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Sample records for acid n-terminal sequence

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of the N-terminal extension of calf skin type III procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, A; Glanville, R W; Hörlein, D; Bruckner, P; Timpl, R; Fietzek, P P; Kühn, K

    1984-01-01

    The N-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen, isolated from foetal-calf skin, contains 130 amino acid residues. To determine its amino acid sequence, the peptide was reduced and carboxymethylated or aminoethylated and fragmented with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and bacterial collagenase. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase was used to deblock the N-terminal collagenase fragment to enable amino acid sequencing. The type III collagen extension peptide is homologous to that of the alpha 1 chain of type I procollagen with respect to a three-domain structure. The N-terminal 79 amino acids, which contain ten of the 12 cysteine residues, form a compact globular domain. The next 39 amino acids are in a collagenase triplet sequence (Gly- Xaa - Yaa )n with a high hydroxyproline content. Finally, another short non-collagenous domain of 12 amino acids ends at the cleavage site for procollagen aminopeptidase, which cleaves a proline-glutamine bond. In contrast with type I procollagen, the type III procollagen extension peptides contain interchain disulphide bridges located at the C-terminus of the triple-helical domain. PMID:6331392

  2. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence of dextranicin 24, a bacteriocin of Leuconostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Revol-Junelles, A M; Lefebvre, G

    1996-08-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum strain J24 synthesized a bacteriocin named Dextranicin 24 (Dex-24), which inhibited only other Leuconostoc sp. strains. It was purified by a two-step procedure from the fraction of the bacteriocin bound to the producer cells at the end of the growth: desorption form the cells at acidic pH, followed by reserve phase HPLC. The N-terminal sequence of Dex-24 was the following: NH2(-) K G V L G W L S M A S S A L T G P Q Q . . .

  3. N-terminal amino acid sequence of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase: comparison with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus subtilis Enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, H; Fietzek, P P; Lampen, J O

    1982-01-01

    The thermostable, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis was immunologically cross-reactive with the thermolabile, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed extensive homology with each other, but not with the saccharifying alpha-amylases of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6172418

  4. Predicting subcellular localization of proteins based on their N-terminal amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, O; Nielsen, H; Brunak, S; von Heijne, G

    2000-07-21

    A neural network-based tool, TargetP, for large-scale subcellular location prediction of newly identified proteins has been developed. Using N-terminal sequence information only, it discriminates between proteins destined for the mitochondrion, the chloroplast, the secretory pathway, and "other" localizations with a success rate of 85% (plant) or 90% (non-plant) on redundancy-reduced test sets. From a TargetP analysis of the recently sequenced Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 2 and 4 and the Ensembl Homo sapiens protein set, we estimate that 10% of all plant proteins are mitochondrial and 14% chloroplastic, and that the abundance of secretory proteins, in both Arabidopsis and Homo, is around 10%. TargetP also predicts cleavage sites with levels of correctly predicted sites ranging from approximately 40% to 50% (chloroplastic and mitochondrial presequences) to above 70% (secretory signal peptides). TargetP is available as a web-server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TargetP/.

  5. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting and N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequencing of Glycosylated Cysteine Protease of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham.

    PubMed Central

    Badgujar, Shamkant B.; Mahajan, Raghunath T.

    2013-01-01

    A new cysteine protease named Nivulian-II has been purified from the latex of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham. The apparent molecular mass of Nivulian-II is 43670.846 Da (MALDI TOF/MS). Peptide mass fingerprint analysis revealed peptide matches to Maturase K (Q52ZV1_9MAGN) of Banksia quercifolia. The N-terminal sequence (DFPPNTCCCICC) showed partial homology with those of other cysteine proteinases of biological origin. This is the first paper to characterize a Nivulian-II of E. nivulia latex with respect to amino acid sequencing. PMID:23476742

  6. N-terminal amino acid sequence of proalbumin from inbred buffalo rats.

    PubMed

    Millership, A; Edwards, K; Chelladurai, M; Dryburgh, H; Inglis, A S; Urban, J; Schreiber, G

    1980-03-01

    The sequence of radioactively labelled amino acids at the N-terminus of proalbumin was determined by automated Edman-degradation. [3H] Valine, [3H]phenylalanine or [14C]arginine was incorporated into protein in vivo for a time period of 10 min after injection. Since albumin remains unlabelled during this time period (Urban et al., 1976), separation of proalbumin and albumin was not required for this work. Hence, compared to previous methods, a shorter purification procedure could be used which increased the yield of anti-albumin-precipitable protein and reduced the risk of proteolysis. Microsomes were prepared from livers removed 10 min after injection of the radioactively labelled amino acids. A buffer extract of the acetone-dried powder from these microsomes was chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose. All protein obtained after chromatography which could be precipitated with antiserum to serum albumin was isolated by immunoprecipitation and subsequent separation of the antigen-antibody complex. The sequence of radioactive amino acids in this antigen preparation suggests that about 20-25% of proalbumin possessed at the N-terminus the pentapeptide sequence X-Val-Phe-Arg-Arg- whereas 75-80% contained the hexapeptide sequence Arg-X-Val-Phe-Arg-Arg-.

  7. Sequence dependent N-terminal rearrangement and degradation of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, M.; Christensen, L.; Schmidt, J.; Haaima, G.; Orgel, L.; Nielsen, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the PNA (peptide nucleic acid) thymine monomer inverted question markN-[2-(thymin-1-ylacetyl)]-N-(2-aminoaminoethyl)glycine inverted question mark and those of various PNA oligomers (5-8-mers) have been measured at room temperature (20 degrees C) as a function of pH. The thymine monomer undergoes N-acyl transfer rearrangement with a half-life of 34 days at pH 11 as analyzed by 1H NMR; and two reactions, the N-acyl transfer and a sequential degradation, are found by HPLC analysis to occur at measurable rates for the oligomers at pH 9 or above. Dependent on the amino-terminal sequence, half-lives of 350 h to 163 days were found at pH 9. At pH 12 the half-lives ranged from 1.5 h to 21 days. The results are discussed in terms of PNA as a gene therapeutic drug as well as a possible prebiotic genetic material.

  8. Sequence dependent N-terminal rearrangement and degradation of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, M.; Christensen, L.; Schmidt, J.; Haaima, G.; Orgel, L.; Nielsen, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the PNA (peptide nucleic acid) thymine monomer inverted question markN-[2-(thymin-1-ylacetyl)]-N-(2-aminoaminoethyl)glycine inverted question mark and those of various PNA oligomers (5-8-mers) have been measured at room temperature (20 degrees C) as a function of pH. The thymine monomer undergoes N-acyl transfer rearrangement with a half-life of 34 days at pH 11 as analyzed by 1H NMR; and two reactions, the N-acyl transfer and a sequential degradation, are found by HPLC analysis to occur at measurable rates for the oligomers at pH 9 or above. Dependent on the amino-terminal sequence, half-lives of 350 h to 163 days were found at pH 9. At pH 12 the half-lives ranged from 1.5 h to 21 days. The results are discussed in terms of PNA as a gene therapeutic drug as well as a possible prebiotic genetic material.

  9. The ABRF Edman Sequencing Research Group 2008 Study: Investigation into Homopolymeric Amino Acid N-Terminal Sequence Tags and Their Effects on Automated Edman Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, R. S.; Smith, J. S.; Sandoval, W.; Leone, J. W.; Hunziker, P.; Hampton, B.; Linse, K. D.; Denslow, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    The Edman Sequence Research Group (ESRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource designs and executes interlaboratory studies investigating the use of automated Edman degradation for protein and peptide analysis. In 2008, the ESRG enlisted the help of core sequencing facilities to investigate the effects of a repeating amino acid tag at the N-terminus of a protein. Commonly, to facilitate protein purification, an affinity tag containing a polyhistidine sequence is conjugated to the N-terminus of the protein. After expression, polyhistidine-tagged protein is readily purified via chelation with an immobilized metal affinity resin. The addition of the polyhistidine tag presents unique challenges for the determination of protein identity using Edman degradation chemistry. Participating laboratories were asked to sequence one protein engineered in three configurations: with an N-terminal polyhistidine tag; with an N-terminal polyalanine tag; or with no tag. Study participants were asked to return a data file containing the uncorrected amino acid picomole yields for the first 17 cycles. Initial and repetitive yield (R.Y.) information and the amount of lag were evaluated. Information about instrumentation and sample treatment was also collected as part of the study. For this study, the majority of participating laboratories successfully called the amino acid sequence for 17 cycles for all three test proteins. In general, laboratories found it more difficult to call the sequence containing the polyhistidine tag. Lag was observed earlier and more consistently with the polyhistidine-tagged protein than the polyalanine-tagged protein. Histidine yields were significantly less than the alanine yields in the tag portion of each analysis. The polyhistidine and polyalanine protein-R.Y. calculations were found to be equivalent. These calculations showed that the nontagged portion from each protein was equivalent. The terminal histidines from the tagged portion of the protein

  10. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, H.; Coligan, J.; Benacerraf, B.; Rock, K.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. They therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, they further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin.

  11. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO4/PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. We, therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, we further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin. Images PMID:3033645

  12. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae: N-terminal amino acid sequence of a major fimbrial subunit and nucleotide sequences of the genes from two strains.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, F K; Cook, S; Hull, R A; Massad, G; Mobley, H L

    1993-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection in hospitalized and catheterized patients, produces mannose-resistant/klebsiella-like (MR/K) and mannose-resistant/proteus-like (MR/P) hemagglutinins. The gene encoding the major structural subunit of a fimbria, possibly MR/K, was identified in two strains. A degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the N terminus of the Proteus uroepithelial cell adhesin and antiserum raised against the denatured polypeptide were used to screen a cosmid gene bank of strain HU1069. A cosmid clone that reacted with the probe and antiserum was identified, and a fimbria-like open reading frame was determined by nucleotide sequencing. The predicted N-terminal amino acid sequence of the processed polypeptide, ENETPAPKVSSTKGEIQLKG (residues 23 to 42), did not match the uroepithelial cell adhesin N terminus but, rather, matched exactly the N-terminal amino acid sequence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular size of 19.5 kDa isolated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a fimbrial preparation from strain HI4320 expressing MR/K hemagglutinin. By using an oligonucleotide from the HU1069 open reading frame, the fimbrial gene was isolated and sequenced from a cosmid gene bank clone of strain HI4320. A 552-bp open reading frame predicts a 184-amino-acid polypeptide including a 22-amino-acid hydrophobic leader sequence. The unprocessed polypeptide is predicted to be 18,921 Da; the processed polypeptide is predicted to be 16,749 Da. The predicted amino acid sequence of the polypeptide encoded by the gene, designated pmfA, displayed 36% exact matches with the mannose-resistant fimbrial subunit encoded by smfA of Serratia marcescens but only 15% exact matches with the predicted sequence encoded by mrkA of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  13. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence comparisons of structural proteins from retrovirus-D/Washington and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L E; Sowder, R; Smythers, G; Benveniste, R E; Oroszlan, S

    1985-01-01

    A new D-type retrovirus originally designated SAIDS-D/Washington and here referred to as retrovirus-D/Washington (R-D/W) was recently isolated at the University of Washington Primate Center, Seattle, Wash., from a rhesus monkey with an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and retroperitoneal fibromatosis. To better establish the relationship of this new D-type virus to the prototype D-type virus, Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), we have purified and compared six structural proteins from each virus. The proteins purified from each D-type retrovirus include p4, p10, p12, p14, p27, and a phosphoprotein designated pp18 for MPMV and pp20 for R-D/W. Amino acid analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis show that the p4, p12, p14, and p27 proteins of R-D/W are distinct from the homologous proteins of MPMV but that these proteins from the two different viruses share a high degree of amino acid sequence homology. The p10 proteins from the two viruses have similar amino acid compositions, and both are blocked to N-terminal Edman degradation. The phosphoproteins from the two viruses each contain phosphoserine but are different from each other in amino acid composition, molecular weight, and N-terminal amino acid sequence. The data thus show that each of the R-D/W proteins examined is distinguishable from its MPMV homolog and that a major difference between these two D-type retroviruses is found in the viral phosphoproteins. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of D-type retroviral proteins were used to search for sequence homologies between D-type and other retroviral amino acid sequences. An unexpected amino acid sequence homology was found between R-D/W pp20 (a gag protein) and a 28-residue segment of the env precursor polyprotein of Rous sarcoma virus. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the D-type major gag protein (p27) and the nucleic acid-binding protein (p14) show only limited amino acid sequence homology to functionally homologous proteins of C

  14. N-terminal amino acid sequences of D-serine deaminases of wild-type and operator-constitutive strains of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Heincz, M C; McFall, E

    1975-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the D-serine deaminases from strains of Escherichia coli K-12 that harbor wild-type and high-level constitutive catabolite-insensitive operator-initiator regions are identical: Met-Ser-GluNH2-Ser-Gly-Arg-His-Cys. This result indicates that the operator-initiator region is probably distinct from the D-serine deaminase structural gene. Images PMID:1099073

  15. Characterization of a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ATPase) from rat bone: hydrodynamic properties and N-terminal amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Ek-Rylander, B; Bergman, T; Andersson, G

    1991-04-01

    Certain physicochemical properties of rat bone tartrate-resistant acid ATPase (TrATPase), including the size and shape of the enzyme, potential subunit composition, and detergent binding, have been elucidated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with immunoblot analysis showed that the bone TrATPase has a molecular weight of 33,000 D and is composed of disulfide-linked polypeptides of 20,000 and 16,000 D. The enzyme contains 1.7 mol Fe per mol enzyme. Hydrodynamic studies allowed calculation of the Stokes radius (24 A), the sedimentation coefficient (3.19S), the partial specific volume (0.748 ml/g), the frictional ratio (0.995), and the axial ratio (1.0). The amount of detergent bound to the protein was determined to 4 mol of Triton X-100 per mol enzyme. The molecular weight of bone TrATPase derived from these parameters was 31,900 D. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the Mr 20,000 subunit indicated a high degree of similarity with TRAP enzymes from spleen, uterus, placenta, hairy cell leukemia, and osteoclastoma. It is concluded that rat bone TrATPase belongs to the type 5 (tartrate-resistant and purple) acid phosphatase family. The similarities in the N-terminal amino acid sequences, iron content, and physicochemical properties of TRAP enzymes indicate a close structural relationship between type 5 acid phosphatases expressed in different tissues. The findings that TrATPase has a spherical shape and binds low amounts of detergent suggest that the enzyme is a soluble protein, compatible with the view that TrATPase is secreted by the osteoclast.

  16. UNIT 11.10 N-Terminal Sequence Analysis of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Kaye D.; Gorman, Nicole; Speicher, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Automated N-terminal sequence analysis involves a series of chemical reactions that derivatize and remove one amino acid at a time from the N-terminal of purified peptides or intact proteins. At least several pmoles of a purified protein or 10 to 20 pmoles of a purified peptide with an unmodified N-terminal is required in order to obtain useful sequence information. In recent years the demand for N-terminal sequencing has decreased substantially as some applications for protein identification and characterization can now be more effectively performed using mass spectrometry. However, N-terminal sequencing remains the method of choice for verifying the N-terminal boundary of recombinant proteins, determining the N-terminal of protease-resistant domains, identifying proteins isolated from species where most of the genome has not yet been sequenced, and mapping modified or crosslinked sites in proteins that prove to be refractory to analysis by mass spectrometry. PMID:18429102

  17. Characterization of the 33-kilodalton major allergen of Penicillium citrinum by using MoAbs and N-terminal amino acid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shen, H D; Lin, W L; Liaw, S F; Tam, M F; Han, S H

    1997-01-01

    The 33 kD component has been identified as a major allergen of Penicillium citrinum, the most prevalent Penicillium species in the Taipei area of Taiwan. This study analyses the isoforms, antigenic cross-reactivity and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 33 kD allergen of P. citrinum. The composition of isoforms and antigenic cross-reactivity was analysed by SDS-PAGE and 2D-immunoblotting using MoAbs generated. The N-terminal sequence was analysed by using an automatic gas/liquid phase sequencer. Two MoAbs (55A and 34H) against the 33 kD allergen were generated in the present study. In addition to the 33 kD component, MoAb 34H also showed immunoblot reactivity to other components in the crude extract of P. citrinum. Analysed by 2D-immunoblotting, at least six different isoforms of the 33 kD component with pI values ranging from 6.75 to greater than 7.0 were shown to be reactive to both MoAbs and IgE antibodies in serum of an asthmatic patient. Different immunoblot patterns were observed when both MoAbs were reacted with four different strains of P. citrinum used in the present study. Among another six different Penicillium and four different Aspergillus species tested, only an immunoblot reactivity of MoAb 55A to the 33 kD component of P. brevicompactum was observed. In 2D-immunoblotting, components of P. brevicompactum with an MW of about 33 kD and pI values similar to those of the 33 kD component of P. citrinum reacted with MoAb 55A and IgE antibodies in serum of the asthmatic patient. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 33 kD component of P. citrinum was determined to be ANVVQSNVP which was identical to the first 9 N-terminal amino acids of a heat-labile alkaline serine proteinase from P. citrinum. Results obtained in the present study suggest that the 33 kD major allergen of P. citrinum may be an alkaline serine proteinase.

  18. The characterization of Mycoplasma synoviae EF-Tu protein and proteins involved in hemadherence and their N-terminal amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Narat, M; Dovc, P; Drobnic-Valic, M; Habe, F; Kleven, S H

    1999-04-01

    An abundant cytoplasmic 43-kDa protein from Mycoplasma synoviae, a major pathogen from poultry, was identified as elongation factor Tu. The N-terminal amino acid sequence (AKLDFDRSKEHVNVGTIGHV) has 90% identity with the sequence of the Mycoplasma hominis elongation factor Tu protein. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with the M. synoviae elongation factor Tu protein also reacted with 43-kDa proteins from the avian Mycoplasma species Mycoplasma gallinarum, Mycoplasma gallinaceum, Mycoplasma pullorum, Mycoplasma cloacale, Mycoplasma iners and Mycoplasma meleagridis, but not with the proteins from Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma imitans or Mycoplasma iowae. In addition, two groups of phase variable integral membrane proteins, pMSA and pMSB, associated with hemadherence and pathogenicity of M. synoviae strains AAY-4 and ULB925 were identified. The cleavage of a larger hemagglutinating protein encoded by a gene homologous to the vlhA gene of M. synoviae generates pMSB1 and pMSA1 proteins defined by mAb 125 and by hemagglutination inhibiting mAb 3E10, respectively. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of pMSA proteins (SENKLI ... and SENETQ ...) probably indicate the cleavage site of the M. synoviae strain ULB 925 hemagglutinin.

  19. N-terminal sequence analysis of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Reim, D F; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    Amino-terminal (N-terminal) sequence analysis is used to identify the order of amino acids of proteins or peptides, starting at their N-terminal end. This unit describes the sequence analysis of protein or peptide samples in solution or bound to PVDF membranes using a Perkin-Elmer Procise Sequencer. Sequence analysis of protein or peptide samples in solution or bound to PVDF membranes using a Hewlett-Packard Model G1005A sequencer is also described. Methods are provided for optimizing separation of PTH amino acid derivatives on Perkin-Elmer instruments and for increasing the proportion of sample injected onto the PTH analyzer on older Perkin-Elmer instruments by installing a modified sample loop. The amount of data obtained from a single sequencer run is substantial, and careful interpretation of this data by an experienced scientist familiar with the current operation performance of the instrument used for this analysis is critically important. A discussion of data interpretation is therefore provided. Finally, discussion of optimization of sequencer performance as well as possible solutions to frequently encountered problems is included.

  20. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  1. Proteolytic interconversion and N-terminal sequences of the Citrobacter diversus major beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, N; Amicosante, G; Perilli, M; Maccarrone, M; Oratore, A; van Beeumen, J; Frère, J M

    1991-01-01

    The N-terminal sequences of the two major beta-lactamases produced by Citrobacter diversus differed only by the absence of the first residue in form II and the loss of five amino acid residues at the C-terminal end. Limited proteolysis of the homogeneous form I protein yielded a variety of enzymatically active products. In the major product obtained after the action of papain, the first three N-terminal residues of form I had been cleaved, whereas at the C-terminal end the treated enzyme lacked five residues. However, this cannot explain the different behaviours of form I, form II and papain digestion product upon chromatofocusing. Form I, which was sequenced up to position 56, exhibited a very high degree of similarity with a Klebsiella oxytoca beta-lactamase. The determined sequence, which contained the active serine residue, demonstrated that the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Citrobacter diversus belong to class A. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2039443

  2. Identification of the sequence determinants of protein N-terminal acetylation through a decision tree approach.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori D; Omori, Satoshi; Nishi, Hafumi; Miyagi, Masaru

    2017-06-02

    N-terminal acetylation is one of the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and occurs co-translationally when the N-terminus of the nascent polypeptide is still attached to the ribosome. This modification has been shown to be involved in a wide range of biological phenomena such as protein half-life regulation, protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions, and protein subcellular localization. Thus, accurately predicting which proteins receive an acetyl group based on their protein sequence is expected to facilitate the functional study of this modification. As the occurrence of N-terminal acetylation strongly depends on the context of protein sequences, attempts to understand the sequence determinants of N-terminal acetylation were conducted initially by simply examining the N-terminal sequences of many acetylated and unacetylated proteins and more recently by machine learning approaches. However, a complete understanding of the sequence determinants of this modification remains to be elucidated. We obtained curated N-terminally acetylated and unacetylated sequences from the UniProt database and employed a decision tree algorithm to identify the sequence determinants of N-terminal acetylation for proteins whose initiator methionine ((i)Met) residues have been removed. The results suggested that the main determinants of N-terminal acetylation are contained within the first five residues following (i)Met and that the first and second positions are the most important discriminator for the occurrence of this phenomenon. The results also indicated the existence of position-specific preferred and inhibitory residues that determine the occurrence of N-terminal acetylation. The developed predictor software, termed NT-AcPredictor, accurately predicted the N-terminal acetylation, with an overall performance comparable or superior to those of preceding predictors incorporating machine learning algorithms. Our machine learning approach based on a decision tree

  3. N-Terminal signal sequence is required for cellular trafficking and hyaluronan-depolymerization of KIAA1199.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nagaoka, Aya; Nakamura, Sachiko; Tobiishi, Megumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2014-01-03

    Recently, we disclosed that KIAA1199-mediated hyaluronan (HA) depolymerization requires an acidic cellular microenvironment (e.g. clathrin-coated vesicles or early endosomes), but no information about the structural basis underlying the cellular targeting and functional modification of KIAA1199 was available. Here, we show that the cleavage of N-terminal 30 amino acids occurs in functionally matured KIAA1199, and the deletion of the N-terminal portion results in altered intracellular trafficking of the molecule and loss of cellular HA depolymerization. These results suggest that the N-terminal portion of KIAA1199 functions as a cleavable signal sequence required for proper KIAA1199 translocation and KIAA1199-mediated HA depolymerization.

  4. Identification, N-terminal region sequencing and similarity analysis of differentially expressed proteins in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, A F; Sousa, M V; Silva, S P; Jesuíno, R S; Soares, C M; Felipe, M S

    1999-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the causal agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, which is a systemic mycosis in Latin America. This human pathogen is a dimorphic fungus existing as mycelium (26 degrees C) and in infected tissues as a yeast form (36 degrees C). The in vitro differentiation process is reversible and dependent on temperature shift. In the present study, the total proteins from both forms of P. brasiliensis (isolate Pb01) were analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were identified. Two of these proteins, PbM46 (mycelium) and PbY20 (yeast), were submitted to automated protein sequencing of their N-terminal regions. The 15 amino acid residue sequence of PbM46, AITKIFALKVYDSSG, is similar to enolases from several sources, and specially those from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (80%) and Candida albicans (67%), when compared to the NR database at NCBI using the BLASTP program. The 34 amino acid residue sequence of PbY20, APKIAIVFYSLYGHIQKLAEAQKKGIEAAGGTAD, could probably represent an allergen protein since it is very similar (90%) to the minor allergen protein of Alternaria alternata and 82% similar to the allergen protein of Cladosporium herbarum. This comparative analysis of proteins from mycelium and yeast forms has allowed the identification and characterization of differentially expressed proteins, probably related to differential gene expression in P. brasiliensis.

  5. Acute effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens P; Hansen, Carsten P; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2017-03-01

    We previously identified an N-terminal fragment of progastrin in human antrum and plasma, where it circulates in high concentrations. In this study, we examined the effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion by infusion in healthy individuals. Increasing doses of progastrin fragment 1-35 were infused intravenously during constant gastric acid stimulation by gastrin-17. In addition, the effects of progastrin fragment 1-35, fragment 6-35, and fragment 1-19 on gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion were tested. The gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion decreased 30% after administration of a high dose of progastrin fragment 1-35 (P < 0.05). In extension, a 1-h infusion of fragment 1-35 also decreased gastric acid output. In contrast, fragment 6-35 did not affect acid secretion, and a single infusion of gastrin-17 alone did not reveal fading of gastric acid output during the time course of the experiments. The results show that N-terminal fragments of progastrin may acutely affect gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in vivo. Structure-function analysis suggests that the N-terminal pentapeptide of progastrin is required for the effect.

  6. Processing of the precursor of protamine P2 in mouse. Peptide mapping and N-terminal sequence analysis of intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Carré-Eusèbe, D; Lederer, F; Lê, K H; Elsevier, S M

    1991-01-01

    Protamine P2, the major basic chromosomal protein of mouse spermatozoa, is synthesized as a precursor almost twice as long as the mature protein, its extra length arising from an N-terminal extension of 44 amino acid residues. This precursor is integrated into chromatin of spermatids, and the extension is processed during chromatin condensation in the haploid cells. We have studied processing in the mouse and have identified two intermediates generated by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor. H.p.l.c. separated protamine P2 from four other spermatid proteins, including the precursor and three proteins known to possess physiological characteristics expected of processing intermediates. Peptide mapping indicated that all of these proteins were structurally similar. Two major proteins were further purified by PAGE, transferred to poly(vinylidene difluoride) membranes and submitted to automated N-terminal sequence analysis. Both sequences were found within the deduced sequence of the precursor extension. The N-terminus of the larger intermediate, PP2C, was Gly-12, whereas the N-terminus of the smaller, PP2D, was His-21. Both processing sites involved a peptide bond in which the carbonyl function was contributed by an acidic amino acid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1854346

  7. The reaction of iodine and thiol-blocking reagents with human complement components C2 and factor B. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence of a peptide from C2a containing a free thiol group.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, C; Gagnon, J; Kerr, M A

    1983-01-01

    Human complement components C2 and Factor B each contain one free thiol group/molecule. Reaction with p-chloromercuribenzoate destroyed the haemolytic activity of C2 but had no effect on Factor B. Reaction of C2 with I2 gave a 16-fold enhancement of its haemolytic activity. The pH optimum for the reaction was 7.0. The I2 reacted at the thiol group in C2 with a stoicheiometry of 1 mol of I2/mol of C2. The product of the reaction was unaffected by millimolar concentrations of dithiothreitol; however, azide and cyanide were inhibitory. Reaction with azide did not result in re-expression of the thiol group. Mild oxidation of the thiol group with m-chloroperbenzoic acid did not enhance the haemolytic activity. The results suggest that reaction with I2 causes intramolecular covalent, but not disulphide, bond formation. I2 reacted with Factor B at the free thiol group without affecting the haemolytic activity. A CNBr-cleavage peptide from C2a (obtained by cleavage of C2 by subcomponent C1s) containing the free thiol group was isolated. Automated Edman degradation of the peptide showed that it was the N-terminal peptide of C2a. The free thiol group was identified at position 18. PMID:6555044

  8. Ascorbate as a pro-oxidant: mild N-terminal modification with vinylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Ball, Zachary T

    2017-02-04

    We describe divergent reactivity of vinylboronic acids for protein modification. In addition to previously reported copper-catalyzed backbone N-H modification, ascorbate in air mediates N-terminal functionalization with the same vinylboronate reagents. This mild and selective aqueous reactivity enables selective single-modification of the B chain of human insulin.

  9. Hydrogen ion titration of 12 S rape seed protein and partial N-terminal sequence of one of it's subunits.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, R; Mahesh, V K; Mallikharjun, P V

    1989-10-01

    The high molecular weight 12 S protein from rape seed was isolated in a homogeneous form and characterized. Six subunits were isolated by PAGE in the presence of SDS and 0.2 M 2-mercaptoethanol. These subunits (s1 to s6) were found in the protein in the weight ratio of 1.32:1.2:1.15:1.0:1.21:1.11. The molecular weights and first two N-terminal amino acids of the isolated subunits were 64,800 and phenylalanine, alanine (s1), 50,650 and valine, tyrosine (s2), 42,500 and phenylalanine, leucine (s3), 28,800 and threonine, glutamic acid (s4), 19,100 and cystine, isoleucine (s5) and 15,600 and alanine, phenylalanine (s6). The number of side chain carboxyl, imidazole and epsilon-amino groups were calculated from the hydrogen ion titrations, which were in agreement with the amino acid assay. Besides, the N-terminal amino acid sequence upto 43 residues for one subunit (s6) is reported using Edman degradation.

  10. Preparation of protein samples for mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of protein samples for mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing is a key step in successfully identifying proteins. Mass spectrometry is a very sensitive technique, and as such, samples must be prepared carefully since they can be subject to contamination of the sample (e.g., due to incomplete subcellular fractionation or purification of a multiprotein complex), overwhelming of the sample by highly abundant proteins, and contamination from skin or hair (keratin can be a very common hit). One goal of sample preparation for mass spec is to reduce the complexity of the sample - in the example presented here, mitochondria are purified, solubilized, and fractionated by sucrose density gradient sedimentation prior to preparative 1D SDS-PAGE. It is important to verify the purity and integrity of the sample so that you can have confidence in the hits obtained. More protein is needed for N-terminal sequencing and ideally it should be purified to a single band when run on an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. The example presented here involves stably expressing a tagged protein in HEK293 cells and then isolating the protein by affinity purification and SDS-PAGE.

  11. Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin binds to target cells via the N-terminal 30 amino acids.

    PubMed

    Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Ohnishi, Shinya; Kamitani, Shigeki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2011-03-01

    Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) affects the biological function of host cells by activating intracellular Rho GTPases. The toxin binds to unidentified receptor(s) via 54 N-terminal amino acids, undergoes intramolecular cleavage on the C-terminal side of Arg(44) by furin or furin-like protease, and eventually enters the cytoplasm where the Rho GTPases reside. The binding to the receptor(s) and intramolecular cleavage are essential for DNT to intoxicate cells, and the 54 amino-acid binding domain encompasses the cleavage site, however, it is unclear whether these two events are related. In this study, we could narrow down the cell-binding domain to the N-terminal amino acids 2-30. The region does not contain the furin-recognition site, indicating that the cell binding and the intramolecular cleavage are independent events.

  12. Identification of succinimide sites in proteins by N-terminal sequence analysis after alkaline hydroxylamine cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, M. Y.; Harris, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Under favorable conditions, Asp or Asn residues can undergo rearrangement to a succinimide (cyclic imide), which may also serve as an intermediate for deamidation and/or isoaspartate formation. Direct identification of such succinimides by peptide mapping is hampered by their lability at neutral and alkaline pH. We determined that incubation in 2 M hydroxylamine, 0.2 M Tris buffer, pH 9, for 2 h at 45 degrees C will specifically cleave on the C-terminal side of succinimides without cleavage at Asn-Gly bonds; yields are typically approximately 50%. N-terminal sequence analysis can then be used to identify an internal sequence generated by cleavage of the succinimide, hence identifying the succinimide site. PMID:8142891

  13. An N-terminal glycine-rich sequence contributes to retrovirus trimer of hairpins stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kirilee A.; Maerz, Anne L.; Baer, Severine; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis . E-mail: apoumbourios@burnet.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain a glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide and coiled coil core. Previously, we reported that the glycine-rich segment (Met-326-Ser-337) of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, is a determinant of membrane fusion function [K.A. Wilson, S. Baer, A.L. Maerz, M. Alizon, P. Poumbourios, The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function, J. Virol. 79 (2005) 4533-4539]. Here we show that the reduced fusion activity of an I334A mutant correlated with a decrease in stability of the gp21 trimer of hairpins conformation, in the context of a maltose-binding protein-gp21 chimera. The stabilizing influence of Ile-334 required the C-terminal membrane-proximal sequence Trp-431-Ser-436. Proline substitution of four of five Gly residues altered gp21 trimer of hairpins stability. Our data indicate that flexibility within and hydrophobic interactions mediated by this region are determinants of gp21 stability and membrane fusion function.

  14. A highly conserved N-terminal sequence for teleost vitellogenin with potential value to the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folmar, L.D.; Denslow, N.D.; Wallace, R.A.; LaFleur, G.; Gross, T.S.; Bonomelli, S.; Sullivan, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    N-terminal amino acid sequences for vitellogenin (Vtg) from six species of teleost fish (striped bass, mummichog, pinfish, brown bullhead, medaka, yellow perch and the sturgeon) are compared with published N-terminal Vtg sequences for the lamprey, clawed frog and domestic chicken. Striped bass and mummichog had 100% identical amino acids between positions 7 and 21, while pinfish, brown bullhead, sturgeon, lamprey, Xenopus and chicken had 87%, 93%, 60%, 47%, 47-60%) for four transcripts and had 40% identical, respectively, with striped bass for the same positions. Partial sequences obtained for medaka and yellow perch were 100% identical between positions 5 to 10. The potential utility of this conserved sequence for studies on the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis is discussed.

  15. Sequence requirements for Lon-dependent degradation of the Escherichia coli transcription activator SoxS: identification of the SoxS residues critical to proteolysis and specific inhibition of in vitro degradation by a peptide comprised of the N-terminal 21 amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ishita M; Wolf, Richard E

    2006-03-31

    When Escherichia coli encounter redox-cycling compounds that endogenously generate superoxide, the cell's defense response is initiated by the de novo synthesis of SoxS, which then activates transcription of the genes of the SoxRS regulon. Recently, we showed that after the oxidative stress is relieved, the SoxRS system resets by an active process wherein SoxS synthesis ceases and the intrinsically unstable SoxS protein is rapidly degraded, primarily by Lon protease. Here, we use deletion mutants and a library of alanine-stretch mutants of the entire protein to identify the SoxS features responsible for Lon-dependent proteolysis in vivo. We found that the 17 amino acid residues at the SoxS N terminus play the primary role in protease recognition and that the addition of the N-terminal 21 residues of SoxS to the otherwise stable green fluorescent protein is sufficient to signal the chimera for Lon-dependent degradation. With a minimal in vitro degradation system, we confirm the intrinsic instability of SoxS and the sequence requirements for Lon-dependent degradation. Lastly, we demonstrate that the addition of a peptide comprised of the 21 N-terminal amino acid residues of SoxS is able to inhibit specifically the in vitro proteolysis of SoxS.

  16. Requirement of N-terminal amino acid residues of gp41 for human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, H; Klein, M; Gehrmann, P; Adams, O; Scheid, A

    1995-01-01

    An expression vector was designed to test the structural requirements of the gp41 N terminus for human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced membrane fusion. Mutations in the region coding for the N terminus of gp41 were found to disrupt glycoprotein expression because of deleterious effects on the Rev-responsive element (RRE). Insertion of an additional RRE in the 3'-noncoding sequence of env made possible efficient glycoprotein expression, irrespective of the mutations introduced into the RRE in the natural location. This permitted the insertion of the unique restriction site SpeI within the N-terminal sequences of gp41, allowing convenient and efficient mutation of the gp41 N terminus by using double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. Mutants with deletions of 1 to 7 amino acids of the N terminus were constructed. Expression and cleavage of all mutants were confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis with anti-gp41 antibodies. The capability of mutants to induce membrane fusion was monitored following transfection of HeLa-T4+ cell lines with wild-type and mutant expression vectors by electroporation and microinjection. The efficiency of cell-fusing activity decreased drastically with deletion of 3 and 4 amino acids and was completely lost with deletion of 5 amino acids. Cotransfection of the parent and mutant expression vectors resulted in reduced cell-fusing activity. The extent of this dominant interference by mutant glycoprotein paralleled the decrease in cell-fusing activity of the mutants alone. This suggests the existence of a specific N-terminal structure required for fusing activity. However, there does not appear to be a stringent requirement for the precise length of the N terminus. This finding is supported by the length variation of this region among natural human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates and is in contrast to the apparent stringency in the length of analogous N-terminal structures of influenza A virus and paramyxovirus fusion

  17. Inhibition of polyglutamine aggregation by SIMILAR huntingtin N-terminal sequences: Prospective molecules for preclinical evaluation in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Burra, Gunasekhar; Thakur, Ashwani Kumar

    2017-04-12

    The mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) fragments with expanded polyglutamine sequence forms microscopically visible aggregates in neurons, a hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD). The aggregation process and aggregates are possible targets of therapeutic intervention in HD. Due to lack of treatment and cure, the patients die within 15-20 years after the disease onset. Therefore, discovering therapeutic molecules that may either inhibit the aggregation mechanism or downregulate the toxic effects of mhtt are highly needed. The present study demonstrates the design and use of peptide inhibitors based on the role played by the N-terminal seventeen amino acid sequence (NT17 ) of huntingtin fragment in its aggregation. Fug-NT17 (Fugu), Xen-NT17 (Xenopus), Dro-NT17 (Drosophila), Aib-NT17 , and Pro-NT17 sequences were tested for their ability to inhibit aggregation. Among them, the first three are the sequence variants of human NT17 from evolutionarily distant organisms and the latter two are the analogs of human NT17 containing aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and proline (Pro). Four out of five inhibited the aggregation of huntingtin fragment, NT17 Q35 P10 K2 polypeptide. Data indicates that the physicochemical properties of the inhibitors play a crucial role in exhibiting the inhibitory effect. These inhibitors can be tested in cell and animal models for the preclinical evaluation in the treating of HD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. The VP1 N-terminal sequence of canine parvovirus affects nuclear transport of capsids and efficient cell infection.

    PubMed

    Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Wang, Dai; Weichert, Wendy S; Parrish, Colin R

    2002-02-01

    The unique N-terminal region of the parvovirus VP1 capsid protein is required for infectivity by the capsids but is not required for capsid assembly. The VP1 N terminus contains a number of groups of basic amino acids which resemble classical nuclear localization sequences, including a conserved sequence near the N terminus comprised of four basic amino acids, which in a peptide can act to transport other proteins into the cell nucleus. Testing with a monoclonal antibody recognizing residues 2 to 13 of VP1 (anti-VP1-2-13) and with a rabbit polyclonal serum against the entire VP1 unique region showed that the VP1 unique region was not exposed on purified capsids but that it became exposed after treatment of the capsids with heat (55 to 75 degrees C), or urea (3 to 5 M). A high concentration of anti-VP1-2-13 neutralized canine parvovirus (CPV) when it was incubated with the virus prior to inoculation of cells. Both antibodies blocked infection when injected into cells prior to virus inoculation, but neither prevented infection by coinjected infectious plasmid DNA. The VP1 unique region could be detected 4 and 8 h after the virus capsids were injected into cells, and that sequence exposure appeared to be correlated with nuclear transport of the capsids. To examine the role of the VP1 N terminus in infection, we altered that sequence in CPV, and some of those changes made the capsids inefficient at cell infection.

  19. N-Terminal Peptide Detection with Optimized Peptide-Spectrum Matching and Streamlined Sequence Libraries.

    PubMed

    Lycette, Brynne E; Glickman, Jacob W; Roth, Samuel J; Cram, Abigail E; Kim, Tae Hee; Krizanc, Danny; Weir, Michael P

    2016-09-02

    We identified tryptic peptides in yeast cell lysates that map to translation initiation sites downstream of the annotated start sites using the peptide-spectrum matching algorithms OMSSA and Mascot. To increase the accuracy of peptide-spectrum matching, both algorithms were run using several standardized parameter sets, and Mascot was run utilizing a, b, and y ions from collision-induced dissociation. A large fraction (22%) of the detected N-terminal peptides mapped to translation initiation downstream of the annotated initiation sites. Expression of several truncated proteins from downstream initiation in the same reading frame as the full-length protein (frame 1) was verified by western analysis. To facilitate analysis of the larger proteome of Drosophila, we created a streamlined sequence library from which all duplicated trypsin fragments had been removed. OMSSA assessment using this "stripped" library revealed 171 peptides that map to downstream translation initiation sites, 76% of which are in the same reading frame as the full-length annotated proteins, although some are in different reading frames creating new protein sequences not in the annotated proteome. Sequences surrounding implicated downstream AUG start codons are associated with nucleotide preferences with a pronounced three-base periodicity N1^G2^A3.

  20. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P.; Firth, Andrew E.; Michel, Audrey M.; Atkins, John F.; Baranov, Pavel V.

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5′ cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized—both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms—remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5′ untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data. PMID:21266472

  1. N-terminal or signal peptide sequence engineering prevents truncation of human monoclonal antibody light chains.

    PubMed

    Gibson, S J; Bond, N J; Milne, S; Lewis, A; Sheriff, A; Pettman, G; Pradhan, R; Higazi, D R; Hatton, D

    2017-03-28

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) contain short N-terminal signal peptides on each individual polypeptide that comprises the mature antibody, targeting them for export from the cell in which they are produced. The signal peptide is cleaved from each heavy chain (Hc) and light chain (Lc) polypeptide after translocation to the ER and prior to secretion. This process is generally highly efficient, producing a high proportion of correctly cleaved Hc and Lc polypeptides. However, mis-cleavage of the signal peptide can occur, resulting in truncation or elongation at the N-terminus of the Hc or Lc. This is undesirable for antibody manufacturing as it can impact efficacy and can result in product heterogeneity. Here, we describe a truncated variant of the Lc that was detected during a routine developability assessment of the recombinant human IgG1 MEDI8490 in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that the truncation of the Lc was caused due to the use of the murine Hc signal peptide together with a lambda Lc containing an SYE amino acid motif at the N-terminus. This truncation was not caused by mis-processing of the mRNA encoding the Lc and was not dependent on expression platform (transient or stable), the scale of the fed-batch culture or clonal lineage. We further show that using alternative signal peptides or engineering the Lc SYE N-terminal motif prevented the truncation and that this strategy will improve Lc homogeneity of other SYE lambda Lc-containing mAbs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Modifications in the purification protocol of Celosia cristata antiviral proteins lead to protein that can be N-terminally sequenced.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Ashraf; Kapoor, H C

    2004-12-01

    Plants antiviral proteins are being used as anticancer agents and inhibit other viral diseases in humans. We modified the purification protocol of the two N-terminally blocked antiviral glycoproteins, CCP-25 and CCP-27, purified from the leaves of Celosia cristata. This not only gave rise to single pure samples with few steps of purification but also resulted in N-terminally free proteins. The extra purity of the samples was analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Deglycosylation studies of CCP-25 with PNGase F enzyme revealed that its asparagine or asparagine-linked glycon contents are negligible. Partial N-terminal sequence of the CCP-25 showed the sequence (ANDIS), which seems to be conserved among plant antiviral proteins.

  3. HIV blocking antibodies following immunisation with chimaeric peptides coding a short N-terminal sequence of the CCR5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benjamin M.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gardener, Michelle; Tsang, Jhen; Wright, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is required for cellular entry by many strains of HIV, and provides a potential target for molecules, including antibodies, designed to block HIV transmission. This study investigates a novel approach to stimulate antibodies to CCR5. Rabbits were immunised with chimaeric peptides which encode a short fragment of the N-terminal sequence of CCR5, as well as an unrelated T cell epitope from Tetanus toxoid. Immunisation with these chimaeric peptides generates a strong antibody response which is highly focused on the N-terminal CCR5 sequence. The antibody to the chimaeric peptide containing an N-terminal methionine also recognises the full length CCR5 receptor on the cell surface, albeit at higher concentrations. Further comparison of binding to intact CCR5 with binding to CCR5 peptide suggest that the receptor specific antibody generated represents a very small fragment of the total anti-peptide antibody. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal peptide in the context of the intact receptor has a different structure to that of the synthetic peptide. Finally, the antibody was able to block HIV infection of macrophages in vitro. Thus results of this study suggest that N-terminal fragments of CCR5 may provide potential immunogens with which to generate blocking antibodies to this receptor, while avoiding the dangers of including T cell auto-epitopes. PMID:18765264

  4. An inner membrane protein N-terminal signal sequence is able to promote efficient localisation of an outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M E; Pratt, J M; Stoker, N G; Holland, I B

    1985-01-01

    To test the importance of N-terminal pre-sequences in translocation of different classes of membrane proteins, we exchanged the normal signal sequence of an Escherichia coli outer membrane protein, OmpF, for the pre-sequence of the inner membrane protein, DacA. The DacA-OmpF hybrid was efficiently assembled into the outer membrane in a functionally active form. Thus the pre-sequence of DacA, despite its relatively low hydrophobicity compared with that of OmpF, contains all the essential information necessary to initiate the translocation of OmpF to the outer membrane. Since processing of DacA was also shown to be dependent upon SecA we conclude that the initiation of translocation of this inner membrane polypeptide across the envelope occurs by the same mechanism as outer membrane and periplasmic proteins. The N-terminal 11 amino acids of mature OmpF, which in the hybrid are replaced by the N-terminal nine amino acids of DacA, carry no essential assembly signals since the hybrid protein is apparently assembled with equal efficiency to OmpF. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3908094

  5. Amino-Terminal Oriented Mass Spectrometry of Substrates (ATOMS) N-terminal sequencing of proteins and proteolytic cleavage sites by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Edman degradation is a long-established technique for N-terminal sequencing of proteins and cleavage fragments. However, for accurate data analysis and amino acid assignments, Edman sequencing proceeds on samples of single proteins only and so lacks high-throughput capabilities. We describe a new method for the high-throughput determination of N-terminal sequences of multiple protein fragments in solution. Proteolytic processing can change the activity of bioactive proteins and also reveal cryptic binding sites and generate proteins with new functions (neoproteins) not found in the parent molecule. For example, extracellular matrix (ECM) protein processing often produces multiple proteolytic fragments with the generation of cryptic binding sites and neoproteins by ECM protein processing being well documented. The exact proteolytic cleavage sites need to be identified to fully understand the functions of the cleavage fragments and biological roles of proteases in vivo. However, the identification of cleavage sites in complex high molecular proteins such as those composing the ECM is not trivial. N-terminal microsequencing of proteolytic fragments is the usual method employed, but it suffers from poor resolution of sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and is inefficient at identifying multiple cleavages, requiring preparation of numerous gels or membrane slices for analysis. We recently developed Amino-Terminal Oriented Mass spectrometry of Substrates (ATOMS) to overcome these limitations as a complement for N-terminal sequencing. ATOMS employs isotopic labeling and quantitative tandem mass spectrometry to identify cleavage sites in a fast and accurate manner. We successfully used ATOMS to identify nearly 100 cleavage sites in the ECM proteins laminin and fibronectin. Presented herein is the detailed step-by-step protocol for ATOMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The N-terminal sequence of the ribosomal 'A' protein from two moderate halophiles, Vibrio costicola and an unidentified moderate (NRCC 11227).

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, P; Yaguchi, M; Rollin, C F; Matheson, A T; Wydro, R

    1979-05-23

    The 'A' protein, equivalent to ribosomal protein EL7/L12 from Escherichia coli, has been isolated and purified from two moderate halophiles Vibrio costicola and NRCC 11227. The 'A' protein from V. costicola contained an N-terminal serine and separated into two forms on DEAE-cellulose and two-dimensional electrophoresis while the equivalent protein in NRCC 11227 contained an N-terminal alanine residue and was present in only one form. The amino acid composition and mobility on two-dimensional gels indicated these proteins were very similar to EL7/L12. The first 38 residues of the 'A' proteins were sequenced and compared to the equivalent protein from E. coli and the extreme halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum. The N-terminal region of the 'A' protein from both moderate halophiles showed substantial homology to EL 12 (75--80%) but no evidence of any homology to the equivalent protein from the extreme halophile. The ribosomal proteins equivalent to ES1A in E. coli were also isolated and their amino acid compositions determined.

  7. Functional dissection of the N-terminal sequence of Clostridium sp. G0005 glucoamylase: identification of components critical for folding the catalytic domain and for constructing the active site structure.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Matsushima, Yudai; Nagamine, Yusuke; Matsuhashi, Tomoki; Honda, Shotaro; Okuda, Shoi; Ohno, Misa; Sugahara, Yasusato; Shin, Yongchol; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium sp. G0005 glucoamylase (CGA) is composed of a β-sandwich domain (BD), a linker, and a catalytic domain (CD). In the present study, CGA was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies when the N-terminal region (39 amino acid residues) of the BD was truncated. To further elucidate the role of the N-terminal region of the BD, we constructed N-terminally truncated proteins (Δ19, Δ24, Δ29, and Δ34) and assessed their solubility and activity. Although all evaluated proteins were soluble, their hydrolytic activities toward maltotriose as a substrate varied: Δ19 and Δ24 were almost as active as CGA, but the activity of Δ29 was substantially lower, and Δ34 exhibited little hydrolytic activity. Subsequent truncation analysis of the N-terminal region sequence between residues 25 and 28 revealed that truncation of less than 26 residues did not affect CGA activity, whereas truncation of 26 or more residues resulted in a substantial loss of activity. Based on further site-directed mutagenesis and N-terminal sequence analysis, we concluded that the 26XaaXaaTrp28 sequence of CGA is important in exhibiting CGA activity. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of the BD in bacterial GAs may function not only in folding the protein into the correct structure but also in constructing a competent active site for catalyzing the hydrolytic reaction.

  8. Identification of Cell Adhesive Sequences in the N-terminal Region of the Laminin α2 Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Hozumi, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Masaya; Hayashi, Takemitsu; Yamada, Yuji; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The laminin α2 chain is specifically expressed in the basement membrane surrounding muscle and nerve. We screened biologically active sequences in the mouse laminin N-terminal region of α2 chain using 216 soluble peptides and three recombinant proteins (rec-a2LN, rec-a2LN+, and rec-a2N) by both the peptide- or protein-coated plate and the peptide-conjugated Sepharose bead assays. Ten peptides showed cell attachment activity in the plate assay, and 8 peptides were active in the bead assay. Seven peptides were active in the both assays. Five peptides promoted neurite outgrowth with PC12 cells. To clarify the cellular receptors, we examined the effects of heparin and EDTA on cell attachment to 11 active peptides. Heparin inhibited cell attachment to 10 peptides, and EDTA significantly affected only A2-8 peptide (YHYVTITLDLQQ, mouse laminin α2 chain, 117–128)-mediated cell attachment. Cell attachment to A2-8 was also specifically inhibited by anti-integrin β1 and anti-integrin α2β1 antibodies. These results suggest that A2-8 promotes an integrin α2β1-mediated cell attachment. The rec-a2LN protein, containing the A2-8 sequence, bound to integrin α2β1 and cell attachment to rec-a2LN was inhibited by A2-8 peptide. Further, alanine substitution analysis of both the A2-8 peptide and the rec-a2LN+ protein revealed that the amino acids Ile-122, Leu-124, and Asp-125 were involved in integrin α2β1-mediated cell attachment, suggesting that the A2-8 site plays a functional role as an integrin α2β1 binding site in the LN module. These active peptides may provide new insights on the molecular mechanism of laminin-receptor interactions. PMID:22654118

  9. Nitrone protecting groups for enantiopure N-hydroxyamino acids: synthesis of N-terminal peptide hydroxylamines for chemoselective ligations.

    PubMed

    Medina, S Irene; Wu, Jian; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2010-08-07

    The synthesis of enantiopure N-benzylidene nitrones of N-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids and their incorporation using standard Fmoc-based peptide chemistry into solid-supported peptide chains is described. Deprotection and resin cleavage affords N-terminal peptide hydroxylamines, which are the key substrates for chemoselective ligations with C-terminal peptide alpha-ketoacids. This general route is applicable to a variety of different N-terminal residues and provides a general approach to the solid phase synthesis of peptide hydroxylamines.

  10. Structural characterization and biological activity of recombinant human epidermal growth factor proteins with different N-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Bauhofer, A; Schwind, P; Bade, E; Rasched, I; Przybylski, M

    1994-05-18

    The primary structures and molecular homogeneity of recombinant human epidermal growth factors from different suppliers were characterized and their biological activities evaluated by a standard DNA synthesis assay. Molecular weight determinations using 252Cf-plasma-desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry in combination with N- and C-terminal sequence analysis and determination of intramolecular disulfide bridges revealed that one recombinant protein had the correct human-identical structure (54 aa residues; 6347 Da). In contrast, a second recombinant protein (7020 Da) was found to contain a pentapeptide (KKYPR) insert following its N-terminal methionine. This structural variant showed a significant reduction in its capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis.

  11. Selective heterogeneous acid catalyzed esterification of N-terminal sulfyhdryl fatty acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our interest in thiol fatty acids lies in their antioxidative, free radical scavenging, and metal ion scavenging capabilities as applied to cosmeceutical and skin care formulations. The retail market is filled with products containing the disulfide-containing free fatty acid, lipoic acid. These pr...

  12. Conformational stability of the N-terminal amino acid residues of mutated recombinant pigeon liver malic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chou, W Y; Huang, S M; Chang, G G

    1998-05-01

    Pigeon liver malic enzyme has an N-terminal amino acid sequence of Met-Lys-Lys-Gly-Tyr-Glu-Val-Leu-Arg-. Our previous results indicated that the N-terminus of the enzyme is located at or near the enzyme's active center involved in Mn(II)-L-malate binding and is also near to the subunits' interface. In the present study, the conformational stability of the various deletion (delta) and substitution mutants at Lys2/Lys3 of the enzyme was investigated with chemical and thermal sensitivities. The lysine residue at position 2 or 3 seems to be crucial for the correct active site conformation, probably through an ion-pairing with Glu6. Deletion at Lys2 or Lys3, delta(K2/K3), and the double mutant K(2,3)E were much less stable than the wild-type enzyme towards chemical denaturation. Kinetic analysis of the thermal inactivation at 58 degrees C of the recombinant enzymes indicated that mutation at position 3 to alanine (K3A) endows the protein with extra stability compared with the wild-type enzyme. K3A is also stable towards chemical denaturation. The concentration of urea that causes half unfolding, [urea]0.5, for K3A is 3.25 M compared with 2.54 M for the wild-type enzyme. The K3A mutant of malic enzyme might therefore have potential practical applications.

  13. Purification and N-terminal sequence of a serine proteinase-like protein (BMK-CBP) from the venom of the Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensii Karsch).

    PubMed

    Gao, Rong; Zhang, Yong; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam

    2008-08-01

    A serine proteinase-like protein was isolated from the venom of Chinese red scorpion (Buthus martensii Karsch) by combination of gel filtration, ion-exchange and reveres-phase chromatography and named BMK-CBP. The apparent molecular weight of BMK-CBP was identified as 33 kDa by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing condition. The sequence of N-terminal 40 amino acids was obtained by Edman degradation. The sequence shows highest similarity to proteinase from insect source. When tested with commonly used substrates of proteinase, no significant hydrolytic activity was observed for BMK-CBP. The purified BMK-CBP was found to bind to the cancer cell line MCF-7 and the cell binding ability was dose-dependent.

  14. The N-terminal portion of domain E of retinoic acid receptors alpha and beta is essential for the recognition of retinoic acid and various analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, J; Hammer, L; Roalsvig, T; Pokornowski, K; Reczek, P R

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing a strategy involving domain exchange between retinoic acid receptors alpha and beta (RAR alpha and RAR beta) and monitoring the transcriptional activity of the resulting chimeric receptors with receptor-selective retinoids, we identified a 70-aa region within the N-terminal portion of the RAR alpha and -beta domain E which is important for an RAR alpha- or RAR beta-specific response. Two amino acid residues within this region, serine-232 (S232) and threonine-239 (T239) in RAR alpha and the corresponding alanine-225 (A225) and isoleucine-232 (I232) in RAR beta, were found to be essential for this effect. In addition, binding studies using the chimeric receptors expressed in Escherichia coli showed that the N-terminal portion of domain E was also important for the characteristic binding profile of t-RA and various retinoids with RAR alpha or RAR beta. Structural predictions of the primary amino acid sequence in this region indicate the presence of an amphipathic helix-turn-helix structure with five hydrophobic amino acids that resemble a leucine zipper motif. The amino acid residues identified by domain swapping, S232 and T239 in RAR alpha and A225 and I232 in RAR beta, were found within the hydrophobic face of an alpha-helix in close proximity to this zipper motif, suggesting that the ligand may interact with the receptor in the region adjacent to a surface involved in protein-protein interactions. This finding may link ligand binding to other processes important for transcriptional activation. PMID:7892182

  15. The N-terminal portion of domain E of retinoic acid receptors alpha and beta is essential for the recognition of retinoic acid and various analogs.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, J; Hammer, L; Roalsvig, T; Pokornowski, K; Reczek, P R

    1995-03-14

    Utilizing a strategy involving domain exchange between retinoic acid receptors alpha and beta (RAR alpha and RAR beta) and monitoring the transcriptional activity of the resulting chimeric receptors with receptor-selective retinoids, we identified a 70-aa region within the N-terminal portion of the RAR alpha and -beta domain E which is important for an RAR alpha- or RAR beta-specific response. Two amino acid residues within this region, serine-232 (S232) and threonine-239 (T239) in RAR alpha and the corresponding alanine-225 (A225) and isoleucine-232 (I232) in RAR beta, were found to be essential for this effect. In addition, binding studies using the chimeric receptors expressed in Escherichia coli showed that the N-terminal portion of domain E was also important for the characteristic binding profile of t-RA and various retinoids with RAR alpha or RAR beta. Structural predictions of the primary amino acid sequence in this region indicate the presence of an amphipathic helix-turn-helix structure with five hydrophobic amino acids that resemble a leucine zipper motif. The amino acid residues identified by domain swapping, S232 and T239 in RAR alpha and A225 and I232 in RAR beta, were found within the hydrophobic face of an alpha-helix in close proximity to this zipper motif, suggesting that the ligand may interact with the receptor in the region adjacent to a surface involved in protein-protein interactions. This finding may link ligand binding to other processes important for transcriptional activation.

  16. Size does matter: 18 amino acids at the N-terminal tip of an amino acid transporter in Leishmania determine substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schlisselberg, Doreen; Mazarib, Eldar; Inbar, Ehud; Rentsch, Doris; Myler, Peter J.; Zilberstein, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Long N-terminal tails of amino acid transporters are known to act as sensors of the internal pool of amino acids and as positive regulators of substrate flux rate. In this study we establish that N-termini of amino acid transporters can also determine substrate specificity. We show that due to alternative trans splicing, the human pathogen Leishmania naturally expresses two variants of the proline/alanine transporter, one 18 amino acid shorter than the other. We demonstrate that the longer variant (LdAAP24) translocates both proline and alanine, whereas the shorter variant (∆18LdAAP24) translocates just proline. Remarkably, co-expressing the hydrophilic N-terminal peptide of the long variant with ∆18LdAAP24 was found to recover alanine transport. This restoration of alanine transport could be mediated by a truncated N-terminal tail, though truncations exceeding half of the tail length were no longer functional. Taken together, the data indicate that the first 18 amino acids of the negatively charged N-terminal LdAAP24 tail are required for alanine transport and may facilitate the electrostatic interactions of the entire negatively charged N-terminal tail with the positively charged internal loops in the transmembrane domain, as this mechanism has been shown to underlie regulation of substrate flux rate for other transporters. PMID:26549185

  17. Inhibition of 2A-mediated ‘cleavage’ of certain artificial polyproteins bearing N-terminal signal sequences

    PubMed Central

    de Felipe, Pablo; Luke, Garry A; Brown, Jeremy D; Ryan, Martin D

    2010-01-01

    Where 2A oligopeptide sequences occur within ORFs, the formation of the glycyl-prolyl peptide bond at the C-terminus of (each) 2A does not occur. This property can be used to concatenate sequences encoding several proteins into a single ORF: each component of such an artificial polyprotein is generated as a discrete translation product. 2A and ‘2A-like’ sequences have become widely utilised in biotechnology and biomedicine. Individual proteins may also be co- and post-translationally targeted to a variety of sub-cellular sites. In the case of polyproteins bearing N-terminal signal sequences we observed, however, that the protein downstream of 2A (no signal) was translocated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We interpreted these data as a form of ‘slipstream’ translocation: downstream proteins, without signals, were translocated through a translocon pore already formed by the signal sequence at the N-terminus of the polyprotein. Here we show this effect is, in fact, due to inhibition of the 2A reaction (formation of fusion protein) by the C-terminal region (immediately upstream of 2A) of some proteins when translocated into the ER. Solutions to this problem include the use of longer 2As (with a favourable upstream context) or modifying the order of proteins comprising polyproteins. PMID:19946875

  18. The serine proteinase chain of human complement component C1s. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and N-terminal sequences of the fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, P E; Dunbar, B; Fothergill, J E

    1983-01-01

    Human complement component C1s was purified from fresh blood by conventional methods of precipitation and chromatography. The single-chain zymogen form was activated by treatment with C1r. Reduction and carboxymethylation then allowed the light chain and heavy chain to be separated on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B in 8 M-urea. Liquid-phase sequencing of the light chain determined 50 residues from the N-terminus. CNBr-cleavage fragments of the light chain were separated by high-pressure liquid chromatography on gel-permeation and reverse-phase columns. N-Terminal sequencing of these fragments determined the order of a further 138 residues, giving a total of 188 residues or about 75% of the light chain. Seven of these eight sequences could be readily aligned with the amino acid sequences of other serine proteinases. The typical serine proteinase active-site residues are clearly conserved in C1s, and the specificity-related side chain of the substrate-binding pocket is aspartic acid, as in trypsin, consistent with the proteolytic action of C1s on C4 at an arginine residue. Somewhat surprisingly, when the C1s sequence is compared with that of complement subcomponent C1r, the percentage difference (59%) is approximately the same as that found between the other mammalian serine proteinases (56-71%). PMID:6362661

  19. The scorpion toxin Bot IX is a potent member of the α-like family and has a unique N-terminal sequence extension.

    PubMed

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Salvatierra, Juan; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    We report the detailed chemical, immunological and pharmacological characterization of the α-toxin Bot IX from the Moroccan scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom. Bot IX, which consists of 70 amino acids, is a highly atypical toxin. It carries a unique N-terminal sequence extension and is highly lethal in mice. Voltage clamp recordings on oocytes expressing rat Nav1.2 or insect BgNav1 reveal that, similar to other α-like toxins, Bot IX inhibits fast inactivation of both variants. Moreover, Bot IX belongs to the same structural/immunological group as the α-like toxin Bot I. Remarkably, radioiodinated Bot IX competes efficiently with the classical α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis, and displays one of the highest affinities for Nav channels.

  20. NMR solution structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein.

    PubMed

    Biverståhl, Henrik; Andersson, August; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2004-11-30

    The structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein (bPrPp) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in phospholipid membrane mimetic systems. CD spectroscopy revealed that the peptide adopts a largely alpha-helical structure in zwitterionic bicelles as well as in DHPC micelles but has a less degree of alpha-helix structure in partly charged bicelles. The solution structure of bPrPp was determined in DHPC micelles, and an alpha-helix was found between residues Ser8 and Ile21. The residues within the helical region show slow amide hydrogen exchange. Translational diffusion measurements in zwitterionic q = 0.5 bicelles show that the peptide does not induce aggregation of the bicelles. Increased quadrupolar splittings were observed in the outer part of the (2)H spectrum of DMPC in q = 3.5 bicelles, indicating that the peptide induces a certain degree of order in the bilayer. The amide hydrogen exchange and the (2)H NMR results are consistent with a slight positive hydrophobic mismatch and that bPrPp forms a stable helix that inserts in a transmembrane location in the bilayer. The structure of bPrPp and its position in the membrane may be relevant for the understanding of how the N-terminal (1-30) part of the bovine PrP functions as a cell-penetrating peptide. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how the prion protein accumulates at the membrane surface and also how the conversion into the scrapie form is carried out.

  1. A putative N-terminal nuclear export sequence is sufficient for Mps1 nuclear exclusion during interphase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haiwei; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Wenjun; Bai, Yuanyuan; Ling, Youguo; Cao, Cheng; Ma, Runlin Z; Zhong, Hui; Wang, Xue; Xu, Quanbin

    2015-02-27

    Mps1, an essential component of the mitotic checkpoint, is also an important interphase regulator and has roles in DNA damage response, cytokinesis and centrosome duplication. Mps1 predominantly resides in the cytoplasm and relocates into the nucleus at the late G2 phase. So far, the mechanism underlying the Mps1 translocation between the cytoplasm and nucleus has been unclear. In this work, a dynamic export process of Mps1 from the nucleus to cytoplasm in interphase was revealed- a process blocked by the Crm1 inhibitor, Leptomycin B, suggesting that export of Mps1 is Crm1 dependent. Consistent with this speculation, a direct association between Mps1 and Crm1 was found. Furthermore, a putative nuclear export sequence (pNES) motif at the N-terminal of Mps1 was identified by analyzing the motif of Mps1. This motif shows a high sequence similarity to the classic NES, a fusion of this motif with EGFP results in dramatic exclusion of the fusion protein from the nucleus. Additionally, Mps1 mutant loss of pNES integrity was shown by replacing leucine with alanine which produced a diffused subcellular distribution, compared to the wild type protein which resides predominantly in cytoplasm. Taken these findings together, it was concluded that the pNES sequence is sufficient for the Mps1 export from nucleus during interphase.

  2. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  3. Impact of the N-terminal amino acid on the formation of pyrazines from peptides in Maillard model systems.

    PubMed

    Van Lancker, Fien; Adams, An; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2012-05-09

    Only a minor part of Maillard reaction studies in the literature focused on the reaction between carbohydrates and peptides. Therefore, in continuation of a previous study in which the influence of the peptide C-terminal amino acid was investigated, this study focused on the influence of the peptide N-terminal amino acid on the production of pyrazines in model reactions of glucose, methylglyoxal, or glyoxal. Nine different dipeptides and three tripeptides were selected. It was shown that the structure of the N-terminal amino acid is determinative for the overall pyrazine production. Especially, the production of 2,5(6)-dimethylpyrazine and trimethylpyrazine was low in the case of proline, valine, or leucine at the N-terminus, whereas it was very high for glycine, alanine, or serine. In contrast to the alkyl-substituted pyrazines, unsubstituted pyrazine was always produced more in the case of experiments with free amino acids. It is clear that different mechanisms must be responsible for this observation. This study clearly illustrates the capability of peptides to produce flavor compounds such as pyrazines.

  4. Fatty Acids Bind Tightly to the N-terminal Domain of Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 and Modulate Its Interaction with Lipoprotein Lipase*

    PubMed Central

    Robal, Terje; Larsson, Mikael; Martin, Miina; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2012-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4), a potent regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism, binds to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) through its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (ccd-Angptl4) inducing dissociation of the dimeric enzyme to inactive monomers. In this study, we demonstrate that fatty acids reduce the inactivation of LPL by Angptl4. This was the case both with ccd-Angptl4 and full-length Angptl4, and the effect was seen in human plasma or in the presence of albumin. The effect decreased in the sequence oleic acid > palmitic acid > myristic acid > linoleic acid > linolenic acid. Surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence, and chromatography measurements revealed that fatty acids bind with high affinity to ccd-Angptl4. The interactions were characterized by fast association and slow dissociation rates, indicating formation of stable complexes. The highest affinity for ccd-Angptl4 was detected for oleic acid with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd). The Kd values for palmitic and myristic acid were in the nanomolar range. Linoleic and linolenic acid bound with much lower affinity. On binding of fatty acids, ccd-Angptl4 underwent conformational changes resulting in a decreased helical content, weakened structural stability, dissociation of oligomers, and altered fluorescence properties of the Trp-38 residue that is located close to the putative LPL-binding region. Based on these results, we propose that fatty acids play an important role in modulating the effects of Angptl4. PMID:22773878

  5. [Proteolysis of semax analogues with different N-terminal amino acids by aminopeptidases].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, K V; V'iunova, T V; Nagaev, I Iu; Andreeva, L A; Alfeeva, L Iu; Miasoedov, N F

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis of semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro, Sem) and its analogues ([Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem, [Thr1]Sem, [Trp1]Sem) that are differ from semax in substitution of N-terminal Met residue were studied. It is shown that such replacement changes the rate of peptides degradation by N-aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.2, Sigma, Type VI, 9.2 units. Akt. / mg). [Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem and [Thr1]Sem semax analogues proved to be more stable to proteolysis than semax (Sem), and their initial product of proteolysis is His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-5). For triptophan analogue both Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-6) and Sem-5 product are formed in similar quantities. It is found that all investigated analogues can be used as inhibitors in Sem proteolysis.

  6. An N-terminal partial sequence of the 13 kDa Pycnopodia helianthoides sperm chemoattractant 'startrak' possesses sperm-attracting activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Vogt, R

    1996-02-01

    Freshwater extracts of starfish ovaries were used to purify the sperm-attracting peptide 'startrak' from Pycnopodia helianthoides using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and DEAE-high-pressure liquid chromatography. Partially purified attractant had a molecular mass of 13 kDa, estimated from gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis results. The purified attractant was subjected to amino acid analysis and direct sequencing, and was found to consist largely of a single peptide composed of an estimated 127 residues based on a molecular mass of 13kDa. An N-terminal sequence of amino acids from positions 3 to 34 was obtained and synthesized as: NH2-Ala-Glu-Leu-Gly-Leu-Cys-Ile-Ala-Arg-Val-Arg-Gln-Gln-Asn-Gln-Gly-Gln- Asp-Asp-Val-Ser-Ile-Tyr-Gln-Ala-Ile-Met-Ser-Gln-Cys-Gln-Ser-COOH. The synthetic peptide possessed sperm-attracting activity 130 times greater than the activity of partially purified startrak and showed a pattern of species-specificity of sperm chemotaxis similar to that of startrak. Antibody prepared against synthetic peptide removed the sperm-attracting activity from crude and partially purified preparations of startrak. The partial sequence of startrak was not homologous with that of any of the known echinoid sperm motility-activating peptides.

  7. Monomer DJ-1 and Its N-Terminal Sequence Are Necessary for Mitochondrial Localization of DJ-1 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease (park7). DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in DJ-1-knockout mice and fry, and mitochondrial DJ-1 is more protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Although translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria is enhanced by oxidative stress that leads to oxidation of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1, the characteristics of mitochondrial DJ-1 and the mechanism by which DJ-1 is translocated into mitochondria are poorly understood. In this study, immunostaining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell fractionation and pull-down experiments showed that mutants of glutamine 18 (E18) DJ-1 are localized in mitochondria and do not make homodimers. Likewise, DJ-1 with mutations of two cysteines located in the dimer interface, C46S and C53A, and pathogenic mutants, M26I and L166P DJ-1, were found to be localized in mitochondria and not to make homodimers. Mutant DJ-1 harboring both E18A and C106S, in which C106 is not oxidized, was also localized in mitochondria, indicating that oxidation of C106 is important but not essential for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1. It should be noted that E18A DJ-1 was translocated from mitochondria to the cytoplasm when mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by treatment of cells with CCCP, an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation system in mitochondria. Furthermore, deletion or substitution of the N-terminal 12 amino acids in DJ-1 resulted in re-localization of E18A, M26I and L166P DJ-1 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that a monomer and the N-terminal 12 amino acids are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants and that conformation change induced by C106 oxidation or by E18 mutation leads to translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria. PMID:23326576

  8. Monomer DJ-1 and its N-terminal sequence are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease (park7). DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in DJ-1-knockout mice and fry, and mitochondrial DJ-1 is more protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Although translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria is enhanced by oxidative stress that leads to oxidation of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1, the characteristics of mitochondrial DJ-1 and the mechanism by which DJ-1 is translocated into mitochondria are poorly understood. In this study, immunostaining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell fractionation and pull-down experiments showed that mutants of glutamine 18 (E18) DJ-1 are localized in mitochondria and do not make homodimers. Likewise, DJ-1 with mutations of two cysteines located in the dimer interface, C46S and C53A, and pathogenic mutants, M26I and L166P DJ-1, were found to be localized in mitochondria and not to make homodimers. Mutant DJ-1 harboring both E18A and C106S, in which C106 is not oxidized, was also localized in mitochondria, indicating that oxidation of C106 is important but not essential for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1. It should be noted that E18A DJ-1 was translocated from mitochondria to the cytoplasm when mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by treatment of cells with CCCP, an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation system in mitochondria. Furthermore, deletion or substitution of the N-terminal 12 amino acids in DJ-1 resulted in re-localization of E18A, M26I and L166P DJ-1 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that a monomer and the N-terminal 12 amino acids are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants and that conformation change induced by C106 oxidation or by E18 mutation leads to translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria.

  9. Intein-Promoted Cyclization of Aspartic Acid Flanking the Intein Leads to Atypical N-Terminal Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Christopher J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Colelli, Kathryn M; Liu, Xinyue; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Chunyu; Gomez, Alvin V; Reitter, Julie N; Mills, Kenneth V

    2017-02-28

    Protein splicing is a post-translational reaction facilitated by an intein, or intervening protein, which involves the removal of the intein and the ligation of the flanking polypeptides, or exteins. A DNA polymerase II intein from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab PolII intein) can promote protein splicing in vitro on incubation at high temperature. Mutation of active site residues Cys1, Gln185, and Cys+1 to Ala results in an inactive intein precursor, which cannot promote the steps of splicing, including cleavage of the peptide bond linking the N-extein and intein (N-terminal cleavage). Surprisingly, coupling the inactivating mutations to a change of the residue at the C-terminus of the N-extein (N-1 residue) from the native Asn to Asp reactivates N-terminal cleavage at pH 5. Similar "aspartic acid effects" have been observed in other proteins and peptides but usually only occur at lower pH values. In this case, however, the unusual N-terminal cleavage is abolished by mutations to catalytic active site residues and unfolding of the intein, indicating that this cleavage effect is mediated by the intein active site and the intein fold. We show via mass spectrometry that the reaction proceeds through cyclization of Asp resulting in anhydride formation coupled to peptide bond cleavage. Our results add to the richness of the understanding of the mechanism of protein splicing and provide insight into the stability of proteins at moderately low pH. The results also explain, and may help practitioners avoid, a side reaction that may complicate intein applications in biotechnology.

  10. The N-terminal anchor sequences of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases determine their orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Odermatt, A; Arnold, P; Stauffer, A; Frey, B M; Frey, F J

    1999-10-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (11beta- HSD) regulate the ratio of active endogenous glucocorticoids to their inactive keto-metabolites, thereby controlling the access of glucocorticoids to their cognate receptors. In this study, the topology and intracellular localization of 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2 have been analyzed by immunohistochemistry and protease protection assays of in vitro transcription/translation products. 11beta-HSD constructs, tagged with the FLAG epitope, were transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells. The enzymatic characteristics of tagged and native enzymes were indistinguishable. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the localization of both 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2 exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. To examine the orientation of tagged 11beta-HSD enzymes within the ER membrane, we stained selectively permeabilized HEK-293 cells with anti-FLAG antibody. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the N terminus of 11beta-HSD1 is cytoplasmic, and the catalytic domain containing the C terminus is protruding into the ER lumen. In contrast, the N terminus of 11beta-HSD2 is lumenal, and the catalytic domain is facing the cytoplasm. Chimeric proteins where the N-terminal anchor sequences of 11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2 were exchanged adopted inverted orientation in the ER membrane. However, both chimeric proteins were not catalytically active. Furthermore, mutation of a tyrosine motif to alanine in the transmembrane segment of 11beta-HSD1 significantly reduced V(max). The subcellular localization of 11beta-HSD1 was not affected by mutations of the tyrosine motif or of a di-lysine motif in the N terminus. However, residue Lys(5), but not Lys(6), turned out to be critical for the topology of 11beta-HSD1. Mutation of Lys(5) to Ser inverted the orientation of 11beta-HSD1 in the ER membrane without loss of catalytic activity. Our results emphasize the importance of the N-terminal transmembrane segments of 11beta-HSD enzymes for

  11. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3.

  12. Identification of the cleavage sites of the RNA2-encoded polyproteins for two members of the genus Torradovirus by N-terminal sequencing of the virion capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, I; Silva Junior, D M; Nigg, J C; Zamora-Macorra, E J; Falk, B W

    2016-11-01

    Torradoviruses, family Secoviridae, are emergent bipartite RNA plant viruses. RNA1 is ca. 7kb and has one open reading frame (ORF) encoding for the protease, helicase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). RNA2 is ca. 5kb and has two ORFs. RNA2-ORF1 encodes for a putative protein with unknown function(s). RNA2-ORF2 encodes for a putative movement protein and three capsid proteins. Little is known about the replication and polyprotein processing strategies of torradoviruses. Here, the cleavage sites in the RNA2-ORF2-encoded polyproteins of two torradoviruses, Tomato marchitez virus isolate M (ToMarV-M) and tomato chocolate spot virus, were determined by N-terminal sequencing, revealing that the amino acid (aa) at the -1 position of the cleavage sites is a glutamine. Multiple aa sequence comparison confirmed that this glutamine is conserved among other torradoviruses. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of conserved aas in the ToMarV-M RdRp and protease prevented substantial accumulation of viral coat proteins or RNAs.

  13. A specific isoform of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Whatcott, Clifford J.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2009-12-10

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) convert NAD to polymers of ADP-ribose that are converted to free ADP-ribose by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP-1 following genotoxic stress has been linked to release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria, but the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted between nuclear and mitochondrial compartments are not well understood. The study reported here has examined the relationship between PARG and mitochondria in HeLa cells. Endogenous PARG associated with the mitochondrial fraction migrated in the range of 60 kDa. Transient transfection of cells with PARG expression constructs with amino acids encoded by exon 4 at the N-terminus was targeted to the mitochondria as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy of whole cells. Deletion and missense mutants allowed identification of a canonical N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence consisting of the first 16 amino acids encoded by PARG exon 4. Sub-mitochondrial localization experiments indicate that this mitochondrial PARG isoform is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. The identification of a PARG isoform as a component of the mitochondrial matrix raises several interesting possibilities concerning mechanisms of nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk involved in regulation of cell death pathways.

  14. The N-terminal extension of the P. falciparum GBP130 signal peptide is irrelevant for signal sequence function.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Corinna; Barniol, Luis; Hiss, Jan A; Przyborski, Jude M

    2017-07-17

    The malaria parasite P. falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is not well understood, many exported proteins appear to play a role in modification of the erythrocyte following invasion. Protein export to the erythrocyte is a secretory process that begins with entry to the endoplasmic reticulum. For most exported proteins, this step is mediated by hydrophobic signal peptides found towards the N-terminal end of proteins. The signal peptides present on P. falciparum exported proteins often differ in length from those found in other systems, and generally contain a highly extended N-terminal region. Here we have investigated the function of these extended N-terminal regions, using the exported parasite protein GBP130 as a model. Surprisingly, several deletions of the extended N-terminal regions of the GBP130 signal peptide have no effect on the ability of the signal peptide to direct a fluorescent reporter to the secretory pathway. Addition of the same N-terminal extension to a canonical signal peptide does not affect transport of either soluble or membrane proteins to their correct respective subcellular localisations. Finally, we show that extended signal peptides are able to complement canonical signal peptides in driving protein traffic to the apicoplast of the parasite, and are also functional in a mammalian cell system. Our study is the first detailed analysis of an extended P. falciparum signal peptide and suggests that N-terminal extensions of exported Plasmodium falciparum proteins are not required for entry to the secretory system, and are likely to be involved in other, so far unknown, processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Conservation of Expression and N-Terminal Sequences of the Pasteurella haemolytica 31-Kilodalton and Pasteurella trehalosi 29-Kilodalton Periplasmic Iron-Regulated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Frank, Glynn H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the conservation of expression of a 31-kDa iron-regulated protein by serotypes of Pasteurella haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi associated with pasteurellosis of cattle and sheep. A polyclonal antibody prepared against the purified 31-kDa periplasmic iron-regulated protein from P. haemolytica serotype A1 showed that all P. haemolytica serotypes expressed similar 31-kDa proteins with identical N-terminal sequences, whereas P. trehalosi serotypes expressed immunologically different 29-kDa proteins with a different N-terminal sequence. Antibody to the 31-kDa iron-regulated protein was a useful tool to distinguish similarities and differences of the iron-regulated proteins of P. haemolytica and P. trehalosi. PMID:10391874

  16. Biochemical characterization, stability studies and N-terminal sequence of a bi-functional inhibitor from Phaseolus aureus Roxb. (Mung bean).

    PubMed

    Haq, Soghra Khatun; Atif, Shaikh Muhammad; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2005-12-01

    Herein, we report the purification and biochemical characterization of a novel bi-functional protein proteinase/amylase inhibitor from the dietary leguminous pulse Phaseolus aureus Roxb. (Vigna radiata L.) by means of acetic acid precipitation, salt fractionation, ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE-cellulose) and affinity chromatography on trypsin-sepharose column. P. aureus inhibitor is a bi-functional inhibitor since it exhibits inhibitory activity towards trypsin-like and alpha-chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases as well as against alpha-amylases. It is a helix-rich protein (Mr 13,600) containing approximately eight tyrosines, one tryptophan and two cystines. N-terminal sequence alignment reveals no homology to other proteinase inhibitors reported from Phaseolus sp. thereby confirming that it is a novel inhibitor. Inhibitory activity measurements show that the inhibitor is quite stable even at extremely high temperatures and is only slightly affected by pH changes. Circular dichroism (CD) conformational studies revealed some changes in its near- as well as far-ultraviolet spectrum at extremes of pH and temperature. Treatments with trypsin for varying time periods did not alter its proteolytic inhibitory activity but caused some reduction in its amylase inhibitory activity.

  17. Critical Structural and Functional Roles for the N-Terminal Insertion Sequence in Surfactant Protein B Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Hernandez-Juviel, Jose M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Wang, Zhengdong; Jung, Chun-Ling; Ruchala, Piotr; Clark, Andrew P.; Smith, Wesley M.; Sharma, Shantanu; Notter, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues) belongs to the saposin protein superfamily, and plays functional roles in lung surfactant. The disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B have been theoretically predicted to fold as charged, amphipathic helices, suggesting their participation in surfactant activities. Earlier structural studies with Mini-B, a disulfide-linked construct based on the N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B (i.e., ∼residues 8–25 and 63–78), confirmed that these neighboring domains are helical; moreover, Mini-B retains critical in vitro and in vivo surfactant functions of the native protein. Here, we perform similar analyses on a Super Mini-B construct that has native SP-B residues (1–7) attached to the N-terminus of Mini-B, to test whether the N-terminal sequence is also involved in surfactant activity. Methodology/Results FTIR spectra of Mini-B and Super Mini-B in either lipids or lipid-mimics indicated that these peptides share similar conformations, with primary α-helix and secondary β-sheet and loop-turns. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that Super Mini-B was dimeric in SDS detergent-polyacrylamide, while Mini-B was monomeric. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), predictive aggregation algorithms, and molecular dynamics (MD) and docking simulations further suggested a preliminary model for dimeric Super Mini-B, in which monomers self-associate to form a dimer peptide with a “saposin-like” fold. Similar to native SP-B, both Mini-B and Super Mini-B exhibit in vitro activity with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tension during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Super Mini-B demonstrates oxygenation and dynamic compliance that are greater than Mini-B and compare favorably to full-length SP-B. Conclusion Super Mini-B shows enhanced surfactant activity, probably due to the self-assembly of monomer peptide into dimer Super Mini-B that mimics the functions and putative structure of

  18. Evidence of mineralization activity and supramolecular assembly by the N-terminal sequence of ACCBP, a biomineralization protein that is homologous to the acetylcholine binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Amos, Fairland F; Ndao, Moise; Evans, John Spencer

    2009-12-14

    Several biomineralization proteins that exhibit intrinsic disorder also possess sequence regions that are homologous to nonmineral associated folded proteins. One such protein is the amorphous calcium carbonate binding protein (ACCBP), one of several proteins that regulate the formation of the oyster shell and exhibit 30% conserved sequence identity to the acetylcholine binding protein sequences. To gain a better understanding of the ACCBP protein, we utilized bioinformatic approaches to identify the location of disordered and folded regions within this protein. In addition, we synthesized a 50 AA polypeptide, ACCN, representing the N-terminal domain of the mature processed ACCBP protein. We then utilized this polypeptide to determine the mineralization activity and qualitative structure of the N-terminal region of ACCBP. Our bioinformatic studies indicate that ACCBP consists of a ten-stranded beta-sandwich structure that includes short disordered sequence blocks, two of which reside within the primarily helical and surface-accessible ACCN sequence. Circular dichroism studies reveal that ACCN is partially disordered in solution; however, ACCN can be induced to fold into an alpha helix in the presence of TFE. Furthermore, we confirm that the ACCN sequence is multifunctional; this sequence promotes radial calcite polycrystal growth on Kevlar threads and forms supramolecular assemblies in solution that contain amorphous-appearing deposits. We conclude that the partially disordered ACCN sequence is a putative site for mineralization activity within the ACCBP protein and that the presence of short disordered sequence regions within the ACCBP fold are essential for function.

  19. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal region of phosphorylated tau (residues 68-71) improves spatial memory in okadaic acid induced tauopathy model rats.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sarada; Savanur, Ganesh; Madhavadas, Sowmya

    2017-01-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia, characterized by progressive loss of memory and other cognitive functions. The cognitive impairment in patients with AD is closely associated with loss of synapses and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) containing hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus. Effective treatment for AD is still not available. In this study, the sequence comprising of residues 50-71 in the N-terminal region of tau, containing theoretically predicted B- and T-cell epitopes in close proximity to pathologically relevant phospho-serine (residue 68) and phospho-threonine (residues 69, 71) was selected as a potential immunotherapeutic peptide. This 22-residue long phospho-peptide ((50)TPTEDGSEEPGSETSDAKpSpTPpT(71)) was custom synthesized and its therapeutic potential was tested in experimental rats. For this purpose, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally treated with okadaic acid (OA), a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase PP2A. Within a day of OA administration, these rats showed marked impairment in cognitive functions with a significant increase in p-tau/t-tau ratio in the hippocampal homogenates. Passive immunization studies conducted in these OA treated rats with polyclonal anti-phospho-peptide antibodies resulted in a significant improvement in learning and memory functions in Barne's maze task. Further, p-tau levels in the hippocampal homogenates were reduced. In addition, these antibodies effectively prevented the aggregation of recombinant tau in vitro. These results demonstrate that targeting N-terminal region of tau harbouring the phospho-residue cluster 68-71 would be beneficial and may present an effective therapeutic opportunity for AD and other tauopathies.

  20. Electrophoretic characterization of species of fibronectin bearing sequences from the N-terminal heparin-binding domain in synovial fluid samples from patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, John H; Carsons, Steven; Yoshida, Mika; Ko, Fred; McDougall, Skye; Loredo, Grace A; Hahn, Theodore J

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of fibronectin (FN) corresponding to the N-terminal heparin-binding domain have been observed to promote catabolic chondrocytic gene expression and chondrolysis. We therefore characterized FN species that include sequences from this domain in samples of arthritic synovial fluid using one-and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) Western blot analysis. We detected similar assortments of species, ranging from ~47 to greater than 200 kDa, in samples obtained from patients with osteoarthritis (n = 9) versus rheumatoid arthritis (n = 10). One of the predominant forms, with an apparent molecular weight of ~170 kDa, typically resolved in 2D electrophoresis into a cluster of subspecies. These exhibited reduced binding to gelatin in comparison with a more prevalent species of ~200+ kDa and were also recognized by a monoclonal antibody to the central cell-binding domain (CBD). When considered together with our previous analyses of synovial fluid FN species containing the alternatively spliced EIIIA segment, these observations indicate that the ~170-kDa species includes sequences from four FN domains that have previously, in isolation, been observed to promote catabolic responses by chondrocytes in vitro: the N-terminal heparin-binding domain, the gelatin-binding domain, the central CBD, and the EIIIA segment. The ~170-kDa N-terminal species of FN may therefore be both a participant in joint destructive processes and a biomarker with which to gauge activity of the arthritic process. PMID:14680507

  1. The proximal N-terminal amino acid residues are required for the coupling activity of the bovine heart mitochondrial factor B.

    PubMed

    Belogrudov, Grigory I

    2008-05-01

    Treatment of the recombinant bovine factor B with trypsin yielded a fragment (amino acid residues 62-175) devoid of coupling activity. Removal of the N-terminal Trp2-Gly3-Trp4 peptide resulted in a significant loss of coupling activity in the FB(DeltaW)(2)(-W)(4) deletion mutant. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation demonstrated co-sedimentation of recombinant factor B with the ADP/ATP carrier, which is present in preparations of H(+)-translocating F(0)F(1)-ATPase, but not in preparations of complex V. The N-terminally truncated factor B mutant FB(DeltaW)(2)(-W)(4) did not co-sediment with the ADP/ATP carrier. Recombinant factor B co-sedimented with partially purified membrane sector F(0), extracted from F(1)-stripped bovine submitochondrial particles with n-dodecyl-beta-d-maltoside. Factor B inhibited the passive proton conductance catalyzed by F(0) reconstituted into asolectin liposomes. A factor B mutant, bearing a photoreactive unnatural amino acid pbenzoyl-l-phenylalanine (pBpa) substituted for Trp2, cross-linked with F(0) subunits e and g as well as the ADP/ATP carrier. These results suggest that the N-terminal domain and, in particular, the proximal N-terminal amino acids are important for the coupling activity and protein-protein interactions of bovine factor B.

  2. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1-208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD.

  3. N-terminal sequences from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus envelope proteins ODV-E66 and ODV-E25 are sufficient to direct reporter proteins to the nuclear envelope, intranuclear microvesicles and the envelope of occlusion derived virus.

    PubMed

    Hong, T; Summers, M D; Braunagel, S C

    1997-04-15

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) derives its envelope from an intranuclear membrane source. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) envelope proteins, ODV-E66 and ODV-E25 (23 and 24 amino acids, respectively) are highly hydrophobic. Recombinant viruses that express the two N-terminal amino acid sequences fused to green fluorescent protein (23GFP or 24GFP) provided visual markers to follow protein transport and localization within the nucleus during infection. Autoflourescence was first detected along the cytoplasmic periphery of the nucleus and subsequently localized as foci to discrete locations within the nucleus. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that these foci predominantly contained intranuclear microvesicles and the reporter fusion proteins were also detected in cytoplasmic membranes near the nucleus, and the outer and inner nuclear membrane. Therefore, these defined hydrophobic domains are sufficient to direct native and fusion proteins to induced membrane microvesicles within a baculovirus-infected cell nucleus and the viral envelope. In addition, these data suggest that movement of these proteins into the nuclear envelope may initiate through cytoplasmic membranes, such as endoplasmic reticulum, and that transport into the nucleus may be mediated through the outer and inner nuclear membrane.

  4. The Aquaporin Splice Variant NbXIP1;1α Is Permeable to Boric Acid and Is Phosphorylated in the N-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ampah-Korsah, Henry; Anderberg, Hanna I.; Engfors, Angelica; Kirscht, Andreas; Norden, Kristina; Kjellstrom, Sven; Kjellbom, Per; Johanson, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane channel proteins that transport water and uncharged solutes across different membranes in organisms in all kingdoms of life. In plants, the AQPs can be divided into seven different subfamilies and five of these are present in higher plants. The most recently characterized of these subfamilies is the XIP subfamily, which is found in most dicots but not in monocots. In this article, we present data on two different splice variants (α and β) of NbXIP1;1 from Nicotiana benthamiana. We describe the heterologous expression of NbXIP1;1α and β in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the subcellular localization of the protein in this system and the purification of the NbXIP1;1α protein. Furthermore, we investigated the functionality and the substrate specificity of the protein by stopped-flow spectrometry in P. pastoris spheroplasts and with the protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The phosphorylation status of the protein and localization of the phosphorylated amino acids were verified by mass spectrometry. Our results show that NbXIP1;1α is located in the plasma membrane when expressed in P. pastoris, that it is not permeable to water but to boric acid and that the protein is phosphorylated at several amino acids in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the protein. A growth assay showed that the yeast cells expressing the N-terminally His-tagged NbXIP1;1α were more sensitive to boric acid as compared to the cells expressing the C-terminally His-tagged isoform. This might suggest that the N-terminal His-tag functionally mimics the phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain and that the N-terminal domain is involved in gating of the channel. PMID:27379142

  5. The Aquaporin Splice Variant NbXIP1;1α Is Permeable to Boric Acid and Is Phosphorylated in the N-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Ampah-Korsah, Henry; Anderberg, Hanna I; Engfors, Angelica; Kirscht, Andreas; Norden, Kristina; Kjellstrom, Sven; Kjellbom, Per; Johanson, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane channel proteins that transport water and uncharged solutes across different membranes in organisms in all kingdoms of life. In plants, the AQPs can be divided into seven different subfamilies and five of these are present in higher plants. The most recently characterized of these subfamilies is the XIP subfamily, which is found in most dicots but not in monocots. In this article, we present data on two different splice variants (α and β) of NbXIP1;1 from Nicotiana benthamiana. We describe the heterologous expression of NbXIP1;1α and β in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the subcellular localization of the protein in this system and the purification of the NbXIP1;1α protein. Furthermore, we investigated the functionality and the substrate specificity of the protein by stopped-flow spectrometry in P. pastoris spheroplasts and with the protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The phosphorylation status of the protein and localization of the phosphorylated amino acids were verified by mass spectrometry. Our results show that NbXIP1;1α is located in the plasma membrane when expressed in P. pastoris, that it is not permeable to water but to boric acid and that the protein is phosphorylated at several amino acids in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the protein. A growth assay showed that the yeast cells expressing the N-terminally His-tagged NbXIP1;1α were more sensitive to boric acid as compared to the cells expressing the C-terminally His-tagged isoform. This might suggest that the N-terminal His-tag functionally mimics the phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain and that the N-terminal domain is involved in gating of the channel.

  6. N-terminal Residues of the Vibrio cholerae Virulence Regulatory Protein ToxT Involved in Dimerization and Modulation by Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Childers, Brandon M.; Cao, Xiaohang; Weber, Gregor G.; Demeler, Borries; Hart, P. John; Klose, Karl E.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory protein ToxT is an AraC family protein that is responsible for activating transcription of the genes encoding cholera toxin and toxin coregulated pilus, which are required for virulence by the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The N terminus of ToxT contains dimerization and regulatory elements, whereas the C terminus contains the DNA binding domain. Bile and long chain fatty acids negatively regulate ToxT activity. Utilizing a comprehensive alanine substitution mutant library of ToxT, 19 N-terminal residues were found to be critical for dimerization and transcriptional activation. One of these mutant proteins (F151A) was confirmed to be monomeric via centrifugation and exhibited a weakened ability to bind to the tcpA promoter in a gel mobility shift assay. Moreover, a V. cholerae toxTF151A mutant failed to colonize the infant mouse intestine, emphasizing the importance of ToxT N-terminal dimerization to cholera pathogenesis. Six N-terminal alanine substitutions allowed ToxT transcriptional activity in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of bile, palmitoleic acid, and the small molecule inhibitor virstatin. Two of these mutations (N106A and L114A) enhance N-terminal dimerization in a bacterial two-hybrid system reconstituted in V. cholerae, which is otherwise disrupted by bile, palmitoleic acid, and virstatin. We demonstrate that V. cholerae toxTN106A and toxTL114A strains colonize the infant mouse intestine at significantly higher levels than the wild type strain. Our results demonstrate that ToxT N-terminal dimerization is required for transcriptional activation and cholera pathogenesis and that fatty acids modulate ToxT activity via modulation of dimerization. PMID:21673111

  7. Maintenance of coat protein N-terminal net charge and not primary sequence is essential for zucchini yellow mosaic virus systemic infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kimalov, Boaz; Gal-On, Amit; Stav, Ran; Belausov, Eduard; Arazi, Tzahi

    2004-11-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) surface exposed coat protein (CP) N-terminal domain (Nt) is 43 aa long and contains an equal number of positively and negatively charged amino acid residues (CP-Nt net charge = 0). A ZYMV-AGII truncation mutant lacking the first 20 aa of its CP-Nt (AGII-CP Delta 20; CP-Nt net charge = +2) was found to be systemically non-infectious even though AGII mutants harbouring larger CP-Nt deletions were previously demonstrated to be fully infectious. Nevertheless, AGII-CP Delta 20 infectivity was restored by fusion to its CP-Nt two Asp residues or a negatively charged Myc peptide, both predicted to neutralize CP-Nt net positive charge. To evaluate further the significance of CP-Nt net charge for AGII infectivity, a series of CP-Nt net charge mutants was generated and analysed for systemic infectivity of squash plants. AGII-CP(KKK) harbouring a CP-Nt amino fusion of three Lys residues (CP-Nt net charge = +3) was not systemically infectious. Addition of up to four Asp residues to CP-Nt did not abolish virus infectivity, although certain mutants were genetically unstable and had delayed infectivity. Addition of five negatively charged residues abolished infectivity (AGII-CP(DDDDD); CP-Nt net charge = -5) even though a recombinant CP(DDDDD) could assemble into potyviral-like particle in bacteria. Neutralization of CP-Nt net charge by fusing Asp or Lys residues recovered infectivity of AGII-CP(KKK) and AGII-CP(DDDDD). GFP-tagging of these mutants has demonstrated that both viruses have defective cell-to-cell movement. Together, these findings suggest that maintenance of CP-Nt net charge and not primary sequence is essential for ZYMV infectivity.

  8. The N-terminal of a heparin-binding sperm membrane mitogen possess lectin-like sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, Visesato; Chatterjee, Tapati . E-mail: c_tapati@yahoo.com

    2007-03-02

    Glycosaminoglycans like heparin and heparin sulfate in follicular fluid induce changes in the intracellular environment during the spermatozoal functional maturation. We previously reported the isolation, purification and partial characterization of a heparin binding sperm membrane protein (HBSM). In the present study, the amino acids analysis provided evidence of a single sequence, which suggest the homogeneity of the purified HBSM. Fourteen amino acids-{sup 1} A D T I V A V E L D T Y P N {sup 14}-correspond to the amino terminal sequence of Concanavalin A (Con A) and contain 45.2% carbohydrate by weight. HBSM possess mitogenic property on lymphocytes with comparable magnitude to the well-known mitogen; Con A, inducing 83% radiolabel thymidine incorporation in growing lymphocytes. Unlike Con A, there was no agglutination of cell by HBSM upto 5 ng/ml concentration. Interestingly, we found that heparin and chondroitin sulfate-conjugated HBSM inhibit the proliferative activity. Similar effect was also found with an in-house isolate sulfated glycans; G-I (28% sulfate). In contrast, there was no inhibition by the desulfated form; G-ID. Altogether, our data suggest that the mechanism of cell proliferative pathway may be different for HBSM and Con A.

  9. "Unknown genome" proteomics: a new NADP-dependent epimerase/dehydratase revealed by N-terminal sequencing, inverted PCR, and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Susnea, Iuliana; Moise, Adrian; Schink, Bernhard; Przybylski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present here a new approach that enabled the identification of a new protein from a bacterial strain with unknown genomic background using a combination of inverted PCR with degenerate primers derived from N-terminal protein sequences and high resolution peptide mass determination of proteolytic digests from two-dimensional electrophoretic separation. Proteins of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans specifically induced in the presence of phosphite were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as a series of apparent soluble and membrane-bound isoforms with molecular masses of approximately 35 kDa. Inverted PCR based on N-terminal sequences and high resolution peptide mass fingerprinting by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provided the identification of a new NAD(P) epimerase/dehydratase by specific assignment of peptide masses to a single ORF, excluding other possible ORF candidates. The protein identification was ascertained by chromatographic separation and sequencing of internal proteolytic peptides. Metal ion affinity isolation of tryptic peptides and high resolution mass spectrometry provided the identification of five phosphorylations identified in the domains 23-47 and 91-118 of the protein. In agreement with the phosphorylations identified, direct molecular weight determination of the soluble protein eluted from the two-dimensional gels by mass spectrometry provided a molecular mass of 35,400 Da, which is consistent with an average degree of three phosphorylations.

  10. Involvement of arginine 878 together with Ca2+ in mouse aminopeptidase A substrate specificity for N-terminal acidic amino-acid residues.

    PubMed

    Couvineau, Pierre; de Almeida, Hugo; Maigret, Bernard; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine; Iturrioz, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) is a membrane-bound zinc metalloprotease cleaving, in the brain, the N-terminal aspartyl residue of angiotensin II to generate angiotensin III, which exerts a tonic stimulatory effect on the control of blood pressure in hypertensive animals. Using a refined APA structure derived from the human APA crystal structure, we docked the specific and selective APA inhibitor, EC33 in the presence of Ca2+. We report the presence in the S1 subsite of Arg-887 (Arg-878 in mouse APA), the guanidinium moiety of which established an interaction with the electronegative sulfonate group of EC33. Mutagenic replacement of Arg-878 with an alanine or a lysine residue decreased the affinity of the recombinant enzymes for the acidic substrate, α-L-glutamyl-β-naphthylamide, with a slight decrease in substrate hydrolysis velocity either with or without Ca2+. In the absence of Ca2+, the mutations modified the substrate specificity of APA for the acidic substrate, the mutated enzymes hydrolyzing more efficiently basic and neutral substrates, although the addition of Ca2+ partially restored the acidic substrate specificity. The analysis of the 3D models of the Arg-878 mutated APAs revealed a change in the volume of the S1 subsite, which may impair the binding and/or the optimal positioning of the substrate in the active site as well as its hydrolysis. These findings demonstrate the key role of Arg-878 together with Ca2 + in APA substrate specificity for N-terminal acidic amino acid residues by ensuring the optimal positioning of acidic substrates during catalysis.

  11. Involvement of arginine 878 together with Ca2+ in mouse aminopeptidase A substrate specificity for N-terminal acidic amino-acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, Pierre; de Almeida, Hugo; Maigret, Bernard; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) is a membrane-bound zinc metalloprotease cleaving, in the brain, the N-terminal aspartyl residue of angiotensin II to generate angiotensin III, which exerts a tonic stimulatory effect on the control of blood pressure in hypertensive animals. Using a refined APA structure derived from the human APA crystal structure, we docked the specific and selective APA inhibitor, EC33 in the presence of Ca2+. We report the presence in the S1 subsite of Arg-887 (Arg-878 in mouse APA), the guanidinium moiety of which established an interaction with the electronegative sulfonate group of EC33. Mutagenic replacement of Arg-878 with an alanine or a lysine residue decreased the affinity of the recombinant enzymes for the acidic substrate, α-L-glutamyl-β-naphthylamide, with a slight decrease in substrate hydrolysis velocity either with or without Ca2+. In the absence of Ca2+, the mutations modified the substrate specificity of APA for the acidic substrate, the mutated enzymes hydrolyzing more efficiently basic and neutral substrates, although the addition of Ca2+ partially restored the acidic substrate specificity. The analysis of the 3D models of the Arg-878 mutated APAs revealed a change in the volume of the S1 subsite, which may impair the binding and/or the optimal positioning of the substrate in the active site as well as its hydrolysis. These findings demonstrate the key role of Arg-878 together with Ca2 + in APA substrate specificity for N-terminal acidic amino acid residues by ensuring the optimal positioning of acidic substrates during catalysis. PMID:28877217

  12. Improving the secretion of a methyl parathion hydrolase in Pichia pastoris by modifying its N-terminal sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Huang, Lu; Jiang, Hu; Tian, Jian; Chu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Ningfeng

    2014-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is commonly used to express and secrete target proteins, although not all recombinant proteins can be successfully produced. In this study, we used methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) from Ochrobactrum sp. M231 as a model to study the importance of the N-terminus of the protein for its secretion. While MPH can be efficiently expressed intracellularly in P. pastoris, it is not secreted into the extracellular environment. Three MPH mutants (N66-MPH, D10-MPH, and N9-MPH) were constructed through modification of its N-terminus, and the secretion of each by P. pastoris was improved when compared to wild-type MPH. The level of secreted D10-MPH was increased to 0.21 U/mL, while that of N9-MPH was enhanced to 0.16 U/mL. Although N66-MPH was not enzymatically active, it was secreted efficiently, and was identified by SDS-PAGE. These results demonstrate that the secretion of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris may be improved by modifying their N-terminal structures.

  13. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuta; Fujino, Kaien; Ogawa, Kana; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1) and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1. PMID:24616728

  14. Escherichia coli contains a protein that is homologous in function and N-terminal sequence to the protein encoded by the nifS gene of Azotobacter vinelandii and that can participate in the synthesis of the Fe-S cluster of dihydroxy-acid dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Flint, D H

    1996-07-05

    In this paper, I report the purification of a protein from Escherichia coli that is very similar in sequence, molecular weight, and the reactions it can catalyze to the protein encoded by the Azotobacter vinelandii nifS gene. This E. coli protein contains pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor and catalyzes the removal of sulfur from cysteine to form alanine and S0. When dithiothreitol is present along with cysteine, the S0 formed is reduced to S2-. This protein has a reactive sulfhydryl group that is essential for activity. As isolated, this sulfhydryl group appears to be in a disulfide linkage with the sulfhydryl group from the phosphopantetheine moiety of the acyl carrier protein. The purified E. coli protein can mobilize the sulfur from cysteine and contribute it to the formation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the apoprotein of E. coli dihydroxy-acid dehydratase. A mechanism is proposed for the early stages of the synthesis of Fe-S clusters using this protein and sulfur in the S0 oxidation state.

  15. Characterization of N-terminal amino group-heme ligation emerging upon guanidine hydrochloric acid induced unfolding of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus ferricytochrome c552.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Kawano, Shin; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Nonnative heme coordination structures emerging upon guanidine hydrochloric acid (GdnHCl) induced unfolding of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus ferricytochrome c552 were characterized by means of paramagnetic NMR. The heme coordination structure possessing the N-terminal amino group of the peptide chain in place of axial Met (His-Nterm form) was determined in the presence of GdnHCl concentrations in excess of 1.5 M at neutral pH. The stability of the His-Nterm form at pH 7.0 was found to be comparable with that of the bis-His form which has been recognized as a major nonnative heme coordination structure in cytochrome c folding/unfolding. Consequently, in addition to the bis-His form, the His-Nterm form is a substantial intermediate which affects the pathway and kinetics of the folding/unfolding of cytochromes c, of which the N-terminal amino groups are not acetylated.

  16. The N-terminal region of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is essential for both the localization on lipid droplets and the function in fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Poppelreuther, Margarete; Rudolph, Berenice; Du, Chen; Großmann, Regina; Becker, Melanie; Thiele, Christoph; Ehehalt, Robert; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles for neutral lipids derived from endogenous metabolism. Acyl-CoA synthetase family proteins are essential enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway, contributing activated fatty acids. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ACSL3 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and LDs, with the distribution dependent on the cell type and the supply of fatty acids. The N-terminus of ACSL3 was necessary and sufficient for targeting reporter proteins correctly, as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. The N-terminal region of ACSL3 was also found to be functionally required for the enzyme activity. Selective permeabilization and in silico analysis suggest that ACSL3 assumes a hairpin membrane topology, with the N-terminal hydrophobic amino acids forming an amphipathic helix restricted to the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. ACSL3 was effectively translocated from the ER to nascent LDs when neutral lipid synthesis was stimulated by the external addition of fatty acids. Cellular fatty acid uptake was increased by overexpression and reduced by RNA interference of ACSL3. In conclusion, the structural organization of ACSL3 allows the fast and efficient movement from the ER to emerging LDs. ACSL3 not only esterifies fatty acids with CoA but is also involved in the cellular uptake of fatty acids, presumably indirectly by metabolic trapping. The unique localization of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL3 on LDs suggests a function in the local synthesis of lipids. PMID:22357706

  17. The N-terminal region of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is essential for both the localization on lipid droplets and the function in fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Poppelreuther, Margarete; Rudolph, Berenice; Du, Chen; Großmann, Regina; Becker, Melanie; Thiele, Christoph; Ehehalt, Robert; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2012-05-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles for neutral lipids derived from endogenous metabolism. Acyl-CoA synthetase family proteins are essential enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway, contributing activated fatty acids. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ACSL3 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and LDs, with the distribution dependent on the cell type and the supply of fatty acids. The N-terminus of ACSL3 was necessary and sufficient for targeting reporter proteins correctly, as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. The N-terminal region of ACSL3 was also found to be functionally required for the enzyme activity. Selective permeabilization and in silico analysis suggest that ACSL3 assumes a hairpin membrane topology, with the N-terminal hydrophobic amino acids forming an amphipathic helix restricted to the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. ACSL3 was effectively translocated from the ER to nascent LDs when neutral lipid synthesis was stimulated by the external addition of fatty acids. Cellular fatty acid uptake was increased by overexpression and reduced by RNA interference of ACSL3. In conclusion, the structural organization of ACSL3 allows the fast and efficient movement from the ER to emerging LDs. ACSL3 not only esterifies fatty acids with CoA but is also involved in the cellular uptake of fatty acids, presumably indirectly by metabolic trapping. The unique localization of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL3 on LDs suggests a function in the local synthesis of lipids.

  18. Application of protein N-terminal amidase in enzymatic synthesis of dipeptides containing acidic amino acids specifically at the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshinobu; Noguchi, Atsushi; Takano, Eriko; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-04-01

    Dipeptides exhibit unique physiological functions and physical properties, e.g., l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine-methyl ester (Asp-Phe-OMe, aspartame) as an artificial sweetener, and functional studies of peptides have been carried out in various fields. Therefore, to establish a manufacturing process for the useful dipeptides, we investigated its enzymatic synthesis by utilizing an l-amino acid ligase (Lal), which catalyzes dipeptide synthesis in an ATP-dependent manner. Many Lals were obtained, but the Lals recognizing acidic amino acids as N-terminal substrates have not been identified. To increase the variety of dipeptides that are enzymatically synthesized, we proposed a two-step synthesis: Asn-Xaa and Gln-Xaa (Asn, l-asparagine; Gln, l-glutamine; and Xaa, arbitrary amino acids) synthesized by Lals were continuously deamidated by a novel amidase, yielding Asp-Xaa and Glu-Xaa (Asp, l-aspartic acid; and Glu, l-glutamic acid). We searched for amidases that specifically deamidate the N-terminus of Asn or Gln in dipeptides since none have been previously reported. We focused on the protein N-terminal amidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NTA1), and assayed its activity toward dipeptides. Our findings showed that NTA1 deamidated l-asparaginyl-l-valine (Asn-Val) and l-glutaminyl-glycine (Gln-Gly), but did not deamidate l-valyl-l-asparagine and l-alanyl-l-glutamine, suggesting that this deamidation activity is N-terminus specific. The specific activity toward Asn-Val and Gln-Gly were 190 ± 30 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein and 136 ± 6 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein. Additionally, we examined some characteristics of NTA1. Acidic dipeptide synthesis was examined by a combination of Lals and NTA1, resulting in the synthesis of 12 kinds of Asp-Xaa, including Asp-Phe, a precursor of aspartame, and 11 kinds of Glu-Xaa.

  19. Interaction of the N-Terminal Tandem Domains of hnRNP LL with the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif DNA Sequence.

    PubMed

    Lannes, Laurie; Young, Phoebe; Richter, Christian; Morgner, Nina; Schwalbe, Harald

    2017-08-14

    The human genome contains GC-rich sequences able to form tetraplex secondary structures known as the G-quadruplex and i-motif. Such sequences are notably present in the promoter region of oncogenes and are proposed to function as regulatory elements of gene expression. The P1 promoter of BCL2 contains a 39-mer C-rich sequence (Py39wt) that can fold into a hairpin or an i-motif in a pH-dependent manner in vitro. The protein hnRNP LL was identified to recognise the i-motif over the hairpin conformation and act as an activating transcription factor. Thus, the Py39wt sequence would act as an ON/OFF switch, according to the secondary structure adopted. Herein, a structural study of the interaction between hnRNP LL and Py39wt is reported. Both N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRM12) cooperatively recognise one Py39wt DNA sequence and engage their β-sheet to form a large binding platform. In contrast, the C-terminal RRMs show no binding capacity. It is observed that RRM12 binds to Py39wt regardless of the DNA conformation. We propose that RRM12 recognises a single-stranded CTCCC element present in loop 1 of the i-motif and in the apical loop of the hairpin conformation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Characterization, N-terminal sequencing and classification of Tolworthcin 524: A bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Cano, Rubén D; de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén; León-Galván, M Fabiola; Bideshi, Dennis K; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriocins synthesized by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis are gaining attention owing to their inhibitory effects against a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we purified and characterized Tolworthcin 524, a bacteriocin synthesized by B. thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi, and compared it with other bacteriocins synthesized by B. thuringiensis. Tolworthcin 524 was separated and purified from the secretome of B. thuringiensis by fast protein liquid chromatography with a gel filtration column to obtain yields of 17% and a specific activity of ∼3600U/mgprotein. The purified product showed two peptides of ∼9 and 6kDa with antimicrobial activity in a gel-screening assay. The purified product was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the resolved peptides of ∼9 and 6kDa with isoelectric points of ∼8 were sequenced. Partial sequences (METPVVQPR and DWTCWSCLVCAACS) were obtained suggesting that the ∼9 and 6kDa correspond to the prebacteriocin and mature Tolworthcin 524, respectively. Sequences showed high identity with Thurincin H and Thuricin 17 and had a conserved motif with other bacteriocins of B. thuringiensis. Based on sequence data, Tolworthcin 524 was classified in subclass II.2 (Thuricin-like peptides) of the Bacillus bacteriocin classification scheme. The larger peptide did not harbor a sequence suggestive of a signal peptide neither did it contain the double-glycine (GG) motif characteristic of the secretion leader recognized by the ABC transport system. Implications of these properties in Tolworthcin 524 secretion are discussed.

  1. Isolation, purification and N-terminal sequencing of a bioactive peptide that alters action potentials from the venom of Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Hahin, R; Chen, Z; Reddy, G; Li, Y

    2001-08-01

    A bioactive peptide that extensively prolongs action potentials (APs) in frog nerve has been isolated and purified from the venom of the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BMK). The peptide, designated as BMK 18(2), was purified using gel filtration, ion exchange, FPLC, and HPLC chromatography. APs recorded in the presence of nanomolar concentrations of the peptide were extensively prolonged with some attenuation in their heights. The N-terminal sequence of BMK 18(2) was found to be: VRDAYIAEDYD-VYH-ARDA. Sequence similarity comparisons to other alpha-scorpion toxins suggest that the two blanks in the sequences are cysteines. The molecular weight (M.W.) of BMK 18(2) was determined by LC/MS/MS to be 7185 Da. Since the peptide prolongs APs when both K+ and Ca++ channels were blocked and shows sequence similarity to other alpha-neurotoxins, it appears likely that BMK 18(2) acts to alter Na channel inactivation to produce its effect.

  2. Detection of purine cytosine permease of S. cerevisiae: use of antibodies against a synthetic peptide corresponding to a predicted sequence in the N-terminal domain of the protein.

    PubMed

    Grandier-Vazeille, X; Neaud, V; Geoffre, S

    1993-12-15

    A synthetic peptide, selected in the predicted N-terminal amino-acid sequence of the purine cytosine permease (gene FCY2), linked to albumins proved a remarkably good immunogen in rabbits. In ELISA, sera reacted with the synthetic peptide and with specific proteins of plasma-membrane-enriched fractions of mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae pAB strains (amplified FCY2 gene) with high titers and high avidity. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins of pAB strain probed with antisera showed two bands: a major (45 kDa) and minor band (50 kDa). On the contrary, plasma-membrane-enriched fractions of mutant S. cerevisiae pJDB strain (deficient in FCY2 gene) gave no signal when probed in the same conditions. These results demonstrate the specificity of the antisera and also suggest that the 45 kDa and 50 kDa proteins are both products of the FCY2 gene.

  3. Copper and zinc binding properties of the N-terminal histidine-rich sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Paksi, Zoltán; Jancsó, Attila; Pacello, Francesca; Nagy, Nóra; Battistoni, Andrea; Gajda, Tamás

    2008-09-01

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) isolated from Haemophilus ducreyi possesses a His-rich N-terminal metal binding domain, which has been previously proposed to play a copper(II) chaperoning role. To analyze the metal binding ability and selectivity of the histidine-rich domain we have carried out thermodynamic and solution structural analysis of the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a peptide corresponding to the first 11 amino acids of the enzyme (H(2)N-HGDHMHNHDTK-OH, L). This peptide has highly versatile metal binding ability and provides one and three high affinity binding sites for zinc(II) and copper(II), respectively. In equimolar solutions the MHL complexes are dominant in the neutral pH-range with protonated lysine epsilon-amino group. As a consequence of its multidentate nature, L binds zinc and copper with extraordinary high affinity (K(D,Zn)=1.6x10(-9)M and K(D,Cu)=5.0x10(-12)M at pH 7.4) and appears as the strongest zinc(II) and copper(II) chelator between the His-rich peptides so far investigated. These K(D) values support the already proposed role of the N-terminal His-rich region of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD in copper recruitment under metal starvation, and indicate a similar function in the zinc(II) uptake, too. The kinetics of copper(II) transfer from L to the active site of Cu-free N-deleted H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD showed significant pH and copper-to-peptide ratio dependence, indicating specific structural requirements during the metal ion transfer to the active site. Interestingly, the complex CuHL has significant superoxide dismutase like activity, which may suggest multifunctional role of the copper(II)-bound N-terminal His-rich domain of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD.

  4. Functional roles of the N-terminal amino acid residues in the Mn(II)-L-malate binding and subunit interactions of pigeon liver malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chou, W Y; Huang, S M; Chang, G G

    1997-10-01

    Pigeon liver malic enzyme has an N-terminal amino acid sequence of Met-Lys-Lys-Gly-Tyr-Glu-. In this work, various mutants of the enzyme with individual or combinational deletion (delta) or substitution at these amino acids were constructed and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli cells. A major protein band corresponding to an Mr of approximately 65000 was observed for all recombinant enzymes in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. However, when examining by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under native conditions, the recombinant enzymes were found to possess a tetrameric structure with Mr approximately 260000 or a mixture of tetramers and dimers with the exception of delta(K2K3G4) and delta(1-16) mutants, which existed exclusively as dimers at the protein concentration we employed. K3A and K3E also dissociated substantially. K(2,3)A was a tetramer but K(2,3)E essentially existed as dimers. All tetramers and dimers were enzymatically active in the gels. All mutants displayed a similar apparent Km value for NADP+. The apparent Km for L-malate and Mn(II), on the other hand, was increased by 4-27-fold for the delta(K2/K3) and the delta(1-16) mutants. The small binding affinity of delta(K2/K3) with Mn(II)-L-malate was specific. With additional deletion at positions 3 and/or 4, the delta(K2K3), delta(K2G4/K3G4) or delta(K2K3G4) mutants exhibited similar kinetic properties for the wild type. The lysine residues at the positions 2 or 3 seem to be crucial for the correct active site conformation. The results indicate that the N-terminus of malic enzyme is located at the Mn(II)-L-malate binding domain of the active center and is also near the subunit's interface. These results were interpreted with our asymmetric double-dimer model for the enzyme in which the N-terminus was involved in the head-to-tail monomer-monomer interactions but not the dimer-dimer interactions.

  5. Quantification of glycated N-terminal peptide of hemoglobin using derivatization for multiple functional groups of amino acids followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2016-02-01

    A novel method of amino acid analysis using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups) was applied to measure glycated amino acids in order to quantify glycated peptides and evaluate the degree of glycation of peptide. Amino and carboxyl groups of amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids, including glycated amino acids, were improved. These derivatized amino acids could be detected with high sensitivity using LC-MS/MS. In this study, 1-deoxyfructosyl-VHLTPE and VHLTPE, which are N-terminal peptides of the β-chains of hemoglobin, were selected as target compounds. After reducing the peptide sample solution with sodium borohydride, the obtained peptides were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid. The released amino acids were then derivatized with 1-bromobutane and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. The derivatized amino acids, including glycated amino acids, could be separated using an octadecyl silylated silica column and good sharp peaks were detected. We show a confirmatory experiment that the proposed method can be applied to evaluate the degree of glycation of peptides, using mixtures of glycated and non-glycated peptide.

  6. Synthesis of Met-enkephalin by solution-phase peptide synthesis methodology utilizing para-toluene sulfonic acid as N-terminal masking of l-methionine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Riaz A

    2016-12-01

    The Met-enkephalin, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met, was synthesized by the solution-phase synthesis (SPS) methodology employing -OBzl group as carboxyls' protection, while the t-Boc groups were employed for the N-terminal α-amines' protection for the majority of the amino acids of the pentapeptide sequence. The l-methionine (l-Met) amino acid was used as PTSA.Met-OBzl obtained from the simultaneous protection of the α-amino, and carboxyl group with para-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) and as-OBzl ester, respectively in a C-terminal start of the 2 + 2 + 1 fragments condensation convergent synthetic approach. The protection strategy provided a short, single-step, simultaneous, orthogonal, nearly quantitative, robust, and stable process to carry through the protected l-methionine and l-phenylalanine coupling without any structural deformities during coupling and workups. The structurally confirmed final pentapeptide product was feasibly obtained in good yields through the current approach.

  7. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence of the Borna disease virus X protein improves its mitochondrial targeting and neuroprotective potential.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Cécile A; Davezac, Noélie; Thouard, Anne; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Szelechowski, Marion

    2016-04-01

    To favor their replication, viruses express proteins that target diverse mammalian cellular pathways. Due to the limited size of many viral genomes, such proteins are endowed with multiple functions, which require targeting to different subcellular compartments. One salient example is the X protein of Borna disease virus, which is expressed both at the mitochondria and in the nucleus. Moreover, we recently demonstrated that mitochondrial X protein is neuroprotective. In this study, we sought to examine the mechanisms whereby the X protein transits between subcellular compartments and to define its localization signals, to enhance its mitochondrial accumulation and thus, potentially, its neuroprotective activity. We transfected plasmids expressing fusion proteins bearing different domains of X fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and compared their subcellular localization to that of eGFP. We observed that the 5-16 domain of X was responsible for both nuclear export and mitochondrial targeting and identified critical residues for mitochondrial localization. We next took advantage of these findings and constructed mutant X proteins that were targeted only to the mitochondria. Such mutants exhibited enhanced neuroprotective properties in compartmented cultures of neurons grown in microfluidic chambers, thereby confirming the parallel between mitochondrial accumulation of the X protein and its neuroprotective potential.-Ferré C. A., Davezac, N., Thouard, A., Peyrin, J. M., Belenguer, P., Miquel, M.-C., Gonzalez-Dunia, D., Szelechowski, M. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence of the Borna disease virus X protein improves its mitochondrial targeting and neuroprotective potential. © FASEB.

  8. The N-terminal nuclear localization sequences of liver X receptors alpha and beta bind to importin alpha and are essential for both nuclear import and transactivating functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna; Crumbley, Christine; Prüfer, Kirsten

    2009-04-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) alpha and beta are nuclear receptors, which form obligate heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). The LXRs regulate both redundantly and non-redundantly the transcription of genes controlling cholesterol metabolism and transport as well as lipogenesis. Previously, we showed that mutations in putative N-terminal nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) within both LXRs inhibit nuclear import. Through in vitro studies, we show here that these NLSs bind importin alpha and are both necessary and sufficient for the nuclear import of LXRs. Imaging, transactivation, and electro-mobility shift experiments show that RXR rescues the nuclear import of the LXRalpha NLS mutant yet does not restore its transcriptional activity despite intact DNA binding. In contrast, RXR partially rescues the import of the LXRbeta NLS mutant, but has no effect on its transcriptional activity due to the loss of DNA binding. Experiments with NLS mutant RXR confirmed that RXR may dominate the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRalpha heterodimer, whereas LXRbeta dominates the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRbeta heterodimer. Intriguingly, our data indicate differences between LXRalpha and LXRbeta in their interaction with RXR and in the role their NLSs play in transactivating functions independent of nuclear import.

  9. Ischemia-Modified Albumin as a Marker of Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Case for Revising the Concept of "N-Terminal Modification" to "Fatty Acid Occupation" of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Oran, Ismail; Oran, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is assumed "N-terminal modified" albumin which is generated immediately following myocardial ischemia. The diagnosis of IMA is based on reduced cobalt binding affinity to albumin which is attributed mainly to incapability of cobalt to bind at albumin's modified N-terminus. Although the albumin cobalt binding test was accepted as a potentially powerful marker for discriminating acute coronary syndrome from nonischemic chest pain, its usefulness has been brought into question in recent years. Patients with acutely ischemic myocardium exhibit a rapid increase in serum levels of fatty acids (FAs). Almost all released FAs are strongly bound to albumin which create conformational changes in the protein with resultant reduced cobalt binding affinity. There is a clear metabolic and temporal relationship between IMA measured via albumin cobalt binding testing and serum levels of FAs. In line with what has been suggested recently in the literature, we conclude that a shift from the concept of "N-terminal modified" to "FA-occupied" albumin is required, as this better describes IMA in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We also offer "oxidation modified albumin, OMA," which is conceptually different from the "FA-occupied" IMA, to describe modification of albumin in chronic disease associated with increased oxidative stress.

  10. N-Terminal 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) peptides as efficient methylglyoxal scavengers to inhibit advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N André; Garcia-Alvarez, Maria Concepcion; Wang, Qian; Ermolenko, Ludmila; Franck, Gisèle; Nhiri, Naïma; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Audic, Nicolas; Potier, Pierre

    2009-03-15

    2,3-Diaminopropionic acid (Dap) and N-terminal Dap peptides have been found to inhibit in vitro protein-modifications by methylglyoxal (MG), one of the highly reactive alpha-dicarbonyl compounds. MG scavenging potency of the newly synthesized N-terminal Dap peptides is demonstrated by RP-HPLC, SDS-PAGE and non-denaturing PAGE analysis, assays for enzymatic activity and cell viability study and was compared with that of known AGE inhibitors, such as aminoguanidine, pyridoxamine, metformin and carnosine. Two addition products of MG and L-Dap-L-Leu are separated by HPLC and their chemical structures are characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy to indicate that both of them are pyrazines derived from 2 molecules of MG and 1 molecule of L-Dap-L-Leu. Mutagenic activities of L-Dap-L-Leu and L-Dap-L-Val and their metabolites according to the Ames assay are found to be negative.

  11. A Crucial Sequence for Transglutaminase Type 2 Extracellular Trafficking in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Lies in Its N-terminal β-Sandwich Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Che-Yi; Streets, Andrew J.; Watson, Philip F.; Huang, Linghong; Verderio, Elisabetta A. M.; Johnson, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Transglutaminase type 2 (TG2) catalyzes the formation of an ϵ-(γ-glutamyl)-lysine isopeptide bond between adjacent peptides or proteins including those of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Elevated extracellular TG2 leads to accelerated ECM deposition and reduced clearance that underlie tissue scarring and fibrosis. The extracellular trafficking of TG2 is crucial to its role in ECM homeostasis; however, the mechanism by which TG2 escapes the cell is unknown as it has no signal leader peptide and therefore cannot be transported classically. Understanding TG2 transport may highlight novel mechanisms to interfere with the extracellular function of TG2 as isoform-specific TG2 inhibitors remain elusive. Mammalian expression vectors were constructed containing domain deletions of TG2. These were transfected into three kidney tubular epithelial cell lines, and TG2 export was assessed to identify critical domains. Point mutation was then used to highlight specific sequences within the domain required for TG2 export. The removal of β-sandwich domain prevented all TG2 export. Mutations of Asp94 and Asp97 within the N-terminal β-sandwich domain were identified as crucial for TG2 externalization. These form part of a previously identified fibronectin binding domain (88WTATVVDQQDCTLSLQLTT106). However, siRNA knockdown of fibronectin failed to affect TG2 export. The sequence 88WTATVVDQQDCTLSLQLTT106 within the β-sandwich domain of TG2 is critical to its export in tubular epithelial cell lines. The extracellular trafficking of TG2 is independent of fibronectin. PMID:21652693

  12. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) induces phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at Thr668, in okadaic acid-induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji-Hwan; So, Sang-Pil; Kim, Na-Young; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have revealed that phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at Thr668 is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Okadaic acid (OA), a protein phosphatase-2A inhibitor, has been used in AD research models to increase tau phosphorylation and induce neuronal death. We previously showed that OA increased levels of APP and induced accumulation of APP in axonal swellings. In this study, we found that in OA-treated neurons, phosphorylation of APP at Thr668 increased and accumulated in axonal swellings by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and not by Cdk5 or ERK/MAPK. These results suggest that JNK may be one of therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 376-381] PMID:26839154

  13. Regulation of Nucleosome Stacking and Chromatin Compaction by the Histone H4 N-Terminal Tail-H2A Acidic Patch Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinming; Yang, Renliang; Korolev, Nikolay; Liu, Chuan Fa; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2017-06-30

    Chromatin folding and dynamics are critically dependent on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions with important contributions from internucleosome binding of the histone H4 N-terminal tail K16-R23 domain to the surface of the H2A/H2B dimer. The H4 Lys16 plays a pivotal role in this regard. Using in vitro reconstituted 12-mer nucleosome arrays, we have investigated the mechanism of the H4 N-terminal tail in maintaining nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and mediating intra- and inter-array chromatin compaction, with emphasis on the role of K16 and the positive charge region, R17-R23. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments and precipitation assays were employed to analyze effects on chromatin folding and self-association, respectively. Effects on chromatin folding caused by various mutations and modifications at position K16 in the H4 histone were studied. Additionally, using charge-quenching mutations, we characterized the importance of the interaction of the residues within the H4 positive charge region R17-R23 with the H2A acidic patch of the adjacent nucleosome. Furthermore, crosslinking experiments were conducted to establish the proximity of the basic tail region to the acidic patch. Our data indicate that the positive charge and length of the side chain of H4 K16 are important for its access to the adjacent nucleosome in the process of nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and array folding. The location and orientation of the H4 R17-R23 domain on the H2A/H2B dimer surface of the neighboring nucleosome core particle (NCP) in the compacted chromatin fiber were established. The dominance of electrostatic interactions in maintaining intra-array interaction was demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 that play a role in Ubc9 nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhri, Palak; Tao, Tao; Kaplan, Feige; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-27

    As the sole E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, Ubc9 is predominantly nuclear. However, the underlying mechanisms of Ubc9 nuclear localization are still not well understood. Here we show that RNAi-depletion of Imp13, an importin known to mediate Ubc9 nuclear import, reduces both Ubc9 nuclear accumulation and global SUMOylation. Furthermore, Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation previously shown to interrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOs reduces the nuclear enrichment of Ubc9, suggesting that the interaction of Ubc9 with the nuclear SUMOs may enhance Ubc9 nuclear retention. Moreover, Ubc9-R17E mutation, which is known to disrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with both SUMOs and Imp13, causes a greater decrease in Ubc9 nuclear accumulation than Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation. Lastly, Ubc9-K74A/S89D mutations that perturb the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOylation-consensus motifs has no effect on Ubc9 nuclear localization. Altogether, our results have elucidated that the amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 play a pivotal role in regulation of Ubc9 nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Imp13-mediated nuclear import of Ubc9 is critical for global SUMOylation. • Ubc9 mutations disrupting Ubc9-SUMO interaction decrease Ubc9 nuclear accumulation. • N-terminal amino acid residues of Ubc9 are critical for Ubc9 nuclear enrichment.

  15. N-terminal basic amino acid residues of Beet black scorch virus capsid protein play a critical role in virion assembly and systemic movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanjing; Niu, Shaofang; Qu, Feng; Zhang, Yongliang; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2013-06-20

    Beet black scorch virus (BBSV) is a small single-stranded, positive-sense RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Necrovirus, family Tombusviridae. Its capsid protein (CP) contains a 13 amino acid long basic region at the N-terminus, rich in arginine and lysine residues, which is thought to interact with viral RNA to initiate virion assembly. In the current study, a series of BBSV mutants containing amino acid substitutions as well as deletions within the N-terminal region were generated and examined for their effects on viral RNA replication, virion assembly, and long distance spread in protoplasts and whole host plants of BBSV. The RNA-binding activities of the mutated CPs were also evaluated in vitro. These experiments allowed us to identify two key basic amino acid residues in this region that are responsible for initiating virus assembly through RNA-binding. Proper assembly of BBSV particles is in turn needed for efficient viral systemic movement. We have identified two basic amino acid residues near the N-terminus of the BBSV CP that bind viral RNA with high affinity to initiate virion assembly. We further provide evidence showing that systemic spread of BBSV in infected plants requires intact virions. This study represents the first in-depth investigation of the role of basic amino acid residues within the N-terminus of a necroviral CP.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structural Mapping Reveals Promiscuous Interactions between Clathrin-Box Motif Sequences and the N-Terminal Domain of the Clathrin Heavy Chain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment and organization of clathrin at endocytic sites first to form coated pits and then clathrin-coated vesicles depend on interactions between the clathrin N-terminal domain (TD) and multiple clathrin binding sequences on the cargo adaptor and accessory proteins that are concentrated at such sites. Up to four distinct protein binding sites have been proposed to be present on the clathrin TD, with each site proposed to interact with a distinct clathrin binding motif. However, an understanding of how such interactions contribute to clathrin coat assembly must take into account observations that any three of these four sites on clathrin TD can be mutationally ablated without causing loss of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To take an unbiased approach to mapping binding sites for clathrin-box motifs on clathrin TD, we used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our ITC experiments revealed that a canonical clathrin-box motif peptide from the AP-2 adaptor binds to clathrin TD with a stoichiometry of 3:1. Assignment of 90% of the total visible amide resonances in the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-labeled TD40 allowed us to map these three binding sites by analyzing the chemical shift changes as clathrin-box motif peptides were titrated into clathrin TD. We found that three different clathrin-box motif peptides can each simultaneously bind not only to the previously characterized clathrin-box site but also to the W-box site and the β-arrestin splice loop site on a single TD. The promiscuity of these binding sites can help explain why their mutation does not lead to larger effects on clathrin function and suggests a mechanism by which clathrin may be transferred between different proteins during the course of an endocytic event. PMID:25844500

  17. Complete nucleotide and derived amino acid sequence of cDNA encoding the mitochondrial uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue: lack of a mitochondrial targeting presequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, R G; Patel, H V; Gerber, G E; Morton, R C; Freeman, K B

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone spanning the entire amino acid sequence of the nuclear-encoded uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue mitochondria has been isolated and sequenced. With the exception of the N-terminal methionine the deduced N-terminus of the newly synthesized uncoupling protein is identical to the N-terminal 30 amino acids of the native uncoupling protein as determined by protein sequencing. This proves that the protein contains no N-terminal mitochondrial targeting prepiece and that a targeting region must reside within the amino acid sequence of the mature protein. Images PMID:3012461

  18. Deletion of N-terminal amino acids from human lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase differentially affects enzyme activity toward alpha- and beta-substrate lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vickaryous, Nicola K; Teh, Evelyn M; Stewart, Bruce; Dolphin, Peter J; Too, Catherine K L; McLeod, Roger S

    2003-03-21

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for generation of the majority of the cholesteryl esters (CE) in human plasma. Although most plasma cholesterol esterification occurs on high-density lipoprotein (HDL), via alpha-LCAT activity, esterification also occurs on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) via the beta-activity of the enzyme. Computer threading techniques have provided a three-dimensional model for use in the structure-function analysis of the core and catalytic site of the LCAT protein, but the model does not extend to the N-terminal region of the enzyme, which may mediate LCAT interaction with lipoprotein substrates. In the present study, we have examined the functional consequences of deletion of the highly conserved hydrophobic N-terminal amino acids (residues 1-5) of human LCAT. Western blot analysis showed that the mutant proteins (Delta 1-Delta 5) were synthesized and secreted from transfected COS-7 cells at levels approximately equivalent to those of wild-type hLCAT. The secreted proteins had apparent molecular weights of 67 kDa, indicating that they were correctly processed and glycosylated during cellular transit. However, deletion of the first residue of the mature LCAT protein (Delta 1 mutant) resulted in a dramatic loss of alpha-LCAT activity (5% of wild type using reconstituted HDL substrate, rHDL), although this mutant retained full beta-LCAT activity (108% of wild-type using human LDL substrate). Removal of residues 1 and 2 (Delta 2 mutant) abolished alpha-LCAT activity and reduced beta-LCAT activity to 12% of wild type. Nevertheless, LCAT Delta 1 and Delta 2 mutants retained their ability to bind to rHDL and LDL lipoprotein substrates. The dramatic loss of enzyme activity suggests that the N-terminal residues of LCAT may be involved in maintaining the conformation of the lid domain and influence activation by the alpha-LCAT cofactor apoA-I (in Delta 1) and/or loss of enzyme activity (in Delta 1-Delta 5). Since the

  19. The N-terminal cleavable pre-sequence encoded in the first exon of cystathionine γ-synthase contains two different functional domains for chloroplast targeting and regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Sugiyama, Tomoya; Yamashita, Yui; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Naito, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    Chloroplast transit peptide sequences (cTPs) located in the N-terminal region of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins are essential for their sorting, and are generally cleaved from the proteins after their import into the chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis thaliana cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS), the first committed enzyme of methionine biosynthesis, is a nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein. Arabidopsis CGS possesses an N-terminal extension region that is dispensable for enzymatic activity. This N-terminal extension contains the cTP and several functional domains including an MTO1 region, the cis-element for post-transcriptional feedback regulation of CGS1 that codes for CGS. A previous report suggested that the cTP cleavage site of CGS is located upstream of the MTO1 region. However, the region required for protein sorting has not been analyzed. In this study, we carried out functional analyses to elucidate the region required for chloroplast targeting by using a chimeric protein, Ex1:GFP, in which the CGS1 exon 1 coding region containing the N-terminal extension was tagged with green fluorescent protein. The sequence upstream of the MTO1 region was responsible for efficient chloroplast targeting and for avoidance of missorting to the mitochondria. Our data also showed that the major N-terminus of Ex1:GFP is Ala91, which is located immediately downstream of the MTO1 region, and the MTO1 region is not retained in the mature Ex1:GFP accumulated in the chloroplast. These findings suggest that the N-terminal cleavable pre-sequence harbors dual functions in protein sorting and in regulating gene expression. Our study highlights the unique properties of Arabidopsis CGS cTP among chloroplast-targeted proteins. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to the major feline allergen Fel d I. II. Single step affinity purification of Fel d I, N-terminal sequence analysis, and development of a sensitive two-site immunoassay to assess Fel d I exposure.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M D; Aalberse, R C; Brown, M J; Platts-Mills, T A

    1988-02-01

    Two mAb were used to develop new techniques for the purification and quantitation of the major feline salivary allergen, Felis domesticus allergen I (Fel d I). The allergen was purified from aqueous house dust extract with a high Fel d I content by affinity chromatography over a monoclonal immunosorbent and elution with 4 mM HCl, pH 2.5. This single step procedure gave 40 to 50% recovery of 90% pure allergen which, following final purification by size exclusion HPLC, showed a single line on immunodiffusion and crossed immunoelectrophoresis against monospecific anti-Fel d I and polyclonal anti-cat dander antibodies. The m.w. of native Fel d I was 39,000 on size exclusion HPLC, and 17,000 under nonreducing conditions on gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence (33 residues) showed no homology with other known protein sequences. The combination of the SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequence data suggests that Fel d I is a non-covalently linked homodimer. A two-site RIA was developed using mAb directed against different epitopes on Fel d I. This assay was species-specific, highly sensitive (0.0004 U/ml), and showed an excellent correlation with a polyclonal inhibition RIA (n = 27, r = 0.93, p less than 0.001). Cat allergen extracts used for immediate skin tests showed marked differences in Fel d I content (from 0.1 to 30 U/ml). Consistently high Fel d I levels were found at monthly intervals in six dust samples from four houses with cats (10 to 100 U/g of dust). Comparisons of Fel d I and mite and pollen allergen levels showed that house dust can contain greater than 100 micrograms/g of either of these allergens and is a potent source of foreign environmental antigens. Monoclonal affinity chromatography provides a major breakthrough in the purification of Fel d I, from a source material that would otherwise have been considered impossible (house dust). The mAb assay for Fel d I is both more sensitive and more easily standardized than existing techniques. These

  1. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca2+ signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca2+ signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  2. Unique dominant negative mutation in the N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence of StAR, causing a variant form of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, María Sonia; Guercio, Gabriela; Marino, Roxana; Berensztein, Esperanza; Costanzo, Mariana; Bailez, Marcela; Vaiani, Elisa; Maceiras, Mercedes; Ramirez, Pablo; Chaler, Eduardo; Rivarola, Marco A; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Steroid acute regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondria-targeted protein that is part of the transduceosome complex crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. Recessive mutations cause classic and nonclassic congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia. The aim of this study was to report the clinical, hormonal, genetic, and functional data of a novel heterozygous mutation in the StAR gene found in a 46,XY patient with ambiguous genitalia and neonatal severe steroidogenic deficiency. Undetectable serum steroids with high ACTH and plasma renin activity but normal acute GnRH response were found in infancy. After gonadectomy (at 3 yr of age), serum LH and testosterone were undetectable, whereas FSH was normal but increased slowly afterward. Estrogen replacement therapy, started at 10.2 yr of age, suppressed gonadotropins (for 2 yr). However, after 1 month off estrogens, the patient showed castrated levels. At 11.9 yr old, after fludrocortisone withdrawal because of hypertension, plasma renin activity and aldosterone remained normal, suggesting mineralocorticoid recovery by a StAR-independent mechanism. We found a de novo heterozygous IVS-2A>G StAR mutation and the reported heterozygous p.G146A SF1 polymorphism with normal CYP11A1, FDXR, FDX1, VDAC1, and TSPO genes. The mutant StAR transcript lacked exon 2, resulting in the in-frame loss of amino acids 22 to 59 in the N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal. In vitro, the mutant protein exhibited reduced StAR activity in a dominant-negative manner and almost no mitochondria localization. A misfolded p.G22_L59del StAR might interfere with wild-type StAR activity by blocking the transduceosome complex, causing an autosomal dominant form of StAR deficiency, explaining the clinical phenotype. We speculated that estrogen might have modulated mineralocorticoid function and pubertal maturation in a human natural model lacking endogenous steroid production.

  3. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct. PMID:27681031

  4. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct.

  5. Genomic analysis of 16 Colorado human NL63 coronaviruses identifies a new genotype, high sequence diversity in the N-terminal domain of the spike gene and evidence of recombination

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Gregory E.; Wentworth, David E.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Robinson, Christine C.; Town, Christopher D.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the complete genome sequences of 16 NL63 strain human coronaviruses (hCoVs) from respiratory specimens of paediatric patients with respiratory disease in Colorado, USA, and characterized the epidemiology and clinical characteristics associated with circulating NL63 viruses over a 3-year period. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2011, 92 of 9380 respiratory specimens were found to be positive for NL63 RNA by PCR, an overall prevalence of 1 %. NL63 viruses were circulating during all 3 years, but there was considerable yearly variation in prevalence and the month of peak incidence. Phylogenetic analysis comparing the genome sequences of the 16 Colorado NL63 viruses with those of the prototypical hCoV-NL63 and three other NL63 viruses from the Netherlands demonstrated that there were three genotypes (A, B and C) circulating in Colorado from 2005 to 2010, and evidence of recombination between virus strains was found. Genotypes B and C co-circulated in Colorado in 2005, 2009 and 2010, but genotype A circulated only in 2005 when it was the predominant NL63 strain. Genotype C represents a new lineage that has not been described previously. The greatest variability in the NL63 virus genomes was found in the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the spike gene (nt 1–600, aa 1–200). Ten different amino acid sequences were found in the NTD of the spike protein among these NL63 strains and the 75 partial published sequences of NTDs from strains found at different times throughout the world. PMID:22837419

  6. Genomic analysis of 16 Colorado human NL63 coronaviruses identifies a new genotype, high sequence diversity in the N-terminal domain of the spike gene and evidence of recombination.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Sims, Gregory E; Wentworth, David E; Halpin, Rebecca A; Robinson, Christine C; Town, Christopher D; Holmes, Kathryn V

    2012-11-01

    This study compared the complete genome sequences of 16 NL63 strain human coronaviruses (hCoVs) from respiratory specimens of paediatric patients with respiratory disease in Colorado, USA, and characterized the epidemiology and clinical characteristics associated with circulating NL63 viruses over a 3-year period. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2011, 92 of 9380 respiratory specimens were found to be positive for NL63 RNA by PCR, an overall prevalence of 1 %. NL63 viruses were circulating during all 3 years, but there was considerable yearly variation in prevalence and the month of peak incidence. Phylogenetic analysis comparing the genome sequences of the 16 Colorado NL63 viruses with those of the prototypical hCoV-NL63 and three other NL63 viruses from the Netherlands demonstrated that there were three genotypes (A, B and C) circulating in Colorado from 2005 to 2010, and evidence of recombination between virus strains was found. Genotypes B and C co-circulated in Colorado in 2005, 2009 and 2010, but genotype A circulated only in 2005 when it was the predominant NL63 strain. Genotype C represents a new lineage that has not been described previously. The greatest variability in the NL63 virus genomes was found in the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the spike gene (nt 1-600, aa 1-200). Ten different amino acid sequences were found in the NTD of the spike protein among these NL63 strains and the 75 partial published sequences of NTDs from strains found at different times throughout the world.

  7. Primary structure of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r. N-terminal sequences and alignment of autolytic fragments and CNBr-cleavage peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, J; Arlaud, G J

    1985-01-01

    Activated human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r has previously been shown to undergo autolytic cleavages occurring in the A chain [Arlaud, Villiers, Chesne & Colomb (1980) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 616, 116-129]. Chemical analysis of the autolytic products confirms that the A chain undergoes two major cleavages, generating three fragments, which have now been isolated and characterized. The N-terminal alpha fragment (approx. 210 residues long) has a blocked N-terminus, as does the whole A chain, whereas N-terminal sequences of fragments beta and gamma (approx. 66 and 176 residues long respectively) do not, and their N-terminal sequences were determined. Fragments alpha, beta and gamma, which are not interconnected by disulphide bridges, are located in this order within C1r A chain. Fragment gamma is disulphide-linked to the B chain of C1r, which is C-terminal in the single polypeptide chain of precursor C1r. CNBr cleavage of C1r A chain yields seven major peptides, CN1b, CN4a, CN2a, CN1a, CN3, CN4b and CN2b, which were positioned in that order, on the basis of N-terminal sequences of the methionine-containing peptides generated from tryptic cleavage of the succinylated (3-carboxypropionylated) C1r A chain. About 60% of the sequence of C1r A chain (440-460 residues long) was determined, including the complete sequence of the C-terminal 95 residues. This region shows homology with the corresponding parts of plasminogen and chymotrypsinogen and, more surprisingly, with the alpha 1 chain of human haptoglobin 1-1, a serine proteinase homologue. PMID:2983658

  8. Identification of Basic Amino Acids at the N-Terminal End of the Core Protein That Are Crucial for Hepatitis C Virus Infectivity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleh, Khaled; Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Pillez, André; Duverlie, Gilles; Descamps, Véronique; Rouillé, Yves; Dubuisson, Jean; Wychowski, Czeslaw

    2010-01-01

    A major function of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is the interaction with genomic RNA to form the nucleocapsid, an essential component of the virus particle. Analyses to identify basic amino acid residues of HCV core protein, important for capsid assembly, were initially performed with a cell-free system, which did not indicate the importance of these residues for HCV infectivity. The development of a cell culture system for HCV (HCVcc) allows a more precise analysis of these core protein amino acids during the HCV life cycle. In the present study, we used a mutational analysis in the context of the HCVcc system to determine the role of the basic amino acid residues of the core protein in HCV infectivity. We focused our analysis on basic residues located in two clusters (cluster 1, amino acids [aa]6 to 23; cluster 2, aa 39 to 62) within the N-terminal 62 amino acids of the HCV core protein. Our data indicate that basic residues of the first cluster have little impact on replication and are dispensable for infectivity. Furthermore, only four basic amino acids residues of the second cluster (R50, K51, R59, and R62) were essential for the production of infectious viral particles. Mutation of these residues did not interfere with core protein subcellular localization, core protein-RNA interaction, or core protein oligomerization. Moreover, these mutations had no effect on core protein envelopment by intracellular membranes. Together, these data indicate that R50, K51, R59, and R62 residues play a major role in the formation of infectious viral particles at a post-nucleocapsid assembly step. PMID:20943968

  9. Identification of basic amino acids at the N-terminal end of the core protein that are crucial for hepatitis C virus infectivity.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Khaled; Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Pillez, André; Duverlie, Gilles; Descamps, Véronique; Rouillé, Yves; Dubuisson, Jean; Wychowski, Czeslaw

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is the interaction with genomic RNA to form the nucleocapsid, an essential component of the virus particle. Analyses to identify basic amino acid residues of HCV core protein, important for capsid assembly, were initially performed with a cell-free system, which did not indicate the importance of these residues for HCV infectivity. The development of a cell culture system for HCV (HCVcc) allows a more precise analysis of these core protein amino acids during the HCV life cycle. In the present study, we used a mutational analysis in the context of the HCVcc system to determine the role of the basic amino acid residues of the core protein in HCV infectivity. We focused our analysis on basic residues located in two clusters (cluster 1, amino acids [aa]6 to 23; cluster 2, aa 39 to 62) within the N-terminal 62 amino acids of the HCV core protein. Our data indicate that basic residues of the first cluster have little impact on replication and are dispensable for infectivity. Furthermore, only four basic amino acids residues of the second cluster (R50, K51, R59, and R62) were essential for the production of infectious viral particles. Mutation of these residues did not interfere with core protein subcellular localization, core protein-RNA interaction, or core protein oligomerization. Moreover, these mutations had no effect on core protein envelopment by intracellular membranes. Together, these data indicate that R50, K51, R59, and R62 residues play a major role in the formation of infectious viral particles at a post-nucleocapsid assembly step.

  10. Stability of the heme Fe-N-terminal amino group coordination bond in denatured cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Munegumi, Toratane; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-05

    In the denatured states of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c(552) (HT) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c(551) (PA), and their mutants, the N-terminal amino group of the polypeptide chain is coordinated to heme Fe in place of the axial Met, the His-N(term) form being formed. The coordination of the N-terminal amino group to heme Fe leads to loop formation by the N-terminal stretch preceding the first Cys residue bound to the heme, and the N-terminal stretches of HT and PA are different from each other in terms of both the sequence and the number of constituent amino acid residues. The His-N(term) form was shown to be rather stable, and hence it can influence the stability of the denatured state. We have investigated the heme Fe coordination structures and stabilities of the His-N(term) forms emerging upon guanidine hydrochloric acid-induced unfolding of the oxidized forms of the proteins. The Fe-N(term) coordination bond in the His-N(term) form with a 9-residue N-terminal stretch of HT proteins was found to be tilted to some extent away from the heme normal, as reflected by the great heme methyl proton shift spread. On the other hand, the small heme methyl proton shift spread of the His-N(term) form with an 11-residue stretch of PA proteins indicated that its Fe-N(term) bond is nearly parallel with the heme normal. The stability of the His-N(term) form was found to be affected by the structural properties of the N-terminal stretch, such as its length and the N-terminal residue. With a given N-terminal residue, the stability of the His-N(term) form is higher for a 9-residue N-terminal stretch than an 11-residue one. In addition, with a given length of the N-terminal stretch, the His-N(term) form with an N-terminal Glu is stabilized by a few kJ mol(-1) relative to that with an N-terminal Asn. These results provide a novel insight into the stabilizing interactions in the denatured cyts c that will facilitate elucidation of the folding/unfolding mechanisms

  11. Oligomerization of the microtubule-associated protein tau is mediated by its N-terminal sequences: implications for normal and pathological tau action.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, H Eric; Benbow, Sarah J; LaPointe, Nichole E; Patel, Nirav; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Do, Thanh D; Gaylord, Michelle R; Huskey, Noelle E; Dressler, Nicolette; Korff, Megan; Quon, Brady; Cantrell, Kristi Lazar; Bowers, Michael T; Lal, Ratnesh; Feinstein, Stuart C

    2016-06-01

    Despite extensive structure-function analyses, the molecular mechanisms of normal and pathological tau action remain poorly understood. How does the C-terminal microtubule-binding region regulate microtubule dynamics and bundling? In what biophysical form does tau transfer trans-synaptically from one neuron to another, promoting neurodegeneration and dementia? Previous biochemical/biophysical work led to the hypothesis that tau can dimerize via electrostatic interactions between two N-terminal 'projection domains' aligned in an anti-parallel fashion, generating a multivalent complex capable of interacting with multiple tubulin subunits. We sought to test this dimerization model directly. Native gel analyses of full-length tau and deletion constructs demonstrate that the N-terminal region leads to multiple bands, consistent with oligomerization. Ferguson analyses of native gels indicate that an N-terminal fragment (tau(45-230) ) assembles into heptamers/octamers. Ferguson analyses of denaturing gels demonstrates that tau(45-230) can dimerize even in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Atomic force microscopy reveals multiple levels of oligomerization by both full-length tau and tau(45-230) . Finally, ion mobility-mass spectrometric analyses of tau(106-144) , a small peptide containing the core of the hypothesized dimerization region, also demonstrate oligomerization. Thus, multiple independent strategies demonstrate that the N-terminal region of tau can mediate higher order oligomerization, which may have important implications for both normal and pathological tau action. The microtubule-associated protein tau is essential for neuronal development and maintenance, but is also central to Alzheimer's and related dementias. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and pathological tau action remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that tau can homo-oligomerize, providing novel mechanistic models for normal tau action (promoting microtubule growth and

  12. Influenza A virus virulence depends on two amino acids in the N-terminal domain of its NS1 protein facilitating inhibition of PKR.

    PubMed

    Schierhorn, Kristina L; Jolmes, Fabian; Bespalowa, Julia; Saenger, Sandra; Peteranderl, Christin; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Budt, Matthias; Pleschka, Stephan; Herrmann, Andreas; Herold, Susanne; Wolff, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    main activity of the amino acids 35 and 46 as the strong attenuation of corresponding mutant viruses in human cells was rescued to a large extent by lowering PKR expression levels. Significantly, this corresponded with restoration of viral virulence for NS1 R35A and R46A mutant viruses in PKR(-/-) mice. Therefore, our data establish a model in which the NS1 N-terminal domain engages in a binding interaction to inhibit activation of PKR and ensure efficient viral propagation and virulence.

  13. Efficient production of d-amino acid oxidase in Escherichia coli by a trade-off between its expression and biomass using N-terminal modification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junxian; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Xu, Meijuan; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Shangtian

    2017-07-05

    Native d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) that is expressed mostly as inclusion body and its toxicity for E. coli hamper efficient heterologous expression. In this study, the soluble expression of DAAO from Rhodosporidium toruloides (RtDAAO) was improved in E. coli through N-terminal modification, but the cell biomass was decreased. Then a trade-off between DAAO expression and biomass was achieved to obtain the highest volumetric activity of DAAO through regulated the number of N-terminus histidine residues. When variant (2)H(3)G was fused with three N-terminus histidine residues, the volumetric activity was increased by 3.1 times and the biomass was not significant change compared with the wild type. Finally, the N-terminus disordered region of RtDAAO (HSQK) was replaced with HHHG and the variant enzyme activity reached 80.7U/mL (with a 40 percent of inactive DAAO reduced) in a 7.5L fermenter in 24h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A highly basic sequence at the N-terminal region is essential for targeting the DNA replication protein ORC1 to the nucleus in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devanand; Kumar, Diwakar; Saha, Swati

    2012-07-01

    The conserved eukaryotic DNA replication protein ORC1 is one of the constituents of pre-replication complexes that assemble at or very near origins prior to replication initiation. ORC1 has been shown to be constitutively nuclear in Leishmania major. This study investigates the sequences involved in nuclear localization of ORC1 in Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) have been reported in only a few Leishmania proteins. Functional analyses have delineated NLSs to regions of ~60 amino acids in length in the tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I and type II DNA topoisomerase of L. donovani, and in the L. major kinesin KIN13-1. Using a panel of site-directed mutations we have identified a sequence essential for nuclear import of LdORC1. This sequence at the N terminus of the protein comprises residues 2-5 (KRSR), with K2, R3 and R5 being crucial. Independent mutation of the K2 residue causes exclusion of the protein from the nucleus, while mutating the R5 residue leads to diffusion of the protein throughout the cell. This sequence, however, is insufficient for targeting a heterologous protein (β-galactosidase) to the nucleus. Analysis of additional ORC1 mutations and reporter constructs reveals that while the highly basic tetra-amino acid sequence at the N terminus is essential for nuclear localization, the ORC1 NLS in its entirety is more complex, and of a distributive character. Our results suggest that nuclear localization signalling sequences in Leishmania nuclear proteins are more complex than what is typically seen in higher eukaryotes.

  15. Dipeptide Sequence Determination: Analyzing Phenylthiohydantoin Amino Acids by HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Janice S.; Tang, Chung-Fei; Reed, Steven S.

    2000-02-01

    Amino acid composition and sequence determination, important techniques for characterizing peptides and proteins, are essential for predicting conformation and studying sequence alignment. This experiment presents improved, fundamental methods of sequence analysis for an upper-division biochemistry laboratory. Working in pairs, students use the Edman reagent to prepare phenylthiohydantoin derivatives of amino acids for determination of the sequence of an unknown dipeptide. With a single HPLC technique, students identify both the N-terminal amino acid and the composition of the dipeptide. This method yields good precision of retention times and allows use of a broad range of amino acids as components of the dipeptide. Students learn fundamental principles and techniques of sequence analysis and HPLC.

  16. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Heart Dysfunction by Restoring Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats by Mitigating C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bingdong; Liu, Lidan; Wang, Ni; Tong, Dongyi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is common in intensive care units (ICU) and is associated with high mortality. Cardiac dysfunction complicating sepsis is one of the most important causes of this mortality. This dysfunction is due to myocardial inflammation and reduced production of energy by the heart. A number of studies have shown that hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a beneficial effect on sepsis. Therefore, we tested whether HRS prevents cardiac dysfunction by increasing cardiac energy. Four groups of rats received intraperitoneal injections of one of the following solutions: normal saline (NS), HRS, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and LPS plus HRS. Cardiac function was measured by echocardiography 8 h after the injections. Gene and protein expression related to fatty acid oxidation (FAO) were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis. The injection of LPS compromised heart function through decreased fractional shortening (FS) and increased left ventricular diameter (LVD). The addition of HRS increased FS, palmitate triphosphate, and the ratio of phosphocreatinine (PCr) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as well as decreasing LVD. The LPS challenge reduced the expression of genes related to FAO, including perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα), and their downstream targets, in mRNA and protein level, which were attenuated by HRS. However, HRS had little effect on glucose metabolism. Furthermore, HRS inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the rat heart. Inhibition of JNK by HRS showed beneficial effects on LPS-challenged rats, at least in part, by restoring cardiac FAO.

  17. The N-terminal sequence of the extrinsic PsbP protein modulates the redox potential of Cyt b559 in photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Taishi; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi; Nield, Jon; Sato, Fumihiko; Ifuku, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The PsbP protein, an extrinsic subunit of photosystem II (PSII) in green plants, is known to induce a conformational change around the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster securing the binding of Ca2+ and Cl– in PSII. PsbP has multiple interactions with the membrane subunits of PSII, but how these affect the structure and function of PSII requires clarification. Here, we focus on the interactions between the N-terminal residues of PsbP and the α subunit of Cytochrome (Cyt) b559 (PsbE). A key observation was that a peptide fragment formed of the first N-terminal 15 residues of PsbP, ‘pN15’, was able to convert Cyt b559 into its HP form. Interestingly, addition of pN15 to NaCl-washed PSII membranes decreased PSII’s oxygen-evolving activity, even in the presence of saturating Ca2+ and Cl– ions. In fact, pN15 reversibly inhibited the S1 to S2 transition of the OEC in PSII. These data suggest that pN15 can modulate the redox property of Cyt b559 involved in the side-electron pathway in PSII. This potential change of Cyt b559, in the absence of the C-terminal domain of PsbP, however, would interfere with any electron donation from the Mn4CaO5 cluster, leading to the possibility that multiple interactions of PsbP, binding to PSII, have distinct roles in regulating electron transfer within PSII. PMID:26887804

  18. Engineered recombinant enteropeptidase catalytic subunit: effect of N-terminal modification.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye-Won; Choi, Sung-Il; Seong, Baik L

    2002-04-01

    Enteropeptidase (enterokinase) is a serine protease highly specific for recognition and cleavage of the target sequence of Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys (D4K). The three-dimensional structure of the enteropeptidase shows that the N-terminal amino acid is buried inside the protein providing molecular interactions necessary to maintain the conformation of the active site. To determine the influence of the N-terminal amino acid of enteropeptidase light chain (EK(L)) on the enzymatic activity, we constructed various mutants including 17 different single amino acid substitutions and three different extensions at the N-terminal end. The mutants of recombinant enteropeptidase (rEK(L)) were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secreted into culture medium. Among 20 different mutants tested, the only mutant with the Ile --> Val substitution exhibited significant activity. The kinetic properties of the mutant protein were very similar to those of the wild-type rEK(L). Based on the three-dimensional structure where the N-terminal Ile is oriented into hydrophobic pocket, the results suggest that Val could substitute Ile without affecting the active conformation of the enzyme. The results also explain why all trypsin-like serine proteases carry either Ile or Val at the N-termini and none other amino acid residues are found. Moreover, this finding provides a mental framework for expressing the N-terminally engineered enteropeptidase in Escherichia coli, utilizing the known property of the methionine aminopeptidase that exhibits poor activity toward the N-terminal Met-Ile bond, but offers efficient cleavage of the Met-Val bond.

  19. Enzyme-Dependent [4 + 2] Cycloaddition Depends on Lid-like Interaction of the N-Terminal Sequence with the Catalytic Core in PyrI4.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qingfei; Guo, Yujiao; Yang, Linlin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wu, Zhuhua; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Jianping; Cheng, Xiaofang; Wu, Jiequn; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Pan, Lifeng; Liu, Wen

    2016-03-17

    The Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction is one of the most powerful and elegant organic synthesis methods for forming 6-membered molecules and has been known for nearly a century. However, whether and how enzymes catalyze this type of reaction is still not completely clear. Here we focus on PyrI4, an enzyme found in the biosynthetic pathway of pyrroindomycins where it catalyzes the formation of a spiro-conjugate via an enzyme-dependent exo-selective [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. We report the crystal structures of PyrI4 alone and in complex with its product. Comparative analysis of these structures, combined with biochemical analysis, lead us to propose a unique trapping mechanism whereby the lid-like action of the N-terminal tail imposes conformational constraints on the β barrel catalytic core, which enhances the proximity and polarization effects of reactive groups (1,3-diene and alkene) to drive cyclization in a regio- and stereo-specific manner. This work represents an important step toward the wider application of enzyme-catalyzed [4 + 2] cyclization for synthetic purposes.

  20. High sequence homology between protein tyrosine acid phosphatase from boar seminal vesicles and human prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Paweł; Płucienniczak, Grazyna; Strzezek, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Boar seminal vesicle protein tyrosine acid phosphatase (PTAP) and human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) show high affinity for protein phosphotyrosine residues. The physico-chemical and kinetic properties of the boar and human enzymes are different. The main objective of this study was to establish the nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding boar PTAP and compare it with that of human PAP cDNA. Also, the amino-acid sequence of boar PTAP was compared with the sequence of human PAP. PTAP was isolated from boar seminal vesicle fluid and sequenced. cDNA to boar seminal vesicle RNA was synthesized, amplified by PCR, cloned in E. coli and sequenced. The obtained N-terminal amino-acid sequence of boar PTAP showed 92% identity with the N-terminal amino-acid sequence of human PAP. The determined sequence of a 354 bp nucleotide fragment (GenBank accession number: GQ184596) showed 90% identity with the corresponding sequence of human PAP. On the basis of this sequence a 118 amino acid fragment of boar PTAP was predicted. This fragment showed 89% identity with the corresponding fragment of human PAP and had a similar hydropathy profile. The compared sequences differ in terms of their isoelectric points and amino-acid composition. This may explain the differences in substrate specificity and inhibitor resistance of boar PTAP and human PAP.

  1. Roles of N-Terminal Fatty Acid Acylations in Membrane Compartment Partitioning: Arabidopsis h-Type Thioredoxins as a Case Study[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, José A.; Micalella, Chiara; Martinez, Aude; Brown, Spencer C.; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    N-terminal fatty acylations (N-myristoylation [MYR] and S-palmitoylation [PAL]) are crucial modifications affecting 2 to 4% of eukaryotic proteins. The role of these modifications is to target proteins to membranes. Predictive tools have revealed unexpected targets of these acylations in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. However, little is known about how N-terminal lipidation governs membrane compartmentalization of proteins in plants. We show here that h-type thioredoxins (h-TRXs) cluster in four evolutionary subgroups displaying strictly conserved N-terminal modifications. It was predicted that one subgroup undergoes only MYR and another undergoes both MYR and PAL. We used plant TRXs as a model protein family to explore the effect of MYR alone or MYR and PAL in the same family of proteins. We used a high-throughput biochemical strategy to assess MYR of specific TRXs. Moreover, various TRX–green fluorescent protein fusions revealed that MYR localized protein to the endomembrane system and that partitioning between this membrane compartment and the cytosol correlated with the catalytic efficiency of the N-myristoyltransferase acting at the N terminus of the TRXs. Generalization of these results was obtained using several randomly selected Arabidopsis proteins displaying a MYR site only. Finally, we demonstrated that a palmitoylatable Cys residue flanking the MYR site is crucial to localize proteins to micropatching zones of the plasma membrane. PMID:23543785

  2. Roles of N-terminal fatty acid acylations in membrane compartment partitioning: Arabidopsis h-type thioredoxins as a case study.

    PubMed

    Traverso, José A; Micalella, Chiara; Martinez, Aude; Brown, Spencer C; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2013-03-01

    N-terminal fatty acylations (N-myristoylation [MYR] and S-palmitoylation [PAL]) are crucial modifications affecting 2 to 4% of eukaryotic proteins. The role of these modifications is to target proteins to membranes. Predictive tools have revealed unexpected targets of these acylations in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. However, little is known about how N-terminal lipidation governs membrane compartmentalization of proteins in plants. We show here that h-type thioredoxins (h-TRXs) cluster in four evolutionary subgroups displaying strictly conserved N-terminal modifications. It was predicted that one subgroup undergoes only MYR and another undergoes both MYR and PAL. We used plant TRXs as a model protein family to explore the effect of MYR alone or MYR and PAL in the same family of proteins. We used a high-throughput biochemical strategy to assess MYR of specific TRXs. Moreover, various TRX-green fluorescent protein fusions revealed that MYR localized protein to the endomembrane system and that partitioning between this membrane compartment and the cytosol correlated with the catalytic efficiency of the N-myristoyltransferase acting at the N terminus of the TRXs. Generalization of these results was obtained using several randomly selected Arabidopsis proteins displaying a MYR site only. Finally, we demonstrated that a palmitoylatable Cys residue flanking the MYR site is crucial to localize proteins to micropatching zones of the plasma membrane.

  3. Specific sequences in the N-terminal domain of human small heat-shock protein HSPB6 dictate preferential hetero-oligomerization with the orthologue HSPB1.

    PubMed

    Heirbaut, Michelle; Lermyte, Frederik; Martin, Esther M; Beelen, Steven; Sobott, Frank; Strelkov, Sergei V; Weeks, Stephen D

    2017-06-16

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) are a conserved group of molecular chaperones with important roles in cellular proteostasis. Although sHSPs are characterized by their small monomeric weight, they typically assemble into large polydisperse oligomers that vary in both size and shape but are principally composed of dimeric building blocks. These assemblies can include different sHSP orthologues, creating additional complexity that may affect chaperone activity. However, the structural and functional properties of such hetero-oligomers are poorly understood. We became interested in hetero-oligomer formation between human heat-shock protein family B (small) member 1 (HSPB1) and HSPB6, which are both highly expressed in skeletal muscle. When mixed in vitro, these two sHSPs form a polydisperse oligomer array composed solely of heterodimers, suggesting preferential association that is determined at the monomer level. Previously, we have shown that the sHSP N-terminal domains (NTDs), which have a high degree of intrinsic disorder, are essential for the biased formation. Here we employed iterative deletion mapping to elucidate how the NTD of HSPB6 influences its preferential association with HSPB1 and show that this region has multiple roles in this process. First, the highly conserved motif RLFDQXFG is necessary for subunit exchange among oligomers. Second, a site ∼20 residues downstream of this motif determines the size of the resultant hetero-oligomers. Third, a region unique to HSPB6 dictates the preferential formation of heterodimers. In conclusion, the disordered NTD of HSPB6 helps regulate the size and stability of hetero-oligomeric complexes, indicating that terminal sHSP regions define the assembly properties of these proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A novel Drosophila model of TDP-43 proteinopathies: N-terminal sequences combined with the Q/N domain induce protein functional loss and locomotion defects.

    PubMed

    Langellotti, Simona; Romano, Valentina; Romano, Giulia; Klima, Raffaella; Feiguin, Fabian; Cragnaz, Lucia; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Francisco E

    2016-06-01

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43, also known as TBPH in Drosophila melanogaster and TARDBP in mammals) is the main protein component of the pathological inclusions observed in neurons of patients affected by different neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The number of studies investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration is constantly growing; however, the role played by TDP-43 in disease onset and progression is still unclear. A fundamental shortcoming that hampers progress is the lack of animal models showing aggregation of TDP-43 without overexpression. In this manuscript, we have extended our cellular model of aggregation to a transgenic Drosophila line. Our fly model is not based on the overexpression of a wild-type TDP-43 transgene. By contrast, we engineered a construct that includes only the specific TDP-43 amino acid sequences necessary to trigger aggregate formation and capable of trapping endogenous Drosophila TDP-43 into a non-functional insoluble form. Importantly, the resulting recombinant product lacks functional RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and, thus, does not have specific TDP-43-physiological functions (i.e. splicing regulation ability) that might affect the animal phenotype per se. This novel Drosophila model exhibits an evident degenerative phenotype with reduced lifespan and early locomotion defects. Additionally, we show that important proteins involved in neuromuscular junction function, such as syntaxin (SYX), decrease their levels as a consequence of TDP-43 loss of function implying that the degenerative phenotype is a consequence of TDP-43 sequestration into the aggregates. Our data lend further support to the role of TDP-43 loss-of-function in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The novel transgenic Drosophila model presented in this study will help to gain further insight into the molecular

  5. Structure of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser of Aβ-peptide with phospholipase A2 from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Pillai, Vikram Gopalakrishna; Zhong, Wei-Zhu

    2014-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most significant social and health burdens of the present century. Plaques formed by extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) are the prime player of AD's neuropathology. Studies have implicated the varied role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in brain where it contributes to neuronal growth and inflammatory response. Overall contour and chemical nature of the substrate-binding channel in the low molecular weight PLA2s are similar. This study involves the reductionist fragment-based approach to understand the structure adopted by N-terminal fragment of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide in its complex with PLA2. In the current communication, we report the structure determined by X-ray crystallography of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser (DAEFRHDS) of Aβ-peptide with a Group I PLA2 purified from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution (Protein Data Bank (PDB) Code: 3JQ5). This is probably the first attempt to structurally establish interaction between amyloid-β peptide fragment and hydrophobic substrate binding site of PLA2 involving H bond and van der Waals interactions. We speculate that higher affinity between Aβ and PLA2 has the therapeutic potential of decreasing the Aβ-Aβ interaction, thereby reducing the amyloid aggregation and plaque formation in AD.

  6. Major immunoreactive domains of human ribosomal P proteins lie N-terminal to a homologous C-22 sequence: application to a novel ELISA for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J L J; Dubljevic, V; Fritzler, M J; Toh, Ban-Hock

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive domains on human ribosomal P0, P1 and P2 proteins, other than the C-22 peptide, to develop a novel ELISA using a combination of these proteins and to compare this ELISA with one using the C-22 peptide. Human recombinant P0, P1, P2 and mutant P0 lacking the homologous C-22 peptide (N-P0) were produced in bacteria and tested by ELISA and immunoblotting using sera from 48 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 48 with an unrelated inflammatory disorder (Crohn's disease) and 47 healthy controls. ELISA with P0, P1 and P2, premixed at equimolar concentrations, gave higher OD readings than each protein tested individually. Eighteen SLE sera tested positive by ELISA with premixed P0, P1, P2 but only 3 tested positive with the C-22 peptide. Twenty-two SLE sera reacted positively, as determined by immunoblotting, with 5 different P protein combinations: P1P2, P0P1P2, P1, P0P1, P0 and P1. Only sera reactive with all three P proteins reacted with the C-22 peptide, with absent or minimal reactivity with N-P0. Native antigens yielded sensitivity (6/48, 13%) similar to the C-22 peptide assay. An ELISA with premixed P1 and P2 gave higher OD values than the arithmetic means with P1 or P2. Fifteen SLE patients had antibodies to double stranded (ds)-DNA, of which 6 also had antibodies to P0P1P2 by ELISA but 12 reactive with P0P1P2 did not have discernable ds-DNA antibodies. Ribosomal P autoantibodies react mainly with epitopes N-terminal to a homologous C-22 peptide. An ELISA with premixed P0, P1 and P2 has 5-fold greater sensitivity (38%) for SLE than an assay with the conventional C-22 peptide (7%). The combined sensitivity for SLE for antibodies to P0P1P2 and ds-DNA is 56%, higher than C-22 and ds-DNA, 38%. Only one of the SLE patients had neuropsychiatric lupus. PMID:15958082

  7. N-terminal-prolonged vinyl ester-based peptides as selective proteasome beta1 subunit inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Destro, Federica; Vertuani, Gianni; Marastoni, Mauro; Gavioli, Riccardo; Tomatis, Roberto

    2009-08-01

    The synthesis and biological properties of vinyl ester peptide-based molecules bearing linear N-terminal amino acids are reported. Compounds were tested in vitro for their capacity to inhibit the chymotryptic-, tryptic-like, and post-acidic activities of the proteasome. Some analogues showed selective inhibition of post-acidic (PGPH) activity, which is attributed to the beta1 subunit. Interestingly, active compounds demonstrated higher inhibitory activity toward 'standard' proteasomes than toward immunoproteasomes. The inhibitory potency was found to be related to the amino acidic sequence and to the length of the N-terminal residues. The new inhibitors demonstrated resistance to plasmatic proteases and a good capacity to permeate the cell membrane.

  8. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    SciTech Connect

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H. . E-mail: doday@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ({sup 171}EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF{sup 195}) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues {sup 48}KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK{sup 64} that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to {sup 48}EF{sup 49} abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the {sup 48}EF{sup 49} construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

  9. N-Terminal Fragments of Huntingtin Longer than Residue 170 form Visible Aggregates Independently to Polyglutamine Expansion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Moore Z; Mok, Sue-Ann; Ormsby, Angelique R; Muchowski, Paul J; Hatters, Danny M

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of Huntington's disease is the progressive aggregation of full length and N-terminal fragments of polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded Huntingtin (Htt) into intracellular inclusions. The production of N-terminal fragments appears important for enabling pathology and aggregation; and hence the direct expression of a variety of N-terminal fragments are commonly used to model HD in animal and cellular models. It remains unclear how the length of the N-terminal fragments relates to polyQ - mediated aggregation. We investigated the fundamental intracellular aggregation process of eight different-length N-terminal fragments of Htt in both short (25Q) and long polyQ (97Q). N-terminal fragments were fused to fluorescent proteins and transiently expressed in mammalian cell culture models. These included the classic exon 1 fragment (90 amino acids) and longer forms of 105, 117, 171, 513, 536, 552, and 586 amino acids based on wild-type Htt (of 23Q) sequence length nomenclature. N-terminal fragments of less than 171 amino acids only formed inclusions in polyQ-expanded form. By contrast the longer fragments formed inclusions irrespective of Q-length, with Q-length playing a negligible role in extent of aggregation. The inclusions could be classified into 3 distinct morphological categories. One type (Type A) was universally associated with polyQ expansions whereas the other two types (Types B and C) formed independently of polyQ length expansion. PolyQ-expansion was only required for fragments of less than 171 amino acids to aggregate. Longer fragments aggregated predominately through a non-polyQ mechanism, involving at least one, and probably more distinct clustering mechanisms.

  10. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Subunits Play a Direct Structural Role in Synaptic Contact Formation via Their N-terminal Extracellular Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura E.; Nicholson, Martin W.; Arama, Jessica E.; Thomson, Alex M.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of cell-cell contacts between presynaptic GABAergic neurons and their postsynaptic targets initiates the process of GABAergic synapse formation. GABAA receptors (GABAARs), the main postsynaptic receptors for GABA, have been recently demonstrated to act as synaptogenic proteins that can single-handedly induce the formation and functional maturation of inhibitory synapses. To establish how the subunit composition of GABAARs influences their ability to induce synaptogenesis, a co-culture model system incorporating GABAergic medium spiny neurons and the HEK293 cells, stably expressing different combinations of receptor subunits, was developed. Analyses of HEK293 cell innervation by medium spiny neuron axons using immunocytochemistry, activity-dependent labeling, and electrophysiology have indicated that the γ2 subunit is required for the formation of active synapses and that its effects are influenced by the type of α/β subunits incorporated into the functional receptor. To further characterize this process, the large N-terminal extracellular domains (ECDs) of α1, α2, β2, and γ2 subunits were purified using the baculovirus/Sf9 cell system. When these proteins were applied to the co-cultures of MSNs and α1/β2/γ2-expressing HEK293 cells, the α1, β2, or γ2 ECD each caused a significant reduction in contact formation, in contrast to the α2 ECD, which had no effect. Together, our experiments indicate that the structural role of GABAARs in synaptic contact formation is determined by their subunit composition, with the N-terminal ECDs of each of the subunits directly participating in interactions between the presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, suggesting the these interactions are multivalent and specific. PMID:27129275

  11. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities.

  12. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  13. SHAPE Analysis of the RNA Secondary Structure of the Mouse Hepatitis Virus 5′ Untranslated Region and N-Terminal Nsp1 Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Liu, Pinghua; Wudeck, Elyse V.; Giedroc, David P.; Leibowitz, Julian L.

    2014-01-01

    SHAPE technology was used to analyze RNA secondary structure of the 5′ most 474 nts of the MHV-A59 genome encompassing the minimal 5′ cis-acting region required for defective interfering RNA replication. The structures generated were in agreement with previous characterizations of SL1 through SL4 and two recently predicted secondary structure elements, S5 and SL5A. SHAPE provided biochemical support for four additional stem-loops not previously functionally investigated in MHV. Secondary structure predictions for 5′ regions of MHV-A59, BCoV and SARS-CoV were similar despite high sequence divergence. The pattern of SHAPE reactivity of in virio genomic RNA, ex virio genomic RNA, and in vitro synthesized RNA were similar, suggesting that binding of N protein or other proteins to virion RNA fails to protect the RNA from reaction with lipid permeable SHAPE reagent. Reverse genetic experiments suggested that SL5C and SL6 within the nsp1 coding sequence are not required for viral replication. PMID:25462342

  14. N-Terminal Methionine Processing.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2017-04-03

    Protein synthesis is initiated by methionine in eukaryotes and by formylmethionine in prokaryotes. N-terminal methionine can be co-translationally cleaved by the enzyme methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). When recombinant proteins are expressed in bacterial and mammalian expression systems, there is a simple universal rule that predicts whether the initiating methionine will be processed by MAP based on the size of the residue adjacent (penultimate) to the N-methionine. In general, if the side chains of the penultimate residues have a radius of gyration of 1.29 Å or less, methionine is cleaved. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Role of the N-terminal region of the skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase target sequence in its interaction with calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, W. A.; Gradwell, M. J.; Bayley, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    The binding of calmodulin (CaM) to four synthetic peptide analogues of the skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase (sk-MLCK) target sequence has been studied using 1H-NMR. The 18-residue peptide WFF is anchored to CaM via the interaction of the Trp 4 side chain with the C-domain and the Phe 17 side chain with the N-domain of the protein. A peptide corresponding to the first 10 residues (WF10) does not provide the second anchoring residue and is not long enough to span both domains of CaM. 1H-NMR spectroscopy indicates that the WF10 peptide interacts specifically with the C-domain of CaM, and the chemical shifts of the bound Trp side chain are very similar in the CaM:WF10 and CaM:WFF complexes. Binding of the C-domain of CaM to the strongly basic region around Trp 4 of this MLCK sequence may be an important step in target recognition. Comparison of 1H-NMR spectra of CaM bound to WFF, a Trp 4-->Phe analogue (FFF), or a Trp 4-->Phe/Phe 17-->Trp analogue (FFW) suggests that all three peptides bind to CaM in the same orientation, i.e., with the peptide side chain in position 4 interacting with the C-domain and the side chain in position 17 interacting with the N-domain. This indicates that a Trp residue in position 4 is not an absolute requirement for binding this target sequence and that interchanging the Trp 4 and Phe 17 residues does not reverse the orientation of the bound peptide, in confirmation of the deduction from previous indirect studies using circular dichroism (Findlay WA, Martin SR, Beckingham K, Bayley PM, 1995, Biochemistry 34:2087-2094). Molecular modeling/energy minimization studies indicate that only minor local changes in the protein structure are required to accommodate binding of the bulkier Trp 17 side chain of the FFW peptide to the N-domain of CaM. PMID:8563635

  16. Complete amino acid sequence of three reptile lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Ponkham, Pornpimol; Daduang, Sakda; Kitimasak, Wachira; Krittanai, Chartchai; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Svasti, Jisnuson; Kawamura, Shunsuke; Araki, Tomohiro; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2010-01-01

    To study the structure and function of reptile lysozymes, we have reported their purification, and in this study we have established the amino acid sequence of three egg white lysozymes in soft-shelled turtle eggs (SSTL A and SSTL B from Trionyx sinensis, ASTL from Amyda cartilaginea) by using the rapid peptide mapping method. The established amino acid sequence of SSTL A, SSTL B, and ASTL showed substitutions of 43, 42, and 44 residues respectively when compared with the HEWL (hen egg white lysozyme) sequence. In these reptile lysozymes, SSTL A had one substitution compared with SSTL B (Gly126Asp) and had an N-terminal extra Gly and 11 substitutions compared with ASTL. SSTL B had an N-terminal extra Gly and 10 residues different from ASTL. The sequence of SSTL B was identical to soft-shelled turtle lysozyme from STL (Trionyx sinensis japonicus). The Ile residue at position 93 of ASTL is the first report in all C-type lysozymes. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions (Phe34His, Arg45Tyr, Thr47Arg, and Arg114Tyr) were also found at subsites E and F when compared with HEWL. The time course using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate exhibited a reduction of the rate constant of glycosidic cleavage and increase of binding free energy for subsites E and F, which proved the contribution for amino acids mentioned above for substrate binding at subsites E and F. Interestingly, the variable binding free energy values occurred on ASTL, may be contributed from substitutions at outside of subsites E and F.

  17. Protection efficacy of the Brucella abortus ghost vaccine candidate lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36) in murine models

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Ae Jeong; MOON, Ja Young; KIM, Won Kyong; KIM, Suk; HUR, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus cells were lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36). Next, the protection efficacy of the lysed fragment as a vaccine candidate was evaluated. Group A mice were immunized with sterile PBS, group B mice were intraperitoneally (ip) immunized with 3 × 108 colony-forming units (CFUs) of B. abortus strain RB51, group C mice were immunized ip with 3 × 108 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate, and group D mice were orally immunized with 3 × 109 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate. Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific serum IgG titers were considerably higher in groups C and D than in group A. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were significantly higher in groups B–D than in group A. After an ip challenge with B. abortus 544, only group C mice showed a significant level of protection as compared to group A. Overall, these results show that ip immunization with a vaccine candidate lysed by GI24 can effectively protect mice from systemic infection with virulent B. abortus. PMID:27349900

  18. Independent repression of bile acid synthesis and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by activated hepatocyte fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and bile acids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chundong; Wang, Fen; Jin, Chengliu; Huang, Xinqiang; McKeehan, Wallace L

    2005-05-06

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor complex is a regulator of adult organ homeostasis in addition to its central role in embryonic development and wound healing. FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) is the sole FGFR receptor kinase that is significantly expressed in mature hepatocytes. Previously, we showed that mice lacking mouse FGFR4 (mR4(-/-)) exhibited elevated fecal bile acids, bile acid pool size, and expression of liver cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for canonical neutral bile acid synthesis. To prove that hepatocyte FGFR4 was a negative regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid synthesis independent of background, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing a constitutively active human FGFR4 (CahR4) in hepatocytes and crossed them with the FGFR4-deficient mice to generate CahR4/mR4(-/-) mice. In mice expressing active FGFR4 in liver, fecal bile acid excretion was 64%, bile acid pool size was 47%, and Cyp7a1 expression was 10-30% of wild-type mice. The repressed level of Cyp7a1 expression was resistant to induction by a high cholesterol diet relative to wild-type mice. Expression of CahR4 in mR4(-/-) mouse livers depressed bile acid synthesis below wild-type levels from the elevated levels observed in mR4(-/-). Levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is part of a pathway implicated in bile acid-mediated repression of synthesis, was 30% of wild-type levels in mR4(-/-) livers, whereas CahR4 livers exhibited an average 2-fold increase. However, cholate still strongly induced phospho-JNK in mR4(-/-) livers. These results confirm that hepatocyte FGFR4 regulates bile acid synthesis by repression of Cyp7a1 expression. Hepatocyte FGFR4 may contribute to the repression of bile acid synthesis through JNK signaling but is not required for activation of JNK signaling by bile acids.

  19. Basic amino acids in the N-terminal half of the PB2 subunit of influenza virus RNA polymerase are involved in both transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Hara, Koyu; Kashiwagi, Takahito; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    The PB2 subunit of influenza virus RNA polymerase is known to be involved in the initiation of transcription of the virus genome via cap binding. However, other specific roles of PB2 for viral RNA synthesis are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that basic residues, 124R, 142R, 143R, 268R and 331K/332R, in the N-terminal half of PB2 are important for the polymerase activity. Notably, R124A mutation remarkably reduced the synthesis of mRNA, cRNA and vRNA in vivo, which was in good agreement with the data obtained in vitro. Cross-linking studies suggested that a reduction of the polymerase activity in the R124A mutant was due to a significant decrease in binding to the viral RNA promoter. In the three-dimensional structure of the polymerase, 124R is visible through the NTP tunnel and is located close to the polymerase active site. We propose that 124R plays a key role in promoter binding during RNA synthesis.

  20. pH-sensitive Self-associations of the N-terminal Domain of NBCe1-A Suggest a Compact Conformation under Acidic Intracellular Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harindarpal S

    2012-01-01

    NBCe1-A is an integral membrane protein that cotransports Na+ and HCO3- ions across the basolateral membrane of the proximal tubule. It is essential for maintaining a homeostatic balance of cellular and blood pH. In X-ray diffraction studies, we reported that the cytoplasmic, N-terminal domain of NBCe1-A (NtNBCe1-A) is a dimer. Here, biophysical measurements show that the dimer is in a concentration-dependent dynamic equilibrium among three additional states in solution that are characterized by its hydrodynamic properties, molar masses, emission spectra, binding properties, and stabilities as a function of pH. Under physiological conditions, dimers are in equilibrium with monomers that are pronounced at low concentration and clusters of molecular masses up to 3-5 times that of a dimer that are pronounced at high concentration. The equilibrium can be influenced so that individual dimers predominate in a taut conformation by lowering the pH. Conversely, dimers begin to relax and disassociate into an increasing population of monomers by elevating the pH. A mechanistic diagram for the inter-conversion of these states is given. The self-associations are further supported by surface plasmon resonance (SPR-Biacore) techniques that illustrate NtNBCe1-A molecules transiently bind with one another. Bicarbonate and bicarbonate-analog bisulfite appear to enhance dimerization and induce a small amount of tetramers. A model is proposed, where the Nt responds to pH or bicarbonate fluctuations inside the cell and plays a role in self-association of entire NBCe1-A molecules in the membrane. PMID:22316307

  1. Ischemia-Modified Albumin as a Marker of Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Case for Revising the Concept of “N-Terminal Modification” to “Fatty Acid Occupation” of Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is assumed “N-terminal modified” albumin which is generated immediately following myocardial ischemia. The diagnosis of IMA is based on reduced cobalt binding affinity to albumin which is attributed mainly to incapability of cobalt to bind at albumin's modified N-terminus. Although the albumin cobalt binding test was accepted as a potentially powerful marker for discriminating acute coronary syndrome from nonischemic chest pain, its usefulness has been brought into question in recent years. Patients with acutely ischemic myocardium exhibit a rapid increase in serum levels of fatty acids (FAs). Almost all released FAs are strongly bound to albumin which create conformational changes in the protein with resultant reduced cobalt binding affinity. There is a clear metabolic and temporal relationship between IMA measured via albumin cobalt binding testing and serum levels of FAs. In line with what has been suggested recently in the literature, we conclude that a shift from the concept of “N-terminal modified” to “FA-occupied” albumin is required, as this better describes IMA in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We also offer “oxidation modified albumin, OMA,” which is conceptually different from the “FA-occupied” IMA, to describe modification of albumin in chronic disease associated with increased oxidative stress. PMID:28356609

  2. Spatial structure of oligopeptide PAP(248-261), the N-terminal fragment of the HIV enhancer prostatic acid phosphatase peptide PAP(248-286), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is an enzyme that facilitates infection of cells by HIV. Its peptide fragment PAP(248-286) forms amyloid fibrils known as SEVI, which enhance attachment of the virus by viral adhesion to the host cell prior to receptor-specific binding via reducing the electrostatic repulsion between the membranes of the virus and the target cell. The secondary structure of PAP(248-286) in aqueous and SDS solutions can be divided into an N-terminal disordered region, an α-helical central part and an α/310-helical C-terminal region (Nanga et al., 2009). In this work, we used NMR spectroscopy to study the spatial structure of the isolated N-terminal fragment of PAP(248-286), PAP(248-261) (GIHKQKEKSRLQGG), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions. Formation of a PAP(248-261)-SDS complex was confirmed by chemical shift alterations in the 1H NMR spectra of the peptide, as well as by the signs and values of Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE). In addition, the PAP(248-261) peptide does not form any specified secondary structure in either aqueous or SDS solutions.

  3. Human antibody response to Campylobacter jejuni flagellin protein and a synthetic N-terminal flagellin peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Nachamkin, I; Yang, X H

    1989-01-01

    We measured isotype-specific human antibodies directed against Campylobacter jejuni native flagellin and a synthetic peptide derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein by using a microdilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum samples from patients with gastrointestinal infection caused by C. jejuni (n = 20) and control samples (number from normal subjects = 20; number from patients with diarrhea other than campylobacter = 20) were tested in this assay. Serum specimens from patients with campylobacter infection showed statistically significant higher isotype-specific antiflagellin antibody titers than control samples did. Detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies was less specific (70%) than detection of either IgA or IgM antibodies in infected patients (95%). The sensitivity of testing for any of the isotypes ranged from 64 to 100% in acute-phase serum specimens and 85 to 95% in convalescent-phase serum specimens. An ELISA with an N-terminal synthetic peptide derived from the flagellin protein as antigen was not sensitive (60%) for detecting campylobacter infection but was very specific (97.5%). In conclusion, detection of serum IgA or IgM against C. jejuni flagellin may be a useful marker of infection. Although the N-terminal synthetic peptide was antigenic in a few patients with infection and showed good specificity in the ELISA, additional amino acid sequences with better sensitivity for detecting infection need to be identified. PMID:2584372

  4. Expression of a borage desaturase cDNA containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain results in the accumulation of high levels of Δ6-desaturated fatty acids in transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Sayanova, Olga; Smith, Mark A.; Lapinskas, Peter; Stobart, A. Keith; Dobson, Gary; Christie, William W.; Shewry, Peter R.; Napier, Johnathan A.

    1997-01-01

    γ-Linolenic acid (GLA; C18:3 Δ6,9,12) is a component of the seed oils of evening primrose (Oenothera spp.), borage (Borago officinalis L.), and some other plants. It is widely used as a dietary supplement and for treatment of various medical conditions. GLA is synthesized by a Δ6-fatty acid desaturase using linoleic acid (C18:2 Δ9,12) as a substrate. To enable the production of GLA in conventional oilseeds, we have isolated a cDNA encoding the Δ6-fatty acid desaturase from developing seeds of borage and confirmed its function by expression in transgenic tobacco plants. Analysis of leaf lipids from a transformed plant demonstrated the accumulation of GLA and octadecatetraenoic acid (C18:4 Δ6,9,12,15) to levels of 13.2% and 9.6% of the total fatty acids, respectively. The borage Δ6-fatty acid desaturase differs from other desaturase enzymes, characterized from higher plants previously, by the presence of an N-terminal domain related to cytochrome b5. PMID:9108131

  5. Expression of a borage desaturase cDNA containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain results in the accumulation of high levels of delta6-desaturated fatty acids in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, O; Smith, M A; Lapinskas, P; Stobart, A K; Dobson, G; Christie, W W; Shewry, P R; Napier, J A

    1997-04-15

    gamma-Linolenic acid (GLA; C18:3 delta(6,9,12)) is a component of the seed oils of evening primrose (Oenothera spp.), borage (Borago officinalis L.), and some other plants. It is widely used as a dietary supplement and for treatment of various medical conditions. GLA is synthesized by a delta6-fatty acid desaturase using linoleic acid (C18:2 delta(9,12)) as a substrate. To enable the production of GLA in conventional oilseeds, we have isolated a cDNA encoding the delta6-fatty acid desaturase from developing seeds of borage and confirmed its function by expression in transgenic tobacco plants. Analysis of leaf lipids from a transformed plant demonstrated the accumulation of GLA and octadecatetraenoic acid (C18:4 delta(6,9,12,15)) to levels of 13.2% and 9.6% of the total fatty acids, respectively. The borage delta6-fatty acid desaturase differs from other desaturase enzymes, characterized from higher plants previously, by the presence of an N-terminal domain related to cytochrome b5.

  6. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  7. New roles for old modifications: emerging roles of N-terminal post-translational modifications in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Tooley, John G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2014-12-01

    The importance of internal post-translational modification (PTM) in protein signaling and function has long been known and appreciated. However, the significance of the same PTMs on the alpha amino group of N-terminal amino acids has been comparatively understudied. Historically considered static regulators of protein stability, additional functional roles for N-terminal PTMs are now beginning to be elucidated. New findings show that N-terminal methylation, along with N-terminal acetylation, is an important regulatory modification with significant roles in development and disease progression. There are also emerging studies on the enzymology and functional roles of N-terminal ubiquitylation and N-terminal propionylation. Here, will discuss the recent advances in the functional studies of N-terminal PTMs, recount the new N-terminal PTMs being identified, and briefly examine the possibility of dynamic N-terminal PTM exchange.

  8. New roles for old modifications: Emerging roles of N-terminal post-translational modifications in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, John G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    The importance of internal post-translational modification (PTM) in protein signaling and function has long been known and appreciated. However, the significance of the same PTMs on the alpha amino group of N-terminal amino acids has been comparatively understudied. Historically considered static regulators of protein stability, additional functional roles for N-terminal PTMs are now beginning to be elucidated. New findings show that N-terminal methylation, along with N-terminal acetylation, is an important regulatory modification with significant roles in development and disease progression. There are also emerging studies on the enzymology and functional roles of N-terminal ubiquitylation and N-terminal propionylation. Here, will discuss the recent advances in the functional studies of N-terminal PTMs, recount the new N-terminal PTMs being identified, and briefly examine the possibility of dynamic N-terminal PTM exchange. PMID:25209108

  9. Effects of curcumin on apoptosis and oxidoinflammatory regulation in a rat model of acetic acid-induced colitis: the roles of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Akpolat, Meryem; Uz, Yesim Hulya; Kizilay, Gulnur; Sapmaz-Metin, Melike; Cerkezkayabekir, Aysegul; Omurlu, Imran Kurt

    2013-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of curcumin on epithelial cell apoptosis, the immunoreactivity of the phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in inflamed colon mucosa, and oxidative stress in a rat model of ulcerative colitis induced by acetic acid. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, acetic acid, and acetic acid+curcumin. Curcumin (100 mg/kg per day, intragastrically) was administered 10 days before the induction of colitis and was continued for two additional days. Acetic acid-induced colitis caused a significant increase in the macroscopic and microscopic tissue ranking scores as well as an elevation in colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and the number of apoptotic epithelial cells in colon tissue compared to controls. In the rat colon, immunoreactivity of phospho-p38 MAPK was increased, whereas the phospho-JNK activity was decreased following the induction of colitis. Curcumin treatment was associated with amelioration of macroscopic and microscopic colitis sores, decreased MPO activity, and decreased MDA levels in acetic acid-induced colitis. Furthermore, oral curcumin supplementation clearly prevented programmed cell death and restored immunreactivity of MAPKs in the colons of colitic rats. The results of this study suggest that oral curcumin treatment decreases colon injury and is associated with decreased inflammatory reactions, lipid peroxidation, apoptotic cell death, and modulating p38- and JNK-MAPK pathways.

  10. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  11. Inhibition of c-Jun-N-terminal Kinase Increases Cardiac Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor α Expression and Fatty Acid Oxidation and Prevents Lipopolysaccharide-induced Heart Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Drosatos, Konstantinos; Drosatos-Tampakaki, Zoi; Khan, Raffay; Homma, Shunichi; Schulze, P. Christian; Zannis, Vassilis I.; Goldberg, Ira J.

    2011-01-01

    Septic shock results from bacterial infection and is associated with multi-organ failure, high mortality, and cardiac dysfunction. Sepsis causes both myocardial inflammation and energy depletion. We hypothesized that reduced cardiac energy production is a primary cause of ventricular dysfunction in sepsis. The JNK pathway is activated in sepsis and has also been implicated in impaired fatty acid oxidation in several tissues. Therefore, we tested whether JNK activation inhibits cardiac fatty acid oxidation and whether blocking JNK would restore fatty acid oxidation during LPS treatment. LPS treatment of C57BL/6 mice and adenovirus-mediated activation of the JNK pathway in cardiomyocytes inhibited peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression and fatty acid oxidation. Surprisingly, none of the adaptive responses that have been described in other types of heart failure, such as increased glucose utilization, reduced αMHC:βMHC ratio or induction of certain microRNAs, occurred in LPS-treated mice. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a general JNK inhibitor (SP600125) increased fatty acid oxidation in mice and a cardiomyocyte-derived cell line. JNK inhibition also prevented LPS-mediated reduction in fatty acid oxidation and cardiac dysfunction. Inflammation was not alleviated in LPS-treated mice that received the JNK inhibitor. We conclude that activation of JNK signaling reduces fatty acid oxidation and prevents the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α down-regulation that occurs with LPS. PMID:21873422

  12. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-03-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region.

  13. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region

    PubMed Central

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2015-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region. PMID:26691840

  14. Membrane permeabilization of the African horse sickness virus VP5 protein is mediated by two N-terminal amphipathic α-helices.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Liesel; Huismans, Henk; Theron, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    The VP5 outer capsid protein of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is cytotoxic when expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells. Secondary structure analysis of the VP5 amino acid sequence of AHSV-9 identified two N-terminal amphipathic α-helices within the first 43 amino acids. Baculovirus expression of N- and C-terminal truncated VP5 proteins in Sf-9 cells indicated that the N-terminal 43 amino acids correlated with low levels of protein expression and with increased membrane permeabilization and cytotoxicity. Exogenous addition of chemically synthesized VP5 peptides indicated that both N-terminal amphipathic α-helices are required for membrane permeabilization of Sf-9 cells. These findings suggest that AHSV VP5 is a membrane-destabilizing protein.

  15. Retinoic acids acting through retinoid receptors protect hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-mediated cell death by inhibition of c-jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Y; Sato, Y; Koizumi, S; Ohno, Y; Nagao, T; Inoue, K

    2007-06-15

    Retinoic acids (RAs), including all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA), play fundamental roles in a variety of physiological events in vertebrates, through their specific nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). Despite the physiological importance of RA, their functional significance under pathological conditions is not well understood. We examined the effect of ATRA on oxygen/glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/Rep)-induced neuronal damage in cultured rat hippocampal slices, and found that ATRA significantly reduced neuronal death. The cytoprotective effect of ATRA was observed not only in cornu ammonis (CA) 1 but also in CA2 and dentate gyrus (DG), and was attenuated by selective antagonists for RAR or RXR. By contrast, in the CA3 region, no protective effects of ATRA were observed. The OGD/Rep also increased phosphorylated forms of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and p38 (P-p38) in hippocampus, and specific inhibitors for these kinases protected neurons. ATRA prevented the increases in P-JNK and P-p38 after OGD/Rep, as well as the decrease in NeuN and its shrinkage, all of which were inhibited by antagonists for RAR or RXR. These findings suggest that the ATRA signaling via retinoid receptors results in the inhibition of JNK and p38 activation, leading to the protection of neurons against OGD/Rep-induced damage in the rat hippocampus.

  16. N-Terminal Fatty Acid Substitution Increases the Leishmanicidal Activity of CA(1-7)M(2-9), a Cecropin-Melittin Hybrid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Chicharro, Cristina; Granata, Cesare; Lozano, Rosario; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the leishmanicidal activity of the synthetic cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide CA(1-7)M(2-9) (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), a systematic study of its acylation with saturated linear fatty acids was carried out. Acylation of the Nɛ-7 lysine residue led to a drastic decrease in leishmanicidal activity, whereas acylation at lysine 1, in either the α or the ɛ NH2 group, increased up to 3 times the activity of the peptide against promastigotes and increased up to 15 times the activity of the peptide against amastigotes. Leishmanicidal activity increased with the length of the fatty acid chain, reaching a maximum for the lauroyl analogue (12 carbons). According to the fast kinetics, dissipation of membrane potential, and parasite membrane permeability to the nucleic acid binding probe SYTOX green, the lethal mechanism was directly related to plasma membrane permeabilization. PMID:11502512

  17. Expression of Ceramide Synthase 6 Transcriptionally Activates Acid Ceramidase in a c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Tirodkar, Tejas S.; Lu, Ping; Bai, Aiping; Scheffel, Matthew J.; Gencer, Salih; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Bielawska, Alicja; Ogretmen, Besim; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A family of six ceramide synthases with distinct but overlapping substrate specificities is responsible for generation of ceramides with acyl chains ranging from ∼14–26 carbons. Ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) preferentially generates C14- and C16-ceramides, and we have previously shown that down-regulation of this enzyme decreases apoptotic susceptibility. In this study, we further evaluated how increased CerS6 expression impacts sphingolipid composition and metabolism. Overexpression of CerS6 in HT29 colon cancer cells resulted in increased apoptotic susceptibility and preferential generation of C16-ceramide, which occurred at the expense of very long chain, saturated ceramides. These changes were also reflected in sphingomyelin composition. HT-CerS6 cells had increased intracellular levels of sphingosine, which is generated by ceramidases upon hydrolysis of ceramide. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that only expression of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) was increased. The increase in acid ceramidase was confirmed by expression and activity analyses. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK (SP600125) or curcumin reduced transcriptional up-regulation of acid ceramidase. Using an acid ceramidase promoter driven luciferase reporter plasmid, we demonstrated that CerS1 has no effect on transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase and that CerS2 slightly but significantly decreased the luciferase signal. Similar to CerS6, overexpression of CerS3–5 resulted in an ∼2-fold increase in luciferase reporter gene activity. Exogenous ceramide failed to induce reporter activity, while a CerS inhibitor and a catalytically inactive mutant of CerS6 failed to reduce it. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of CerS6 can mediate transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase in a JNK-dependent manner that is independent of CerS6 activity. PMID:25839235

  18. Expression of Ceramide Synthase 6 Transcriptionally Activates Acid Ceramidase in a c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Tirodkar, Tejas S; Lu, Ping; Bai, Aiping; Scheffel, Matthew J; Gencer, Salih; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Bielawska, Alicja; Ogretmen, Besim; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2015-05-22

    A family of six ceramide synthases with distinct but overlapping substrate specificities is responsible for generation of ceramides with acyl chains ranging from ∼14-26 carbons. Ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) preferentially generates C14- and C16-ceramides, and we have previously shown that down-regulation of this enzyme decreases apoptotic susceptibility. In this study, we further evaluated how increased CerS6 expression impacts sphingolipid composition and metabolism. Overexpression of CerS6 in HT29 colon cancer cells resulted in increased apoptotic susceptibility and preferential generation of C16-ceramide, which occurred at the expense of very long chain, saturated ceramides. These changes were also reflected in sphingomyelin composition. HT-CerS6 cells had increased intracellular levels of sphingosine, which is generated by ceramidases upon hydrolysis of ceramide. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that only expression of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) was increased. The increase in acid ceramidase was confirmed by expression and activity analyses. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK (SP600125) or curcumin reduced transcriptional up-regulation of acid ceramidase. Using an acid ceramidase promoter driven luciferase reporter plasmid, we demonstrated that CerS1 has no effect on transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase and that CerS2 slightly but significantly decreased the luciferase signal. Similar to CerS6, overexpression of CerS3-5 resulted in an ∼2-fold increase in luciferase reporter gene activity. Exogenous ceramide failed to induce reporter activity, while a CerS inhibitor and a catalytically inactive mutant of CerS6 failed to reduce it. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of CerS6 can mediate transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase in a JNK-dependent manner that is independent of CerS6 activity.

  19. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  20. Addition of an N-terminal epitope tag significantly increases the activity of plant fatty acid desaturases expressed in yeast cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows great potential for development of bioreactor systems geared towards the production of high-value lipids such as polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, the yields of which are largely dependent on the activity of ectopically-expressed enzymes. Here we show that the addit...

  1. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  2. Acetylation of the Entamoeba histone H4 N-terminal domain is influenced by short chain fatty acids that enter trophozoites in a pH-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Jennifer; Eichinger, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of higher eukaryotic cells with short chain fatty acids (SCFA) such as butyrate causes decreased levels of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and hyperacetylation of histones, and thereby affects gene expression, cell growth and differentiation. Entamoeba parasites encounter high levels of SCFA in the host colon, and in vitro these compounds allow trophozoite stage parasites to multiply but prevent their differentiation into infectious cysts. The Entamoeba invadens IP-1 histone H4 protein has an unusual number of lysines in its N-terminus, and these become hyperacetylated in trophozoites exposed to the HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) or HC-toxin, but not in trophozoites exposed to butyrate. We have now found that several other commonly studied isolates of Entamoeba parasites also have an extended set of histone H4 acetylation sites that become hyperacetylated in response to TSA, but hypoacetylated in response to butyrate, suggesting an unusual sensitivity of this parasite's histone modifying enzymes to SCFA. Butyrate was found to enter trophozoites in a pH-dependent manner consistent with diffusive entry of the un-ionized form of the fatty acid into the amoebae. Transit of the Entamoeba organism through areas of the host intestine with distinct pH and SCFA concentrations would therefore result in very different levels of SCFA within the parasite. Entamoeba appears to have acquired unique alterations of its histone acetylation mechanism that may allow for its growth in the presence of varying amounts of the bacterial fermentation products. PMID:17706222

  3. Solid-phase N-terminal peptide enrichment study by optimizing trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine modified proteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Yang, Jonathon; Zhukova, Daria; Nguen, Hamilton; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proteolytic cleavages generate active precursor proteins by creating new N-termini in the proteins. A number of strategies recently published regarding the enrichment of original or newly formed N-terminal peptides using guanidination of lysine residues and amine reactive reagents. For effective enrichment of N-terminal peptides, the efficiency of trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine (guanidinated) modified proteins must be understood and simple and versatile solid-phase N-terminal capture strategies should be developed. Methods We present here a mass spectrometry-based study to evaluate and optimize the trypsin proteolysis on a guanidinated modified protein. Trypsin proteolysis was studied using different amount of trypsin to modified protein ratios. To capture the original N-termini, after guanidination of proteins, original N-termini were acetylated and the proteins were digested with trypsin. The newly formed N-terminal tryptic peptides were captured with a new amine reactive acid-cleavable solid-phase reagent. The original N-terminal peptides were then collected from the supernatant of the solution. Results We demonstrated a detailed study of the efficiency of enzyme trypsin on homoarginine modified proteins. We observed that the rate of hydrolysis of homoarginine residues compared to their lysine/arginine counter parts were slower but generally cleaved after an overnight digestion period depending on the protein to protease concentration ratios. Selectivity of the solid-phase N-terminal reagent was studied by enrichment of original N-terminal peptides from two standard proteins, ubiquitin and RNaseS. Conclusion We found enzyme trypsin is active in guanidinated form of protein depending on enzyme to protein concentrations, time and the proximity of arginine residues in the sequence. The novel solid-phase capture reagent also successfully enriched N-terminal peptides from the standard protein mixtures. We believe this trypsin proteolysis study on

  4. Oxidative stress-mediated N-terminal protein modifications and MS-based approaches for N-terminal proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2016-02-01

    The N-termini of peptides and proteins can be subjected to highly diverse modifications, including acetylation, myristoylation, pyroglutamylation, and epimerization. These modifications affect protein stability, localization, and activity as well as alter the chemical properties of the N-terminus. Oxidative stress is known to induce the direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and peptide backbones in proteins. Alternatively, polyunsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized to lipid hydroperoxides, which further decompose to form highly reactive aldehydes such as 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE) and 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE). ONE and HNE modify various amino acid residues and induce protein cross-linking. However, there have been few studies on oxidative stress-mediated N-terminal modifications and the resulting functional changes. Our recent studies have reported several novel N-terminal modifications that result in the formation of α-ketoamide, transamination, cyclization, and epimerization. These novel N-terminal modifications are the focus of this review. We also outline recent advances in approaches for N-terminal analysis, which have been developed over the last several decades. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. N-terminal and central segments of the type 1 ryanodine receptor mediate its interaction with FK506-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Girgenrath, Tanya; Mahalingam, Mohana; Svensson, Bengt; Nitu, Florentin R; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D

    2013-05-31

    We used site-directed labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to map RyR1 sequence elements forming the binding site of the 12-kDa binding protein for the immunosuppressant drug, FK506. This protein, FKBP12, promotes the RyR1 closed state, thereby inhibiting Ca(2+) leakage in resting muscle. Although FKBP12 function is well established, its binding determinants within the RyR1 protein sequence remain unresolved. To identify these sequence determinants using FRET, we created five single-Cys FKBP variants labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (denoted D-FKBP) and then targeted these D-FKBPs to full-length RyR1 constructs containing decahistidine (His10) "tags" placed within N-terminal (amino acid residues 76-619) or central (residues 2157-2777) regions of RyR1. The FRET acceptor Cy3NTA bound specifically and saturably to these His tags, allowing distance analysis of FRET measured from each D-FKBP variant to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag. Results indicate that D-FKBP binds proximal to both N-terminal and central domains of RyR1, thus suggesting that the FKBP binding site is composed of determinants from both regions. These findings further imply that the RyR1 N-terminal and central domains are proximal to one another, a core premise of the domain-switch hypothesis of RyR function. We observed FRET from GFP fused at position 620 within the N-terminal domain to central domain His-tagged sites, thus further supporting this hypothesis. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that N-terminal and central domain elements are closely apposed near the FKBP binding site within the RyR1 three-dimensional structure.

  6. N-terminal and Central Segments of the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Mediate Its Interaction with FK506-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Girgenrath, Tanya; Mahalingam, Mohana; Svensson, Bengt; Nitu, Florentin R.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.

    2013-01-01

    We used site-directed labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to map RyR1 sequence elements forming the binding site of the 12-kDa binding protein for the immunosuppressant drug, FK506. This protein, FKBP12, promotes the RyR1 closed state, thereby inhibiting Ca2+ leakage in resting muscle. Although FKBP12 function is well established, its binding determinants within the RyR1 protein sequence remain unresolved. To identify these sequence determinants using FRET, we created five single-Cys FKBP variants labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (denoted D-FKBP) and then targeted these D-FKBPs to full-length RyR1 constructs containing decahistidine (His10) “tags” placed within N-terminal (amino acid residues 76–619) or central (residues 2157–2777) regions of RyR1. The FRET acceptor Cy3NTA bound specifically and saturably to these His tags, allowing distance analysis of FRET measured from each D-FKBP variant to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag. Results indicate that D-FKBP binds proximal to both N-terminal and central domains of RyR1, thus suggesting that the FKBP binding site is composed of determinants from both regions. These findings further imply that the RyR1 N-terminal and central domains are proximal to one another, a core premise of the domain-switch hypothesis of RyR function. We observed FRET from GFP fused at position 620 within the N-terminal domain to central domain His-tagged sites, thus further supporting this hypothesis. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that N-terminal and central domain elements are closely apposed near the FKBP binding site within the RyR1 three-dimensional structure. PMID:23585572

  7. Bioinformatics analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae N-terminal proteome provides evidence of alternative translation initiation and post-translational N-terminal acetylation.

    PubMed

    Helsens, Kenny; Van Damme, Petra; Degroeve, Sven; Martens, Lennart; Arnesen, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2011-08-05

    Initiation of protein translation is a well-studied fundamental process, albeit high-throughput and more comprehensive determination of the exact translation initiation sites (TIS) was only recently made possible following the introduction of positional proteomics techniques that target protein N-termini. Precise translation initiation is of crucial importance, as truncated or extended proteins might fold, function, and locate erroneously. Still, as already shown for some proteins, alternative translation initiation can also serve as a regulatory mechanism. By applying N-terminal COFRADIC (combined fractional diagonal chromatography), we here isolated N-terminal peptides of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome and analyzed both annotated and alternative TIS. We analyzed this N-terminome of S. cerevisiae which resulted in the identification of 650 unique N-terminal peptides corresponding to database annotated TIS. Furthermore, 56 unique N(α)-acetylated peptides were identified that suggest alternative TIS (MS/MS-based), while MS-based evidence of N(α)-acetylation led to an additional 33 such peptides. To improve the overall sensitivity of the analysis, we also included the 5' UTR (untranslated region) in-frame translations together with the yeast protein sequences in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. To ensure the quality of the individual peptide identifications, peptide-to-spectrum matches were only accepted at a 99% probability threshold and were subsequently analyzed in detail by the Peptizer tool to automatically ascertain their compliance with several expert criteria. Furthermore, we have also identified 60 MS/MS-based and 117 MS-based N(α)-acetylated peptides that point to N(α)-acetylation as a post-translational modification since these peptides did not start nor were preceded (in their corresponding protein sequence) by a methionine residue. Next, we evaluated consensus sequence features of nucleic acids and amino acids across each of these groups of peptides and

  8. Structural basis for substrate recognition by the human N-terminal methyltransferase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Cheng; Mao, Yunfei; Tempel, Wolfram; Qin, Su; Li, Li; Loppnau, Peter; Huang, Rong; Min, Jinrong

    2015-11-05

    α-N-terminal methylation represents a highly conserved and prevalent post-translational modification, yet its biological function has remained largely speculative. The recent discovery of α-N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) and its physiological substrates propels the elucidation of a general role of α-N-terminal methylation in mediating DNA-binding ability of the modified proteins. The phenotypes, observed from both NTMT1 knockdown in breast cancer cell lines and knockout mouse models, suggest the potential involvement of α-N-terminal methylation in DNA damage response and cancer development. In this study, we report the first crystal structures of human NTMT1 in complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) and six substrate peptides, respectively, and reveal that NTMT1 contains two characteristic structural elements (a β hairpin and an N-terminal extension) that contribute to its substrate specificity. Our complex structures, coupled with mutagenesis, binding, and enzymatic studies, also present the key elements involved in locking the consensus substrate motif XPK (X indicates any residue type other than D/E) into the catalytic pocket for α-N-terminal methylation and explain why NTMT1 prefers an XPK sequence motif. We propose a catalytic mechanism for α-N-terminal methylation. Overall, this study gives us the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism of α-N-terminal methylation and potentially contributes to the advent of therapeutic agents for human diseases associated with deregulated α-N-terminal methylation.

  9. Purification, characterization and partial amino acid sequence of glycogen synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Carabaza, A; Arino, J; Fox, J W; Villar-Palasi, C; Guinovart, J J

    1990-01-01

    Glycogen synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme showed a subunit molecular mass of 80 kDa. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer. Antibodies developed against purified yeast glycogen synthase inactivated the enzyme in yeast extracts and allowed the detection of the protein in Western blots. Amino acid analysis showed that the enzyme is very rich in glutamate and/or glutamine residues. The N-terminal sequence (11 amino acid residues) was determined. In addition, selected tryptic-digest peptides were purified by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and submitted to gas-phase sequencing. Up to eight sequences (79 amino acid residues) could be aligned with the human muscle enzyme sequence. Levels of identity range between 37 and 100%, indicating that, although human and yeast glycogen synthases probably share some conserved regions, significant differences in their primary structure should be expected. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2114092

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  11. N-terminal modification of proteins with o-aminophenols.

    PubMed

    Obermeyer, Allie C; Jarman, John B; Francis, Matthew B

    2014-07-09

    The synthetic modification of proteins plays an important role in chemical biology and biomaterials science. These fields provide a constant need for chemical tools that can introduce new functionality in specific locations on protein surfaces. In this work, an oxidative strategy is demonstrated for the efficient modification of N-terminal residues on peptides and N-terminal proline residues on proteins. The strategy uses o-aminophenols or o-catechols that are oxidized to active coupling species in situ using potassium ferricyanide. Peptide screening results have revealed that many N-terminal amino acids can participate in this reaction, and that proline residues are particularly reactive. When applied to protein substrates, the reaction shows a stronger requirement for the proline group. Key advantages of the reaction include its fast second-order kinetics and ability to achieve site-selective modification in a single step using low concentrations of reagent. Although free cysteines are also modified by the coupling reaction, they can be protected through disulfide formation and then liberated after N-terminal coupling is complete. This allows access to doubly functionalized bioconjugates that can be difficult to access using other methods.

  12. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  13. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  14. β-Amyloid Oligomers Induce Phosphorylation of Tau and Inactivation of Insulin Receptor Substrate via c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling: Suppression by Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Yang, Fusheng; Rosario, Emily R.; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Beech, Walter; Gant, Dana J.; Chen, Ping Ping; Hudspeth, Beverly; Chen, Cory; Zhao, Yongle; Vinters, Harry V.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2009-01-01

    Both insulin resistance (type II diabetes) and β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers are implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we investigate the role of Aβ oligomer-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation leading to phosphorylation and degradation of the adaptor protein insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). IRS-1 couples insulin and other trophic factor receptors to downstream kinases and neuroprotective signaling. Increased phospho-IRS-1 is found in AD brain and insulin-resistant tissues from diabetics. Here, we report Aβ oligomers significantly increased active JNK and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser616) and tau (Ser422) in cultured hippocampal neurons, whereas JNK inhibition blocked these responses. The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) similarly inhibited JNK and the phosphorylation of IRS-1 and tau in cultured hippocampal neurons. Feeding 3xTg-AD transgenic mice a diet high in saturated and omega-6 fat increased active JNK and phosphorylated IRS-1 and tau. Treatment of the 3xTg-AD mice on high-fat diet with fish oil or curcumin or a combination of both for 4 months reduced phosphorylated JNK, IRS-1, and tau and prevented the degradation of total IRS-1. This was accompanied by improvement in Y-maze performance. Mice fed with fish oil and curcumin for 1 month had more significant effects on Y-maze, and the combination showed more significant inhibition of JNK, IRS-1, and tau phosphorylation. These data indicate JNK mediates Aβ oligomer inactivation of IRS-1 and phospho-tau pathology and that dietary treatment with fish oil/DHA, curcumin, or a combination of both has the potential to improve insulin/trophic signaling and cognitive deficits in AD. PMID:19605645

  15. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of the maize endosperm protein glutelin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Prat, S; Cortadas, J; Puigdomènech, P; Palau, J

    1985-01-01

    The cDNA coding for a glutelin-2 protein from maize endosperm has been cloned and the complete amino acid sequence of the protein derived for the first time. An immature maize endosperm cDNA bank was screened for the expression of a beta-lactamase:glutelin-2 (G2) fusion polypeptide by using antibodies against the purified 28 kd G2 protein. A clone corresponding to the 28 kd G2 protein was sequenced and the primary structure of this protein was derived. Five regions can be defined in the protein sequence: an 11 residue N-terminal part, a repeated region formed by eight units of the sequence Pro-Pro-Pro-Val-His-Leu, an alternating Pro-X stretch 21 residues long, a Cys rich domain and a C-terminal part rich in Gln. The protein sequence is preceded by 19 residues which have the characteristics of the signal peptide found in secreted proteins. Unlike zeins, the main maize storage proteins, 28 kd glutelin-2 has several homologous sequences in common with other cereal storage proteins. Images PMID:3839076

  16. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding an alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase from Acetobacter turbidans.

    PubMed

    Polderman-Tijmes, Jolanda J; Jekel, Peter A; de Vries, Erik J; van Merode, Annet E J; Floris, René; van der Laan, Jan-Metske; Sonke, Theo; Janssen, Dick B

    2002-01-01

    The alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase from Acetobacter turbidans ATCC 9325 is capable of hydrolyzing and synthesizing beta-lactam antibiotics, such as cephalexin and ampicillin. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the purified alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase allowed cloning and genetic characterization of the corresponding gene from an A. turbidans genomic library. The gene, designated aehA, encodes a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 72,000. Comparison of the determined N-terminal sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence indicated the presence of an N-terminal leader sequence of 40 amino acids. The aehA gene was subcloned in the pET9 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and found to be dimeric with subunits of 70 kDa. A sequence similarity search revealed 26% identity with a glutaryl 7-ACA acylase precursor from Bacillus laterosporus, but no homology was found with other known penicillin or cephalosporin acylases. There was some similarity to serine proteases, including the conservation of the active site motif, GXSYXG. Together with database searches, this suggested that the alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase is a beta-lactam antibiotic acylase that belongs to a class of hydrolases that is different from the Ntn hydrolase superfamily to which the well-characterized penicillin acylase from E. coli belongs. The alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase of A. turbidans represents a subclass of this new class of beta-lactam antibiotic acylases.

  17. Evaluation of the purity of recombinant proteins and detection of residual protein contaminants via N-terminal microsequencing and database searching.

    PubMed

    Jin, D Y; Zhang, Z Q; Zhou, Y A; Hou, Y D

    1991-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequences of purified recombinant human gamma-interferon, alpha 2a-interferon and interleukin-2 expressed in E. coli were determined on an Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer and 120A PTH Amino Acid Analyzer. From the raw chromatographic data of these samples, the identity, heterogeneity, amount of methionine-plus species remaining in the final products, and the probable process contaminants were evaluated with the help of computer methods including database searching. General methods to characterize trace contaminants in protein samples were also discussed. Among the sequenced samples, only gamma-interferon was shown to be N-terminal homogeneous. Methionine-containing species were found in interleukin-2 and alpha 2a-interferon. Chicken eggwhite lysozyme was detected in very small amounts in one batch of samples. These results provide valuable information for the development and improvement of preparation methods as well as regulatory responses to recombinant products.

  18. The localization of a vitamin K-induced modification in an N-terminal fragment of human prothrombin

    PubMed Central

    Skotland, Tore; Holm, Turid; Østerud, Bjarne; Flengsrud, Ragnar; Prydz, Hans

    1974-01-01

    1. The N-terminal fragment (PF-I) split off from prothrombin during coagulation was purified to homogeneity from human serum. 2. The apparent molecular weight is 27000±2000 in sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, whereas a value of about 19600 is obtained by calculation based on amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. The N-terminal sequence is an Ala-Asx bond. The fragment contains about 16% carbohydrate, binds phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+ and is adsorbed to BaSO4. The pKa of its BaSO4-binding group(s) is 3.1–3.5. 3. By CNBr cleavage of fragment PF-I two peptides (C-1 and C-2) were obtained with molecular weights of about 5900 (C-2) and 12400 (C-1) on the basis of amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. Only the smaller (N-terminal) peptide is adsorbed to BaSO4 and, since the ability of the whole protein to bind to BaSO4 is known to be absent in samples obtained from patients treated with vitamin K antagonists, this peptide probably contains the site of a modification to the structure of the protein which occurs during biosynthesis and depends on vitamin K. This peptide does not contain hexosamine or sialic acid. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:4219283

  19. A new idea for simple and rapid monitoring of gene expression: requirement of nucleotide sequences encoding an N-terminal HA tag in the T7 promoter-driven expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong-Mi; Kim, Goo-Young; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2012-10-01

    Mammalian expression vectors are used to overexpress genes of interest in mammalian cells. High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), used as a specific target, was expressed from the pHA-M-HtrA1 plasmid in HEK293T cells, inducing cell death. Expression of HtrA1 was driven by the pHA-M-HtrA1 mammalian expression vector in E. coli resulting in growth suppression of E. coli in an HtrA1 serine protease-dependent manner. By using various combinations of promoters, target genes and N-terminal tags, the T7 promoter and N-terminal HA tag in the mammalian expression vector were shown to be responsible for expression of target genes in E. coli. Thus the pHA-M-HtrA1 plasmid can be used as a novel, rapid pre-test system for expression and cytotoxicity of the specific target gene in E. coli before assessing its functions in mammalian cells.

  20. The N-terminal region of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) plays an essential role in regulating its plasma membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se-Eun; Thakkar, Nilay; Oh, Yunseok; Park, Ji Eun; Han, Songhee; Ryoo, Gongmi; Hahn, Hyunggu; Maeng, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young-Ran; Han, Byung Woo; Lee, Wooin

    2017-05-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) is a major influx transporter mediating the hepatic uptake of various endogenous substrates as well as clinically important drugs such as statins and anticancer drugs. However, molecular mechanisms controlling the membrane trafficking of OATP1B3 have been largely unknown. Several reports recently indicated the presence of a distinct, cancer-type OATP1B3 variant lacking the N-terminal 28 amino acids compared to OATP1B3 expressed in non-malignant hepatocytes. Interestingly, the cancer-type OATP1B3 variant is located predominantly in the cytoplasm, implicating the involvement of the N-terminal region of OATP1B3 in its membrane trafficking. In the current study, we set out to experimentally validate the importance of the N-terminal region of OATP1B3 and to identify responsible sequence motif(s) in that region. A number of truncation or point mutants of OATP1B3 were transiently expressed in HEK293T, HCT-8 or MDCK II cells and their expression in cytoplasmic and surface membrane fractions were analyzed by immunoblotting. Our results indicated that the N-terminal sequence of OATP1B3, in particular, at the amino acid positions between 12 and 28, may be indispensable in its membrane trafficking. Moreover, our results using a fusion construct indicated that the first 50 amino acids of OATP1B3 are sufficient for its membrane localization. The importance of the N-terminal region in membranous localization was shared among the other OATP1B subfamily members, OATP1B1 and rat Oatp1b2. Our efforts to identify the responsible amino acid(s) or structure motif(s) in the N-terminal region did not pinpoint individual amino acids or motifs with putative secondary structures. Our current findings however demonstrate that the N-terminal region is important for the membrane localization of the OATP1B subfamily members and should facilitate future investigations of the mechanisms involved in the regulation and membrane trafficking of

  1. Amino acid sequences of heterotrophic and photosynthetic ferredoxins from the tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Kamide, K; Sakai, H; Aoki, K; Sanada, Y; Wada, K; Green, L S; Yee, B C; Buchanan, B B

    1995-11-01

    Several forms (isoproteins) of ferredoxin in roots, leaves, and green and red pericarps in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were earlier identified on the basis of N-terminal amino acid sequence and chromatographic behavior (Green et al. 1991). In the present study, a large scale preparation made possible determination of the full length amino acid sequence of the two ferredoxins from leaves. The ferredoxins characteristic of fruit and root were sequenced from the amino terminus to the 30th residue or beyond. The leaf ferredoxins were confirmed to be expressed in pericarp of both green and red fruit. The ferredoxins characteristic of fruit and root appeared to be restricted to those tissue. The results extend earlier findings in demonstrating that ferredoxin occurs in the major organs of the tomato plant where it appears to function irrespective of photosynthetic competence.

  2. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  3. N-Terminal region is responsible for chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder IL-8.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Osamu; Wada, Shinpei; Matsuyama, Tomomasa; Sakai, Takamitsu; Takano, Tomokazu

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to locate the functional region responsible for the chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder interleukin 8 (IL-8), which lacks the glutamic acid-leucine-arginine (ELR) motif essential for the induction of neutrophil migration by mammalian IL-8. Using a human cell line, we produced a secretory recombinant protein of flounder IL-8, and analyzed its chemotaxis-inducing activity on leukocytes collected from the flounder kidney. The recombinant IL-8 induced significant migration in neutrophils, which were morphologically and functionally characterized. Using the Edman degradation method, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of rIL-8 was identified as VSLRSLGV. To examine the significance of the N-terminal region for the bioactivity of flounder IL-8, we prepared several recombinant proteins that containing mutations at the N-terminus. Modification of three residues (residues 9-11: serine-leucine-histidine) corresponding in position to the ELR motif in mammalian IL-8 did not reduce its chemotaxis-inducing activity. However, deletion of the first six or more residues significantly reduced its chemotaxis-inducing activity. We propose that residue 6 (leucine) at the N-terminus is important for the chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder IL-8.

  4. Coding and 3' non-coding nucleotide sequence of chalcone synthase mRNA and assignment of amino acid sequence of the enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Reimold, Ursula; Kröger, Manfred; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Hahlbrock, Klaus

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an almost complete cDNA copy of chalcone synthase mRNA from cultured parsley cells (Petroselinum hortense) has been determined. The cDNA copy comprised the complete coding sequence for chalcone synthase, a short A-rich stretch of the 5' non-coding region and the complete 3' non-coding region including a poly(A) tail. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA is consistent with a partial N-terminal sequence analysis, the total amino acid composition, the cyanogen bromide cleavage pattern, and the apparent mol. wt. of the subunit of the purified enzyme. PMID:16453477

  5. Myoglobin of the shark Heterodontus portusjacksoni: isolation and amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1979-06-01

    Myoglobin isolated from red muscle of the shark H. portusjacksoni was purified by ion-exchange chromatography on sulfopropyl-Sephadex and gel-filtration. Amino acid analysis and sequence determination showed 148 amino acid residues. The amino terminal residue is acetylated as shown by mass spectrographic analysis of N-terminal peptides. There is a deletion of four residues at the amino terminal end as well as one residue in the CD interhelical area relative to other myoglobins. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and staphylococcal protease. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed approximately 85 differences from mammalian, monotreme and bird myoglobins. The date of divergence of the shark H. portusjacksoni from these other orders was estimated at 450 +/- 16 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for multiple mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate agrees well with similar estimates made using alpha- and beta-globin sequences, in contrast to widely differing estimates of dates of divergence for monotremes using the same three globin chains. Compared with myoglobins from species previously studied, there are many more differences in amino acid sequences, and in many positions residues are found that are more characteristic of alpha- and beta-globins, suggesting a conservation of residues over a long period of evolutionary time. There are fewer stabilizing hydrogen bonds and salt-linkages than in other myoglobins.

  6. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  7. Further characterization and amino acid sequence of m-type thioredoxins from spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Tsugita, A; Dalzoppo, D; Vilbois, F; Schürmann, P

    1986-01-02

    The complete primary structure of m-type thioredoxin from spinach chloroplasts has been sequenced by conventional sequencing including fragmentation, Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion. As already reported [Tsugita, A., Maeda, K. & Schürmann, P. (1983) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 115, 1-7] these thioredoxins contain the same active-site sequence as thioredoxins from other sources. Based on the amino acid sequence thioredoxin mc contains 103 residues, has a relative molecular mass of 11425 and a molar absorption coefficient at 280 nm of 19 300 M-1 cm-1. The spinach thioredoxin mc has an overall homology of 44% with the thioredoxin from Escherichia coli mainly due to differences in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions.

  8. Functional Characterization of the N-Terminal C2 Domain from Arabidopsis thaliana Phospholipase Dα and Dβ

    PubMed Central

    Noiriel, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Most of plant phospholipases D (PLD) exhibit a C2-lipid binding domain of around 130 amino acid residues at their N-terminal region, involved in their Ca2+-dependent membrane binding. In this study, we expressed and partially purified catalytically active PLDα from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPLDα) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the recombinant AtPLDα was found to be NVEETIGV and thus to lack the first 35 amino acid belonging to the C2 domain, as found in other recombinant or plant purified PLDs. To investigate the impact of such a cleavage on the functionality of C2 domains, we expressed, in E. coli, purified, and refolded the mature-like form of the C2 domain of the AtPLDα along with its equivalent C2 domain of the AtPLDβ, for the sake of comparison. Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and dot-blot assays, both C2 domains were shown to bind phosphatidylglycerol in a Ca2+-independent manner while phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine binding were found to be enhanced in the presence of Ca2+. Amino acid sequence alignment and molecular modeling of both C2 domains with known C2 domain structures revealed the presence of a novel Ca2+-binding site within the C2 domain of AtPLDα. PMID:28101506

  9. Functional Characterization of the N-Terminal C2 Domain from Arabidopsis thaliana Phospholipase Dα and Dβ.

    PubMed

    Rahier, Renaud; Noiriel, Alexandre; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    Most of plant phospholipases D (PLD) exhibit a C2-lipid binding domain of around 130 amino acid residues at their N-terminal region, involved in their Ca(2+)-dependent membrane binding. In this study, we expressed and partially purified catalytically active PLDα from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPLDα) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the recombinant AtPLDα was found to be NVEETIGV and thus to lack the first 35 amino acid belonging to the C2 domain, as found in other recombinant or plant purified PLDs. To investigate the impact of such a cleavage on the functionality of C2 domains, we expressed, in E. coli, purified, and refolded the mature-like form of the C2 domain of the AtPLDα along with its equivalent C2 domain of the AtPLDβ, for the sake of comparison. Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and dot-blot assays, both C2 domains were shown to bind phosphatidylglycerol in a Ca(2+)-independent manner while phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine binding were found to be enhanced in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequence alignment and molecular modeling of both C2 domains with known C2 domain structures revealed the presence of a novel Ca(2+)-binding site within the C2 domain of AtPLDα.

  10. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  11. The complete amino acid sequence of prochymosin.

    PubMed Central

    Foltmann, B; Pedersen, V B; Jacobsen, H; Kauffman, D; Wybrandt, G

    1977-01-01

    The total sequence of 365 amino acid residues in bovine prochymosin is presented. Alignment with the amino acid sequence of porcine pepsinogen shows that 204 amino acid residues are common to the two zymogens. Further comparison and alignment with the amino acid sequence of penicillopepsin shows that 66 residues are located at identical positions in all three proteases. The three enzymes belong to a large group of proteases with two aspartate residues in the active center. This group forms a family derived from one common ancestor. PMID:329280

  12. "De-novo" amino acid sequence elucidation of protein G'e by combined "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up" mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Koy, Cornelia; Cui, Weidong; Yan, Yuetian; Gross, Michael L.; Glocker, Michael O.

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometric de-novo sequencing was applied to review the amino acid sequence of a commercially available recombinant protein Ǵ with great scientific and economic importance. Substantial deviations to the published amino acid sequence (Uniprot Q54181) were found by the presence of 46 additional amino acids at the N-terminus, including a so-called "His-tag" as well as an N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylation and α- N-phosphogluconoylation, respectively. The unexpected amino acid sequence of the commercial protein G' comprised 241 amino acids and resulted in a molecular mass of 25,998.9 ± 0.2 Da for the unmodified protein. Due to the higher mass that is caused by its extended amino acid sequence compared with the original protein G' (185 amino acids), we named this protein "protein G'e." By means of mass spectrometric peptide mapping, the suggested amino acid sequence, as well as the N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylations, was confirmed with 100% sequence coverage. After the protein G'e sequence was determined, we were able to determine the expression vector pET-28b from Novagen with the Xho I restriction enzyme cleavage site as the best option that was used for cloning and expressing the recombinant protein G'e in E. coli. A dissociation constant ( K d ) value of 9.4 nM for protein G'e was determined thermophoretically, showing that the N-terminal flanking sequence extension did not cause significant changes in the binding affinity to immunoglobulins.

  13. Substrate specificity of mammalian N-terminal α-amino methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Petkowski, Janusz J.; Schaner Tooley, Christine E.; Anderson, Lissa C.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Minor, Wladek; Macara, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal methylation of free α-amino-groups is a post-translational modification of proteins that has been known for 30 years but has been very little studied. In this modification, the initiating M residue is cleaved and the exposed α-amino group is mono- di- or trimethylated by NRMT, a recently identified N-terminal methyltransferase. Currently, all known eukaryotic α-aminomethylated proteins have a unique N-terminal motif, M-X-P-K, where X is A, P, or S. NRMT can also methylate artificial substrates in vitro in which X is G, F, Y, C, M, K, R, N, Q or H. Methylation efficiencies of N-terminal amino acids are variable with respect to the identity of X. Here we use in vitro peptide methylation assays and substrate immunoprecipitations to show that the canonical M-X-P-K methylation motif is not the only one recognized by NRMT. We predict that N-terminal methylation is a widespread post-translational modification, and that there is interplay between N-terminal acetylation and N-terminal methylation. We also use isothermal calorimetry experiments to demonstrate that NRMT can efficiently recognize and bind to its fully methylated products. PMID:22769851

  14. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  15. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  16. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  17. Structural basis for substrate recognition by the human N-terminal methyltransferase 1

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Cheng; Mao, Yunfei; Tempel, Wolfram; ...

    2015-11-05

    α-N-terminal methylation represents a highly conserved and prevalent post-translational modification, yet its biological function has remained largely speculative. The recent discovery of α-N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) and its physiological substrates propels the elucidation of a general role of α-N-terminal methylation in mediating DNA-binding ability of the modified proteins. The phenotypes, observed from both NTMT1 knockdown in breast cancer cell lines and knockout mouse models, suggest the potential involvement of α-N-terminal methylation in DNA damage response and cancer development. In this study, we report the first crystal structures of human NTMT1 in complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) and six substrate peptides,more » respectively, and reveal that NTMT1 contains two characteristic structural elements (a β hairpin and an N-terminal extension) that contribute to its substrate specificity. Our complex structures, coupled with mutagenesis, binding, and enzymatic studies, also present the key elements involved in locking the consensus substrate motif XPK (X indicates any residue type other than D/E) into the catalytic pocket for α-N-terminal methylation and explain why NTMT1 prefers an XPK sequence motif. We propose a catalytic mechanism for α-N-terminal methylation. Overall, this study gives us the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism of α-N-terminal methylation and potentially contributes to the advent of therapeutic agents for human diseases associated with deregulated α-N-terminal methylation.« less

  18. Evidence for N-Terminal Myristoylation of Tetrahymena Arginine Kinase Using Peptide Mass Fingerprinting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Shou; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we confirmed N-terminal myristoylation of Tetrahymena pyriformis arginine kinase (AK1) by identifying a myristoylation signal sequence at the N-terminus. A sufficient amount of modified enzyme was synthesized using an insect cell-free protein synthesis system that contains all of the elements necessary for post-transcriptional modification by fatty acids. Subsequent peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analyses were performed after digestion with trypsin. The PMF data covered 39 % (143 residues) of internal peptides. The target N-myristoylated peptide had a theoretical mass of 832.4477 and was clearly observed with an experimental mass (m/z-H(+)) of 832.4747. The difference between the two masses was 0.0271, supporting the accuracy of identification and indicating that the synthesized T. pyriformis AK1 is myristoylated. The fixed specimens of T. pyriformis were reacted with an anti-AK1 peptide antibody followed by a secondary antibody with a fluorescent chromophore and were observed using immunofluorescence microscope. In agreement with previous western blotting analyses, microscopic observations suggested that AK1 is localized in the cilia. The present PMF and microscopic analyses indicate that T. pyriformis AK1 may be localized and anchored to ciliary membranes via N-terminal myristoyl groups.

  19. Designing a Long Acting Erythropoietin by Fusing Three Carboxyl-Terminal Peptides of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin β Subunit to the N-Terminal and C-Terminal Coding Sequence.

    PubMed

    Fares, Fuad; Havron, Avri; Fima, Eyal

    2011-01-01

    A new analog of EPO was designed by fusing one and two CTPs to the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of EPO (EPO-(CTP)(3)), respectively. This analog was expressed and secreted efficiently in CHO cells. The in vitro test shows that the activity of EPO-(CTP)(3) in TFI-1 cell proliferation assay is similar to that of EPO-WT and commercial rHEPO. However, in vivo studies indicated that treatment once a week with EPO-(CTP)(3) (15 μg/kg) dramatically increased (~8 folds) haematocrit as it was compared to rHuEPO. Moreover, it was found that EPO-(CTP)(3) is more effective than rHuEPO and Aranesp in increasing reticulocyte number in mice blood. The detected circulatory half-lives of rHuEPO, Aranesp, and EPO-(CTP)(3) following IV injection of 20 IU were 4.4, 10.8, and 13.1 h, respectively. These data established the rational for using this chimera as a long-acting EPO analog in clinics. The therapeutic efficacy of EPO-CTP analog needs to be established in higher animals and in human clinical trials.

  20. Partial amino acid sequence of human pancreatic stone protein, a novel pancreatic secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, G; Bonicel, J; Multigner, L; Rovery, M; Sarles, H; De Caro, A

    1986-01-01

    Pancreatic stone protein (PSP) is the major organic component of human pancreatic stones. With the use of monoclonal antibody immunoadsorbents, five immunoreactive forms (PSP-S) with close Mr values (14,000-19,000) were isolated from normal pancreatic juice. By CM-Trisacryl M chromatography the lowest-Mr form (PSP-S1) was separated from the others and some of its molecular characteristics were investigated. The Mr of the PSP-S1 polypeptide chain calculated from the amino acid composition was about 16,100. The N-terminal sequences (40 residues) of PSP and PSP-S1 are identical, which suggests that the peptide backbone is the same for both of these polypeptides. The PSP-S1 sequence was determined up to residue 65 and was found to be different from all other known protein sequences. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3541906

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria.

  2. SSDP1 gene encodes a protein with a conserved N-terminal FORWARD domain.

    PubMed

    Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2002-09-23

    I describe the characterization of mouse, human and chicken SSDP1 orthologs that encode a highly conserved protein with over 90% identity at the amino acid level. Structurally, the protein consists of a well-preserved FWD (FORWARD)-domain at the N-terminal end and a proline-, glycine-, methionine- and serine-rich sequence in the central and C-terminal regions. The FORWARD domain, comprised of three alpha-helices, is characterized by the presence of a FWD-box of unknown function conserved not only in vertebrates, but also in nematode, plants, fly and yeast. Human SSDP1 spans about 200 kb on the chromosome 1p31-p32 region and consists of 17 exons. The SSDP1 mRNA transcripts are distributed ubiquitously in adult human and mouse tissues.

  3. Specific cleavage of N-terminal acetyl-methionine from peptides by rabbit muscle fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, G.R.; Wold, F.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the hypothesis that the processing of eukaryotic proteins involves acetylation of the N-terminal Met, followed by removal of the resulting Ac-Met to expose the second amino acid in the sequence. An activity was identified in rabbit muscle extracts that effectively removes Ac-Met from a synthetic peptide I (AcMDETGDTALVA) resembling the N-terminus of actin. The activity is associated with microsomes and free ribosomes, but can be extracted from the ribosomes by treatment with 0.5 M NaCl in the presence of 2 mM Mg/sup + +/; a 200 fold purification is achieved by this differential centrifugation procedure. A number of chemically acetylated (/sup 14/C-Ac) peptides have been tested as substrates using an HPLC assay for liberated /sup 14/C-Ac-Met. The results suggest that the partially purified activity is specific for N-terminal Ac-Met in that other Ac-amino acids (Gly, Ala, Ser, Asp) were not released from similar peptides, including a derivative of peptide I with Met missing and with Ac-Asp as n-terminus. The amino acid in the second position also appears to be involved as a specificity determinant; a peptide Ac-Met-Arg-Phe-Ala was inert and the tripeptide Ac-Met/sub 3/ was a poor substrate. The dipeptide Ac-Met-Glu was also a very poor substrate, while several tripeptides Ac-Met-X-Y, were good substrates, although not as good as the actinlike peptide I.

  4. N-terminal H3/D3-acetylation for improved high-throughput peptide sequencing by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with a time-of-flight/time-of-flight analyzer.

    PubMed

    Noga, Marek J; Asperger, Arndt; Silberring, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for peptide sequencing by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with a time-of-flight/time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF/TOF) is presented. A stable isotope label introduced in the peptide N-terminus by derivatization, using a 1:1 mixture of acetic anhydride and deuterated acetic anhydride, allows for easy and unambiguous identification of ions belonging either to the N- or the C-terminal ion series in the product ion spectrum, making sequence assignment significantly simplified. The good performance of this technique was shown by successful sequencing of the contents of several peptide maps. A similar approach was recently applied to nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) and nano-liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The MALDI-TOF/TOF technique allows for fast, direct sequencing of modified peptides in proteomics samples, and is complementary to the nanoESI and nanoLC/MS/MS approaches.

  5. N-Terminal Hypothesis for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Sharma, Bhanushee; Belfort, Georges

    2017-03-15

    Although the amyloid (abeta peptide, Aβ) hypothesis is 25 years old, is the dominant model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and guides the development of potential treatments, it is still controversial. One possible reason is a lack of a mechanistic path from the cleavage products of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) such as soluble Aβ monomer and soluble molecular fragments to the deleterious effects on synaptic form and function. From a review of the recent literature and our own published work including aggregation kinetics and structural morphology, Aβ clearance, molecular simulations, long-term potentiation measurements with inhibition binding, and the binding of a commercial monoclonal antibody, aducanumab, we hypothesize that the N-terminal domains of neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are implicated in causing the disease.

  6. The isolation, purification and amino-acid sequence of insulin from the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin).

    PubMed

    Cutfield, J F; Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Emdin, S O; Falkmer, S

    1986-07-01

    Insulin from the principal islets of the teleost fish, Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin), has been isolated and sequenced. Purification involved acid/alcohol extraction, gel filtration, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to yield nearly 1 mg pure insulin/g wet weight islet tissue. Biological potency was estimated as 40% compared to porcine insulin. The sculpin insulin crystallised in the absence of zinc ions although zinc is known to be present in the islets in significant amounts. Two other hormones, glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, were copurified with the insulin, and an N-terminal sequence for pancreatic polypeptide was determined. The primary structure of sculpin insulin shows a number of sequence changes unique so far amongst teleost fish. These changes occur at A14 (Arg), A15 (Val), and B2 (Asp). The B chain contains 29 amino acids and there is no N-terminal extension as seen with several other fish. Presumably as a result of the amino acid substitutions, sculpin insulin does not readily form crystals containing zinc-insulin hexamers, despite the presence of the coordinating B10 His.

  7. Purification, amino acid sequence, and cDNA cloning of trypsin inhibitors from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Deshimaru, Masanobu; Watanabe, Akira; Suematsu, Keiko; Hatano, Maki; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2003-08-01

    Three protease inhibitors (OTI-1-3) have been purified from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Molecular masses of these inhibitors were found to be 7,370.2, 7,472.2, and 7,642.6 Da by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), respectively. Based on amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence, OTI-1 and -2 are the N-terminal truncated proteins of OTI-3. All the inhibitors are stable to heat and extreme pH. OTI-3 inhibited trypsin, chymotrypsin, and plasmin with dissociation constants of 1.3 x 10(-9) M, 2.3 x 10(-7) M, and 3.1 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The complete amino acid sequence of OTI-3 showed a significant homology to Bowman-Birk family inhibitors, and the first reactive site (P1) was found to be Arg17 by limited proteolysis by trypsin. The second reactive site (P1) was estimated to be Leu46, that may inhibit chymotrypsin. OTI-3 lacks an S-S bond near the second reactive site, resulting in a low affinity for the enzyme. The sequence of OTI-3 was also ascertained by the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding a 101-residue precursor of the onion inhibitor.

  8. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence...

  9. Nickel Ligation of the N-Terminal Amine of HypA Is Required for Urease Maturation in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hu, Heidi Q; Johnson, Ryan C; Merrell, D Scott; Maroney, Michael J

    2017-02-28

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires nickel for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach. HypA, a Ni metallochaperone that is typically associated with hydrogenase maturation, is also required for urease maturation and acid survival of H. pylori. There are two proposed Ni site structures for HypA; one is a paramagnetic six-coordinate site characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in unmodified HypA, while another is a diamagnetic four-coordinate planar site characterized by solution nuclear magnetic resonance in an N-terminally modified HypA construct. To determine the role of the N-terminal amine in Ni binding of HypA, an N-terminal extension variant, L2*-HypA, in which a leucine residue was inserted into the second position of the amino acid sequence in the proposed Ni-binding motif, was characterized in vitro and in vivo. Structural characterization of the Ni site using XAS showed a coordination change from six-coordinate in wild-type HypA (WT-HypA) to five-coordinate pyramidal in L2*-HypA, which was accompanied by the loss of two N/O donor protein ligands and the addition of an exogenous bromide ligand from the buffer. The magnetic properties of the Ni sites in WT-HypA compared to those of the Ni sites in L2*-HypA confirmed that a spin-state change from high to low spin accompanied this change in structure. The L2*-HypA H. pylori strain was shown to be acid sensitive and deficient in urease activity in vivo. In vitro characterization showed that L2*-HypA did not disrupt the HypA-UreE interaction that is essential for urease maturation but was at least 20-fold weaker in Ni binding than WT-HypA. Characterization of the L2*-HypA variant clearly demonstrates that the N-terminal amine of HypA is involved in proper Ni coordination and is necessary for urease activity and acid survival.

  10. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator.

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r.

    PubMed Central

    Arlaud, G J; Willis, A C; Gagnon, J

    1987-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of human C1r A chain was determined, from sequence analysis performed on fragments obtained from C1r autolytic cleavage, cleavage of methionyl bonds, tryptic cleavages at arginine and lysine residues, and cleavages by staphylococcal proteinase. The polypeptide chain has an N-terminal serine residue and contains 446 amino acid residues (Mr 51,200). The sequence data allow chemical characterization of fragments alpha (positions 1-211), beta (positions 212-279) and gamma (positions 280-446) yielded from C1r autolytic cleavage, and identification of the two major cleavage sites generating these fragments. Position 150 of C1r A chain is occupied by a modified amino acid residue that, upon acid hydrolysis, yields erythro-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid, and that is located in a sequence homologous to the beta-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing regions of Factor IX, Factor X, protein C and protein Z. Sequence comparison reveals internal homology between two segments (positions 10-78 and 186-257). Two carbohydrate moieties are attached to the polypeptide chain, both via asparagine residues at positions 108 and 204. Combined with the previously determined sequence of C1r B chain [Arlaud & Gagnon (1983) Biochemistry 22, 1758-1764], these data give the complete sequence of human C1r. PMID:3036070

  12. Peptidase E, a Peptidase Specific for N-Terminal Aspartic Dipeptides, Is a Serine Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Lassy, Rachel A. L.; Miller, Charles G.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium peptidase E (PepE) is an N-terminal Asp-specific dipeptidase. PepE is not inhibited by any of the classical peptidase inhibitors, and its amino acid sequence does not place it in any of the known peptidase structural classes. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of PepE with a number of related sequences has allowed us to define the amino acid residues that are strongly conserved in this family. To ensure the validity of this comparison, we have expressed one of the most distantly related relatives (Xenopus) in Escherichia coli and have shown that it is indeed an Asp-specific dipeptidase with properties very similar to those of serovar Typhimurium PepE. The sequence comparison suggests that PepE is a serine hydrolase. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to change all of the conserved Ser, His, and Asp residues and have found that Ser120, His157, and Asp135 are all required for activity. Conversion of Ser120 to Cys leads to severely reduced (104-fold) but still detectable activity, and this activity but not that of the parent is inhibited by thiol reagents; these results confirm that this residue is likely to be the catalytic nucleophile. These results suggest that PepE is the prototype of a new family of serine peptidases. The phylogenetic distribution of the family is unusual, since representatives are found in eubacteria, an insect (Drosophila), and a vertebrate (Xenopus) but not in the Archaea or in any of the other eukaryotes for which genome sequences are available. PMID:10762256

  13. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  14. Histone H4 N-terminal acetylation in Kasumi-1 cells treated with depsipeptide determined by acetic acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, amino acid coded mass tagging, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Su, Xiaodan; Liu, Shujun; Knapp, Amy R; Parthun, Mark R; Marcucci, Guido; Freitas, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Disrupted patterns of acetylation and deacetylation of core histones play an important role in silencing transcription of hematopoietic important genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A thorough investigation of these mechanisms and the response to pharmacologic modifiers will provide a better understanding of the role of histone acetylation in leukemogenesis. We describe here an analytical approach that combines acid urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AU-PAGE), amino acid coded mass tagging (AACM), and mass spectrometry (MS) for the investigation of histone acetylation patterns. The combined approach was used to follow the dynamics of H4 acetylation in Kasumi-1 cells harboring the fusion gene AML1/ETO shown to aberrantly recruit histone deacetylases (HDACs). The histones in Kasumi-1 cells were labeled by growing the cells in media in which lysine was replaced with stable isotope-labeled lysine (Lys-D4). Labeled and unlabeled cells were treated with depsipeptide and analyzed at different time points (0, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h). The cells were mixed, the histone was extracted, and acetylated H4 isoforms were separated using AU-PAGE before in-gel trypsin digestion. The digests were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. Peptides were identified by mass and isotope pattern. LC-MS/MS of Arg-C digests were also performed to verify the acetylation pattern for H4. The major pattern of acetylation was determined as follows: initial acetylation at K16, followed by acetylation at K12, and finally acetylation of either K8 and/or K5.

  15. A unique glycine-rich motif at the N-terminal region of Bamboo mosaic virus coat protein is required for symptom expression.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ping; Yeh, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Chih-Wei; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2010-07-01

    The coat proteins (CP) of many plant viruses are multifunctional proteins. We used N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis to identify a truncated form of the Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) CP missing the N-terminal 35 amino acids (N35). The N35 region is unique in the potexviruses by its containing a glycine-rich motif (GRM) not present in databases but highly conserved among BaMV isolates. Results from site-directed mutagenesis and deletion mutational analysis showed that loss of this region converted necrotic local lesions to chlorotic local lesions on Chenopodium quinoa leaves. Furthermore, this region is required for successful development of mosaic symptoms on Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but is dispensable for BaMV replication and cell-to-cell and long-distance movement as well as virion assembly. This unique GRM-containing region of BaMV CP may be a symptom determinant in specific hosts.

  16. Affects of N-terminal variation in the SeM protein of Streptococcus equi on antibody and fibrinogen binding.

    PubMed

    Timoney, John F; DeNegri, Rafaela; Sheoran, Abhineet; Forster, Nathalie

    2010-02-10

    The clonal Streptococcus equi causes equine strangles, a highly contagious suppurative lymphadenopathy and rhinopharyngitis. An important virulence factor and vaccine component, the antiphagocytic fibrinogen binding SeM of S. equi is a surface anchored fibrillar protein. Two recent studies of N. American, Japanese and European isolates have revealed a high frequency of N-terminal amino acid variation in SeM of S. equi CF32 that suggests this region of the protein is subject to immunologic selection pressure. The aims of the present study were firstly to map regions of SeM reactive with convalescent equine IgG and IgA and stimulatory for lymph node cells and secondly to determine effects of N-terminal variation on the functionality of SeM. Variation did not significantly affect fibrinogen binding or susceptibility of S. equi to an opsonic equine serum. Linear epitopes reactive with convalescent IgG and mucosal IgA were concentrated toward the conserved center of SeM. However, IgA but not IgG from every horse reacted with at least one peptide that contained variable sequence. Lymph node cells (CD4+) from horses immunized with SeM were strongly responsive to a peptide (alphaalpha36-138) encoding the entire variable region. SeM (CF32) specific mouse Mab 04D11 which reacted strongly with this larger peptide but not with shorter peptides within that sequence reacted strongly with whole cells of S. equi CF32 but only weakly with cells of any of 14 isolates of S. equi expressing different variants of SeM. These results in combination suggest that N-terminal variation alters a conformational epitope of significance in mucosal IgA and systemic T cell responses but does not affect antibody mediated phagocytosis and killing. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protease Substrate Profiling by N-Terminal COFRADIC.

    PubMed

    Staes, An; Van Damme, Petra; Timmerman, Evy; Ruttens, Bart; Stes, Elisabeth; Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Detection of (neo-)N-terminal peptides is essential for identifying protease cleavage sites . We here present an update of a well-established and efficient selection method for enriching N-terminal peptides out of peptide mixtures: N-terminal COFRADIC (COmbined FRActional DIagonal Chromatography). This method is based on the old concept of diagonal chromatography, which involves a peptide modification step in between otherwise identical chromatographic separations, with this modification step finally allowing for the isolation of N-terminal peptides by longer retention of non-N-terminal peptides on the resin. N-terminal COFRADIC has been successfully applied in many protease-centric studies, as well as for studies on protein alpha-N-acetylation and on characterizing alternative translation initiation events.

  18. The complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from Bauhinia variegata var. candida seeds.

    PubMed

    Di Ciero, L; Oliva, M L; Torquato, R; Köhler, P; Weder, J K; Camillo Novello, J; Sampaio, C A; Oliveira, B; Marangoni, S

    1998-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitors of two varieties of Bauhinia variegata seeds have been isolated and characterized. Bauhinia variegata candida trypsin inhibitor (BvcTI) and B. variegata lilac trypsin inhibitor (BvlTI) are proteins with Mr of about 20,000 without free sulfhydryl groups. Amino acid analysis shows a high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and glycine, and a low content of histidine, tyrosine, methionine, and lysine in both inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing for both varieties detected three isoforms (pI 4.85, 5.00, and 5.15), which were resolved by HPLC procedure. The trypsin inhibitors show Ki values of 6.9 and 1.2 nM for BvcTI and BvlTI, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of the three trypsin inhibitor isoforms from both varieties of Bauhinia variegata and the complete amino acid sequence of B. variegata var. candida L. trypsin inhibitor isoform 3 (BvcTI-3) are presented. The sequences have been determined by automated Edman degradation of the reduced and carboxymethylated proteins of the peptides resulting from Staphylococcus aureus protease and trypsin digestion. BvcTI-3 is composed of 167 residues and has a calculated molecular mass of 18,529. Homology studies with other trypsin inhibitors show that BvcTI-3 belongs to the Kunitz family. The putative active site encompasses Arg (63)-Ile (64).

  19. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities.

    PubMed

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in I h activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of I h to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  20. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K.; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F.; Meuth, Sven G.; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in Ih activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of Ih to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats. PMID:26578877

  1. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  2. Amino acid substitutions V63I or A37S/I61T/V63I/V100A in the PA N-terminal domain increase the virulence of H7N7 influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Meng; Chu, Hin; Zhang, Ke; Singh, Kailash; Li, Cun; Yuan, Shuofeng; Chow, Billy K. C.; Song, Wenjun; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The PA N-terminal domain (PA-Nter) is essential for viral transcription and replication. Here we identified PA-Nter substitutions A37S, I61T, V63I and V100A in recently emerged avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) with potential effect on virus pathogenicity and/or host adaptation. We introduced the identified PA-Nter substitutions into avian H7N7 IAV by reverse genetics. Our results showed that single substitution V63I and combined substitutions, I61T/V63I and A37S/I61T/V63I/V100A (Mfour), significantly increased virus growth capacity in mammalian cells. Meanwhile, these substitutions conferred higher virus transcription/replication capacity by producing more mRNA, cRNA and vRNA. Consistently, the polymerase activity and the endonuclease activity were enhanced by these PA-Nter substitutions. Notably, substitutions V63I and Mfour strongly increased virus replication and virulence in mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that the PA-Nter substitutions V63I and Mfour enhanced IAV pathogenicity through modification of the polymerase activity and the endonuclease activity, which added to the evolving knowledge of IAV virulence determinants. PMID:27886255

  3. Novel function of the unique N-terminal region of RUNX1c in B cell growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gareth; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Farrell, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    RUNX family proteins are expressed from alternate promoters, giving rise to different N-terminal forms, but the functional difference of these isoforms is not understood. Here, we show that growth of a human B lymphoblastoid cell line infected with Epstein–Barr virus is inhibited by RUNX1c but not by RUNX1b. This gives a novel functional assay for the unique N-terminus of RUNX1c, and amino acids of RUNX1c required for the effect have been identified. Primary resting B cells contain RUNX1c, consistent with the growth inhibitory effect in B cells. The oncogene TEL–RUNX1 lacks the N-terminus of RUNX1c because of the TEL fusion and does not inhibit B cell growth. Mouse Runx1c lacks some of the sequences required for human RUNX1c to inhibit B cell growth, indicating that this aspect of human B cell growth control may differ in mice. Remarkably, a cell-penetrating peptide containing the N-terminal sequence of RUNX1c specifically antagonizes the growth inhibitory effect in B lymphoblastoid cells and might be used to modulate the function of human RUNX1c. PMID:23254331

  4. Nuclear hormone receptors involved in neoplasia: erb A exhibits a novel DNA sequence specificity determined by amino acids outside of the zinc-finger domain.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Smit-McBride, Z; Lewis, S; Sharif, M; Privalsky, M L

    1993-01-01

    The erb A oncogene is a dominant negative allele of a thyroid hormone receptor gene and acts in the cancer cell by encoding a transcriptional repressor. We demonstrate here that the DNA sequence recognition properties of the oncogenic form of the erb A protein are significantly altered from those of the normal thyroid hormone receptors and more closely resemble those of the retinoic acid receptors; this alteration appears to play an important role in defining the targets of erb A action in neoplasia. Unexpectedly, the novel DNA recognition properties of erb A are encoded by an N-terminal region not previously implicated as playing this function in current models of receptor-DNA interaction. Two N-terminal erb A amino acids in particular, histidine 12 and cysteine 32, contribute to this phenomenon, acting in conjunction with amino acids in the zinc finger domain. The effects of the N-terminal domain can be observed at the level of both DNA binding and transcriptional modulation. Our results indicate that unanticipated determinants within the nuclear hormone receptors participate in DNA sequence recognition and may contribute to the differential target gene specificity displayed by different receptor forms. Images PMID:8096060

  5. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  6. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  7. Oxidation of the N-terminal methionine of lens alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Horwitz, J.; Emmons, T.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum against the N-terminal peptide of bovine alpha-A crystallin has been used to monitor purification of two different seropositive peptides (i.e. T1a and T1b) from a tryptic digest of bovine lens proteins. Both these peptides have similar amino acid compositions, but peptide T1b has a molecular weight 16 atomic mass units larger than T1a, suggesting posttranslational modification. Analysis of ionization fragments of the T1b peptide by mass spectrometry demonstrates that this difference in molecular weight is due to the in vivo oxidation of the N-terminal met residue of the alpha-A crystallin molecule.

  8. The proton pump inhibitor, E3810, binds to the N-terminal half of the alpha-subunit of gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Morii, M; Hamatani, K; Takeguchi, N

    1995-06-16

    E3810 (2-([4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridine-2-yl]methylsulphinyl )- 1H-benzimidazole sodium salt), an inhibitor of gastric proton pump (gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase), is activated in a luminal acidic environment of gastric glands and binds to a Cys residue of H+,K(+)-ATPase on its luminal side. It was found that bound E3810 is transformed into a strongly fluorescent compound by UV-light irradiation (excitation wavelength = 335 nm, emission wavelength = 470 nm). The location of Cys residue bound with E3810 in the alpha-subunit of hog gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase was estimated from the fluorescence labelling and limited tryptic digestion of the enzyme. Tryptic digestion in the presence of Mg-ATP produces N-terminal 67 kDa subfragment which contains the phosphorylation and fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate binding sites and C-terminal 35 kDa subfragment. Trypsin digestion in the presence of KCl produces N-terminal 42 kDa and C-terminal 56 kDa subfragments. E3810 was found to bind to both N-terminal but not to any of two C-terminal subfragments. Taking the amino acid sequence and topology of this ATPase as well as the fact that the ratio of specific binding sites per alpha-subunit is one into consideration, the possibility that E3810 specifically binds to Cys322 residue of hog gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase is discussed.

  9. Interchange of DNA-binding modes in the deformed and ultrabithorax homeodomains: a structural role for the N-terminal arm.

    PubMed

    Frazee, Richard W; Taylor, Jennifer A; Tullius, Thomas D

    2002-11-01

    with that of Ubx does not elicit a complete interchange of the DNA-binding mode. Although the position of the chimera relative to DNA, as judged by hydroxyl radical footprinting, is similar to that of the Dfd HD, the missing nucleoside and methylation interference patterns resemble those of the Ubx HD. Repositioning of amino acid side-chains without wholesale structural alteration in the polypeptide appears to occur as a function of N-terminal arm identity and DNA-binding site sequence. Complete interchange of binding modes was achieved only by replacement of the Dfd N-terminal arm and the recognition helix plus 13 carboxyl-terminal residues with the corresponding residues of Ubx. The position of the N-terminal arm in the DNA minor groove appears to differ in a manner that depends on the two base-pair differences between the Dfd and Ubx-optimal-binding sites. Thus, N-terminal arm position dictates the binding mode and the interaction of the recognition helix with nucleosides in the major groove.

  10. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  11. Protein N-terminal Acetyltransferases Act as N-terminal Propionyltransferases In Vitro and In Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Foyn, Håvard; Van Damme, Petra; Støve, Svein I.; Glomnes, Nina; Evjenth, Rune; Gevaert, Kris; Arnesen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) is a highly abundant protein modification in eukaryotes catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), which transfer an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to the alpha amino group of a nascent polypeptide. Nt-acetylation has emerged as an important protein modifier, steering protein degradation, protein complex formation and protein localization. Very recently, it was reported that some human proteins could carry a propionyl group at their N-terminus. Here, we investigated the generality of N-terminal propionylation by analyzing its proteome-wide occurrence in yeast and we identified 10 unique in vivo Nt-propionylated N-termini. Furthermore, by performing differential N-terminome analysis of a control yeast strain (yNatA), a yeast NatA deletion strain (yNatAΔ) or a yeast NatA deletion strain expressing human NatA (hNatA), we were able to demonstrate that in vivo Nt-propionylation of several proteins, displaying a NatA type substrate specificity profile, depended on the presence of either yeast or human NatA. Furthermore, in vitro Nt-propionylation assays using synthetic peptides, propionyl coenzyme A, and either purified human NATs or immunoprecipitated human NatA, clearly demonstrated that NATs are Nt-propionyltransferases (NPTs) per se. We here demonstrate for the first time that Nt-propionylation can occur in yeast and thus is an evolutionarily conserved process, and that the NATs are multifunctional enzymes acting as NPTs in vivo and in vitro, in addition to their main role as NATs, and their potential function as lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and noncatalytic regulators. PMID:23043182

  12. Analysis of a eukaryotic beta-galactosidase gene: the N-terminal end of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis protein shows homology to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Dahlems, U; Das, S; Hollenberg, C P

    1984-01-01

    The LAC4 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase was mapped on a cloned DNA fragment and the sequence of the 5' end was determined. This sequence includes the 5' regulatory region involved in the induction by lactose and the N-terminal end of the protein coding region. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of this eukaryotic enzyme with the N-terminal end of the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase revealed substantial homology. Two major RNA initiation sites were mapped at -115 and -105. A number of structural peculiarities of the 5'non-coding region are discussed as in comparison to Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes. Images PMID:6324114

  13. NRMT2 is an N-terminal monomethylase that primes for its homologue NRMT1.

    PubMed

    Petkowski, Janusz J; Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Tooley, John G; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L; Macara, Ian G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2013-12-15

    NRMT (N-terminal regulator of chromatin condensation 1 methyltransferase) was the first eukaryotic methyltransferase identified to specifically methylate the free α-amino group of proteins. Since the discovery of this N-terminal methyltransferase, many new substrates have been identified and the modification itself has been shown to regulate DNA-protein interactions. Sequence analysis predicts one close human homologue of NRMT, METTL11B (methyltransferase-like protein 11B, now renamed NRMT2). We show in the present paper for the first time that NRMT2 also has N-terminal methylation activity and recognizes the same N-terminal consensus sequences as NRMT (now NRMT1). Both enzymes have similar tissue expression and cellular localization patterns. However, enzyme assays and MS experiments indicate that they differ in their specific catalytic functions. Although NRMT1 is a distributive methyltransferase that can mono-, di- and tri-methylate its substrates, NRMT2 is primarily a monomethylase. Concurrent expression of NRMT1 and NRMT2 accelerates the production of trimethylation, and we propose that NRMT2 activates NRMT1 by priming its substrates for trimethylation.

  14. NRMT2 is an N-terminal monomethylase that primes for its homolog NRMT1

    PubMed Central

    Petkowski, Janusz J.; Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Tooley, John G.; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Macara, Ian G.; Schaner Tooley, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal RCC1 methyltransferase (NRMT) was the first eukaryotic methyltransferase identified to specifically methylate the free α-amino group of proteins. Since the discovery of this N-terminal methyltransferase, many new substrates have been identified and the modification itself has been shown to regulate DNA-protein interactions. Sequence analysis predicts one close human homolog of NRMT, Methyltransferase-like protein 11B (METTL11B, now renamed NRMT2). We show here for the first time that NRMT2 also has N-terminal methylation activity and recognizes the same N-terminal consensus sequences as NRMT (now NRMT1). Both enzymes have similar tissue expression and cellular localization patterns. However, enzyme assays and mass spectrometry experiments indicate they differ in their specific catalytic functions. While NRMT1 is a distributive methyltransferase that can mono-, di-, and trimethylate its substrates, NRMT2 is primarily a monomethylase. Concurrent expression of NRMT1 and NRMT2 accelerates the production of trimethylation, and we propose that NRMT2 activates NRMT1 by priming its substrates for trimethylation. PMID:24090352

  15. Structural characterization of the N-terminal mineral modification domains from the molluscan crystal-modulating biomineralization proteins, AP7 and AP24.

    PubMed

    Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel E; Evans, John Spencer

    2004-08-05

    The AP7 and AP24 proteins represent a class of mineral-interaction polypeptides that are found in the aragonite-containing nacre layer of mollusk shell (H. rufescens). These proteins have been shown to preferentially interfere with calcium carbonate mineral growth in vitro. It is believed that both proteins play an important role in aragonite polymorph selection in the mollusk shell. Previously, we demonstrated the 1-30 amino acid (AA) N-terminal sequences of AP7 and AP24 represent mineral interaction/modification domains in both proteins, as evidenced by their ability to frustrate calcium carbonate crystal growth at step edge regions. In this present report, using free N-terminal, C(alpha)-amide "capped" synthetic polypeptides representing the 1-30 AA regions of AP7 (AP7-1 polypeptide) and AP24 (AP24-1 polypeptide) and NMR spectroscopy, we confirm that both N-terminal sequences possess putative Ca (II) interaction polyanionic sequence regions (2 x -DD- in AP7-1, -DDDED- in AP24-1) that are random coil-like in structure. However, with regard to the remaining sequences regions, each polypeptide features unique structural differences. AP7-1 possesses an extended beta-strand or polyproline type II-like structure within the A11-M10, S12-V13, and S28-I27 sequence regions, with the remaining sequence regions adopting a random-coil-like structure, a trait common to other polyelectrolyte mineral-associated polypeptide sequences. Conversely, AP24-1 possesses random coil-like structure within A1-S9 and Q14-N16 sequence regions, and evidence for turn-like, bend, or loop conformation within the G10-N13, Q17-N24, and M29-F30 sequence regions, similar to the structures identified within the putative elastomeric proteins Lustrin A and sea urchin spicule matrix proteins. The similarities and differences in AP7 and AP24 N-terminal domain structure are discussed with regard to joint AP7-AP24 protein modification of calcium carbonate growth.

  16. Large-scale identification of N-terminal peptides in the halophilic archaea Halobacterium salinarum and Natronomonas pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Aivaliotis, Michalis; Gevaert, Kris; Falb, Michaela; Tebbe, Andreas; Konstantinidis, Kosta; Bisle, Birgit; Klein, Christian; Martens, Lennart; Staes, An; Timmerman, Evy; Van Damme, Jozef; Siedler, Frank; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2007-06-01

    Characterization of protein N-terminal peptides supports the quality assessment of data derived from genomic sequences (e.g., the correct assignment of start codons) and hints to in vivo N-terminal modifications such as N-terminal acetylation and removal of the initiator methionine. The current work represents the first large-scale identification of N-terminal peptides from prokaryotes, of the two halophilic euryarchaeota Halobacterium salinarum and Natronomonas pharaonis. Two methods were used that specifically allow the characterization of protein N-terminal peptides: combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) and strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), both known to enrich for N-terminally blocked peptides. In addition to these specific methods, N-terminal peptide identifications were extracted from our previous genome-wide proteomic data. Combining all data, 606 N-terminal peptides from Hbt. salinarum and 328 from Nmn. pharaonis were reliably identified. These results constitute the largest available dataset holding identified and characterized protein N-termini for prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria). They allowed the validation/improvement of start codon assignments as automatic gene finders tend to misassign start codons for GC-rich genomes. In addition, the dataset allowed unravelling N-terminal protein maturation in archaea, showing that 60% of the proteins undergo methionine cleavage and that-in contrast to current knowledge-Nalpha-acetylation is common in the archaeal domain of life with 13-18% of the proteins being Nalpha-acetylated. The protein sets described in this paper are available by FTP and might be used as reference sets to test the performance of new gene finders.

  17. Complete Amino Acid Sequence of a Copper/Zinc-Superoxide Dismutase from Ginger Rhizome.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yuki; Fukamizo, Tamo; Yoneda, Kazunari; Araki, Tomohiro

    2017-04-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme protecting cells from oxidative stress. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is known for its antioxidant properties, however, there are no data on SODs from ginger rhizomes. In this study, we purified SOD from the rhizome of Z. officinale (Zo-SOD) and determined its complete amino acid sequence using N terminal sequencing, amino acid analysis, and de novo sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry. Zo-SOD consists of 151 amino acids with two signature Cu/Zn-SOD motifs and has high similarity to other plant Cu/Zn-SODs. Multiple sequence alignment showed that Cu/Zn-binding residues and cysteines forming a disulfide bond, which are highly conserved in Cu/Zn-SODs, are also present in Zo-SOD. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that plant Cu/Zn-SODs clustered into distinct chloroplastic, cytoplasmic, and intermediate groups. Among them, only chloroplastic enzymes carried amino acid substitutions in the region functionally important for enzymatic activity, suggesting that chloroplastic SODs may have a function distinct from those of SODs localized in other subcellular compartments. The nucleotide sequence of the Zo-SOD coding region was obtained by reverse-translation, and the gene was synthesized, cloned, and expressed. The recombinant Zo-SOD demonstrated pH stability in the range of 5-10, which is similar to other reported Cu/Zn-SODs, and thermal stability in the range of 10-60 °C, which is higher than that for most plant Cu/Zn-SODs but lower compared to the enzyme from a Z. officinale relative Curcuma aromatica.

  18. A quantitative analysis of spontaneous isoaspartate formation from N-terminal asparaginyl and aspartyl residues.

    PubMed

    Güttler, Bert H-O; Cynis, Holger; Seifert, Franziska; Ludwig, Hans-Henning; Porzel, Andrea; Schilling, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    The formation of isoaspartate (isoAsp) from asparaginyl or aspartyl residues is a spontaneous post-translational modification of peptides and proteins. Due to isopeptide bond formation, the structure and possibly function of peptides and proteins is altered. IsoAsp modifications within the peptide chain have been reported for many cytosolic proteins. Amyloid peptides (Aβ) deposited in Alzheimer's disease may carry an N-terminal isoAsp-modification. Here, we describe a quantitative investigation of isoAsp-formation from N-terminal Asn and Asp using model peptides similar to the Aβ N-terminus. The study is based on a newly developed separation of peptides using capillary electrophoresis (CE). 1H NMR was employed to validate the basic finding of N-terminal isoAsp-formation from Asp and Asn. Thereby, the isomerization of Asn at neutral pH (0.6 day(-1), peptide NGEF) is approximately six times faster than that within the peptide chain (AANGEF). The difference in velocity between Asn and Asp isomerization is approximately 50-fold. In contrast to N-terminal Asn, Asp isomerization is significantly accelerated at acidic pH. The kinetic solvent isotope (kD2O/kH2O) effect of 2.46 suggests a rate-limiting proton transfer in isoAsp-formation. The proton inventory is consistent with transfer of one proton in the transition state, supporting the previous notion of rate-limiting deprotonation of the peptide backbone amide during succinimide-intermediate formation. The study provides evidence for a spontaneous N-terminal isoAsp-formation within peptides and might explain the accumulation of N-terminal isoAsp in amyloid deposits.

  19. Influence of N-terminal residue composition on the structure of proline-containing b2+ ions.

    PubMed

    Gucinski, Ashley C; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Steinmetz, Vincent; Somogyi, Árpád; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2013-02-14

    To probe the structural implications of the proline residue on its characteristic peptide fragmentation patterns, in particular its unusual cleavage at its C-terminus in formation of a b(2) ion in XxxProZzz sequences, the structures of a series of proline-containing b(2)(+) ions were studied by using action infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and fragment ion hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX). Five different Xxx-Pro b(2)(+) ions were studied, with glycine, alanine, isoleucine, valine, or histidine in the N-terminal position. The residues selected feature different sizes, chain lengths, and gas phase basicities to explore whether the structure of the N-terminal residue influences the Xxx-Pro b(2)(+) ion structure. In proteins, the proline side chain-to-backbone attachment causes its peptide bonds to be in the cis conformation more than any other amino acid, although trans is still favored over cis. However, HP is the only b(2)(+) ion studied here that forms the diketopiperazine exclusively. The GP, AP, IP, and VP b(2)(+) ions formed from protonated tripeptide precursors predominantly featured oxazolone structures with small diketopiperazine contributions. In contrast to the b(2)(+) ions generated from tripeptides, synthetic cyclic dipeptides VP and HP were confirmed to have exclusive diketopiperazine structures.

  20. Lumazine proteins from photobacteria: localization of the single ligand binding site to the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Illarionov, Boris; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Wirth, Martina; Yong Lee, Chan; Eun Woo, Young; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus

    2007-12-01

    Lumazine protein is believed to serve as an optical transponder in bioluminescence emission by certain marine bacteria. Sequence arguments suggest that the protein comprises two similarly folded riboflavin synthase-type domains, but earlier work also suggested that only one domain binds 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine (DMRL). We show that the replacement of serine-48 or threonine-50 in the N-terminal domain of lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi modulates the absorbance and fluorescence properties of bound DMRL or riboflavin. Moreover, the replacement of these amino acids is accompanied by reduced ligand affinity. Replacement of serine-48 by tryptophan shifts the (13)C NMR signal of the 6-methyl group in bound DMRL upfield by 2.9 ppm as compared to the wild-type protein complex. Replacement of threonine-50 causes a downfield shift of approximately 20 ppm for the (15)N NMR signal of N-5, as well as an upfield shift of 3 ppm for the (13)C NMR signal of C-7 in bound DMRL, respectively. The replacement of the topologically equivalent serine-144 and proline-146 in the C-terminal domain had no significant impact on optical properties, chemical shifts and apparent binding constants of bound DMRL. These data show that the N-terminal domain is the unique site for ligand binding in lumazine protein.

  1. Site-Specific Protein Bioconjugation via a Pyridoxal 5'-Phosphate-Mediated N-Terminal Transamination Reaction.

    PubMed

    Witus, Leah S; Francis, Matthew

    2010-06-01

    The covalent attachment of chemical groups to proteins is a critically important tool for the study of protein function and the creation of protein-based materials. Methods of site-specific protein modification are necessary for the generation of well defined bioconjugates possessing a new functional group in a single position in the amino acid sequence. This article describes a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-mediated transamination reaction that is specific for the N-terminus of a protein. The reaction oxidizes the N-terminal amine to a ketone or an aldehyde, which can form a stable oxime linkage with an alkoxyamine reagent of choice. Screening studies have identified the most reactive N-terminal residues, facilitating the use of site-directed mutagenesis to achieve high levels of conversion. Additionally, this reaction has been shown to be effective for a number of targets that are not easily accessed through heterologous expression, such as monoclonal antibodies. Curr. Protoc. Chem. Biol. 2:125-134 © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-08-20

    The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  3. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Vogt, Alexander; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-07-13

    Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  4. Amino acid sequences and structures of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Welinder, K G; Jespersen, H M; Walther-Rasmussen, J; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulins have been determined by analyses of tryptic, V8-proteolytic and cyanogen bromide fragments, and by N-terminal sequencing. Mass spectrometric analysis of chicken beta 2-microglobulin supports the sequence-derived Mr of 11,048. The higher apparent Mr obtained for the avian beta 2-microglobulins as compared to human beta 2-microglobulin by SDS-PAGE is not understood. Chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin consist of 98 residues and deviate at seven positions: 60, 66, 74-76, 78 and 82. The chicken and turkey sequences are identical to human beta 2-microglobulin at 46 and 47 positions, respectively, and to bovine beta 2-microglobulin at 47 positions, i.e. there is about 47% identity between avian and mammalian beta 2-microglobulins. The known X-ray crystallographic structures of bovine beta 2-microglobulin and human HLA-A2 complex suggest that the seven chicken to turkey differences are exposed to solvent in the avian MHC class I complex. The key residues of beta 2-microglobulin involved in alpha chain contacts within the MHC class I molecule are highly conserved between chicken and man. This explains that heterologous human beta 2-microglobulin can substitute the chicken beta 2-microglobulin in exchange studies with B-F (chicken MHC class I molecule), and suggests that the MHC class I structure is conserved over long evolutionary distances.

  5. Enzymatic generation of peptides flanked by basic amino acids to obtain MS/MS spectra with 2× sequence coverage.

    PubMed

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Nan, Jie; Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-12-30

    Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) typically lack redundant peptide sequence information in the form of e.g. b- and y-ion series due to frequent use of sequence-specific endopeptidases cleaving C- or N-terminal to Arg or Lys residues. Here we introduce arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE, EC 2.3.2.8) for proteomics. ATE recognizes acidic amino acids or oxidized Cys at the N-terminus of a substrate peptide and conjugates an arginine from an aminoacylated tRNA(Arg) onto the N-terminus of the substrate peptide. This enzymatic reaction is carried out under physiological conditions and, in combination with Lys-C/Asp-N double digest, results in arginylated peptides with basic amino acids on both termini. We demonstrate that in vitro arginylation of peptides using yeast arginyl tRNA protein transferase 1 (yATE1) is a robust enzymatic reaction, specific to only modifying N-terminal acidic amino acids. Precursors originating from arginylated peptides generally have an increased protonation state compared with their non-arginylated forms. Furthermore, the product ion spectra of arginylated peptides show near complete 2× fragment ladders within the same MS/MS spectrum using commonly available electrospray ionization peptide fragmentation modes. Unexpectedly, arginylated peptides generate complete y- and c-ion series using electron transfer dissociation (ETD) despite having an internal proline residue. We introduce a rapid enzymatic method to generate peptides flanked on either terminus by basic amino acids, resulting in a rich, redundant MS/MS fragment pattern. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identification of the N-terminal region of TjZNT2, a Zrt/Irt-like protein family metal transporter, as a novel functional region involved in metal ion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sho; Morinaga, Yasuhiro; Obata, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2011-03-01

    The Zrt/Irt-like protein (ZIP) family of transporter proteins is involved in the uptake of essential metal elements in plants. Two homologous ZIP genes from Thlaspi japonicum, TjZNT1 and TjZNT2, encode products that share high amino acid sequence similarity except at the N-terminus and the cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane domains III and IV, and that have been shown to be Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) transporters, respectively. To identify the region that determines the ion selectivity of these transporters, we constructed a series of TjZNT1 and TjZNT2 chimeric genes and assayed for the Zn(2+) uptake of yeast cells expressing them. As a result, the extracellular N-terminal ends were identified as regions involved in Zn(2+) selectivity. TjZNT2 possesses a 36 amino acid hydrophilic extension at its N-terminus that is absent in native TjZNT1, and a mutant TjZNT2 lacking the N-terminal extension was shown to possess Zn(2+) uptake activity. This suggests that the extended N-terminal region inhibits Zn(2+) transport by TjZNT2. Further studies showed that it is the first 25 amino acid region of the N-terminus that is important for the inhibition of Zn(2+) transport. Furthermore, the N-terminal truncated TjZNT2 lacked Mn(2+) uptake activity. These findings suggest that the N-terminal region is a novel substrate selector in the ZIP family of transporters. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  7. Porcine proinsulin: characterization and amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Chance, R E; Ellis, R M; Bromer, W W

    1968-07-12

    Proinsulin in nearly homogeneous form has been isolated from a preparation of porcine insulin. A molecular weight close to 9100 was calculated from the amino acid composition and from sedimentation-equilibrium studies. Through the action of trypsin this single-chain protein is transformed to desalanine insulin by cleavage of a polypeptide chain connecting the carboxy-terminus of the B chain to the amino-terminus of the A chain of insulin. The amino acid sequence of this connecting peptide was found to be Arg-Arg-Glu-Ala-Gln-Asn-Pro-Gln-Ala-Gly-Ala-Val-Glu-Leu-Gly-Gly-Gly-Leu-Gly-Gly-Leu-Gln-Ala-Leu-Ala-Leu-Glu-Gly-Pro-Pro-Gln-Lys-Arg.

  8. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor.

    PubMed

    Monlezun, Laura; Phan, Gilles; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Enguéné, Véronique Y N; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In Gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved outer membrane factor (OMF) protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional PTM could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In Escherichia coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any modification. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X-ray structure at 3.8 Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitoylated cysteine.

  9. N-terminal isoforms of the large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channel are differentially modulated by the auxiliary β1-subunit.

    PubMed

    Lorca, Ramón A; Stamnes, Susan J; Pillai, Meghan K; Hsiao, Jordy J; Wright, Michael E; England, Sarah K

    2014-04-04

    The large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel is essential for maintaining the membrane in a hyperpolarized state, thereby regulating neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, and secretion. The BK(Ca) α-subunit has three predicted initiation codons that generate proteins with N-terminal ends starting with the amino acid sequences MANG, MSSN, or MDAL. Because the N-terminal region and first transmembrane domain of the α-subunit are required for modulation by auxiliary β1-subunits, we examined whether β1 differentially modulates the N-terminal BK(Ca) α-subunit isoforms. In the absence of β1, all isoforms had similar single-channel conductances and voltage-dependent activation. However, whereas β1 did not modulate the voltage-activation curve of MSSN, β1 induced a significant leftward shift of the voltage activation curves of both the MDAL and MANG isoforms. These shifts, of which the MDAL was larger, occurred at both 10 μM and 100 μM Ca(2+). The β1-subunit increased the open dwell times of all three isoforms and decreased the closed dwell times of MANG and MDAL but increased the closed dwell times of MSSN. The distinct modulation of voltage activation by the β1-subunit may be due to the differential effect of β1 on burst duration and interburst intervals observed among these isoforms. Additionally, we observed that the related β2-subunit induced comparable leftward shifts in the voltage-activation curves of all three isoforms, indicating that the differential modulation of these isoforms was specific to β1. These findings suggest that the relative expression of the N-terminal isoforms can fine-tune BK(Ca) channel activity in cells, highlighting a novel mechanism of BK(Ca) channel regulation.

  10. Structure and Function of the N-Terminal Domain of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shihong; Ogino, Minako; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have various mechanisms to duplicate their genomes and produce virus-specific mRNAs. Negative-strand RNA viruses encode their own polymerases to perform each of these processes. For the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the polymerase is comprised of the large polymerase subunit (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). L proteins from members of the Rhabdoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Filoviridae share sequence and predicted secondary structure homology. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain (conserved region I) of the L protein from a rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, at 1.8-Å resolution. The strictly and strongly conserved residues in this domain cluster in a single area of the protein. Serial mutation of these residues shows that many of the amino acids are essential for viral transcription but not for mRNA capping. Three-dimensional alignments show that this domain shares structural homology with polymerases from other viral families, including segmented negative-strand RNA and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. IMPORTANCE Negative-strand RNA viruses include a diverse set of viral families that infect animals and plants, causing serious illness and economic impact. The members of this group of viruses share a set of functionally conserved proteins that are essential to their replication cycle. Among this set of proteins is the viral polymerase, which performs a unique set of reactions to produce genome- and subgenome-length RNA transcripts. In this article, we study the polymerase of vesicular stomatitis virus, a member of the rhabdoviruses, which has served in the past as a model to study negative-strand RNA virus replication. We have identified a site in the N-terminal domain of the polymerase that is essential to viral transcription and that shares sequence homology with members of the paramyxoviruses and the filoviruses. Newly identified sites such as that described here could prove to be useful targets in the

  11. Sargaquinoic acid isolated from Sargassum siliquastrum inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in macrophages via modulation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gyeoung-Jin; Han, Sang-Chul; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Youl Cho, Jae; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2013-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a crucial molecule in inflammatory diseases and is synthesized from L-arginine by a specific enzyme, NO synthase (NOS). The expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) is activated in macrophages by various stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a wall component of gram-negative bacteria. LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the macrophage surface and activates several downstream signaling pathways, including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways. This study investigated whether sargaquinoic acid isolated from Sargassum siliquastrum might have anti-inflammatory activity and interfere with NO production in macrophages by disrupting LPS-induced signaling. This study was conducted in vitro using RAW264.7 murine macrophages. LPS-stimulated cells were treated with sargaquinoic acid, and the effects on NO production, iNOS expression, and involvement of the NF-κB signaling pathway were investigated by Griess assay, western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The results demonstrated that sargaquinoic acid inhibited the production of NO and the expression of the iNOS protein in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, sargaquinoic acid inhibited the degradation of inhibitory-κB protein (IκB)-α and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a key transcription factor for the regulation of iNOS expression. Also, sargaquinoic acid influenced the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 MAPK, except ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs, stimulated by LPS. These results suggest that sargaquinoic acid specifically prevents NO production in macrophages via the blockade of NF-κB activation and may thus have therapeutic applications in various inflammatory diseases.

  12. N-Terminal Derivatization with Structures Having High Proton Affinity for Discrimination between Leu and Ile Residues in Peptides by High-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Atsushi; Miyashita, Masahiro; Kubo, Ayumi; Satoh, Takaya; Toyoda, Michisato; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    De novo sequencing is still essential in the identification of peptides and proteins from unexplored organisms whose sequence information is not available. One of the remaining problems in de novo sequencing is discrimination between Leu and Ile residues. The discrimination is possible based on differences in side chain fragmentation between Leu and Ile under high-energy collision-induced dissociation (HE-CID) conditions. However, this is observed only when basic residues, such as Arg and Lys, are present near the N- or C-terminal end. It has been shown that the charge derivatization at the N-terminal end by a quarternary ammonium or phosphonium moiety facilitates the side chain fragmentation by HE-CID. However, the effective backbone fragmentation by low-energy CID (LE-CID) is often hampered in those derivatives with a fixed charge. Previously, we demonstrated that the N-terminal charge derivatization with the structures having high proton affinity induced the preferential formation of b-ions under LE-CID conditions, allowing straightforward interpretation of product ion spectra. In the present study, we further investigated whether the same derivatization approach is also effective for discrimination between Leu and Ile under HE-CID conditions. Consequently, the side chain fragmentation of Leu and Ile residues was most effectively enhanced by the N-terminal derivatization with 4-(guanidinomethyl)benzoic acid among the tested structures. This derivatization approach, which is compatible with both HE- and LE-CID analysis, offers a straightforward and unambiguous de novo peptide sequencing method. PMID:27900234

  13. N-Terminal Derivatization with Structures Having High Proton Affinity for Discrimination between Leu and Ile Residues in Peptides by High-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Atsushi; Miyashita, Masahiro; Kubo, Ayumi; Satoh, Takaya; Toyoda, Michisato; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    De novo sequencing is still essential in the identification of peptides and proteins from unexplored organisms whose sequence information is not available. One of the remaining problems in de novo sequencing is discrimination between Leu and Ile residues. The discrimination is possible based on differences in side chain fragmentation between Leu and Ile under high-energy collision-induced dissociation (HE-CID) conditions. However, this is observed only when basic residues, such as Arg and Lys, are present near the N- or C-terminal end. It has been shown that the charge derivatization at the N-terminal end by a quarternary ammonium or phosphonium moiety facilitates the side chain fragmentation by HE-CID. However, the effective backbone fragmentation by low-energy CID (LE-CID) is often hampered in those derivatives with a fixed charge. Previously, we demonstrated that the N-terminal charge derivatization with the structures having high proton affinity induced the preferential formation of b-ions under LE-CID conditions, allowing straightforward interpretation of product ion spectra. In the present study, we further investigated whether the same derivatization approach is also effective for discrimination between Leu and Ile under HE-CID conditions. Consequently, the side chain fragmentation of Leu and Ile residues was most effectively enhanced by the N-terminal derivatization with 4-(guanidinomethyl)benzoic acid among the tested structures. This derivatization approach, which is compatible with both HE- and LE-CID analysis, offers a straightforward and unambiguous de novo peptide sequencing method.

  14. Molecular properties of the N-terminal extension of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7.

    PubMed

    Edamatsu, M

    2016-02-11

    Kinesin-5 plays an essential role in spindle formation and function, and serves as a potential target for anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular properties of the N-terminal extension of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe kinesin-5, Cut7. This extension is rich in charged amino acids and predicted to be intrinsically disordered. In S. pombe cells, a Cut7 construct lacking half the N-terminal extension failed to localize along the spindle microtubules and formed a monopolar spindle. However, a construct lacking the entire N-terminal extension exhibited normal localization and formed a typical bipolar spindle. In addition, in vitro analyses revealed that the truncated Cut7 constructs demonstrated similar motile velocities and directionalities as the wild-type motor protein, but the microtubule landing rates were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that the N-terminal extension is not required for normal Cut7 intracellular localization or function, but alters the microtubule-binding properties of this protein in vitro.

  15. The N-terminal acetyltransferase Naa10 is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Rasmus; Myklebust, Line M.; Thiel, Puja; Foyn, Håvard; Fladmark, Kari E.; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation, catalysed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and involves the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the α-amino group of the first amino acid. Functions of N-terminal acetylation include protein degradation and sub-cellular targeting. Recent findings in humans indicate that a dysfunctional Nα-acetyltransferase (Naa) 10, the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major NAT, is associated with lethality during infancy. In the present study, we identified the Danio rerio orthologue zebrafish Naa 10 (zNaa10). In vitro N-terminal acetylation assays revealed that zNaa10 has NAT activity with substrate specificity highly similar to that of human Naa10. Spatiotemporal expression pattern was determined by in situ hybridization, showing ubiquitous expression with especially strong staining in brain and eye. By morpholino-mediated knockdown, we demonstrated that naa10 morphants displayed increased lethality, growth retardation and developmental abnormalities like bent axis, abnormal eyes and bent tails. In conclusion, we identified the zebrafish Naa10 orthologue and revealed that it is essential for normal development and viability of zebrafish. PMID:26251455

  16. Selecting protein N-terminal peptides by combined fractional diagonal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Staes, An; Impens, Francis; Van Damme, Petra; Ruttens, Bart; Goethals, Marc; Demol, Hans; Timmerman, Evy; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2011-07-14

    In recent years, procedures for selecting the N-terminal peptides of proteins with analysis by mass spectrometry have been established to characterize protease-mediated cleavage and protein α-N-acetylation on a proteomic level. As a pioneering technology, N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) has been used in numerous studies in which these protein modifications were investigated. Derivatization of primary amines--which can include stable isotope labeling--occurs before trypsin digestion so that cleavage occurs after arginine residues. Strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography results in the removal of most of the internal peptides. Diagonal, reversed-phase peptide chromatography, in which the two runs are separated by reaction with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, results in the removal of the C-terminal peptides and remaining internal peptides and the fractionation of the sample. We describe here the fully matured N-terminal COFRADIC protocol as it is currently routinely used, including the most substantial improvements (including treatment with glutamine cyclotransferase and pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase to remove pyroglutamate before SCX, and a sample pooling scheme to reduce the overall number of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses) that were made since its original publication. Completion of the N-terminal COFRADIC procedure takes ~5 d.

  17. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  18. Expression in Escherichia coli of active human alcohol dehydrogenase lacking N-terminal acetylation.

    PubMed

    Höög, J O; Weis, M; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H; von Bahr-Lindström, H

    1987-12-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, beta beta isozyme of class I) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized regarding N-terminal processing. The expression system was obtained by ligation of a cDNA fragment corresponding to the beta-subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase into the vector pKK 223-3 containing the tac promoter. The enzyme, detected by Western-blot analysis and ethanol oxidizing activity, constituted up to 3% of the total amount of protein. Recombinant ADH was separated from E. coli ADH by ion-exchange chromatography and the isolated enzyme was essentially pure as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. The N-terminal sequence was identical to that of the authentic beta-subunit except that the N-terminus was non-acetylated, indicating a correct removal of the initiator methionine, but lack of further processing.

  19. Proteolytic cleavage of ostrich and turkey pancreatic lipases: production of an active N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Fendri, Ahmed; Gargouri, Youssef; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Miled, Nabil

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to check some biochemical and structural properties of ostrich and turkey pancreatic lipases (OPL and TPL, respectively). Limited proteolysis of OPL and TPL was performed in conditions similar to those reported for porcine pancreatic lipase. In the absence of bile salts and colipase, OPL failed to catalyze the hydrolysis of pure tributyrin or efficiently hydrolyze olive oil emulsion. When bile salts and colipase were preincubated with the substrate, the OPL kinetic behavior remained linear for more than 30 minutes. The enzyme presented a penetration power value into an egg phosphatidylcholine monomolecular film that was comparable to that of HPL and lower than that of TPL. Chymotrypsin, trypsin, and thermolysin were able to hydrolyze OPL and TPL in different ways. In both cases, only N-terminal fragments accumulated during the hydrolysis, whereas no C-terminal fragment was obtained in either case. Tryptic cleavage of OPL and TPL completely degraded the enzymes. Nevertheless, chymotryptic attack generated 35-kd and 43-kd forms for TPL and OPL, respectively. Interestingly, the OPL 43-kd form was inactive, whereas the TPL 35-kd protein conserved its lipolytic activity. OPL, TPL, and mammal pancreatic lipases share a high amino acid sequence homology. Further investigations are, however, needed to identify key residues involved in substrate recognition responsible for biochemical differences between the 2 classes of lipases.

  20. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  1. Purification, amino acid sequence and characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II have been purified to homogeneity from kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum, thus this represents the first report of the purification, sequencing and characterisation of marsupial IGFs. N-Terminal protein sequencing reveals that there are six amino acid differences between kangaroo and human IGF-I. Kangaroo IGF-II has been partially sequenced and no differences were found between human and kangaroo IGF-II in the 53 residues identified. Thus the IGFs appear to be remarkably structurally conserved during mammalian radiation. In addition, in vitro characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I demonstrated that the functional properties of human, kangaroo and chicken IGF-I are very similar. In an assay measuring the ability of the proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts, all IGF-I proteins were found to be equally potent. The ability of all three proteins to compete for binding with radiolabelled human IGF-I to type-1 IGF receptors in L6 myoblasts and in Sminthopsis crassicaudata transformed lung fibroblasts, a marsupial cell line, was comparable. Furthermore, kangaroo and human IGF-I react equally in a human IGF-I RIA using a human reference standard, radiolabelled human IGF-I and a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human IGF-I. This study indicates that not only is the primary structure of eutherian and metatherian IGF-I conserved, but also the proteins appear to be functionally similar.

  2. Contributions of the Histidine Side Chain and the N-terminal α-Amino Group to the Binding Thermodynamics of Oligopeptides to Nucleic Acids as a Function of pH

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, Jeff D.; Prevas, James P.; Ross, Christina R.; Toth, Eric A.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Interactions of histidine with nucleic acid phosphates and histidine pKa shifts make important contributions to many protein-nucleic acid binding processes. To characterize these phenomena in simplified systems, we quantified binding of a histidine-containing model peptide HWKK (+NH3-His-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2) and its lysine analog KWKK (+NH3-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2) to a single-stranded RNA model, polyuridylate (polyU), by changes in tryptophan fluorescence as a function of salt concentration and pH. For both HWKK and KWKK, equilibrium binding constants, Kobs, and magnitudes of log-log salt derivatives SKobs ≡ (∂logKobs/∂log[Na+]), decreased with increasing pH in the manner expected for a titration curve model in which deprotonation of the histidine and α-amino groups weakens binding and reduces its salt-dependence. Fully protonated HWKK and KWKK exhibit the same Kobs and SKobs within uncertainty, and these SKobs values are consistent with limiting-law polyelectrolyte theory for +4 cationic oligopeptides binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. The pH-dependence of HWKK binding to polyU provides no evidence for pKa shifts nor any requirement for histidine protonation, in stark contrast to the thermodynamics of coupled protonation often seen for these cationic residues in the context of native protein structure where histidine protonation satisfies specific interactions (e.g., salt-bridge formation) within highly complementary binding interfaces. The absence of pKa shifts in our studies indicates that additional Coulombic interactions across the nonspecific-binding interface between RNA and protonated histidine or the α-amino group are not sufficient to promote proton uptake for these oligopeptides. We present our findings in the context of hydration models for specific versus nonspecific nucleic acid binding. PMID:20108951

  3. Three N-terminal domains of beta-1,3-glucanase A1 are involved in binding to insoluble beta-1,3-glucan.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, T; Kasahara, N; Aida, K; Tanaka, H

    1992-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of beta-1,3-glucanase A1 by three different proteases, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and papain, gave three major active fragments. The sizes of the three major fragments generated by each protease treatment were identical to those of beta-1,3-glucanase A2, A3, and A4 detected in both the culture supernatant of Bacillus circulans WL-12 and the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli carrying a cloned glcA gene. These results indicate a four-domain structure for the enzyme. At the N terminus of the glucanase, duplicated segments of approximately 100 amino acids were observed. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the active fragments with sizes corresponding to those of A2 and A3 lack the first segment (domain) and both duplicated segments (domains), respectively. The fragment corresponding to A4 lacks both duplicated segments and the following ca. 120-amino-acid region. By losing the first, second, and third (corresponding to the segment of 120 amino acids) domains, beta-1,3-glucanase progressively lost the ability to bind to pachyman, beta-1,3-glucan. An active fragment which did not have the three N-terminal domains did not show significant binding to pachyman. Thus, all three N-terminal domains contribute to binding to beta-1,3-glucan, and the presence of three domains confers the highest binding activity on the glucanase. The loss of these binding domains remarkably decreased pachyman-hydrolyzing activity, indicating that the binding activity is essential for the efficient hydrolysis of insoluble beta-1,3-glucan. Images PMID:1729208

  4. Glycosylation and surface expression of the influenza virus neuraminidase requires the N-terminal hydrophobic region.

    PubMed Central

    Markoff, L; Lin, B C; Sveda, M M; Lai, C J

    1984-01-01

    A full-length double-stranded DNA copy of an influenza A virus N2 neuraminidase (NA) gene was cloned into the late region of pSV2330, a hybrid expression vector that includes pBR322 plasmid DNA sequences and the simian virus 40 early region and simian virus 40 late region promoters, splice sequences, and transcription termination sites. The protein encoded by the cloned wild-type NA gene was shown to be present in the cytoplasm of fixed cells and at the surface of "live" or unfixed cells by indirect immunofluorescence with N2 monoclonal antibodies. Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins from wild-type vector-infected cells with heterospecific N2 antibody showed that the product of the cloned NA DNA comigrated with glycosylated NA from influenza virus-infected cells, remained associated with internal membranes of cells fractionated into membrane and cytoplasmic fractions, and could form an immunoprecipitable dimer. NA enzymatic activity was detectable after simian virus 40 lysis of vector-infected cells. These properties of the product of the cloned wild-type gene were compared with those of the polypeptides produced by three deletion mutant NA DNAs that were also cloned into the late region of the pSV2330 vector. These mutants lacked 7 (dlk), 21 (dlI), or all 23 amino acids (dlZ) of the amino (N)-terminal variable hydrophobic region that anchors the mature wild-type NA tetrameric structure in the infected cell or influenza viral membrane. Comparison of the phenotypes of these mutants showed that this region in the NA molecule also includes sequences that control translocation of the nascent polypeptide into membrane organelles for glycosylation. Images PMID:6700587

  5. Stable proline box motif at the N-terminal end of alpha-helices.

    PubMed Central

    Viguera, A. R.; Serrano, L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a novel N-terminal alpha-helix local motif that involves three hydrophobic residues and a Pro residue (Pro-box motif). Database analysis shows that when Pro is the N-cap of an alpha-helix the distribution of amino acids in adjacent positions changes dramatically with respect to the average distribution in an alpha-helix, but not when Pro is at position N1. N-cap Pro residues are usually associated to Ile and Leu, at position N', Val at position N3 and a hydrophobic residue (h) at position N4. The side chain of the N-cap Pro packs against Val, while the hydrophobic residues at positions N' and N4 make favorable interactions. To analyze the role of this putative motif (sequence fingerprint hPXXhh), we have synthesized a series of peptides and analyzed them by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR. We find that this motif is formed in peptides, and that the accompanying hydrophobic interactions contribute up to 1.2 kcal/mol to helix stability. The fact that some of the residues in this fingerprint are not good N-cap and helix formers results in a small overall stabilization of the alpha-helix with respect to other peptides having Gly as the N-cap and Ala at N3 and N4. This suggests that the Pro-box motif will not specially contribute to protein stability but to the specificity of its fold. In fact, 80% of the sequences that contain the fingerprint sequence in the protein database are adopting the described structural motif, and in none of them is the helix extended to place Pro at the more favorable N1 position. PMID:10493574

  6. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus NSvc2 Glycoproteins Targeted to the Golgi Body by the N-Terminal Transmembrane Domain and Adjacent Cytosolic 24 Amino Acids via the COP I- and COP II-Dependent Secretion Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Min; Liu, Xiaofan; Li, Shuo; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The NSvc2 glycoproteins encoded by Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) share many characteristics common to the glycoproteins found among Bunyaviridae. Within this viral family, glycoproteins targeting to the Golgi apparatus play a pivotal role in the maturation of the enveloped spherical particles. RSV particles, however, adopt a long filamentous morphology. Recently, RSV NSvc2 glycoproteins were shown to localize exclusively to the ER in Sf9 insect cells. Here, we demonstrate that the amino-terminal NSvc2 (NSvc2-N) targets to the Golgi apparatus in Nicotiana benthamiana cells, whereas the carboxyl-terminal NSvc2 (NSvc2-C) accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Upon coexpression, NSvc2-N redirects NSvc2-C from the ER to the Golgi bodies. The NSvc2 glycoproteins move together with the Golgi stacks along the ER/actin network. The targeting of the NSvc2 glycoproteins to the Golgi bodies was strictly dependent on functional anterograde traffic out of the ER to the Golgi bodies or on a retrograde transport route from the Golgi apparatus. The analysis of truncated and chimeric NSvc2 proteins demonstrates that the Golgi targeting signal comprises amino acids 269 to 315 of NSvc2-N, encompassing the transmembrane domain and 24 adjacent amino acids in the cytosolic tail. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the glycoproteins from an unenveloped Tenuivirus could target Golgi bodies in plant cells. IMPORTANCE NSvc2 glycoprotein encoded by unenveloped Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) share many characteristics in common with glycoprotein found among Bunyaviridae in which all members have membrane-enveloped sphere particle. Recently, RSV NSvc2 glycoproteins were shown to localize exclusively to the ER in Sf9 insect cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the RSV glycoproteins could target Golgi bodies in plant cells. The targeting of NSvc2 glycoproteins to the Golgi bodies was dependent on active COP II or COP I. The Golgi targeting signal was mapped to the

  7. The N-terminal half of membrane CD14 is a functional cellular lipopolysaccharide receptor.

    PubMed

    Viriyakosol, S; Kirkland, T N

    1996-02-01

    CD14, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein on the surface of monocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, is a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was recently reported that an N-terminal 152-amino-acid fragment of soluble CD14 was an active soluble lipopolysaccharide receptor (T. S. -C. Juan, M. J. Kelley, D. A. Johnson, L. A. Busse, E. Hailman, S. D. Wright, and H. S. Lichenstein, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1382-1387, 1995). To determine whether the N-terminal half of the membrane CD14 was a functional LPS receptor on the cell membrane, we engineered a chimeric gene coding for amino acids 1 to 151 of CD14 fused to the C-terminal region of decay-accelerating factor and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and 70Z/3 cells. We found that the chimeric, truncated CD14 is a fully functional LPS receptor in both cell lines.

  8. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  9. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: XXX aminopyrazoles, a new class of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors, have been synthesized and the biochemical IC50 has been...have also been generated as backups. XXX compounds from the pyridopyrimidinone class have been synthesized and tested in biochemical and cell based...assays, and XXX compounds from the amino acid transporter analog class have been made and tested in biochemical assays. The goal of this work is to

  10. Histone H4 N-Terminal Acetylation in Kasumi-1 Cells Treated with Depsipeptide Determined by Acetic Acid–Urea olyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis, Amino Acid Coded Mass Tagging, and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Su, Xiaodan; Liu, Shujun; Knapp, Amy R.; Parthun, Mark R.; Marcucci, Guido; Freitas, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Disrupted patterns of acetylation and deacetylation of core histones play an important role in silencing transcription of hematopoietic important genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A thorough investigation of these mechanisms and the response to pharmacologic modifiers will provide a better understanding of the role of histone acetylation in leukemogenesis. We describe here an analytical approach that combines acid urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AU-PAGE), amino acid coded mass tagging (AACM), and mass spectrometry (MS) for the investigation of histone acetylation patterns. The combined approach was used to follow the dynamics of H4 acetylation in Kasumi-1 cells harboring the fusion gene AML1/ETO shown to aberrantly recruit histone deacetylases (HDACs). The histones in Kasumi-1 cells were labeled by growing the cells in media in which lysine was replaced with stable isotope-labeled lysine (Lys-D4). Labeled and unlabeled cells were treated with depsipeptide and analyzed at different time points (0, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h). The cells were mixed, the histone was extracted, and acetylated H4 isoforms were separated using AU-PAGE before in-gel trypsin digestion. The digests were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. Peptides were identified by mass and isotope pattern. LC–MS/MS of Arg-C digests were also performed to verify the acetylation pattern for H4. The major pattern of acetylation was determined as follows: initial acetylation at K16, followed by acetylation at K12, and finally acetylation of either K8 and/or K5. PMID:17203951

  11. The N-terminal hydrophobic region of the mature phosphate translocator is sufficient for targeting to the chloroplast inner envelope membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, J S; Gray, J C

    1995-01-01

    To locate the sequence required for directing the phosphate translocator to the chloroplast inner envelope membrane, a series of chimeric proteins constituting parts of the phosphate translocator and the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, which is normally located in the stroma, has been produced. Reciprocal exchanges of the presequences and mature sequences of the phosphate translocator and the small subunit indicated that the phosphate translocator presequence contains stromal targeting information and that the mature protein is responsible for inner envelope membrane targeting. Chimeric proteins containing the N-terminal 46 amino acid residues of the phosphate translocator were directed to the inner envelope membrane. Subdivision of this region into its composite hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions showed that the hydrophobic region alone, which consists of amino acid residues 24 to 45, was able to direct the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase to the inner envelope membrane. PMID:8589626

  12. A novel N-terminal motif is responsible for the evolution of neural crest-specific gene-regulatory activity in vertebrate FoxD3.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroki; Kozmik, Zbynek; Yu, Jr-Kai; Wada, Hiroshi

    2014-01-15

    The neural crest is unique to vertebrates and has allowed the evolution of their complicated craniofacial structures. During vertebrate evolution, the acquisition of the neural crest must have been accompanied by the emergence of a new gene regulatory network (GRN). Here, to investigate the role of protein evolution in the emergence of the neural crest GRN, we examined the neural crest cell (NCC) differentiation-inducing activity of chordate FoxD genes. Amphioxus and vertebrate (Xenopus) FoxD proteins both exhibited transcriptional repressor activity in Gal4 transactivation assays and bound to similar DNA sequences in vitro. However, whereas vertebrate FoxD3 genes induced the differentiation of ectopic NCCs when overexpressed in chick neural tube, neither amphioxus FoxD nor any other vertebrate FoxD paralogs exhibited this activity. Experiments using chimeric proteins showed that the N-terminal portion of the vertebrate FoxD3 protein is critical to its NCC differentiation-inducing activity. Furthermore, replacement of the N-terminus of amphioxus FoxD with a 39-amino-acid segment from zebrafish FoxD3 conferred neural crest-inducing activity on amphioxus FoxD or zebrafish FoxD1. Therefore, fixation of this N-terminal amino acid sequence may have been crucial in the evolutionary recruitment of FoxD3 to the vertebrate neural crest GRN. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  14. A 25-Amino Acid Sequence of the Arabidopsis TGD2 Protein Is Sufficient for Specific Binding of Phosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Binbin; Benning, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Genetic analysis suggests that the TGD2 protein of Arabidopsis is required for the biosynthesis of endoplasmic reticulum derived thylakoid lipids. TGD2 is proposed to be the substrate-binding protein of a presumed lipid transporter consisting of the TGD1 (permease) and TGD3 (ATPase) proteins. The TGD1, -2, and -3 proteins are localized in the inner chloroplast envelope membrane. TGD2 appears to be anchored with an N-terminal membrane-spanning domain into the inner envelope membrane, whereas the C-terminal domain faces the intermembrane space. It was previously shown that the C-terminal domain of TGD2 binds phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). To investigate the PtdOH binding site of TGD2 in detail, the C-terminal domain of the TGD2 sequence lacking the transit peptide and transmembrane sequences was fused to the C terminus of the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DR). This greatly improved the solubility of the resulting DR-TGD2C fusion protein following production in Escherichia coli. The DR-TGD2C protein bound PtdOH with high specificity, as demonstrated by membrane lipid-protein overlay and liposome association assays. Internal deletion and truncation mutagenesis identified a previously undescribed minimal 25-amino acid fragment in the C-terminal domain of TGD2 that is sufficient for PtdOH binding. Binding characteristics of this 25-mer were distinctly different from those of TGD2C, suggesting that additional sequences of TGD2 providing the proper context for this 25-mer are needed for wild type-like PtdOH binding. PMID:19416982

  15. The cyanobacterial cell division factor Ftn6 contains an N-terminal DnaD-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Marbouty, Martial; Saguez, Cyril; Chauvat, Franck

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA replication and cell cycle as well as their relationship have been extensively studied in the two model organisms E. coli and B. subtilis. By contrast, little is known about these processes in cyanobacteria, even though they are crucial to the biosphere, in utilizing solar energy to renew the oxygenic atmosphere and in producing the biomass for the food chain. Recent studies have allowed the identification of several cell division factors that are specifics to cyanobacteria. Among them, Ftn6 has been proposed to function in the recruitment of the crucial FtsZ proteins to the septum or the subsequent Z-ring assembly and possibly in chromosome segregation. Results In this study, we identified an as yet undescribed domain located in the conserved N-terminal region of Ftn6. This 77 amino-acids-long domain, designated here as FND (Ftn6 N-Terminal Domain), exhibits striking sequence and structural similarities with the DNA-interacting module, listed in the PFAM database as the DnaD-like domain (pfam04271). We took advantage of the sequence similarities between FND and the DnaD-like domains to construct a homology 3D-model of the Ftn6 FND domain from the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803. Mapping of the conserved residues exposed onto the FND surface allowed us to identify a highly conserved area that could be engaged in Ftn6-specific interactions. Conclusion Overall, similarities between FND and DnaD-like domains as well as previously reported observations on Ftn6 suggest that FND may function as a DNA-interacting module thereby providing an as yet missing link between DNA replication and cell division in cyanobacteria. Consistently, we also showed that Ftn6 is involved in tolerance to DNA damages generated by UV rays. PMID:19698108

  16. Critical roles of CTP synthase N-terminal in cytoophidium assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Jin-Jun; Ghosh, Sanjay; Liu, Ji-Long

    2017-03-22

    Several metabolic enzymes assemble into distinct intracellular structures in prokaryotes and eukaryotes suggesting an important functional role in cell physiology. The CTP-generating enzyme CTP synthase forms long filamentous structures termed cytoophidia in bacteria, yeast, fruit flies and human cells independent of its catalytic activity. However, the amino acid determinants for protein-protein interaction necessary for polymerisation remained unknown. In this study, we systematically analysed the role of the conserved N-terminal of Drosophila CTP synthase in cytoophidium assembly. Our mutational analyses identified three key amino acid residues within this region that play an instructive role in organisation of CTP synthase into a filamentous structure. Co-transfection assays demonstrated formation of heteromeric CTP synthase filaments which is disrupted by protein carrying a mutated N-terminal alanine residue thus revealing a dominant-negative activity. Interestingly, the dominant-negative activity is supressed by the CTP synthase inhibitor DON. Furthermore, we found that the amino acids at the corresponding position in the human protein exhibit similar properties suggesting conservation of their function through evolution. Our data suggest that cytoophidium assembly is a multi-step process involving N-terminal-dependent sequential interactions between correctly folded structural units and provide insights into the assembly of these enigmatic structures.

  17. The N-terminal region of the dopamine D2 receptor, a rhodopsin-like GPCR, regulates correct integration into the plasma membrane and endocytic routes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, DI; Min, C; Jung, KS; Cheong, SY; Zheng, M; Cheong, SJ; Oak, MH; Cheong, JH; Lee, BK; Kim, KM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Functional roles of the N-terminal region of rhodopsin-like GPCR family remain unclear. Using dopamine D2 and D3 receptors as a model system, we probed the roles of the N-terminal region in the signalling, intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins, and explored the critical factors that determine the functionality of the N-terminal region. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor was gradually shortened or switched with that of the D3 receptor or a non-specific sequence (FLAG), or potential N-terminal glycosylation sites were mutated. Effects of these manipulations on surface expression, internalization, post-endocytic behaviours and signalling were determined. KEY RESULTS Shortening the N-terminal region of the D2 receptor enhanced receptor internalization and impaired surface expression and signalling; ligand binding, desensitization and down-regulation were not affected but their association with a particular microdomain, caveolae, was disrupted. Replacement of critical residues within the N-terminal region with the FLAG epitope failed to restore surface expression but partially restored the altered internalization and signalling. When the N-terminal regions were switched between D2 and D3 receptors, cell surface expression pattern of each receptor was switched. Mutations of potential N-terminal glycosylation sites inhibited surface expression but enhanced internalization of D2 receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Shortening of N-terminus or mutation of glycosylation sites located within the N-terminus enhanced receptor internalization but impaired the surface expression of D2 receptors. The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor, in a sequence-specific manner, controls the receptor's conformation and integration into the plasma membrane, which determine its subcellular localization, intracellular trafficking and signalling properties. PMID:22117524

  18. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del; Wall, Jonathan S.; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L.; Pérez Carreón, Julio I.; and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  19. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  20. PURIFICATION AND N-TERMINAL ANALYSES OF ALGAL BILIPROTEINS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    R-, B- and C-phycoerythrins and R- and C- phycocyanins were isolated and purified on a preparative scale by calcium phosphate chromatography, ammonium...of C-phycoerythrin (mol.wt. 226 000). Threonine (1 residue) is N-terminal in C- phycocyanin (mol.wt. 138 000), and both threonine (about 1.3 residues...and methionine (5 residues) are N-terminal in R- phycocyanin (mol.wt. 273 000). Results suggest that the apoproteins of the various phycoerythrins are

  1. Correlation between spina bifida manifesta in fetal rats and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling★

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yinghuan; Bao, Yongxin; Li, Chenghao; Jiao, Fubin; Xin, Hongjie; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2012-01-01

    Fetal rat models with neural tube defects were established by injection with retinoic acid at 10 days after conception. The immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the number of caspase-3 positive cells in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta was increased. There was also increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation level was positively correlated with caspase-3 expression in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta. Experimental findings indicate that abnormal apoptosis is involved in retinoic acid-induced dominant spina bifida formation in fetal rats, and may be associated with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signal transduction pathway. PMID:25337099

  2. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Marcianò, G; Huang, D T

    2016-02-01

    The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  3. The N-terminal domains of spider silk proteins assemble ultrafast and protected from charge screening.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Simone; Zwettler, Fabian U; Johnson, Christopher M; Neuweiler, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Web spiders assemble spidroin monomers into silk fibres of unrivalled tensile strength at remarkably high spinning speeds of up to 1 m s(-1). The spidroin N-terminal domain contains a charge-driven, pH-sensitive relay that controls self-association by an elusive mechanism. The underlying kinetics have not yet been reported. Here we engineer a fluorescence switch into the isolated N-terminal domain from spidroin 1 of the major ampullate gland of the nursery web spider E. australis that monitors dimerization. We observe ultrafast association that is surprisingly insensitive to salt, contrasting the classical screening effects in accelerated, charged protein interfaces. To gain deeper mechanistic insight, we mutate each of the protonatable residue side chains and probe their contributions. Two vicinal aspartic acids are critically involved in an unusual process of accelerated protein association that is protected from screening by electrolytes, potentially facilitating the rapid synthesis of silk fibres by web spiders.

  4. Effects of Acidic Peptide Size and Sequence on Trivalent Praseodymium Adduction and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Commodore, Juliette J; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2017-02-07

    Using the lanthanide ion praseodymium, Pr(III), metallated ion formation and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) were studied for 25 biological and model acidic peptides. For chain lengths of seven or more residues, even highly acidic peptides that can be difficult to protonate by electrospray ionization will metallate and undergo abundant ETD fragmentation. Peptides composed of predominantly acidic residues form only the deprotonated ion, [M + Pr - H](2+) ; this ion yields near complete ETD sequence coverage for larger peptides. Peptides with a mixture of acidic and neutral residues, generate [M + Pr](3+) , which cleaves between every residue for many peptides. Acidic peptides that contain at least one residue with a basic side chain also produce the protonated ion, [M + Pr + H](4+) ; this ion undergoes the most extensive sequence coverage by ETD. Primarily metallated and non-metallated c- and z-ions form for all peptides investigated. Metal adducted product ions are only present when at least half of the peptide sequence can be incorporated into the ion; this suggests that the metal ion simultaneously attaches to more than one acidic site. The only site consistently lacking dissociation is at the N-terminal side of a proline residue. Increasing peptide chain length generates more backbone cleavage for metal-peptide complexes with the same charge state. For acidic peptides with the same length, increasing the precursor ion charge state from 2+ to 3+ also leads to more cleavage. The results of this study indicate that highly acidic peptides can be sequenced by ETD of complexes formed with Pr(III).

  5. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Wall, Jonathan S; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L; Pérez Carreón, Julio I; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián; Fernández-Velasco, D Alejandro

    2014-01-10

    It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V(L)) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V(L) protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  6. Specific amplification of gene encoding N-terminal region of catalase-peroxidase protein (KatG-N) for diagnosis of disseminated MAC disease in HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Latawa, Romica; Singh, Krishna Kumar; Wanchu, Ajay; Sethi, Sunil; Sharma, Kusum; Sharma, Aman; Laal, Suman; Verma, Indu

    2014-10-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) infection is considered as severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Currently available various laboratory investigations have not only limited ability to discriminate between MAC infection and tuberculosis but are also laborious and time consuming. The aim of this study was, therefore, to design a molecular-based strategy for specific detection of MAC and its differentiation from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) isolated from the blood specimens of HIV patients. A simple PCR was developed based on the amplification of 120-bp katG-N gene corresponding to the first 40 amino acids of N-terminal catalase-peroxidase (KatG) protein of Mycobacterium avium that shows only ~13% sequence homology by clustal W alignment to N-terminal region of M. tb KatG protein. This assay allowed the accurate and rapid detection of MAC bacteremia, distinguishing it from M. tb in a single PCR reaction without any need for sequencing or hybridization protocol to be performed thereafter. This study produced enough evidence that a significant proportion of Indian HIV patients have disseminated MAC bacteremia, suggesting the utility of M. avium katG-N gene PCR for early detection of MAC disease in HIV patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Designing of hybrid human interferon alfa-2 strain-producers and the use of enteropeptidase for obtaining N-terminal methionine-free interferons].

    PubMed

    Shirokov, D A; Riabichenko, V V; Akishina, R I; Ospel'nikova, T P; Glazunov, A V; Chestukhina, G G; Veĭko, V P

    2011-01-01

    A system for production of human interferon-alpha2a (IFN-alpha2a) and IFN-alpha2b lacking N-terminal methionine has been developed. Plasmids containing genes of hybrid IFN-alpha2 under the control of different promoters were constructed; a sequence encoding the enteropeptidase hydrolysis site being introduced in proximal part of the genes. As the result, 4 strains of Escherichia coli producing hybrid IFN-alpha2 have been obtained. The methodology for IFN-alpha2 renaturation, hydrolysis of its N-terminal part, chromatographic purification of N-terminal methionine-free IFN-alpha2 has been developed.

  8. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    PubMed Central

    Monlezun, Laura; Phan, Gilles; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Enguéné, Véronique Y. N.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In Gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved outer membrane factor (OMF) protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional PTM could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In Escherichia coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any modification. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X-ray structure at 3.8 Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitoylated cysteine. PMID:26191054

  9. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  10. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  11. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  12. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein.

  13. Structure and Function of the Sterol Carrier Protein-2 N-Terminal Presequence†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Hostetler, Heather A.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Tichy, Shane E.; Williams, Brad J.; Russell, David H.; Berg, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Thomas A.; Ball, Judith; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) is encoded as a precursor protein (proSCP-2), little is known regarding the structure and function of the 20-amino acid N-terminal presequence. As shown herein, the presequence contains significant secondary structure and alters SCP-2: (i) secondary structure (CD), (ii) tertiary structure (aqueous exposure of Trp shown by UV absorbance, fluorescence, fluorescence quenching), (iii) ligand binding site [Trp response to ligands, peptide cross-linked by photoactivatable free cholesterol (FCBP)], (iv) selectivity for interaction with anionic phospholipid-rich membranes, (v) interaction with a peroxisomal import protein [FRET studies of Pex5p(C) binding], the N-terminal presequence increased SCP-2’s affinity for Pex5p(C) by 10-fold, and (vi) intracellular targeting in living and fixed cells (confocal microscopy). Nearly 5-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae (AF488-CTB), 2.8-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with a mitochondrial marker (Mitotracker), but nearly 2-fold less SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with peroxisomes (AF488-antibody to PMP70). These data indicate the importance of the N-terminal presequence in regulating SCP-2 structure, cholesterol localization within the ligand binding site, membrane association, and, potentially, intracellular targeting. PMID:18465878

  14. Molecular Basis of Substrate Specific Acetylation by N-Terminal Acetyltransferase NatB.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Cai, Yongfei; Zhang, Shijun; Ding, Hongyan; Wang, Haitao; Han, Aidong

    2017-04-04

    The NatB N-terminal acetyltransferase specifically acetylates the N-terminal group of substrate protein peptides starting with Met-Asp/Glu/Asn/Gln. How NatB recognizes and acetylates these substrates remains unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of a NatB holoenzyme from Candida albicans in the presence of its co-factor CoA and substrate peptides. The auxiliary subunit Naa25 of NatB forms a horseshoe-like deck to hold specifically its catalytic subunit Naa20. The first two amino acids Met and Asp of a substrate peptide mediate the major interactions with the active site in the Naa20 subunit. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate Asp and pocket residues of Naa20 are essential to determine the NatB substrate specificity. Moreover, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the substrate Met and a carbonyl group in the Naa20 active site directly anchors the substrate toward acetyl-CoA. Together, these structures define a unique molecular mechanism of specific N-terminal acetylation acted by NatB.

  15. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T.

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  16. The amino acid sequence of wood duck lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Torikata, T

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of wood duck (Aix sponsa) lysozyme was analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had the highest similarity to duck III lysozyme with four amino acid substitutions, and had eighteen amino acid substitutions from chicken lysozyme. The valine at position 75 was newly detected in chicken-type lysozymes. In the active site, Tyr34 and Glu57 were found at subsites F and D, respectively, when compared with chicken lysozyme.

  17. Prediction of N-terminal protein sorting signals.

    PubMed

    Claros, M G; Brunak, S; von Heijne, G

    1997-06-01

    Recently, neural networks have been applied to a widening range of problems in molecular biology. An area particularly suited to neural-network methods is the identification of protein sorting signals and the prediction of their cleavage sites, as these functional units are encoded by local, linear sequences of amino acids rather than global 3D structures.

  18. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  19. Folding and stability studies on C-PE and its natural N-terminal truncant.

    PubMed

    Anwer, Khalid; Parmar, Asha; Rahman, Safikur; Kaushal, Avani; Madamwar, Datta; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2014-03-01

    The conformational and functional state of biliproteins can be determined by optical properties of the covalently linked chromophores. α-Subunit of most of the phycoerythrin contains 164 residues. Recently determined crystal structure of the naturally truncated form of α-subunit of cyanobacterial phycoerythrin (Tr-αC-PE) lacks 31 N-terminal residues present in its full length form (FL-αC-PE). This provides an opportunity to investigate the structure-function relationship between these two natural forms. We measured guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturation curves of FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE proteins, followed by observing changes in absorbance at 565nm, fluorescence at 350 and 573nm, and circular dichroism at 222nm. The denaturation curve of each protein was analyzed for ΔGD(∘), the value of Gibbs free energy change on denaturation (ΔGD) in the absence of GdmCl. The main conclusions of the this study are: (i) GdmCl-induced denaturation (native state↔denatured state) of FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE is reversible and follows a two-state mechanism, (ii) FL-αC-PE is 1.4kcalmol(-1) more stable than Tr-αC-PE, (iii) truncation of 31-residue long fragment that contains two α-helices, does not alter the 3-D structure of the remaining protein polypeptide chain, protein-chromophore interaction, and (iv) amino acid sequence of Tr-αC-PE determines the functional structure of the phycoerythrin.

  20. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  1. The complete amino acid sequence of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, R E; Conroy, S C; Dunbar, B; Fothergill, L A; Tuite, M F; Dobson, M J; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1983-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase, comprising 415 residues, was determined. The sequence of residues 1-173 was deduced mainly from nucleotide sequence analysis of a series of overlapping fragments derived from the relevant portion of a 2.95-kilobase endonuclease-HindIII-digest fragment containing the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase gene. The sequence of residues 174-415 was deduced mainly from amino acid sequence analysis of three CNBr-cleavage fragments, and from peptides derived from these fragments after digestion by a number of proteolytic enzymes. Cleavage at the two tryptophan residues with o-iodosobenzoic acid was also used to isolate fragments suitable for amino acid sequence analysis. Determination of the complete sequence now allows a detailed interpretation of the existing high-resolution X-ray-crystallographic structure. The sequence -Ile-Ile-Gly-Gly-Gly- occurs twice in distant parts of the linear sequence (residues 232-236 and 367-371). Both these regions contribute to the nucleoside phosphate-binding site. A comparison of the sequence of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase reported here with the sequences of phosphoglycerate kinase from horse muscle and human erythrocytes shows that the yeast enzyme is 64% identical with the mammalian enzymes. The yeast has strikingly fewer methionine, cysteine and tryptophan residues. PMID:6347186

  2. Altering the N-terminal arms of the polymerase manager protein UmuD modulates protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Murison, David A; Ollivierre, Jaylene N; Huang, Qiuying; Budil, David E; Beuning, Penny J

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells that are exposed to DNA damaging agents invoke the SOS response that involves expression of the umuD gene products, along with more than 50 other genes. Full-length UmuD is expressed as a 139-amino-acid protein, which eventually cleaves its N-terminal 24 amino acids to form UmuD'. The N-terminal arms of UmuD are dynamic and contain recognition sites for multiple partner proteins. Cleavage of UmuD to UmuD' dramatically affects the function of the protein and activates UmuC for translesion synthesis (TLS) by forming DNA Polymerase V. To probe the roles of the N-terminal arms in the cellular functions of the umuD gene products, we constructed additional N-terminal truncated versions of UmuD: UmuD 8 (UmuD Δ1-7) and UmuD 18 (UmuD Δ1-17). We found that the loss of just the N-terminal seven (7) amino acids of UmuD results in changes in conformation of the N-terminal arms, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling. UmuD 8 is cleaved as efficiently as full-length UmuD in vitro and in vivo, but expression of a plasmid-borne non-cleavable variant of UmuD 8 causes hypersensitivity to UV irradiation, which we determined is the result of a copy-number effect. UmuD 18 does not cleave to form UmuD', but confers resistance to UV radiation. Moreover, removal of the N-terminal seven residues of UmuD maintained its interactions with the alpha polymerase subunit of DNA polymerase III as well as its ability to disrupt interactions between alpha and the beta processivity clamp, whereas deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues resulted in decreases in binding to alpha and in the ability to disrupt the alpha-beta interaction. We find that UmuD 8 mimics full-length UmuD in many respects, whereas UmuD 18 lacks a number of functions characteristic of UmuD.

  3. Altering the N-terminal arms of the polymerase manager protein UmuD modulates protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiuying; Budil, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells that are exposed to DNA damaging agents invoke the SOS response that involves expression of the umuD gene products, along with more than 50 other genes. Full-length UmuD is expressed as a 139-amino-acid protein, which eventually cleaves its N-terminal 24 amino acids to form UmuD′. The N-terminal arms of UmuD are dynamic and contain recognition sites for multiple partner proteins. Cleavage of UmuD to UmuD′ dramatically affects the function of the protein and activates UmuC for translesion synthesis (TLS) by forming DNA Polymerase V. To probe the roles of the N-terminal arms in the cellular functions of the umuD gene products, we constructed additional N-terminal truncated versions of UmuD: UmuD 8 (UmuD Δ1–7) and UmuD 18 (UmuD Δ1–17). We found that the loss of just the N-terminal seven (7) amino acids of UmuD results in changes in conformation of the N-terminal arms, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling. UmuD 8 is cleaved as efficiently as full-length UmuD in vitro and in vivo, but expression of a plasmid-borne non-cleavable variant of UmuD 8 causes hypersensitivity to UV irradiation, which we determined is the result of a copy-number effect. UmuD 18 does not cleave to form UmuDʹ, but confers resistance to UV radiation. Moreover, removal of the N-terminal seven residues of UmuD maintained its interactions with the alpha polymerase subunit of DNA polymerase III as well as its ability to disrupt interactions between alpha and the beta processivity clamp, whereas deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues resulted in decreases in binding to alpha and in the ability to disrupt the alpha-beta interaction. We find that UmuD 8 mimics full-length UmuD in many respects, whereas UmuD 18 lacks a number of functions characteristic of UmuD. PMID:28273172

  4. Isolation, amino acid sequence and biological activities of novel long-chain polyamine-associated peptide toxins from the sponge Axinyssa aculeata.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Gill, Martin B; Wyhe, L Leanne Lash-Van; Murata, Michio; Nonomura, Ken'ichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2011-09-19

    A novel family of functionalized peptide toxins, aculeines (ACUs), was isolated from the marine sponge Axinyssa aculeate. ACUs are polypeptides with N-terminal residues that are modified by the addition of long-chain polyamines (LCPA). Aculeines were present in the sponge extract as a complex mixture with differing polyamine chain lengths and peptide structures. ACU-A and B, which were purified in this study, share a common polypeptide chain but differ in their N-terminal residue modifications. The amino acid sequence of the polypeptide portion of ACU-A and B was deduced from 3' and 5' RACE, and supported by Edman degradation and mass spectral analysis of peptide fragments. ACU induced convulsions upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in mice, and disrupted neuronal membrane integrity in electrophysiological assays. ACU also lysed erythrocytes with a potency that differed between animal species. Here we describe the isolation, amino acid sequence, and biological activity of this new group of cytotoxic sponge peptides. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Isolation, Amino Acid Sequence and Biological Activities of Novel Long-Chain Polyamine-Associated Peptide Toxins from the Sponge Axinyssa aculeata

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Gill, Martin B.; Lash-Van Wyhe, L. Leanne; Murata, Michio; Nonomura, Ken’ichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    A novel family of functionalized peptide toxins, aculeines (ACUs), was isolated from the marine sponge Axinyssa aculeate. ACUs are polypeptides with N-terminal residues that are modified by the addition of long-chain polyamines (LCPA). Aculeines were present in the sponge extract as a complex mixture with differing polyamine chain lengths and peptide structures. ACU-A and B, which were purified in this study, share a common polypeptide chain but differ in their N-terminal residue modifications. The amino acid sequence of the polypeptide portion of ACU-A and B was deduced from 3′ and 5′ RACE, and supported by Edman degradation and mass spectral analysis of peptide fragments. ACU induced convulsions upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in mice, and disrupted neuronal membrane integrity in electrophysiological assays. ACU also lysed erythrocytes with a potency that differed between animal species. Here we describe the isolation, amino acid sequence, and biological activity of this new group of cytotoxic sponge peptides. PMID:21830292

  6. Soil amino acid composition across a boreal forest successional sequence

    Treesearch

    Nancy R. Werdin-Pfisterer; Knut Kielland; Richard D. Boone

    2009-01-01

    Soil amino acids are important sources of organic nitrogen for plant nutrition, yet few studies have examined which amino acids are most prevalent in the soil. In this study, we examined the composition, concentration, and seasonal patterns of soil amino acids across a primary successional sequence encompassing a natural gradient of plant productivity and soil...

  7. N-Terminal extension of human immunodeficiency virus capsid protein converts the in vitro assembly phenotype from tubular to spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Gross, I; Hohenberg, H; Huckhagel, C; Kräusslich, H G

    1998-06-01

    Expression of retroviral Gag polyproteins is sufficient for morphogenesis of virus-like particles with a spherical immature protein shell. Proteolytic cleavage of Gag into the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains (in the case of human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]) leads to condensation to the mature cone-shaped core. We have analyzed the formation of spherical or cylindrical particles on in vitro assembly of purified HIV proteins or inside Escherichia coli cells. CA protein alone yielded cylindrical particles, while all N-terminal extensions of CA abolished cylinder formation. Spherical particles with heterogeneous diameters or amorphous protein aggregates were observed instead. Extending CA by 5 amino acids was sufficient to convert the assembly phenotype to spherical particles. Sequences C-terminal of CA were not required for sphere formation. Proteolytic cleavage of N-terminally extended CA proteins prior to in vitro assembly led to the formation of cylindrical particles, while proteolysis of in vitro assembly products caused disruption of spheres but not formation of cylinders. In vitro assembly of CA and extended CA proteins in the presence of cyclophilin A (CypA) at a CA-to-CypA molar ratio of 10:1 yielded significantly longer cylinders and heterogeneous spheres, while higher concentrations of CypA completely disrupted particle formation. We conclude that the spherical shape of immature HIV particles is determined by the presence of an N-terminal extension on the CA domain and that core condensation during virion maturation requires the liberation of the N terminus of CA.

  8. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Taggart, David J; Dayeh, Daniel M; Fredrickson, Saul W; Suo, Zucai

    2014-10-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5'-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate lyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or an 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated -1 or -2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of -2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of -1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase within the non

  9. Role of Prion Disease-Linked Mutations in the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminal Domain of the Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Casiraghi, Nicola; Rossetti, Giulia; Mohanty, Sandipan; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe; Carloni, Paolo

    2013-11-12

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals and other animal species. In humans, about 15% of these maladies are caused by pathogenic mutations (PMs) in the gene encoding for the prion protein (PrP(C)). Seven PMs are located in the naturally unfolded PrP(C) N-terminal domain, which constitutes about half of the protein. Intriguingly and in sharp contrast to other PMs clustered in the folded domain, N-terminal PMs barely affect the conversion to the pathogenic (scrapie, or PrP(Sc)) isoform of PrP(C). Here, we hypothesize that the neurotoxicity of these PMs arises from changes in structural determinants of the N-terminal domain, affecting the protein binding with its cellular partners and/or the cotranslational translocation during the PrP(C) biosynthesis. We test this idea by predicting the conformational ensemble of the wild-type (WT) and mutated mouse PrP(C) N-terminal domain, whose sequence is almost identical to that of the human one and for which the largest number of in vivo data is available. The conformational properties of the WT are consistent with those inferred experimentally. Importantly, the PMs turn out to affect in a subtle manner the intramolecular contacts in the putative N-terminal domain binding sites for Cu(2+) ions, sulphated glycosaminoglycans, and other known PrP(C) cellular partners. The PMs also alter the local structural features of the transmembrane domain and adjacent stop transfer effector, which act together to regulate the protein topology. These results corroborate the hypothesis that N-terminal PMs affect the PrP(C) binding to functional interactors and/or the translocation.

  10. Cloning, sequencing, and heterologous expression of an Erwinia cypripedii 314B lactonase specific for L-alpha-hydroxyglutaric acid gamma-lactone.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazuya

    2006-08-01

    The gene for a lactonase that stereospecifically hydrolyzes (S)-5-oxo-2-tetrahydrofurancarboxylic acid to L-alpha-hydroxyglutaric acid was isolated from Erwinia cypripedii 314B. Determination of the nucleotide sequence showed that the gene consists of a single open reading frame of 1,152 bp that encodes a 383-amino-acid protein. Comparison of the sequence of the predicted protein to that of the enzyme purified from E. cypripedii 314B revealed an N-terminal signal sequence of 19 amino acids. The gene for the mature enzyme was inserted into a pET vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Active recombinant enzyme accumulated in the cells to approximately 30% of the total protein, and the enzyme was purified to homogeneity. The physical and catalytic properties of the recombinant enzyme were indistinguishable from those of the protein purified from E. cypripedii 314B. The deduced amino acid sequence displayed approximately 35% similarity with a putative 3-carboxymuconate cyclase, but exhibited no such activity. The enzyme also showed approximately 35% similarity with 6-phosphogluconolactonase. However, the activity of the enzyme toward 6-phosphogluconolactone was less than 2% of that toward (S)-5-oxo-2-tetrahydrofurancarboxylic acid, demonstrating a novel specificity for this lactonase.

  11. A domain in the N-terminal part of Hsp26 is essential for chaperone function and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Martin; Ignatiou, Athanasios; Saibil, Helen; Helmich, Sonja; Frenzl, Elke; Stromer, Thusnelda; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-10-15

    Small heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the unspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. For Hsp26, a cytosolic sHsp from of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been shown that, at elevated temperatures, the 24 subunit complex dissociates into dimers. This dissociation is required for the efficient interaction with non-native proteins. Deletion analysis of the protein showed that the N-terminal half of Hsp26 (amino acid residues 1-95) is required for the assembly of the oligomer. Limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry suggested that this region can be divided in two parts, an N-terminal segment including amino acid residues 1-30 and a second part ranging from residues 31-95. To analyze the structure and function of the N-terminal part of Hsp26 we created a deletion mutant lacking amino acid residues 1-30. We show that the oligomeric state and the structure, as determined by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy, corresponds to that of the Hsp26 wild-type protein. Furthermore, this truncated version of Hsp26 is active as a chaperone. However, in contrast to full length Hsp26, the truncated version dissociates at lower temperatures and complexes with non-native proteins are less stable than those found with wild-type Hsp26. Our results suggest that the N-terminal segment of Hsp26 is involved in both, oligomerization and chaperone function and that the second part of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 31-95) is essential for both functions.

  12. Amino acid sequence of mouse submaxillary gland renin.

    PubMed Central

    Misono, K S; Chang, J J; Inagami, T

    1982-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of the heavy chain and light chain of mouse submaxillary gland renin have been determined. The heavy chain consists of 288 amino acid residues having a Mr of 31,036 calculated from the sequence. The light chain contains 48 amino acid residues with a Mr of 5,458. The sequence of the heavy chain was determined by automated Edman degradations of the cyanogen bromide peptides and tryptic peptides generated after citraconylation, as well as other peptides generated therefrom. The sequence of the light chain was derived from sequence analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage or by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protease. The sequences in the active site regions in renin containing two catalytically essential aspartyl residues 32 and 215 were found identical with those in pepsin, chymosin, and penicillopepsin. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of renin with that of porcine pepsin indicated a 42% sequence identity of the heavy chain with the amino-terminal and middle regions and a 46% identity of the light chain with the carboxyl-terminal region of the porcine pepsin sequence. Residues identical in renin and pepsin are distributed throughout the length of the molecules, suggesting a similarity in their overall structures. PMID:6812055

  13. Investigating Mutations to Reduce Huntingtin Aggregation by Increasing Htt-N-Terminal Stability and Weakening Interactions with PolyQ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mazza-Anthony, Cody; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal autosomal genetic disorder characterized by an expanded glutamine-coding CAG repeat sequence in the huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 gene. The Htt protein associated with the disease misfolds into toxic oligomers and aggregate fibril structures. Competing models for the misfolding and aggregation phenomena have suggested the role of the Htt-N-terminal region and the CAG trinucleotide repeats (polyQ domain) in affecting aggregation propensities and misfolding. In particular, one model suggests a correlation between structural stability and the emergence of toxic oligomers, whereas a second model proposes that molecular interactions with the extended polyQ domain increase aggregation propensity. In this paper, we computationally explore the potential to reduce Htt aggregation by addressing the aggregation causes outlined in both models. We investigate the mutation landscape of the Htt-N-terminal region and explore amino acid residue mutations that affect its structural stability and hydrophobic interactions with the polyQ domain. Out of the millions of 3-point mutation combinations that we explored, the (L4K E12K K15E) was the most promising mutation combination that addressed aggregation causes in both models. The mutant structure exhibited extreme alpha-helical stability, low amyloidogenicity potential, a hydrophobic residue replacement, and removal of a solvent-inaccessible intermolecular side chain that assists oligomerization. PMID:28096892

  14. Bovine testis acylphosphatase: purification and amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, L; Cappugi, G; Camici, G; Manao, G; Ramponi, G

    1993-10-01

    Two acylphosphatase molecular forms have been isolated from bovine testis. Their amino acid sequence was determined. One (ACY1) consists of 98 amino acid residues, while the other one (ACY2) consists of 100 amino acid residues. Both molecular forms are N-acetylated and differ only in the amino terminus. ACY2 has an additional Ser-Met tail with respect to ACY1. Both ACY1 and ACY2 are organ-common type isoenzymes and thus differ for about half of the amino acid positions from the previously sequenced bovine muscle isoenzyme.

  15. Amino Acid Sequence of Human Cholinesterase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    liquid chromatography (HPLC). Activity testing of the aged, DFP-labeled cholinesterase showed that 99.8% of the active sites had been labeled, since...acids were quantitated by ninhydrin at the AAA Labs, or by derivatization with phenylisothiocyanate at the University of Michigan. The latter method

  16. Peptide vaccine against canine parvovirus: identification of two neutralization subsites in the N terminus of VP2 and optimization of the amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Langeveld, J P; Cortés, E; Schaaper, W W; van Dijk, E; Vela, C; Kamstrup, S; Meloen, R H

    1995-11-01

    The N-terminal domain of the major capsid protein VP2 of canine parvovirus was shown to be an excellent target for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine, but detailed information about number of epitopes, optimal length, sequence choice, and site of coupling to the carrier protein was lacking. Therefore, several overlapping peptides based on this N terminus were synthesized to establish conditions for optimal and reproducible induction of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. The specificity and neutralizing ability of the antibody response for these peptides were determined. Within the N-terminal 23 residues of VP2, two subsites able to induce neutralizing antibodies and which overlapped by only two glycine residues at positions 10 and 11 could be discriminated. The shortest sequence sufficient for neutralization induction was nine residues. Peptides longer than 13 residues consistently induced neutralization, provided that their N termini were located between positions 1 and 11 of VP2. The orientation of the peptides at the carrier protein was also of importance, being more effective when coupled through the N terminus than through the C terminus to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The results suggest that the presence of amino acid residues 2 to 21 (and probably 3 to 17) of VP2 in a single peptide is preferable for a synthetic peptide vaccine.

  17. Peptide vaccine against canine parvovirus: identification of two neutralization subsites in the N terminus of VP2 and optimization of the amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Casal, J I; Langeveld, J P; Cortés, E; Schaaper, W W; van Dijk, E; Vela, C; Kamstrup, S; Meloen, R H

    1995-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the major capsid protein VP2 of canine parvovirus was shown to be an excellent target for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine, but detailed information about number of epitopes, optimal length, sequence choice, and site of coupling to the carrier protein was lacking. Therefore, several overlapping peptides based on this N terminus were synthesized to establish conditions for optimal and reproducible induction of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. The specificity and neutralizing ability of the antibody response for these peptides were determined. Within the N-terminal 23 residues of VP2, two subsites able to induce neutralizing antibodies and which overlapped by only two glycine residues at positions 10 and 11 could be discriminated. The shortest sequence sufficient for neutralization induction was nine residues. Peptides longer than 13 residues consistently induced neutralization, provided that their N termini were located between positions 1 and 11 of VP2. The orientation of the peptides at the carrier protein was also of importance, being more effective when coupled through the N terminus than through the C terminus to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The results suggest that the presence of amino acid residues 2 to 21 (and probably 3 to 17) of VP2 in a single peptide is preferable for a synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:7474152

  18. Cystatin. Amino acid sequence and possible secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, C; Anastasi, A; Crow, H; McDonald, J K; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of cystatin, the protein from chicken egg-white that is a tight-binding inhibitor of many cysteine proteinases, is reported. Cystatin is composed of 116 amino acid residues, and the Mr is calculated to be 13 143. No striking similarity to any other known sequence has been detected. The results of computer analysis of the sequence and c.d. spectrometry indicate that the secondary structure includes relatively little alpha-helix (about 20%) and that the remainder is mainly beta-structure. PMID:6712597

  19. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. Conclusions The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena. PMID:20626890

  20. Molecular evolution of troponin I and a role of its N-terminal extension in nematode locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dawn E.; Hwang, Hyundoo; Ono, Kanako; Lu, Hang; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary The troponin complex, composed of troponin T (TnT), troponin I (TnI), and troponin C (TnC), is the major calcium-dependent regulator of muscle contraction, which is present widely in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Little is known about evolutionary aspects of troponin in the animal kingdom. Using a combination of data mining and functional analysis of TnI, we report evidence that an N-terminal extension of TnI is present in most of bilaterian animals as a functionally important domain. Troponin components have been reported in species in most of representative bilaterian phyla. Comparison of TnI sequences shows that the core domains are conserved in all examined TnIs, and that N- and C-terminal extensions are variable among isoforms and species. In particular, N-terminal extensions are present in all protostome TnIs and chordate cardiac TnIs but lost in a subset of chordate TnIs including vertebrate skeletal-muscle isoforms. Transgenic rescue experiments in C. elegans striated muscle show that the N-terminal extension of TnI (UNC-27) is required for coordinated worm locomotion but not in sarcomere assembly and single muscle-contractility kinetics. These results suggest that N-terminal extensions of TnIs are retained from a TnI ancestor as a functional domain. PMID:26849746

  1. N-Terminal Ubiquitination of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 3 and p21 Directs Their Degradation by the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Philippe; Rodier, Geneviève; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Meloche, Sylvain

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 (ERK3) is an unstable mitogen-activated protein kinase homologue that is constitutively degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in proliferating cells. Here we show that a lysineless mutant of ERK3 is still ubiquitinated in vivo and requires a functional ubiquitin conjugation pathway for its degradation. Addition of N-terminal sequence tags of increasing size stabilizes ERK3 by preventing its ubiquitination. Importantly, we identified a fusion peptide between the N-terminal methionine of ERK3 and the C-terminal glycine of ubiquitin in vivo by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. These findings demonstrate that ERK3 is conjugated to ubiquitin via its free NH2 terminus. We found that large N-terminal tags also stabilize the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 but not that of substrates ubiquitinated on internal lysine residues. Consistent with this observation, lysineless p21 is ubiquitinated and degraded in a ubiquitin-dependent manner in intact cells. Our results suggests that N-terminal ubiquitination is a more prevalent modification than originally recognized. PMID:15226418

  2. Non-native, N-terminal Hsp70 Molecular Motor Recognition Elements in Transit Peptides Support Plastid Protein Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Bruce, Barry D.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we identified the N-terminal domain of transit peptides (TPs) as a major determinant for the translocation step in plastid protein import. Analysis of Arabidopsis TP dataset revealed that this domain has two overlapping characteristics, highly uncharged and Hsp70-interacting. To investigate these two properties, we replaced the N-terminal domains of the TP of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and its reverse peptide with a series of unrelated peptides whose affinities to the chloroplast stromal Hsp70 have been determined. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that eight out of nine peptides in this series are not similar to the TP N terminus. Using in vivo and in vitro protein import assays, the majority of the precursors containing Hsp70-binding elements were targeted to plastids, whereas none of the chimeric precursors lacking an N-terminal Hsp70-binding element were targeted to the plastids. Moreover, a pulse-chase assay showed that two chimeric precursors with the most uncharged peptides failed to translocate into the stroma. The ability of multiple unrelated Hsp70-binding elements to support protein import verified that the majority of TPs utilize an N-terminal Hsp70-binding domain during translocation and expand the mechanistic view of the import process. This work also indicates that synthetic biology may be utilized to create de novo TPs that exceed the targeting activity of naturally occurring sequences. PMID:25645915

  3. Transglutaminase 5 is acetylated at the N-terminal end.

    PubMed

    Rufini, A; Vilbois, F; Paradisi, A; Oddi, S; Tartaglione, R; Leta, A; Bagetta, G; Guerrieri, P; Finazzi-Agro', A; Melino, G; Candi, E

    2004-07-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) are calcium-dependent enzymes that catalyse cross-linking between proteins by acyl transfer reaction; they are involved in many biological processes including coagulation, differentiation, and tissue repair. Transglutaminase 5 was originally cloned from keratinocytes, and a partial biochemical characterisation showed its involvement in skin differentiation, in parallel to TGase 1 and TGase 3. Here, we demonstrate, by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry that TGase 5 is acetylated at the N-terminal end. Moreover, in situ measurement of TGase activity shows that endogenous TGase 5 is active upon treatment with phorbol acetate, and the enzyme co-localises with vimentin intermediate filaments.

  4. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  5. The Localization of Cytochrome P450s CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 into Different Lipid Microdomains Is Governed by Their N-terminal and Internal Protein Regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L

    2015-12-04

    In cellular membranes, different lipid species are heterogeneously distributed forming domains with different characteristics. Ordered domains are tightly packed with cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and saturated fatty acids, whereas disordered domains contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids. Our laboratory has shown that membrane heterogeneity affects the organization of cytochrome P450s and their cognate redox partner, the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, CYP1A1 was found to localize to disordered regions, whereas CYP1A2 resided in ordered domains. We hypothesized that regions of amino acid sequence variability may contain signal motifs that direct CYP1A proteins into ordered or disordered domains. Thus, chimeric constructs of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were created, and their localization was tested in HEK293T cells. CYP1A2, containing the N-terminal regions from CYP1A1, no longer localized in ordered domains, whereas the N terminus of CYP1A2 partially directed CYP1A1 into ordered regions. In addition, intact CYP1A2 containing a 206-302-residue peptide segment of CYP1A1 had less affinity to bind to ordered microdomains. After expression, the catalytic activity of CYP1A2 was higher than that of the CYP1A1-CYP1A2 chimera containing the N-terminal end of CYP1A1 with subsaturating CPR concentrations, but it was approximately equal with excess CPR suggesting that the localization of the CYP1A enzyme in ordered domains favored its interaction with CPR. These data demonstrate that both the N-terminal end and an internal region of CYP1A2 play roles in targeting CYP1A2 to ordered domains, and domain localization may influence P450 function under conditions that resemble those found in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. A human transmembrane protein-tyrosine-phosphatase, PTP zeta, is expressed in brain and has an N-terminal receptor domain homologous to carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, N X; Saito, H

    1992-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPases, EC 3.1.3.48) play a crucial role in the regulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Recently, it was found that the PTPase gene family exhibits a large variety of different functional domains associated with the PTPase catalytic domains. In this paper, we report the complete cDNA sequence of a human transmembrane PTPase, PTP zeta, isolated from fetal brain cDNA libraries. The deduced amino acid sequence of human PTP zeta is composed of a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids, a very large extracellular domain of 1616 amino acids, a transmembrane peptide of 26 amino acids, and a cytoplasmic domain of 653 amino acids. The extracellular portion of human PTP zeta contains two striking structural features: the N-terminal 280-amino acid sequence that is homologous to carbonic anhydrases (carbonate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.1), and a sequence of 1048 amino acids without a cysteine residue. While it is unlikely that the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTP zeta has any carbonic anhydrase activity, its three-dimensional structure may be quite similar to that of carbonic anhydrases, a structure that appears ideal for binding a small soluble ligand. The cytoplasmic portion of human PTP zeta contains two repeated PTPase-like domains, which, when expressed in Escherichia coli, had PTPase activity in vitro. Mutational analyses indicate that only the membrane-proximal PTPase domain is catalytically active. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses indicate that human PTP zeta is highly expressed in a glioblastoma cell line. Images PMID:1323835

  7. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  8. Analysis of the complete sequences of two biologically distinct Zucchini yellow mosaic virus isolates further evidences the involvement of a single amino acid in the virus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Nováková, S; Svoboda, J; Glasa, M

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of two Slovak Zucchini yellow mosaic virus isolates (ZYMV-H and ZYMV-SE04T) were determined. These isolates differ significantly in their pathogenicity, producing either severe or very mild symptoms on susceptible cucurbit hosts. The viral genome of both isolates consisted of 9593 nucleotides in size, and contained an open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein of 3080 amino acids. Despite their different biological properties, an extremely high nucleotide identity could be noted (99.8%), resulting in differences of only 5 aa, located in the HC-Pro, P3, and NIb, respectively. In silico analysis including 5 additional fully-sequenced and phylogenetically closely-related isolates known to induce different symptoms in cucurbits was performed. This suggested that the key single mutation responsible for virus pathogenicity is likely located in the N-terminal part of P3, adjacent to the PIPO.

  9. Amino acid sequence of toxin III from Anemonia sulcata.

    PubMed

    Bĕress, L; Wunderer, G; Wachter, E

    1977-08-01

    Toxin III, the smallest toxin component of the poison of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata, is a polypeptide with 27 amino acids. Its structure is stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The amino acid sequence was determined by solid-phase Edman degradation of the aminoethylated derivative. The peptide was coupled to the carrier, porous glass, by thiourea bridges between the alpha-amino group of arginine-1 and the epsilon-amino group of lysine-26 and the isothiocyanate groups of the carrier. Another fraction of the polypeptide was bound by an acid-amide condensation of the C-terminal valine-27 with the aminopropyl group of the carrier. The sequence of toxin III has no regions homologous to the 47-residue toxin II. Comparison with the known partial sequence of toxin I, which contains 46 amino acids (Wunderer, G. & Eulitz, M., in preparation) also fails to reveal homologies.

  10. A noncanonical PWI domain in the N-terminal helicase-associated region of the spliceosomal Brr2 protein.

    PubMed

    Absmeier, Eva; Rosenberger, Leonie; Apelt, Luise; Becke, Christian; Santos, Karine F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-04-01

    The spliceosomal RNA helicase Brr2 is required for the assembly of a catalytically active spliceosome on a messenger RNA precursor. Brr2 exhibits an unusual organization with tandem helicase units, each comprising dual RecA-like domains and a Sec63 homology unit, preceded by a more than 400-residue N-terminal helicase-associated region. Whereas recent crystal structures have provided insights into the molecular architecture and regulation of the Brr2 helicase region, little is known about the structural organization and function of its N-terminal part. Here, a near-atomic resolution crystal structure of a PWI-like domain that resides in the N-terminal region of Chaetomium thermophilum Brr2 is presented. CD spectroscopic studies suggested that this domain is conserved in the yeast and human Brr2 orthologues. Although canonical PWI domains act as low-specificity nucleic acid-binding domains, no significant affinity of the unusual PWI domain of Brr2 for a broad spectrum of DNAs and RNAs was detected in band-shift assays. Consistently, the C. thermophilum Brr2 PWI-like domain, in the conformation seen in the present crystal structure, lacks an expanded positively charged surface patch as observed in at least one canonical, nucleic acid-binding PWI domain. Instead, in a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screen against human spliceosomal proteins, fragments of the N-terminal region of human Brr2 were found to interact with several other spliceosomal proteins. At least one of these interactions, with the Prp19 complex protein SPF27, depended on the presence of the PWI-like domain. The results suggest that the N-terminal region of Brr2 serves as a versatile protein-protein interaction platform in the spliceosome and that some interactions require or are reinforced by the PWI-like domain.

  11. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj; Beck, Konrad; Lai, F. Anthony; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Ševčík, Jozef

    2014-11-01

    X-ray and solution structures of the human RyR2 N-terminal region were obtained under near-physiological conditions. The structure exhibits a unique network of interactions between its three domains, revealing an important stabilizing role of the central helix. Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardiomyocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals C{sup α} atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface.

  12. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  13. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Grauffel, Cédric; Abboud, Angèle; Liszczak, Glen; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas; Reuter, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p). To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG), hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE). Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic), hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic), hNaa30p (basic) and hNaa50p (hydrophobic). We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide-enzyme interactions

  14. CXCL12 N-terminal end is sufficient to induce chemotaxis and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Filippo, Thais R M; Galindo, Layla T; Barnabe, Gabriela F; Ariza, Carolina B; Mello, Luiz E; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Porcionatto, Marimélia A

    2013-09-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) respond to injury after brain injuries secreting IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, as well as chemokine members of the CC and CXC ligand families. CXCL12 is one of the chemokines secreted at an injury site and is known to attract NSC-derived neuroblasts, cells that express CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4. Activation of CXCR4 by CXCL12 depends on two domains located at the N-terminal of the chemokine. In the present work we aimed to investigate if the N-terminal end of CXCL12, where CXCR4 binding and activation domains are located, was sufficient to induce NSC-derived neuroblast chemotaxis. Our data show that a synthetic peptide analogous to the first 21 amino acids of the N-terminal end of CXCL12, named PepC-C (KPVSLSYRCPCRFFESHIARA), is able to promote chemotaxis of neuroblasts in vivo, and stimulate chemotaxis and proliferation of CXCR4+ cells in vitro, without affecting NSC fate. We also show that PepC-C upregulates CXCL12 expression in vivo and in vitro. We suggest the N-terminal end of CXCL12 is responsible for a positive feedback loop to maintain a gradient of CXCL12 that attracts neuroblasts from the subventricular zone into an injury site.

  15. Expressed truncated N-terminal variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) of Trypanosoma evansi in E. coli exhibits immuno-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P P; Balumahendiran, M; Balamurugan, V; Rudramurthy, G R; Prabhudas, K

    2012-06-08

    The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of trypanosome is an important part of its body surface coat, which is expressed in early, middle and late stages of infection contributing a major diagnostic value. In the present study, the 5' end of the partial VSG gene sequences (681 bp) encoding N-terminal protein of RoTat 1.2 VSG (227 amino acid) was amplified, cloned into pET32a vector, and expressed in prokaryotic system. The fused His-tagged expressed VSG protein (43 kDa) of the Trypanosoma evansi was characterized in SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using hyperimmune/immune sera raised against buffalo, dog, lion and leopard isolates of T. evansi. The expressed protein remained immunoreactive with all the sera combinations. The animals immunized with whole cell lysate or recombinant protein showed similar antibody reactions in ELISA and CATT (Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis). This study suggests the expressed recombinant truncated VSG is having its importance for its possible use in sero-diagnosis of surra.

  16. The N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor drives its nuclear localization in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Javid A.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Eisermann, Kurtis; Isharwal, Sudhir; Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E.; Nelson, Joel B.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Androgen-independent nuclear localization is required for androgen receptor (AR) transactivation in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should be a key step leading to castration resistance. However, mechanism(s) leading to androgen-independent AR nuclear localization are poorly understood. Since the N-terminal domain (NTD) of AR plays a role in transactivation under androgen-depleted conditions, we investigated the role of NTD in AR nuclear localization in CRPC. Deletion mutagenesis was used to identify amino acid sequences in the NTD essential for its androgen-independent nuclear localization in C4-2, a widely used CRPC cell line. Deletion mutants of AR tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the 5`-end were generated and their signal distribution was investigated in C4-2 cells by fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the region of a.a. 294–556 was required for androgen-independent AR nuclear localization whereas a.a. 1–293 mediates Hsp90 regulation of AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Although a.a. 294–556 does not contain a nuclear import signal, it was able to enhance DHT-induced import of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Also, transactivation of the NTD could be uncoupled from its modulation of AR nuclear localization in C4-2 cells. These observations suggest an important role of NTD in AR intracellular trafficking and androgen-independent AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. PMID:24662325

  17. Rescue and Stabilization of Acetylcholinesterase in Skeletal Muscle by N-terminal Peptides Derived from the Noncatalytic Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Carlos A.; Rossi, Susana G.; Rotundo, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of newly synthesized acetylcholinesterase (AChE) molecules do not assemble into catalytically active oligomeric forms and are rapidly degraded intracellularly by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway. We have previously shown that AChE in skeletal muscle is regulated in part post-translationally by the availability of the noncatalytic subunit collagen Q, and others have shown that expression of a 17-amino acid N-terminal proline-rich attachment domain of collagen Q is sufficient to promote AChE tetramerization in cells producing AChE. In this study we show that muscle cells, or cell lines expressing AChE catalytic subunits, incubated with synthetic proline-rich attachment domain peptides containing the endoplasmic reticulum retrieval sequence KDEL take up and retrogradely transport them to the endoplasmic reticulum network where they induce assembly of AChE tetramers. The peptides act to enhance AChE folding thereby rescuing them from reticulum degradation. This enhanced folding efficiency occurs in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis and in turn increases total cell-associated AChE activity and active tetramer secretion. Pulse-chase studies of isotopically labeled AChE molecules show that the enzyme is rescued from intracellular degradation. These studies provide a mechanistic explanation for the large scale intracellular degradation of AChE previously observed and indicate that simple peptides alone can increase the production and secretion of this critical synaptic enzyme in muscle tissue. PMID:26139603

  18. The N-terminal domain of Npro of classical swine fever virus determines its stability and regulates type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Mine, Junki; Tamura, Tomokazu; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Parchariyanon, Sujira; Pinyochon, Wasana; Ruggli, Nicolas; Tratschin, Jon-Duri; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    The viral protein Npro is unique to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. After autocatalytic cleavage from the nascent polyprotein, Npro suppresses type I IFN (IFN-α/β) induction by mediating proteasomal degradation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3). Previous studies found that the Npro-mediated IRF-3 degradation was dependent of a TRASH domain in the C-terminal half of Npro coordinating zinc by means of the amino acid residues C112, C134, D136 and C138. Interestingly, four classical swine fever virus (CSFV) isolates obtained from diseased pigs in Thailand in 1993 and 1998 did not suppress IFN-α/β induction despite the presence of an intact TRASH domain. Through systematic analyses, it was found that an amino acid mutation at position 40 or mutations at positions 17 and 61 in the N-terminal half of Npro of these four isolates were related to the lack of IRF-3-degrading activity. Restoring a histidine at position 40 or both a proline at position 17 and a lysine at position 61 based on the sequence of a functional Npro contributed to higher stability of the reconstructed Npro compared with the Npro from the Thai isolate. This led to enhanced interaction of Npro with IRF-3 along with its degradation by the proteasome. The results of the present study revealed that amino acid residues in the N-terminal domain of Npro are involved in the stability of Npro, in interaction of Npro with IRF-3 and subsequent degradation of IRF-3, leading to downregulation of IFN-α/β production.

  19. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    SciTech Connect

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew; Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin

    2012-12-01

    The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium T. tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure has been solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  20. A helical bundle in the N-terminal domain of the BLM helicase mediates dimer and potentially hexamer formation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Chen, Wei-Fei; Zhang, Bo; Fan, San-Hong; Ai, Xia; Liu, Na-Nv; Rety, Stephane; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-04-07

    Helicases play a critical role in processes such as replication or recombination by unwinding double-stranded DNA; mutations of these genes can therefore have devastating biological consequences. In humans, mutations in genes of three members of the RecQ family helicases (blm, wrn, and recq4) give rise to three strikingly distinctive clinical phenotypes: Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, respectively. However, the molecular basis for these varying phenotypic outcomes is unclear, in part because a full mechanistic description of helicase activity is lacking. Because the helicase core domains are highly conserved, it has been postulated that functional differences among family members might be explained by significant differences in the N-terminal domains, but these domains are poorly characterized. To help fill this gap, we now describe bioinformatics, biochemical, and structural data for three vertebrate BLM proteins. We pair high resolution crystal structures with SAXS analysis to describe an internal, highly conserved sequence we term the dimerization helical bundle in N-terminal domain (DHBN). We show that, despite the N-terminal domain being loosely structured and potentially lacking a defined three-dimensional structure in general, the DHBN exists as a dimeric structure required for higher order oligomer assembly. Interestingly, the unwinding amplitude and rate decrease as BLM is assembled from dimer into hexamer, and also, the stable DHBN dimer can be dissociated upon ATP hydrolysis. Thus, the structural and biochemical characterizations of N-terminal domains will provide new insights into how the N-terminal domain affects the structural and functional organization of the full BLM molecule.

  1. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences

    PubMed Central

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Adir, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel. PMID:27307442

  2. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences.

    PubMed

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D; Adir, Noam

    2016-06-28

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel.

  3. Peptide scrambling during collision-induced dissociation is influenced by N-terminal residue basicity.

    PubMed

    Chawner, Ross; Holman, Stephen W; Gaskell, Simon J; Eyers, Claire E

    2014-11-01

    'Bottom up' proteomic studies typically use tandem mass spectrometry data to infer peptide ion sequence, enabling identification of the protein whence they derive. The majority of such studies employ collision-induced dissociation (CID) to induce fragmentation of the peptide structure giving diagnostic b-, y-, and a- ions. Recently, rearrangement processes that result in scrambling of the original peptide sequence during CID have been reported for these ions. Such processes have the potential to adversely affect ion accounting (and thus scores from automated search algorithms) in tandem mass spectra, and in extreme cases could lead to false peptide identification. Here, analysis of peptide species produced by Lys-N proteolysis of standard proteins is performed and sequences that exhibit such rearrangement processes identified. The effect of increasing the gas-phase basicity of the N-terminal lysine residue through derivatization to homoarginine toward such sequence scrambling is then assessed. The presence of a highly basic homoarginine (or arginine) residue at the N-terminus is found to disfavor/inhibit sequence scrambling with a coincident increase in the formation of b(n-1)+H(2)O product ions. Finally, further analysis of a sequence produced by Lys-C proteolysis provides evidence toward a potential mechanism for the apparent inhibition of sequence scrambling during resonance excitation CID.

  4. Supramolecular properties of the proline-rich gamma-Zein N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Marcelo J; Dalcol, Ionara; Gorostiza, Pau; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Pons, Ramon; Pons, Miquel; Sanz, Fausto; Giralt, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Zeins are maize storages proteins that accumulate inside large vesicles called protein bodies. gamma-Zein lines the inner face of the protein body membrane, and its N-terminal proline-rich repetitive domain with the sequence (VHLPPP)(8) appears to be necessary for the accumulation of the protein within the organelle. Synthetic (VHLPPP)(8) adopts an amphipathic polyproline II conformation. In a preliminary recent work we used atomic force microscopy to study the surface organization of the octamer and transmission electron microscopy to visualize aggregates of the peptide from aqueous solution. We previously envisioned two self-assembly models (i.e., the geometric and the micellar) that take into account the observed features. In the present work we studied in detail the self-assembly of the peptide in solution and found that the peptide is able to form cylindrical micelles. Fibrils formed on graphite are generated by assembly of solution micelles. Based on the results of these studies, we focused exclusively on the micellar model. To our knowledge we have characterized for the first time supramolecular aggregates of polyproline structures other than collagen. The spontaneous arrangement of (VHLPPP)(8) suggests a role for the N-terminal domain of gamma-zein in the process of the whole protein deposition in protein bodies. PMID:12124299

  5. Supramolecular properties of the proline-rich gamma-Zein N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Marcelo J; Dalcol, Ionara; Gorostiza, Pau; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Pons, Ramon; Pons, Miquel; Sanz, Fausto; Giralt, Ernest

    2002-08-01

    Zeins are maize storages proteins that accumulate inside large vesicles called protein bodies. gamma-Zein lines the inner face of the protein body membrane, and its N-terminal proline-rich repetitive domain with the sequence (VHLPPP)(8) appears to be necessary for the accumulation of the protein within the organelle. Synthetic (VHLPPP)(8) adopts an amphipathic polyproline II conformation. In a preliminary recent work we used atomic force microscopy to study the surface organization of the octamer and transmission electron microscopy to visualize aggregates of the peptide from aqueous solution. We previously envisioned two self-assembly models (i.e., the geometric and the micellar) that take into account the observed features. In the present work we studied in detail the self-assembly of the peptide in solution and found that the peptide is able to form cylindrical micelles. Fibrils formed on graphite are generated by assembly of solution micelles. Based on the results of these studies, we focused exclusively on the micellar model. To our knowledge we have characterized for the first time supramolecular aggregates of polyproline structures other than collagen. The spontaneous arrangement of (VHLPPP)(8) suggests a role for the N-terminal domain of gamma-zein in the process of the whole protein deposition in protein bodies.

  6. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-04

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile.

  7. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Specific N-terminal CGRP fragments mitigate chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xin; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Keith, Ingegerd M

    2003-01-31

    Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (P(PA)), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular remodeling, pulmonary edema and polycythemia. Currently, there is no safe and effective treatment for HPH. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is the most potent peptide vasodilator discovered thus far. We previously demonstrated that exogenous CGRP reversed HPH in rats. However, the CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37) and smaller inhibitory C-terminal CGRP fragments that can be formed by enzymatic cleavage in vivo may compromise the beneficial effects of endogenous or exogenous CGRP. We here examine the agonistic efficacy of N-terminal rat alpha-CGRP peptides containing the disulfide bridge (Cys(2)-Cys(7)) with amidated C-terminal in prevention of HPH. Chronic infusion of CGRP(1-8), CGRP(1-13), or CGRP(1-14) at 7 nmol/h/rat via the right jugular vein during 14 days of hypobaric hypoxia (10% inspired O(2)) significantly decreased the P(PA), RVH and pulmonary arterial medial thickness in comparison with controls, suggesting that these CGRP sequences can mitigate chronic HPH in rats. Systemic pressure was unchanged by infused peptides indicating no carry-over effect. In conclusion, N-terminal CGRP fragments (CGRP(1-8), CGRP(1-13) and CGRP(1-14)) may have a protective role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  9. [Chemical synthesis of lactococcin B and functional evaluation of the N-terminal domain using a truncated synthetic analogue].

    PubMed

    Lasta, S; Fajloun, Z; Mansuelle, P; Sabatier, J M; Boudabous, A; Sampieri, F

    2008-01-01

    The lactococcin B (LnB) is a hydrophobic, positively charged bacteriocin, produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris 9B4. It consists of a peptidic chain made up of 47 amino acid residues, and inhibits Lactococcus exclusively. In order to study its biological activity a synthetic lactococcin B (LnBs) was obtained by solid-phase chemical synthesis using a Fmoc strategy. LnBs was shown to be indistinguishable from the natural peptide. In addition, a synthetic (7-47) LnBst analogue was obtained by withdrawal of peptidyl-resin after the 41 cycle of LnBs peptide chain assembly. The synthetic N-terminal truncated (7-47) LnBst analogue was found to be inactive on indicator strains. Our results strongly suggest that the first six N-terminal amino acid residues are involved in the bactericidal activity of LnB.

  10. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  11. Conformational unfolding in the N-terminal region of ribonuclease A detected by nonradiative energy transfer.

    PubMed

    McWherter, C A; Haas, E; Leed, A R; Scheraga, H A

    1986-04-22

    Unfolding in the N-terminal region of RNase A was studied by the nonradiative energy-transfer technique. RNase A was labeled with a nonfluorescent acceptor (2,4-dinitrophenyl) on the alpha-amino group and a fluorescent donor (ethylenediamine monoamide of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid) on a carboxyl group in the vicinity of residue 50 (75% at Glu-49 and 25% at Asp-53). The distribution of donor labeling sites does not affect the results of this study since they are close in both the sequence and the three-dimensional structure. The sites of labeling were determined by peptide mapping. The derivatives possessed full enzymatic activity and underwent reversible thermal transitions. However, there were some quantitative differences in the thermodynamic parameters. When the carboxyl groups were masked, there was a 5 degrees C lowering of the melting temperature at pH 2 and 4, and no significant change in delta H(Tm). Labeling of the alpha-amino group had no effect on the melting temperature or delta H(Tm) at pH 2 but did result in a dramatic decrease in delta H(Tm) of the unfolding reaction at pH 4. The melting temperature did not change appreciably at pH 4, indicating that an enthalpy/entropy compensation had occurred. The efficiencies of energy transfer determined with both fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements were in reasonably good agreement. The transfer efficiency dropped from about 60% under folding conditions to roughly 20% when the derivatives were unfolded with disulfide bonds intact and was further reduced to 5% when the disulfide bonds were reduced. The interprobe separation distance was estimated to be 35 +/- 2 A under folding conditions. The contribution to the interprobe distance resulting from the finite size of the probes was treated by using simple geometric considerations and a rotational isomeric state model of the donor probe linkage. With this model, the estimated average interprobe distance of 36 A is in excellent agreement with the

  12. Dominant autoimmune epitopes recognized by pemphigus antibodies map to the N-terminal adhesive region of desmogleins.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, M; Futei, Y; Fujii, Y; Iwasaki, T; Nishikawa, T; Amagai, M

    2001-11-01

    Desmoglein (Dsg) is a cadherin-type adhesion molecule found in desmosomes. Dsg1 and Dsg3 are the target Ags in the autoimmune blistering diseases pemphigus foliaceus (PF) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV), respectively. To map conformational epitopes of Dsg1 and Dsg3 in PF and PV, we generated Dsg1- and Dsg3-domain-swapped molecules and point-mutated Dsg3 molecules with Dsg1-specific residues by baculovirus expression. The swapped domains were portions of the N-terminal extracellular domains of Dsg1 (1-496) and Dsg3 (1-566), which have similar structures but distinct epitopes. The binding of autoantibodies to the mutant molecules was assessed by competition ELISAs. Domain-swapped molecules containing the N-terminal 161 residues of Dsg1 and Dsg3 yielded >50% competition in 30/43 (69.8%) PF sera and 31/40 (77.5%) PV sera, respectively. Furthermore, removal of Abs against the 161 N-terminal residues of Dsg1 by immunoadsorption eliminated the ability of PF sera to induce cutaneous blisters in neonatal mice. Within these N-terminal regions, most of the epitopes were mapped to residues 26-87 of Dsg1 and 25-88 of Dsg3. Furthermore, a point-mutated Dsg3 molecule containing Dsg1-specific amino acid substitutions (His(25), Cys(28), Ala(29)) reacted with anti-Dsg1 IgG, thus defining one of the epitopes of Dsg1. Using the predicted three-dimensional structure of classic cadherins as a model, these findings suggest that the dominant autoimmune epitopes in both PF and PV are found in the N-terminal adhesive surfaces of Dsgs.

  13. N-terminal {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms do not correlate with bronchodilator response in asthma families

    SciTech Connect

    Holyroyd, K.J.; Dragwa, C.; Xu, J.

    1994-09-01

    Family and twin studies have suggested that susceptibility to asthma is inherited. One clinically relevant phenotype in asthma is the bronchodilator response to beta adrenergic therapy (reversibility) which may also be inherited and vary among asthmatics. Two polymorphisms of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor common to both asthmatic and normal individuals have been reported. One polymorphism, an amino acid polymorphism at position 16, correlated in one study with the need for long-term corticosteriod use in a population of asthmatics. It is conceivable that the increased use of corticosteroids needed to control symptoms in these patients may be explained by a decreased responsiveness to brochodilators mediated through this amino acid polymorphism in the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor. However, the response to {beta}{sub 2} bronchodilators was not tested in these patients. In our Dutch asthma families, DNA sequencing of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor has been performed for N-terminal polymorphisms at amino acid positions 16 and 27 in over 100 individuals, and no correlation was found with the increase of FEV{sub 1} in response to bronchodilator. Linkage analysis between bronchodilator response and marker D5S412 near the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor gene was performed in 286 sibpairs from these families. Using a bronchodilator response of >10% in FEV{sub 1} as a qualitative definition of affected individuals, there were 145 unaffected sibpairs, 121 sibpairs where one was affected, and 20 in which both were affected. Linear regression analysis of these sibpair data suggested possible linkage (p=0.007). This supports further examination of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor and its regulatory regions for polymorphisms that correlate with the bronchodilator response in asthma families.

  14. Cloning, sequence, and developmental expression of a type 5, tartrate-resistant, acid phosphatase of rat bone.

    PubMed

    Ek-Rylander, B; Bill, P; Norgård, M; Nilsson, S; Andersson, G

    1991-12-25

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is a characteristic constituent of osteoclasts and some mononuclear preosteoclasts and, therefore, used as a histochemical and biochemical marker for osteoclasts and bone resorption. We now report the isolation of a 1397-base pair (bp) full-length TRAP/tartrate-resistant acid ATPase (TrATPase) cDNA clone from a neonatal rat calvaria lambda gt11 cDNA library. The cDNA clone consists of a 92-bp untranslated 5'-flank, an open reading frame of 981 bp and a 324-bp untranslated 3'-poly(A)-containing region. The deduced protein sequence of 327 amino acids contains a putative cleavable signal sequence of 21 amino acids. The mature polypeptide of 306 amino acids has a calculated Mr of 34,350 Da and a pI of 9.18, and it contains two potential N-glycosylation sites and the lysosomal targeting sequence DKRFQ. At the protein level, the sequence displays 89-94% homology to TRAP enzymes from human placenta, beef spleen, and uteroferrin and identity to the N terminus of purified rat bone TRAP/TrATPase. An N-terminal amino acid segment is strikingly homologous to the corresponding region in lysosomal and prostatic acid phosphatases. The cDNA recognized a 1.5-kilobase mRNA in long bones and calvaria, and in vitro translation using, as template, mRNA transcribed from the full-length insert yielded an immunoprecipitated product of 34 kDa. In neonatal rats, TRAP/TrATPase mRNA was highly expressed in skeletal tissues, with much lower (less than 10%) levels detected in spleen, thymus, liver, skin, brain, kidney, brain, lung, and heart. In situ hybridization demonstrated specific labeling of osteoclasts at endostal surfaces and bone trabeculae of long bones. Thus, despite the apparent similarity of this osteoclastic TRAP/TrATPase with type 5, tartrate-resistant and purple, acid phosphatases expressed in other mammalian tissues, this gene appears to be preferentially expressed at skeletal sites.

  15. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; )

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  16. Concerted regulation of ISWI by an autoinhibitory domain and the H4 N-terminal tail

    PubMed Central

    Ludwigsen, Johanna; Pfennig, Sabrina; Singh, Ashish K; Schindler, Christina; Harrer, Nadine; Forné, Ignasi; Zacharias, Martin; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2017-01-01

    ISWI-family nucleosome remodeling enzymes need the histone H4 N-terminal tail to mobilize nucleosomes. Here we mapped the H4-tail binding pocket of ISWI. Surprisingly the binding site was adjacent to but not overlapping with the docking site of an auto-regulatory motif, AutoN, in the N-terminal region (NTR) of ISWI, indicating that AutoN does not act as a simple pseudosubstrate as suggested previously. Rather, AutoN cooperated with a hitherto uncharacterized motif, termed AcidicN, to confer H4-tail sensitivity and discriminate between DNA and nucleosomes. A third motif in the NTR, ppHSA, was functionally required in vivo and provided structural stability by clamping the NTR to Lobe 2 of the ATPase domain. This configuration is reminiscent of Chd1 even though Chd1 contains an unrelated NTR. Our results shed light on the intricate structural and functional regulation of ISWI by the NTR and uncover surprising parallels with Chd1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21477.001 PMID:28109157

  17. Extensive amino acid sequence homologies between animal lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Paroutaud, P.; Levi, G.; Teichberg, V.I.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have established the amino acid sequence of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from the electric eel and the sequences of several peptides from a similar lectin isolated from human placenta. These sequences were compared with the published sequences of peptides derived from the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from human lung and with sequences deduced from cDNAs assigned to the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins from chicken embryo skin and human hepatomas. Significant homologies were observed. One of the highly conserved regions that contains a tryptophan residue and two glutamic acid resides is probably part of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding site, which, on the basis of spectroscopic studies of the electric eel lectin, is expected to contain such residues. The similarity of the hydropathy profiles and the predicted secondary structure of the lectins from chicken skin and electric eel, in spite of differences in their amino acid sequences, strongly suggests that these proteins have maintained structural homologies during evolution and together with the other ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins were derived form a common ancestor gene.

  18. Amino acid sequence of porcine spleen cathepsin D.

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, J G; Tang, J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of porcine spleen cathepsin D heavy chain has been determined and, hence, the complete structure of this enzyme is now known. The sequence of heavy chain was constructed by aligning the structures of peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, trypsin, and endo-proteinase Lys C cleavages. The structure of the light chain has been published previously. The cathepsin D molecule contains 339 amino acid residues in two polypeptide chains: a 97-residue light chain and a 242-residue heavy chain, with a combined Mr of 36,779 (without carbohydrate). There are two carbohydrate units linked to asparagine residues 70 and 192. The disulfide bond arrangement in cathepsin D is probably similar to that of pepsin, because the positions of six half-cystine residues are conserved. The active site aspartyl residues, corresponding to aspartic acid-32 and -215 of pepsin, are located at residues 33 and 224 in the cathepsin D molecule. The amino acid sequence around these aspartyl residues is strongly conserved. Cathepsin D shows a strong homology with other acid proteases. When the sequence of cathepsin D, renin, and pepsin are aligned, 32.7% of the residues are identical. The homology is observed throughout the length of the molecules, indicating that three-dimensional structures of all three molecules are similar. PMID:6587385

  19. Amino acid sequences of bacterial cytochromes c' and c-556.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P; Bartsch, R G; Daniel, M; Kamen, M D; McLellan, L; Meyer, T E; Van Beeumen, J

    1981-01-01

    The cytochrome c' are electron transport proteins widely distributed in photosynthetic and aerobic bacteria. We report the amino acid sequences of the proteins from 12 different bacterial species, and we show by sequences that the cytochromes c-556 from 2 different bacteria are structurally related to the cytochromes c'. Unlike the mitochondrial cytochromes c, the heme binding site in the cytochromes c' and c-556 is near the COOH terminus. The cytochromes c-556 probably have a methionine sixth heme ligand located near the NH2 terminus, whereas the cytochromes c' may be pentacoordinate. Quantitative comparison of cytochrome c' and c-556 sequences indicates a relatively low 28% average identity. PMID:6273892

  20. Identification of specific adenovirus E1A N-terminal residues critical to the binding of cellular proteins and to the control of cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H G; Rikitake, Y; Carter, M C; Yaciuk, P; Abraham, S E; Zerler, B; Moran, E

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) oncogene-encoded sequences essential for transformation- and cell growth-regulating activities are localized at the N terminus and in regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence designated conserved regions 1 and 2. These regions interact to form the binding sites for two classes of cellular proteins: those, such as the retinoblastoma gene product, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on region 2, and another class which so far is known to include only a large cellular DNA-binding protein, p300, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on the N-terminal region. Association between the E1A products and either class of cellular proteins can be disrupted by mutations in conserved region 1. While region 2 has been studied intensively, very little is known so far concerning the nature of the essential residues in the N-terminal region, or about the manner in which conserved region 1 participates in the binding of two distinct sets of cellular proteins. A combination of site-directed point mutagenesis and monoclonal antibody competition experiments reported here suggests that p300 binding is dependent on specific, conserved residues in the N terminus, including positively charged residues at positions 2 and 3 of the E1A proteins, and that p300 and pRB bind to distinct, nonoverlapping subregions within conserved region 1. The availability of precise point mutations disrupting p300 binding supports previous data linking p300 with cell cycle control and enhancer function. Images PMID:8416379

  1. The catalytic subunit of Dictyostelium cAMP-dependent protein kinase -- role of the N-terminal domain and of the C-terminal residues in catalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Etchebehere, L C; Van Bemmelen, M X; Anjard, C; Traincard, F; Assemat, K; Reymond, C; Véron, M

    1997-09-15

    The C subunit of Dictyostelium cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is unusually large (73 kDa) due to the presence of 330 amino acids N-terminal to the conserved catalytic core. The sequence following the core, including a C-terminal -Phe-Xaa-Xaa-Phe-COOH motif, is highly conserved. We have characterized the catalytic activity and stability of C subunits mutated in sequences outside the catalytic core and we have analyzed their ability to interact with the R subunit and with the heat-stable protein-kinase inhibitor PKI. Mutants carrying deletions in the N-terminal domain displayed little difference in their kinetic properties and retained their capacity to be inhibited by R subunit and by PKI. In contrast, the mutation of one or both of the phenylalanine residues in the C-terminal motif resulted in a decrease of catalytic activity and stability of the proteins. Inhibition by the R subunit or by PKI were however unaffected. Sequence-comparison analysis of other protein kinases revealed that a -Phe-Xaa-Xaa-Phe- motif is present in many Ser/Thr protein kinases, although its location at the very end of the polypeptide is a particular feature of the PKA family. We propose that the presence of this motif may serve to identify isoforms of protein kinases.

  2. Recombinant hnRNP protein A1 and its N-terminal domain show preferential affinity for oligodeoxynucleotides homologous to intron/exon acceptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Buvoli, M; Cobianchi, F; Biamonti, G; Riva, S

    1990-01-01

    The reported binding preference of human hnRNP protein A1 for the 3'-splice site of some introns (Swanson and Dreyfuss (1988) EMBO J. 7, 3519-3529; Mayrand and Pederson (1990) Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 3307-3318) was tested by assaying in vitro the binding of purified recombinant A1 protein (expressed in bacteria) to synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (21-mers) of suitable sequence. In such a minimal system we find preferential binding of protein A1 to oligodeoxynucleotide sequences corresponding to the 3'-splice site of IVS1 of human beta-globin pre-mRNA and of IVS1 of Adenovirus type 2 major late transcript. Mutation studies demonstrate that the binding specificity is dependent on the known critical domains of this intron region, the AG splice site dinucleotide and polypyrimidine tract, and resides entirely in the short oligonucleotide sequence. Moreover specific binding does not require the presence of other hnRNP proteins or of snRNP particles. Studies with a truncated recombinant protein demonstrated that the minimal protein sequence determinants for A1 recognition of 3'-splice acceptor site reside entirely in the N-terminal 195 aa of the unmodified protein. Images PMID:2251120

  3. The N-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A signals to nuclear localization of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Gomes, Marcelo D.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2007-10-19

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a ubiquitous protein of eukaryotic and archaeal organisms which undergoes hypusination, a unique post-translational modification. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against murine eIF5A, which in immunocytochemical assays in B16-F10 cells revealed that the endogenous protein is preferentially localized to the nuclear region. We therefore analyzed possible structural features present in eIF5A proteins that could be responsible for that characteristic. Multiple sequence alignment analysis of eIF5A proteins from different eukaryotic and archaeal organisms showed that the former sequences have an extended N-terminal segment. We have then performed in silico prediction analyses and constructed different truncated forms of murine eIF5A to verify any possible role that the N-terminal extension might have in determining the subcellular localization of the eIF5A in eukaryotic organisms. Our results indicate that the N-terminal extension of the eukaryotic eIF5A contributes in signaling this protein to nuclear localization, despite of bearing no structural similarity with classical nuclear localization signals.

  4. The N-Terminal Domain of the Arenavirus L Protein Is an RNA Endonuclease Essential in mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Benjamin; Coutard, Bruno; Lelke, Michaela; Ferron, François; Kerber, Romy; Jamal, Saïd; Frangeul, Antoine; Baronti, Cécile; Charrel, Rémi; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Vonrhein, Clemens; Lescar, Julien; Bricogne, Gérard; Günther, Stephan; Canard, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Arenaviridae synthesize viral mRNAs using short capped primers presumably acquired from cellular transcripts by a ‘cap-snatching’ mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure and functional characterization of the N-terminal 196 residues (NL1) of the L protein from the prototypic arenavirus: lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The NL1 domain is able to bind and cleave RNA. The 2.13 Å resolution crystal structure of NL1 reveals a type II endonuclease α/β architecture similar to the N-terminal end of the influenza virus PA protein. Superimposition of both structures, mutagenesis and reverse genetics studies reveal a unique spatial arrangement of key active site residues related to the PD…(D/E)XK type II endonuclease signature sequence. We show that this endonuclease domain is conserved and active across the virus families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Orthomyxoviridae and propose that the arenavirus NL1 domain is the Arenaviridae cap-snatching endonuclease. PMID:20862324

  5. Crystals of the hydrogenase maturation factor HypF N-terminal domain grown in microgravity, display improved internal order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponassi, Marco; Felli, Lamberto; Parodi, Stefania; Valbusa, Ugo; Rosano, Camillo

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of the active [Ni-Fe]-hydrogenase in prokaryotes requires a series of ancillary maturation factors. Among them, the HypF maturation factor is a multidomain 82 kDa protein, whose N-terminal domain displays sequence and structural similarities to acylphosphatases. Acylphosphatases are small enzymes that are able to catalyze carboxyl-phosphate bond hydrolysis in acylphosphates, as well as in nucleoside di- and tri-phosphates and in arylphosphates. Here, we present a crystallographic comparison between microgravity and earth-grown crystals of the HypF N-terminal domain. Both crystals were of excellent quality, thereby allowing us to collect very high resolution datasets. A detailed analysis of data collection and refinement statistics, together with an analysis of the diffraction pattern showed that microgravity would appear to further improve the internal order of crystals.

  6. N-terminal acetylome analyses and functional insights of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatB

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Petra; Lasa, Marta; Polevoda, Bogdan; Gazquez, Cristina; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Kim, Duk Soo; De Juan-Pardo, Elena; Demeyer, Kimberly; Hole, Kristine; Larrea, Esther; Timmerman, Evy; Prieto, Jesus; Arnesen, Thomas; Sherman, Fred; Gevaert, Kris; Aldabe, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) is an important mediator of protein function, stability, sorting, and localization. Although the responsible enzymes are thought to be fairly well characterized, the lack of identified in vivo substrates, the occurrence of Nt-acetylation substrates displaying yet uncharacterized N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) specificities, and emerging evidence of posttranslational Nt-acetylation, necessitate the use of genetic models and quantitative proteomics. NatB, which targets Met-Glu-, Met-Asp-, and Met-Asn-starting protein N termini, is presumed to Nt-acetylate 15% of all yeast and 18% of all human proteins. We here report on the evolutionary traits of NatB from yeast to human and demonstrate that ectopically expressed hNatB in a yNatB-Δ yeast strain partially complements the natB-Δ phenotypes and partially restores the yNatB Nt-acetylome. Overall, combining quantitative N-terminomics with yeast studies and knockdown of hNatB in human cell lines, led to the unambiguous identification of 180 human and 110 yeast NatB substrates. Interestingly, these substrates included Met-Gln- N-termini, which are thus now classified as in vivo NatB substrates. We also demonstrate the requirement of hNatB activity for maintaining the structure and function of actomyosin fibers and for proper cellular migration. In addition, expression of tropomyosin-1 restored the altered focal adhesions and cellular migration defects observed in hNatB-depleted HeLa cells, indicative for the conserved link between NatB, tropomyosin, and actin cable function from yeast to human. PMID:22814378

  7. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  8. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-03-14

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD.

  9. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  10. Identification of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractants (CINC), rat GRO/CINC-2 alpha and CINC-2 beta, produced by granulation tissue in culture: purification, complete amino acid sequences and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, H; Komorita, N; Shibata, F; Ikesue, A; Konishi, K; Fujioka, M; Kato, H

    1994-01-01

    Four basic neutrophil chemotactic factors (chemokines) have been purified from conditioned medium of granulation tissue obtained from carrageenin-induced inflammation in the rat. On the basis of their N-terminal amino acid sequences, one of the chemokines was identical with rat GRO/cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) which we reported previously, and another was identical with rat macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). Two other chemokines were novel chemoattractants related to MIP-2. The novel chemokines are referred to as rat GRO/CINC-2 alpha and CINC-2 beta, and consequently CINC and rat MIP-2 are renamed rat GRO/CINC-1 and CINC-3 respectively. The complete amino acid sequences of purified CINC-2 alpha and CINC-3 were determined by analysis of the fragments isolated from proteinase V8-treated CINCs. The cDNA for CINC-2 beta was cloned by reverse transcription/PCR amplification using specific primers starting with total RNA extracted from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat macrophages. A comparison of the amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified CINC-2 beta revealed that mature CINC-2 beta is a 68-residue chemoattractant produced by cleavage of a 32-residue signal peptide. The difference in amino acid sequences between CINC-2 alpha and CINC-2 beta consisted of only three C-terminal residues. Rat GRO/CINC-2 alpha is a major chemokine, and the four purified chemokines have similar chemotactic activity, suggesting that they contribute to neutrophil infiltration into inflammatory sites in rats. Images Figure 2 PMID:8043001

  11. The amino acid sequence of iguana (Iguana iguana) pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Beintema, J J; Hofsteenge, J

    1994-01-15

    The pyrimidine-specific ribonuclease superfamily constitutes a group of homologous proteins so far found only in higher vertebrates. Four separate families are found in mammals, which have resulted from gene duplications in mammalian ancestors. To learn more about the evolutionary history of this superfamily, the primary structure and other characteristics of the pancreatic enzyme from iguana (Iguana iguana), a herbivorous lizard species belonging to the reptiles, have been determined. The polypeptide chain consists of 119 amino acid residues. The positions of insertions and deletions in the sequence are identical to those in the enzyme from snapping turtle. However, the two enzymes differ at 54% of the amino acid positions. Iguana ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses three recognition sites for carbohydrate attachment, and has a high number of acidic residues in a localized part of the sequence.

  12. Defining Lipid Interacting Domains in the N-terminal Region of Apolipoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Gantz, Donald; Bullitt, Esther; McKnight, C. James

    2008-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a nonexchangeable apolipoprotein that dictates the synthesis of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins. ApoB is the major protein in low density lipoprotein, also known as the “bad cholesterol” that is directly implicated in atherosclerosis. It has been suggested that the N-terminal domain of apoB plays a critical role in the formation of apoB-containing lipoproteins through the initial recruitment of phospholipids in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, very little is known about the mechanism of lipoprotein nucleation by apoB. Here we demonstrate that a strong phospholipid remodeling function is associated with the predicted α-helical and C-sheet domains in the N-terminal 17% of apoB (B17). Using dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) as a model lipid, these domains can convert multilamellar DMPC vesicles into discoidal-shaped particles. The nascent particles reconstituted from different apoB domains are distinctive and compositionally homogenous. This phospholipid remodeling activity is also observed with egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) and is therefore not DMPC dependent. Using kinetic analysis of the DMPC clearance assay, we show that the identified phospholipid binding sequences all map to the surface of the lipid binding pocket in the B17 model based on the homologous protein, lipovitellin. Since both B17 and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), a critical chaperone during lipoprotein assembly, are homologous to lipovitellin, the identification of these phospholipid remodeling sequences in B17 provides important insights into the potential mechanism that initiates the assembly of apoB-containing lipoproteins. PMID:17002280

  13. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-08

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import.

  14. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  15. Structure of the Tropomyosin Overlap Complex from Chicken Smooth Muscle: Insight into the Diversity of N-Terminal Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Jeremiah; Klenchin, Vadim A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2010-09-08

    Tropomyosin is a stereotypical {alpha}-helical coiled coil that polymerizes to form a filamentous macromolecular assembly that lies on the surface of F-actin. The interaction between the C-terminal and N-terminal segments on adjacent molecules is known as the overlap region. We report here two X-ray structures of the chicken smooth muscle tropomyosin overlap complex. A novel approach was used to stabilize the C-terminal and N-terminal fragments. Globular domains from both the human DNA ligase binding protein XRCC4 and bacteriophage {phi}29 scaffolding protein Gp7 were fused to 37 and 28 C-terminal amino acid residues of tropomyosin, respectively, whereas the 29 N-terminal amino acids of tropomyosin were fused to the C-terminal helix bundle of microtubule binding protein EB1. The structures of both the XRCC4 and Gp7 fusion proteins complexed with the N-terminal EB1 fusion contain a very similar helix bundle in the overlap region that encompasses {approx}15 residues. The C-terminal coiled coil opens to allow formation of the helix bundle, which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These structures are similar to that observed in the NMR structure of the rat skeletal overlap complex [Greenfield, N. J., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 364, 80-96]. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal coiled coils of smooth muscle tropomyosin show significant curvature, which differs somewhat between the two structures and implies flexibility in the overlap complex, at least in solution. This is likely an important attribute that allows tropomyosin to assemble around the actin filaments. These structures provide a molecular explanation for the role of N-acetylation in the assembly of native tropomyosin.

  16. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj; Beck, Konrad; Lai, F. Anthony; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Ševčík, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardio­myocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals Cα atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface. PMID:25372681

  17. Amino acid sequence of bovine gamma E (IVa) lens crystallin.

    PubMed Central

    Kilby, G. W.; Sheil, M. M.; Shaw, D.; Harding, J. J.; Truscott, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    When electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS) was used to analyze purified bovine gamma E (gamma IVa)-crystallin, it yielded a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 20.955 +/- 5. This mass is significantly different from that calculated from the published sequence (M(r) 20.894) (White HE et al., 1989, J Mol Biol 207:217-235). Further, ES-MS analysis of the protein after it had been reduced and carboxymethylated indicated the presence of five cysteine residues, whereas the published sequence contains six (Kilby GW et al., 1995, Eur Mass Spectrom 1:203-208). The entire protein sequence of gamma E crystallin has therefore been studied via a combination of ES-MS, ES-MS/MS, and Edman amino acid sequencing. The corrected sequence gives an M(r) of 20.955.3, which matches that obtained by ES-MS analysis of the purified native protein. The corrected sequence is also in agreement with a recent cDNA sequence obtained for a bovine gamma-crystallin by R. Hay (pers. comm.). PMID:9098901

  18. Amino acid sequence of bovine gamma E (IVa) lens crystallin.

    PubMed

    Kilby, G W; Sheil, M M; Shaw, D; Harding, J J; Truscott, R J

    1997-04-01

    When electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS) was used to analyze purified bovine gamma E (gamma IVa)-crystallin, it yielded a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 20.955 +/- 5. This mass is significantly different from that calculated from the published sequence (M(r) 20.894) (White HE et al., 1989, J Mol Biol 207:217-235). Further, ES-MS analysis of the protein after it had been reduced and carboxymethylated indicated the presence of five cysteine residues, whereas the published sequence contains six (Kilby GW et al., 1995, Eur Mass Spectrom 1:203-208). The entire protein sequence of gamma E crystallin has therefore been studied via a combination of ES-MS, ES-MS/MS, and Edman amino acid sequencing. The corrected sequence gives an M(r) of 20.955.3, which matches that obtained by ES-MS analysis of the purified native protein. The corrected sequence is also in agreement with a recent cDNA sequence obtained for a bovine gamma-crystallin by R. Hay (pers. comm.).

  19. Amino acid sequence and comparative antigenicity of chicken metallothionein.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C C; Fullmer, C S; Garvey, J S

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of metallothionein (MT) from chicken liver is reported. The primary structure was determined by automated sequence analysis of peptides produced by limited acid hydrolysis and by trypsin digestion. The comparative antigenicity of chicken MT was determined by radioimmunoassay using rabbit anti-rat MT polyclonal antibody. Chicken MT consists of 63 amino acids as compared to 61 found in MTs from mammals. One insertion (and two substitutions) occurs in the amino-terminal region, a region considered invariant among mammalian MTs. Eighteen of the 20 cysteines in chicken MT were aligned with cysteines from other mammalian sequences. Two cysteines near the carboxyl terminus are shifted by one residue due to the insertion of proline in that region. Overall, the chicken protein showed approximately equal to 68% sequence identity in a comparison with various mammalian MTs. The affinity of the polyclonal antibody for chicken MT was decreased by 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to that of a mammalian MT (rat MT isoforms). This reduced affinity is attributed to major substitutions in chicken MT in the regions of the principal determinants of mammalian MTs. Theoretical analysis of the primary structure predicted the secondary structure to consist of reverse turns and random coils with no stable beta or helix conformations. There is no evidence that chicken MT differs functionally from mammalian MTs. PMID:2448773

  20. Amino acid sequence of bovine heart coupling factor 6.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J K; Jacobs, J W; Kanner, B I; Racker, E; Bradshaw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine heart mitochondrial coupling factor 6 (F6) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and derived peptides. Preparations based on heat precipitation and ethanol extraction showed allotypic variation at three positions while material further purified by HPLC yielded only one sequence that also differed by a Phe-Thr replacement at residue 62. The mature protein contains 76 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 9006 and a pI of approximately equal to 5, in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The charged amino acids are mainly clustered at the termini and in one section in the middle; these three polar segments are separated by two segments relatively rich in nonpolar residues. Chou-Fasman analysis suggests three stretches of alpha-helix coinciding (or within) the high-charge-density sequences with a single beta-turn at the first polar-nonpolar junction. Comparison of the F6 sequence with those of other proteins did not reveal any homologous structures. PMID:6149548

  1. Constrained Multistate Sequence Design for Nucleic Acid Reaction Pathway Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Brian R; Porubsky, Nicholas J; Zadeh, Joseph N; Dirks, Robert M; Pierce, Niles A

    2017-03-01

    We describe a framework for designing the sequences of multiple nucleic acid strands intended to hybridize in solution via a prescribed reaction pathway. Sequence design is formulated as a multistate optimization problem using a set of target test tubes to represent reactant, intermediate, and product states of the system, as well as to model crosstalk between components. Each target test tube contains a set of desired "on-target" complexes, each with a target secondary structure and target concentration, and a set of undesired "off-target" complexes, each with vanishing target concentration. Optimization of the equilibrium ensemble properties of the target test tubes implements both a positive design paradigm, explicitly designing for on-pathway elementary steps, and a negative design paradigm, explicitly designing against off-pathway crosstalk. Sequence design is performed subject to diverse user-specified sequence constraints including composition constraints, complementarity constraints, pattern prevention constraints, and biological constraints. Constrained multistate sequence design facilitates nucleic acid reaction pathway engineering for diverse applications in molecular programming and synthetic biology. Design jobs can be run online via the NUPACK web application.

  2. Structural and functional properties of CiNTH, an endonuclease III homologue of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: critical role of N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiji; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Igarashi, Kento; Moriwaki, Takahito; Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged bases in DNA can cause cell death, mutation and/or cancer induction. To overcome such deleterious effects of DNA base oxidation, cells are equipped with base excision repair (BER) initiated by DNA glycosylases. Endonuclease III (Nth), a major DNA glycosylase, mainly excises oxidatively damaged pyrimidines from DNA. The aims of this study were to obtain an overview of the repair mechanism of oxidatively damaged bases and to elucidate the function of BER in maintaining genome stability during embryogenesis and development. In this study, we used the ascidian Ciona intestinalis because at every developmental stage it is possible to observe the phenotype of individuals with DNA damage or mutations. Sequence alignment analysis revealed that the amino acid sequence of Ciona intestinalis Nth homologue (CiNTH) had high homology with those of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and human Nth homologues. It was evident that two domains, the Helix-hairpin-Helix and 4Fe-4S cluster domains that are critical regions for the Nth activity, are well conserved in CiNTH. CiNTH efficiently complemented the sensitivity of E. coli nth nei mutant to H(2)O(2). CiNTH was bifunctional, with DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities. It removed thymine glycol, 5-formyluracil and 8-oxoguanine paired with G from DNA via a β-elimination reaction. Interestingly, the N-terminal 44 amino acids were essential for the DNA glycosylase activity of CiNTH.

  3. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  4. Kinetic mechanism of protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stacie L; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L; Huang, Rong

    2015-05-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Kinetic Mechanism of Protein N-terminal Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stacie L.; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L.; Huang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  6. Jun N-terminal kinase signaling makes a face

    PubMed Central

    Hursh, Deborah A.; Stultz, Brian G.; Park, Sung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT decapentaplegic (dpp), the Drosophila ortholog of BMP 2/4, directs ventral adult head morphogenesis through expression in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc. This dpp expressing domain exerts effects both on the peripodial epithelium, and the underlying disc proper epithelium. We have uncovered a role for the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in dpp-mediated ventral head development. JNK activity is required for dpp's action on the disc proper, but in the absence of dpp expression, excessive JNK activity is produced, leading to specific loss of maxillary palps. In this review we outline our hypotheses on how dpp acts by both short range and longer range mechanisms to direct head morphogenesis and speculate on the dual role of JNK signaling in this process. Finally, we describe the regulatory control of dpp expression in the eye-antennal disc, and pose the problem of how the various expression domains of a secreted protein can be targeted to their specific functions. PMID:27384866

  7. The human erythrocyte anion-transport protein. Partial amino acid sequence, conformation and a possible molecular mechanism for anion exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, C J; Tanner, M J; Kempf, C

    1983-01-01

    The N-terminal 72 residues of an integral membrane fragment, P5, of the human erythrocyte anion-transport protein, which is known to be directly involved in the anion-exchange process, was shown to have the following amino acid sequence: Met-Val-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gly-Pro-Leu-Pro-Asn-Thr-Ala-Leu-Leu-Ser-Leu-Val-Leu-Met -Ala-Gly-Thr-Phe-Phe-Phe-Ala-Met-Met-Leu-Arg-Lys-Phe-Lys-Asn-Ser-Ser-Tyr-Phe-Pro-Gly-Lys-Leu-Arg-Arg-Val-Ile-Gly-Asp-Phe-Gly-Val-Pro-Ile-Ser-Ile-Leu-Ile-Met-Val-Leu-Val-Asp-Phe-Phe-Ile-Gln-Asp-Thr-Tyr-Thr-Gln- The structure of this fragment was analysed, with account being taken of the constraints that apply to the folding of integral membrane proteins and the topographical locations of various sites in the sequence. It was concluded that this sequence forms two transmembrane alpha-helices. These are probably part of a cluster of amphipathic transmembrane alpha-helices, which could comprise that part of the protein responsible for transport activity. The presently available evidence relating to the anion-exchange process was considered with the structural features noted in this study and a possible molecular mechanism is proposed. In this model the rearrangement of a network of intramembranous charged pairs mediates the translocation of an anion between anion-binding regions at each surface of the membrane, which are composed of clusters of positively charged amino acids. This model imposes a sequential exchange mechanism on the system. Supplementary material, including Tables and Figures describing the compositions of peptides determined by amino acid analysis and sequence studies, quantitative and qualitative data that provide a residue-by-residue justification for the sequence assignment and a description of modifications to and use of the solid-phase sequencer has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50123 (12 pages) with the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the active matrix metalloproteinase-2: positioning of the N-terminal fragment and binding of a small peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2008-07-01

    Herein we use different computational methods to study the structure and energetic stability of the catalytic domain of the active MMP-2 enzyme considering two different orientations of its N-terminal coil. The first orientation is largely solvent accessible and corresponds to that observed in the 1CK7 crystal structure of the proenzyme. In the second orientation, the N-terminal coil is packed against the Omega-loop and the alpha3-helix of the MMP-2 enzyme likewise in the so-called "superactivated" form of other MMPs. Binding to the MMP-2 catalytic domain of a short peptide substrate, which mimics the sequence of the alpha1 chain of collagen type I, is also examined considering again the two configurations of the N-terminal coil. All these MMP-2 models are subject to 20 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by MM-PBSA (Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area) calculations. The positioning of the N-terminal coil in the "superactivated" form is found to be energetically favored for the MMP-2 enzyme. Moreover, this configuration of the N-terminal moiety can facilitate the binding of peptide substrates. Globally, the results obtained in this study could be relevant for the structural-based design of specific MMP inhibitors.

  9. The N-terminal Zinc Finger and Flanking Basic Domains Represent the Minimal Region of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein for Targeting Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mithun; Wang, Wei; Vo, My-Nuong; Rouzina, Ioulia; Barany, George; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein is a chaperone that facilitates nucleic acid conformational changes to form the most thermodynamically stable arrangement. The critical role of NC in many steps of the viral life cycle makes it an attractive therapeutic target. The chaperone activity of NC depends on its nucleic acid aggregating ability, duplex destabilizing activity and rapid on/off binding kinetics. During the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription, NC chaperones the annealing of highly structured transactivation response region (TAR) RNA to the complementary TAR DNA. In this work, the role of different functional domains of NC in facilitating 59-nucleotide TAR RNA/DNA annealing was probed by using chemically-synthesized peptides derived from full-length (55 amino acids) HIV-1 NC: NC(1-14), NC(15-35), NC(1-28), NC(1-35), NC(29-55), NC(36-55) and NC(11-55). Most of these peptides displayed significantly reduced annealing kinetics, even when present at much higher concentrations than wild-type (WT) NC. In addition, these truncated NC constructs generally bind more weakly to single-stranded DNA and are less effective nucleic acid aggregating agents than full-length NC, consistent with the loss of both electrostatic and hydrophobic contacts. However, NC(1-35) displayed annealing kinetics, nucleic acid binding, and aggregation activity that were very similar to that of WT NC. Thus, we conclude that the N-terminal zinc finger, flanked by the N-terminus and linker domains, represents the minimal sequence that is necessary and sufficient for chaperone function in vitro. In addition, covalent continuity of the N-terminal 35 amino acids of NC is critical for full activity. Thus, although the hydrophobic pocket formed by residues proximal to the C-terminal zinc finger has been a major focus of recent anti-NC therapeutic strategies, NC(1-35) represents an alternative target for therapeutics aimed at disrupting NC

  10. Mass spectrometric amino acid sequencing of a mixture of seed storage proteins (napin) from Brassica napus, products of a multigene family.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, P M; Krzyzaniak, A; Barciszewski, J; Biemann, K

    1996-04-16

    The amino acid sequences of a number of closely related proteins ("napin") isolated from Brassica napus were determined by mass spectrometry without prior separation into individual components. Some of these proteins correspond to those previously deduced (napA, BngNAP1, and gNa), chiefly from DNA sequences. Others were found to differ to a varying extent (BngNAP1', BngNAP1A, BngNAP1B, BngNAP1C, gNa', and gNaA). The short chains of gNa and gNa' and of BngNAP1 and BngNAP1' differ by the replacement of N-terminal proline by pyroglutamic acid; the long chains of gNaA and BngNAP1B contain a six amino acid stretch, MQGQQM, which is present in gNa (according to its DNA sequence) but absent from BngNAP1 and BngNAP1C. These alternations of sequences between napin isoforms are most likely due to homologous recombination of the genetic material, but some of the changes may also be due to RNA editing. The amino acids that follow the untruncated C termini of those napin chains for which the DNA sequences are known (napA, BngNAP1, and gNa) are aromatic amino acids. This suggests that the processing of the proprotein leading to the C termini of the two chains is due to the action of a protease that specifically cleaves a G/S-F/Y/W bond.

  11. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  12. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  13. Nanopore-based sequencing and detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yi-Lun; Zhang, Junji; Gao, Rui; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-12-09

    Nanopore-based techniques, which mimic the functions of natural ion channels, have attracted increasing attention as unique methods for single-molecule detection. The technology allows the real-time, selective, high-throughput analysis of nucleic acids through both biological and solid-state nanopores. In this Minireview, the background and latest progress in nanopore-based sequencing and detection of nucleic acids are summarized, and light is shed on a novel platform for nanopore-based detection. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Characterization of mutant xylanases using fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: stabilizing contributions of disulfide bridges and N-terminal extensions.

    PubMed

    Jänis, Janne; Turunen, Ossi; Leisola, Matti; Derrick, Peter J; Rouvinen, Juha; Vainiotalo, Pirjo

    2004-07-27

    Structural properties and thermal stability of Trichoderma reesei endo-1,4-beta-xylanase II (TRX II) and its three recombinant mutants were characterized using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions. TRX II has been previously stabilized by a disulfide bridge C110-C154 and other site-directed mutations (TRX II mutants DS2 and DS5). Very recently, a highly thermostable mutant was introduced by combining mutations of DS5 with an N-terminal disulfide bridge C2-C28 (mutant DB1). Accurate mass measurements of TRX II, DS2, DS5, and DB1 verified the expected DNA-encoded protein sequences (average mass error 1.3 ppm) and allowed unequivocal assignment of the disulfides without chemical reduction and subsequent alkylation of the expected cross-links. Moreover, H/D exchange reactions provided means for the detection of a major heat-induced conformational change comprising two interconverting conformers of very different H/D exchange rates as well as allowed the apparent melting temperatures (T(m)) to be determined (62.6, 65.1, 68.0, and 82.2 degrees C for TRX II, DS2, DS5, and DB1, respectively). Residual activity measurements verified that the enzymes inactivated at significantly lower temperatures than expected on the basis of the apparent T(m) values, strongly suggesting that the inactivation takes place through minor conformational change other than observed by H/D exchange. ESI FT-ICR analyses also revealed molecular heterogeneity in DS5 and DB1 due to the propeptide incorporation. Resulting unintentional N-terminal extensions were observed to further improve the stability of the DB1 mutant. The extension of six amino acid residues upstream from the protein N-terminus increased stability by approximately 5 degrees C.

  15. The ataxia3 mutation in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of sodium channel Nav1.6 disrupts intracellular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Lisa M.; Cheng, X-Y; Drews, Valerie; Buchner, David A.; Jones, Julie M.; Justice, Monica J.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Meisler, Miriam H.

    2009-01-01

    The ENU-induced neurological mutant ataxia3 was mapped to distal mouse chromosome 15. Sequencing of the positional candidate gene Scn8a encoding the sodium channel Nav1.6 identified a T>C transition in exon 1 resulting in the amino acid substitution p.S21P near the N-terminus of the channel. The cytoplasmic N-terminal region is evolutionarily conserved but its function has not been well characterized. ataxia3 homozygotes exhibit a severe disorder that includes ataxia, tremor, and juvenile lethality. Unlike Scn8a null mice, they retain partial hind limb function. The mutant transcript is stable but protein abundance is reduced and the mutant channel is not detected in its usual site of concentration at nodes of Ranvier. In whole cell patch-clamp studies of transfected ND7/23 cells which were maintained at 37°C, the mutant channel did not produce sodium current, and function was not restored by co-expression of β1 and β2 subunits. However, when tranfected cells were maintained at 30°C, the mutant channel generated voltage-dependent inward sodium currents with an average peak current density comparable to wildtype, demonstrating recovery of channel activity. Immunohistochemistry of primary cerebellar granule cells from ataxia3 mice demonstrated that the mutant protein is retained in the cis-Golgi. This trafficking defect can account for the low level of Nav1.6-S21P at nodes of Ranvier in vivo and at the surface of transfected cells. The data demonstrate that the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of the sodium channel is required for anterograde transport from the Golgi complex to the plasma membrane. PMID:19261867

  16. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  17. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  18. The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Sugai, Manabu; Mori, Kentaro; Yokota, Yoshifumi

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Sodium arsenite induces cytoplasmic accumulation of Id3. •Arsenite binds to closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3. •N-terminal cysteines are essential for arsenite-induced nuclear export of Id3. •Nuclear export of Id3 counteracts its transcriptional repression activity. -- Abstract: Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite.

  19. Amino acid sequence of tyrosinase from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, K

    1978-01-01

    The amino-acid sequence of tyrosinase from Neurospora crassa (monophenol,dihydroxyphenylalanine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1) is reported. This copper-containing oxidase consists of a single polypeptide chain of 407 amino acids. The primary structure was determined by automated and manual sequence analysis on fragments produced by cleavage with cyanogen bromide and on peptides obtained by digestion with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, or chymotrypsin. The amino terminus of the protein is acetylated and the single cysteinyl residue 96 is covalently linked via a thioether bridge to histidyl residue 94. The formation and the possible role of this unusual structure in Neurospora tyrosinase is discussed. Dye-sensitized photooxidation of apotyrosinase and active-site-directed inactivation of the native enzyme indicate the possible involvement of histidyl residues 188, 192, 289, and 305 or 306 as ligands to the active-site copper as well as in the catalytic mechanism of this monooxygenase. PMID:151279

  20. N-Terminal Presequence-Independent Import of Phosphofructokinase into Hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Petr; Makki, Abhijith Radhakrishna; Zimorski, Verena; Garg, Sriram; Hampl, Vladimír; Hrdý, Ivan; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial evolution entailed the origin of protein import machinery that allows nuclear-encoded proteins to be targeted to the organelle, as well as the origin of cleavable N-terminal targeting sequences (NTS) that allow efficient sorting and import of matrix proteins. In hydrogenosomes and mitosomes, reduced forms of mitochondria with reduced proteomes, NTS-independent targeting of matrix proteins is known. Here, we studied the cellular localization of two glycolytic enzymes in the anaerobic pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis: PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase (TvPPi-PFK), which is the main glycolytic PFK activity of the protist, and ATP-dependent PFK (TvATP-PFK), the function of which is less clear. TvPPi-PFK was detected predominantly in the cytosol, as expected, while all four TvATP-PFK paralogues were imported into T. vaginalis hydrogenosomes, although none of them possesses an NTS. The heterologous expression of TvATP-PFK in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed an intrinsic capability of the protein to be recognized and imported into yeast mitochondria, whereas yeast ATP-PFK resides in the cytosol. TvATP-PFK consists of only a catalytic domain, similarly to “short” bacterial enzymes, while ScATP-PFK includes an N-terminal extension, a catalytic domain, and a C-terminal regulatory domain. Expression of the catalytic domain of ScATP-PFK and short Escherichia coli ATP-PFK in T. vaginalis resulted in their partial delivery to hydrogenosomes. These results indicate that TvATP-PFK and the homologous ATP-PFKs possess internal structural targeting information that is recognized by the hydrogenosomal import machinery. From an evolutionary perspective, the predisposition of ancient ATP-PFK to be recognized and imported into hydrogenosomes might be a relict from the early phases of organelle evolution. PMID:26475173

  1. Micellar environments induce structuring of the N-terminal tail of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Renner, Christian; Fiori, Stella; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Landgraf, Dirk; Deluca, Dominga; Mentler, Matthias; Grantner, Klaus; Parak, Fritz G; Kretzschmar, Hans; Moroder, Luis

    2004-03-01

    In the physiological form, the prion protein is a glycoprotein tethered to the cell surface via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, consisting of a largely alpha-helical globular C-terminal domain and an unstructured N-terminal portion. This unstructured part of the protein contains four successive octapeptide repeats, which were shown to bind up to four Cu(2+) ions in a cooperative manner. To mimic the location of the protein on the cell membrane and to analyze possible structuring effects of the lipid/water interface, the conformational preferences of a single octapeptide repeat and its tetrameric form, as well of the fragment 92-113, proposed as an additional copper binding site, were comparatively analyzed in aqueous and dodecylphosphocholine micellar solution as a membrane mimetic. While for the downstream fragment 92-113 no conformational effects were detectable in the presence of DPC micelles by CD and NMR, both the single octapeptide repeat and, in an even more pronounced manner, its tetrameric form are restricted into well-defined conformations. Because of the repetitive character of the rigid structural subdomain in the tetrarepeat molecule, the spatial arrangement of these identical motifs could not be resolved by NMR analysis. However, the polyvalent nature of the repetitive subunits leads to a remarkably enhanced interaction with the micelles, which is not detectably affected by copper complexation. These results strongly suggest interactions of the cellular form of PrP (PrP(c)) N-terminal tail with the cell membrane surface at least in the octapeptide repeat region with preorganization of these sequence portions for copper complexation. There are sufficient experimental facts known that support a physiological role of copper complexation by the octapeptide repeat region of PrP(c) such as a copper-buffering role of the PrP(c) protein on the extracellular surface. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Functional differences between HOX proteins conferred by two residues in the homeodomain N-terminal arm.

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, M L; Sadoul, R; Featherstone, M S

    1994-01-01

    Hox genes encode homeodomain-containing transcriptional regulators that function during development to specify positional identity along embryonic axes. The homeodomain is composed of a flexible N-terminal arm and three alpha helices, and it differentially binds DNA. A number of homeodomains recognize sites containing a TAAT core motif. The product of the murine Hoxd-4 (Hox-4.2) gene functions in a positive autoregulatory fashion in P19 cells that is dependent on two TAAT motifs in the Hoxd-4 promoter. This effect is specific in that murine HOXA-1 (HOX-1.6) is unable to activate transcription through the Hoxd-4 autoregulatory element. Here we show that this is due to an inability of the HOXA-1 homeodomain to bind a HOXD-4 recognition site effectively. We have produced chimeras between HOXD-4 and HOXA-1 to map specific residues responsible for this functional difference. When positions 2 and 3 in the N-terminal arm of HOXA-1 were converted to HOXD-4 identity, both strong DNA binding and transcriptional activation were rescued. This substitution appears to confer an increased DNA-binding ability on the HOXA-1 homeodomain, since we were unable to detect a high-affinity recognition sequence for HOXA-1 in a randomized pool of DNA probes. The contribution of position 3 to DNA binding has been implicated by structural studies, but this is the first report of the importance of position 2 in regulating homeodomain-DNA interactions. Additionally, specific homeodomain residues that confer major differences in DNA binding and transcriptional activation between Hox gene products have not been previously determined. Identity at these two positions is generally conserved among paralogs but varies between Hox gene subfamilies. As a result, these residues may be important for the regulation of target gene expression by specific Hox products. Images PMID:7913516

  3. The N-terminal domain plays a crucial role in the structure of a full-length human mitochondrial Lon protease

    PubMed Central

    Kereïche, Sami; Kováčik, Lubomír; Bednár, Jan; Pevala, Vladimír; Kunová, Nina; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Bauer, Jacob; Ambro, Ľuboš; Bellová, Jana; Kutejová, Eva; Raška, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Lon is an essential, multitasking AAA+ protease regulating many cellular processes in species across all kingdoms of life. Altered expression levels of the human mitochondrial Lon protease (hLon) are linked to serious diseases including myopathies, paraplegia, and cancer. Here, we present the first 3D structure of full-length hLon using cryo-electron microscopy. hLon has a unique three-dimensional structure, in which the proteolytic and ATP-binding domains (AP-domain) form a hexameric chamber, while the N-terminal domain is arranged as a trimer of dimers. These two domains are linked by a narrow trimeric channel composed likely of coiled-coil helices. In the presence of AMP-PNP, the AP-domain has a closed-ring conformation and its N-terminal entry gate appears closed, but in ADP binding, it switches to a lock-washer conformation and its N-terminal gate opens, which is accompanied by a rearrangement of the N-terminal domain. We have also found that both the enzymatic activities and the 3D structure of a hLon mutant lacking the first 156 amino acids are severely disturbed, showing that hLon’s N-terminal domains are crucial for the overall structure of the hLon, maintaining a conformation allowing its proper functioning. PMID:27632940

  4. The Solution Structure of the N-Terminal Domain of Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C Reveals a Platform for Tubulin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mayoral, Mª Flor; Castaño, Raquel; Fanarraga, Monica L.; Zabala, Juan Carlos; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C (TBCC) is a post-chaperonin involved in the folding and assembly of α- and β-tubulin monomers leading to the release of productive tubulin heterodimers ready to polymerize into microtubules. In this process it collaborates with other cofactors (TBC's A, B, D, and E) and forms a supercomplex with TBCD, β-tubulin, TBCE and α-tubulin. Here, we demonstrate that TBCC depletion results in multipolar spindles and mitotic failure. Accordingly, TBCC is found at the centrosome and is implicated in bipolar spindle formation. We also determine by NMR the structure of the N-terminal domain of TBCC. The TBCC N-terminal domain adopts a spectrin-like fold topology composed of a left-handed 3-stranded α-helix bundle. Remarkably, the 30-residue N-terminal segment of the TBCC N-terminal domain is flexible and disordered in solution. This unstructured region is involved in the interaction with tubulin. Our data lead us to propose a testable model for TBCC N-terminal domain/tubulin recognition in which the highly charged N-terminus as well as residues from the three helices and the loops interact with the acidic hypervariable regions of tubulin monomers. PMID:22028797

  5. Amino-acid sequence of toxin I from Anemonia sulcata.

    PubMed

    Wunderer, G; Eulitz, M

    1978-08-15

    Toxin I from Anemonia sulcata, a major component of the sea anemone venom, consists of 46 amino acid residues which are linked by three disulfide bridges. The [14C]carboxymethylated polypeptide was sequenced to position 29 by automated Edman degradation. The remaining sequence was determined from cyanogen bromide peptides and from tryptic peptides of the citraconylated [14C]carboxymethylated toxin. Toxin I is homologous to toxin II from Anemonia sulcata and to anthopleurin A, a toxin from the sea anemone Anthopleura xanthogrammica. These toxins constitute a new class of polypeptide toxins. No significant homologies exist with toxin III from Anemonia sulcata nor with known sequences of neurotoxins or cardiotoxins of various origin.

  6. Diversified Structural Basis of a Conserved Molecular Mechanism for pH-Dependent Dimerization in Spider Silk N-Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Otikovs, Martins; Chen, Gefei; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Meng, Qing; Jörnvall, Hans; Kronqvist, Nina; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jaudzems, Kristaps

    2015-08-17

    Conversion of spider silk proteins from soluble dope to insoluble fibers involves pH-dependent dimerization of the N-terminal domain (NT). This conversion is tightly regulated to prevent premature precipitation and enable rapid silk formation at the end of the duct. Three glutamic acid residues that mediate this process in the NT from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 are well conserved among spidroins. However, NTs of minor ampullate spidroins from several species, including Araneus ventricosus ((Av)MiSp NT), lack one of the glutamic acids. Here we investigate the pH-dependent structural changes of (Av)MiSp NT, revealing that it uses the same mechanism but involves a non-conserved glutamic acid residue instead. Homology modeling of the structures of other MiSp NTs suggests that these harbor different compensatory residues. This indicates that, despite sequence variations, the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent dimerization of NT is conserved among different silk types.

  7. Improved thermal performance of Thermomyces lanuginosus GH11 xylanase by engineering of an N-terminal disulfide bridge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawei; Fu, Zheng; Huang, Huoqing; Zhang, Huashan; Yao, Bin; Xiong, Hairong; Turunen, Ossi

    2012-05-01

    In order to increase the stability of thermophilic Thermomyces lanuginosus GH11 xylanase, TLX, a disulfide bridge Q1C-Q24C was introduced into the N-terminal region of the enzyme. The apparent temperature optimum shifted upwards at pH 6.5 by about 10°C to 75°C. The resistance to thermal inactivation also increased by about 10°C. The melting temperature measured by CD spectroscopy increased from 66 to 74°C. Therefore the N-terminal disulfide bridge increased both kinetic and thermodynamic stability almost equally. At pH 8 and 70°C, the disulfide bridge increased the enzyme half-life 20-fold in the presence of substrate. In contrast to the situation in acidic-neutral pH, the substrate decreased the thermostability of xylanases in alkaline pH. The upper limit for the performance of the disulfide bridge mutant at pH 9 was 75°C. This study showed that N-terminal disulfide bridges can stabilize even thermostable family GH11 xylanases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins are convenient translation enhancers in a human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Machida, Kodai; Masutani, Mamiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis systems are useful for the production of recombinant proteins. Productivity can be increased by supplementation with GADD34, a protein that is difficult to express in and purify from E. coli. Deletion of the N-terminal 120 or 240 amino acids of GADD34 improves recovery of this protein from E. coli without compromising its ability to boost protein synthesis in an in vitro protein synthesis system. The use of N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins in place of full-length GADD34 should improve the utility of human cell-based cell-free protein synthesis systems.

  9. Biochemical and Genetic Evidence that Enterococcus faecium L50 Produces Enterocins L50A and L50B, the sec-Dependent Enterocin P, and a Novel Bacteriocin Secreted without an N-Terminal Extension Termed Enterocin Q

    PubMed Central

    Cintas, Luis M.; Casaus, Pilar; Herranz, Carmen; Håvarstein, Leiv Sigve; Holo, Helge; Hernández, Pablo E.; Nes, Ingolf F.

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium L50 grown at 16 to 32°C produces enterocin L50 (EntL50), consisting of EntL50A and EntL50B, two unmodified non-pediocin-like peptides synthesized without an N-terminal leader sequence or signal peptide. However, the bacteriocin activity found in the cell-free culture supernatants following growth at higher temperatures (37 to 47°C) is not due to EntL50. A purification procedure including cation-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and reverse-phase liquid chromatography has shown that the antimicrobial activity is due to two different bacteriocins. Amino acid sequences obtained by Edman degradation and DNA sequencing analyses revealed that one is identical to the sec-dependent pediocin-like enterocin P produced by E. faecium P13 (L. M. Cintas, P. Casaus, L. S. Håvarstein, P. E. Hernández, and I. F. Nes, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:4321–4330, 1997) and the other is a novel unmodified non-pediocin-like bacteriocin termed enterocin Q (EntQ), with a molecular mass of 3,980. DNA sequencing analysis of a 963-bp region of E. faecium L50 containing the enterocin P structural gene (entP) and the putative immunity protein gene (entiP) reveals a genetic organization identical to that previously found in E. faecium P13. DNA sequencing analysis of a 1,448-bp region identified two consecutive but diverging open reading frames (ORFs) of which one, termed entQ, encodes a 34-amino-acid protein whose deduced amino acid sequence was identical to that obtained for EntQ by amino acid sequencing, showing that EntQ, similarly to EntL50A and EntL50B, is synthesized without an N-terminal leader sequence or signal peptide. The second ORF, termed orf2, was located immediately upstream of and in opposite orientation to entQ and encodes a putative immunity protein composed of 221 amino acids. Bacteriocin production by E. faecium L50 showed that EntP and EntQ are produced in the temperature range from 16 to 47°C and maximally detected at 47 and 37 to 47

  10. Impact of an N-terminal extension on the stability and activity of the GH11 xylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus.

    PubMed

    Song, Letian; Dumon, Claire; Siguier, Béatrice; André, Isabelle; Eneyskaya, Elena; Kulminskaya, Anna; Bozonnet, Sophie; O'Donohue, Michael Joseph

    2014-03-20

    To understand structure-function relationships in the N-terminal region of GH11 xylanases, the 17 N-terminal amino acids of the GH11 xylanase from Neocallimastix patriciarum (Np-Xyn) have been grafted onto the N-terminal extremity of the untypically short GH11 xylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus (Tx-Xyn), creating a hybrid enzyme denoted NTfus. The hybrid xylanase displayed properties (pH and temperature optima) similar to those of the parental enzyme, although thermostability was lowered, with the Tm value, being reduced by 5°C. Kinetic assays using oNP-Xylo-oligosaccharides (DP2 and 3) indicated that the N-extension did not procure more extensive substrate binding, even when further mutagenesis was performed to promote this. However, these experiments confirmed weak subsite -3 for both NTfus and the parental enzyme. The catalytic efficiency of NTfus was shown to be 17% higher than that of the parental enzyme on low viscosity wheat arabinoxylan and trials using milled wheat straw as the substrate revealed that NTfus released more substituted oligosaccharide products (Xyl/Ara=8.97±0.13 compared to Xyl/Ara=9.70±0.21 for the parental enzyme), suggesting that the hybrid enzyme possesses wider substrate selectivity. Combining either the parental enzyme or NTfus with the cellulolytic cocktail Accellerase 1500 boosted the impact of the latter on wheat straw, procuring yields of solubilized xylose and glucose of 23 and 24% of theoretical yield, respectively, thus underlining the benefits of added xylanase activity when using this cellulase cocktail. Overall, in view of the results obtained for NTfus, we propose that the N-terminal extension leads to the modification of a putative secondary substrate binding site, a hypothesis that is highly consistent with previous data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. NFAT2 Isoforms Differentially Regulate Gene Expression, Cell Death, and Transformation through Alternative N-Terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Pedro I; Faget, Douglas V; Pachulec, Emilia; Robaina, Marcela C; Klumb, Claudete E; Robbs, Bruno K; Viola, João P B

    2016-01-01

    The NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) family of transcription factors is composed of four calcium-responsive proteins (NFAT1 to -4). The NFAT2 (also called NFATc1) gene encodes the isoforms NFAT2α and NFAT2β that result mainly from alternative initiation exons that provide two different N-terminal transactivation domains. However, the specific roles of the NFAT2 isoforms in cell physiology remain unclear. Because previous studies have shown oncogenic potential for NFAT2, this study emphasized the role of the NFAT2 isoforms in cell transformation. Here, we show that a constitutively active form of NFAT2α (CA-NFAT2α) and CA-NFAT2β distinctly control death and transformation in NIH 3T3 cells. While CA-NFAT2α strongly induces cell transformation, CA-NFAT2β leads to reduced cell proliferation and intense cell death through the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). CA-NFAT2β also increases cell death and upregulates Fas ligand (FasL) and TNF-α in CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that differential roles of NFAT2 isoforms in NIH 3T3 cells depend on the N-terminal domain, where the NFAT2β-specific N-terminal acidic motif is necessary to induce cell death. Interestingly, the NFAT2α isoform is upregulated in Burkitt lymphomas, suggesting an isoform-specific involvement of NFAT2 in cancer development. Finally, our data suggest that alternative N-terminal domains of NFAT2 could provide differential mechanisms for the control of cellular functions.

  12. The N-Terminal Domain of the Tomato Immune Protein Prf Contains Multiple Homotypic and Pto Kinase Interaction Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Isabel Marie-Luise; Conlan, Brendon Francis; Rathjen, John Paul

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is conferred by the Prf recognition complex, composed of the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeats protein Prf and the protein kinase Pto. The complex is activated by recognition of the P. syringae effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. The N-terminal domain is responsible for Prf homodimerization, which brings two Pto kinases into close proximity and holds them in inactive conformation in the absence of either effector. Negative regulation is lost by effector binding to the catalytic cleft of Pto, leading to disruption of its P+1 loop within the activation segment. This change is translated through Prf to a second Pto molecule in the complex. Here we describe a schematic model of the unique Prf N-terminal domain dimer and its interaction with the effector binding determinant Pto. Using heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, we define multiple sites of N domain homotypic interaction and infer that it forms a parallel dimer folded centrally to enable contact between the N and C termini. Furthermore, we found independent binding sites for Pto at either end of the N-terminal domain. Using the constitutively active mutant ptoL205D, we identify a potential repression site for Pto in the first ∼100 amino acids of Prf. Finally, we find that the Prf leucine-rich repeats domain also binds the N-terminal region, highlighting a possible mechanism for transfer of the effector binding signal to the NB-LRR regulatory unit (consisting of a central nucleotide binding and C-terminal leucine-rich repeats). PMID:25792750

  13. The N-terminal domain of the tomato immune protein Prf contains multiple homotypic and Pto kinase interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Saur, Isabel Marie-Luise; Conlan, Brendon Francis; Rathjen, John Paul

    2015-05-01

    Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is conferred by the Prf recognition complex, composed of the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeats protein Prf and the protein kinase Pto. The complex is activated by recognition of the P. syringae effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. The N-terminal domain is responsible for Prf homodimerization, which brings two Pto kinases into close proximity and holds them in inactive conformation in the absence of either effector. Negative regulation is lost by effector binding to the catalytic cleft of Pto, leading to disruption of its P+1 loop within the activation segment. This change is translated through Prf to a second Pto molecule in the complex. Here we describe a schematic model of the unique Prf N-terminal domain dimer and its interaction with the effector binding determinant Pto. Using heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, we define multiple sites of N domain homotypic interaction and infer that it forms a parallel dimer folded centrally to enable contact between the N and C termini. Furthermore, we found independent binding sites for Pto at either end of the N-terminal domain. Using the constitutively active mutant ptoL205D, we identify a potential repression site for Pto in the first ∼100 amino acids of Prf. Finally, we find that the Prf leucine-rich repeats domain also binds the N-terminal region, highlighting a possible mechanism for transfer of the effector binding signal to the NB-LRR regulatory unit (consisting of a central nucleotide binding and C-terminal leucine-rich repeats). © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. N-terminal motifs in some plant disease resistance proteins function in membrane attachment and contribute to disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Daigo; Rafiqi, Maryam; Hurley, Ursula; Lawrence, Greg J; Bernoux, Maud; Hardham, Adrienne R; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N; Jones, David A

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of N-terminal domains of plant disease resistance proteins in membrane targeting, the N termini of a number of Arabidopsis and flax disease resistance proteins were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the fusion proteins localized in planta using confocal microscopy. The N termini of the Arabidopsis RPP1-WsB and RPS5 resistance proteins and the PBS1 protein, which is required for RPS5 resistance, targeted GFP to the plasma membrane, and mutation of predicted myristoylation and potential palmitoylation sites resulted in a shift to nucleocytosolic localization. The N-terminal domain of the membrane-attached Arabidopsis RPS2 resistance protein was targeted incompletely to the plasma membrane. In contrast, the N-terminal domains of the Arabidopsis RPP1-WsA and flax L6 and M resistance proteins, which carry predicted signal anchors, were targeted to the endomembrane system, RPP1-WsA to the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, L6 to the Golgi apparatus, and M to the tonoplast. Full-length L6 was also targeted to the Golgi apparatus. Site-directed mutagenesis of six nonconserved amino acid residues in the signal anchor domains of L6 and M was used to change the localization of the L6 N-terminal fusion protein to that of M and vice versa, showing that these residues control the targeting specificity of the signal anchor. Replacement of the signal anchor domain of L6 by that of M did not affect L6 protein accumulation or resistance against flax rust expressing AvrL567 but removal of the signal anchor domain reduced L6 protein accumulation and L6 resistance, suggesting that membrane attachment is required to stabilize the L6 protein.

  15. NFAT2 Isoforms Differentially Regulate Gene Expression, Cell Death, and Transformation through Alternative N-Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Pedro I.; Faget, Douglas V.; Pachulec, Emilia; Robaina, Marcela C.; Klumb, Claudete E.

    2015-01-01

    The NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) family of transcription factors is composed of four calcium-responsive proteins (NFAT1 to -4). The NFAT2 (also called NFATc1) gene encodes the isoforms NFAT2α and NFAT2β that result mainly from alternative initiation exons that provide two different N-terminal transactivation domains. However, the specific roles of the NFAT2 isoforms in cell physiology remain unclear. Because previous studies have shown oncogenic potential for NFAT2, this study emphasized the role of the NFAT2 isoforms in cell transformation. Here, we show that a constitutively active form of NFAT2α (CA-NFAT2α) and CA-NFAT2β distinctly control death and transformation in NIH 3T3 cells. While CA-NFAT2α strongly induces cell transformation, CA-NFAT2β leads to reduced cell proliferation and intense cell death through the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). CA-NFAT2β also increases cell death and upregulates Fas ligand (FasL) and TNF-α in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that differential roles of NFAT2 isoforms in NIH 3T3 cells depend on the N-terminal domain, where the NFAT2β-specific N-terminal acidic motif is necessary to induce cell death. Interestingly, the NFAT2α isoform is upregulated in Burkitt lymphomas, suggesting an isoform-specific involvement of NFAT2 in cancer development. Finally, our data suggest that alternative N-terminal domains of NFAT2 could provide differential mechanisms for the control of cellular functions. PMID:26483414

  16. Lactobacillus kefiri shows inter-strain variations in the amino acid sequence of the S-layer proteins.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Mariano; Carasi, Paula; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Trejo, Sebastián A; Serradell, María de Los Angeles

    2017-04-01

    The S-layer is a proteinaceous envelope constituted by subunits that self-assemble to form a two-dimensional lattice that covers the surface of different species of Bacteria and Archaea, and it could be involved in cell recognition of microbes among other several distinct functions. In this work, both proteomic and genomic approaches were used to gain knowledge about the sequences of the S-layer protein (SLPs) encoding genes expressed by six aggregative and sixteen non-aggregative strains of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus kefiri. Peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) analysis confirmed the identity of SLPs extracted from L. kefiri, and based on the homology with phylogenetically related species, primers located outside and inside the SLP-genes were employed to amplify genomic DNA. The O-glycosylation site SASSAS was found in all L. kefiri SLPs. Ten strains were selected for sequencing of the complete genes. The total length of the mature proteins varies from 492 to 576 amino acids, and all SLPs have a calculated pI between 9.37 and 9.60. The N-terminal region is relatively conserved and shows a high percentage of positively charged amino acids. Major differences among strains are found in the C-terminal region. Different groups could be distinguished regarding the mature SLPs and the similarities observed in the PMF spectra. Interestingly, SLPs of the aggregative strains are 100% homologous, although these strains were isolated from different kefir grains. This knowledge provides relevant data for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in SLPs functionality and could contribute to the development of products of biotechnological interest from potentially probiotic bacteria.

  17. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex.

  18. Atomistic mechanisms of huntingtin N-terminal fragment insertion on a phospholipid bilayer revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Côté, Sébastien; Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-07-01

    The huntingtin protein is characterized by a segment of consecutive glutamines (Q(N)) that is responsible for its fibrillation. As with other amyloid proteins, misfolding of huntingtin is related to Huntington's disease through pathways that can involve interactions with phospholipid membranes. Experimental results suggest that the N-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (htt(NT)) positioned just before the Q(N) region is important for the binding of huntingtin to membranes. Through all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, we unveil the structure and dynamics of the htt(NT)Q(N) fragment on a phospholipid membrane at the atomic level. We observe that the insertion dynamics of this peptide can be described by four main steps-approach, reorganization, anchoring, and insertion-that are very diverse at the atomic level. On the membrane, the htt(NT) peptide forms a stable α-helix essentially parallel to the membrane with its nonpolar side-chains-mainly Leu-4, Leu-7, Phe-11 and Leu-14-positioned in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Salt-bridges involving Glu-5, Glu-12, Lys-6, and Lys-15, as well as hydrogen bonds involving Thr-3 and Ser-13 with the phospholipids also stabilize the structure and orientation of the htt(NT) peptide. These observations do not significantly change upon adding the Q(N) region whose role is rather to provide, through its hydrogen bonds with the phospholipids' head group, a stable scaffold facilitating the partitioning of the htt(NT) region in the membrane. Moreover, by staying accessible to the solvent, the amyloidogenic Q(N) region could also play a key role for the oligomerization of htt(NT)Q(N) on phospholipid membranes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor drives its nuclear localization in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dar, Javid A; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Eisermann, Kurtis; Isharwal, Sudhir; Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Androgen-independent nuclear localization is required for androgen receptor (AR) transactivation in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should be a key step leading to castration resistance. However, mechanism(s) leading to androgen-independent AR nuclear localization are poorly understood. Since the N-terminal domain (NTD) of AR plays a role in transactivation under androgen-depleted conditions, we investigated the role of the NTD in AR nuclear localization in CRPC. Deletion mutagenesis was used to identify amino acid sequences in the NTD essential for its androgen-independent nuclear localization in C4-2, a widely used CRPC cell line. Deletion mutants of AR tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the 5'-end were generated and their signal distribution was investigated in C4-2 cells by fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the region of a.a. 294-556 was required for androgen-independent AR nuclear localization whereas a.a. 1-293 mediates Hsp90 regulation of AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Although the region of a.a. 294-556 does not contain a nuclear import signal, it was able to enhance DHT-induced import of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Also, transactivation of the NTD could be uncoupled from its modulation of AR nuclear localization in C4-2 cells. These observations suggest an important role of the NTD in AR intracellular trafficking and androgen-independent AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Study of Oligomer Formation by N-Terminally Truncated Amyloid β-Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meral, Derya; Urbanc, Brigita

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid β-protein (Aβ) self–assembles into toxic oligomers. Of the two predominant Aβ alloforms, Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42, the latter is particularly strongly linked to AD. N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamated Aβ peptides were recently shown to seed Aβ aggregation and contribute significantly to Aβ–mediated toxicity, yet their folding and assembly were not explored computationally. Discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) approach previously captured in vitro–derived distinct Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 oligomer size distributions and predicted that the more toxic Aβ1–42 oligomers had more flexible and solvent exposed N-termini than Aβ1–40 oligomers. Here, we examined oligomer formation of Aβ3–40, Aβ3–42, Aβ11–40, and Aβ11–42 by the DMD approach. The four N-terminally truncated peptides showed increased oligomerization propensity relative to the full–length peptides, consistent with in vitro findings. Conformations formed by Aβ3–40/42 had significantly more flexible and solvent–exposed N-termini than Aβ1–40/42 conformations. In contrast, in Aβ11–40/42 conformations the N-termini formed more contacts and were less accessible to the solvent. The compactness of the Aβ11–40/42 conformations was in part facilitated by Val12. Two single amino acid substitutions that reduced and abolished hydrophobicity at position 12, respectively, resulted in a proportionally increased structural variability. Our results suggest that Aβ11–40 and Aβ11–42 oligomers might be less toxic than Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 oligomers and offer a plausible explanation for the experimentally–observed increased toxicity of Aβ3–40 and Aβ3–42 and their pyroglutamated forms. PMID:23500806

  1. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Rasulova, Fatima S.; Melnikov, Edward E.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Rotanova, Tatyana V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The medium-resolution structure of the N-terminal fragment of E. coli Lon protease shows that this part of the enzyme consists of two compact domains and a very long α-helix. The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1–245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 Å resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal α-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1–117), which consists mostly of β-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  2. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  3. The complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequence of guinea pig endometrial prorelaxin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y A; Bryant-Greenwood, G D; Mandel, M; Greenwood, F C

    1992-03-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the relaxin gene transcript in the endometrium of the late pregnant guinea pig has been determined. The strategy used was a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers designed from the mRNA sequence of porcine preprorelaxin, rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR, and blunt end cloning in M13 mp18. With heterologous primers, a 226-basepair (bp) segment of the guinea pig relaxin gene sequence was obtained and was used to design a guinea pig-specific primer for use with the rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR method. The latter allowed completion of the sequence of 336 bp, with a 96-bp overlap. The sequence obtained shows greater homology at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels with porcine and human relaxins H1 and H2 than with rat relaxin, supporting the thesis that the guinea pig is not a rodent. The transcription of the guinea pig endometrial relaxin gene during pregnancy was confirmed by Northern analysis of guinea pig endometrial tissues with a species-specific cDNA probe. The endometrial relaxin gene is transcribed during pregnancy, but not in lactation, consistent with the observed immunostaining for relaxin.

  4. N-Terminal Acetylation Acts as an Avidity Enhancer Within an Interconnected Multiprotein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Daniel C.; Monda, Julie K.; Bennett, Eric J.; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-10-25

    Although many eukaryotic proteins are amino (N)-terminally acetylated, structural mechanisms by which N-terminal acetylation mediates protein interactions are largely unknown. Here, we found that N-terminal acetylation of the E2 enzyme, Ubc12, dictates distinctive E3-dependent ligation of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to Cul1. Structural, biochemical, biophysical, and genetic analyses revealed how complete burial of Ubc12's N-acetyl-methionine in a hydrophobic pocket in the E3, Dcn1, promotes cullin neddylation. The results suggest that the N-terminal acetyl both directs Ubc12's interactions with Dcn1 and prevents repulsion of a charged N terminus. Our data provide a link between acetylation and ubiquitin-like protein conjugation and define a mechanism for N-terminal acetylation-dependent recognition.

  5. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  6. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  7. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-01-01

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  8. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  9. The amino acid sequence of rabbit cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed Central

    Grand, R J; Wilkinson, J M

    1976-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of troponin I from rabbit cardiac muscle was determined by the isolation of four unique CNBr fragments, together with overlapping tryptic peptides containing radioactive methionine residues. Overlap data for residues 35-36, 93-94 and 140-145 are incomplete, the sequence at these positions being based on homology with the sequence of the fast-skeletal-muscle protein. Cardiac troponin I is a single polypeptide chain of 206 residues with mol.wt. 23550 and an extinction coefficient, E 1%,1cm/280, of 4.37. The protein has a net positive charge of 14 and is thus somewhat more basic than troponin I from fast-skeletal muscle. Comparison of the sequences of troponin I from cardiac and fast skeletal muscle show that the cardiac protein has 26 extra residues at the N-terminus which account for the larger size of the protein. In the remainder of sequence there is a considerable degree of homology, this being greater in the C-terminal two-thirds of the molecule. The region in the cardiac protein corresponding to the peptide with inhibitory activity from the fast-skeletal-muscle protein is very similar and it seems unlikely that this is the cause of the difference in inhibitory activity between the two proteins. The region responsible for binding troponin C, however, possesses a lower degree of homology. Detailed evidence on which the sequence is based has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50072 (20 pages), at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7QB, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1976) 153, 5. PMID:1008822

  10. Amino acid sequence of a mouse immunoglobulin mu chain.

    PubMed Central

    Kehry, M; Sibley, C; Fuhrman, J; Schilling, J; Hood, L E

    1979-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the mouse mu chain from the BALB/c myeloma tumor MOPC 104E is reported. The C mu region contains four consecutive homology regions of approximately 110 residues and a COOH-terminal region of 19 residues. A comparison of this mu chain from mouse with a complete mu sequence from human (Ou) and a partial mu chain sequence from dog (Moo) reveals a striking gradient of increasing homology from the NH2-terminal to the COOH-terminal portion of these mu chains, with the former being the least and the latter the most highly conserved. Four of the five sites of carbohydrate attachment appear to be at identical residue positions when the constant regions of the mouse and human mu chains are compared. The mu chain of MOPC 104E has a carbohydrate moiety attached in the second hypervariable region. This is particularly interesting in view of the fact that MOPC 104E binds alpha-(1 leads to 3)-dextran, a simple carbohydrate. The structural and functional constraints imposed by these comparative sequence analyses are discussed. PMID:111247

  11. Bacteriorhodopsin: partial sequence of mRNA provides amino acid sequence in the precursor region.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S H; Majumdar, A; Dunn, R; Makabe, O; RajBhandary, U L; Khorana, H G; Ohtsuka, E; Tanaka, T; Taniyama, Y O; Ikehara, M

    1981-01-01

    mRNA for bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium halobium has been partially purified. By using this mRNA as template in the presence of reverse transcriptase RNA-dependent DNA nucleotidyltransferase and a 5'-[32P] synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide corresponding to amino acids 9-12 of bacteriorhodopsin as primer, we have isolated the major 5'-[32P]cDNA product, approximately 80 nucleotides long, and determined its sequence. Based on the cDNA sequence, the 5'-proximal sequence of bacteriorhodopsin mRNA is G-C-A-U-G-U-U-G-G-A-G-U-U-A-U-U-G-C-C-A-A-C-A-G-C-A-G-U-G-G-A-G-G-G-G-G-U-A-U-C -G-C-A-G-G-C-C-C-A-G-A-U-C-A-C-C-G-G-A-C-G-U-C-C-G. This includes the expected sequence for amino acids 1-8 and shows that bacteriorhodopsin is synthesized as a precursor that is at least 13 amino acids longer (Met-Leu-Glu-Leu-Leu-Pro-Thr-Ala-Val-Glu-Gly-Val-Ser) at the NH2 terminus. Agarose/urea gel electrophoresis of the partially purified mRNA showed several bands; of these, a major one hybridized with 5'-[32P]cDNA. These results suggest that the bacteriorhodopsin mRNA in the partially purified preparation is homogeneous in size and that it constitutes a substantial portion of the RNA preparation subjected to electrophoresis. Images PMID:6943548

  12. Highly heterologous region in the N-terminal extracellular domain of reptilian follitropin receptors.

    PubMed

    Akazome, Y; Ogasawara, O; Park, M K; Mori, T

    1996-12-01

    The primary structure of the N-terminal extracellular region of the follitropin receptor (FSH-R), which is thought to be responsible for hormone binding specificity, was determined in three reptilian species (tortoise, gecko, and lizard). Remarkably low sequence homologies were detected in the C-terminal part of the extracellular domain. This region was estimated to be a part of exon 10, which is the last exon of the FSH-R gene. In this region, not only were low homologies detected among the three reptilian species, but also specific deletions and/or insertions were found. In particular, large deletions were detected in squamate (gecko and lizard) FSH-Rs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these large deletions occurred recently, i.e., after the Triassic period. In another region characterized, sequence homologies were high, with tortoise-rat homology 78.4%, gecko-rat 64.7%, and lizard-rat 69.1%. In this highly conserved region, however, some reptile-specific alterations were detected, such as the loss of a cysteine residue in putative exon 7 and the existence of potential N-linked glycosylation sites in putative exon 9.

  13. Relationship between peptide amino acid sequence and membrane curvature generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Kuo, David; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Amphipathic peptides and amphipathic domains in proteins can perturb and restructure biological membranes. For example, it is believed that the cationic, amphipathic motif found in membrane active antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is responsible for their membrane disruption mechanisms of action. And ApoA-I, the main apolipoprotein in high density lipoprotein contains a series of amphipathic α-helical repeats which are responsible for its lipid associating properties. We use small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate the interaction of model cell membranes with prototypical AMPs and consensus peptides derived from the helical structural motif of ApoA-I. The relationship between peptide sequence and the peptide-induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane rearrangement and corresponding phase behavior induced by these two distinct classes of membrane restructuring peptides we will discuss the role of amino acid sequence on membrane curvature generation.