsmeyer and Peppas equations and fronts movement was investigated using a colorimetric technique. The drug release rate and the relative positions of the fronts were studied as functions of the type of copolymer and the initial porosity of the tablets. Drug release was controlled mainly by diffusion and the release rate was found to be affected by the drying method and related to the area exposed to the dissolution medium. Three distinct fronts (water uptake, complete wetting, erosion) were observed during the release process and the dynamics of fronts movement confirmed the diffusional mechanism. PMID:14499186

  4. Boronic acid-functionalized core-shell-shell magnetic composite microspheres for the selective enrichment of glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Miaorong; Sun, Yangfei; Zheng, Jin; Yang, Wuli

    2013-09-11

    In this work, core-shell-shell-structured boronic acid-functionalized magnetic composite microspheres Fe3O4@SiO2@poly (methyl methacrylate-co-4-vinylphenylbornoic acid) (Fe3O4@SiO2@P(MMA-co-VPBA)) with a uniform size and fine morphology were synthesized. Here, Fe3O4 magnetic particles were prepared by a solvothermal reaction, whereas the Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres with a core-shell structure were obtained by a sol-gel process. 3-(Trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS)-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 was used as the seed in the emulsion polymerization of MMA and VPBA to form the core-shell-shell-structured magnetic composite microspheres. As the boronic acid groups on the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2@P(MMA-co-VPBA) could form tight yet reversible covalent bonds with the cis-1,2-diols groups of glycoproteins, the magnetic composite microspheres were applied to enrich a standard glycoprotein, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and the results demonstrated that the composite microspheres have a higher affinity for the glycoproteins in the presence of the nonglycoprotein bovine serum albumin (BSA) over HRP. Additionally, different monomer mole ratios of MMA/VPBA were studied, and the results implied that using MMA as the major monomer could reduce the amount of VPBA with a similar glycoprotein enrichment efficiency but a lower cost. PMID:23924282

  5. One-Pot Synthesis of Hydrophilic Superparamagnetic Fe3O4/Poly(methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) Composite Nanoparticles with High Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohua; Lan, Fang; Yang, Qi; Xie, Liqin; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2015-01-01

    Uniform superparamagnetic Fe3O4/poly(methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) (P(MMA-AA)) composite nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization and good hydrophilicity were successfully and directly synthesized via a facile one-pot miniemulsion polymerization approach. The mixture of the ferrofluids, MMA and AA monomers, surfactants and initiator was co-sonicated and emulsified to prepare stable miniemulsion for polymerization. The as-prepared products were characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and VSM. The results of SEM indicated that the morphology of the Fe3O4/P(MMA-AA) composite nanoparticles all assumed near spherical geometry with diameters about 60 nm, 60 nm, and 100 nm respectively corresponding to the weight ratios of Fe3O4 to MMA and AA at 1:8, 1:4, and 1:2. The TEM images implied that the Fe3O4/P(MMA-AA) composite nanoparticles showed a perfect core-shell structure with a polymeric shell of about 2 nm thickness and a core encapsulating uniform and close packed Fe3O4 nanoparticles. TGA and VSM showed that the Fe3O4/P(MMA-AA) composite nanoparticles with a maximum saturation magnetization up to 45 emu g(-1) corresponding to the magnetite content of 78% exhibited superparamagntism. The hydrophilic modification and the high saturation magnetization impart a promising potential for biomedical applications to the as-synthesized composite nanoparticles. PMID:26328359

  6. Differential inhibitory effects of methylmalonic acid on respiratory chain complex activities in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C; Schmidt, Anna Laura; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir

    2006-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and clinically by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is so far poorly established. Previous studies have shown that MMA inhibits complex II of the respiratory chain in rat cerebral cortex, although no inhibition of complexes I-V was found in bovine heart. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the in vitro effect of 2.5mM MMA on the activity of complexes I-III, II, II-III and IV in striatum, hippocampus, heart, liver and kidney homogenates from young rats. We observed that MMA caused a significant inhibition of complex II activity in striatum and hippocampus (15-20%) at low concentrations of succinate in the medium, but not in the peripheral tissues. We also verified that the inhibitory property of MMA only occurred after exposing brain homogenates for at least 10 min with the acid, suggesting that this inhibition was mediated by indirect mechanisms. Simultaneous preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and catalase (CAT) plus superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not prevent MMA-induced inhibition of complex II, suggesting that common reactive oxygen (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric (nitric oxide) species were not involved in this effect. In addition, complex II-III (20-35%) was also inhibited by MMA in all tissues tested, and complex I-III only in the kidney (53%) and liver (38%). In contrast, complex IV activity was not changed by MMA in all tissues studied. These results indicate that MMA differentially affects the activity of the respiratory chain pending on the tissues studied, being striatum and hippocampus more vulnerable to its effect. In case our in vitro data are confirmed in vivo in tissues from methylmalonic acidemic patients, it is feasible that that the present findings may be

  7. A Common Polymorphism in HIBCH Influences Methylmalonic Acid Concentrations in Blood Independently of Cobalamin.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Anne M; Pangilinan, Faith; Mills, James L; Shane, Barry; O'Neill, Mary B; McGaughey, David M; Velkova, Aneliya; Abaan, Hatice Ozel; Ueland, Per M; McNulty, Helene; Ward, Mary; Strain, J J; Cunningham, Conal; Casey, Miriam; Cropp, Cheryl D; Kim, Yoonhee; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Wilson, Alexander F; Brody, Lawrence C

    2016-05-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a by-product of propionic acid metabolism through the vitamin B12 (cobalamin)-dependent enzyme methylmalonyl CoA mutase. Elevated MMA concentrations are a hallmark of several inborn errors of metabolism and indicators of cobalamin deficiency in older persons. In a genome-wide analysis of 2,210 healthy young Irish adults (median age 22 years) we identified a strong association of plasma MMA with SNPs in 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH, p = 8.42 × 10(-89)) and acyl-CoA synthetase family member 3 (ACSF3, p = 3.48 × 10(-19)). These loci accounted for 12% of the variance in MMA concentration. The most strongly associated SNP (HIBCH rs291466; c:2T>C) causes a missense change of the initiator methionine codon (minor-allele frequency = 0.43) to threonine. Surprisingly, the resulting variant, p.Met1?, is associated with increased expression of HIBCH mRNA and encoded protein. These homozygotes had, on average, 46% higher MMA concentrations than methionine-encoding homozygotes in young adults with generally low MMA concentrations (0.17 [0.14-0.21] μmol/L; median [25(th)-75(th) quartile]). The association between MMA levels and HIBCH rs291466 was highly significant in a replication cohort of 1,481 older individuals (median age 79 years) with elevated plasma MMA concentrations (0.34 [0.24-0.51] μmol/L; p = 4.0 × 10(-26)). In a longitudinal study of 185 pregnant women and their newborns, the association of this SNP remained significant across the gestational trimesters and in newborns. HIBCH is unique to valine catabolism. Studies evaluating flux through the valine catabolic pathway in humans should account for these variants. Furthermore, this SNP could help resolve equivocal clinical tests where plasma MMA values have been used to diagnose cobalamin deficiency. PMID:27132595

  8. Plasma vitamin B12, methylmalonic acid and heart rate variability in healthy young Indian adults.

    PubMed

    Sucharita, Sambashivaiah; Sowmya, Sharma; Thomas, Tinku; Kurpad, Anura V; Vaz, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the Indian population is not known, however; it is considered to be higher than in the Western population. Vitamin B12 deficiency is generally diagnosed by the plasma vitamin B12 level. Metabolites of vitamin B12 such as homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) are considered to be better markers to diagnose vitamin B12 deficiency at the tissue level. Autonomic neuropathy in vitamin B12 deficiency appears to precede other neurological signs. One of the recent techniques to evaluate autonomic neuropathy is heart rate variability (HRV). We evaluated 14 healthy young adults to explore the association of plasma vitamin B12, MMA, and Hcy levels with HRV. Resting lead II ECG was recorded and power spectral analyses were performed. Plasma MMA level was significantly and negatively correlated with the log-transformed low frequency (r = - 0.74, p = 0.002) and total power spectra (r = - 0.55, p = 0.03) of HRV in absolute units. Low frequency (LF) (r = - 0.56, p = 0.03) and high frequency (HF) (r = 0.57, p = 0.03), when represented in normalized units, were also correlated significantly with plasma MMA. In summary, plasma MMA but not vitamin B12 was significantly associated with HRV indices in a young adult population, suggesting that a tissue-level marker of vitamin B12 deficiency is more closely correlated with functional changes. PMID:24846903

  9. The Rice Aquaporin Lsi1 Mediates Uptake of Methylated Arsenic Species1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ren-Ying; Ago, Yukiko; Liu, Wen-Ju; Mitani, Namiki; Feldmann, Jörg; McGrath, Steve P.; Ma, Jian Feng; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Pentavalent methylated arsenic (As) species such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] are used as herbicides or pesticides, and can also be synthesized by soil microorganisms or algae through As methylation. The mechanism of MMA(V) and DMA(V) uptake remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that arsenite is taken up by rice (Oryza sativa) roots through two silicon transporters, Lsi1 (the aquaporin NIP2;1) and Lsi2 (an efflux carrier). Here we investigated whether these two transporters also mediate the uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V). MMA(V) was partly reduced to trivalent MMA(III) in rice roots, but only MMA(V) was translocated to shoots. DMA(V) was stable in plants. The rice lsi1 mutant lost about 80% and 50% of the uptake capacity for MMA(V) and DMA(V), respectively, compared with the wild-type rice, whereas Lsi2 mutation had little effect. The short-term uptake kinetics of MMA(V) can be described by a Michaelis-Menten plus linear model, with the wild type having 3.5-fold higher Vmax than the lsi1 mutant. The uptake kinetics of DMA(V) were linear with the slope being 2.8-fold higher in the wild type than the lsi1 mutant. Heterologous expression of Lsi1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of MMA(V) but not DMA(V), possibly because of a very limited uptake of the latter. Uptake of MMA(V) and DMA(V) by wild-type rice was increased as the pH of the medium decreased, consistent with an increasing proportion of the undissociated species. The results demonstrate that Lsi1 mediates the uptake of undissociated methylated As in rice roots. PMID:19542298

  10. Improvement of holographic thermal stability in phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) photopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dan; Liu, Hongpeng; Wang, Heng; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yongyuan; Sun, Xiudong

    2011-08-01

    Experimental studies of holographic thermal stability in phenanthrenequinone (PQ)-doped poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) [P(MMA-co-MAA)] photopolymers are presented. A possibility to improve the thermal stability of holograms is demonstrated by doping methacrylic acid (MAA) into the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer matrix. MAA as a copolymerization monomer can form a more stable polymer matrix with methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer and increase average molecular weight of photoproducts, which finally depress the diffusion of photoproduct. The optimized MAA concentration copolymerized into P(MMA-co-MAA) polymer matrix can bring nearly a month's lifetime of gratings, which is obviously an improvement over the usual PQ-PMMA material under thermal treatment.

  11. Maleic Acid – but Not Structurally Related Methylmalonic Acid – Interrupts Energy Metabolism by Impaired Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei-Tzu; Okun, Jürgen Günther; Kölker, Stefan; Morath, Marina Alexandra; Sauer, Sven Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Maleic acid (MA) has been shown to induce Fanconi syndrome via disturbance of renal energy homeostasis, though the underlying pathomechanism is still under debate. Our study aimed to examine the pathomechanism underlying maleic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is structurally similar to MA and accumulates in patients affected with methymalonic aciduria, a defect in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids, odd-chain fatty acids and cholesterol, which is associated with the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis resulting in chronic renal failure. We therefore used MMA application as a control experiment in our study and stressed hPTECs with MA and MMA to further validate the specificity of our findings. MMA did not show any toxic effects on proximal tubule cells, whereas maleic acid induced concentration-dependent and time-dependent cell death shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase release as well as ethidium homodimer and calcein acetoxymethyl ester staining. The toxic effect of MA was blocked by administration of single amino acids, in particular L-alanine and L-glutamate. MA application further resulted in severe impairment of cellular energy homeostasis on the level of glycolysis, respiratory chain, and citric acid cycle resulting in ATP depletion. As underlying mechanism we could identify disturbance of calcium homeostasis. MA toxicity was critically dependent on calcium levels in culture medium and blocked by the extra- and intracellular calcium chelators EGTA and BAPTA-AM respectively. Moreover, MA-induced cell death was associated with activation of calcium-dependent calpain proteases. In summary, our study shows a comprehensive pathomechanistic concept for MA-induced dysfunction and damage of human proximal tubule cells. PMID:26086473

  12. Resistance of medical gloves to permeation by methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), and 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,4-BDMA).

    PubMed

    Lönnroth, Emma-Christin; Eystein Ruyter, I

    2003-01-01

    Gloves afford hand protection by minimizing skin contact. The effectiveness of medical gloves to protect against permeation of the monomers, methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), and 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,4-BDMA), was assessed focusing on permeation rates and degradation of glove materials caused by monomer contact. Fifteen different brands of gloves were tested using a European Standard procedure. Surface images of glove materials before and after exposure to the monomer mixture were obtained using a scanning electron microscope. The standard is not applicable as the only method for estimating the safety of gloves, but it is useful as guideline together with the cumulative permeation of acrylic monomers. Monomer contact on the outside resulted in substantial swelling of most glove materials, and structure changes of the inside surface. PMID:14577946

  13. Surface and chemical properties of surface-modified UHMWPE powder and mechanical and thermal properties of its impregnated PMMA bone cement, IV: effect of MMA/accelerator on the surface modification of UHMWPE powder.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Hyeok; Ko, Jong Tae; Kim, Yong Sik; Kim, Moon Suk; Shin, Hyung Sik; Rhee, John M; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Hai Bang

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we manufactured a reinforced poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement with 3 wt% of the surface-modified ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder to improve its poor mechanical and thermal properties resulting from unreacted methylmethacrylate (MMA), the generation of bubble and shrinkage, and high curing temperature. In the present study, the effect of ratios of MMA and N,N'-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) solutions in redox polymerization system was investigated for the surface modification of UHMWPE powder. We characterized physical and chemical properties of surface-modified UHMWPE powder and reinforced bone cements by a scanning electron microscope, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and curing temperature (Tmax). It was found that UTSs (41.3-51.3 MPa) of the reinforced PMMA bone cements were similar to those (44.5 MPa) of conventional PMMA bone cement (control), as well as significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those (33.8 MPa) of 3 wt% unmodified UHMWPE powder-impregnated bone cement. In particular, the UTS of redox polymerization system using MMA/DMPT solution was better than that of radical system using MMA/xylene solution. Also, Tmax of the reinforced PMMA bone cements decreased from 103 to 72-84 degrees C. From these results, we confirmed that the surface-modified UHMWPE powder can be used as reinforcing agent to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of conventional PMMA bone cement. PMID:16909947

  14. Fate of ( sup 14 C)arsanilic acid in pigs and chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Aschbacher, P.W.; Feil, V.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Arsanilic acid uniformly labeled with {sup 14}C in the benzene ring was used to determine the metabolic fate of oral arsanilic acid in pigs and chickens. Arsanilic acid was well absorbed in both species, and urine was the predominant route of excretion. The bile was a minor (< 5% of the dose) route of excretion in pigs; however, biliary excretion was not measured in roosters. Arsanilic acid, N-acetylarsanilic acid, and (4-acetamidophenyl)dimethylarsine oxide were isolated from pig urine (17-39%, 15-29%, and < 5% of urinary {sup 14}C, respectively). Only 25% of the {sup 14}C in pig feces was extractable, and no metabolites could be isolated. Arsanilic acid was the only radioactive compound isolated from urine of colostomized roosters, and there was no suggestion of other metabolites from the isolation scheme employed. No attempt was made to isolate {sup 14}C compounds in feces from colostomized roosters or in excreta from normal roosters.

  15. In vitamin B12 deficiency, higher serum folate is assoicated with increased total homocysteine (tHcy) and methlmalonic acid (MMA) concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a recent study of older participants (age >/= 60 y) in the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we showed that a combination of high serum folate and low vitamin B-12 status was associated with higher prevalence of cognitive impairment and anemia than other combina...

  16. Serum folate, cobalamin, homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations in pigs with acute, chronic or subclinical Lawsonia intracellularis infection.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Gebhart, Connie J; Lawhorn, Bruce D; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2015-03-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of porcine proliferative enteropathy. The clinical presentation can be acute (i.e. proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy, PHE), chronic (i.e. porcine intestinal adenomatosis, PIA) or subclinical. In humans with chronic enteropathies, low serum folate (vitamin B(9)) and cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) concentrations have been associated with increased serum concentrations of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid (MMA), which reflect the availability of both vitamins at the cellular level. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum folate, cobalamin, homocysteine and MMA concentrations in serum samples from pigs with PHE, PIA or subclinical L. intracellularis infection, and in negative controls. Serum folate, cobalamin, homocysteine and MMA concentrations differed significantly among pigs in the PHE, PIA, subclinical and negative control groups. Serum folate concentrations in the PHE and PIA groups were lower than in the subclinical and negative control groups, while serum cobalamin concentrations were lower in the PIA group than in other groups. Serum concentrations of homocysteine were higher in the PHE, PIA and subclinical groups than in the negative control group. Serum concentrations of MMA were higher in the subclinical and PIA groups than in the control group. These data suggest that pigs infected with L. intracellularis have altered serum cobalamin, folate, homocysteine and MMA concentrations. PMID:25618855

  17. Dietary Sources of Methylated Arsenic Species in Urine of the United States Population, NHANES 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    deCastro, B. Rey; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Jones, Robert L.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Pan, Yi; Ward, Cynthia; Mortensen, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic is an ubiquitous element linked to carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, as well as adverse respiratory, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and dermal health effects. Objective Identify dietary sources of speciated arsenic: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Methods Age-stratified, sample-weighted regression of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2003–2010 data (∼8,300 participants ≥6 years old) characterized the association between urinary arsenic species and the additional mass consumed of USDA-standardized food groups (24-hour dietary recall data), controlling for potential confounders. Results For all arsenic species, the rank-order of age strata for median urinary molar concentration was children 6–11 years > adults 20–84 years > adolescents 12–19 years, and for all age strata, the rank-order was DMA > MMA. Median urinary molar concentrations of methylated arsenic species ranged from 0.56 to 3.52 µmol/mol creatinine. Statistically significant increases in urinary arsenic species were associated with increased consumption of: fish (DMA); fruits (DMA, MMA); grain products (DMA, MMA); legumes, nuts, seeds (DMA); meat, poultry (DMA); rice (DMA, MMA); rice cakes/crackers (DMA, MMA); and sugars, sweets, beverages (MMA). And, for adults, rice beverage/milk (DMA, MMA). In addition, based on US (United States) median and 90th percentile consumption rates of each food group, exposure from the following food groups was highlighted: fish; fruits; grain products; legumes, nuts, seeds; meat, poultry; and sugars, sweets, beverages. Conclusions In a nationally representative sample of the US civilian, noninstitutionalized population, fish (adults), rice (children), and rice cakes/crackers (adolescents) had the largest associations with urinary DMA. For MMA, rice beverage/milk (adults) and rice cakes/crackers (children, adolescents) had the largest associations. PMID:25251890

  18. Tumors and Proliferative Lesions in Adult Offspring After Maternal Exposure to Methylarsonous Acid During Gestation in CD1 Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental exposure to inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and mice, and adult offspring of mice exposed to inorganic arsenic can develop tumors of the lung, liver, adrenal, uterus, and ovary. It has been suggested that methylarsonous acid (MMA3+), a product of the bi...

  19. Automated assay of methylmalonic acid in serum and urine by derivatization with 1-pyrenyldiazomethane, liquid chromatography, and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Schneede, J; Ueland, P M

    1993-03-01

    Determination of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in serum has been established as an accurate test for the diagnosis of cobalamin deficiency. We describe here the development and performance of a liquid-chromatographic assay of MMA in blood and urine. The assay is based on our recent finding that one of the carboxylic acid moieties of some short-chain dicarboxylic acids reacts with the fluorogenic reagent 1-pyrenyldiazomethane in an aqueous medium, whereas the other remains underivatized (Anal Chem 1992; 63:315-9). The pH-dependent ionization of the free carboxylic acid group of 1-pyrenylmethyl monoesters permits retention on anion-exchange columns, which are used for solid-phase extraction. The analysis is done with a cyanopropyl column coupled in series with an octadecyldimethylsilyl column. Solid-phase extraction and sample injection are carried out automatically by a Gilson ASPEC sample processor. The assay response varies linearly with MMA concentration in the range 0.1-1000 mumol/L in serum. The within-day and between-day CVs are 2.8-10.9%, and the detection limit of 5 fmol injected (approximately 20 nmol/L in serum) is sufficiently low to determine MMA in serum (mean 0.187 mumol/L, SD 0.084, range 0.044-0.431, n = 44) and urine from healthy subjects. PMID:8448848

  20. Effect of annealing on the phase structure and the properties of the film formed from P(St-co-BA)/P(MMA-co-BA) composite latex.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xianyong; Huo, Dongxia; Qian, Qingwen

    2010-06-01

    Composite latex of P(St-co-BA)/P(MMA-co-BA) was prepared by two-step semi-continuous emulsion polymerization under starved conditions. Optical properties, water resistance and heat aging process of the film formed by the composite latex were examined. It was revealed that annealing temperature played an important role on the structure of the composite latex film. The surface of the film prepared at room temperature was very rough. Many micro-cracks were observed both on the surface and inside of the film. Increase of annealing temperature assisted film formation. There was a critical temperature at which the film properties, such as water resistance and transparency, were significantly improved. However, it was worth to note that phase rearrangement had occurred when the annealing temperature was higher than critical temperature. Micro-pinholes and micro-cracks were detected on the surface of the film. Meanwhile, the properties of the film, such as transparency and water adsorption, became remarkable deteriorated. PMID:20303499

  1. Methylmalonic Acid and Homocysteine as Indicators of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Pankaj; Edwin, Persis; Popiel, Brenten; Lammersfeld, Carolyn; Gupta, Digant

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Normal or high serum vitamin B-12 levels can sometimes be seen in a B-12 deficient state, and can therefore be misleading. High levels of Methymalonic Acid (MMA) and Homocysteine (HC) have been identified as better indicators of B-12 deficiency than the actual serum B-12 level itself. We evaluated the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency using appropriate cut-off levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC, and determined the relationship between serum levels of vitamin B-12, MMA and HC in cancer. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using a consecutive case series of 316 cancer patients first seen at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center between April 2014 and June 2014. All patients were evaluated at baseline for vitamin B-12 (pg/mL), MMA (nmol/L) and HC (μmol/L) levels. In accordance with previously published research, the following cut-offs were used to define vitamin B-12 deficiency: <300 pg/mL for vitamin B-12, >260 nmol/L for MMA and >12 μmol/L for HC. The relationship between B-12, MMA and HC was evaluated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient and cross-tabulation analysis. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of vitamin B-12 using Fedosov quotient as the "gold standard". Results Mean age at presentation was 52.5 years. 134 (42.4%) patients were males while 182 (57.6%) were females. Median vitamin B-12, MMA and HC levels were 582.5 pg/mL, 146.5 nmol/L and 8.4 μmol/L respectively. Of 316 patients, 28 (8.9%) were vitamin B-12 deficient based on vitamin B-12 (<300pg/mL), 34 (10.8%) were deficient based on MMA (>260 nmol/L) while 55 (17.4%) were deficient based on HC (>12 μmol/L). Correlation analysis revealed a significant weak negative correlation between vitamin B-12 and MMA (rho = -0.22) as well as B-12 and HC (rho = -0.35). ROC curves suggested MMA to have the best discriminatory power in

  2. In vitro evaluation of a modified 4-META/MMA-TBB resin for filling access holes of screw-retained implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Remy; Suzuki, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates a modified 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (M4M) as a candidate material for filling screw-retained implant access hole. Its characteristics were compared with a conventional composite resin (CR) with or without a bonding agent (BA) or a ceramic primer (CP). Ceramic blocks were divided into five groups, including (A) CR, (B) CR with BA, (C) CR with CP and BA, (D) M4M, and (E) M4M with CP. Shear bond strengths were measured after 5000 times of thermocycling. Groups A, B, and D were excluded from further tests as they showed no adhesion. A cylindrical cavity (2.5 mm diameter, 3 mm depth) simulating access hole was prepared in a ceramic block and glazed to evaluate micro-leakage and wear test of groups C and E. The results were statistically analyzed with Mann-Whitney test (p  <  0.05). Shear bond strength of groups C (7.6 ± 2.2 MPa) and E (8.6 ± 1.0 MPa) was not significantly different. In micro-leakage analysis, average wear depth and wear volume, group E (7.5 ± 3.3%, 59.3 ± 12.9 μm, 0.16 ± 0.04 mm(3) ) showed significantly lower values than those of group C (45.6 ± 24.4%, 76.0 ± 16.4 μm, 0.28 ± 0.03 mm(3) ). It is suggested that the combination of CP and M4M can be one of feasible systems to fill the ceramic access holes of the implant upper structure. PMID:25224516

  3. Magnetofluorescent probe of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles modified with poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA-r-Eu(NTA)3(MMA)(TOPO)3).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Cheol; Kang, Bo-Sun; Sohn, Youngjoo; Tae, Ki-Sik; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Do Kyung; Chang, Yun Seung

    2014-11-01

    In this study, hybrid magnetofluorescent structures composed of organic moiety of poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA) for biomolecules-resistant surfaces and methyl methacrylate for conjugation of europium complex inorganic moiety of magnetic nanoparticles are reported. Lanthanide complex of europium ion with 4,4,4-Trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-butanedione (NTA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO)[Eu(NTA)3(TOPO)3] were incorporated into poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA-r-MMA) matrix. Afterward, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were coated with as prepared polymeric europium complex (PEC) to construct hierarchical structure of magnetofluorescent probe. The PL spectra of the PEC@SPIONs excited by UV light showed characteristic emission behavior with a hypersensitive transition 5D0 --> 7F2 at 621 nm. About a 20% quenching in the intensity of the emission peak at 621 nm was found after the addition of SPIONs. Interestingly, when the concentration of PEC against SPIONs is increased, the hypersensitive transition 5D0 --> 7F2 at 621 nm is linearly increased, while 5D1 --> 7F6 at 700 nm is linearly decreased. The cytotoxic effect of PEC@SPIONs was evaluated with U373MG cell by the MTT assay of PEC@SPIONs in cell proliferation. The cell viability in the range of 10-200 ug/ml was more than 80%. No significant difference in cell proliferation until the concentration of 300 ug/ml (77.61 ± 3.33%). The cellular uptake of PEC@SPIONs evaluated by confocal microscopy showed that the magnetofluorescent nanoparticles were internalized extensively in the cytoplasmic region. PMID:25958588

  4. Physicians' Plan for a healthy Minnesota. The MMA proposal for health care reform. The report of the Minnesota Medical Association Health Care Reform Task Force.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    The health care system in the United States, according to some, is on the verge of imploding. The rapidly rising cost of services is causing more and more Minnesotans to forego needed care. At the same time, the increasing costs are placing additional pressure on families, businesses, and state and local government budgets. The Minnesota Medical Association's (MMA) Health Care Reform Task Force has proposed a bold new approach that seeks to ensure affordable health care for all Minnesotans. The proposal is a roadmap to provide all Minnesotans with affordable insurance for essential health care services. In creating this plan, the task force strove to achieve three common reform goals: expand access to care, improve quality, and control costs. To achieve those ends, it has proposed a model built on four key features: (1) A strong public health system, (2) A reformed insurance market that delivers universal coverage, (3) A reformed health care delivery market that creates incentives for increasing value, (4) Systems that fully support the delivery of high-quality care. The task force believes that these elements will provide the foundation for a system that serves everyone and allows Minnesotans to purchase better health care at a relatively lower price. Why health care reform again? The average annual cost of health care for an average Minnesota household is about 11,000 dollars--an amount that's projected to double by 2010, if current trends continue. Real wages are not growing fast enough to absorb such cost increases. If unabated, these trends portend a reduction in access to and quality of care, and a heavier economic burden on individuals, employers, and the government. Furthermore, Minnesota and the United States are not getting the best value for their health care dollars. The United States spends 50 percent more per capita than any other country on health care but lags far behind other countries in the health measures of its population. PMID:15853031

  5. Medicinal facilities to B16F10 melanoma cells for distant metastasis control with a supramolecular complex by DEAE-dextran-MMA copolymer/paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Eshita, Yuki; Ji, Rui-Cheng; Onishi, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun; Kubota, Naoji; Onishi, Yasuhiko

    2015-02-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs (MDR) is a major problem to be solved. A supramolecular DEAE-dextran-MMA copolymer (DDMC)/paclitaxel (PTX) complex was obtained by using PTX as the guest and DDMC as the host having 50-300 nm in diameter. The drug resistance of B16F10 melanoma cells to paclitaxel was observed, but there is no drug resistance of melanoma cells to the DDMC/PTX complex in vitro. The cell death rate was determined using Michaelis-Menten kinetics, as the DDMC/PTX complex promoted allosteric supramolecular reaction to tubulin. The DDMC/PTX complex showed a very superior anti-cancer activity to paclitaxel alone in vivo. The median survival time (MST) of the saline, PTX, DDMC/PTX4 (particle size, 50 nm), and DDMC/PTX5 (particle size, 290 nm) groups were 120 h (T/C, 1.0), 176 h (T/C, 1.46), 328 h (T/C, 2.73), and 280 h (T/C, 2.33), respectively. The supramolecular DDMC/PTX complex showed the twofold effectiveness of PTX alone (p < 0.036). Histochemical analysis indicated that the administration of DDMC/PTX complex decreased distant metastasis and increased the survival of mice. A mouse of DDMC/PTX4 group in vivo was almost curing after small dermatorrhagia owing to its anti-angiogenesis, and it will be the hemorrhagic necrotic symptom of tumor by the release of "tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)" cytokine. As the result, the medicinal action of the DDMC/PTX complex will suppress the tumor-associated action of M2 macrophages and will control the metastasis of cancer cells. PMID:25787338

  6. AB041. Genetic diversity of organic and fatty acid disorders detectable in expanded newborn screening in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Seiji; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Chí, Dũng Vũ; Thu, Nhan Nguen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the increasing number of children with organic acidemias (OAs) and fatty acid oxidation defects (FAODs) has been detected with development of diagnostic tools, like GC/MS or MS/MS, for inborn metabolic disease (IMD). We have performed collaboration study with some Asian countries, and have noticed the diversity of disease contribution and genetic aspects. Diversity of disease distribution: metabolic screening of children at high risk using GC/MS and NS/MS has been performed in collaboration with several Asian countries. In India, Vietnam, and China, as well as Japan, methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) was most common, followed by urea cycle disorder (UCD), propionic academia (PPA). In Vietnam and India, 3-ketothiolase deficiency (BKTD), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), and oxoprolinuria are also common, although they are extremely rare in Japan. In China, frequency of MMA seemed to be high, in particular combined MMA and homocystinuria many of which are B12 responsible. Genetic diversity: (I) MMA: in China, 42% of MMA are combined type of MMA and HCY due to CblC defect. 609G>A in MMACHC gene is a common mutation, covering 55%; (II) BKTD: in Vietnamese patients, c.662C>G in T2 gene is common, covering 72%; (III) PPA: in Japanese, Y435C mutation in PCCB gene is a common mutation in the mild form of PPA, at prevalence of 1 in 86 alleles in Japanese population; (IV) MCAD deficiency: common mutation 985A>C which covers about 90% of alleles among Caucasian is famous. A mutation study of Japanese cases, revealed a common mutation, c.449delCTGA, covering about 45% of the alleles. It is still unknown whether the mutation is Japanese specific, or East-Asian specific. Newborn mass screening (NBS) is increasingly popular in Asian countries. The diversity of disease distribution and genetic mutations will be made clear with the spread of collaboration studies and expanded NBS using MS/MS.

  7. Effect of Dietary Treatment with Dimethylarsinous Acid (DMAIII) on the Urinary Bladder Epithelium of Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase (As3mt) Knockout and C57BL/6 Wild Type Female Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic to the human urinary bladder. It produces urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation in rats and mice. DMAv, a major methylated urinary metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder carcinogen, but without effects on the...

  8. Highly sensitive and selective measurement of underivatized methylmalonic acid in serum and plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Gabler, Jessica; El-Khoury, Joe M; Spatholt, Regina; Wang, Sihe

    2012-07-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a functional biomarker of vitamin B12 deficiency. Measurement of plasma MMA is challenging due to its small molecular weight and hydrophilic nature. Several liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods have been developed for measuring plasma MMA. However, these methods involve lengthy sample preparation, long chromatographic run time, inadequate sensitivity, or interference from succinic acid (SA). Here we report a novel LC-MS/MS method for quantitation of underivatized MMA in serum or heparinized plasma with high sensitivity and selectivity. Sample preparation involved only strong anion exchange solid phase extraction. The extract was purified by online turbulent flow and analyzed on an Organic Acids column. MS/MS analysis was performed in negative electrospray mode, and the analytical time was 6 min. The use of ion ratio confirmation in combination with chromatographic resolution from SA greatly enhanced the selectivity. No interference was observed. This method was linear from 26.2 to 26,010.0 nM with an accuracy of 98-111 %. Total coefficient of variation was less than 4.6 % for three concentration levels tested. Comparison with a reference laboratory LC-MS/MS method using leftover patient serum specimens (n = 48) showed a mean bias of -2.3 nM (-0.61 %) with a Deming regression slope of 1.016, intercept of -6.6 nM, standard error of estimate of 25.3 nM, and a correlation coefficient of 0.9945. In conclusion, this LC-MS/MS method offers highly sensitive and selective quantitation of MMA in serum and plasma with simple sample preparation. PMID:22618327

  9. Genetic and cellular studies of oxidative stress in methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cobalamin deficiency type C (cblC) with homocystinuria (MMACHC).

    PubMed

    Richard, Eva; Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Garcia-Villoria, Judit; Merinero, Begoña; Desviat, Lourdes R; Gort, Laura; Briones, Paz; Leal, Fátima; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Ribes, Antonia; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén

    2009-11-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cobalamin deficiency type C (cblC) with homocystinuria (MMACHC) is the most frequent genetic disorder of vitamin B(12) metabolism. The aim of this work was to identify the mutational spectrum in a cohort of cblC-affected patients and the analysis of the cellular oxidative stress and apoptosis processes, in the presence or absence of vitamin B(12). The mutational spectrum includes nine previously described mutations: c.3G>A (p.M1L), c.217C>T (p.R73X), c.271dupA (p.R91KfsX14), c.331C>T (p.R111X), c.394C>T (p.R132X), c.457C>T (p.R153X), c.481C>T (p.R161X), c.565C>A (p.R189S), and c.615C>G (p.Y205X), and two novel changes, c.90G>A (p.W30X) and c.81+2T>G (IVS1+2T>G). The most frequent change was the known c.271dupA mutation, which accounts for 85% of the mutant alleles characterized in this cohort of patients. Owing to its high frequency, a real-time PCR and subsequent high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for this mutation has been established for diagnostic purposes. All cell lines studied presented a significant increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and also a high rate of apoptosis, suggesting that elevated ROS levels might induce apoptosis in cblC patients. In addition, ROS levels decreased in hydroxocobalamin-incubated cells, indicating that cobalamin might either directly or indirectly act as a scavenger of ROS. ROS production might be considered as a phenotypic modifier in cblC patients, and cobalamin supplementation or additional antioxidant drugs might suppress apoptosis and prevent cellular damage in these patients. PMID:19760748

  10. Differential toxicity and gene expression in Caco-2 cells exposed to arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, M; Devesa, V; Vélez, D

    2013-03-27

    Inorganic arsenic [As(V)+As(III)] and its metabolites, especially the trivalent forms [monomethylarsonous acid, MMA(III), and dimethylarsinous acid, DMA(III)], are considered the forms of arsenic with the highest degree of toxicity, linked to certain types of cancer and other pathologies. The gastrointestinal mucosa is exposed to these forms of arsenic, but it is not known what toxic effect these species may have on it. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the toxicity and some mechanisms of action of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites [monomethylarsonic acid, MMA(V), dimethylarsinic acid, DMA(V), MMA(III) and DMA(III)] in intestinal epithelial cells, using the Caco-2 human cell line as a model. The results show that the pentavalent forms do not produce toxic effects on the intestinal monolayer, but the trivalent species have a different degree of toxicity. As(III) induces death mainly by necrosis, whereas only apoptotic cells are detected after exposure to MMA(III), and for DMA(III) the percentages of apoptosis and necrosis are similar. The three forms produce reactive oxygen species, accompanied by a reduction in intracellular GSH and lipid peroxidation, the latter being especially notable in the dimethylated form. They also alter the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase and catalase and induce expression of stress proteins and metallothioneins. The results indicate that the trivalent forms of arsenic can affect cell viability of intestinal cells by mechanisms related to the induction of oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to evaluate how the effects observed in this study affect the structure and functionality of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:23353816

  11. Association between body mass index and arsenic methylation efficiency in adult women from southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Rubio, Paulina; Roberge, Jason; Arendell, Leslie; Harris, Robin B.; O'Rourke, Mary K.; Chen, Zhao; Cantu-Soto, Ernesto; Meza-Montenegro, Maria M.; Billheimer, Dean; Lu Zhenqiang; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2011-04-15

    Human arsenic methylation efficiency has been consistently associated with arsenic-induced disease risk. Interindividual variation in arsenic methylation profiles is commonly observed in exposed populations, and great effort has been put into the study of potential determinants of this variability. Among the factors that have been evaluated, body mass index (BMI) has not been consistently associated with arsenic methylation efficiency; however, an underrepresentation of the upper BMI distribution was commonly observed in these studies. This study investigated potential factors contributing to variations in the metabolism of arsenic, with specific interest in the effect of BMI where more than half of the population was overweight or obese. We studied 624 adult women exposed to arsenic in drinking water from three independent populations. Multivariate regression models showed that higher BMI, arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) genetic variant 7388, and higher total urinary arsenic were significantly associated with low percentage of urinary arsenic excreted as monomethylarsonic acid (%uMMA) or high ratio between urinary dimethylarsinic acid and uMMA (uDMA/uMMA), while AS3MT genetic variant M287T was associated with high %uMMA and low uDMA/uMMA. The association between BMI and arsenic methylation efficiency was also evident in each of the three populations when studied separately. This strong association observed between high BMI and low %uMMA and high uDMA/uMMA underscores the importance of BMI as a potential arsenic-associated disease risk factor, and should be carefully considered in future studies associating human arsenic metabolism and toxicity.

  12. Association between body mass index and arsenic methylation efficiency in adult women from southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rubio, Paulina; Roberge, Jason; Arendell, Leslie; Harris, Robin B.; O’Rourke, Mary K.; Chen, Zhao; Cantu-Soto, Ernesto; Meza-Montenegro, Maria M.; Billheimer, Dean; Lu, Zhenqiang; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2011-01-01

    Human arsenic methylation efficiency has been consistently associated with arsenic-induced disease risk. Interindividual variation in arsenic methylation profiles is commonly observed in exposed populations, and great effort has been put into the study of potential determinants of this variability. Among the factors that have been evaluated, body mass index (BMI) has not been consistently associated with arsenic methylation efficiency, however an underrepresentation of the upper BMI distribution was commonly observed in these studies. This study investigated potential factors contributing to variations in the metabolism of arsenic, with specific interest in the effect of BMI where more than half of the population was overweight or obese. We studied 624 adult women exposed to arsenic in drinking water from three independent populations. Multivariate regression models showed that higher BMI, arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) genetic variant 7388, and higher total urinary arsenic, were significantly associated with low percentage of urinary arsenic excreted as monomethylarsonic acid (%uMMA) or high ratio between urinary dimethylarsinic acid and uMMA (uDMA/uMMA); while AS3MT genetic variant M287T was associated with high %uMMA and low uDMA/uMMA. The association between BMI and arsenic methylation efficiency was also evident in each of the three populations when studied separately. This strong association observed between high BMI and low %uMMA and high uDMA/uMMA underscores the importance of BMI as a potential arsenic-associated disease risk factor, and should be carefully considered in future studies associating human arsenic metabolism and toxicity. PMID:21320519

  13. Arsenic Speciation in Phloem and Xylem Exudates of Castor Bean[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wen-Ling; Wood, B. Alan; Stroud, Jacqueline L.; Andralojc, P. John; Raab, Andrea; McGrath, Steve P.; Feldmann, Jörg; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2010-01-01

    How arsenic (As) is transported in phloem remains unknown. To help answer this question, we quantified the chemical species of As in phloem and xylem exudates of castor bean (Ricinus communis) exposed to arsenate [As(V)], arsenite [As(III)], monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)], or dimethylarsinic acid. In the As(V)- and As(III)-exposed plants, As(V) was the main species in xylem exudate (55%–83%) whereas As(III) predominated in phloem exudate (70%–94%). The ratio of As concentrations in phloem to xylem exudate varied from 0.7 to 3.9. Analyses of phloem exudate using high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and accurate mass electrospray mass spectrometry coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography identified high concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione and some oxidized phytochelatin, but no As(III)-thiol complexes. It is thought that As(III)-thiol complexes would not be stable in the alkaline conditions of phloem sap. Small concentrations of oxidized glutathione and oxidized phytochelatin were found in xylem exudate, where there was also no evidence of As(III)-thiol complexes. MMA(V) was partially reduced to MMA(III) in roots, but only MMA(V) was found in xylem and phloem exudate. Despite the smallest uptake among the four As species supplied to plants, dimethylarsinic acid was most efficiently transported in both xylem and phloem, and its phloem concentration was 3.2 times that in xylem. Our results show that free inorganic As, mainly As(III), was transported in the phloem of castor bean exposed to either As(V) or As(III), and that methylated As species were more mobile than inorganic As in the phloem. PMID:20870777

  14. Synthesis and properties of poly(methyl methacrylate-2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid)/PbS hybrid composite

    SciTech Connect

    Preda, N.; Rusen, E.; Musuc, A.; Enculescu, M.; Matei, E.; Marculescu, B.; Fruth, V.; Enculescu, I.

    2010-08-15

    The synthesis of a new hybrid composite based on PbS nanoparticles and poly(methyl methacrylate-2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid) [P(MMA-AMPSA)] copolymer is reported. The chemical synthesis consists in two steps: (i) a surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization between methyl methacrylate and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid and (ii) the generation of PbS particles in the presence of the P(MMA-AMPSA) latex, from the reaction between lead nitrate and thiourea. The composite was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructure observed using SEM proves that the PbS nanoparticles are well dispersed in the copolymer matrix. The X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrate that the PbS nanoparticles have a cubic rock salt structure. It was also found that the inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles improve the thermal stability of the copolymer matrix.

  15. Monitoring of vitamin B-12 nutritional status in the United States by using plasma methylmalonic acid and serum vitamin B-121234

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Regan L; Carmel, Ralph; Green, Ralph; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Cogswell, Mary E; Osterloh, John D; Sempos, Christopher T; Yetley, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Various definitions, criteria, tests, and cutoffs have been used to define vitamin B-12 status; however, a need exists for the systematic study of vitamin B-12 status in the United States because of concerns about high folic acid intakes and the potential for associated adverse effects. Objective: The objective was to determine the effect of different cutoff choices on outcomes and of the different degrees of serum vitamin B-12 status, definable by the concurrent use of a functional and circulating marker as the first steps to developing a data-based consensus on the biochemical diagnosis of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Design: Data from NHANES, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey, were examined for adults aged >19 y (mean ± SD age: 45 ± 1 y) from 1999 to 2004 (n = 12,612). Results: Commonly used cutoffs had a greater effect on prevalence estimates of low vitamin B-12 status with the use of vitamin B-12 than with the use of methylmalonic acid (MMA; 3–26% and 2–6%, respectively). A cutoff of >148 pmol/L for vitamin B-12 and of ≤210 nmol/L for MMA resulted in significant misclassifications. Approximately 1% of adults had a clear vitamin B-12 deficiency (low vitamin B-12 and elevated MMA); 92% of adults had adequate vitamin B-12 status. A high percentage of younger women characterized the group with low vitamin B-12 and normal MMA (2% of adults) and may have falsely reflected low vitamin B-12. Adults with elevated MMA (5%) only were demographically similar (ie, by age and race) to the deficient group and may have included some individuals with early vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: These analyses indicate the challenges of assessing vitamin B-12 status when uncertainties exist about the appropriate cutoffs. Future studies should determine definable endpoints to achieve this goal. PMID:21677051

  16. Methylated arsenic species in plants originate from soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Charlotte; Liu, Wen-Ju; Wu, Liyou; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; McGrath, Steve P; Meharg, Andrew A; Miller, Anthony J; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2012-02-01

    • Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a ubiquitous human carcinogen, and rice (Oryza sativa) is the main contributor to iAs in the diet. Methylated pentavalent As species are less toxic and are routinely found in plants; however, it is currently unknown whether plants are able to methylate As. • Rice, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and red clover (Trifolium pratense) were exposed to iAs, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), or dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), under axenic conditions. Rice seedlings were also grown in two soils under nonsterile flooded conditions, and rice plants exposed to arsenite or DMA(V) were grown to maturity in nonsterile hydroponic culture. Arsenic speciation in samples was determined by HPLC-ICP-MS. • Methylated arsenicals were not found in the three plant species exposed to iAs under axenic conditions. Axenically grown rice was able to take up MMA(V) or DMA(V), and reduce MMA(V) to MMA(III) but not convert it to DMA(V). Methylated As was detected in the shoots of soil-grown rice, and in rice grain from nonsterile hydroponic culture. GeoChip analysis of microbial genes in a Bangladeshi paddy soil showed the presence of the microbial As methyltransferase gene arsM. • Our results suggest that plants are unable to methylate iAs, and instead take up methylated As produced by microorganisms. PMID:22098145

  17. Urinary arsenic speciation profile in ethnic group of the Atacama desert (Chile) exposed to variable arsenic levels in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Yáñez, Jorge; Mansilla, Héctor D; Santander, I Paola; Fierro, Vladimir; Cornejo, Lorena; Barnes, Ramón M; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic groups from the Atacama Desert (known as Atacameños) have been exposed to natural arsenic pollution for over 5000 years. This work presents an integral study that characterizes arsenic species in water used for human consumption. It also describes the metabolism and arsenic elimination through urine in a chronically exposed population in northern Chile. In this region, water contained total arsenic concentrations up to 1250 μg L(-1), which was almost exclusively As(V). It is also important that this water was ingested directly from natural water sources without any treatment. The ingested arsenic was extensively methylated. In urine 93% of the arsenic was found as methylated arsenic species, such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)]. The original ingested inorganic species [As(V)], represent less than 1% of the total urinary arsenic. Methylation activity among individuals can be assessed by measuring primary [inorganic As/methylated As] and secondary methylation [MMA/DMA] indexes. Both methylation indexes were 0.06, indicating a high biological converting capability of As(V) into MMA and then MMA into DMA, compared with the control population and other arsenic exposed populations previously reported. PMID:25438126

  18. Remediation of Organic and Inorganic Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater using a Nonocrystalline TiO2 Based Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Meng, X; Calvache, E; Jiang, G

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 ?g L-1 As(III), 246 ?g L-1 As(V), 151 ?g L-1 MMA, and 202 ?g L-1 DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11 000, 14 000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 ?g L-1. However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III). A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent could be used for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in contaminated groundwater.

  19. Methylated arsenic metabolites bind to PML protein but do not induce cellular differentiation and PML-RARα protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian Qian; Zhou, Xin Yi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Bu, Na; Zhou, Jin; Cao, Feng Lin; Naranmandura, Hua

    2015-09-22

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is one of the most effective therapeutic agents used for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The probable explanation for As2O3-induced cell differentiation is the direct targeting of PML-RARα oncoprotein by As2O3, which results in initiation of PML-RARα degradation. However, after injection, As2O3 is rapidly methylated in body to different intermediate metabolites such as trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)), therefore, it remains unknown that which arsenic specie is actually responsible for the therapeutic effects against APL. Here we have shown the role of As2O3 (as iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites (i.e., MMA(III)/DMA(III)) in NB4 cells. Inorganic iAs(III) predominantly showed induction of cell differentiation, while MMA(III) and DMA(III) specifically showed to induce mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis, respectively. On the other hand, in contrast to iAs(III), MMA(III) showed stronger binding affinity for ring domain of PML recombinant protein, however, could not induce PML protein SUMOylation and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation. In summary, our results suggest that the binding of arsenicals to the ring domain of PML proteins is not associated with the degradation of PML-RARα fusion protein. Moreover, methylated arsenicals can efficiently lead to cellular apoptosis, however, they are incapable of inducing NB4 cell differentiation. PMID:26213848

  20. An LC-MS/MS method for serum methylmalonic acid suitable for monitoring vitamin B12 status in population surveys1

    PubMed Central

    Mineva, Ekaterina M.; Zhang, Mindy; Rabinowitz, Daniel J.; Phinney, Karen W.; Pfeiffer, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA), a functional indicator of vitamin B12 insufficiency, was measured in the U.S. population in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999–2004 using a GC/MS procedure that required 275 µL of sample and had a low throughput (36 samples/run). Our objective was to introduce a more efficient, yet highly accurate LC-MS/MS method for NHANES 2011–2014. We adapted the sample preparation with some modifications from a published isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS procedure. The procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction and generation of MMA di-butyl ester. Reversed-phase chromatography with isocratic elution allowed baseline resolution of MMA from its naturally occurring structural isomer succinic acid within 4.5 min. Our new method afforded an increased throughput (≤160 samples/run) and measured serum MMA with high sensitivity (LOD = 22.1 nmol/L) in only 75 µL of sample. Mean (±SD) recovery of MMA spiked into serum (2 days, 4 levels, 2 replicates each) was 94±5.5%. Total imprecision (41 days, 2 replicates each) for three serum quality control pools was 4.9–7.9% (97.1–548 nmol/L). The LC-MS/MS method showed excellent correlation (n=326, r=0.99) and no bias (Deming regression, Bland-Altman analysis) compared to the previous GC/MS method. Both methods produced virtually identical mean (±SD) MMA concentrations [LC-MS/MS: 18.47±0.71 ng/mL (n=17), GC/MS: 18.18±0.67 ng/mL (n=11)] on a future plasma reference material compared to a GC/MS method procedure from the National Institute of Standards and Technology [18.41±0.70 ng/mL (n=15)]. No adjustment will be necessary to compare previous (1999–2004) to future (2011–2014) NHANES MMA data. PMID:25258283

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in AS3MT and arsenic metabolism in residents of the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Minh, Tu Binh; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2009-04-15

    To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic (As) metabolism, we studied associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in As (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) with the As concentrations in hair and urine, and urinary As profile in residents in the Red River Delta, Vietnam. Concentrations of total As in groundwater were 0.7-502 {mu}g/l. Total As levels in groundwater drastically decreased by using sand filter, indicating that the filter could be effective to remove As from raw groundwater. Concentrations of inorganic As (IAs) in urine and total As in hair of males were higher than those of females. A significant positive correlation between monomethylarsonic acid (MMA)/IAs and age in females indicates that older females have higher methylation capacity from IAs to MMA. Body mass index negatively correlated with urinary As concentrations in males. Homozygote for SNPs 4602AA, 35991GG, and 37853GG, which showed strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), had higher percentage (%) of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine. SNPs 4740 and 12590 had strong LD and associated with urinary %DMA. Although SNPs 6144, 12390, 14215, and 35587 comprised LD cluster, homozygotes in SNPs 12390GG and 35587CC had lower DMA/MMA in urine, suggesting low methylation capacity from MMA to DMA in homo types for these SNPs. SNPs 5913 and 8973 correlated with %MMA and %DMA, respectively. Heterozygote for SNP 14458TC had higher MMA/IAs in urine than TT homozygote, indicating that the heterozygote may have stronger methylation ability of IAs. To our knowledge, this is the first study on the association of genetic factors with As metabolism in Vietnamese.

  2. Significance of urinary arsenic speciation in assessment of seafood ingestion as the main source of organic and inorganic arsenic in a population resident near a coastal area.

    PubMed

    Soleo, Leonardo; Lovreglio, Piero; Iavicoli, Sergio; Antelmi, Annarita; Drago, Ignazio; Basso, Antonella; Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Gilberti, Maria Enrica; De Palma, Giuseppe; Apostoli, Pietro

    2008-09-01

    In order to characterize the different sources of exposure to arsenic (As), urinary excretion of total As, the sum of inorganic As+MMA+DMA determined by the hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique, and the species As3, As5, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenobetaine were determined in 49 workers at a steel foundry, with presumed occupational exposure to As, and 50 subjects from the general population, all males. No evidence of occupational exposure to As resulted from environmental monitoring performed in the foundry, although the analysis of minerals used as raw materials showed the presence of As, particularly in fossils and fine ores. The urinary concentrations of As3, MMA, DMA, the sum of inorganic As+MMA+DMA and total As were not different in the two groups, while arsenobetaine appeared significantly higher in the controls than in the workers. The different species of urinary As were all significantly correlated. Urinary excretion of As3 was associated with the consumption of mineral water and with residence in an industrial zone, while MMA, DMA, arsenobetaine, the sum of inorganic As+MMA+DMA and total As urinary excretion were associated with the consumption of crustaceans and/or shellfish 3 days or less before urine collection. Multiple regression analysis confirmed these results. In conclusion, in populations with a high consumption of seafood, living in areas characterized by coastal/marine As pollution, only speciation of As can identify a prevalent role of environmental sources, like the consumption of seafood contaminated by As, in determining urinary As excretion, and exclude an occupational origin of the exposure. PMID:18657289

  3. Low-level arsenic exposure: Nutritional and dietary predictors in first-grade Uruguayan children.

    PubMed

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I; Mañay, Nelly; Peregalli, Fabiana; Hsiao, Pao Ying; Lu, Ying; Vahter, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure in children is a public health concern but is understudied in relation to the predictors, and effects of low-level exposure. We examined the extent and dietary predictors of exposure to inorganic arsenic in 5-8 year old children from Montevideo, Uruguay. Children were recruited at school; 357 were enrolled, 328 collected morning urine samples, and 317 had two 24-h dietary recalls. Urinary arsenic metabolites, i.e. inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-MS), and the sum concentration (U-As) used for exposure assessment. Proportions of arsenic metabolites (%iAs, %MMA and %DMA) in urine were modelled in OLS regressions as functions of food groups, dietary patterns, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Exposure to arsenic was low (median U-As: 9.9µg/L) and household water (water As: median 0.45µg/L) was not a major contributor to exposure. Children with higher consumption of rice had higher U-As but lower %iAs, %MMA, and higher %DMA. Children with higher meat consumption had lower %iAs and higher %DMA. Higher scores on "nutrient dense" dietary pattern were related to lower %iAs and %MMA, and higher %DMA. Higher intake of dietary folate was associated with lower %MMA and higher %DMA. Overweight children had lower %MMA and higher %DMA than normal-weight children. In summary, rice was an important predictor of exposure to inorganic arsenic and DMA. Higher meat and folate consumption, diet rich in green leafy and red-orange vegetables and eggs, and higher BMI contributed to higher arsenic methylation capacity. PMID:26828624

  4. A comparative study of the sub-chronic toxic effects of three organic arsenical compounds on the urothelium in F344 rats; gender-based differences in response

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jun; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Waalkes, Michael P.; Salim, Elsayed I.; Kinoshita, Anna; Yoshida, Kaoru; Endo, Ginji; Fukushima, Shoji . E-mail: fukuchan@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2006-02-01

    Epidemiological studies indicated that human arsenic exposure can induce urinary bladder cancer. Methylation of inorganic arsenic can generate more reactive and toxic organic arsenical species. In this regard, it was recently reported that the methylated arsenical metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], induced urinary bladder tumors in rats. However, other methylated metabolites, like monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were not carcinogenic to the urinary bladder. In order to compare the early effects of DMA(V), MMA(V), and TMAO on the urinary bladder transitional cell epithelium at the scanning electron microscope (SEM) level, we investigated the sub-chronic (13 weeks) toxicological effects of MMA(V) (187 ppm), DMA(V) (184 ppm), TMAO (182 ppm) given in the drinking water to male and female F344 rats with a focus on the urinary bladder in this study. Obvious pathological changes, including ropy microridges, pitting, increased separation of epithelial cells, exfoliation, and necrosis, were found in the urinary bladders of both sexes, but particularly in females receiving carcinogenic doses of DMA(V). Urine arsenical metabolic differences were found between males and females, with levels of MMA(III), a potential genotoxic form, higher in females treated with DMA(V) than in males. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that DMA(V) is more toxic to the female urinary bladder, in accord with sensitivity to carcinogenesis. Important gender-related metabolic differences including enhanced presentation of MMA(III) to the urothelial cells might possibly account for heightened sensitivity in females. However, the potential carcinogenic effects of MMA(III) need to be further elucidated.

  5. Toxic synergism between quinolinic acid and organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes: Relevance for metabolic acidemias.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-11-12

    The brain of children affected by organic acidemias develop acute neurodegeneration linked to accumulation of endogenous toxic metabolites like glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids. Excitotoxic and oxidative events are involved in the toxic patterns elicited by these organic acids, although their single actions cannot explain the extent of brain damage observed in organic acidemias. The characterization of co-adjuvant factors involved in the magnification of early toxic processes evoked by these metabolites is essential to infer their actions in the human brain. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway (KP) - a metabolic route devoted to degrade tryptophan to form NAD(+) - produce increased levels of the excitotoxic metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN), which has been involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Herein we investigated the effects of subtoxic concentrations of GA, 3-OHGA, MMA and PA, either alone or in combination with QUIN, on early toxic endpoints in rat brain synaptosomes. To establish specific mechanisms, we pre-incubated synaptosomes with different protective agents, including the endogenous N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KA), the antioxidant S-allylcysteine (SAC) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). While the incubation of synaptosomes with toxic metabolites at subtoxic concentrations produced no effects, their co-incubation (QUIN+GA, +3-OHGA, +MMA or +PA) decreased the mitochondrial function and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation. For all cases, this effect was partially prevented by KA and l-NAME, and completely avoided by SAC. These findings suggest that early damaging events elicited by organic acids involved in metabolic acidemias can be magnified by toxic synergism with QUIN, and this process is mostly mediated by oxidative stress, and in a lesser extent by excitotoxicity and

  6. Uptake and transport of roxarsone and its metabolites in water spinach as affected by phosphate supply.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lixian; Li, Guoliang; Dang, Zhi; Yang, Baomei; He, Zhaohuan; Zhou, Changmin

    2010-04-01

    Roxarsone (ROX) is widely used as a feed additive in intensive animal production. While an animal is fed with ROX, the As compounds in the manure primarily occur as ROX and its metabolites, including arsenate (As[V]), arsenite (As[III]), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Animal manure is commonly land applied with phosphorous fertilizers in China. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the phytoavailability of ROX, As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), with the soil amended with 0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.0 g PO(4)/kg, respectively, plus 2% (w/w manure/soil) chicken manure (CM) bearing ROX and its metabolites. The results indicate that this species of water spinach cannot accumulate ROX and MMA at detectable levels, but As(V), As(III), and DMA were present in all plant samples. Increased phosphorous decreased the shoot As(V) and As(III) in water spinach but did not affect the root As(V). The shoot DMA and root As(III) and DMA were decreased/increased and then increased/decreased by elevated phosphorous. The total phosphorous content (P) in plant tissue did not correlate with the total As or the three As species in tissues. Arsenate, As(III), and DMA were more easily accumulated in the roots, and phosphate considerably inhibited their upward transport. Dimethylarsinic acid had higher transport efficiency than As(V) and As(III), but As(III) was dominant in tissues. Conclusively, phosphate had multiple effects on the accumulation and transport of ROX metabolites, which depended on their levels. However, proper utilization of phosphate fertilizer can decrease the accumulation of ROX metabolites in water spinach when treated with CM containing ROX and its metabolites. PMID:20821525

  7. Excessive folic acid intake and relation to adverse health outcome.

    PubMed

    Selhub, Jacob; Rosenberg, Irwin H

    2016-07-01

    The recent increase in the intake of folic acid by the general public through fortified foods and supplements, has raised safety concern based on early reports of adverse health outcome in elderly with low B12 status who took high doses of folic acid. These safety concerns are contrary to the 2015 WHO statement that "high folic acid intake has not reliably been shown to be associated with negative healeffects". In the folic acid post-fortification era, we have shown that in elderly participants in NHANES 1999-2002, high plasma folate level is associated with exacerbation of both clinical (anemia and cognitive impairment) and biochemical (high MMA and high Hcy plasma levels) signs of vitamin B12 deficiency. Adverse clinical outcomes in association with high folate intake were also seen among elderly with low plasma B12 levels from the Framingham Original Cohort and in a study from Australia which combined three elderly cohorts. Relation between high folate and adverse biochemical outcomes were also seen in the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (High Hcy, high MMA and lower TC2) and at an outpatient clinic at Yale University where high folate is associated with higher MMA in the elderly but not in the young. Potential detrimental effects of high folic acid intake may not be limited to the elderly nor to those with B12 deficiency. A study from India linked maternal high RBC folate to increased insulin resistance in offspring. Our study suggested that excessive folic acid intake is associated with lower natural killer cells activity in elderly women. In a recent study we found that the risk for unilateral retinoblastoma in offspring is 4 fold higher in women that are homozygotes for the 19 bp deletion in the DHFR gene and took folic acid supplement during pregnancy. In the elderly this polymorphism is associated with lower memory and executive scores, both being significantly worse in those with high plasma folate. These and other data strongly imply that

  8. High Viral Load and Elevated Angiogenic Markers Associated with Increased Risk of Preeclampsia among Women Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in Pregnancy in the Mma Bana Study, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Kathleen M; McElrath, Thomas F; Hughes, Michael D; Ogwu, Anthony; Souda, Sajini; Datwyler, Saul A; von Widenfelt, Erik; Moyo, Sikhulile; Nádas, Marisa; Makhema, Joseph; Machakaire, Esther; Lockman, Shahin; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger L

    2013-01-01

    Background Risk factors associated with preeclampsia in HIV-infected women remain largely unknown. Systemic angiogenic imbalance contributes to preeclampsia in HIV-uninfected women, but changes in angiogenic markers after HAART initiation have not been studied. Methods The Mma Bana study randomized 560 HIV-infected, HAART-naive pregnant women with CD4 counts ≥ 200 cells/mm3 between 26–34 weeks gestation to lopinavir/ritonavir/zidovudine/lamivudine or abacavir/zidovudine/lamivudine. Another 170 participants with CD4 counts < 200 cells/mm3 initiated nevirapine/zidovudine/lamivudine between 18–34 weeks gestation. Characteristics of 11 women who developed preeclampsia were compared with the remaining722 Mma Bana participants who delivered, using logistic regression. Plasma samples drawn at HAART initiation and one month later from 60 women without preeclampsia and at HAART initiation for all11 preeclamptic women were assayed for placental growth factor (PlGF) and soluble FMS toll-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), Results Pre-HAART viral load > 100,000 copies/ml was associated with preeclampsia (OR 5.8; 95% CI 1.8, 19.4; p = 0.004). Median pre-HAART PlGF level was lower and sFLT-1 was higher in women who developed preeclampsia versus those who did not (130 vs 992 pg/ml, p=0.001; 17.5 vs 9.4 pg/ml, p=0.03, respectively). In multivariate analysis, PlGF and viral load remained significantly associated with preeclampsia. No significant changes in angiogenic factors were noted after 1 month of HAART treatment among non-preeclamptic women. Conclusions Pre-HAART viral load > 100,000 copies/ml and PlGF predicted preeclampsia among women starting HAART in pregnancy. Among non-preeclamptic women, HAART treatment did not significantly alter levels of PlGF or sFlt-1 one month into treatment. PMID:23344545

  9. Developmental and genetic modulation of arsenic biotransformation: A gene by environment interaction?

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, Mercedes; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2007-08-01

    The complexity of arsenic toxicology has confounded the identification of specific pathways of disease causation. One focal point of arsenic research is aimed at fully characterizing arsenic biotransformation in humans, a process that appears to be quite variable, producing a mixture of several arsenic species with greatly differing toxic potencies. In an effort to characterize genetic determinants of variability in arsenic biotransformation, a genetic association study of 135 subjects in western Sonora, Mexico was performed by testing 23 polymorphic sites in three arsenic biotransformation candidate genes. One gene, arsenic 3 methyltransferase (AS3MT), was strongly associated with the ratio of urinary dimethylarsinic acid to monomethylarsonic acid (D/M) in children (7-11 years) but not in adults (18-79 years). Subsequent analyses revealed that the high D/M values associated with variant AS3MT alleles were primarily due to lower levels of monomethylarsonic acid as percent of total urinary arsenic (%MMA5). In light of several reports of arsenic-induced disease being associated with relatively high %MMA5 levels, these findings raise the possibility that variant AS3MT individuals may suffer less risk from arsenic exposure than non-variant individuals. These analyses also provide evidence that, in this population, regardless of AS3MT variant status, children tend to have lower %MMA5 values than adults, suggesting that the global developmental regulation of arsenic biotransformation may interact with genetic variants in metabolic genes to result in novel genetic effects such as those in this report.

  10. Developmental and Genetic Modulation of Arsenic Biotransformation: A Gene by Environment Interaction?

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Mercedes; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2007-01-01

    The complexity of arsenic toxicology has confounded the identification of specific pathways of disease causation. One focal point of arsenic research is aimed at fully characterizing arsenic biotransformation in humans, a process that appears to be quite variable, producing a mixture of several arsenic species with greatly differing toxic potencies. In an effort to characterize genetic determinants of variability in arsenic biotransformation, a genetic association study of 135 subjects in western Sonora, Mexico was performed by testing 23 polymorphic sites in three arsenic biotransformation candidate genes. One gene, arsenic 3 methyltransferase (AS3MT), was strongly associated with the ratio of urinary dimethylarsinic acid to monomethylarsonic acid (D/M) in children (7-11 years) but not in adults (18-79 years). Subsequent analyses revealed that the high D/M values associated with variant AS3MT alleles were primarily due to lower levels of monomethylarsonic acid as percent of total urinary arsenic (%MMA5). In light of several reports of arsenic-induced disease being associated with relatively high %MMA5 levels, these findings raise the possibility that variant AS3MT individuals may suffer less risk from arsenic exposure than non-variant individuals. These analyses also provide evidence that in this population, regardless of AS3MT variant status, children tend to have lower %MMA5 values than adults, suggesting that the global developmental regulation of arsenic biotransformation may interact with genetic variants in metabolic genes to result in novel genetic effects such as those in this report. PMID:17306849

  11. Developmental and genetic modulation of arsenic biotransformation: a gene by environment interaction?

    PubMed

    Meza, Mercedes; Gandolfi, A Jay; Klimecki, Walter T

    2007-08-01

    The complexity of arsenic toxicology has confounded the identification of specific pathways of disease causation. One focal point of arsenic research is aimed at fully characterizing arsenic biotransformation in humans, a process that appears to be quite variable, producing a mixture of several arsenic species with greatly differing toxic potencies. In an effort to characterize genetic determinants of variability in arsenic biotransformation, a genetic association study of 135 subjects in western Sonora, Mexico was performed by testing 23 polymorphic sites in three arsenic biotransformation candidate genes. One gene, arsenic 3 methyltransferase (AS3MT), was strongly associated with the ratio of urinary dimethylarsinic acid to monomethylarsonic acid (D/M) in children (7-11 years) but not in adults (18-79 years). Subsequent analyses revealed that the high D/M values associated with variant AS3MT alleles were primarily due to lower levels of monomethylarsonic acid as percent of total urinary arsenic (%MMA5). In light of several reports of arsenic-induced disease being associated with relatively high %MMA5 levels, these findings raise the possibility that variant AS3MT individuals may suffer less risk from arsenic exposure than non-variant individuals. These analyses also provide evidence that, in this population, regardless of AS3MT variant status, children tend to have lower %MMA5 values than adults, suggesting that the global developmental regulation of arsenic biotransformation may interact with genetic variants in metabolic genes to result in novel genetic effects such as those in this report. PMID:17306849

  12. Effects of endogenous hydrogen peroxide and glutathione on the stability of arsenic metabolites in rat bile

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yayoi Hirano, Seishiro

    2008-10-01

    Trivalent arsenicals such as arsenite (iAs{sup III}), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) are more toxic than analogous pentavalent compounds such as arsenate (iAs{sup V}), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). It has been reported that arsenic-glutathione (As-GSH) complexes such as arsenic triglutathione (ATG) and methylarsenic diglutathione (MADG) are major metabolites in rat bile following intravenous administration of iAs{sup III}. Recently, we have shown that both ATG and MADG are unstable and easily hydrolyzed to iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}, respectively, and that MMA{sup III} is oxidized to MMA{sup V} in bile. In the present study we report the effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH on the stability of As-GSH complexes in rat bile. Male SD rats were injected intravenously with saline or iAs{sup III} at a dose of 0.2 or 2.0 mg As/kg body weight, and bile fluid was collected on ice for 30 min. To estimate the stability of As-GSH complexes in bile, ATG or MADG was added to untreated, heat-treated, catalase-treated, or dialyzed bile, and then incubated at 37 deg. C for 10 min. Concentrations of biliary H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH in the higher dose group were 12.6- and 4.5-times higher than the control value, respectively. Exogenously added trivalent arsenicals were oxidized to pentavalent arsenicals in the bile depending on the biliary concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Both catalase and dialysis prevented oxidation of trivalent arsenicals to the corresponding pentavalent compounds. Exogenously added GSH stabilized As-GSH complexes in bile. These results suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} converts trivalent arsenicals to less toxic pentavalent arsenicals, whereas GSH prevents hydrolysis of As-GSH complexes and the generation of unconjugated toxic trivalent arsenicals.

  13. Trivalent methylated arsenical-induced phosphatidylserine exposure and apoptosis in platelets may lead to increased thrombus formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Trivalent methylated metabolites of arsenic, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), have been found highly reactive and toxic in various cells and in vivo animal models, suggesting their roles in the arsenic-associated toxicity. However, their effects on cardiovascular system including blood cells, one of the most important targets for arsenic toxicity, remain poorly understood. Here we found that MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III} could induce procoagulant activity and apoptosis in platelets, which play key roles in the development of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) through excessive thrombus formation. In freshly isolated human platelets, treatment of MMA{sup III} resulted in phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, a hallmark of procoagulant activation, accompanied by distinctive apoptotic features including mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. These procoagulant activation and apoptotic features were found to be mediated by the depletion of protein thiol and intracellular ATP, and flippase inhibition by MMA{sup III}, while the intracellular calcium increase or reactive oxygen species generation was not involved. Importantly, increased platelet procoagulant activity by MMA{sup III} resulted in enhanced blood coagulation and excessive thrombus formation in a rat in vivo venous thrombosis model. DMA{sup III} also induced PS-exposure with apoptotic features mediated by protein thiol depletion, which resulted in enhanced thrombin generation. In summary, we believe that this study provides an important evidence for the role of trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites in arsenic-associated CVDs, giving a novel insight into the role of platelet apoptosis in toxicant-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  14. Urinary arsenic speciation and its correlation with 8-OHdG in Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Pi, J.B.; Li, B.; Xu, Y.Y.; Jin, Y.P.; Sun, G.F.

    2008-10-15

    In contrast to arsenicosis caused by consumption of water contaminated by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic, human exposure to this metalloid through coal burning has been rarely reported. In this study, arsenic speciation and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in urine were determined in the Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning in Guizhou, China, an epidemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning caused by coal burning. The urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and total arsenic (tAs) of high-arsenic exposed subjects were significantly higher than those of low-arsenic exposed residents. A biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, urinary 8-OHdG level was significantly higher in high-arsenic exposed subjects than that of low exposed. Significant positive correlations were found between 8-OHdG levels and concentrations of iAs, MMA, DMA and tAs, respectively. In addition, a significant negative correlation was observed between 8-OHdG levels and the secondary methylation ratio (DMA/(MMA + DMA)). The results suggest that chronic arsenic exposure through burning coal rich in arsenic is associated with oxidative DNA damages, and that secondary methylation capacity is potentially related to the susceptibility of individuals to oxidative DNA damage induced by arsenic exposure through coal burning in domestic living.

  15. Remediation of organic and inorganic arsenic contaminated groundwater using a nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chuanyong; Meng, Xiaoguang; Calvache, Edwin; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 microg L(-1) As(III), 246 microg L(-1) As(V), 151 microg L(-1) MMA, and 202 microg L(-1) DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11,000, 14,000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 microg L(-1). However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III). PMID:19339086

  16. Association between arsenic exposure from a coal-burning power plant and urinary arsenic concentrations in Prievidza District, Slovakia.

    PubMed Central

    Ranft, Ulrich; Miskovic, Peter; Pesch, Beate; Jakubis, Pavel; Fabianova, Elenora; Keegan, Tom; Hergemöller, Andre; Jakubis, Marian; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2003-01-01

    To assess the arsenic exposure of a population living in the vicinity of a coal-burning power plant with high arsenic emission in the Prievidza District, Slovakia, 548 spot urine samples were speciated for inorganic As (Asinorg), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and their sum (Assum). The urine samples were collected from the population of a case-control study on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). A total of 411 samples with complete As speciations and sufficient urine quality and without fish consumption were used for statistical analysis. Although current environmental As exposure and urinary As concentrations were low (median As in soil within 5 km distance to the power plant, 41 micro g/g; median urinary Assum, 5.8 microg/L), there was a significant but weak association between As in soil and urinary Assum(r = 0.21, p < 0.01). We performed a multivariate regression analysis to calculate adjusted regression coefficients for environmental As exposure and other determinants of urinary As. Persons living in the vicinity of the plant had 27% higher Assum values (p < 0.01), based on elevated concentrations of the methylated species. A 32% increase of MMA occurred among subjects who consumed homegrown food (p < 0.001). NMSC cases had significantly higher levels of Assum, DMA, and Asinorg. The methylation index Asinorg/(MMA + DMA) was about 20% lower among cases (p < 0.05) and in men (p < 0.05) compared with controls and females, respectively. PMID:12782488

  17. Arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk in subjects living in arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-K.; Tseng, C.-H.; Huang, Y.-L.; Yang, M.-H.; Chen, C.-J.; Hsueh, Y.-M. . E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    Background: Cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) from drinking water has been shown to be associated with hypertension in a dose-response pattern. This study further explored the association between arsenic methylation capability and hypertension risk among residents of arseniasis-hyperendemic areas in Taiwan considering the effect of CAE and other potential confounders. Method: There were 871 subjects (488 women and 383 men) and among them 372 were diagnosed as having hypertension based on a positive history or measured systolic blood pressure {>=} 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=} 90 mm Hg. Urinary arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Primary arsenic methylation index [PMI, defined as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) divided by (As{sup III} + As{sup V})] and secondary arsenic methylation index (SMI, defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA{sup V}) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capability. Results: The level of urinary arsenic was still significantly correlated with cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE) calculated from a questionnaire interview (p = 0.02) even after the residents stopped drinking the artesian well water for 2-3 decades. Hypertensive subjects had higher percentages of MMA{sup V} and lower SMI than subjects without hypertension. However, subjects having CAE > 0 mg/L-year had higher hypertension risk than those who had CAE = 0 mg/L-year disregard a high or low methylation index. Conclusion: Inefficient arsenic methylation ability may be related with hypertension risk.

  18. TISSUE DOSIMETRY, METABOLISM AND EXCRETION OF PENTAVALENT AND TRIVALENT MONOMETHYLATED ARSENIC IN MICE AFTER ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) can result from their formation as metabolites of inorganic arsenic and by the use of the sodium salts of MMA(V) as herbicides. This study compared the disposition of MMA(V) and MMA(III) in adult ...

  19. The effect of WIN 55,212-2 suggests a cannabinoid-sensitive component in the early toxicity induced by organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in related disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I N; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-12-01

    Several physiological processes in the CNS are regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists have been involved in the modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation. Glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids are endogenous metabolites produced and accumulated in the brain of children affected by severe organic acidemias (OAs) with neurodegeneration. Oxidative stress and excitotoxicity have been involved in the toxic pattern exerted by these organic acids. Studying the early pattern of toxicity exerted by these metabolites is crucial to explain the extent of damage that they can produce in the brain. Herein, we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on early markers of GA-, 3-OHGA-, MMA- and PA-induced toxicity in brain synaptosomes from adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (30-day-old) rats. As pre-treatment, WIN exerted protective effects on the GA- and MMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation induced by all metabolites. Our findings support a protective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by toxic metabolites involved in OAs. PMID:26431622

  20. Nutritional Supplementation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa Lowers Serum Methylmalonic Acid in Vegans and Vegetarians with a Suspected Vitamin B₁₂ Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Randall Edward; Phillips, Todd W; Udani, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Since vitamin B12 occurs in substantial amounts only in foods derived from animals, vegetarians and particularly vegans are at risk of developing deficiencies of this essential vitamin. The chlorella used for this study is a commercially available whole-food supplement, which is believed to contain the physiologically active form of the vitamin. This exploratory open-label study was performed to determine if adding 9 g of Chlorella pyrenoidosa daily could help mitigate a vitamin B12 deficiency in vegetarians and vegans. Seventeen vegan or vegetarian adults (26-57 years of age) with a known vitamin B12 deficiency, as evidenced by a baseline serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) level above 270 nmol/L at screening, but who otherwise appeared healthy were enrolled in the study. Each participant added 9 g of C. pyrenoidosa to their daily diet for 60 ± 5 days and their serum MMA, vitamin B12, homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as mean corpuscular volume (MCV), hemoglobin (Hgb), and hematocrit (Hct) were measured at 30 and 60 days from baseline. After 30 and 60 days, the serum MMA level fell significantly (P < .05) by an average ∼34%. Fifteen of the 17 (88%) subjects showed at least a 10% drop in MMA. At the same time, Hcy trended downward and serum vitamin B12 trended upward, while MCV, Hgb, and Hct appeared unchanged. The results of this work suggest that the vitamin B12 in chlorella is bioavailable and such dietary supplementation is a natural way for vegetarians and vegans to get the vitamin B12 they need. PMID:26485478

  1. Phloem transport of arsenic species from flag leaf to grain during grain filling

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Norton, Gareth J.; Deacon, Claire; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2011-09-20

    Strategies to reduce arsenic (As) in rice grain, below concentrations that represent a serious human health concern, require that the mechanisms of As accumulation within grain be established. Therefore, retranslocation of As species from flag leaves into filling rice grain was investigated. Arsenic species were delivered through cut flag leaves during grain fill. Spatial unloading within grains was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography. Additionally, the effect of germanic acid (a silicic acid analog) on grain As accumulation in arsenite-treated panicles was examined. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were extremely efficiently retranslocated from flag leaves to rice grain; arsenate was poorly retranslocated, and was rapidly reduced to arsenite within flag leaves; arsenite displayed no retranslocation. Within grains, DMA rapidly dispersed while MMA and inorganic As remained close to the entry point. Germanic acid addition did not affect grain As in arsenite-treated panicles. Three-dimensional SXRF microtomography gave further information on arsenite localization in the ovular vascular trace (OVT) of rice grains. These results demonstrate that inorganic As is poorly remobilized, while organic species are readily remobilized, from leaves to grain. Stem translocation of inorganic As may not rely solely on silicic acid transporters.

  2. Phloem Transport of Arsenic Species from Flag Leaf to Grain During Grain Filling

    SciTech Connect

    A Carey; G Norton; C Deacon; K Scheckel; E Lombi; T Punshon; M Guerinot; A Lanzirotti; M Newville; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Strategies to reduce arsenic (As) in rice grain, below concentrations that represent a serious human health concern, require that the mechanisms of As accumulation within grain be established. Therefore, retranslocation of As species from flag leaves into filling rice grain was investigated. Arsenic species were delivered through cut flag leaves during grain fill. Spatial unloading within grains was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography. Additionally, the effect of germanic acid (a silicic acid analog) on grain As accumulation in arsenite-treated panicles was examined. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were extremely efficiently retranslocated from flag leaves to rice grain; arsenate was poorly retranslocated, and was rapidly reduced to arsenite within flag leaves; arsenite displayed no retranslocation. Within grains, DMA rapidly dispersed while MMA and inorganic As remained close to the entry point. Germanic acid addition did not affect grain As in arsenite-treated panicles. Three-dimensional SXRF microtomography gave further information on arsenite localization in the ovular vascular trace (OVT) of rice grains. These results demonstrate that inorganic As is poorly remobilized, while organic species are readily remobilized, from leaves to grain. Stem translocation of inorganic As may not rely solely on silicic acid transporters.

  3. Phloem transport of arsenic species from flag leaf to grain during grain filling

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Norton, Gareth J.; Deacon, Claire; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Strategies to reduce arsenic in rice grain, below levels that represent a serious human health concern, require that the mechanisms of arsenic accumulation within grain be established. Therefore, re-translocation of arsenic species from flag leaves into filling rice grain was investigated.Arsenic species were delivered through cut flag leaves during grain fill. Spatial unloading within grains was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography. Additionally, the effect of germanic acid (a silicic acid analogue) on grain arsenic accumulation in arsenite treated panicles was examined.Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were extremely efficiently re-translocated from flag leaves to rice grain; arsenate was poorly re-translocated, and was rapidly reduced to arsenite within flag leaves; arsenite displayed no re-translocation. Within grains, DMA rapidly dispersed while MMA and inorganic arsenic remained close to the entry point. Germanic acid addition did not affect grain arsenic in arsenite treated panicles. 3D SXRF microtomography gave further information on arsenite localization in the ovular vascular trace (OVT) of rice grains.These results demonstrate that inorganic arsenic is poorly re-mobilized, while organic species are readily re-mobilized, from leaves to grain. Stem translocation of inorganic arsenic may not rely solely on silicic acid transporters. PMID:21658183

  4. Synthesis and characterization of phosphonate ester and phosphonic acid containing polymers and blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamber, Harinder Singh

    1997-12-01

    Vinylbenzylphosphonate ester (VBP) was homopolymerized and copolymerized with methyl methacrylate and the reactivity ratio of this pair of monomers was calculated from Finneman-Ross and Kelen-Tudos methods. These methods provided identical values, which are rsb1 (VBP) = 1.23 and rsb2(MMA) = 0.43. The phosphonate ester group, -P = O(OEt)sb2; in VBP and poly(VBP-MMA) copolymers was hydrolysed to phosphonic acid, -P = O(OH)sb2; at room temperature to obtain vinylbenzylphosphonic acid (VBPa) and poly(VBPa-MMA) copolymers. sp1H, sp{13}C & sp{31}P NMR spectroscopy, DSC and FTIR were used to monitor the hydrolysis of these phosphorylated monomers and polymers. The glass transition temperature of PVBP was 13sp°C as compared to 198sp°C of PVBPa. The phosphoryl group in the parent polymers acts as a self plasticizing agent resulting in lower glass transition temperature, on the other hand inter and intra hydrogen bonding results in broad and high Tsbg in these hydrolysed polymers. VBP was also polymerized with BisGMA or TEGDM to low conversions. These oligomers were tested in vitro as potential adhesive materials for dental/enamel and composite resins. The phosphonate esters containing polymers show substantial capacity to dissolve the heavy metal salts, e.g., UOsb2(NO)sb3.6Hsb2O and thus provides radiopaque polymers. Excessive sorption of water lead to phase separation and, hence, loss of radiopacity. Thus, an alternate method of synthesis of radiopaque polymers is also described in which radiopacifying agent is covalently linked to polymer backbone. Styryldiphenylbismuth was prepared by the reaction of diphenylbismuthchloride and Grignard of p-bromostyrene, but some other by-products such as triphenylbismuth, distyrylphenyl bismoth were also obtained as revealed by reverse phase HPLC and the yield of the reaction was low. Iodinated monomers VBTIsb3 and IEMIsb3 were prepared by reacting VBC or IEM to triiodophenol in high yields. Decomposition kinetic analysis was done by

  5. Arsenic Exposure From Drinking Water, Arsenic Methylation Capacity, and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Fen; Graziano, Joseph H.; Parvez, Faruque; Liu, Mengling; Paul, Rina Rani; Shaheen, Ishrat; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the interrelationships between past arsenic exposure, biomarkers specific for susceptibility to arsenic exposure, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in 959 subjects from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh. We measured cIMT levels on average 7.2 years after baseline during 2010–2011. Arsenic exposure was measured in well water at baseline and in urine samples collected at baseline and during follow-up. Every 1-standard-deviation increase in urinary arsenic (357.9 µg/g creatinine) and well-water arsenic (102.0 µg/L) concentration was related to a 11.7-µm (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 21.6) and 5.1-µm (95% CI: −0.2, 10.3) increase in cIMT, respectively. For every 10% increase in monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) percentage, there was an increase of 12.1 µm (95% CI: 0.4, 23.8) in cIMT. Among participants with a higher urinary MMA percentage, a higher ratio of urinary MMA to inorganic arsenic, and a lower ratio of dimethylarsinic acid to MMA, the association between well-water arsenic and cIMT was stronger. The findings indicate an effect of past long-term arsenic exposure on cIMT, which may be potentiated by suboptimal or incomplete arsenic methylation capacity. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm the association between arsenic methylation capacity and atherosclerosis-related outcomes. PMID:23788675

  6. Zirconium/PVA modified flat-sheet PVDF membrane as a cost-effective adsorptive and filtration material: A case study on decontamination of organic arsenic in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dandan; Yu, Yang; Wang, Chenghong; Chen, J Paul

    2016-09-01

    Organic arsenic in waters has been a global concern in drinking water due to its higher toxicity to humans. In this study, a novel zirconium/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) modified polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was applied to remove organic arsenic from water. The impregnation of zirconium ions within the modified membrane was attributed to the coordination reactions among the zirconium ions, ether and hydroxyl groups. The synthesized membrane worked better at the acidic conditions and achieved the optimal uptake for both monomethylarsonic (MMA) and dimethylarsinic (DMA) at pH 2.0. The adsorption isotherm study demonstrated that the adsorption of both organic arsenic species was controlled by the mono-layer adsorption process; the maximum adsorption capacities for MMA and DMA were 73.04 and 37.53mg/g at pH 2, and 29.78 and 19.03mg/g at pH 7.0, respectively. The presence of humic acid had a negligible impact on the uptake of organic arsenic, whereas varying impacts on the arsenic adsorption were observed due to the presence of coexisting anions such as fluoride, phosphate, carbonate and silicate. A single piece of membrane with a surface area of only 12.56cm(2) could treat 7.5-L MMA and 4.1-L DMA solution with an influent concentration of about 100μg/L to meet the WHO and USEPA standard of 10μg/L. Based on the XPS analyses, the ion exchange reaction between chloride ions on the membrane surface and organic arsenic species was responsible for the removal of both MMA and DMA. PMID:27267042

  7. Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B.; Leszczynska, Joanna; Hickey, Christina; Rossman, Toby G.

    2007-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals; therefore, it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic cocarcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable.

  8. Urinary arsenic profile affects the risk of urothelial carcinoma even at low arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Y.-S.; Yang, S.-M.; Huang, Y.-K.; Chung, C.-J.; Huang, Steven K.; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Yang, M.-H.; Chen, C.-J.; Hsueh, Y.-M. . E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    Arsenic exposure is associated with an increased risk of urothelial carcinoma (UC). To explore the association between individual risk and urinary arsenic profile in subjects without evident exposure, 177 UC cases and 313 age-matched controls were recruited between September 2002 and May 2004 for a case-control study. Urinary arsenic species including the following three categories, inorganic arsenic (As{sup III} + As{sup V}), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}), were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Arsenic methylation profile was assessed by percentages of various arsenic species in the sum of the three categories measured. The primary methylation index (PMI) was defined as the ratio between MMA{sup V} and inorganic arsenic. Secondary methylation index (SMI) was determined as the ratio between DMA{sup V} and MMA{sup V}. Smoking is associated with a significant risk of UC in a dose-dependent manner. After multivariate adjustment, UC cases had a significantly higher sum of all the urinary species measured, higher percent MMA{sup V}, lower percent DMA{sup V}, higher PMI and lower SMI values compared with controls. Smoking interacts with the urinary arsenic profile in modifying the UC risk. Differential carcinogenic effects of the urinary arsenic profile, however, were seen more prominently in non-smokers than in smokers, suggesting that smoking is not the only major environmental source of arsenic contamination since the UC risk differs in non-smokers. Subjects who have an unfavorable urinary arsenic profile have an increased UC risk even at low exposure levels.

  9. Low level exposure to monomethyl arsonous acid-induced the over-production of inflammation-related cytokines and the activation of cell signals associated with tumor progression in a urothelial cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Lourdes, C.; Medeiros, M.K.; Cardenas-Gonzalez, M.C.; Wnek, S.M.; Gandolfi, J.A.

    2010-04-15

    Human bladder cancer has been associated with chronic exposure to arsenic. Chronic exposure of an immortalized non-tumorigenic urothelial cell line (UROtsa cells) to arsenicals has transformed these cells to a malignant phenotype, but the involved mechanisms are not fully understood. Chronic inflammation has been linked with cancer development mainly because many pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors as well as angiogenic chemokines have been found in tumors. In this study the chronology of inflammatory cytokines production was profiled in UROtsa cells chronically exposed to the toxic arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid [50 nM MMA(III)] to know the role of inflammation in cell transformation. Acute 50 nM MMA(III) exposure induced over-production of many pro-inflammatory cytokines as soon as 12 h after acute exposure. The same cytokines remain over-regulated after chronic exposure to 50 nM MMA(III), especially after 3 mo exposure. At 3 mo exposure the sustained production of cytokines like IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF is coincident with the appearance of characteristics associated with cell transformation seen in other arsenic-UROtsa studies. The sustained and increased activation of NFkappaB and c-Jun is also present along the transformation process and the phosphorylated proteins p38 MAPK and ERK 1/2 are increased also through the time line. Taken together these results support the notion that chronic inflammation is associated within MMA(III)-induced cell transformation and may act as a promoting factor in UROtsa cell transformation.

  10. Simple, Fast, and Simultaneous Detection of Plasma Total Homocysteine, Methylmalonic Acid, Methionine, and 2-Methylcitric Acid Using Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowei; Xu, Yan-Kang; Chan, Penny; Pattengale, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) plays an essential role both in the conversion of methylmalonyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA and in the synthesis of methionine (Met) from homocysteine (Hcy). Elevations of total homocysteine (tHcy), Met, methylmalonic acid (MMA), and 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) are indicative of disorders in these related pathways, and can clinically present as methylmalonic acidemia, cobalamin defects or deficiency, propionic acidemia, homocystinuria, and hypermethioninemia. We have developed a fast, sensitive, and simple method for the simultaneous detection of plasma tHcy, MMA, Met, and 2MCA using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). All analytes were directly determined without the need of derivatization. Both positive and negative modes were used to achieve the best sensitivity and specificity. The two stereo isomers of 2MCA (2S, 3S) and (2R, 3S) were successfully separated and were designated as 2MCA1 and 2MCA2. The assays were linear up to a concentration of 800 μMol/l for tHcy, 2,000 μMol/l for Met, 80 μMol/l for MMA, 40 μMol/l for 2MCA1, and 40 μMol/l for 2MCA2 (80 μMol/l for total 2MCA), respectively. The recovery was between 84.42 % and 120.05 %. The intra-assay coefficient of variations (CVs) ranged from 2.1 % to 6.9 % (n = 20), and the inter-assay CVs ranged from 2.7 % to 11.6 % (n = 20). Reference intervals were established and verified (n = 125). A total of 15 patients with variable disorders in related pathway were successfully confirmed. The assay can be performed either in diagnostic laboratories or as second-tier, follow-up test in newborn screening laboratories.A fast, sensitive, and simple LC/MS/MS method was developed successfully for the simultaneous detection of plasma total homocysteine, methylmalonic acid, methionine, and 2-methylcitric acid for diagnosis of disorders in related pathways. PMID:23430805

  11. Determination of arsenic species in marine samples by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shizuko; Toshimitsu, Hideki; Aihara, Masato

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic speciation analysis in marine samples was performed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ICP-MS detection. The separation of eight arsenic species viz. arsenite (As(III)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), arsenate (As(V)), arsenobetaine, trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO), arsenocholine and tetramethylarsonium ion (TeMAs) was achieved on a Shiseido Capcell Pak C18 column by using an isocratic eluent (pH 3.0), in which condition As(III) and MMA were co-eluted. The entire separation was accomplished in 15 min. The detection limits for 8 arsenic species by HPLC/ICP-MS were in the range of 0.02 - 0.10 microg L(-1) based on 3sigma of blank response (n=9). The precision was calculated to be 3.1-7.3% (RSD) for all eight species. The method then successfully applied to several marine samples e.g., oyster, scallop, fish, and shrimps. For the extraction of arsenic species from seafood products, the low power microwave digestion was employed. The extraction efficiency was in the range of 52.9 - 112.3%. Total arsenic concentrations were analyzed by using the microwave acid digestion. The total arsenics in the certified reference materials (DORM-2 and TORT-2) were analyzed and agreed with the certified values. The concentrations of arsenics in marine samples were in the range 6.6 - 35.1 microg g(-1). PMID:16429770

  12. Delivery of roxarsone via chicken diet→chicken→chicken manure→soil→rice plant.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lixian; Huang, Lianxi; He, Zhaohuan; Zhou, Changmin; Lu, Weisheng; Bai, Cuihua

    2016-10-01

    Roxarsone (ROX), a widely used feed additive, occurs as itself and its metabolites in animal manure. Rice is prone to accumulate As than other staple food. Four diets with 0, 40, 80 and 120mgROXkg(-1) were fed in chickens, and four chicken manures (CMs) were collected to fertilize rice plants in a soil culture experiment. Linear regression analysis shows that the slopes of As species including 4-hydroxy-phenylarsonic acid, As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in CM versus dietary ROX were 0.033, 0.314, 0.033, 0.054 and 0.138, respectively. Both As(III) and DMA were determined in all rice grains, and As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA in rice hull, but detectable As forms in rice straws and soils increased with increasing ROX dose. Grain As(III) was unrelated to ROX dose but exceeded the Chinese rice As limit (0.15mgAs(III)kg(-1)). Dietary ROX enhanced straw As(III) mostly, with the slope of 0.020, followed by hull DMA (0.006) and grain DMA (0.002). The slopes of soil As(V) and As(III) were 0.003 and 0.001. This is the first report illustrating the quantitative delivery of ROX via food chain, which helps to evaluate health and environmental risks caused by ROX use in animal production. PMID:27265740

  13. Association between polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes and urinary arsenic methylation profiles in girls and boys chronically exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; González-Cortes, Tania; Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Clark Lantz, R; Jay Gandolfi, A; Michel-Ramirez, Gladis

    2016-08-01

    Disease manifestations or susceptibilities often differ among individuals exposed to the same concentrations of arsenic (As). These differences have been associated with several factors including As metabolism, sex, age, genetic variants, nutritional status, smoking, and others. This study evaluated the associations between four As metabolism-related gene polymorphisms/null genotypes with urinary As methylation profiles in girls and boys chronically exposed to As. In a total of 332 children aged 6-12 years, the frequency of AS3MT, GSTO1, GSTT1, and GSTM1 polymorphisms/null genotypes and As urinary metabolites were measured. The results revealed that total As and monomethyl metabolites of As (MMA) levels were higher in boys than in girls. No differences in the frequency of the evaluated polymorphisms were found between girls and boys. In AS3MT-Met287Thr carriers, %MMA levels were higher and second methylation levels (defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA) were lower. In children with the GSTM1 null genotype, second methylation levels were higher. In boys, a positive association between the AS3MT-Met287Thr polymorphism with %MMA and between the GSTO1-Glu155del and As(v) was found; whereas, a negative relationship was identified between AS3MT-Met287Thr and second methylation profiles. In girls, a positive association was found between the GSTO1-Ala140Asp polymorphism with second methylation levels. In conclusion, our data indicate that gender, high As exposure levels, and polymorphisms in the evaluated genes negatively influenced As metabolism. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:516-525, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27327299

  14. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  15. Intermediaries of branched chain amino acid metabolism induce fetal hemoglobin, and repress SOX6 and BCL11A, in definitive erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Karkashon, Shay; Raghupathy, Radha; Bhatia, Himanshu; Dutta, Amrita; Hess, Sonja; Higgs, Jaimie; Tifft, Cynthia J; Little, Jane A

    2015-08-01

    High levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) can ameliorate human β-globin gene disorders. The short chain fatty acid butyrate is the paradigmatic metabolic intermediary that induces HbF. Inherited disorders of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism have been associated with supranormal HbF levels beyond infancy, e.g., propionic acidemia (PA) and methylmalonic acidemia (MMA). We tested intermediaries of BCAA metabolism for their effects on definitive erythropoiesis. Like butyrate, the elevated BCAA intermediaries isovalerate, isobutyrate, and propionate, induce fetal globin gene expression in murine EryD in vitro, are associated with bulk histone H3 hyperacylation, and repress the transcription of key gamma globin regulatory factors, notably BCL11A and SOX6. Metabolic intermediaries that are elevated in Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) affect none of these processes. Percent HbF and gamma (γ) chain isoforms were also measured in non-anemic, therapeutically optimized subjects with MSUD (Group I, n=6) or with Isovaleric Acidemia (IVA), MMA, or PA (Group II, n=5). Mean HbF was 0.24 ± 0.15% in Group I and 0.87 ± 0.13% in Group II (p=.01); only the Gγ isoform was detected. We conclude that a family of biochemically related intermediaries of branched chain amino acid metabolism induces fetal hemoglobin during definitive erythropoiesis, with mechanisms that mirror those so far identified for butyrate. PMID:26142333

  16. Arsenic levels in immigrant children from countries at risk of consuming arsenic polluted water compared to children from Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Piñol, S; Sala, A; Guzman, C; Marcos, S; Joya, X; Puig, C; Velasco, M; Velez, D; Vall, O; Garcia-Algar, O

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a highly toxic element that pollutes groundwater, being a major environmental problem worldwide, especially in the Bengal Basin. About 40% of patients in our outpatient clinics come from those countries, and there is no published data about their arsenic exposure. This study compares arsenic exposure between immigrant and native children. A total of 114 children (57 natives, 57 immigrants), aged 2 months to 16 years, were recruited and sociodemographic and environmental exposure data were recorded. Total arsenic in urine, hair, and nails and arsenic-speciated compounds in urine were determined. We did not find significant differences in total and inorganic arsenic levels in urine and hair, but in organic arsenic monomethylarsenic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA) in urine and in total arsenic in nails. However, these values were not in the toxic range. There were significant differences between longer than 5 years exposure and less than 5 years exposure (consumption of water from tube wells), with respect to inorganic and organic MMA arsenic in urine and total arsenic in nails. There was partial correlation between the duration of exposure and inorganic arsenic levels in urine. Immigrant children have higher arsenic levels than native children, but they are not toxic. At present, there is no need for specific arsenic screening or follow-up in immigrant children recently arrived in Spain from exposure high-risk countries. PMID:26431705

  17. Arsenic exposure levels in relation to different working departments in a copper mining and smelting plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingshan; Song, Yingli; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Lin; Xi, Shuhua; Sun, Guifan

    2015-10-01

    The investigation was carried out to evaluate arsenic exposure and the urine metabolite profiles of workers with different working departments, including administration (Group1), copper ore mining (Group2), copper ore grinding (Group3), electrolytic procession (Group4) and copper smelting (Group5) in a Copper mining and processing plant in China. Information about characteristics of each subject was obtained by questionnaire and inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine were determined. The highest urinary levels of iAs, MMA and DMA all were found in the Group 5. Group 4 workers had a higher iAs% and a lower PMI compared to Group 3. The urinary total As (TAs) levels of 54.7% subjects exceeded 50 μg/g Cr, and the highest percentage (93.3%) was found in Group 5, smelters. The results of the present study indicate that workers in copper production plant indeed exposed to As, especially for smelters and workers of electrolytic process.

  18. Lewis pair polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs: acid, base and monomer scope and polymerization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuetao; Miyake, Garret M; John, Mallory G; Falivene, Laura; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2012-08-14

    Classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (LPs) of the strong Lewis acid (LA) Al(C(6)F(5))(3) with several Lewis base (LB) classes have been found to exhibit exceptional activity in the Lewis pair polymerization (LPP) of conjugated polar alkenes such as methyl methacrylate (MMA) as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (MBL) and γ-methyl-α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone (γ-MMBL), leading to high molecular weight polymers, often with narrow molecular weight distributions. This study has investigated a large number of LPs, consisting of 11 LAs as well as 10 achiral and 4 chiral LBs, for LPP of 12 monomers of several different types. Although some more common LAs can also be utilized for LPP, Al(C(6)F(5))(3)-based LPs are far more active and effective than other LA-based LPs. On the other hand, several classes of LBs, when paired with Al(C(6)F(5))(3), can render highly active and effective LPP of MMA and γ-MMBL; such LBs include phosphines (e.g., P(t)Bu(3)), chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), and phosphazene superbases (e.g., P(4)-(t)Bu). The P(4)-(t)Bu/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair exhibits the highest activity of the LP series, with a remarkably high turn-over frequency of 9.6 × 10(4) h(-1) (0.125 mol% catalyst, 100% MMA conversion in 30 s, M(n) = 2.12 × 10(5) g mol(-1), PDI = 1.34). The polymers produced by LPs at RT are typically atactic (P(γ)MMBL with ∼47% mr) or syndio-rich (PMMA with ∼70-75% rr), but highly syndiotactic PMMA with rr ∼91% can be produced by chiral or achiral LPs at -78 °C. Mechanistic studies have identified and structurally characterized zwitterionic phosphonium and imidazolium enolaluminates as the active species of the current LPP system, which are formed by the reaction of the monomer·Al(C(6)F(5))(3) adduct with P(t)Bu(3) and NHC bases, respectively. Kinetic studies have revealed that the MMA polymerization by the (t)Bu(3)P/Al(C(6)F(5))(3) pair is zero-order in monomer concentration after an initial

  19. Exploring the in vitro formation of trimethylarsine sulfide from dimethylthioarsinic acid in anaerobic microflora of mouse cecum using HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubachka, Kevin M.; Kohan, Michael C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Creed, John T. Thomas, David J.

    2009-09-01

    Although metabolism of arsenicals to form methylated oxoarsenical species has been extensively studied, less is known about the formation of thiolated arsenical species that have recently been detected as urinary metabolites. Indeed, their presence suggests that the metabolism of ingested arsenic is more complex than previously thought. Recent reports have shown that thiolated arsenicals can be produced by the anaerobic microflora of the mouse cecum, suggesting that metabolism prior to systemic absorption may be a significant determinant of the pattern and extent of exposure to various arsenic-containing species. Here, we examined the metabolism of {sup 34}S labeled dimethylthioarsinic acid ({sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V}) by the anaerobic microflora of the mouse cecum using HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS to monitor for the presence of various oxo- and thioarsenicals. The use of isotopically enriched {sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V} made it possible to differentiate among potential metabolic pathways for production of the trimethylarsine sulfide (TMAS{sup V}). Upon in vitro incubation in an assay containing anaerobic microflora of mouse cecum, {sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V} underwent several transformations. Labile {sup 34}S was exchanged with more abundant {sup 32}S to produce {sup 32}S-DMTA{sup V}, a thiol group was added to yield DMDTA{sup V}, and a methyl group was added to yield {sup 34}S-TMAS{sup V}. Because incubation of {sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V} resulted in the formation of {sup 34}S-TMAS{sup V}, the pathway for its formation must preserve the arsenic-sulfur bond. The alternative metabolic pathway postulated for formation of TMAS{sup V} from dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) would proceed via a dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) intermediate and would necessitate the loss of {sup 34}S label. Structural confirmation of the metabolic product was achieved using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The data presented support the direct methylation of DMTA{sup V} to TMAS{sup V}. Additionally, the detection of

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  1. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  2. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  3. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  4. Dietary administration of sodium arsenite to rats: Relations between dose and urinary concentrations of methylated and thio-metabolites and effects on the rat urinary bladder epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shugo; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L.; Chen, Baowei; Naranmandura, Hua; Le, X. Chris; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2010-04-15

    Based on epidemiological data, chronic exposure to high levels of inorganic arsenic in drinking water is carcinogenic to humans, inducing skin, urinary bladder and lung tumors. In vivo, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to organic methylated arsenicals including the highly toxic dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Short-term treatment of rats with 100 mug/g trivalent arsenic (As{sup III}) as sodium arsenite in the diet or in drinking water induced cytotoxicity and necrosis of the urothelial superficial layer, with increased cell proliferation and hyperplasia. The objectives of this study were to determine if these arsenic-induced urothelial effects are dose responsive, the dose of arsenic at which urothelial effects are not detected, and the urinary concentrations of the arsenical metabolites. We treated female F344 rats for 5 weeks with sodium arsenite at dietary doses of 0, 1, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. Cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and hyperplasia of urothelial superficial cells were increased in a dose-responsive manner, with maximum effects found at 50 ppm As{sup III}. There were no effects at 1 ppm As{sup III}. The main urinary arsenical in As{sup III}-treated rats was the organic arsenical dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). The thio-metabolites dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA{sup V}) and monomethylmonothioarsinic acid (MMMTA{sup V}) were also found in the urine of As{sup III}-treated rats. The LC{sub 50} concentrations of DMMTA{sup V} for rat and human urothelial cells in vitro were similar to trivalent oxygen-containing arsenicals. These data suggest that dietary As{sup III}-induced urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation are dose responsive, and the urothelial effects have a threshold corresponding to the urinary excretion of measurable reactive metabolites.

  5. Elevation of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and cell proliferation via generation of oxidative stress by organic arsenicals contributes to their carcinogenicity in the rat liver and bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki . E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Wei Min; Yunoki, Takayuki; Fukushima, Shoji

    2007-06-15

    Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO{sup V}) are well-documented inorganic arsenic (iAs) methylated metabolites. In our previous studies, DMA{sup V} and TMAO{sup V} were shown to exert carcinogenicity in the rat bladder and liver, respectively. Furthermore, MMA{sup V}, DMA{sup V} and TMAO{sup V} exhibited promoting activity on rat hepatocarcinogenesis. To clarify mechanisms of arsenical carcinogenicity and compare biological responses in the liver and bladder, male F344 rats were sequentially treated for 5, 10, 15, 20 days with MMA{sup V}, DMA{sup V} and TMAO{sup V} in their drinking water at a dose of 0.02%. Significant increase of P450 total content and generation of hydroxyl radicals in the liver were observed from 10 and 15 days of treatment with arsenicals, respectively, with the highest levels induced by TMAO{sup V}. Similarly, elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation was found in the DNA with significant increase by TMAO{sup V} treatment in the liver at days 15 and 20, and DMA{sup V} in the bladder after 20 days treatment. In addition, cell proliferation and apoptosis indices were significantly increased by TMAO{sup V} in the liver and by DMA{sup V} in the bladder of rats. These events were accompanied by differential up-regulation of phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, cyclins D1 and E, PCNA, caspase 3 and FasL. The results indicate that early elevation of 8-OHdG and cell proliferation via generation of oxidative stress by TMAO{sup V} and DMA{sup V} contributes to their carcinogenicity in the rat liver and bladder.

  6. Arsenic metabolism efficiency has a causal role in arsenic toxicity: Mendelian randomization and gene-environment interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Argos, Maria; Gao, Jianjun; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Rahaman, Ronald; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Quasem, Iftekhar; Hore, Samar K; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Harjes, Judith; Sarwar, Golam; Slavkovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary V; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mohammad; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-01-01

    Background Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a serious global health issue. Observational studies suggest that individuals who metabolize arsenic efficiently are at lower risk for toxicities such as arsenical skin lesions. Using two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 10q24.32 region (near AS3MT) that show independent associations with metabolism efficiency, Mendelian randomization can be used to assess whether the association between metabolism efficiency and skin lesions is likely to be causal. Methods Using data on 2060 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we estimated associations for two 10q24.32 SNPs with relative concentrations of three urinary arsenic species (representing metabolism efficiency): inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). SNP-based predictions of iAs%, MMA% and DMA% were tested for association with skin lesion status among 2483 cases and 2857 controls. Results Causal odds ratios for skin lesions were 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.87, 0.95), 1.19 (CI: 1.10, 1.28) and 1.23 (CI: 1.12, 1.36) for a one standard deviation increase in DMA%, MMA% and iAs%, respectively. We demonstrated genotype-arsenic interaction, with metabolism-related variants showing stronger associations with skin lesion risk among individuals with high arsenic exposure (synergy index: 1.37; CI: 1.11, 1.62). Conclusions We provide strong evidence for a causal relationship between arsenic metabolism efficiency and skin lesion risk. Mendelian randomization can be used to assess the causal role of arsenic exposure and metabolism in a wide array of health conditions. Developing interventions that increase arsenic metabolism efficiency are likely to reduce the impact of arsenic exposure on health. PMID:24536095

  7. Proinflammatory effect of trivalent arsenical species in a co-culture of Caco-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Marta; Gimeno-Alcañiz, José V; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2015-04-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) is associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Ingested inorganic As is transformed within the gastrointestinal tract and can give rise to more toxic species such as monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)]. Thus, the intestinal epithelium comes into contact with toxic arsenical species, and the effects of such exposure upon epithelial function are not clear. The present study has evaluated the effect of 1 µM arsenite [As(III)], 0.1 µM MMA(III) and 1 µM DMA(III) upon the release of cytokines [interleukin-6 (IL6), IL8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)], using a compartmentalized co-culture model with differentiated Caco-2 cells in the apical compartment and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the basolateral compartment. In addition, the combined effect of arsenical species and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both added into the apical compartment, has been analyzed. The results indicate that exposure to the arsenical forms induces a proinflammatory response. An increase in cytokine secretion into the basolateral compartment was observed, particularly as regards TNFα (up to 1,600 %). The cytokine levels on the apical side also increased, though to a lesser extent. As/LPS co-exposure significantly affected the proinflammatory response as compared to treatment with As alone. Treatment with DMA(III) and As/LPS co-exposure increased the permeability of the intestinal monolayer. In addition, As/LPS treatments enhanced As(III) and MMA(III) transport through the intestinal monolayer. PMID:24862236

  8. Human exposure to arsenic from drinking water in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Lan, Vi Mai; Anh, Duong Hong; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Viet, Pham Hung; Berg, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Vietnam is an agricultural country with a population of about 88 million, with some 18 million inhabitants living in the Red River Delta in Northern Vietnam. The present study reports the chemical analyses of 68 water and 213 biological (human hair and urine) samples conducted to investigate arsenic contamination in tube well water and human arsenic exposure in four districts (Tu Liem, Dan Phuong, Ly Nhan, and Hoai Duc) in the Red River Delta. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in these areas were in the range of <1 to 632 μg/L, with severe contamination found in the communities Ly Nhan, Hoai Duc, and Dan Phuong. Arsenic concentrations were markedly lowered in water treated with sand filters, except for groundwater from Hoai Duc. Human hair samples had arsenic levels in the range of 0.07-7.51 μg/g, and among residents exposed to arsenic levels ≥50 μg/L, 64% of them had hair arsenic concentrations higher than 1 μg/g, which is a level that can cause skin lesions. Urinary arsenic concentrations were 4-435 μg/g creatinine. Concentrations of arsenic in hair and urine increased significantly with increasing arsenic content in drinking water, indicating that drinking water is a significant source of arsenic exposure for these residents. The percentage of inorganic arsenic (IA) in urine decreased with age, whereas the opposite trend was observed for monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine. Significant co-interactions of age and arsenic exposure status were also detected for concentrations of arsenic in hair and the sum of IA, MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine and %MMA. In summary, this study demonstrates that a considerable proportion of the Vietnamese population is exposed to arsenic levels of chronic toxicity, even if sand filters reduce exposure in many households. Health problems caused by arsenic ingestion through drinking water are increasingly reported in Vietnam. PMID:24262873

  9. Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for simultaneous determination of small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Sriboonvorakul, Natthida; Leepipatpiboon, Natchanun; Dondorp, Arjen M; Pouplin, Thomas; White, Nicholas J; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2013-12-15

    Acidosis is an important cause of mortality in severe falciparum malaria. Lactic acid is a major contributor to metabolic acidosis, but accounts for only one-quarter of the strong anion gap. Other unidentified organic acids have an independent strong prognostic significance for a fatal outcome. In this study, a simultaneous bio-analytical method for qualitative and quantitative assessment in plasma and urine of eight small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria was developed and validated. High-throughput strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction in a 96-well plate format was used for sample preparation. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to negative mass spectroscopy was utilized for separation and detection. Eight possible small organic acids; l-lactic acid (LA), α-hydroxybutyric acid (aHBA), β-hydroxybutyric acid (bHBA), p-hydroxyphenyllactic acid (pHPLA), malonic acid (MA), methylmalonic acid (MMA), ethylmalonic acid (EMA) and α-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) were analyzed simultaneously using a ZIC-HILIC column with an isocratic elution containing acetonitrile and ammonium acetate buffer. This method was validated according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines with additional validation procedures for endogenous substances. Accuracy for all eight acids ranged from 93.1% to 104.0%, and the within-day and between-day precisions (i.e. relative standard deviations) were lower than 5.5% at all tested concentrations. The calibration ranges were: 2.5-2500μg/mL for LA, 0.125-125μg/mL for aHBA, 7.5-375μg/mL for bHBA, 0.1-100μg/mL for pHPLA, 1-1000μg/mL for MA, 0.25-250μg/mL for MMA, 0.25-100μg/mL for EMA, and 30-1500μg/mL for aKGA. Clinical applicability was demonstrated by analyzing plasma and urine samples from five patients with severe falciparum malaria; five acids had increased concentrations in plasma (range LA=177-1169μg/mL, aHBA=4.70-38.4μg/mL, bHBA=7.70-38.0μg/mL, pHPLA=0.900-4.30

  10. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  11. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  12. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  13. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  14. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  15. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  16. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  17. Methylmalonic and propionic acidurias: management without or with a few supplements of specific amino acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Touati, G; Valayannopoulos, V; Mention, K; de Lonlay, P; Jouvet, P; Depondt, E; Assoun, M; Souberbielle, J C; Rabier, D; Ogier de Baulny, H; Saudubray, J-M

    2006-01-01

    In a series of 137 patients with methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA) and propionic acidaemia (PA) diagnosed since the early 1970s, we report in more detail 81 patients (51 MMA and 30 PA) diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. In this series, 14% of patients died at initial access revealing the disease before or despite treatment, 18% died later, and the remainder (68%) are still alive. All patients were treated with the same protocol of enteral feeds with a low-protein diet adjusted to individual tolerance, carnitine, antibiotics, and only occasional use of an amino acid (AA) mixture. There was intensive follow-up and monitoring using measurements of urinary urea. Thirty-nine patients with severe forms, followed for more than 3 years, are analysed in particular detail. Of the 17 PA patients, 6 had moderate disability (all neonatal-onset forms), whereas 11 were normal or slightly delayed in their mental development. Four presented with cardiomyopathy, of whom 2 died. Of the 22 MMA patients, 13 presented in the neonatal period, of whom 3 died later, 2 are in renal failure and only 5 are still alive and have a normal or slightly delayed mental development. In the 9 patients with late-onset forms, there were no deaths and all patients but one have normal mental development. Among the 39 patients, only 40% were given an AA supplement at 3 years, and 50% between 6 and 11 years. The actual intake of natural protein was 0.92, 0.78 and 0.77 g/kg per day at 3, 6 and 11 years, respectively, in patients without AA supplementation, whereas it was 0.75, 0.74 and 0.54 g/kg per day in the group who received small quantities of AA (0.4-0.6 g/kg per day). In both groups, feeding disorders were frequent: 55% at 3 years, 35% at 6 years and 12% at 11 years. Many patients were given a food supplement by tube overnight or were even exclusively tube fed: 60% at 3 years, 48% at 6 years and still 27% at 11 years. Growth velocity was near the normal values. Plasma valine and isoleucine were low to very

  18. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  19. Arsenic-containing fatty acids and hydrocarbons in marine oils - determination using reversed-phase HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-qTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Sele, Veronika; Sloth, Jens J; Holmelid, Bjarte; Valdersnes, Stig; Skov, Kasper; Amlund, Heidi

    2014-04-01

    Arsenolipids are the major arsenic species present in marine oils. Several structures of arsenolipids have been elucidated the last 5 years, demonstrating the chemical complexity of this trace element in the marine environment. Several commercial fish oils and marine oils, ranging in total arsenic concentrations from 1.6 to 12.5 mg kg(-1) oil, were analyzed for arsenolipids using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). The arsenolipids were quantified using three different arsenic-containing calibration standards; dimethylarsinate (DMA), triphenylarsinoxide (Ph₃AsO) and a synthesized arsenic-containing hydrocarbon (AsHC) (dimethylarsinoyl nonadecane; C₂₁H₄₃AsO). The observed variation in signal intensity for arsenic during the gradient elution profile in reversed-phase HPLC was compensated for by determining the time-resolved response factors for the arsenolipids. Isotopes of germanium ((74)Ge) and indium ((115)In) were suited as internal standards for arsenic, and were used for verification of the arsenic signal response factors during the gradient elution. Dimethylarsinate was the most suitable calibration standard for the quantification of arsenolipids, with recoveries between 91% and 104% compared to total arsenic measurements in the same extracts. A range of marine oils was investigated, including oils of several fish species, cod liver and seal, as well as three commercial fish oils. The AsHCs - C₁₇H₃₈AsO, C₁₉H₄₂AsO and C₂₃H₃₈AsO - were identified as the major arsenolipids in the extracts of all oils by HPLC coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (qTOF-MS). Minor amounts of two arsenic-containing fatty acids (AsFAs) (C₂₃H₃₈AsO₃ and C₂₄H₃₈AsO₃) were also detected in the oils. The sum of the AsHCs and the AsFAs determined in the present study accounted for 17-42% of the total arsenic in the oils. PMID

  20. ROXARSONE AND TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS IN CHICKEN MANURE: DETERMINATION BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-INDUCTIVELY COUPLES PLASMA MASS SPECTROMERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The determination of the animal feed additive roxarsone (3-nitro-4- hydroxyphenylarsonic acid) and six of its possible transfonnation products (arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid) in chi...

  1. Arsenic-induced bladder cancer in an animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Samuel M. Ohnishi, Takamasa Arnold, Lora L. Le, X. Chris

    2007-08-01

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder, but not in mice. The carcinogenic mode of action involves cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell proliferation. Dietary DMA{sup V} does not produce urinary solids or significant alterations in urinary composition. The cytotoxicity is due to formation of a reactive metabolite, likely dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), concentrated and excreted in the urine. Urinary concentrations of DMA{sup III} are dose-dependent, and the urinary concentrations are at cytotoxic levels based on in vitro studies. The no observed effect level (NOEL) in these rat dietary studies for detectable levels of DMA{sup III}, cytotoxicity, and proliferation is 2 ppm, with marginal changes at 10 ppm. The tumorigenic dose is 100 ppm. Recent investigations have demonstrated that arsenicals administered to the rat result in binding to a specific cysteine in the hemoglobin alpha chain as DMA{sup III}, regardless of the arsenical being administered. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) is not carcinogenic in rats or mice. In short term experiments ({<=} 10 weeks), sodium arsenate in the drinking water induces significant cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation. There is little evidence that the cytotoxicity produced following administration of arsenicals is caused by oxidative damage, as antioxidants show little inhibitory activity of the cytotoxicity of the various arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo. In summary, the mode of action for DMA{sup V}-induced bladder carcinogenesis in the rat involves generation of a reactive metabolite (DMA{sup III}) leading to cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation, is a non-linear process, and likely involves a threshold. Extrapolation to human risk needs to take this into account along with the significant differences in toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics that occur between different species.

  2. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Kita, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments. PMID:17321558

  3. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Kayoko . E-mail: kkayoko@pharm.teikyo-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments.

  4. Keto-Mycolic Acid-Dependent Pellicle Formation Confers Tolerance to Drug-Sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Dao, Dee N.; Weinrick, Brian C.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gurcha, Sudagar S.; Ojha, Anil; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chronic nature of tuberculosis (TB), its requirement of long duration of treatment, its ability to evade immune intervention, and its propensity to relapse after drug treatment is discontinued are reminiscent of other chronic, biofilm-associated bacterial diseases. Historically, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was grown as a pellicle, a biofilm-like structure, at the liquid-air interface in a variety of synthetic media. Notably, the most widely administered human vaccine, BCG, is grown as a pellicle for vaccine production. However, the molecular requirements for this growth remain ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that keto-mycolic acids (keto-MA) are essential for pellicle growth, and mutants lacking in or depleted of this MA species are unable to form a pellicle. We investigated the role of the pellicle biofilm in the reduction of antibiotic sensitivity known as drug tolerance using the pellicle-defective ΔmmaA4 mutant strain. We discovered that the ΔmmaA4 mutant, which is both pellicle defective and highly sensitive to rifampicin (RIF) under planktonic growth, when incorporated within the wild-type pellicle biofilm, was protected from the bactericidal activity of RIF. The observation that growth within the M. tuberculosis pellicle biofilm can confer drug tolerance to a drug-hypersensitive strain suggests that identifying molecular requirements for pellicle growth could lead to development of novel interventions against mycobacterial infections. Our findings also suggest that a class of drugs that can disrupt M. tuberculosis biofilm formation, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, has the potential to overcome drug tolerance. PMID:23653446

  5. On-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals by thioglycolic acid for speciation analysis by selective hydride generation cryotrapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2008-06-01

    An improvement of current method of selective hydride generation based on pre-reduction for differentiation of tri- and pentavalent arsenicals is described, applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic, mono-, di- and trimethylated arsenicals with minimum sample pretreatment using atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The preconcentration and separation of arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine are then carried out by means of cryotrapping. The presented study shows that 2% (m/v) L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate ( L-cys) currently used for off-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals can be substituted with 1% (m/v) thioglycolic acid (TGA). Much faster pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals at 25 °C with equal sensitivities as in the case of L-cys has been achieved with TGA. A setup for on-line pre-reduction by TGA has been optimized, with the application of segmented flow analysis for suppression of axial dispersion in the pre-reduction coil. Standard calibrations measured with or without on-line pre-reduction indicate uniform and equal sensitivities for all As forms. The possibility of standardization by water standards of single species (e.g. iAs(III)) for quantification of all other As forms in urine is demonstrated in the recovery study. Limits of detection were 100 ng l - 1 for iAs(III), 135 ng l - 1 for iAs(V) and 30 to 50 ng l - 1 for methylated arsenicals.

  6. Determination of transformation mechanisms for DMMTA and DMDTA in landfill leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, J.; Yoon, H.; Bae, J.; Jung, H.; Kong, M.; Kim, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dimethylmonothiolated arsinic acid (DMMTA) and dimethyldithiolated arsinic acid (DMDTA) have receiving increasing attention because of its high toxicity to human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells (Naranmandura et al., 2007) and bladder EJ-1 cells (Naranmandura et al., 2009). These findings require accurate assessment of arsenic species including thiolated compounds in environmental media. Recently, Li et al. (2010) found DMMTA and DMDTA was transformed from dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in landfill leachate with low redox potential and high bacterial biomass and concentrations of BOD and sulfide. Therefore, the transformation mechanisms for DMMTA and DMDTA were investigated to quantify what arsenic species are existed and transformed in landfill leachate for determining their potential risk. For this purpose, simulated leachate mimicking mature landfill condition was prepared under the concentrations of sulfide and volatile fatty acid (VFA) and redox potential controlled. The leachate was spiked with arsenite (iAs(III)), arsenate (iAs(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and DMA respectively and the transformed arsenic species were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Factors influencing arsenic transformations in landfill leachate were evaluated in present study and these results provide to us pathways for being generated thiolated arsenicals. Realistic risk in arsenic disposed landfill is able to calculate by using these results. Acknowledgement : This research was supported by the research grant T31603 from Korea Basic Science Institute.

  7. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  8. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  11. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  12. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  13. Two-Dimensional Phase Unwrapping using Mixed Mathematical Arts (MMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grydeland, T.

    2015-12-01

    The 2D phase unwrapping problem is long standing in interferometric SAR. Solutions fall in two broad classes: local (region growing) and global (eg. network methods) which attempt to unwrap the whole scene as one problem. Large scenes are often split into tiles with overlap. Each tile is unwrapped by itself and the overlap is used to create a solution for the whole scene. Challenging topography, complex coastline, and vegetated or snow covered landscapes can cause problems with disconnected regions in a tiled approach, both for local and global methods. We have implemented a local/global method for unwrapping large interferograms on a sparse domain. The fundamental idea is to use a local, quality-driven method to identify well-connected segments; use global methods (e.g. MCF) to unwrap each segment in isolation; use a global method to balance the segments to arrive at the global solution. The first two stages have been described previously. The number of segments in a scene varies with scene size and quality, but there will typically be several thousand pixels in the larger segments. Segment size is limited to 20-50 thousand to keep segment unwrapping tractable. The crucial final stage is performed using segment balancing with a novel method which does not rely on direct pixel-neighbour contact. Since each segment is itself unwrapped, the remaining problem is to determine a small integer (the difference in absolute wrapping number) for every relevant pair of segments. Each segment tends to have less than ten neighbours, so the number of neighbour relations to be determined is in the low thousands for typical scenes. Good guesses can be made for each of these small integers using boundary or vicinity pixels. Balancing segments for the entire scene is therefore computationally tractable. The quality-guided segmentation always leaves some pixels unsegmented. After balancing, a novel wrapping interval interpolation method is used to extend the solution to the remainder of the scene. This gives a smooth and pleasing impression, while preserving the property that the unwrapped scene will wrap back to the original phase field.

  14. Electrically small, mixed modal antenna (MMA) array for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hwoon; Grimes, Dale M.; Crimes, Craig A.

    Based on the modal antenna analysis due to Grimes (1986) near-field interaction between elements of an antenna ensemble wave used to produce resonant, directed radiation from a small antenna. By previous theory, mixed TE and TM modes are found to be orthogonal and, therefore, a small resonant and/or directional antenna is not possible. The authors recount the analysis showing that time-average power is orthogonal and reactive power is not. Nonorthogonal reactive power suggests that a small, resonant, directive antenna may be possible. Such an antenna is potentially useful for aerospace applications. This paper reports experimental progress to date. In agreement with the theory, it was found that the resonant frequency depends on the relative values of driving currents; the resonant frequency of the magnetic dipole decreased more than 30 percent when a 50-ohm resistive pad loaded the electric dipole.

  15. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  16. Enzyme-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for the determination of arsenic species in chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Le, X Chris

    2015-08-12

    Chicken is the most consumed meat in North America. Concentrations of arsenic in chicken range from μg kg(-1) to mg kg(-1). However, little is known about the speciation of arsenic in chicken meat. The objective of this research was to develop a method enabling determination of arsenic species in chicken breast muscle. We report here enzyme-enhanced extraction of arsenic species from chicken meat, separation using anion exchange chromatography (HPLC), and simultaneous detection with both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESIMS). We compared the extraction of arsenic species using several proteolytic enzymes: bromelain, papain, pepsin, proteinase K, and trypsin. With the use of papain-assisted extraction, 10 arsenic species were extracted and detected, as compared to 8 detectable arsenic species in the water/methanol extract. The overall extraction efficiency was also improved using a combination of ultrasonication and papain digestion, as compared to the conventional water/methanol extraction. Detection limits were in the range of 1.0-1.8 μg arsenic per kg chicken breast meat (dry weight) for seven arsenic species: arsenobetaine (AsB), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), inorganic arsenate (As(V)), 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone), and N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (NAHAA). Analysis of breast meat samples from six chickens receiving feed containing Roxarsone showed the presence of (mean±standard deviation μg kg(-1)) AsB (107±4), As(III) (113±7), As(V) (7±2), MMA (51±5), DMA (64±6), Roxarsone (18±1), and four unidentified arsenic species (approximate concentration 1-10 μg kg(-1)). PMID:26320952

  17. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood vessel to keep it open. Bipolar disorder. Taking folic acid does not appear to improve the antidepressant effects of lithium in people with bipolar disorder. However, taking folate with the medication valproate improves ...

  18. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  19. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  20. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  1. Carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. PMID:25639596

  2. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Amicar® Oral Solution ... Aminocaproic acid comes as a tablet and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  3. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  4. A study on adsorption mechanism of organoarsenic compounds on ferrihydrite by XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, N.

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic organoarsenic compounds which were used such as agrochemicals, pesticides, and herbicides can have a potential as a source of arsenic pollution in water. In the process, the adsorption of arsenic onto mineral surface in soil may play an important role to affect arsenic distribution in solid-water interface. However, adsorption structures of organoarsenic compounds on the iron-(oxyhydr)oxides are not well known. In this study, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to know the adsorption structure of methyl- and phenyl-substituted organoarsenic compounds (methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), phenylarsonic acid (PAA), and diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) onto ferrihydrite which can be a strong adsorbent of arsenic. EXAFS analysis suggests that the formation of inner-sphere surface complex for all organoarsenic compounds with ferrihydrite regardless of the organic functional groups and the number of substitution. The As-Fe distances are around 3.27 , which suggests both mono-and bi-dentate inner-sphere complexes by DFT calculations. The corresponding coordination numbers (CNs) are less than two, suggesting that coexistence of both structures of inner-sphere complexes.

  5. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  6. DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IS MEDIATED BY REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Arsenic is a human carcinogen; however, the mechanisms of arsenic's induction of carcinogenic effects have not been identified clearly. We have shown previously that monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII ) are genotoxic and can damage supe...

  7. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  8. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  9. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  10. Arsenic Speciation in Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) from China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fubin; Ni, Zhanglin; Liu, Yihua; Yu, Qing; Wang, Zhikun; Mo, Runhong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, honeysuckle, a common Chinese herbal medicine, produced from different areas was investigated for total arsenic and arsenic species concentration. The total arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ranged from 275 to 635 μg kg(-1). A microwave-assisted procedure with 1 % phosphoric acid (v/v) was used for the extraction of arsenic species in honeysuckle. The total arsenic species concentration found by liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) was in agreement with the total arsenic concentration determined by the ICP-MS analysis after the microwave digestion. Arsenate (As(V)) with an average proportion of 54.3 % was the predominant arsenic species in honeysuckle. The order of concentration is as follows: As(V) > arsenite (As(III)) > dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) > arsenobetaine (AsB) > monomethylarsonic acid (MMA). The proportion of organic arsenic (24.7 %) was higher than that in most terrestrial plants. Moreover, the distributions of arsenic species in the honeysuckle from different producing areas were significantly different. This study provides useful information for better understanding of the distribution of arsenic species in terrestrial plants. PMID:25865059

  11. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side ... to blood clots (ischemic stroke). Inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome.Taking folic acid by mouth does not improve ...

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  13. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  14. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  15. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  16. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  17. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  18. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  19. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  20. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  1. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of BEAS-2B cells exposed to trivalent arsenicals and dimethylthioarsinic acid.

    PubMed

    Chilakapati, Jaya; Wallace, Kathleen; Ren, Hongzu; Fricke, Michael; Bailey, Kathryn; Ward, William; Creed, Jack; Kitchin, Kirk

    2010-01-31

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans by both oral and inhalation routes. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII) and dimethylthioarsinic acid (DMTA), a sulfur containing dimethyl arsenic metabolite, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Cells were exposed to 3, 15 microM-iAsIII; 0.3, 1 microM-MMAIII; 0.2, 1 microM-DMAIII; 0.2, 0.9 microM-DMTA as non-cytotoxic and minimally cytotoxic ( approximately 20%) concentrations based on Neutral Red uptake assays after 24h of culture. Total RNA was isolated and gene expression analysis conducted using Affymetrix Human Genome 133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were determined using a one-way ANOVA (p < or =0.05) by Rosetta Resolver, a Benjamini-Hochberg FDR (false discovery rate) multiple testing correction (< 0.05) followed by a Scheffe's post hoc test. For all compounds except DMTA, > 90% of DEG altered in the low concentration were also changed at the high concentration. There was a clear dose-response seen in the number of DEGs for all four compounds. iAsIII showed the highest number of DEG at both concentrations (2708 and 123, high and low, respectively). 1749, 420 and 120 DEGs were unique to the high concentrations of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAIII, respectively. Transferrin receptor is a common DEG in low concentration arsenical treated cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed p53 signaling (E2F1 and 2, SERPIN), and cell cycle related genes (cyclin D1) were altered by the high concentrations of DMTA, MMAIII and iAsIII. Oxidative stress (DUSP1, GPX2, NQO1, GCLC) and NF-kappaB signaling (TLR4, NF-kappaB) pathways were changed by the high concentrations of MMAIII and iAsIII. The genes identified in this study can be a valuable tool to determine the mechanism of arsenic toxicity and cancer formation. A number of

  3. Simultaneous separation and determination of six arsenic species in rice by anion-exchange chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Yang, Zhaoguang; Tang, Jie; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The simultaneous separation and determination of arsenite As(III), arsenate As(V), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), arsenobetaine (AsB), and arsenocholine (AsC) in rice samples have been carried out in one single anion-exchange column run by high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To estimate the effect of variables on arsenic (As) speciation, the chromatographic conditions including type of competing anion, ionic strength, pH of elution buffer, and flow rate of mobile phase have been investigated by a univariate approach. Under the optimum chromatographic conditions, baseline separation of six As species has been achieved within 10 min by gradient elution program using 4 mM NH4 HCO3 at pH 8.6 as mobile phase A and 4 mM NH4 HCO3 , 40 mM NH4 NO3 at pH 8.6 as mobile phase B. The method detection limits for As(III), As(V), MMA, DMA, AsB, and AsC were 0.4, 0.9, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.3 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed method has been applied to separation and quantification of As species in real rice samples collected from Hunan Province, China. The main As species detected in all samples were As(III), As(V) and DMA, with inorganic As accounting for over 80% of total As in these samples. PMID:27062347

  4. Arsenic Metabolism in Children Differs From That in Adults.

    PubMed

    Skröder Löveborn, Helena; Kippler, Maria; Lu, Ying; Ahmed, Sultan; Kuehnelt, Doris; Raqib, Rubhana; Vahter, Marie

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic toxicity in adults is associated with methylation efficiency, influenced by factors such as gender, genetics, and nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate influencing factors for arsenic metabolism in children. For 488 children (9 years), whose mothers participated in a study on arsenic exposure during pregnancy (nested into the MINIMat trial) in rural Bangladesh, we measured urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its metabolites methylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) by HPLC-HG-ICPMS. Methylation efficiency was assessed by relative amounts (%) of the metabolites. We evaluated the impact of factors such as maternal urinary metabolite pattern, arsenic exposure, gender, socioeconomic status, season of sampling, and nutritional factors, including erythrocyte selenium (Ery-Se), and plasma folate and vitamin B12.Children had higher %DMA and lower %iAs in urine compared to their mothers, unrelated to their lower exposure [median urinary arsenic (U-As) 53 vs 78 µg/l]. Surprisingly, selenium status (Ery-Se) was strongly associated with children's arsenic methylation; an increase in Ery-Se from the 5-95th percentile was associated with: +1.8 percentage points (pp) for %iAs (P  =  .001), +1.4 pp for %MMA (P  =  .003), and -3.2 pp for %DMA (P  <  .001). Despite this, Ery-Se was positively associated with U-As (5-95th percentile: +41 µg/l, P  =  .026). As expected, plasma folate was inversely associated with %iAs (5-95th percentile: -1.9 pp, P  =  .001) and positively associated with %DMA (5-95th percentile: +2.2 pp, P  =  .008). Children methylated arsenic more efficiently than their mothers. Also influencing factors, mainly selenium and folate, differed. This warrants further research. PMID:27056082

  5. Association between maternal urinary arsenic species and infant cord blood leptin levels in a New Hampshire Pregnancy Cohort.

    PubMed

    Gossai, Anala; Lesseur, Corina; Farzan, Shohreh; Marsit, Carmen; Karagas, Margaret R; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an important pleiotropic hormone involved in the regulation of nutrient intake and energy expenditure, and is known to influence body weight in infants and adults. High maternal levels of arsenic have been associated with reduced infant birth weight, but the mechanism of action is not yet understood. This study aimed to investigate the association between in utero arsenic exposure and infant cord blood leptin concentrations within 156 mother-infant pairs from the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study (NHBCS) who were exposed to low to moderate levels of arsenic through well water and diet. In utero arsenic exposure was obtained from maternal second trimester urinary arsenic concentration, and plasma leptin levels were assessed through immunoassay. Results indicate that urinary arsenic species concentrations were predictive of infant cord blood leptin levels following adjustment for creatinine, infant birth weight for gestational age percentile, infant sex, maternal pregnancy-related weight gain, and maternal education level amongst 149 white mother-infant pairs in multivariate linear regression models. A doubling or 100% increase in total urinary arsenic concentration (iAs+MMA+DMA) was associated with a 10.3% (95% CI: 0.8-20.7%) increase in cord blood leptin levels. A 100% increase in either monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) or dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was also associated with an 8.3% (95% CI: -1.0-18.6%) and 10.3% (95% CI: 1.2-20.2%) increase in cord blood leptin levels, respectively. The association between inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cord blood leptin was of similar magnitude and direction as other arsenic species (a 100% increase in iAs was associated with a 6.5% (95% CI: -3.4-17.5%) increase in cord blood leptin levels), albeit not significant. These results suggest in utero exposure to low levels of arsenic influences cord blood leptin concentration and presents a potential mechanism by which arsenic may impact early childhood growth. PMID:25460635

  6. Arsenic Metabolism in Children Differs From That in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Skröder Löveborn, Helena; Lu, Ying; Ahmed, Sultan; Kuehnelt, Doris; Raqib, Rubhana; Vahter, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity in adults is associated with methylation efficiency, influenced by factors such as gender, genetics, and nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate influencing factors for arsenic metabolism in children. For 488 children (9 years), whose mothers participated in a study on arsenic exposure during pregnancy (nested into the MINIMat trial) in rural Bangladesh, we measured urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its metabolites methylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) by HPLC-HG-ICPMS. Methylation efficiency was assessed by relative amounts (%) of the metabolites. We evaluated the impact of factors such as maternal urinary metabolite pattern, arsenic exposure, gender, socioeconomic status, season of sampling, and nutritional factors, including erythrocyte selenium (Ery-Se), and plasma folate and vitamin B12. Children had higher %DMA and lower %iAs in urine compared to their mothers, unrelated to their lower exposure [median urinary arsenic (U-As) 53 vs 78 µg/l]. Surprisingly, selenium status (Ery-Se) was strongly associated with children’s arsenic methylation; an increase in Ery-Se from the 5–95th percentile was associated with: +1.8 percentage points (pp) for %iAs (P  =  .001), +1.4 pp for %MMA (P  =  .003), and −3.2 pp for %DMA (P  <  .001). Despite this, Ery-Se was positively associated with U-As (5–95th percentile: +41 µg/l, P  =  .026). As expected, plasma folate was inversely associated with %iAs (5–95th percentile: −1.9 pp, P  =  .001) and positively associated with %DMA (5–95th percentile: +2.2 pp, P  =  .008). Children methylated arsenic more efficiently than their mothers. Also influencing factors, mainly selenium and folate, differed. This warrants further research. PMID:27056082

  7. Liquid chromatographic–mass spectrometric method for simultaneous determination of small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria☆

    PubMed Central

    Sriboonvorakul, Natthida; Leepipatpiboon, Natchanun; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Pouplin, Thomas; White, Nicholas J.; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Acidosis is an important cause of mortality in severe falciparum malaria. Lactic acid is a major contributor to metabolic acidosis, but accounts for only one-quarter of the strong anion gap. Other unidentified organic acids have an independent strong prognostic significance for a fatal outcome. In this study, a simultaneous bio-analytical method for qualitative and quantitative assessment in plasma and urine of eight small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria was developed and validated. High-throughput strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction in a 96-well plate format was used for sample preparation. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to negative mass spectroscopy was utilized for separation and detection. Eight possible small organic acids; l-lactic acid (LA), α-hydroxybutyric acid (aHBA), β-hydroxybutyric acid (bHBA), p-hydroxyphenyllactic acid (pHPLA), malonic acid (MA), methylmalonic acid (MMA), ethylmalonic acid (EMA) and α-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) were analyzed simultaneously using a ZIC-HILIC column with an isocratic elution containing acetonitrile and ammonium acetate buffer. This method was validated according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines with additional validation procedures for endogenous substances. Accuracy for all eight acids ranged from 93.1% to 104.0%, and the within-day and between-day precisions (i.e. relative standard deviations) were lower than 5.5% at all tested concentrations. The calibration ranges were: 2.5–2500 μg/mL for LA, 0.125–125 μg/mL for aHBA, 7.5–375 μg/mL for bHBA, 0.1–100 μg/mL for pHPLA, 1–1000 μg/mL for MA, 0.25–250 μg/mL for MMA, 0.25–100 μg/mL for EMA, and 30–1500 μg/mL for aKGA. Clinical applicability was demonstrated by analyzing plasma and urine samples from five patients with severe falciparum malaria; five acids had increased concentrations in plasma (range LA = 177–1169 μg/mL, aHBA = 4.70–38.4

  8. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  9. Urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations and semen quality of male partners of subfertile couples in Tokyo.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Tomoko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Toshima, Hiroki; Mizumoto, Yoshifumi; Hatakeyama, Shota; Tokuoka, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been known as a testicular toxicant in experimental rodents. Possible association between iAs exposure and semen quality (semen volume, sperm concentration, and sperm motility) was explored in male partners of couples (n = 42) who visited a gynecology clinic in Tokyo for infertility consultation. Semen parameters were measured according to WHO guideline at the clinic, and urinary iAs and methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-hydride generation-ICP mass spectrometry. Biological attributes, dietary habits, and exposure levels to other chemicals with known effects on semen parameters were taken into consideration as covariates. Multiple regression analyses and logistic regression analyses did not find iAs exposure as significant contributor to semen parameters. Lower exposure level of subjects (estimated to be 0.5 μg kg(-1) day(-1)) was considered a reason of the absence of adverse effects on semen parameters, which were seen in rodents dosed with 4-7.5 mg kg(-1). PMID:26865228

  10. Selective determination of four arsenic species in rice and water samples by modified graphite electrode-based electrolytic hydride generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-An; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Lin; Chi, Miao-Bin; Hu, Hui-Hui; Zhang, Wang-Bing

    2016-10-01

    This work describes a novel non-chromatographic approach for the accurate and selective determining As species by modified graphite electrode-based electrolytic hydride generation (EHG) for sample introduction coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) detection. Two kinds of sulfydryl-containing modifiers, l-cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH), are used to modify cathode. The EHG performance of As has been changed greatly at the modified cathode, which has never been reported. Arsenite [As(III)] on the GSH modified graphite electrode (GSH/GE)-based EHG can be selectively and quantitatively converted to AsH3 at applied current of 0.4A. As(III) and arsenate [As(V)] on the Cys modified graphite electrode (Cys/GE) EHG can be selectively and efficiently converted to arsine at applied current of 0.6A, whereas monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) do not form any or only less volatile hydrides under this condition. By changing the analytical conditions, we also have achieved the analysis of total As (tAs) and DMA. Under the optimal condition, the detection limits (3s) of As(III), iAs and tAs in aqueous solutions are 0.25μgL(-1), 0.22μgL(-1) and 0.10μgL(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through the analysis of standard reference materials (SRM 1568a). PMID:27474289

  11. Arsenic methylation in soils and its relationship with microbial arsM abundance and diversity, and as speciation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Harris, Eleanor; Yan, Jia; Ma, Jincai; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Wenju; McGrath, Steve P; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-07-01

    Methylation of arsenic in soil influences its environmental behavior and accumulation by plants, but little is known about the factors affecting As methylation. As speciation was determined in the pore waters of six soils from diverse geographical locations over 54 days of incubation under flooded conditions. The concentration of methylated As (monomethylarsonic acid, MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid, DMA) varied from 0 to 85 μg L(-1) (0 - 69% of the total As in pore water). Two Bangladeshi paddy soils contaminated by irrigation of As-laden groundwater produced large concentrations of inorganic As but relatively little methylated As. Two contaminated paddy soils from China produced a transient peak of DMA during the early phase of incubation. Methylated As represented considerable proportions of the total soluble As in the two uncontaminated soils from the UK and U.S. The copy number of the microbial arsenite methyltransferase gene (arsM) correlated positively with soil pH. However, pore-water methylated As correlated negatively with pH or arsM copy number, and positively with dissolved organic C. GeoChip assay revealed considerable arsM diversity among the six soils, with 27-35 out of 66 sequences in the microarray being detected. As speciation in rice plants grown in the soils generally mirrored that in the pore water. The results suggest that methylated As species in plants originated from the soil and As methylation in soil was influenced strongly by the soil conditions. PMID:23750559

  12. Accumulation features of arsenic species in various fishes collected from coastal cities in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung-Deuk; Son, Hee-Sik; Choi, Minkyu; Park, Min-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    In this study, 36 fish species were collected from three coastal cities in Korea to investigate levels and patterns of six arsenicals (arsenite: As (III), arsenate: As (V), arsenocholine: AsC, arsenobetaine: AsB, monomethylarsonic acid: MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid: DMA). The levels of ∑6 As in the different fish species varied substantially, ranging from 0.02 μg As/g ww (Islaeli carp) to 9.65 μg As/g ww (Skate ray) with a median of 0.40 μg As/g ww. All the arsenicals in marine fishes showed higher levels than those in freshwater fishes due to fish feed living in saline water. Overall, marine carnivorous fishes seem to be more contaminated with arsenic. For all the fish samples, AsB (mean fraction: 90.6%) was dominant among the six arsenicals, indicating biomethylation of inorganic arsenic and accumulation of AsB. Fish species with high water contents showed elevated levels of As (III), but there was no further significant correlations between arsenicals and water/lipid contents. Concentrations of As (V) were significantly lower than those of As (III), which implies that As (V) is reduced during biomethylation of inorganic arsenic. Consequently, we hypothesize that the toxicity of arsenic (mainly derived from As (III)) can be increased by the reduction of As (V), especially for the fish species with higher water contents.

  13. Speciation of arsenic in saliva samples from a population of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Subhamoy; Halder, Dipti; Nriagu, Jerome; Guha Mazumder, Debendra Nath; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Chatterjee, Debashis; Iglesias, Mònica

    2014-06-17

    Saliva, an easily accessible biofluid, is validated as biomarker of arsenic (As) exposure in several villages of West Bengal, India. Pentavalent arsenic [As(V)] was found to be the predominant species in saliva, with the amount of inorganic As [As(V) and trivalent form, As(III)] being more than half of the total As in the samples. Significant association was found between total daily ingestion of As and As(V) (r = 0.59; p = 0.000), As(III) (r = 0.60; p = 0.000), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(V)) (r = 0.40; p = 0.000), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(V)) (r = 0.44; p = 0.000), implying that these species have mainly been derived from the methylation of the inorganic As in the water that study participants drank and the food they ate. Analysis of confounding effects of age, sex, smoking, body mass index and the prevalence of skin lesion suggests that women and controls with no skin lesion had a higher capacity to methylate the ingested As compared to the rest of the population. Thus, our study demonstrates that As species in saliva can be an useful tool to predict the individual susceptibility where higher As exposure and a lower methylation capacity are implicated in the development of As-induced health effects. PMID:24857783

  14. Fractionation of inorganic arsenic by adjusting hydrogen ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andrea; Gonzalez, Mario Henrique; Queiroz, Helena Müller; Cadore, Solange

    2016-12-15

    The inorganic fraction of arsenic species, iAs=∑[As(III)+As(V)] present in fish samples can be quantified in the presence of other arsenic species also found in fishes, such as: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenobetaine (AsB). The toxic arsenic fraction was selected taking into account the dissociation constants of these arsenic species in different hydrogen ions concentration leading to the arsine formation from iAs compounds detected as As(III) by HG AAS. For thus, a microwave assisted extraction was carried out using HCl 1molL(-1) in order to maintain the integrity of the arsenic species in this mild extraction media. Recovery experiments were done for iAs fraction, in the presence of other arsenic species. The recovery values obtained for iAs fraction added were quantitative about 87-107% (for N=3, RSD⩽3%). The limit of detection (LOD), and the limit of quantification (LOQ), were 5μgkg(-1) and 16μgkg(-1) respectively. PMID:27451157

  15. Dynamics of organic and inorganic arsenic in the solution phase of an acidic fen in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.-H.; Matzner, E.

    2006-04-01

    Wetland soils play a key role for the transformation of heavy metals in forested watersheds, influencing their mobility, and ecotoxicity. Our goal was to investigate the mechanisms of release from solid to solution phase, the mobility, and the transformation of arsenic species in a fen soil. In methanol-water extracts, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, trimethylarsine oxide, arsenobetaine, and two unknown organic arsenic species were found with concentrations up to 14 ng As g -1 at the surface horizon. Arsenate is the dominant species at the 0-30 cm depth, whereas arsenite predominated at the 30-70 cm depth. Only up to 2.2% of total arsenic in fen was extractable with methanol-water. In porewaters, depth gradient spatial variation of arsenic species, pH, redox potentials, and the other chemical parameters along the profile was observed in June together with high proportion of organic arsenic species (up to 1.2 μg As L -1, 70% of total arsenic). Tetramethylarsonium ion and an unknown organic arsenic species were additionally detected in porewaters at deeper horizons. In comparison, the arsenic speciation in porewaters in April was homogeneous with depth and no organic arsenic species were found. Thus, the occurrence of microbial methylation of arsenic in fen was demonstrated for the first time. The 10 times elevated total arsenic concentrations in porewaters in June compared to April were accompanied by elevated concentrations of total iron, lower concentrations of sulfate and the presence of ammonium and phosphate. The low proportion of methanol-water extractable total arsenic suggests a generally low mobility of arsenic in fen soils. The release of arsenic from solid to solution phases in fen is dominantly controlled by dissolution of iron oxides, redox transformation, and methylation of arsenic, driven by microbial activity in the growing season. As a result, increased concentrations of total arsenic and potentially toxic arsenic species in fen

  16. Tissue, Dosimetry, Metabolism and Excretion of Pentavalent and Trivalent Dimethylated Arsenic in Mice after Oral Administration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) is a rat bladder carcinogen and the major urinary metabolite of administered inorganic arsenic in most mammals. This study examined the disposition of pentavalent and trivalent dimethylated arsenic inmice after acute oral administration. Adult fema...

  17. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  18. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  19. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  20. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the blood. ... Methylmalonic acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ...

  1. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  2. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  3. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  4. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  5. Betulinic acid decreases specificity protein 1 (Sp1) level via increasing the sumoylation of sp1 to inhibit lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Mei-Chun; Chen, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shih-Ting; Yeh, Yu-Min; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the inhibitory effect of betulinic acid (BA) on specificity protein 1 (Sp1) expression is involved in the prevention of cancer progression, but the mechanism of this effect remains to be delineated. In this study, we determined that BA treatment in HeLa cells increased the sumoylation of Sp1 by inhibiting sentrin-specific protease 1 expression. The subsequent recruitment of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RING finger protein 4 resulted in ubiquitin-mediated degradation in a 26S-proteosome-dependent pathway. In addition, both BA treatment and mithramycin A (MMA) treatment inhibited lung tumor growth and down-regulated Sp1 protein expression in Kras(G12D)-induced lung cancers of bitransgenic mice. In gene expression profiles of Kras(G12D)-induced lung cancers in bitransgenic mice with and without Sp1 inhibition, 542 genes were affected by MMA treatment. One of the gene products, cyclin A2, which was involved in the S and G(2)/M phase transition during cell cycle progression, was investigated in detail because its expression was regulated by Sp1. The down-regulation of cyclin A2 by BA treatment resulted in decreased retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and cell cycle G(2)/M arrest. The BA-mediated cellular Sp1 degradation and antitumor effect were also confirmed in a xenograft mouse model by using H1299 cells. The knockdown of Sp1 in lung cancer cells attenuated the tumor-suppressive effect of BA. Taken together, the results of this study clarify the mechanism of BA-mediated Sp1 degradation and identify a pivotal role for Sp1 in the BA-induced repression of lung cancer growth. PMID:22956772

  6. Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Microbial enzymes convert fatty acids to mono-, di-, and trihydroxy fatty acid products. Among them, Bacillus megaterium ALA2 converted n-6 and n-3 PUFAs to many new oxygenated fatty acids. Linoleic acid was ...

  7. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  8. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  9. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  10. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  11. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  12. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  13. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  14. Low-level environmental arsenic exposure correlates with unexplained male infertility risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Weipan; Huang, Qingyu; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Xia, Yankai; Zhang, Weibing; Shen, Heqing

    2016-11-15

    Humans are exposed to arsenic via drinking water, dietary intake and inhaled particulates. Endemic chronic arsenic exposure related reproductive toxicity is well documented, but the effect of low-level general environmental arsenic exposure on unexplained male infertility (UMI) remains unclear. In this case-control study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between non-geogenic environmental arsenic exposure and UMI risk. One hundred and one infertile men with normal semen as cases and sixty one fertile men as controls were recruited. Five urinary arsenic species: pentavalent arsenate (Asi(V)), trivalent arsenite (Asi(III)), methylated to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), arsenobetaine (AsB) were quantitatively measured by liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS). To assess the semen quality, semen volume, sperm concentration, total motility, and progressive motility were measured. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the differences of arsenic species and index between the case and the control group; we observed that concentrations of Asi(V), AsB, MMA(V), DMA(V), total inorganic As and total As were significantly higher in the cases than the controls. The urine Asi(V) level increased more than twenty folds in case group. Moreover, higher redox index (Asi(V)/Asi(III)) and lower primary arsenic methylation index (PMI=MMA(V)/Asi) were observed for case group. Furthermore, through the logistic regression analysis, we observed that the urine Asi(V) level and PMI were most significantly associated with UMI risk among the observations. Specifically, in comparison to the first quartile, the subjects with higher Asi(V) levels were more likely to exhibit UMI with increasing adjusted odds ratios (AORs) (adjusted by age, body mass index, drinking status and smoking status) of 8.39 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.59-27.17], 13.12 (95% CI, 3.44-50.12) and 36.51 (95% CI, 8

  15. Field and laboratory arsenic speciation methods and their application to natural-water analysis.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Garbarino, J R; Burkhardt, M R; Ranville, J F; Wildeman, T R

    2004-01-01

    The toxic and carcinogenic properties of inorganic and organic arsenic species make their determination in natural water vitally important. Determination of individual inorganic and organic arsenic species is critical because the toxicology, mobility, and adsorptivity vary substantially. Several methods for the speciation of arsenic in groundwater, surface-water, and acid mine drainage sample matrices using field and laboratory techniques are presented. The methods provide quantitative determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), and roxarsone in 2-8 min at detection limits of less than 1 microg arsenic per liter (microg As L(-1)). All the methods use anion exchange chromatography to separate the arsenic species and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an arsenic-specific detector. Different methods were needed because some sample matrices did not have all arsenic species present or were incompatible with particular high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mobile phases. The bias and variability of the methods were evaluated using total arsenic, As(III), As(V), DMA, and MMA results from more than 100 surface-water, groundwater, and acid mine drainage samples, and reference materials. Concentrations in test samples were as much as 13,000 microg As L(-1) for As(III) and 3700 microg As L(-1) for As(V). Methylated arsenic species were less than 100 microg As L(-1) and were found only in certain surface-water samples, and roxarsone was not detected in any of the water samples tested. The distribution of inorganic arsenic species in the test samples ranged from 0% to 90% As(III). Laboratory-speciation method variability for As(III), As(V), MMA, and DMA in reagent water at 0.5 microg As L(-1) was 8-13% (n=7). Field-speciation method variability for As(III) and As(V) at 1 microg As L(-1) in reagent water was 3-4% (n=3). PMID:14675647

  16. Assessment of Arsenic Exposure by Measurement of Urinary Speciated Inorganic Arsenic Metabolites in Workers in a Semiconductor Manufacturing Plant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the exposure to arsenic in preventive maintenance (PM) engineers in a semiconductor industry by detecting speciated inorganic arsenic metabolites in the urine. Methods The exposed group included 8 PM engineers from the clean process area and 13 PM engineers from the ion implantation process area; the non-exposed group consisted of 14 office workers from another company who were not occupationally exposed to arsenic. A spot urine specimen was collected from each participant for the detection and measurement of speciated inorganic arsenic metabolites. Metabolites were separated by high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma spectrometry-mass spectrometry. Results Urinary arsenic metabolite concentrations were 1.73 g/L, 0.76 g/L, 3.45 g/L, 43.65 g/L, and 51.32 g/L for trivalent arsenic (As3+), pentavalent arsenic (As5+), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and total inorganic arsenic metabolites (As3+ + As5+ + MMA + DMA), respectively, in clean process PM engineers. In ion implantation process PM engineers, the concentrations were 1.74 g/L, 0.39 g/L, 3.08 g/L, 23.17 g/L, 28.92 g/L for As3+, As5+, MMA, DMA, and total inorganic arsenic metabolites, respectively. Levels of urinary As3+, As5+, MMA, and total inorganic arsenic metabolites in clean process PM engineers were significantly higher than that in the non-exposed group. Urinary As3+ and As5+ levels in ion implantation process PM engineers were significantly higher than that in non-exposed group. Conclusion Levels of urinary arsenic metabolites in PM engineers from the clean process and ion implantation process areas were higher than that in office workers. For a complete assessment of arsenic exposure in the semiconductor industry, further studies are needed. PMID:24472712

  17. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox

  18. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  19. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  20. Corrosion resistance of siloxane-poly(methyl methacrylate) hybrid films modified with acetic acid on tin plate substrates: Influence of tetraethoxysilane addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunst, S. R.; Cardoso, H. R. P.; Oliveira, C. T.; Santana, J. A.; Sarmento, V. H. V.; Muller, I. L.; Malfatti, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of hybrid films. Tin plate was coated with a siloxane-poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid film prepared by sol-gel route with covalent bonds between the organic (PMMA) and inorganic (siloxane) phases obtained by hydrolysis and polycondensation of 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl) methacrylate (TMSM) and polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a thermic initiator. Hydrolysis reactions were catalyzed by acetic acid solution avoiding the use of chlorine or stronger acids in the film preparation. The effect of the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on the protective properties of the film was evaluated. The hydrophobicity of the film was determined by contact angle measurements, and the morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry. The local nanostructure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrochemical behavior of the films was assessed by open circuit potential monitoring, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in a 0.05 M NaCl solution. The mechanical behavior was evaluated by tribology. The results highlighted that the siloxane-PMMA hybrid films modified with acetic acid are promising anti-corrosive coatings that acts as an efficient diffusion barrier, protecting tin plates against corrosion. However, the coating properties were affected by the TEOS addition, which contributed for the thickness increase and irregular surface coverage.

  1. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  2. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  3. Arsenic exposure, genetic susceptibility and leukocyte telomere length in an Italian young adult population.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Andrea; Faita, Francesca; Mercuri, Antonella; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Bustaffa, Elisa; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic-induced health effects may be associated with critically shortened telomeres. However, few data are available on the effects of arsenic exposure on telomere length. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic arsenic exposure on leukocyte telomere length (LTL) as well as the contribution of common polymorphisms in genes implicated in arsenic metabolism (GSTT1 and GSTM1) and DNA repair (hOGG1 and XRCC1). A group of 241 healthy subjects was enrolled from four areas of Italy known to be affected by natural or anthropogenic arsenic pollution. Urine samples were tested for inorganic As (iAs), monomethylarsinic (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). LTL was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP on leukocyte DNA. In multiple linear regression analysis, LTL was significantly and inversely correlated with age (β = -0.231, P = 0.006) and showed a certain trend toward significance with iAs urinary concentration (log10 iAs, β = -0.106, P = 0.08). The genotype distribution showed significant associations between GSTT1 and the As concentration (log10 iAs, P = 0.01) and metabolite patterns (log10 DMA, P = 0.05) in the urine. However, GST genes did not interact with arsenic exposure in the modulation of LTL. Conversely, the combined presence of a higher level of iAs + MMA + DMA ≥ 19.3 μg/l (F = 6.0, P interaction = 0.01), Asi ≥ 3.86 (F = 3.9, P interaction = 0.04) μg/l, iAs + MMA + DMA ≥ 15 μg/l (F = 4.2, P interaction = 0.04) and hOGG1 Cys allele was associated with a significantly lower LTL. An interaction between XRCC1 Arg399Gln and arsenic exposure was also observed (all P interaction = 0.04). These findings suggest that telomere shortening may represent a mechanism that contributes to arsenic-related disease. The interaction of hOGG1 and XRCC1 DNA repair polymorphisms and exposure enhances telomeric DNA damage. Future studies are warranted to understand

  4. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  5. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  6. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  7. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  8. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications ...

  10. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  11. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  12. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  13. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  14. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some ... dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. ...

  15. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  16. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  17. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  18. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  19. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  20. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  2. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... boric acid poisoning usually occurs when someone swallows powdered roach-killing products that contain the chemical. Chronic ... vein (IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Note: Activated charcoal does not effectively treat (absorb) boric acid. For ...

  3. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  4. Simultaneous Determination of Arsenic and Selenium Species in Sediment Extracts Utilizing Coupled Techniques with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Yoon, C.

    2009-12-01

    Arsenic has been recognized as one of the major problems of toxicity in several parts of the world. It is well known that the toxicity of arsenic depends on its chemical form. Selenium is one of the minor but plays an important biological role in human health. The multiple roles of selenium, deficiency and toxicity, depend on its chemical form and concentration. The multielement detection capability of ICP-MS makes it an ideal detector for multielement chromatographic separation. Most of multielement separation analyses by LC-ICP-MS are applied to standard or to water samples. Only very few reports deal with solid matrices. A procedure for the simultaneous determination of arsenic and selenium species in phosphoric acid extracts of sediment samples by liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS has been developing. Arsenic species, arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and selenium species, selenite [Se(IV)], selenate [Se(VI)] were separated on anion exchange column by a mobile phase of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. The total analysis took less than 10 min with gradient elution at flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The sonication extraction was used with dry sediment and phosphoric acid. Reaction gases such as methane and oxygen was used to remove spectral interferences on arsenic and selenium measurement. The estimated detection limits in the sediment ranged between 1 and 25 ng/g for the arsenic and selenium species. The repeatability was less than 15% (RSD) for 1 µg/L arsenic species and 5 µg/L selenium species. Accuracy of the method was assessed through the recovery of the spiked sediment. Recoveries ranged between 82 and 115 % for all the species.

  5. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  6. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  7. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  8. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  9. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  10. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  11. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  12. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  14. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  15. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  16. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  17. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  18. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  20. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  1. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The well-known fatty acids with a Δ5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32) and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19). Finally, the Δ5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs). This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between Δ5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs. PMID:21116406

  2. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  3. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  4. Acid-Base Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3− and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3− is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys. PMID:26597304

  5. The biosynthesis of mycolic acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on multiple specialized elongation complexes interconnected by specific protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Bigot, Sarah; Guerrini, Olivier; Verdoux, Sébastien; Malaga, Wladimir; Daffé, Mamadou; Zerbib, Didier

    2005-11-01

    Tuberculosis kills about two million people every year and remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. As a result of the increasing antibiotic resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, there is an urgent need for new antitubercular drugs. Several efficient antibiotics, including isoniazid, specifically target the fatty acid synthase-II (FAS-II) complex of mycolic acid biosynthesis. We have previously shown that there are protein-protein interactions between the components of FAS-II that are essential for mycobacterial survival. We have now looked at the potential partners of FAS-II, mtFabD, the methyltransferases MmaAs, and Pks13. A combination of yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that mtFabD interacts with each beta-ketoacyl-synthase (KasA, KasB and mtFabH) and with the core of FAS-II (InhA and MabA). The methyltransferases have a greater affinity for KasA and KasB than for mtFabH, suggesting that modifications on the meromycolic chains may occur during their elongation. Finally, Pks13, which catalyzes the final Claisen condensation of mycolic acids, interacts specifically with KasB. These data allowed us to determine the architecture of the multiple specialized FAS-II complexes, giving us insights into the organization of the complete mycolic acids biosynthesis. Our studies suggest a new and crucial interaction (KasB-Pks13) as a putative target for peptidomimetic antibiotics. PMID:16213523

  6. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  7. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  8. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  9. Recovery of organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  10. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  11. Environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid inhibit IL-7/STAT5 cytokine signaling pathways in mouse CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative thymus cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-04-15

    Environmental arsenic exposure is a public health issue. Immunotoxicity induced by arsenic has been reported in humans and animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanisms of As(+3) and MMA(+3) toxicity in mouse thymus cells. Because we know that MMA(+3) inhibits IL-7 signaling in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells, we studied the influence of As(+3) and MMA(+3) on T cell development in the thymus at the earliest stage of T cell development (CD4-CD8-, double negative, DN) which requires IL-7 dependent signaling. We found in a DN thymus cell line (D1) that a low concentration of MMA(+3) (50 nM) suppressed IL-7 dependent JAK1, 3 and STAT5 signaling. As(+3) suppressed STAT5 and JAK3 at higher concentrations (500 nM). Cell surface expression of the IL-7 receptor (CD127) was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+)3, but was increased by 500 NM As(+3), indicating possible differences in the mechanisms of action of these agents. A decrease in cyclin D1 protein expression was observed in D1 cells exposed to As(+3) at 500 nM and MMA(+3) starting at 50 nM, suggesting that arsenic at these environmentally-relevant doses suppresses early T cell development through the inhibition of IL-7 signaling pathway. PMID:26921788

  12. Effects of repeated seafood consumption on urinary excretion of arsenic species by volunteers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung-Sun; Choi, Seong-Jin; Kim, Dong-Won; Huang, Mingai; Kim, Na-Young; Park, Kyung-Su; Kim, Choong-Yong; Lee, Hyo-Min; Yum, Young-Na; Han, Eui-Sik; Kang, Tae-Seok; Yu, Il-Je; Park, Jung-Duck

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a known human carcinogen and widely distributed in the environment. The main route of As exposure in the general population is through food and drinking water. Seafood harvested in Korea contains high-level organoarsenics such as arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, and arsenosugars, which are much less harmful than inorganic arsenics. However, for those who eat large amounts of seafood it is important to understand whether seafood consumption affects urinary levels of inorganic As metabolites such as arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). In this study we investigated urinary As metabolites (inorganic As, MMA[V], DMA[V]) and some biological indexes such as AST, GSH, GPX, lipid peroxidation, and uric acid in volunteer study subjects (seven males and nine females). Total urinary As metabolites were analyzed by the hydride generation method, followed by arsenic speciation using HPLC with ICP-mass spectrometry. Study subjects refrained from eating seafood for 3 days prior to the first urine collection and then ingested seafood daily for 6 consecutive days. The first voided urine of the morning was collected from each subject the first day of the consecutive 6 days of seafood ingestion but prior to the first seafood meal. The first voided urine of the morning was also collected on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and 14 after seafood ingestion. The daily mean intake of total As was 6.98 mg, comprised of 4.71 mg of seaweed (67%), 1.74 mg of flat fish (25%), and 0.53 mg of conch (8%). We observed a substantial increase in total urinary As metabolites for subjects consuming seafood from day 1, which recovered to control level at day 10. The increase in total urinary As metabolites was attributed to the increase in DMA, which is a more harmful metabolite than organoarsenics. However, no significant changes in response biological indexes were observed. These results suggest that it is necessary to evaluate As metabolism when

  13. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perfluoroalkyl acids(PFAAs) area a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perflurinated carbon backbone (4-12in length) and a acidic functional moiety (Carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and have numerous industr...

  14. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  15. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  16. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  17. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reviews of available data indicate that precipitation in a large region of North America is highly acidic when its pH is compared with the expected pH value of 5.65 for pure rain water in equilibrium with CO2. A growing body of evidence suggests that acid rain is responsib...

  18. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  19. Fats and fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The absolute fat requirement of the human species is the amount of essential fatty acids needed to maintain optimal fatty acid composition of all tissues and normal eicosanoid synthesis. At most, this requirement is no more than about 5% of an adequate energy intake. However, fat accounts for appro...

  20. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  1. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  2. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  4. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...

  5. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  6. Activation of Nrf2 by arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid is independent of Keap1-C151: enhanced Keap1-Cul3 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaojun; Sun Zheng; Chen Weimin; Li Yanjie; Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2008-08-01

    Drinking water contaminated with arsenic, a human carcinogen, is a worldwide health issue. An understanding of cellular signaling events in response to arsenic exposure and rational designing of strategies to reduce arsenic damages by modulating signaling events are important to fight against arsenic-induced diseases. Previously, we reported that activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense pathway confers protection against toxic effects induced by sodium arsenite [As(III)] or monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)]. Paradoxically, arsenic has been reported to induce the Nrf2-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we report the unique mechanism of Nrf2 induction by arsenic. Similar to tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) or sulforaphane (SF), arsenic induced the Nrf2-dependent response through enhancing Nrf2 protein levels by inhibiting Nrf2 ubiquitination and degradation. However, the detailed action of arsenic in Nrf2 induction is different from that of tBHQ or SF. Arsenic markedly enhanced the interaction between Keap1 and Cul3, subunits of the E3 ubiquitin ligase for Nrf2, which led to impaired dynamic assembly/disassembly of the E3 ubiquitin ligase and thus decreased its ligase activity. Furthermore, induction of Nrf2 by arsenic is independent of the previously identified C151 residue in Keap1 that is required for Nrf2 activation by tBHQ or SF. Distinct mechanisms of Nrf2 activation by seemingly harmful and beneficial reagents provide a molecular basis to design Nrf2-activating agents for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Preparation and characterization of pH-sensitive and antifouling poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes blended with poly(methyl methacrylate-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Ju, Junping; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tingmei; Wang, Qihua

    2014-11-15

    Functional terpolymer of poly(methyl methacrylate-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) (P(MMA-HEMA-AA)) was synthesized via a radical polymerization method. The terpolymer could be directly blended with poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) to prepare the microfiltration (MF) membranes via phase separate process. The synthesized polymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), the nuclear magnetic resonance proton spectra ((1)H NMR). The membrane had the typical asymmetric structure and the hydrophilic side chains tended to aggregate on the membrane surface. The surface enrichment of amphiphilic copolymer and morphology of MF membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The contact angle (CA) and water uptake were also tested to assess the hydrophilicity and wetting characteristics of the polymer surface. The water filtration properties were measured. It was found the modified membranes showed excellent pH-sensitivity and pH-reversibility behavior. Furthermore, the hydrophilicity of the blended membranes increased, and the membranes showed good protein antifouling property. PMID:25203908

  8. Polymorphisms in cell cycle regulatory genes, urinary arsenic profile and urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.-J.; Huang, C.-J.; Pu, Y.-S.; Su, C.-T.; Huang, Y.-K.; Chen, Y.-T.; Hsueh, Y.-M.

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: Polymorphisms in p53, p21 and CCND1 could regulate the progression of the cell cycle and might increase the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic-related cancer risk. The goal of our study was to evaluate the roles of cell cycle regulatory gene polymorphisms in the carcinogenesis of arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma (UC). Methods: A hospital-based case-controlled study was conducted to explore the relationships among the urinary arsenic profile, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, p53 codon 72, p21 codon 31 and CCND1 G870A polymorphisms and UC risk. The urinary arsenic profile was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). 8-OHdG levels were measured by high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP). Results: Subjects carrying the p21 Arg/Arg genotype had an increased UC risk (age and gender adjusted OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29). However, there was no association of p53 or CCND1 polymorphisms with UC risk. Significant effects were observed in terms of a combination of the three gene polymorphisms and a cumulative exposure of cigarette smoking, along with the urinary arsenic profile on the UC risk. The higher total arsenic concentration, monomethylarsonic acid percentage (MMA%) and lower dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%), possessed greater gene variant numbers, had a higher UC risk and revealed significant dose-response relationships. However, effects of urinary 8-OHdG levels combined with three gene polymorphisms did not seem to be important for UC risk. Conclusions: The results showed that the variant genotype of p21 might be a predictor of inorganic arsenic-related UC risk.

  9. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Su, Chien-Tien; Chu, Jan-Show; Huang, Shu-Pin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Yang, Hsiu-Yuan; Chung, Chi-Jung; Wu, Chia-Chang; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  10. Urinary total arsenic and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine are associated with renal cell carcinoma in an area without obvious arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Su, Chien-Tien; Chung, Chi-Jung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chu, Jan-Show; Yang, Hsiu-Yuan; Wu, Chia-Chang; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2012-08-01

    8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most reliable and abundant markers of DNA damage. The study was designed to explore the relationship between urinary 8-OHdG and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to investigate whether individuals with a high level of 8-OHdG would have a modified odds ratio (OR) of arsenic-related RCC. This case–control study was conducted with 132 RCC patients and 245 age- and sex-matched controls from a hospital-based pool between November 2006 and May 2009. Pathological verification of RCC was completed by image-guided biopsy or surgical resection of renal tumors. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Concentrations of urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Level of urinary 8-OHdG was significantly associated with the OR of RCC in a dose–response relationship after multivariate adjustment. Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. The greatest OR (3.50) was seen in the individuals with high urinary 8-OHdG and high urinary total arsenic. A trend test indicated that the OR of RCC was increased with one of these factors and was further increased with both (p = 0.002). In conclusion, higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of the RCC. High levels of 8-OHdG combined with urinary total arsenic might be indicative of arsenic-induced RCC. -- Highlights: ► Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. ► Higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of RCC risk. ► Urinary 8-OHdG may modify arsenic related RCC risk.

  11. [Variations of arsenic species in the solution of arsenic-contaminated paddy soil under flooding and at different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Cui, Jiang-Hui; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Xiu-Jun; Liu, Wen-Ju

    2013-05-01

    Taking arsenic (As)-contaminated paddy soil as test object, and by using high performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS), this paper studied the variations of As species in soil solution when the soil was sterilized or non-sterilized and incubated at different temperatures (5, 27, and 50 degrees C) under flooding. In the soil solution (pore water), only As(III) (arsenite), As(V) (arsenate), and DMA(V) ( dimethylarsinic acid) were detected, but no MMA(V)(mono methylarsinic acid) was found. With the increasing time of flooding and at the test temperatures, arsenite became the predominant species, averagely accounting for 64%, followed by As(V), with the proportion of 35%, and DMA(V), with the least proportion of 1%. Soil sterilization or non-sterilization had less effect on the concentrations of As(III) and DMA(V) in the soil solution, but remarkably affected the reduction of As(V) and the methylation of As(III). The promotion effect of soil sterilization decreased gradually with the increasing time of flooding and incubation. At 50 degrees C and after flooded for 23 days, the DMA(V) concentration in sterilized soil solution was the highest and up to 23.7 ng x mL(-1), indicating that some thermophilic microbes remained in sterilized soil became predominant species, and promoted the methylation of As(III) In sum, the total arsenic concentration in non-sterilized soil at incubation temperature 27 degrees C and flooded for 23 days was relatively low (501 ng x mL(-1)), and thus, in As-contaminated paddy rice planting areas, to adopt the water management mode of short cycle flooding-non-flooding could decrease the As level in soil solution as far as possible, and in the same time, save water resources and ensure yielding. PMID:24015564

  12. Arsenic biotransformation by cyanobacteria from mining areas: evidences from culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Franco, Maione W; Ferreira, Fernanda A G; Vasconcelos, Igor F; Batista, Bruno L; Pujoni, Diego G F; Magalhães, Sérgia M S; Barbosa, Fernando; Barbosa, Francisco A R

    2015-12-01

    Elucidating the role of cyanobacteria in the biotransformation of arsenic (As) oxyanions is crucial to understand the biogeochemical cycle of this element and indicate species with potential for its bioremediation. In this study, we determined the EC50 for As(III) and As(V) and evaluated the biotransformation of As by Synechococcus sp. through high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS). Synechococcus sp. exhibited higher sensitivity to As(III) with an EC(50, 96 h) of 6.64 mg L(-1) that was approximately 400-fold lower than that for As(V). Even though the cells were exposed to concentrations of As(III) (6 mg L(-1)) approximately 67-fold lower than those of As(V) (400 mg L(-1)), similar intracellular concentrations of As (60.0 μg g(-1)) were observed after 30 days. As(V) was the predominant intracellular As species followed by As(III). Furthermore, organic As species such as monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were observed in higher proportions after exposure to As(III). The differential toxicity among As oxyanions indicates that determining the redox state of As in the environment is fundamental to estimate toxicity risks to aquatic organisms. Synechococcus sp. demonstrated potential for its application in bioremediation due to the high accumulation of As and production of As organic compounds notably after exposure to As(III). PMID:26408110

  13. Application of HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS procedures for arsenic speciation in seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Jhe; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Speciation of arsenic in seaweeds was carried out using ion chromatography (IC) for separation and inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. The arsenic species studied were arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), arsenobetaine (AsB), and arsenocholine (AsC). Chromatographic separation of all the species was achieved in <9 min in gradient elution mode using (NH(4))(2)CO(3) and methanol at pH 8.5. The outlet of the IC column was directly connected to the nebulizer of ICP-MS for the determination of arsenic. The speciation of arsenic has been carried out in several seaweed samples. A microwave-assisted extraction method was used for the extraction of arsenic species from seaweed samples. With a mixture of mobile phase A and methanol as extractant, the extraction efficiency was >84%, and the recoveries from spiked samples were in the range of 90-106%. The unknown compounds detected in different seaweeds were identified by coupling IC directly with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Two arsenosugars and tetramethylarsonium ion (TETRA) were identified in different seaweeds. A fat-soluble arsenolipid compound was identified in the extract of certified reference material BCR-279 Ulva lactuca when 1% HNO(3) was used as the extractant. The precision between sample replicates was >9% for all determinations. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.006-0.015 μg L(-1) for various arsenic species based on peak height. PMID:22339408

  14. The effect of cigarette smoke and arsenic exposure on urothelial carcinoma risk is modified by glutathione S-transferase M1 gene null genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chi-Jung; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Su, Chien-Tien; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2013-01-15

    Inter-individual variation in the metabolism of xenobiotics, caused by factors such as cigarette smoking or inorganic arsenic exposure, is hypothesized to be a susceptibility factor for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, our study aimed to evaluate the role of gene–environment interaction in the carcinogenesis of UC. A hospital-based case–control study was conducted. Urinary arsenic profiles were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography–hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Information about cigarette smoking exposure was acquired from a lifestyle questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to estimate the UC risk associated with certain risk factors. We found that UC patients had higher urinary levels of total arsenic, higher percentages of inorganic arsenic (InAs%) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA%) and lower percentages of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA%) compared to controls. Subjects carrying the GSTM1 null genotype had significantly increased UC risk. However, no association was observed between gene polymorphisms of CYP1A1, EPHX1, SULT1A1 and GSTT1 and UC risk after adjustment for age and sex. Significant gene–environment interactions among urinary arsenic profile, cigarette smoking, and GSTM1 wild/null polymorphism and UC risk were observed after adjustment for potential risk factors. Overall, gene–environment interactions simultaneously played an important role in UC carcinogenesis. In the future, large-scale studies should be conducted using tag-SNPs of xenobiotic-metabolism-related enzymes for gene determination. -- Highlights: ► Subjects with GSTM1 null genotype had significantly increased UC risk. ► UC patients had poor arsenic metabolic ability compared to controls. ► GSTM1 null genotype may modify arsenic related UC risk.

  15. Airborne arsenic and urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites during boiler cleaning operations in a Slovak coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed Central

    Yager, J W; Hicks, J B; Fabianova, E

    1997-01-01

    Little information is available on the relationship between occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic in coal fly ash and urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites. This study ws undertaken in a coal-fired power plant in Slovakia during a routine maintenance outage. Arsenic was measured in the breathing zone of workers during 5 consecutive workdays, and urine samples were obtained for analysis of arsenic metabolites--inorganic arsenic (Asi), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)--prior to the start of each shift. Results from a small number of cascade impactor air samples indicated that approximately 90% of total particle mass and arsenic was present in particle size fractions >/= 3.5 micron. The 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) mean arsenic air concentration was 48.3 microg/m3 (range 0.17-375.2) and the mean sum of urinary arsenic (SigmaAs) metabolites was 16.9 microg As/g creatinine (range 2.6-50.8). For an 8-hr TWA of 10 microg/m3 arsenic from coal fly ash, the predicted mean concentration of the SigmaAs urinary metabolites was 13.2 microg As/G creatinine [95% confidence interval (CI), 10.1-16.3). Comparisons with previously published studies of exposure to arsenic trioxide vapors and dusts in copper smelters suggest that bioavailability of arsenic from airborne coal fly ash (as indicated by urinary excretion) is about one-third that seen in smelters and similar settings. Arsenic compound characteristics, matrix composition, and particle size distribution probably play major roles in determining actual uptake of airborne arsenic. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. PMID:9347899

  16. Airborne arsenic and urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites during boiler cleaning operations in a Slovak coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Yager, J W; Hicks, J B; Fabianova, E

    1997-08-01

    Little information is available on the relationship between occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic in coal fly ash and urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites. This study ws undertaken in a coal-fired power plant in Slovakia during a routine maintenance outage. Arsenic was measured in the breathing zone of workers during 5 consecutive workdays, and urine samples were obtained for analysis of arsenic metabolites--inorganic arsenic (Asi), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)--prior to the start of each shift. Results from a small number of cascade impactor air samples indicated that approximately 90% of total particle mass and arsenic was present in particle size fractions >/= 3.5 micron. The 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) mean arsenic air concentration was 48.3 microg/m3 (range 0.17-375.2) and the mean sum of urinary arsenic (SigmaAs) metabolites was 16.9 microg As/g creatinine (range 2.6-50.8). For an 8-hr TWA of 10 microg/m3 arsenic from coal fly ash, the predicted mean concentration of the SigmaAs urinary metabolites was 13.2 microg As/G creatinine [95% confidence interval (CI), 10.1-16.3). Comparisons with previously published studies of exposure to arsenic trioxide vapors and dusts in copper smelters suggest that bioavailability of arsenic from airborne coal fly ash (as indicated by urinary excretion) is about one-third that seen in smelters and similar settings. Arsenic compound characteristics, matrix composition, and particle size distribution probably play major roles in determining actual uptake of airborne arsenic. PMID:9347899

  17. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  18. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  19. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  20. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  1. Relation between in Utero Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes in a Cohort of Mothers and Their Newborns from New Hampshire

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Emond, Jennifer A.; Baker, Emily R.; Korrick, Susan A.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies suggest that arsenic exposure influences birth outcomes; however, findings are mixed. Objective: We assessed in utero arsenic exposure in relation to birth outcomes and whether maternal prepregnancy weight and infant sex modified the associations. Methods: Among 706 mother–infant pairs exposed to low levels of arsenic through drinking water and diet, we assessed in utero arsenic exposure using maternal second-trimester urinary arsenic, maternal prepregnancy weight through self-report, and birth outcomes from medical records. Results: Median (interquartile range) of total urinary arsenic [tAs; inorganic arsenic (iAs) + monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) + dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] was 3.4 μg/L (1.7–6.0). In adjusted linear models, each doubling of tAs was associated with a 0.10-cm decrease (95% CI: –0.19, –0.01) in head circumference. Results were similar for MMA and DMA. Ln(tAs) and ln(DMA) were positively associated with birth length in infant males only; among males, each doubling of tAs was associated with a 0.28-cm increase (95% CI: 0.09, 0.46) in birth length (pinteraction = 0.04). Results were similar for DMA. Additionally, arsenic exposure was inversely related to ponderal index, and associations differed by maternal weight. Each ln(tAs) doubling of tAs was associated with a 0.55-kg/m3 lower (95% CI: –0.82, –0.28, p < 0.001) ponderal index for infants of overweight/obese, but not normal-weight, mothers (pinteraction < 0.01). Finally, there was a significant interaction between maternal weight status, infant sex, and arsenic exposure on birth weight (pinteraction = 0.03). In girls born of overweight/obese mothers, each doubling of tAs was associated with a 62.9-g decrease (95% CI: –111.6, –14.2) in birth weight, though the association was null in the other strata. Conclusions: Low-level arsenic exposure may affect fetal growth, and the associations may be modified by maternal weight status and infant sex. Citation: Gilbert

  2. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei; Sakamoto, Akira; Zhang, Yan Fang; Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Chromosome 10q24.32 Variants Associated with Arsenic Metabolism and Toxicity Phenotypes in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L.; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Argos, Maria; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Rahaman, Ronald; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Quasem, Iftekhar; Hore, Samar K.; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary V.; Yunus, Md; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A.; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a major public health issue in many countries, increasing risk for a wide array of diseases, including cancer. There is inter-individual variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency and susceptibility to arsenic toxicity; however, the basis of this variation is not well understood. Here, we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of arsenic-related metabolism and toxicity phenotypes to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which arsenic affects health. Using data on urinary arsenic metabolite concentrations and approximately 300,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 1,313 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we identified genome-wide significant association signals (P<5×10−8) for percentages of both monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) near the AS3MT gene (arsenite methyltransferase; 10q24.32), with five genetic variants showing independent associations. In a follow-up analysis of 1,085 individuals with arsenic-induced premalignant skin lesions (the classical sign of arsenic toxicity) and 1,794 controls, we show that one of these five variants (rs9527) is also associated with skin lesion risk (P = 0.0005). Using a subset of individuals with prospectively measured arsenic (n = 769), we show that rs9527 interacts with arsenic to influence incident skin lesion risk (P = 0.01). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses of genome-wide expression data from 950 individual's lymphocyte RNA suggest that several of our lead SNPs represent cis-eQTLs for AS3MT (P = 10−12) and neighboring gene C10orf32 (P = 10−44), which are involved in C10orf32-AS3MT read-through transcription. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic investigation of arsenic metabolism and toxicity to date, the only GWAS of any arsenic-related trait, and the first study to implicate 10q24.32 variants in both arsenic metabolism and arsenical skin

  4. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Longer Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Syeda S.; Xu, YiYi; Engström, Karin; Li, Huiqi; Tallving, Pia; Nermell, Barbro; Boemo, Analia; Parada, Luis A.; Peñaloza, Lidia G.; Concha, Gabriela; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water causes cancer. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and telomere length in blood have been associated with cancer risk. We elucidated if arsenic exposure alters mtDNAcn and telomere length in individuals with different arsenic metabolizing capacity. Methods: We studied two groups in the Salta province, Argentina, one in the Puna area of the Andes (N = 264, 89% females) and one in Chaco (N = 169, 75% females). We assessed arsenic exposure as the sum of arsenic metabolites [iAs, methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] in urine (U-As) using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Efficiency of arsenic metabolism was expressed as percentage of urinary metabolites. MtDNAcn and telomere length were determined in blood by real-time PCR. Results: Median U-As was 196 (5–95 percentile: 21–537) μg/L in Andes and 80 (5–95 percentile: 15–1637) μg/L in Chaco. The latter study group had less-efficient metabolism, with higher %iAs and %MMA in urine compared with the Andean group. U-As was significantly associated with increased mtDNAcn (log2 transformed to improve linearity) in Chaco (β = 0.027 per 100 μg/L, p = 0.0085; adjusted for age and sex), but not in Andes (β = 0.025, p = 0.24). U-As was also associated with longer telomere length in Chaco (β = 0.016, p = 0.0066) and Andes (β = 0.0075, p = 0.029). In both populations, individuals with above median %iAs showed significantly higher mtDNAcn and telomere length compared with individuals with below median %iAs. Conclusions: Arsenic was associated with increased mtDNAcn and telomere length, particularly in individuals with less-efficient arsenic metabolism, a group who may have increased risk for arsenic-related cancer. PMID:27597942

  5. Arsenic methylation capacity, body retention, and null genotypes of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 among current arsenic-exposed residents in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiou, H Y; Hsueh, Y M; Hsieh, L L; Hsu, L I; Hsu, Y H; Hsieh, F I; Wei, M L; Chen, H C; Yang, H T; Leu, L C; Chu, T H; Chen-Wu, C; Yang, M H; Chen, C J

    1997-06-01

    In order to elucidate the relationships among arsenic methylation capacity, body retention, and genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 and T1, a total of 115 study subjects were recruited from Lanyang Basin located on the northeast coast of Taiwan. Specimens of drinking water, blood, urine, hair and toenail were collected from each study subject. Urinary inorganic and methylated arsenic were speciated by high performance liquid chromatography combined with hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Arsenic concentration in hair and toenail were quantitated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The polymerase chain reaction was used to determine genetic polymorphisms of GST M1 and T1. Arsenic concentrations in urine, hair, and toenail of study subjects were positively correlated with arsenic levels in their drinking water. Percentages of various arsenic species in urine (mean +/- standard error (SE) were 11.8 +/- 1.0, 26.9 +/- 1.2 and 61.3 +/- 1.4, respectively, for inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Men and women had similar arsenic methylation capability. No associations were observed between arsenic methylation capability and arsenic content in either drinking water or urine. Ratios of arsenic contents in hair and toenail to urinary arsenic content (mean +/- standard error) were 6.2 +/- 0.7 and 16.5 +/- 1.7, respectively. Genetic polymorphisms of GST M1 and T1 were significantly associated with arsenic methylation. Subjects having the null genotype of GST M1 had an increased percentage of inorganic arsenic in urine, while those with null genotype of GST T1 had an elevated percentage of DMA in urine. Arsenic contents in hair and toenail were significantly correlated with the increase in arsenic concentrations of drinking water and urine, while no significant associations were observed between arsenic contents in hair and toenail and polymorphisms of GST M1 and T1. The relationship between

  6. WASTE ACID DETOXIFICATION AND RECLAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) project demonstrated the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation (WADR) systems ability to recover waste electropolish acid solutions generated during the manufacturing of gun-tubes, and reuse the clean acid. ...

  7. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  8. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  9. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty or scaly ... photosensitizing agents. When aminolevulinic acid is activated by light, it damages the cells of actinic keratosis lesions.

  10. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  11. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to filter fluids and waste normally (chronic glomerulonephritis ) Lead poisoning Long-term (chronic) alcohol use Risks There are ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 28. Read More Gout Lead poisoning Liver disease Polycythemia vera Uric acid - blood Update ...

  12. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria, including infections of the ears, lungs, sinus, skin, ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Clavulanic acid is in a class of medications ...

  13. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Chemical Emergencies: Case Definition: Hydrofluoric Acid . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services; 2005. Goldfrank LR, ed. Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies . 8th ed. New ...

  14. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  15. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  16. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Pantothenic acid and biotin are types of B vitamins. They are water-soluble, which means that the ... found in foods that are good sources of B vitamins, including the following: Animal proteins Avocado Broccoli, kale, ...

  17. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  18. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  19. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a ... as a liquid to be injected subcutaneously (just under the skin) by a doctor. Your doctor will ...

  20. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  1. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the treatment of epilepsy, and to treat bipolar disorder and migraines. I have been taking valproic acid ... that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual problems and difficulty getting pregnant. ...

  2. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  3. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test ... Alcoholism Chemotherapy-related side effects Diabetes Excessive exercise Gout Hypoparathyroidism Lead poisoning Leukemia Medullary cystic kidney disease ...

  4. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The ... level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. ...

  5. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... more easily than natural food folate. Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Folic acid reduces the risk for spina ... g., orange juice and green vegetables). Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Spina bifida and anencephaly are neural tube ...

  6. Folic acid in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... green leafy vegetables Dried beans and peas (legumes) Citrus fruits and juices Fortified means that vitamins have ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Folic Acid Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  7. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amoxicillin is in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth ... allergic to amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), clavulanic acid, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medications.tell your doctor ...

  8. Boric Acid Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L. C.; Heimbach, M. D.; Truscott, D. R.; Duncan, B. D.

    1964-01-01

    Boric acid poisoning in 11 infants, occurring in the newborn nursery as a result of the accidental and inadvertent use of 2.5% boric acid in the preparation of the formulae, is reported. Five of the infants died. All except two exhibited the classical symptomatology of acute boric acid poisoning, namely, diarrhea, vomiting, erythema, exfoliation, desquamation of the skin, and marked central nervous system irritation. Early manifestations of poisoning were nonspecific, and one patient died before skin manifestations were noted. Peritoneal dialysis, instituted in nine cases, was found to be the most effective method of treatment. It is recommended that boric acid, which is of doubtful therapeutic value, should be completely removed from hospitals, dispensaries and pharmacopoeias. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14166459

  9. Polymers for acid thickening

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.W.

    1980-09-30

    Acids, thickened with branched emulsion or suspension polymers of diallyldimethylammonium chloride are useful as oil well drilling and fracturing fluids for stimulating well production and in other applications, such as thickeners for cosmetics, paints, adhesives, textiles and printing inks.

  10. Acid-base chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, C.W.; Blewit, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The book is not a research compendium and there are no references to the literature. It is a teaching text covering the entire range of undergraduate subject matter dealing with acid-base chemistry (some of it remotely) as taught in inorganic, analytical, and organic chemistry courses. The excellent chapters VII through IX deal in detail with the quantitative aspects of aqueous acid-base equilibria (salt hydrolysis and buffer, titrations, polyprotic and amphoteric substances).

  11. Utilization of acid tars

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A.F.; Denisova, T.L.; Aminov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly produced acid tar (FPAT), obtained as refinery waste in treating petroleum oils with sulfuric acid and oleum, contains 80% or more sulfuric acid. Of such tars, pond acid tars, which contain up to 80% neutral petroleum products and sulfonated resins, are more stable, and have found applications in the production of binders for paving materials. In this article the authors are presenting results obtained in a study of the composition and reactivity of FPAT and its stability in storage in blends with asphalts obtained in deasphalting operations, and the possibility of using the FPAT in road construction has been examined. In this work, wastes were used which were obtained in treating the oils T-750, KhF-12, I-8A, and MS-14. Data on the change in group chemical composition of FPAT are shown, and the acidity, viscosity, needle penetration, and softening point of acid tars obtained from different grades of oils are plotted as functions of the storage time. It is also shown that the fresh and hardened FPATs differ in their solubilities in various solvents.

  12. Mammalian Fatty Acid Elongases

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Very long chain fatty acids confer functional diversity on cells by variations in their chain length and degree of unsaturation. Microsomal fatty acid elongation represents the major pathway for determining the chain length of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular lipids. The overall reaction for fatty acid elongation involves four enzymes and utilizes malonyl CoA, NADPH, and fatty acyl CoA as substrates. While the fundamental pathway and its requirements have been known for many years, recent advances have revealed a family of enzymes involved in the first step of the reaction, i.e., the condensation reaction. Seven fatty acid elongase subtypes (Elovl #1–7) have been identified in the mouse, rat, and human genomes. These enzymes determine the rate of overall fatty acid elongation. Moreover, these enzymes also display differential substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and regulation, making them important regulators of cellular lipid composition as well as specific cellular functions. Herein, methods are described to measure elongase activity, analyze elongation products, and alter cellular elongase expression. PMID:19763486

  13. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  14. Autophagy on acid.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumors tends to be more acidic (6.5-7.0) than surrounding normal (7.2-7.4) tissue. Chaotic vasculature, oxygen limitation and major metabolic changes all contribute to the acidic microenvironment. We have previously proposed that low extracellular pH (pHe) plays a critical role in the development and progression of solid tumors. While extracellular acidosis is toxic to most normal cells, cancer cells can adapt and survive under this harsh condition. In this study, we focused on identifying survival strategies employed by cancer cells when challenged with an acidic pHe (6.6-6.7) either acutely or for many generations. While acutely acidic cells did not grow, those acclimated over many generations grew at the same rate as control cells. We observed that these cells induce autophagy in response to acidosis both acutely and chronically, and that this adaptation appears to be necessary for survival. Inhibition of autophagy in low pH cultured cells results in cell death. Histological analysis of tumor xenografts reveals a strong correlation of LC3 protein expression in regions projected to be acidic. Furthermore, in vivo buffering experiments using sodium bicarbonate, previously shown to raise extracellular tumor pH, decreases LC3 protein expression in tumor xenografts. These data imply that autophagy can be induced by extracellular acidosis and appears to be chronically employed as a survival adaptation to acidic microenvironments. PMID:22874557

  15. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  16. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  17. Discovery of essential fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat was recognized as a good source of energy and fat-soluble vitamins by the first part of the 20th century, but fatty acids were not considered to be essential nutrients because they could be synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. This well-established view was challenged in 1929 by George and Mildred Burr who reported that dietary fatty acid was required to prevent a deficiency disease that occurred in rats fed a fat-free diet. They concluded that fatty acids were essential nutrients and showed that linoleic acid prevented the disease and is an essential fatty acid. The Burrs surmised that other unsaturated fatty acids were essential and subsequently demonstrated that linolenic acid, the omega-3 fatty acid analog of linoleic acid, is also an essential fatty acid. The discovery of essential fatty acids was a paradigm-changing finding, and it is now considered to be one of the landmark discoveries in lipid research. PMID:25339684

  18. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  19. Nitric acid-formic acid compatibility in DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R.E.

    1992-10-20

    The addition of the Nitric Acid Flowsheet to the DWPF feed preparation process introduces nitric acid into a vessel which will subsequently receive a formic acid solution. The combination of these two acids suggests that a denitration reaction might occur. This memorandum reviews the conditions under which a denitration reaction is possible and compares these conditions to DWPF operating conditions.

  20. Characterization of new acrylic bone cements prepared with oleic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Blanca; Deb, Sanjukta; Bonfield, William; Román, Julio San

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic bone-cement formulations were prepared with the use of a new tertiary aromatic amine derived from oleic acid, and also by incorporating an acrylic monomer derived from the same acid with the aim of reducing the leaching of toxic residuals and improving mechanical properties. 4-N,N dimethylaminobenzyl oleate (DMAO) was used as an activator in the benzoyl-peroxide radical cold curing of polymethyl methacrylate. Cements that contained DMAO exhibited much lower polymerization exotherm values, ranging between 55 and 62 C, with a setting time around 16--17 min, depending on the amine/BPO molar ratio of the formulation. On curing a commercial bone cement, Palacosreg R with DMAO, a decrease of 20 C in peak temperature and an increase in setting time of 7 min were obtained, the curing parameters remaining well within limits permitted by the standards. In a second stage, partial substitution of MMA by oleyloxyethyl methacrylate (OMA) in the acrylic formulations was performed, the polymerization being initiated with the DMAO/BPO redox system. These formulations exhibited longer setting times and lower peak temperatures with respect to those based on PMMA. The glass transition temperature of the experimental cements were lower than that of PMMA cement because of the presence of long aliphatic chains of both activator and monomer in the cement matrix. Number average molecular weights of the cured cements were in the range of 1.2x10(5). PMMA cements cured with DMAO/BPO revealed a significant (p<0.001) increase in the strain to failure and a significant (p<0.001) decrease in Young's modulus in comparison to Palacosreg R, whereas ultimate tensile strength remained unchanged. When the monomer OMA was incorporated, low concentrations of OMA provided a significant increase in tensile strength and elastic modulus without impairing the strain to failure. The results demonstrate that the experimental cements based on DMAO and OMA have excellent promise for use as orthopaedic and

  1. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  2. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  3. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  4. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  5. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Nekimken, Howard L.; Carey, W. Patrick; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

  6. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M.; Lascalea, Gustavo E.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L- 1 of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea.

  7. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  8. Oleanolic acid ethanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Anna; Gzella, Andrzej K.

    2010-01-01

    Crystals of the title compound (systematic name: 3β-hy­droxy­olean-12-en-28-oic acid ethanol monosolvate), C30H48O3·C2H5OH, were obtained from unsuccessful co-crystallization trials. The asymmetric unit contains two symmetry-independent oleanolic acid mol­ecules, as well as two ethanol solvent mol­ecules. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds stabilize the crystal packing. In the oleanolic acid mol­ecules, ring C has a slightly distorted envelope conformation, while rings A, B, D and E adopt chair conformations and rings D and E are cis-fused. Both independent ethanol mol­ecules are orientationally disordered [occupancy ratios of 0.742 (8):0.258 (8) and 0.632 (12):0.368 (12). PMID:21588987

  9. Amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  10. Acid rain: Controllable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Lester

    Acid rain is one of a growing number of environmental issues in which impacts are far removed from the source o f the irritants. Those who suffer may differ in geographical area from those who benefit from the activity which releases pollution to the atmosphere. Like the issue concerning the depletion of ozone by manufactured chemicals, the acid rain issue further emphasizes the need for continuing atmospheric chemistry research, a science whose history dates back but a few decades. Examination of the acid rain issue also calls for intimate collaboration of atmospheric scientists with ecologists, biologists, and other scientists, who must advise the geophysicists regarding what chemicals in the environment produce damage, their mode of entry into an ecosystem, and the need to understand acute or chronic impacts.

  11. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  12. NITRIC ACID PICKLING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Boller, E.R.; Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-19

    An improved process is described for the treatment of metallic uranium surfaces preparatory to being given hot dip coatings. The process consists in first pickling the uraniunn surInce with aqueous 50% to 70% nitric acid, at 60 to 70 deg C, for about 5 minutes, rinsing the acid solution from the uranium article, promptly drying and then passing it through a molten alkali-metal halide flux consisting of 42% LiCl, 53% KCla and 5% NaCl into a molten metal bath consisting of 85 parts by weight of zinc and 15 parts by weight of aluminum

  13. [Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Shimizu, S

    1999-10-01

    Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are called niacin. They are the antipellagra vitamin essential to many animals for growth and health. In human being, niacin is believed necessary together with other vitamins for the prevention and cure of pellagra. Niacin is widely distributed in nature; appreciable amounts are found in liver, fish, yeast and cereal grains. Nicotinamide is a precursor of the coenzyme NAD and NADP. Some of the most understood metabolic processes that involve niacin are glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and respiration. Niacin is also related to the following diseases: Hartnup disease; blue diaper syndrome; tryptophanuria; hydroxykynureninuria; xanthurenic aciduria; Huntington's disease. PMID:10540864

  14. Increasing Strength and Operational Reliability of Fixed Joints of Tubes by MMA Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Schlyakhova, G. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents peculiar properties of structure formation, phase and chemical composition while welding of low-alloy steel 09MnSi2-l depending on the dynamic characteristics of power sources of different types. Proper selection of power sources enables to decrease burning of alloy elements in metal of weld (Mn by 14% and Si by 17% of the weight ratio), to obtain more homogenous structure of deposited metal, to reduce length of heat-affected zone by 50% and to improve impact strength by 4-9%.

  15. [Analysis of the character of film decomposition of methyl methacrylate (MMA) coated urea by infrared spectrum].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-po; Wu, Zhi-jie; Liang, Cheng-hua; Chen, Li-jun; Zhang, Yu-lan; Nie, Yan-xi

    2012-03-01

    The degradability characteristics of film with 4 kinds of methyl methacrylate coated urea amended with inhibitors were analyzed by FITR, which was purposed to supply theoretical basis for applying the FITR analysis method to film decomposition and methyl methacrylate coated urea fertilizers on farming. The result showed that the chemical component, molecule structure and material form of the membrane were not changed because of adding different inhibitors to urea. the main peaks of expressing film degradation process were brought by the -C-H of CH3 & CH2, -OH, C-O, C-C, C-O-C, C=O, C=C flexing vibrancy in asymmetry and symmetry in 3 479-3 195, 2 993--2 873, 1 741-1 564, 1 461-925 and 850-650 cm(-1). The peak value changed from smooth to tip, and from width to narrow caused by chemical structural transform of film The infrared spectrum of 4 kinds of fertilizers was not different remarkably before 60 days, and the film was slowly degraded. But degradation of the film was expedited after 60 days, it was most quickened at 120 day, and the decomposition rate of film was decreased at 310 day. The substantiality change of film in main molecule structure of 4 kinds of fertilizers didn't happen in 310 days. The main component of film materials was degraded most slowly in brown soil. The speed of film degradation wasn't heavily impacted by different inhibitors. The characteristic of film degradation may be monitored entirely by infrared spectrum. The degradation dynamic, chemical structure change, degradation speed difference of the film could be represented through infrared spectrum. PMID:22582622

  16. Fatty Acids of Thiobacillus thiooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    Fatty acid spectra were made on Thiobacillus thiooxidans cultures both in the presence and absence of organic compounds. Small additions of glucose or acetate had no significant effect either on growth or fatty acid content. The addition of biotin had no stimulatory effect but did result in slight quantitative changes in the fatty acid spectrum. The predominant fatty acid was a C19 cyclopropane acid. PMID:4945206

  17. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  18. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  19. γ-Glutamylmethylamide Is an Essential Intermediate in the Metabolism of Methylamine by Methylocella silvestris▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin; Scanlan, Julie; Song, Lijiang; Crombie, Andrew; Rahman, M. Tanvir; Schäfer, Hendrik; Murrell, J. Colin

    2010-01-01

    Methylocella silvestris BL2, a facultative methane utilizer, can grow on monomethylamine (MMA) as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. No activity of MMA dehydrogenase was detectable. Instead, this bacterium utilizes a methylated amino acid pathway (γ-glutamylmethylamide [GMA] and N-methylglutamate [NMG]) for MMA metabolism. The activities of the two key enzymes in this pathway, GMA synthetase and NMG dehydrogenase, were found when the bacterium was grown on MMA. GMA was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry only when the bacterium was grown on MMA but not when it was grown on methanol. Proteomic analysis of soluble and membrane fractions of the proteome from MMA- and methanol-grown cultures revealed that an eight-gene cluster (Msil2632 to Msil2639) was induced by MMA and cotranscribed as an operon, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. GMA-dissimilating enzyme activity was also detected when it was grown on MMA. Formaldehyde and ammonium production from GMA was dependent on glutamate but not on α-ketoglutarate. Marker exchange mutagenesis of a putative GMAS gene homologue (gmas, Msil2635) within this eight-gene cluster, with a kanamycin gene cassette, abolished growth of M. silvestris on MMA as either a sole carbon or a sole nitrogen source. Overall, our results suggest that gmas is essential in MMA metabolism by M. silvestris. PMID:20472738

  20. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid and lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an important component of membrane phospholipids in the retina, and brain, and accumulates rapidly in these tissues during early infancy. DHA is present in human milk, but the amount varies considerably and is largely dependent on maternal diet. This article reviews dat...

  2. ACID AEROSOL MEASUREMENT WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the discussion and results of the U.S. EPA Acid Aerosol Measurement Workshop, conducted February 1-3, 1989, in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. t was held in response to recommendations by the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) regarding ...

  3. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  4. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  5. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  6. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  7. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  8. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  9. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  10. Targeting tumor acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main features of solid tumors is extracellular acidity, which correlates with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. We introduced novel approach in targeting of acidic tumors, and translocation of cell-impermeable cargo molecules across cellular membrane. Our approach is based on main principle of insertion and folding of a polypeptide in lipid bilayer of membrane. We have identified family of pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs), which are capable spontaneous insertion and folding in membrane at mild acidic conditions. The affinity of peptides of pHLIP family to membrane at low pH is several times higher than at neutral pH. The process of peptides folding occurs within milliseconds. The energy released in a result of folding (about 2 kcal/mol) could be used to move polar cargo across a membrane, which is a novel concept in drug delivery. pHLIP peptides could be considered as a pH-sensitive single peptide molecular transporters and conjugated with imaging probes for fluorescence, MR, PET and SPECT imaging, they represent a novel in vivo marker of acidity. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 and GM073857 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  11. Synthesis of (+)-Coronafacic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Douglass F.; Sheth, Ritesh B.; Tian, Weiwei

    2009-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of (+)-coronafacic acid has been achieved. Rhodium catalyzed cyclization of an α-diazoester provided the intermediate cyclopentanone in high enantiomeric purity. Subsequent Fe-mediated cyclocarbonylation of a derived alkenyl cyclopropane gave a bicyclic enone, that then was hydrogenated and carried on to the natural product. PMID:19231870

  12. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; van de Loo, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  13. Spermatotoxicity of dichloroacetic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular toxicity of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a disinfection byproduct of drinking water, was evaluated in adult male rats given both single and multiple (up to 14 d) oral doses. Delayed spermiation and altered resorption of residual bodies were observed in rats given sin...

  14. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    given only semi-quantitative results. The limits of detection (3 σ) were in the range 0.5-1.2 mg kg - 1 As dry weight (wt.) for direct ETAAS analysis of extracts in both TMAH and MeOH. Within-run precision (RSD%) was 5-15% and 7-20% for TMAH and MeOH extracts at As levels 4-50 mg kg - 1 dry wt., respectively. The hydride active fraction of As species in extracts, i.e. the sum of toxicologically-relevant arsenic species (inorganic As(III), inorganic As(V), monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA)) was determined by FI-HG-ETAAS in diluted tissue extracts. Arsine, monomethylarsine and dimethylarsine were generated from diluted TMAH and MeOH extracts in the presence of 0.06-0.09 mol l - 1 hydrochloric acid and 0.075 mol l - 1 L-cysteine. Collection, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 450, 500, 2100 and 2150 °C, respectively. The LODs for the determination of hydride forming fraction (arsenite + arsenate + MMA + DMA) in TMAH and MeOH extracts were in the range 0.003-0.02 mg kg - 1 As dry wt. Within-run precision (RSD%) was 3-12% and 3-7% for TMAH and methanol extracts at As levels 0.15-2.4 mg kg - 1 dry wt., respectively. Results for the hydride forming fraction of As in TMAH and MeOH extract as % from the certified value for total As (for CRMs) or vs. the total As in TMAH extract (for real marine samples) are generally in agreement.

  15. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  16. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF ARSINE-GENERATING REACTIONS USING DEUTERIUM-LABELED REAGENTS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry was used to detect transfer of deuterium from labeled reagents to arsines following hydride-generation reactions. The arsine gases liberated from the reactions of arsenite, arsenate, methylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid with HC1 and NaBD4 in H2O, or with...

  18. ARSENIC SPECIES THAT CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN AND GENERATION OF ACTIVATED OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    The in vitro effects of four different species of arsenic { arsenate, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in mobilizing iron from horse spleen ferritin under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were investigated. Dimethylarsinicacid {DMA(V...

  19. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass ...

  20. Temperature-dependent infrared and calorimetric studies on arsenicals adsorption from solution to hematite nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the lack of systematic and surface sensitive studies on the adsorption energetics of arsenic compounds on metal (oxyhydr)oxides, we conducted temperature-dependent ATR-FTIR studies for the adsorption of arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid on hematite nanoparticles a...

  1. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations. PMID:22296174

  2. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  3. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis. PMID:27349116

  4. Circulating folic acid in plasma: relation to folic acid fortification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The implementation of folic acid fortification in the United States has resulted in unprecedented amounts of this synthetic form of folate in the American diet. Folic acid in circulation may be a useful measure of physiologic exposure to synthetic folic acid, and there is a potential for elevated co...

  5. College Chemistry Students' Mental Models of Acids and Acid Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to characterize the mental models of acids and acid strength expressed by advanced college chemistry students when engaged in prediction, explanation, and justification tasks that asked them to rank chemical compounds based on their relative acid strength. For that purpose we completed a qualitative research…

  6. NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) results on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) was mandated by Congress in 1980 to study the effects of acid rain. The results of 10 years of research on the effect of acid deposition and ozone on forests, particularly high elevation spruce and fir, southern pines, eastern hardwoods and western conifers, will be published this year.

  7. Acid Earth--The Global Threat of Acid Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, John

    Acid pollution is a major international problem, but the debate it has elicited has often clouded the distinction between myth and facts. This publication attempts to concerning the acid pollution situation. This publication attempts to identify available facts. It is the first global review of the problem of acid pollution and the first to…

  8. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent. PMID:3758667

  9. [Progress in glucaric acid].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuying; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Glucaric acid (GA) is derived from glucose and commonly used in chemical industry. It is also considered as one of the "Top value-added chemicals from biomass" as carbohydrate monomers to produce various synthetic polymers and bioenergy. The demand for GA in food manufacture is increasing. GA has also attracted public attentions due to its therapeutic uses such as regulating hormones, increasing the immune function and reducing the risks of cancers. Currently GA is produced by chemical oxidation. Research on production of GA via microbial synthesis is still at preliminary stage. We reviewed the advances of glucaric acid applications, preparation and quantification methods. The prospects on production of GA by microbial fermentation were also discussed. PMID:26380405

  10. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  11. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  12. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  13. Tunnelling in carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Hirvonen, Viivi; Wu, Chia-Hua; Tyberg, Joseph L; Allen, Wesley D; Schreiner, Peter R

    2016-06-14

    The cis,trans-conformer of carbonic acid (H2CO3), generated by near-infrared radiation, undergoes an unreported quantum mechanical tunnelling rotamerization with half-lives in cryogenic matrices of 4-20 h, depending on temperature and host material. First-principles quantum chemistry at high levels of theory gives a tunnelling half-life of about 1 h, quite near those measured for the fastest rotamerizations. PMID:27248671

  14. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  15. Studies on terreic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Moriyama, K; Jinnouchi, H; Yagishita, K

    1980-03-01

    It was found that Aspergillus sp. No. Y-8980 which was isolated from a soil sample collected at Yoron Island in Kagoshima Prefecture belonged to Aspergillus terreus group by morphological observation. The active substance produced by the strain was obtained with a high yield in sucrose-yeast extract medium and extracted by chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol at pH 2.4 approximately 2.6 from the culture broth. The substance was crystallized from chloroform and ethyl acetate after charcoal treatment of the crude crystal. From various physico-chemical properties, it was found that the substance was identical to terreic acid. Terreic acid showed MICs of 25 approximately 100 mcg/ml, 12.5 mcg/ml and 50 mcg/ml against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Xanthomonas oryzae and Xanthomonas citri, respectively, but it did not control Pseudomonas, fungi and yeast. The LD50 was 75 mg/kg i.p. and i.v. in mice. With regards to the anti-tumor effect, the morphological degeneration on HeLa cells (human carcinoma cells) was observed in the concentrations of more than 6.25 mcg/ml of terreic acid. An increase of body weight of mice caused by Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells was not definitely observed by the daily administration of 150 mcg of terreic acid per mouse for 8 consecutive days. Above showed the enough survival effect in dd mice implanted with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells, and the effect also was demonstrated by anatomies of mice. PMID:7190624

  16. Perfluorooctanoic acid and environmental risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) family of chemicals, which consist of a carbon backbone typically four to fourteen carbons in length and a charged functional moiety.

  17. Folic Acid Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallow large pills. How can I take a vitamin with folic acid? A : These days, multivitamins with folic acid come in chewable chocolate or fruit flavors, liquids, and large oval or smaller round ...

  18. Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)

    MedlinePlus

    Pantothenic acid is a vitamin, also known as vitamin B5. It is widely found in both plants and animals ... Vitamin B5 is commercially available as D-pantothenic acid, as well as dexpanthenol and calcium pantothenate, which ...

  19. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    Bile acid sequestrants are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can ... block them. These medicines work by blocking bile acid in your stomach from being absorbed in your ...

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  1. Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)

    MedlinePlus

    ... D-pantothenic acid, as well as dexpanthenol and calcium pantothenate, which are chemicals made in the lab from ... Early research suggests that pantothenic acid (given as calcium pantothenate) does not reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis. Recovery after ...

  2. Amino acid imbalance in cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Asatoor, A. M.; Freedman, P. S.; Gabriel, J. R. T.; Milne, M. D.; Prosser, D. I.; Roberts, J. T.; Willoughby, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    After oral ingestion of a free amino acid mixture by three cystinuric patients, plasma increments of lysine and arginine were lower and those of many other amino acids were significantly higher than those found in control subjects. Similar results were obtained in control subjects after amino acid imbalance had been artificially induced by the omission of cystine, lysine, and arginine from the amino acid mixture. Especially high increments of alanine and proline provided the best evidence of amino acid imbalance caused by a temporary lysine and, to a lesser extent, arginine and cystine deficit. No such amino acid imbalance was found to occur in the cystinuric patients after ingestion of whole protein, indicating that absorption of oligopeptides produced by protein digestion provided a balanced physiological serum amino acid increment. This is considered to explain the lack of any unequivocal nutritional deficit in cystinuric patients despite poor absorption of the essential free amino acid, lysine. PMID:4411931

  3. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C.; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S.; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A.; Halo, Tiffany L.; Merkel, Timothy J.; Rische, Clayton H.; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies. PMID:25775582

  4. Cannabinoid acids analysis.

    PubMed

    Lercker, G; Bocci, F; Frega, N; Bortolomeazzi, R

    1992-03-01

    The cannabinoid pattern of vegetable preparations from Cannabis sativa (hashish, marijuana) allows to recognize the phenotype of the plants, to be used as drug or for fiber. Cannabinoid determination by analytical point of view has represented some problems caused by the complex composition of the hexane extract. Capillary gas chromatography of the hexane extracts of vegetable samples, shows the presence of rather polar constituents that eluted, with noticeable interactions, only on polar phase. The compounds can be methylated by diazomethane and silanized (TMS) by silylating reagents. The methyl and methyl-TMS derivatives are analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identification of the compounds shows their nature of cannabinoid acids, which the main by quantitative point of view results the cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). It is known that the cannabinoid acids are thermally unstable and are transformed in the corresponding cannabinoids by decarboxilation. This is of interest in forensic analysis with the aim to establish the total amount of THC in the Cannabis preparations, as the active component. PMID:1503600

  5. Acid rain: Reign of controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain is a primer on the science and politics of acid rain. Several introductory chapters describe in simple terms the relevant principles of water chemistry, soil chemistry, and plant physiology and discuss the demonstrated or postulated effects of acid rain on fresh waters and forests as well as on statuary and other exposed objects. There follow discussions on the economic and social implications of acid rain (for example, possible health effects) and on the sources, transport, and distribution of air pollutants.

  6. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Poole, Loree J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  7. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  8. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  9. BACTERIAL OXIDATION OF DIPICOLINIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasuo; Arima, Kei

    1962-01-01

    Kobayashi, Yasuo (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) and Kei Arima. Bacterial oxidation of dipicolinic acid. II. Identification of α-ketoglutaric acid and 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid and some properties of cell-free extracts. J. Bacteriol. 84:765–771. 1962—When a dipicolinic acid (DPA)-decomposing bacterium, Achromobacter strain 1–2, was incubated at 30 C with shaking in a DPA solution containing 10−3m arsenite, a keto acid was accumulated. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone of this acid was synthesized and identified as α-ketoglutaric acid by paper chromatography, visible absorption spectrum, infrared analysis, elemental analysis, and mixed melting point. During this incubation, oxalic acid equivalent to the consumed dipicolinic acid was produced. A fluorescent material was also isolated from culture fluid and identified as 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid by paper chromatography and the ultraviolet absorption spectrum. Further, cell-free extracts were prepared by sonic oscillation. Ferrous ion and a reduced di- or triphosphopyridine nucleotide-generating system were proven to be required for enzymic oxidation of DPA. And 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid was also oxidized by this preparation. From the results obtained, a possible metabolic pathway of dipicolinic acid was proposed. PMID:14033954

  10. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  11. Scientists Puzzle Over Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Reports on a growing concern over increased acidity in atmospheric percipitation. Explores possible causes of the increased acidity, identifies chemical components of precipitation in various parts of the world, and presents environmental changes that might be attributed to the acidity. (GS)

  12. Serum Uric Acid in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Bassam E.; Hamed, Jamal M.; Touhala, Luma M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the possible effect of smoking on serum uric acid. Methods Subjects enrolled in study were divided into two groups; nonsmokers and smokers, each with 60 male volunteers of the same social class and dietary habit without history of alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia and gout, renal, joint, lung or heart diseases. Fasting blood and random urine samples were obtained from both groups for measurement of uric acid and creatinine. Calculation of both urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid were done. The results were statistically evaluated by standard statistical methods. Results No significant differences in the age, serum creatinine, spot urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid between the two groups, serum uric acid was significantly lower in smokers. In smokers there was significant negative correlation of smoking status (average number of cigarette smoked/day, duration of smoking and cumulative amount of smoking) with serum uric acid. Conclusion After exclusion of other factors affecting uric acid level, the significant low serum uric acid level in smokers was attributed to reduce endogenous production as a result of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke that is a significant source of oxidative stress. As this reduction is proportionate with smoking status and predisposes to cardiovascular disease, it is, therefore, recommended for smokers to stop or reduce smoking and introduce serum uric acid estimation as routine test since its cheap and simple to reflect their antioxidant level. Keywords Smokers; Uric acid; CVD. PMID:22334840

  13. Experimental study of the hydrothermal reactivity of organic acids and acid anions: II. Acetic acid, acetate, and valeric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    Organic acids and acid anions occur in substantial concentrations in many aqueous geologic fluids and are thought to take part in a variety of geochemical processes ranging from the transport of metals in ore-forming fluids to the formation of natural gas to serving as a metabolic energy source for microbes in subsurface habitats. The widespread occurrence of organic acids and their potential role in diverse geologic processes has led to numerous experimental studies of their thermal stability, yet there remain substantial gaps in our knowledge of the factors that control the rates and reaction pathways for the decomposition of these compounds under geologic conditions. In order to address some of these uncertainties, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the behavior of organic acids and acid anions under hydrothermal conditions in the presence of minerals. Reported here are results of experiments where aqueous solutions of acetic acid, sodium acetate, or valeric acid ( n-pentanoic acid) were heated at 325°C, 350 bars in the presence of the mineral assemblages hematite + magnetite + pyrite, pyrite + pyrrhotite + magnetite, and hematite + magnetite. The results indicate that aqueous acetic acid and acetate decompose by a combination of two reaction pathways: decarboxylation and oxidation. Both reactions are promoted by minerals, with hematite catalyzing the oxidation reaction while magnetite catalyzes decarboxylation. The oxidation reaction is much faster, so that oxidation dominates the decomposition of acetic acid and acetate when hematite is present. In contrast to previous reports that acetate decomposed more slowly than acetic acid, we found that acetate decomposed at slightly faster rates than the acid in the presence of minerals. Although longer-chain monocarboxylic acids are generally thought to decompose by decarboxylation, valeric acid appeared to decompose primarily by "deformylation" to 1-butene plus formic acid. Subsequent

  14. Role of acid diffusion in matrix acidizing of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefner, M.L.; Fogler, H.S.; Stenius, P.; Sjoblom, J.

    1987-02-01

    To increase the efficiency of matrix treatments in carbonates, a new type of retarded acid-in-oil microemulsion system has ben developed. The microemulsion is of low viscosity but can exhibit acid diffusion rates two orders of magnitude lower than aqueous HCl. Decreased acid diffusion delays spending and allows live acid to penetrate the rock matrix more uniformly and to greater distances. Coreflood results show that the microemulsion can stimulate cores in fewer PV's and under conditions of low injection rates where aqueous HCl fails completely. The microemulsion could also conceivably increase acid penetration along any natural fractures and fissures that may be present, thus increasing acidizing efficiency in this type of treatment. The relationship between the acid diffusion rate and the ability of the fluid to matrix-stimulate limestone is investigated.

  15. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  16. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration. PMID:19560175

  17. The politics of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcher, M.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This work examines and compares the acid rain policies through the different political systems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. Because the flow of acid rain can transcend national boundaries, acid rain has become a crucial international problem. According to the author, because of differences in governmental institutions and structure, the extent of governmental intervention in the industrial economy, the degree of reliance on coal for power generation, and the extent of acid rain damage, national responses to the acid rain problem have varied.

  18. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Tested Demonstrations: Color Oscillations in the Formic Acid-Nitric Acid-Sulfuric Acid System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raw, C. J. G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presented are procedures for demonstrating the production of color oscillations when nitric acid is added to a formic acid/concentrated sulfuric acid mixture. Because of safety considerations, "Super-8" home movie of the color changes was found to be satisfactory for demonstration purposes. (JN)

  1. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  2. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  3. Twinning of dodecanedicarboxylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, R.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Twinning of 1,10-dodecanedicarboxyl acid (DDA) was observed in 0.1 mm thick films with a polarizing microscope. Twins originated from polycrystalline regions which tended to nucleate on twin faces, and terminated by intersection gone another. Twinning increased dramatically with addition of organic compounds with a similar molecular size and shape. Increasing the freezing rate, increasing the temperature gradient, and addition of silica particles increased twinning. It is proposed that twins nucleate with polycrystals and sometimes anneal out before they become observable. The impurities may enhance twinning either by lowering the twin energy or by adsorbing on growing faces.

  4. Synthesis of amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1979-09-21

    A method is described for synthesizing amino acids preceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(OSOC1)CN, R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(C1)CN and (R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(CN)O)/sub 2/SO wherein R/sub 1/ and R/sub 2/ are each selected from hydrogen and monovalent hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  5. Controlling acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines recent transfer of electric power among 48 states and present evidence of significant transfers of electric power from so-called ''perpetrator'' to ''victim'' states. The book compares the efforts of several midwestern and northeastern states during the 1970's to control the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions causing acid rain. The report includes utility and government data on electricity production and sales, on purchase of out-of-state electricity, and on coal use and sulfur dioxide emissions, state by state, for 48 states.

  6. Combined indicator of vitamin B 12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A novel approach to determine vitamin B 12 status is to combine four blood markers: total B 12 (B 12 ), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). This combined indicator of B 12 status is expressed as cB 12 = log 10 [(holoTC · B 12 )/ (MMA · Hcy...

  7. Cryoprotection from lipoteichoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Charles V.; Middaugh, Amy; Wickham, Jason R.; Friedline, Anthony; Thomas, Kieth J.; Johnson, Karen; Zachariah, Malcolm; Garimella, Ravindranth

    2012-10-01

    Numerous chemical additives lower the freezing point of water, but life at sub-zero temperatures is sustained by a limited number of biological cryoprotectants. Antifreeze proteins in fish, plants, and insects provide protection to a few degrees below freezing. Microbes have been found to survive at even lower temperatures, and with a few exceptions, antifreeze proteins are missing. Survival has been attributed to external factors, such as the high salt concentration of brine veins and adhesion to particulates or ice crystal defects. We have discovered an endogenous cryoprotectant in the cell wall of bacteria, lipoteichoic acid biopolymers. Adding 1% LTA to bacteria cultures immediately prior to freezing provides 50% survival rate, similar to the results obtained with 1% glycerol. In the absence of an additive, bacterial survival is negligible as measured with the resazurin cell viability assay. The mode of action for LTA cryoprotection is unknown. With a molecular weight of 3-5 kDa, it is unlikely to enter the cell cytoplasm. Our observations suggest that teichoic acids could provide a shell of liquid water around biofilms and planktonic bacteria, removing the need for brine veins to prevent bacterial freezing.

  8. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  9. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Cassandra L.; Yaar, Ron; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Cantor, Charles R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  10. Ribonucleic acid purification.

    PubMed

    Martins, R; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2014-08-15

    Research on RNA has led to many important biological discoveries and improvement of therapeutic technologies. From basic to applied research, many procedures employ pure and intact RNA molecules; however their isolation and purification are critical steps because of the easy degradability of RNA, which can impair chemical stability and biological functionality. The current techniques to isolate and purify RNA molecules still have several limitations and the requirement for new methods able to improve RNA quality to meet regulatory demands is growing. In fact, as basic research improves the understanding of biological roles of RNAs, the biopharmaceutical industry starts to focus on them as a biotherapeutic tools. Chromatographic bioseparation is a high selective unit operation and is the major option in the purification of biological compounds, requiring high purity degree. In addition, its application in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is well established. This paper discusses the importance and the progress of RNA isolation and purification, considering RNA applicability both in research and clinical fields. In particular and in view of the high specificity, affinity chromatography has been recently applied to RNA purification processes. Accordingly, recent chromatographic investigations based on biorecognition phenomena occurring between RNA and amino acids are focused. Histidine and arginine have been used as amino acid ligands, and their ability to isolate different RNA species demonstrated a multipurpose applicability in molecular biology analysis and RNA therapeutics preparation, highlighting the potential contribution of these methods to overcome the challenges of RNA purification. PMID:24951289

  11. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  12. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-05-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1 - 3 × 10-4 Torr H2O and 1 - 2.5 × 10-6 Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  13. Interaction of silicic acid with sulfurous acid scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The solubility of amorphous silica and the inhibition of silica polymerization in the presence of sulfurous acid and sulfite salts has been investigated to 260{degrees}C. Investigations of inhibition of silica scaling from geothermal brines by sulfurous acid have produced unusual results. Bisulfite/sulfite increases amorphous silica solubility by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} effects resulting from apparent complexation. Silica-sulfite complexes are postulated to form via hydrogen bonding, and appear to be much stronger than silica-sulfate complexes. Treatment of brines with sulfurous acid inhibits silica scaling by (1) retarding the kinetics of silicic acid polymerization, and (2) forming soluble sulfito-silicate complexes. Sulfurous acid offers several advantages over sulfuric acid in controlling scale deposition-reduced corrosion potential, reduced by-product scale formation potential, oxygen scavenging and inhibition of certain metal silicate scales.

  14. Determination of benzoic acid, chlorobenzoic acids and chlorendic acid in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, E.A.; Cortellucci, N.J.; Singley, K.F. )

    1993-01-01

    To characterize and conduct treatment studies of a landfill leachate an analysis procedure was required to determine concentrations of benzoic acid, the three isomers of chlorobenzoic acid and chlorendic acid. The title compounds were isolated from acidified (pH 1) water by extraction with methyl t-butyl ether. Analytes were concentrated by back-extracting the ether with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide which was separated and acidified. This solution was analyzed by C[sub 18] reversed-phase HPLC with water/acetonitrile/acetic acid eluent and UV detection at 222 nm. The method has detection limits of 200 [mu]g/L for chlorendic acid and 100 [mu]g/L for benzoic acid and each isomer of chlorobenzoic acid. Validation studies with water which was fortified with the analytes at concentrations ranging from one to ten times detection limits resulted in average recoveries of >95%.

  15. Acid rain: Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain is now one of the most serious environmental problems in developed countries. Emissions and fallout were previously extremely localized, but since the introduction of tall stacks policies in both Britain and the US - pardoxically to disperse particulate pollutants and hence reduce local damage - emissions are now lifted into the upper air currents and carried long distances downwind. The acid rain debate now embraces many western countries - including Canada, the US, England, Scotland, Wales, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland - and a growing number of eastern countries - including the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia. The problem of acid rain arises, strictly speaking, not so much from the rainfall itself as from its effects on the environment. Runoff affects surface water and groundwater, as well as soils and vegetation. Consequently changes in rainfall acidity can trigger off a range of impacts on the chemistry and ecology of lakes and rivers, soil chemistry and processes, the health and productivity of plants, and building materials, and metallic structures. The most suitable solutions to the problems of acid rain require prevention rather than cure, and there is broad agreement in both the political scientific communities on the need to reduce emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere. Book divisions discuss: the problem of acid rain, the science of acid rain, the technology of acid rain, and the politics of acid rain, in an effort to evaluate this growing global problem of acid rain.

  16. Increased formation of ursodeoxycholic acid in patients treated with chenodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Salen, G; Tint, G S; Eliav, B; Deering, N; Mosbach, E H

    1974-01-01

    The formation of ursodeoxycholic acid, the 7 beta-hydroxy epimer of chenodeoxycholic acid, was investigated in three subjects with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis and in four subjects with gallstones. Total biliary bile acid composition was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography before and after 4 months of treatment with 0.75 g/day of chenodeoxycholic acid. Individual bile acids were identified by mass spectrometry. Before treatment, bile from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) subjects contained cholic acid, 85%; chenodeoxycholic acid, 7%; deoxycholic acid, 3%; allocholic acid, 3%; and unidentified steroids, 2%; while bile from gallstone subjects contained cholic acid, 45%; chenodeoxycholic acid, 43%; deoxycholic acid, 11%, and lithocholic acid, 1%. In all subjects, 4 months of chenodeoxycholic acid therapy increased the proportion of this bile acid to approximately 80% and decreased cholic acid to 3% of the total biliary bile acids, the remaining 17% of bile acids were identified as ursodeoxycholic acid. After the intravenous injection of [3H]chenodeoxycholic acid, the specific activity of biliary ursodeoxycholic acid exceeded the specific activity of chenodeoxycholic acid, and the resulting specific activity decay curves suggested precursor-product relationships. When [3H]7-ketolithocholic acid was administrated to another patient treated with chenodeoxycholic acid, radioactivity was detected in both the ursodeoxycholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid fractions. These results indicate that substantial amounts of ursodeoxycholic acid are formed in patients treated with chenodeoxycholic acid. The ursodeoxycholic acid was synthesized from chenodeoxycholic acid presumably via 7-ketolithocholic acid. Images PMID:11344576

  17. Interactions of amino acids, carboxylic acids, and mineral acids with different quinoline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Dipjyoti; Deka, Himangshu; Samanta, Shyam Sundar; Guchait, Subrata; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-03-01

    A series of quinoline containing receptors having amide and ester bonds are synthesized and characterised. The relative binding abilities of these receptors with various amino acids, carboxylic acids and mineral acids are determined by monitoring the changes in fluorescence intensity. Among the receptors bis(2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)ethyl) isophthalate shows fluorescence enhancement on addition of amino acids whereas the other receptors shows fluorescence quenching on addition of amino acids. The receptor N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy) propanamide has higher binding affinity for amino acids. However, the receptor N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide having similar structure do not bind to amino acids. This is attributed to the concave structure of the former which is favoured due to the presence of methyl substituent. The receptor bis(2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)ethyl) isophthalate do not bind to hydroxy carboxylic acids, but is a good receptor for dicarboxylic acids. The crystal structure of bromide and perchlorate salts of receptor 2-bromo-N-(quinolin-8-yl)-propanamide are determined. In both the cases the amide groups are not in the plane of quinoline ring. The structure of N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide, N-(2-methoxyphenethyl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide and their salts with maleic acid as well as fumaric acid are determined. It is observed that the solid state structures are governed by the double bond geometry of these two acid. Maleic acid forms salt in both the cases, whereas fumaric acid forms either salt or co-crystals.

  18. Acidity of Strong Acids in Water and Dimethyl Sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Trummal, Aleksander; Lipping, Lauri; Kaljurand, Ivari; Koppel, Ilmar A; Leito, Ivo

    2016-05-26

    Careful analysis and comparison of the available acidity data of HCl, HBr, HI, HClO4, and CF3SO3H in water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and gas-phase has been carried out. The data include experimental and computational pKa and gas-phase acidity data from the literature, as well as high-level computations using different approaches (including the W1 theory) carried out in this work. As a result of the analysis, for every acid in every medium, a recommended acidity value is presented. In some cases, the currently accepted pKa values were revised by more than 10 orders of magnitude. PMID:27115918

  19. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by rail... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section...

  20. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as... sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as impurities, when offered for transportation or transported by rail... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section...