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  1. [Aristolochic acid nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy is a chronic, fibrosing, interstitial nephritis caused by aristolochic acid (AA), which is a component of the plants of Aristolochiacae family. It was first reported in 1993, in Belgium as a Chinese herb nephropathy, in patients who received a slimming regimen containing AA. The term aristolochic acid nephropathy also includes Balcan endemic nephropathy and other endemic tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Moreover, AA is a human carcinogen which induces urothelial cancer. The AA-containing herbs are banned in many countries and FDA published the warnings concerning the safety of AA-containing botanical remedies in 2000. Regarding the increasing interest in herbal medicines, uncontrolled access to botanical remedies and replacement of one herb by another AA-containing compounds makes thousands of people all around the world at risk of this grave disease.

  2. An Integrated View of Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy: Update of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jadot, Inès; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Nortier, Joëlle; Caron, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    The term “aristolochic acid nephropathy” (AAN) is used to include any form of toxic interstitial nephropathy that is caused either by ingestion of plants containing aristolochic acids (AA) as part of traditional phytotherapies (formerly known as “Chinese herbs nephropathy”), or by the environmental contaminants in food (Balkan endemic nephropathy). It is frequently associated with urothelial malignancies. Although products containing AA have been banned in most of countries, AAN cases remain regularly reported all over the world. Moreover, AAN incidence is probably highly underestimated given the presence of AA in traditional herbal remedies worldwide and the weak awareness of the disease. During these two past decades, animal models for AAN have been developed to investigate underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in AAN pathogenesis. Indeed, a more-in-depth understanding of these processes is essential to develop therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce the global and underestimated burden of this disease. In this regard, our purpose was to build a broad overview of what is currently known about AAN. To achieve this goal, we aimed to summarize the latest data available about underlying pathophysiological mechanisms leading to AAN development with a particular emphasis on the imbalance between vasoactive factors as well as a focus on the vascular events often not considered in AAN. PMID:28146082

  3. The epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of aristolochic acid nephropathy: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Gökmen, M Refik; Cosyns, Jean-Pierre; Arlt, Volker M; Stiborová, Marie; Phillips, David H; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Simmonds, Monique S J; Cook, H Terence; Vanherweghem, Jean-Louis; Nortier, Joëlle L; Lord, Graham M

    2013-03-19

    It has been 20 years since the first description of a rapidly progressive renal disease that is associated with the consumption of Chinese herbs containing aristolochic acid (AA) and is now termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Recent data have shown that AA is also the primary causative agent in Balkan endemic nephropathy and associated urothelial cancer. Aristolochic acid nephropathy is associated with a high long-term risk for renal failure and urothelial cancer, and the potential worldwide population exposure is enormous. This evidence-based review of the diagnostic approach to and management of AAN draws on the authors' experience with the largest and longest-studied combined cohort of patients with this condition. It is hoped that a better understanding of the importance of this underrecognized and severe condition will improve epidemiologic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies to reduce the global burden of this disease.

  4. Renal Protective Effects of 17β-Estradiol on Mice with Acute Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Li; Fu, Ping

    2016-10-18

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) is a progressive kidney disease caused by a Chinese herb containing aristolochic acid. Excessive death of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) characterized the acute phase of AAN. Therapies for acute AAN were limited, such as steroids and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs)/angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). It was interesting that, in acute AAN, female patients showed relative slower progression to renal failure than males. In a previous study, female hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) was found to attenuate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective role of E2 in acute AAN. Compared with male C57BL/6 mice of acute AAN, lower serum creatinine (SCr) and less renal injury, together with RTEC apoptosis in females, were found. Treatment with E2 in male AAN mice reduced SCr levels and attenuated renal tubular injury and RTEC apoptosis. In the mice kidney tissue and human renal proximal tubule cells (HK-2 cells), E2 both attenuated AA-induced cell apoptosis and downregulated the expression of phosphor-p53 (Ser15), p53, and cleaved-caspase-3. This study highlights that E2 exhibited protective effects on the renal injury of acute AAN in male mice by reducing RTEC apoptosis, which might be related to inhibiting the p53 signaling pathway.

  5. Bioinformatics facilitating the use of microarrays to delineate potential miRNA biomarkers in aristolochic acid nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Lu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) is a rapidly progressive acute or chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN). The present study attempted to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the miRNA-directed development of AAN. Our differentially expressed analysis identified 11 DE-miRNAs and retrieved the target genes of these DE-miRNAs; then, network analysis and functional analysis further identified 6 DE-miRNAs (has-miR-192, has-miR-194, has-miR-542-3p, has-miR-450a, has-miR-584, has-miR-33a) as phenotypic biomarkers of AAN. Surprisingly, of has-miR-192 has been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of AAN, and has-miR-194, has-miR-542-3p and has-miR-450a was first-time identified to link to the development of AAN. In addition, the expressional changes of has-miR-584 and has-miR-33a may be associated with the development of AAN as well, which must be further confirmed by the associated experiments. Taken together, our work reveals for the first time the regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs in the development of AAN and this will contribute to miRNA-based diagnosis and treatment of AAN. PMID:27418141

  6. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  7. Herbs and hazards: risk of aristolochic acid nephropathy in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Khodaie, Laleh; Nasri, Hamid; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Herbs are usually considered as inherently harmless products. Nonetheless, various renal injuries have been reported in association with several herbs. The best-known herb-induced chronic kidney disease is aristolochic acid nephropathy. Aristolochic acid is found in Chinese slim herbs. Balkan endemic nephropathy is nowadays considered as an aristolochic acid nephropathy. Plants of Aristolochiaceae (also known as birthwort, dutchman's pipe, and somersworth) is named zaravand or chopoghak in Persian and it grows in different mountainous and rural areas of Iran. The fruit and the steam of the Aristolochiacae are named zaravand gerd (nokhod alvand) and zaravand dearaz, respectively, and have different usage in Iranian teadirional such as treatment of headache, back pain, and anxiety. Some patients with end-stage renal disease and bilateral small kidneys have a history of exposure to some herbal remedies. We need to consider the possibility of environmental toxins and even Aristolochia nephrotoxicity as a potential danger in Iran.

  8. Bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder abusing an anabolic androgenic steroid.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Castano, Ekaterina; Moeckel, Gilbert; Perazella, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Bile acid nephropathy, also known as cholemic nephrosis or nephropathy, is an entity that can be seen in patients with severe cholestatic liver disease. It typically is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) with various forms of hepatic disease. Most often, patients with severe obstructive jaundice develop this lesion, which is thought to occur due to direct bile acid injury to tubular cells, as well as obstructing bile acid casts. Patients with end-stage liver disease also can develop AKI, in which case a more heterogeneous lesion occurs that includes hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular injury/necrosis. In this circumstance, acute tubular injury develops from a combination of hemodynamic changes with some contribution from direct bile acid-related tubular toxicity and obstructive bile casts. We present a case of AKI due to bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder who developed severe cholestatic liver disease in the setting of anabolic androgenic steroid use.

  9. The serum uric acid concentration is not causally linked to diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahola, Aila J; Sandholm, Niina; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Dahlström, Emma; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2017-02-21

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between uric acid concentration and progression of renal disease. Here we studied causality between the serum uric acid concentration and progression of diabetic nephropathy in 3895 individuals with type 1 diabetes in the FinnDiane Study. The renal status was assessed with the urinary albumin excretion rate and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline and at the end of the follow-up. Based on previous genomewide association studies on serum uric acid concentration, 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with good imputation quality were selected for the SNP score. This score was used to assess the causality between serum uric acid and renal complications using a Mendelian randomization approach. At baseline, the serum uric acid concentration was higher with worsening renal status. In multivariable Cox regression analyses, baseline serum uric acid concentration was not independently associated with progression of diabetic nephropathy over a mean follow-up of 7 years. However, over the same period, baseline serum uric acid was independently associated with the decline in eGFR. In the cross-sectional logistic regression analyses, the SNP score was associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Nevertheless, the Mendelian randomization showed no causality between uric acid and diabetic nephropathy, eGFR categories, or eGFR as a continuous variable. Thus, our results suggest that the serum uric acid concentration is not causally related to diabetic nephropathy but is a downstream marker of kidney damage.

  10. Correlation of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Song, Hai-Yan; Liu, Kai; An, Meng-Meng

    2015-01-01

    To detect the serum concentrations of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in patients with diabetic nephropathy and SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in renal tissue of db/db mice (C57BL/KsJ, diabetic nephropathy mice), thus preliminary exploration on the role of secreted protein acidic riches in cysteine in the development of diabetic nephropathy were carried out. Serum SPARC levels in normal subjects, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without diabetic nephropathy), chronic renal failure (without diabetes mellitus), and diabetic nephropathy were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. 12-week-old db/db mice (db/db group) and its littermate wild-type control mice (NC group) were selected with 6 from each group, and the kidney tissue were taken. RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence were used to detect the mRNA, targeted protein expressions of SPARC and the staining of renal tissue. The serum level of SPARC in diabetic nephropathy group was significantly higher than those in normal group, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and chronic renal failure group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The SPARC level in the type 2 diabetes mellitus group was higher than that in normal group (P < 0.05), but there was no difference between normal group and chronic renal failure. SPARC mRNA and protein levels in renal tissue of db/db mice were higher compared with the normal control group (P < 0.05). The long term hyperglycemic state in patients with diabetic nephropathy causes pathological change of renal tissue. Simultaneously, increased secretion of SPARC from renal tissue results in elevation of serum SPARC level. SPARC correlates with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, and it may play a role in pathological change of diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Influence of Different Levels of Lipoic Acid Synthase Gene Expression on Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Longquan; Hiller, Sylvia; Simington, Stephen; Nickeleit, Volker; Maeda, Nobuyo; James, Leighton R.; Yi, Xianwen

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) but outcomes of many clinical trials are controversial. To define the role of antioxidants in kidney protection during the development of diabetic nephropathy, we have generated a novel genetic antioxidant mouse model with over- or under-expression of lipoic acid synthase gene (Lias). These models have been mated with Ins2Akita/+ mice, a type I diabetic mouse model. We compare the major pathologic changes and oxidative stress status in two new strains of the mice with controls. Our results show that Ins2Akita/+ mice with under-expressed Lias gene, exhibit higher oxidative stress and more severe DN features (albuminuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening and mesangial matrix expansion). In contrast, Ins2Akita/+ mice with highly-expressed Lias gene display lower oxidative stress and less DN pathologic changes. Our study demonstrates that strengthening endogenous antioxidant capacity could be an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of DN. PMID:27706190

  12. Salvianolic acid A as a multifunctional agent ameliorates doxorubicin-induced nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hua-Ying; Yang, Ming-Yan; Qi, Dong; Zhang, Zuo-Kai; Zhu, Lin; Shang-Guan, Xiu-Xin; Liu, Ke; Xu, Hui; Che, Xin

    2015-07-21

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is still a therapeutic challenge. To date there is no ideal treatment. Evidence suggest that multidrug therapy has more effect than monotherapy in amelioration of renal injury. Salvianolic acid A (SAA) is the major active component of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Bunge. Previous studies have demonstrated that SAA is a multi-target agent and has various pharmacological activities. The pleiotropic properties of SAA predict its potential in the treatment of NS. The study investigated the effect of SAA on doxorubicin-induced nephropathy. The kidney function related-biochemical changes, hemorheological parameters and oxidative stress status were determined, and histological examination using light and transmission electron microcopies and western blot analysis were also performed. Results revealed that treatment with SAA alleviated histological damages, relieved proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, reduced oxidative stress, as well as improving hemorheology. Furthermore, SAA restored podocin expression, down-regulated the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-IκBα while up-regulating IκBα protein expression. Overall, as a multifunctional agent, SAA has a favorable renoprotection in doxorubicin-induced nephropathy. The anti-inflammation, antioxidant, amelioration of podocyte injury, improvement of hemorheology and hypolipidemic properties may constituent an important part of its therapeutic effects. All these indicate that SAA is likely to be a promising agent for NS.

  13. Salvianolic acid A as a multifunctional agent ameliorates doxorubicin-induced nephropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hua-Ying; Yang, Ming-Yan; Qi, Dong; Zhang, Zuo-Kai; Zhu, Lin; Shang-Guan, Xiu-Xin; Liu, Ke; Xu, Hui; Che, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is still a therapeutic challenge. To date there is no ideal treatment. Evidence suggest that multidrug therapy has more effect than monotherapy in amelioration of renal injury. Salvianolic acid A (SAA) is the major active component of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Bunge. Previous studies have demonstrated that SAA is a multi-target agent and has various pharmacological activities. The pleiotropic properties of SAA predict its potential in the treatment of NS. The study investigated the effect of SAA on doxorubicin-induced nephropathy. The kidney function related-biochemical changes, hemorheological parameters and oxidative stress status were determined, and histological examination using light and transmission electron microcopies and western blot analysis were also performed. Results revealed that treatment with SAA alleviated histological damages, relieved proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, reduced oxidative stress, as well as improving hemorheology. Furthermore, SAA restored podocin expression, down-regulated the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-IκBα while up-regulating IκBα protein expression. Overall, as a multifunctional agent, SAA has a favorable renoprotection in doxorubicin-induced nephropathy. The anti-inflammation, antioxidant, amelioration of podocyte injury, improvement of hemorheology and hypolipidemic properties may constituent an important part of its therapeutic effects. All these indicate that SAA is likely to be a promising agent for NS. PMID:26194431

  14. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analogue mitigates kidney injury in a rat model of radiation nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Fish, Brian; Wahl, Geneva; Sharma, Amit; Falck, John R; Paudyal, Mahesh P; Moulder, John E; Imig, John D; Cohen, Eric P

    2016-04-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) by CYP epoxygenases, and EETs are kidney protective in multiple pathologies. We determined the ability of an EET analogue, EET-A, to mitigate experimental radiation nephropathy. The kidney expression of the EET producing enzyme CYP2C11 was lower in rats that received total body irradiation (TBI rat) compared with non-irradiated control. At 12 weeks after TBI, the rats had higher systolic blood pressure and impaired renal afferent arteriolar function compared with control, and EET-A or captopril mitigated these abnormalities. The TBI rats had 3-fold higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN) compared with control, and EET-A or captopril decreased BUN by 40-60%. The urine albumin/creatinine ratio was increased 94-fold in TBI rats, and EET-A or captopril attenuated that increase by 60-90%. In TBI rats, nephrinuria was elevated 30-fold and EET-A or captopril decreased it by 50-90%. Renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular and glomerular injury were present in the TBI rats, and each was decreased by EET-A or captopril. We further demonstrated elevated renal parenchymal apoptosis in TBI rats, which was mitigated by EET-A or captopril. Additional studies revealed that captopril or EET-A mitigated renal apoptosis by acting on the p53/Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) apoptotic pathway. The present study demonstrates a novel EET analogue-based strategy for mitigation of experimental radiation nephropathy by improving renal afferent arteriolar function and by decreasing renal apoptosis.

  15. Effects of combined lipoic acid and pyridoxine on albuminuria, advanced glycation end-products, and blood pressure in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Noori, Nazanin; Tabibi, Hadi; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Hedayati, Mehdi; Nafar, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of combined administration of lipoic acid and pyridoxine on albuminuria, oxidative stress, blood pressure, serum advanced glycation end-products, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelin-1 in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Thirty-four patients were randomly assigned to either a supplement group or a placebo group. The patients in the supplement group received 800 mg lipoic acid and 80 mg pyridoxine daily for 12 weeks, whereas the placebo group received corresponding placebos. Urinary albumin, serum malondialdehyde (MDA), and systolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the supplement group compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Serum NO increased in the supplement group compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). Serum pentosidine and carboxymethyl lysine decreased significantly in the supplement group at the end of week 12 compared to baseline (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups in mean changes of serum endothelin-1, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. The present study indicates that combined administration of lipoic acid and pyridoxine improves albuminuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy by reducing oxidative stress, advanced glycation end-products, and systolic blood pressure. The reduction in microalbuminuria may be of benefit in retarding the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Oleanolic acid prevents progression of streptozotocin induced diabetic nephropathy and protects renal microstructures in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Vishal K.; Patil, Chandragouda R.; Kamble, Sarika M.; Tidke, Priti S.; Patil, Kalpesh R.; Maniya, Pragnesh J.; Jadhav, Ramchandra B.; Patil, Sudha P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on streptozotocin induced diabetic nephropathy in Sprague Dawley rats. Materials and Methods: Four weeks after intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 55 mg/kg), the rats with proteinuria were grouped as: Control (non-diabetic, treated orally with vehicle), diabetic control (treated orally with vehicle) and three diabetic groups receiving 20, 40 and 60 mg/kg/day oral doses of OA. At the end of 8 weeks, urine and serum samples from the rats were processed for determination of creatinine, BUN and GFR. The kidney samples were processed for determination of weight changes, oxidative stress related parameters like catalase, superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione levels. A part of one kidney from each rat was used for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Result: As evident in TEM, OA inhibited the nephropathy induced alterations in podocyte integrity, basement membrane thickness and spacing between the podocytes at 60 mg/kg dose. It increased GFR and reduced oxidative stress in the kidneys in a dose dependent manner. These findings conclusively demonstrate the efficacy of OA in diabetic nephropathy. Significant decrease in the oxidative stress in kidneys indicates the role of anti-oxidant mechanisms in the effects of OA. However, OA is known to act through multiple mechanisms like inhibition of the generation of advanced glycation end products and improving the insulin secretion. These mechanisms might have contributed to its efficacy. Conclusion: These results conclusively demonstrate the efficacy of OA in diabetic nephropathy through its possible antioxidant activity. PMID:23662024

  17. Dietary acid load and rapid progression to end-stage renal disease of diabetic nephropathy in Westernized South Asian people.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Else; Hospers, Frédérique A P; Navis, Gerjan; Engberink, Marielle F; Brink, Elizabeth J; Geleijnse, Johanna M; van Baak, Marleen A; Gans, Rijk O B; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is now the most common cause of end-stage renal failure in many countries of the world. Despite increasing implementation of preventive treatment, the chance that an individual diabetic patient will reach end-stage renal failure has been increasing rather than decreasing during recent decades. Current dietary habits in The Netherlands and the rest of the Western world are slowly shifting from relatively alkalinizing (e.g., potatoes and vegetables) toward more acidifying (e.g., rice and meat). Moreover, immigrants who consumed traditional diets in their homelands, usually adapt to Western dietary habits. This phenomenon of diet acculturation could, for instance, be involved in the up to 40 times higher chance of development of end-stage renal failure in association with diabetes in South-Asian immigrants compared with whites, in Western countries. High ingestion of nonvolatile acids with food increases susceptibility for progression to end-stage renal failure. These high dietary acid loads lead to compensatory increases in renal acid excretion and ammoniagenesis. The price paid for maintenance of acid-base homeostasis is renal tubulointerstitial injury, with subsequent decline in renal function and induction of hypertension. The tendency for metabolic acidosis that results from the changing dietary habits could be corrected by a shift toward more alkalinizing food. We hypothesize that promoting such a shift can prevent the epidemic of end-stage renal failure in diabetes.

  18. Reflux nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or other nervous system (neurological) conditions Reflux nephropathy can also occur from swelling of the ureters after a kidney transplant or from injury to the ureter. Risk factors ...

  19. Serum Uric Acid Level Predicts Progression of IgA Nephropathy in Females but Not in Males

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Shinzawa, Maki; Hasuike, Yukiko; Nagatoya, Katsuyuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Kuragano, Takayuki; Moriyama, Toshiki; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is one of most common forms of glomerulonephritis. At this point, the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on IgAN is not clear. The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on the progression of IgAN. Study Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting & Participants 935 IgAN patients who were diagnosed by kidney biopsy at Osaka University Hospital, Osaka General Hospital, and Osaka Rosai Hospital. were included in this study. Predictor Uric acid levels at renal biopsy. Outcomes The outcome of interest was the time from the kidney biopsy to the time when a 50% increase in the baseline serum creatinine level was observed, which was defined as "progression". Measurements The baseline characteristics according to the kidney biopsy at the time of diagnosis were collected from the medical records, and included age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (use of antidiabetic drugs), serum levels of creatinine, urinary protein, smoking status, RAAS blockers and steroid therapy. Results An elevated serum uric acid level was an independent risk factor for progression in female patients (per 1.0 mg/dL, multivariate-adjusted incident rate ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval 1.07, 1.64], P = 0.008) but not in male patients (1.02 [0.81, 1.29], P = 0.855). To control a confounding effect of renal function on an association between serum uric acid level and progression in female patients, age- and serum creatinine-matched and propensity score-matched analyses were performed, and these results also supported the effect by uric acid on kidney disease progression independent of basal kidney function. Limitations A cohort analyzed retorospectively. Conclusions This study revealed that an elevated uric acid level was an independent risk factor for ESKD in female IgAN patients. Therefore, uric acid might be a treatable target in female IgAN patients. PMID:27560997

  20. Dietary acid reduction with fruits and vegetables or bicarbonate attenuates kidney injury in patients with a moderately reduced glomerular filtration rate due to hypertensive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chanhee; Wesson, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    The neutralization of dietary acid with sodium bicarbonate decreases kidney injury and slows the decline of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. The sodium intake, however, could be problematic in patients with reduced GFR. As alkali-induced dietary protein decreased kidney injury in animals, we compared the efficacy of alkali-inducing fruits and vegetables with oral sodium bicarbonate to diminish kidney injury in patients with hypertensive nephropathy at stage 1 or 2 estimated GFR. All patients were evaluated 30 days after no intervention; daily oral sodium bicarbonate; or fruits and vegetables in amounts calculated to reduce dietary acid by half. All patients had 6 months of antihypertensive control by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition before and during these studies, and otherwise ate ad lib. Indices of kidney injury were not changed in the stage 1 group. By contrast, each treatment of stage 2 patients decreased urinary albumin, N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase, and transforming growth factor β from the controls to a similar extent. Thus, a reduction in dietary acid decreased kidney injury in patients with moderately reduced eGFR due to hypertensive nephropathy and that with fruits and vegetables was comparable to sodium bicarbonate. Fruits and vegetables appear to be an effective kidney protective adjunct to blood pressure reduction and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in hypertensive and possibly other nephropathies.

  1. Trans-10,cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid worsens renal pathology and alters cyclooxygenase derived oxylipins in obesity-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yang; Shi, Hong; Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Wu, Yinghong; Declercq, Vanessa; Taylor, Carla G; Zahradka, Peter; Ogborn, Malcolm R; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-02-01

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces indicators of early renal disease progression and the associated elevated cyclooxygenase (COX) levels in young obese rats with obesity-associated nephropathy (OAN). Therefore, renal function and injury and COX and its metabolites were assessed in obese fa/fa Zucker rats with more advanced renal disease. Obese rats at 16 weeks of age were provided with either cis(c)9, trans(t)11 (fa/fa-9,11) or t10,c12 (fa/fa-10,12) CLA for 8 weeks, and compared to lean (lean-CTL) and obese (fa/fa-CTL) rats provided the control diet without CLA. Obese rats displayed significantly reduced renal function and increased renal injury compared to lean rats. In the obese rat groups, glomerular hypertrophy was reduced in both CLA-supplemented groups. While all other measures of renal function or injury were not different in fa/fa-9,11 compared to fa/fa-CTL rats, the fa/fa-10,12 rats had greater renal hypertrophy, glomerular fibrosis, fibrosis, tubular casts and macrophage infiltration compared to the fa/fa-CTL and fa/fa-9,11 groups. The fa/fa-10,12 group also had elevated levels of renal COX1, which was associated with increased levels of two oxylipins produced by this enzyme, 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α), and thromboxane B₂. Renal linoleic acid and its lipoxygenase products also were lower in obese compared to lean rats, but CLA supplementation had no effect on these or any other lipoxygenase oxylipins. In summary, supplementation with c9,t11 CLA did not improve more advanced OAN and t10,c12 CLA worsened the renal pathology. Altered production of select COX1 derived oxylipins was associated with the detrimental effect of the t10,c12 isomer.

  2. Delayed treatment with oleanolic acid attenuates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in chronic cyclosporine nephropathy through Nrf2/HO-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is known to protect against tissue injury by orchestrating antioxidant and detoxification responses to oxidative stress. This study investigated whether upregulation of Nrf2-dependent signaling by oleanolic acid (OA), which is known to activate Nrf2, could attenuate renal inflammation and fibrosis in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced kidney injury. Methods Male ICR mice were divided into four treatment groups: Vehicle (VH, n = 6), VH + OA (n = 6), CsA (n = 8), and CsA + OA (n = 8). For the OA-treated groups, OA (25 mg/kg/day) was administered by intraperitoneal injection for the final week of the 4-week experimental period. Renal function, morphologies and signaling were evaluated at the end of the study. Results Treatment with CsA resulted in decreased kidney function and urine osmolality and increased urine volume and urinary albumin levels. The CsA-induced changes were improved by OA treatment. Specifically, administration of OA decreased tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation scores that were increased in CsA-treated mice. Furthermore, OA treatment decreased urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels. The beneficial effects of OA were attributed to an increased ratio of nuclear/total Nrf2 and subsequently enhanced expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, as well as a stable level of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) expression, indicating that OA enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Increased apoptotic cell death and a high ratio of B cell leukaemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) to Bcl-2 in CsA-treated mice were also significantly ameliorated by OA treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that OA activates Nrf2/HO-1 signaling in chronic CsA nephropathy, which may have beneficial effects on inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24559268

  3. Aristolochic acid exposure in Romania and implications for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turesky, Robert J; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Brennan, Paul; Mates, Dana; Jinga, Viorel; Harnden, Patricia; Banks, Rosamonde E; Blanche, Helene; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Chopard, Priscilia; Letourneau, Louis; Lathrop, G Mark; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aristolochic acid (AA) is a nephrotoxicant associated with AA nephropathy (AAN) and upper urothelial tract cancer (UUTC). Whole-genome sequences of 14 Romanian cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) recently exhibited mutational signatures consistent with AA exposure, although RCC had not been previously linked with AAN and AA exposure was previously reported only in localised rural areas. Methods: We performed mass spectrometric measurements of the aristolactam (AL) DNA adduct 7-(deoxyadenosin-N6-yl) aristolactam I (dA-AL-I) in nontumour renal tissues of the 14 Romanian RCC cases and 15 cases from 3 other countries. Results: We detected dA-AL-I in the 14 Romanian cases at levels ranging from 0.7 to 27 adducts per 108 DNA bases, in line with levels reported in Asian and Balkan populations exposed through herbal remedies or food contamination. The 15 cases from other countries were negative. Interpretation: Although the source of exposure is uncertain and likely different in AAN regions than elsewhere, our results demonstrate that AA exposure in Romania exists outside localised AAN regions and provide further evidence implicating AA in RCC. PMID:26657656

  4. [Lithium nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Ireneusz; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are the first-line drug therapy in the treatment of uni- and bipolar disorder since the sixties of the twentieth century. In the mid-70s, the first information about their nephrotoxicity appeared. Lithium salts have a narrow therapeutic index. Side effects during treatment are polyuria, polydipsia and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Accidental intoxication can cause acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy while receiving long-term lithium salt can lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. The renal biopsy changes revealed a type of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. The imaging studies revealed the presence of numerous symmetric microcysts. Care of the patient receiving lithium should include regular determination of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and monitoring of urine volume. In case of deterioration of renal function reducing the dose should be considered.

  5. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  6. Isogenic mesenchymal stem cells transplantation improves a rat model of chronic aristolochic acid nephropathy via upregulation of hepatic growth factor and downregulation of transforming growth factor β1.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Hong; Feng, Jiang-Min

    2012-09-01

    Chronic aristolochic acid (AA) nephropathy (CAAN) caused by intake of AA-containing herbs is difficult to treat. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat model of CAAN. Female Wistar rats were fed with decoction of Caulis Aristolochia manshuriensis by intragastric administration. MSCs were prepared from BM of male Wistar rats and injected into female CAAN rats through tail vein. Body weight, renal function, and urinary excretion of these CAAN rats were monitored before killing at the end of the 20th week. Blood, urine, and tissue samples were collected from experimental (MSC and non-MSC) and normal control groups. All animals developed renal fibrosis after 12 weeks of intake of AA-containing decoction. Fibrosis in the MSC groups was significantly reduced as examined with light and electron microscopy. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and urine protein levels were significantly reduced and hemoglobin levels were improved in the MSC group as compared with the non-MSC group (p < 0.01). The expression of TGF-β1 mRNA and protein was reduced but hepatic growth factor (HGF) was increased in the MSC group compared with the non-MSC group, but still higher than the normal control level as measured by immunochemical, RT-PCR, and western blotting assays (p < 0.01). The renal fibrosis of CAAN could be protected by isogenic MSC transplantation, probably via upregulation of HGF and downregulation of TGF-β1.

  7. Aristolochic acid, a plant extract used in the treatment of pain and linked to Balkan endemic nephropathy, is a regulator of K2P channels

    PubMed Central

    Veale, Emma L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Aristolochic acid (AristA) is found in plants used in traditional medicines to treat pain. We investigated the action of AristA on TREK and TRESK, potassium (K2P) channels, which are potential therapeutic targets in pain. Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) is a renal disease associated with AristA consumption. A mutation of TASK‐2 (K2P5.1) channels (T108P) is seen in some patients susceptible to BEN, so we investigated how both this mutation and AristA affected TASK‐2 channels. Experimental Approach Currents through wild‐type and mutated human K2P channels expressed in tsA201 cells were measured using whole‐cell patch‐clamp recordings in the presence and absence of AristA. Key Results TREK‐1‐ and TREK‐2‐mediated currents were enhanced by AristA (100 μM), whereas TRESK was inhibited. Inhibition of TRESK did not depend on the phosphorylation of key intracellular serines but was completely blocked by mutation of bulky residues in the inner pore (F145A_F352A). The TASK‐2_T108P mutation markedly reduced both current density and ion selectivity. A related mutation (T108C) had similar but less marked effects. External alkalization and application of flufenamic acid enhanced TASK‐2 and TASK‐2_T108C current but did not affect TASK‐2_T108P current. AristA (300 μM) produced a modest enhancement of TASK‐2 current. Conclusions and Implications Enhancement of TREK‐1 and TREK‐2 and inhibition of TRESK by AristA may contribute to therapeutically useful effects of this compound in pain. Whilst AristA is unlikely to interact directly with TASK‐2 channels in BEN, loss of functional TASK‐2 channels may indirectly increase susceptibility to AristA toxicity. PMID:26914156

  8. Chinese herb nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    In 1994, a 44-year-old woman progressed from normal renal function to advanced renal failure and end-stage renal disease within 8 months. Biopsy revealed extensive interstitial fibrosis with focal lymphocytic infiltration. She received a cadaveric renal transplant in January 1996 and had an uneventful posttransplant course. As a result of a minor motor vehicle accident, the patient had received acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine for pain relief approximately 5 months before the onset of renal symptoms. After the transplant, analysis of the herbal remedies clearly indicated the presence of aristolochic acid in 2 of the 6 Chinese herbs ingested. Ingestion of aristolochic acid has been linked to a newly defined entity, Chinese herb nephropathy (CHN). This article discusses the history of CHN and its implication in the current case and in other recent similar cases and makes recommendations to avoid future problems caused by unregulated use of herbal medicines. This is the first reported case of CHN in the USA. PMID:16389336

  9. A J-shaped association between serum uric acid levels and poor renal survival in female patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Matsukuma, Yuta; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Shigeru; Tsuchimoto, Akihiro; Fujisaki, Kiichiro; Torisu, Kumiko; Katafuchi, Ritsuko; Hirakata, Hideki; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kitazono, Takanari

    2017-03-01

    Recently, low serum uric acid (SUA) levels and high SUA levels, have emerged as risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as for the incidence of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the effect of low SUA on the progression of CKD remains unclear. To evaluate the association between SUA and renal prognosis in patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), one of the most common causes of CKD, we retrospectively followed 1218 patients who were diagnosed with primary IgAN by kidney biopsy between October 1979 and December 2010. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of SUA level tertiles: low (L group), middle (M group) and high (H group) tertiles (<6.1, 6.1-7.0, and >7.0 mg dl(-1), respectively, for men and <4.4, 4.4-5.3, and >5.3 mg dl(-1), respectively, for women). The risk factors for developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. After a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 142 patients (11.7%) developed ESRD. The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) showed a J-shaped trend with the tertiles in both men (1.18 (0.55-2.54), 1.00 (reference), and 1.80 (1.01-3.10) in L, M and H groups, respectively) and women (2.73 (1.10-6.76), 1.00 (reference) and 2.49 (1.16-5.34) in L, M and H groups, respectively). Notably, low SUA was significantly associated with incident ESRD in women. This finding suggests that SUA has a J-shaped association with ESRD in patients with IgAN, especially women.

  10. Diabetic nephropathy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common etiology for end-stage renal disease, complicates approximately 5% of insulin-dependent diabetic pregnancies. Assessment for vasculopathy is important before pregnancy because nephropathy can increase perinatal risks including potential for preeclampsia and preterm birth. Counseling women receiving renoprotective medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors has recently become complicated in light of new information suggesting a teratogenic risk for these agents. Most reproductive age women with overt diabetic nephropathy have preserved renal function and do not seem to have the progression of their disease affected by pregnancy. Perinatal outcomes are excellent for these women who have received care in tertiary institutions. However, there are relatively few women with significant renal impairment included in case series of pregnancies complicated by diabetic nephropathy. For these women, adverse perinatal outcomes are more common, and the effect of pregnancy on the course of their disease is less certain.

  11. Acute phosphate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Habibzadeh, Seyed Mahmoud; Mesbah, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    We present acute phosphate nephropathy in a 28-year-old man, which was developed after a car accident due to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment of acute kidney injury was done with administration of sodium bicarbonate.

  12. Discovery and Preclinical Characterization of 6-Chloro-5-[4-(1-hydroxycyclobutyl)phenyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxylic Acid (PF-06409577), a Direct Activator of Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK), for the Potential Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kimberly O; Kung, Daniel W; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Miller, Russell; Salatto, Christopher T; Ward, Jessica; Withka, Jane M; Bhattacharya, Samit K; Boehm, Markus; Borzilleri, Kris A; Brown, Janice A; Calabrese, Matthew; Caspers, Nicole L; Cokorinos, Emily; Conn, Edward L; Dowling, Matthew S; Edmonds, David J; Eng, Heather; Fernando, Dilinie P; Frisbie, Richard; Hepworth, David; Landro, James; Mao, Yuxia; Rajamohan, Francis; Reyes, Allan R; Rose, Colin R; Ryder, Tim; Shavnya, Andre; Smith, Aaron C; Tu, Meihua; Wolford, Angela C; Xiao, Jun

    2016-09-08

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a protein kinase involved in maintaining energy homeostasis within cells. On the basis of human genetic association data, AMPK activators were pursued for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Identification of an indazole amide high throughput screening (HTS) hit followed by truncation to its minimal pharmacophore provided an indazole acid lead compound. Optimization of the core and aryl appendage improved oral absorption and culminated in the identification of indole acid, PF-06409577 (7). Compound 7 was advanced to first-in-human trials for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Elling, F.; Møller, T.

    1973-01-01

    In Denmark a nephropathy in pigs characterized by tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis has been identified frequently during the last 5 decades in the course of meat inspection in slaughterhouses. The disease was first described by Larsen, who recognized the connexion between feeding mouldy rye to pigs and the development of the nephropathy. In this study kidneys were examined from 19 pigs coming from a farm with an outbreak of nephropathy. The barley fed to the pigs was contaminated with the mycotoxin ochratoxin A. Histological examination revealed different degrees of change ranging from slight regressive changes in the tubular epithelium and periglomerular and interstitial fibrosis to tubular atrophy, thickened basement membranes, glomerular sclerosis, and marked fibrosis. These differences were considered to be due to differences in the length of time of exposure to the mouldy barley and differences in the amount of mycotoxin consumed by the individual pig. However, it will be necessary to carry out experiments using crystalline ochratoxin A in order to prove such a relationship. Mycotoxins have also been suggested as etiological factors in Balkan nephropathy in man, which in the initial stages is characterized by tubular lesions similar to those seen in mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4546872

  14. Heat stress, hydration and uric acid: a cross-sectional study in workers of three occupations in a hotspot of Mesoamerican nephropathy in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Aragón, Aurora; González, Marvin; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Rivard, Christopher J; Roncal-Jiménez, Carlos; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN) and its risk factors in three hot occupations. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Chinandega and León municipalities, a MeN hotspot on the Nicaraguan Pacific coast, January–February 2013. Participants 194 male workers aged 17–39 years: 86 sugarcane cutters, 56 construction workers, 52 small-scale farmers. Outcome measures (1) Differences between the three occupational groups in prevalences/levels of socioeconomic, occupational, lifestyle and health risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in biomarkers of kidney function and hydration; (2) differences in prevalences/levels of CKD risk factors between workers with reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRCKD-EPI <80 mL/min/1.73 m2) and workers with normal kidney function (eGFRCKD-EPI ≥80 mL/min/1.73 m2). Results Sugarcane cutters were more exposed to heat and consumed more fluid on workdays and had less obesity, lower blood sugar, lower blood pressure and a better lipid profile. Reduced eGFR occurred in 16%, 9% and 2% of sugarcane cutters, construction workers and farmers, respectively (trend cane > construction > farming, p=0.003). Significant trends (cane > construction > farming) were also observed for high serum urea nitrogen (blood urea nitrogen (BUN) >20 mg/dL), high serum creatinine (SCr >1.2 mg/dL), low urinary pH (≤5.5) and high BUN/SCr ratio (>20) but not for high urinary specific gravity (≥1.030). Sugarcane cutters also more often had proteinuria and blood and leucocytes in the urine. Workers with eGFR <80 mL/min/1.73 m2 reported a higher intake of water and lower intake of sugary beverages. Serum uric acid levels related strongly and inversely to eGFR levels (adj β −10.4 mL/min/1.73 m2, 95% CI −12.2 to −8.5, p<0.001). No associations were observed for other metabolic risk factors, pesticides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or alcohol. Among cane cutters, consumption of electrolyte hydration

  15. [IgA nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanović, Gordana

    2004-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is glomerular disease first described in 1968 by Berger, named after him Morbus Berger. The disease is characterized by the presence of IgA dominant or codominant immunoglobulin deposits in glomerular mesangium which can be demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Clinical manifestations of IgA nephropathy in the majority of cases is hematuria which can be macro or microscopic, isolated or combined with proteinuria which can be of nephrotic range. In some cases nephrotic syndrome can be the first clinical presentation. In 10% renal insufficiency can be present at the onset of the disease. By light microscopy IgA can manifest any of the histologic phenotypes of immune complex mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. According to light microscopy findings a classification system have been used to categorize the histologic patterns of IgA nephropathy. Glomerular changes in IgA nephropathy are proliferative and can be focal or diffuse accompanied by crescentic formation in many cases. Immune deposits seen by electron microscopy appear as electron dense deposits most numerous in mesangium.

  16. Diabetic nephropathy: preventing progression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Up to one third of people with type 1 or 2 diabetes will develop microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria after 20 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with type 1 diabetes and early nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 1 diabetes and late nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 2 diabetes and early nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 2 diabetes and late nephropathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, glycaemic control, protein restriction, and tight control of blood pressure. PMID:21418671

  17. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. Causes IgA is a protein, called an antibody , that helps the body fight infections. IgA nephropathy occurs when too much of this protein is deposited in the kidneys. IgA builds up inside the small blood vessels of the kidney. Structures in the kidney called glomeruli become inflamed and ...

  18. Nephropathy in Chronic Lead Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lilis, Ruth; Gavrilescu, N.; Nestorescu, B.; Dumitriu, C.; Roventa, Ana

    1968-01-01

    This paper presents a study of renal function in 102 patients with lead poisoning admitted to the Occupational Diseases Clinic in Bucharest during the past 10 years; nearly half the patients had no history of lead colic. Every possible cause of renal damage, other than lead, was excluded by a careful differential diagnosis. Renal function was investigated by repeated determinations of blood urea, creatinine and uric acid, urea clearance, and endogenous creatinine clearance tests. Significant decreases of the clearance values (less than 50 ml./min. urea clearance and less than 80 ml./min. creatinine clearance), persistent high blood urea (more than 50 mg./100 ml.), and high blood creatinine (more than 1·2 mg./100 ml.) were found in a significant number of cases. These signs of impaired renal function were more frequent in the group of patients with chronic lead poisoning who had had several episodes of colic and an occupational exposure of more than 10 years. A high blood pressure was also found more frequently in this group of patients. Undercompensated and decompensated renal failure was found in 17 patients, most of whom had been exposed to lead for more than 10 years and had a history of several attacks of colic. Arterial hypertension accompanied the chronic renal failure in 13 patients, the renal impairment generally preceding the rise in blood pressure by several years. The duration of occupational lead exposure, the high absorption in the past, and the long period of observation of these patients, most of whom were repeatedly hospitalized, may explain the relatively high incidence (17 cases) of nephropathy with chronic renal failure in the present group. Impairment of urea clearance seems to be the earliest sign, at a time when the creatinine clearance is still normal. As the duration of exposure lengthens and the patient is subjected to active episodes of poisoning the creatinine clearance also deteriorates. Persistent urea retention and high creatininaemia

  19. Pirfenidone for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ix, Joachim H.; Mathew, Anna V.; Cho, Monique; Pflueger, Axel; Dunn, Stephen R.; Francos, Barbara; Sharma, Shoba; Falkner, Bonita; McGowan, Tracy A.; Donohue, Michael; RamachandraRao, Satish; Xu, Ronghui; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Pirfenidone is an oral antifibrotic agent that benefits diabetic nephropathy in animal models, but whether it is effective for human diabetic nephropathy is unknown. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 77 subjects with diabetic nephropathy who had elevated albuminuria and reduced estimated GFR (eGFR) (20 to 75 ml/min per 1.73 m2). The prespecified primary outcome was a change in eGFR after 1 year of therapy. We randomly assigned 26 subjects to placebo, 26 to pirfenidone at 1200 mg/d, and 25 to pirfenidone at 2400 mg/d. Among the 52 subjects who completed the study, the mean eGFR increased in the pirfenidone 1200-mg/d group (+3.3 ± 8.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2) whereas the mean eGFR decreased in the placebo group (−2.2 ± 4.8 ml/min per 1.73 m2; P = 0.026 versus pirfenidone at 1200 mg/d). The dropout rate was high (11 of 25) in the pirfenidone 2400-mg/d group, and the change in eGFR was not significantly different from placebo (−1.9 ± 6.7 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Of the 77 subjects, 4 initiated hemodialysis in the placebo group, 1 in the pirfenidone 2400-mg/d group, and none in the pirfenidone 1200-mg/d group during the study (P = 0.25). Baseline levels of plasma biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis significantly correlated with baseline eGFR but did not predict response to therapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that pirfenidone is a promising agent for individuals with overt diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21511828

  20. [Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aurélie

    2012-04-01

    Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by abnormal handling of urate responsible for hyperuricaemia often complicated of gouty arthritis. Renal failure is due to tubulointerstitial nephritis. Ultrasonography sometimes finds renal cysts of variable size and number. Renal histology, although not specific, shows interstitial fibrosis, atrophic tubules, sometimes enlarged and with irregular membrane thickening. Renal failure progresses to end stage between 30 and 60 years of age. Allopurinol treatment is recommended at the early stages of the disease, its efficacy on slowing down the progression of the disease is however not proven. There is genetic heterogeneity in familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy. Uromodulin encoding Tamm-Horsfall protein is the only gene to date identified, responsible in less than half of the families. The described mutations most often concern a cystein and are clustering in exon 4. These mutations result in abnormal retention of the protein in endoplasmic reticulum of Henle loop cells and in reduction of its urinary excretion. The pathophysiology of the disease is however still dubious. Indeed, Tamm-Horsfall protein functions are not well known (anti-infectious role, cristallisation inhibition, immunomodulating role). Knock-out mice do not develop renal phenotype but are more prone to E. coli urinary infections. Uromodulin gene mutations have also been described in medullary cystic kidney disease, an autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial nephropathy, considered at first as a distinct disorder. Genetic progress allowed us to consider familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy and medullary cystic kidney disease as the two facets of a same disease, we should call uromodulin associated kidney diseases. At least two other genes have been implicated in similar clinical presentation: TCF2 and the gene encoding renin.

  1. Drug-induced nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    Drugs are associated frequently with the development of various types of acute and chronic kidney diseases. Nephrotoxicity is associated most commonly with injury in the tubulointerstitial compartment manifested as either acute tubular injury or acute interstitial nephritis. A growing number of reports has also highlighted the potential for drug-induced glomerular disease, including direct cellular injury and immune-mediated injury. Recognition of drug-induced nephropathies and rapid discontinuation of the offending agents are critical to maximizing the likelihood of renal function recovery. This review will focus on the pathology and pathogenesis of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and drug-induced glomerular diseases.

  2. [Chronic transplant nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Campistol Plana, J M

    2008-01-01

    In 2007 there were important scientific contributions in the field of kidney transplant and specifically in chronic transplant nephropathy (interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy). A new nomenclature and classification of chronic kidney disease was probably the most important contribution in this entity. Use of the C4d stain has allowed the concepts of glomerulopathy to be updated and to reveal the frequency of this entity and its impact in kidney transplant. Finally, two experimental studies provide new perspectives on the treatment of chronic kidney disease such as the use of statins or the use of pyridoxamine to block glycation end products.

  3. Heroin crystal nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy.

  4. Scorpion sting nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    Scorpion envenomations are ubiquitous, but nephropathy is a rare manifestation, reported mainly from the Middle East and North Africa. Rapid venom redistribution from blood, delayed excretion from the kidneys, direct toxicity of venom enzymes, cytokine release and afferent arteriolar constriction have been seen in experimental animals. Haemoglobinuria, acute tubular necrosis, interstitial nephritis and haemolytic–uraemic syndrome have been documented in human victims of scorpion envenomation. Epidemiology, venom components and toxins, effects on the laboratory mammals especially the kidneys and reports of renal failure in humans are reviewed in this article. PMID:25984198

  5. IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jennifer C; Haas, Mark; Reich, Heather N

    2017-02-03

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a leading cause of CKD and renal failure. Recent international collaborative efforts have led to important discoveries that have improved our understanding of some of the key steps involved in the immunopathogenesis of IgAN. Furthermore, establishment of multicenter networks has contributed to rigorous design and execution of clinical trials that have provided important insights regarding immunotherapy in IgAN. In this article, we review emerging developments in clinical and translational IgAN research and describe how these novel findings will influence future strategies to improve the outcome of patients with IgAN.

  6. The 2016 AANS Presidential Address: Leading the way.

    PubMed

    Batjer, H Hunt; Ban, Vin Shen

    2016-12-01

    This AANS presidential address focuses on enduring values of the neurosurgical profession that transcend the current political climate. The address was delivered by Dr. Batjer during a US presidential election year, but the authors have intentionally avoided discussing the current chaos of the American health care system in the knowledge that many pressing issues will change depending on the outcome of the 2016 elections. Instead, they have chosen to focus on clarifying what neurosurgeons, and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, in particular, stand for; identifying important challenges to these fundamental principles and values; and proposing specific actions to address these challenges. The authors cite "de-professionalism" and commoditization of medicine as foremost among the threats that confront medicine and surgery today and suggest concrete action that can be taken to reverse these trends as well as steps that can be taken to address other significant challenges. They emphasize the importance of embracing exceptionalism and never compromising the standards that have characterized the profession of neurosurgery since its inception.

  7. Treatment of Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Exciting progress recently has been made in our understanding of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, as well as treatment of this disease. Here, we review important advances regarding the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. We will also review the current approach to treatment and its limitations and will highlight new therapies that are currently being explored for this disease including Rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, with an emphasis on results of the most recent clinical trials. PMID:22859855

  8. Pathologic classification of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Thijs W Cohen; Mooyaart, Antien L; Amann, Kerstin; Cohen, Arthur H; Cook, H Terence; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; de Heer, Emile; Joh, Kensuke; Noël, Laure H; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Seshan, Surya V; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bruijn, Jan A

    2010-04-01

    Although pathologic classifications exist for several renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and lupus nephritis, a uniform classification for diabetic nephropathy is lacking. Our aim, commissioned by the Research Committee of the Renal Pathology Society, was to develop a consensus classification combining type1 and type 2 diabetic nephropathies. Such a classification should discriminate lesions by various degrees of severity that would be easy to use internationally in clinical practice. We divide diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with a separate evaluation for degrees of interstitial and vascular involvement. Biopsies diagnosed as diabetic nephropathy are classified as follows: Class I, glomerular basement membrane thickening: isolated glomerular basement membrane thickening and only mild, nonspecific changes by light microscopy that do not meet the criteria of classes II through IV. Class II, mesangial expansion, mild (IIa) or severe (IIb): glomeruli classified as mild or severe mesangial expansion but without nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions) or global glomerulosclerosis in more than 50% of glomeruli. Class III, nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions): at least one glomerulus with nodular increase in mesangial matrix (Kimmelstiel-Wilson) without changes described in class IV. Class IV, advanced diabetic glomerulosclerosis: more than 50% global glomerulosclerosis with other clinical or pathologic evidence that sclerosis is attributable to diabetic nephropathy. A good interobserver reproducibility for the four classes of DN was shown (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84) in a test of this classification.

  9. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  10. Effects of the N/L-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine on nephropathy and uric acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (J-CIRCLE study).

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shunya; Takahashi, Masato; Sugawara, Masahiro; Saito, Tomoaki; Nakai, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Masami; Mochizuki, Koichi; Shin, Isu; Morita, Takashi; Hikita, Tomoyuki; Itakura, Hironao; Takahashi, Yuko; Mizuno, Shigeki; Ohno, Yasumi; Ito, Kageki; Ito, Takafumi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and uric acid metabolism in 70 hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease in whom urinary ACR had remained ≥30 mg/g under the treatment of the L-type calcium channel blocker amlodipine. Three months after switching to the N/L-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine, blood pressure (BP) did not change; however, urinary ACR significantly decreased with cilnidipine. Serum uric acid levels showed no significant change. In cases where uric acid production had been high (urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio ≥0.5), the urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio decreased significantly after cilnidipine treatment, suggesting that cilnidipine can suppress excessive uric acid formation. These results suggest that switching from amlodipine to cilnidipine results in a significant reduction in urinary ACR as well as significant reduction in uric acid production. Thus, cilnidipine is more useful than amlodipine in improving albuminuria and uric acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

  11. Association of Haemostatic and Inflammatory Biomarkers with Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Domingueti, Caroline Pereira; Fóscolo, Rodrigo Bastos; Reis, Janice Sepúlveda; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Dusse, Luci Maria S.; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Braga Gomes, Karina; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the association between haemostatic biomarkers, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines with chronic kidney disease in type 1 diabetic patients. Patients were divided into two groups: with nephropathy (albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g and/or GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2), n = 65; and without nephropathy (albuminuria < 30 mg/g and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2), n = 60. INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α plasma levels were determined by flow cytometry. VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, and D-Dimer plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ADAMTS13 activity was assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Elevated levels of INF-γ, VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, D-Dimer, and reduced ADAMTS13 activity/antigen ratio were observed in patients with nephropathy as compared to those without nephropathy (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, resp.). Cytokines and haemostatic biomarkers remained associated with nephropathy after adjustments (use of statin, acetylsalicylic acid, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and angiotensin antagonist). INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10 significantly correlated with haemostatic biomarkers. Inflammatory and hypercoagulability status are associated with nephropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus and an interrelationship between them may play an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26770985

  12. Association of Haemostatic and Inflammatory Biomarkers with Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Domingueti, Caroline Pereira; Fóscolo, Rodrigo Bastos; Reis, Janice Sepúlveda; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Dusse, Luci Maria S; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Braga Gomes, Karina; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the association between haemostatic biomarkers, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines with chronic kidney disease in type 1 diabetic patients. Patients were divided into two groups: with nephropathy (albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g and/or GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), n = 65; and without nephropathy (albuminuria < 30 mg/g and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), n = 60. INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α plasma levels were determined by flow cytometry. VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, and D-Dimer plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ADAMTS13 activity was assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Elevated levels of INF-γ, VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, D-Dimer, and reduced ADAMTS13 activity/antigen ratio were observed in patients with nephropathy as compared to those without nephropathy (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, resp.). Cytokines and haemostatic biomarkers remained associated with nephropathy after adjustments (use of statin, acetylsalicylic acid, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and angiotensin antagonist). INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10 significantly correlated with haemostatic biomarkers. Inflammatory and hypercoagulability status are associated with nephropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus and an interrelationship between them may play an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kar Neng; Tang, Sydney C W; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Novak, Jan; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Fogo, Agnes B; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-02-11

    Globally, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis that can progress to renal failure. The exact pathogenesis of IgAN is not well defined, but current biochemical and genetic data implicate overproduction of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1. These aberrant immunoglobulins are characterized by galactose deficiency of some hinge-region O-linked glycans. However, aberrant glycosylation alone is insufficient to induce renal injury: the participation of glycan-specific IgA and IgG autoantibodies that recognize the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecule is required. Glomerular deposits of immune complexes containing undergalactosylated IgA1 activate mesangial cells, leading to the local overproduction of cytokines, chemokines and complement. Emerging data indicate that mesangial-derived mediators that are released following mesangial deposition of IgA1 lead to podocyte and tubulointerstitial injury via humoral crosstalk. Patients can present with a range of signs and symptoms, from asymptomatic microscopic haematuria to macroscopic haematuria. The clinical progression varies, with 30-40% of patients reaching end-stage renal disease 20-30 years after the first clinical presentation. Currently, no IgAN-specific therapies are available and patients are managed with the aim of controlling blood pressure and maintaining renal function. However, new therapeutic approaches are being developed, building upon our ever-improving understanding of disease pathogenesis.

  14. [Selected work-related nephropathies].

    PubMed

    Wołyniec, Wojciech; Renke, Marcin; Wójcik-Stasiak, Małgorzata; Renke, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Infections, high temperature and many of the toxic substances can cause kidney damage. Acute kidney injury is a well known complication of some work-related diseases, e.g., lead intoxication. Chronic kidney disease can also be caused by some occupational factors. Three work-related nephropathies, in which causal connection with work has been proved, are discussed in this article. There are different risk factors of nephrolithiasis, lead nephropathy and silica nephropathy, but each of them can cause chronic kidney disease. Prevention of these nephropaties seems to be relatively simple. The principles of protection from the toxic effects of heavy metals and silica dust are very specific. The most important prevention of kidney stones is correct fluid intake. In addition to providing adequate quantities of drinking water, it is also important to educate exposed workers and assure enough rest breaks at work.

  15. Cytochrome P450 1A2 Detoxicates Aristolochic Acid in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Einolf, Heidi J.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Wang, Lai; Smith, Amanda; Grollman, Arthur P.

    2010-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs) are plant-derived nephrotoxins and carcinogens responsible for chronic renal failure and associated urothelial cell cancers in several clinical syndromes known collectively as aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Mice provide a useful model for study of AAN because the renal histopathology of AA-treated mice is strikingly similar to that of humans. AA is also a potent carcinogen in mice with a tissue spectrum somewhat different from that in humans. The toxic dose of AA in mice is higher than that in humans; this difference in susceptibility has been postulated to reflect differing rates of detoxication between the species. Recent studies in mice have shown that the hepatic cytochrome P450 system detoxicates AA, and inducers of the arylhydrocarbon response protect mice from the nephrotoxic effects of AA. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of specific cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in AA metabolism in vivo. Of 18 human P450 enzymes we surveyed only two, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, which were effective in demethylating 8-methoxy-6-nitro-phenanthro-(3,4-d)-1,3-dioxolo-5-carboxylic acid (AAI) to the nontoxic derivative 8-hydroxy-6-nitro-phenanthro-(3,4-d)-1,3-dioxolo-5-carboxylic acid (AAIa). Kinetic analysis revealed similar efficiencies of formation of AAIa by human and rat CYP1A2. We also report here that CYP1A2-deficient mice display increased sensitivity to the nephrotoxic effects of AAI. Furthermore, Cyp1a2 knockout mice accumulate AAI-derived DNA adducts in the kidney at a higher rate than control mice. Differences in bioavailability or hepatic metabolism of AAI, expression of CYP1A2, or efficiency of a competing nitroreduction pathway in vivo may explain the apparent differences between human and rodent sensitivity to AAI. PMID:20164109

  16. Role of exposure analysis in solving the mystery of Balkan endemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Long, David T; Voice, Thomas C

    2007-06-01

    We evaluated the role of exposure analysis in assessing whether ochratoxin A or aristolochic acid are the agents responsible for causing Balkan endemic nephropathy. We constructed a framework for exposure analysis using the lessons learned from the study of endemic goiter within the context of an accepted general model. We used this framework to develop an exposure analysis model for Balkan endemic nephropathy, evaluated previous findings from the literature on ochratoxin A and aristolochic acid in the context of this model, discussed the strength of evidence for each, and proposed approaches to address critical outstanding questions. The pathway for exposure to ochratoxin A is well defined and there is evidence that humans have ingested ochratoxin A. Factors causing differential exposure to ochratoxin A and how ochratoxin A is implicated in Balkan endemic nephropathy are not defined. Although there is evidence of human exposure to aristolochic acid and that its effects are consistent with Balkan endemic nephropathy, a pathway for exposure to aristolochic acid has been suggested but not demonstrated. Factors causing differential exposure to aristolochic acid are not known. Exposure analysis results suggest that neither ochratoxin A nor aristolochic acid can be firmly linked to Balkan endemic nephropathy. However, this approach suggests future research directions that could provide critical evidence on exposure, which when linked with findings from the health sciences, may be able to demonstrate the cause of this disease and provide a basis for effective public health intervention strategies. One of the key unknowns for both agents is how differential exposure can occur.

  17. Role of Exposure Analysis in Solving the Mystery of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Long, David T.; Voice, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the role of exposure analysis in assessing whether ochratoxin A aristolochic acid are the agents responsible for causing Balkan endemic nephropathy. We constructed a framework for exposure analysis using the lessons learned from the study of endemic goiter within the context of an accepted general model. We used this framework to develop an exposure analysis model for Balkan endemic nephropathy, evaluated previous findings from the literature on ochratoxin A and aristolochic acid in the context of this model, discussed the strength of evidence for each, and proposed approaches to address critical outstanding questions. The pathway for exposure to ochratoxin A is well defined and there is evidence that humans have ingested ochratoxin A. Factors causing differential exposure to ochratoxin A and how ochratoxin A is implicated in Balkan endemic nephropathy are not defined. Although there is evidence of human exposure to aristolochic acid and that its effects are consistent with Balkan endemic nephropathy, a pathway for exposure to aristolochic acid has been suggested but not demonstrated. Factors causing differential exposure to aristolochic acid are not known. Exposure analysis results suggest that neither ochratoxin A nor aristolochic acid can be firmly linked to Balkan endemic nephropathy. However, this approach suggests future research directions that could provide critical evidence on exposure, which when linked with findings from the health sciences, may be able to demonstrate the cause of this disease and provide a basis for effective public health intervention strategies. One of the key unknowns for both agents is how differential exposure can occur. PMID:17589972

  18. Awards, lectures, and fellowships sponsored by the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lau, Darryl; Barker, Fred G; Aghi, Manish K

    2014-09-01

    A major goal of the Section on Tumors of the American Association of Neurological Surgery (AANS) and Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) since it was founded in 1984 has been to foster both education and research in the field of brain tumor treatment and development. In support of this goal, the Section sponsors a number of awards, named lectures, and fellowships at the annual meetings of the AANS and CNS. In this article, we describe the awards given by the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors since its foundation, the recipients of the awards, and their philanthropic donors. The subsequent history of awardees and their work is briefly examined. Specifically for the Preuss and Mahaley Awards, this article also examines the rates of publication among the award-winning abstracts and achievement of grant funding by awardees.

  19. Anticoagulation-related nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D S; Giugliano, R P; Rangaswami, J

    2016-03-01

    Anticoagulation-related nephropathy (ARN) is a significant but underdiagnosed complication of anticoagulation that is associated with increased renal morbidity and all-cause mortality. Originally described in patients receiving supratherapeutic doses of warfarin who had a distinct pattern of glomerular hemorrhage on kidney biopsy, ARN is currently defined as acute kidney injury (AKI) without obvious etiology in the setting of an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of > 3.0. The underlying molecular mechanism is thought to be warfarin-induced thrombin depletion; however, newer studies have hinted at an alternative mechanism involving reductions in activated protein C and endothelial protein C receptor signaling. Prompt recognition of ARN is critical, as it is associated with accelerated progression of chronic kidney disease, and significant increases in short-term and long-term all-cause mortality. Prior investigations into ARN have almost universally focused on anticoagulation with warfarin; however, recent case reports and animal studies suggest that it can also occur in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants. Differences in the incidence and severity of ARN between patients taking warfarin and those taking novel oral anticoagulants are unknown; a post hoc analysis of routinely reported adverse renal outcomes in clinical trials comparing warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants found no significant difference in the rates of AKI, a prerequisite for ARN. Given the significant impact of ARN on renal function and all-cause mortality, a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms, clinical spectrum and therapeutic interventions for ARN is crucial to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulation and optimize treatment.

  20. Polyphenol extracts from Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus attenuate nephropathy in experimental type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chin; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Hsu, Jen-Dong; Cheng, Su-Ya; Chen, Hong-Chen; Lee, Huei-Jane

    2009-03-25

    Diabetic nephropathy progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is found in type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Oxidative stress is one of the precipitation factors in diabetic nephropathy. Previously, Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus and its polyphenol extracts were found to possess antioxidative effects. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. polyphenol extract (HPE) in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic nephropathy. The results show that HPE reduced kidney mass induced by STZ significantly, as well as improving hydropic change of renal proximal convoluted tubules in the rats. HPE also significantly reduced serum triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL in STZ induced rats. Treatment with HPE significantly increased the activity of catalase and glutathione and reduced lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS). The findings of this research show the beneficial effects of HPE on STZ induced diabetic nephropathy including pathology, serum lipid profile and oxidative marker in kidney.

  1. Diabetic nephropathy – complications and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andy KH

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

  2. ARISTOLOCHIC ACID I METABOLISM IN THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Priestap, Horacio A.; Torres, M. Cecilia; Rieger, Robert A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Freshwater, Tomoko; Taft, David R.; Barbieri, Manuel A.; Iden, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochic acids are natural nitro-compounds found globally in the plant genus Aristolochia that have been implicated in the severe illness in humans termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Aristolochic acids undergo nitroreduction, among other metabolic reactions, and active intermediates arise that are carcinogenic. Previous experiments with rats showed that aristolochic acid I (AA-I), after oral administration or injection, is subjected to detoxication reactions to give aristolochic acid Ia, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and their glucuronide and sulfate conjugates that can be found in urine and faeces. Results obtained with whole rats do not clearly define the role of liver and kidney in such metabolic transformation. In this study, in order to determine the specific role of the kidney on the renal disposition of AA-I and to study the biotransformations suffered by AA-I in this organ, isolated kidneys of rats were perfused with AA-I. AA-I and metabolite concentrations were determined in perfusates and urines using HPLC procedures. The isolated perfused rat kidney model showed that AA-I distributes rapidly and extensively in kidney tissues by uptake from the peritubular capillaries and the tubules. It was also established that the kidney is able to metabolize AA-I into aristolochic acid Ia, aristolochic acid Ia O-sulfate, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and aristolactam Ia O-glucuronide. Rapid demethylation and sulfation of AA-I in the kidney generate aristolochic acid Ia and its sulfate conjugate that are voided to the urine. Reduction reactions to give the aristolactam metabolites occur to a slower rate. Renal clearances showed that filtered AA-I is reabsorbed at the tubules whereas the metabolites are secreted. The unconjugated metabolites produced in the renal tissues are transported to both urine and perfusate whereas the conjugated metabolites are almost exclusively secreted to the urine. PMID:22118289

  3. Epigenetic Regulations in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a chronic complication of diabetes and the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease. It has been reported that multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of DN, while the molecular mechanisms that lead to DN are still not fully understood. Numerous risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy have been proposed, including ethnicity and inherited genetic differences. Recently, with the development of high-throughput technologies, there is emerging evidence that suggests the important role of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of DN. Epigenetic regulations, including DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, and histone modifications, play a pivotal role in DN pathogenesis by a second layer of gene regulation. All these findings can contribute to developing novel therapies for DN.

  4. Diabetic nephropathy: a national dialogue.

    PubMed

    Breyer, Matthew D; Coffman, Thomas M; Flessner, Michael F; Fried, Linda F; Harris, Raymond C; Ketchum, Christian J; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G; Sedor, John R; Susztak, Katalin

    2013-09-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-supported Kidney Research National Dialogue (KRND) asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve our understanding of kidney function and disease. Several high-priority objectives for diabetic nephropathy were identified in data and sample collection, hypothesis generation, hypothesis testing, and translation promotion. The lack of readily available human samples linked to comprehensive phenotypic, clinical, and demographic data remains a significant obstacle. With data and biological samples in place, several possibilities exist for using new technologies to develop hypotheses. Testing novel disease mechanisms with state-of-the-art tools should continue to be the foundation of the investigative community. Research must be translated to improve diagnosis and treatment of people. The objectives identified by the KRND provide the research community with future opportunities for improving the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Experimental Models of Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, J. Ashley; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is one of the commonest glomerular diseases, typically presenting in older males with nephrotic syndrome. The development and characterization of animal models of MN, in particular, the passive Heymann nephritis model (PHN), has greatly advanced our understanding of this disease. In this review we discuss the different animal models of human MN that are available, with an emphasis on the PHN model, including technical issues, the typical disease course and its application to human disease. PMID:21359154

  6. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, N.; Haruna, Y.; Kondeti, V.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Its morphologic characteristics include glomerular hypertrophy, basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolar thickening. All of these are part and parcel of microvascular complications of diabetes. A large body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress is the common denominator link for the major pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- as well as macrovascular complications of diabetes. There are a number of macromolecules that have been implicated for increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as, NAD(P)H oxidase, advanced glycation end products (AGE), defects in polyol pathway, uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and mitochondrial respiratory chain via oxidative phosphorylation. Excess amounts of ROS modulate activation of protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and various cytokines and transcription factors which eventually cause increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes with progression to fibrosis and end stage renal disease. Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) further worsens the renal injury induced by ROS in diabetic nephropathy. Buffering the generation of ROS may sound a promising therapeutic to ameliorate renal damage from diabetic nephropathy, however, various studies have demonstrated minimal reno-protection by these agents. Interruption in the RAS has yielded much better results in terms of reno-protection and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review various aspects of oxidative stress coupled with the damage induced by RAS are discussed with the anticipation to yield an impetus for designing new generation of specific antioxidants that are potentially more effective to reduce reno-vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:20939814

  7. Renal function in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. Cardiovascular and renal complications share common risk factors such as blood pressure, blood lipids, and glycemic control. Thus, chronic kidney disease may predict cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of diabetes on renal impairment changes with increasing age. Serum markers of glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria identify renal impairment in different segments of the diabetic population, indicating that serum markers as well as microalbuminuria tests should be used in screening for nephropathy in diabetic older people. The American Diabetes Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from serum creatinine at least once a year in all people with diabetes for detection of kidney dysfunction. eGFR remains an independent and significant predictor after adjustment for conventional risk factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, obesity, blood pressure, and glycemic and lipid control, as well as presence of diabetic retinopathy. Cystatin-C (Cys C) may in future be the preferred marker of diabetic nephropathy due differences in measurements of serum creatinine by various methods. The appropriate reference limit for Cys C in geriatric clinical practice must be defined by further research. Various studies have shown the importance of measurement of albuminuria, eGFR, serum creatinine and hemoglobin level to further enhance the prediction of end stage renal disease. PMID:21537427

  8. Assessing genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobue; Babazono, Tetsuya

    2005-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Studies indicate both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In particular, epidemiological evidence shows a familial clustering of nephropathy in siblings with diabetes, supporting an important role of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. A common approach in genetic research is assessment of candidate gene polymorphisms using case-control analysis; a number of studies have evaluated predictable candidate genes for diabetic nephropathy. In contrast, only a few studies have used a whole genome approach, such as scanning of micro-satellite markers, in the assessment of genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. A whole genome linkage analysis using families of Pima Indians showed susceptibility loci for diabetic nephropathy on chromosome 3, 7, and 20. Another linkage analysis using discordant sib-pairs of Caucasian families with type 1 diabetes identified a critical area on chromosome 3q. However, these results have been inconclusive and further investigation is required. Recently, a genome-wide, case-control analysis identifying susceptibility genes for diabetic nephropathy was performed. As a result, a single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 23 of the solute carrier family 12 (sodium-chloride cotransporter) member 3 gene was found to be strongly associated with diabetic nephropathy. Although further assessment of this polymorphism is needed, this strategy offers great promise in the identification of genetic factors predisposing patients to diabetic nephropathy. Identification of genetic susceptibility markers may offer new hope in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, eNOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Nodular lesions and mesangiolysis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Yoshio; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure all over the world. Advanced human diabetic nephropathy is characterized by the presence of specific lesions including nodular lesions, doughnut lesions, and exudative lesions. Thus far, animal models precisely mimicking advanced human diabetic nephropathy, especially nodular lesions, remain to be fully established. Animal models with spontaneous diabetic kidney diseases or with inducible kidney lesions may be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Based on pathological features, we previously reported that diabetic glomerular nodular-like lesions were formed during the reconstruction process of mesangiolysis. Recently, we established nodular-like lesions resembling those seen in advanced human diabetic nephropathy through vascular endothelial injury and mesangiolysis by administration of monocrotaline. Here, in this review, we discuss diabetic nodular lesions and its animal models resembling human diabetic kidney lesions, with our hypothesis that endothelial cell injury and mesangiolysis might be required for nodular lesions.

  11. Genetic association studies in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Harvest F; Brismar, Kerstin

    2012-09-01

    Clinical observations and epidemiological studies have shown that there is familial aggregation of diabetic nephropathy in many ethnic groups, indicating the strong contribution of inherited factors in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Identification of the genes involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy may provide better knowledge of its pathophysiology and future therapies. To search for the genes involved in susceptibility, resistance or progression to diabetic nephropathy, candidate gene population association, family-based association and genome wide association studies have been widely used. This article reviews genetic polymorphisms, summarizes the data from genetic association studies of diabetic nephropathy in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and discusses about the future genetic analyses in the complex diseases.

  12. Positional effects of AAN motifs in rpoS regulation by sRNAs and Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Soper, Toby J.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    The E. coli stationary phase transcription factor RpoS is translated in response to small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), which base pair with the rpoS mRNA leader. The bacterial Sm-like protein Hfq anneals sRNAs with their mRNA targets by simultaneously binding the mRNA and sRNA. Intriguingly, Hfq is recruited to the rpoS leader via AAN motifs far upstream of the sRNA. SHAPE chemical footprinting showed that the rpoS leader is divided into a far upstream domain, an Hfq binding domain, and a downstream inhibitory stem-loop containing the sRNA and ribosome binding sites. To investigate how Hfq promotes sRNA-mRNA base pairing from a distance, the natural AAN Hfq binding site was deleted, and artificial AAN binding sites were inserted at various positions in the rpoS leader. All the relocated AAN motifs restored tight Hfq binding in vitro, but only insertion at the natural position restored Hfq-dependent sRNA annealing in vitro and sRNA regulation of rpoS translation in vivo. Furthermore, U-rich motifs in the downstream inhibitory domain stabilized the rpoS mRNA-Hfq complex and contributed to regulation of rpoS expression. We propose that the natural Hfq binding domain is optimal for positive regulation because it recruits Hfq to the mRNA and allows it to act on incoming sRNAs without opening the inhibitory stem-loop when sRNA are absent. PMID:24051417

  13. Neurosurgery at the crossroads: leadership role of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. The 1979 AANS presidential address.

    PubMed

    Dohn, D F

    1979-10-01

    The President of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) reviews the formative history of the major neurosurgical societies, together with their agreement to consolidate their efforts in the joint AANS. As a united group, the Association has been effective in carrying out relations with other professional organizations and with government. Long-range planning is being pursued steadily to increase the role of organized neurosurgery in maintenance of, and improvement in, patient care, education, and research.

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of a CBZ-AAN-Dox Prodrug and its in vitro Effects on SiHa Cervical Cancer Cells Under Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyuan; Liu, Xiao; Clayman, Eric S; Shao, Fangyuan; Xiao, Manshan; Tian, Xuyan; Fu, Wuyu; Zhang, Caiyun; Ruan, Bibo; Zhou, Pengjun; Liu, Zhong; Wang, Yifei; Rui, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Although doxorubicin (Dox) is widely used in clinical treatment for solid tumors, it causes many side-effects such as heart and kidney damage, bone marrow suppression, and drug resistance. Legumain is a lysosomal protease that is elevated and associated with an invasive and metastatic phenotype in a number of solid tumors. In this study, we designed and synthesized a Dox prodrug, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Ala-Ala-Asn-Doxorubicin (CBZ-AAN-Dox), with 94% purity. Single substrate kinetic assays demonstrated hLegumain-specific enzymatic cleavage and activation of the prodrug in vitro, and this enzymatic cleavage of the prodrug substrate was more sensitive in acidic conditions, releasing more than 70% of Dox after 24 h. Treatment of tumor cells with our prodrug demonstrated a much higher IC50 value, significantly enhanced uptake of the prodrug, and considerably less cellular toxicity compared to Dox treatment alone. Our study presents a novel prodrug, CBZ-AAN-Dox, to potentially increase both the safety and efficacy of clinical treatment of tumors by exploiting the tumor's innate expression of legumain.

  15. HNF1 AND HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Renata I.; Hinojos, Cruz A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braun, Michael C.; Fornage, Myriam; Doris, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension in SHR is associated with renal redox stress and we hypothesized that nephropathy arises in SHR-A3 from altered capacity to mitigate redox stress compared with nephropathy-resistant SHR lines. We measured renal expression of redox genes in distinct lines of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-A3, SHR-B2, SHR-C) and the normotensive WKY strain. The SHR lines differ in either resisting (SHR-B2, SHR-C) or experiencing hypertensive nephropathy (SHR-A3). Immediately prior to the emergence of hypertensive renal injury expression of redox genes in SHR-A3 was profoundly altered compared with the injury-resistant SHR lines and WKY. This change appeared to arise in anti-oxidant genes where 16 of 28 were expressed at 34.3% of the level in the reference strain (WKY). No such change was observed in the injury-resistant SHR lines. We analyzed occurrence of transcription factor matrices (TFM) in the promoters of the down-regulated antioxidant genes. In these genes, the HNF1 TFM was found to be nearly twice as likely to be present and the overall frequency of HNF1 sites was nearly 5 times higher, compared with HNF1 TFMs in anti-oxidant genes that were not down-regulated. We identified 35 other (non-redox) renal genes regulated by HNF1. These were also significantly down-regulated in SHR-A3, but not in SHR-B2 or SHR-C. Finally, expression of genes that comprise HNF1 (Tcf1, Tcf2 and Dcoh) was also down-regulated in SHR-A3. The present experiments uncover a major change in transcriptional control by HNF1 that affects redox and other genes and precedes emergence of hypertensive renal injury. PMID:18443232

  16. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  17. Enforcement of the ban on aristolochic acids in Chinese traditional herbal preparations on the Dutch market.

    PubMed

    Martena, Martijn J; van der Wielen, Jacqueline C A; van de Laak, Leo F J; Konings, Erik J M; de Groot, Henk N; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2007-09-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine several Aristolochia species are used. Aristolochia spp. contain a mixture of aristolochic acids (AAs), mainly AA I and AA II which are nephrotoxicants and carcinogens. After AA-related nephropathy (AAN) and urothelial cancer were described in female patients in Belgium following intake of AA-contaminated herbal preparations, herbs with AAs were prohibited worldwide. Confusing nomenclature can cause AA contamination of certain Chinese traditional herbal preparations (THPs). Here we report the results of investigations by the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (VWA) into the presence of AAs in THPs sampled on the Dutch market using a liquid-chromatography--mass spectrometry method. Between 2002 and 2006 we sampled 190 Chinese THPs using recent information on Chinese THPs potentially containing AAs. AA I was found in 25 samples up to a concentration of 1,676 mg/kg. AA II was also found in 13 of these samples up to 444 mg/kg. All 25 positive samples including Mu Tong, Fang Ji, Tian Xian Teng and Xi Xin were part of a group of 68 THPs identified as possibly containing AAs. In a worst-case scenario, use of a sample of Mu Tong with the highest AA content over a 7-day period would result in the same intake levels of AAs which significantly raised the cancer risk in the Belgian AAN cases. Our results show that contaminated THPs still can be found on the market following worldwide publicity. Therefore, it can be concluded that testing of possibly AA-contaminated THPs is still essential.

  18. A safety assessment of fixed combinations of acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid, coformulated with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bach, P H; Berndt, W O; Delzell, E; Dubach, U; Finn, W F; Fox, J M; Hess, R; Michielsen, P; Sandler, D P; Trump, B; Williams, G

    1998-11-01

    Overuse and abuse of phenacetin-containing mixed analgesics has contributed to end-stage renal disease. Combination analgesics, especially those coformulated with caffeine, have been implicated as imparting a greater risk of analgesic-associated nephropathy (AAN) than single or coformulated analgesics without caffeine. This has led to a recommendation that the sale of "two plus caffeine" analgesic mixtures be reclassified from over-the-counter to prescription only availability. There is a rational basis for coformulating acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and acetaminophen (paracetamol) as this reduces the dose of each, without altering efficacy. The coformulation of caffeine with these analgesics has a significant adjuvant effect and increases analgesic efficacy 1.4-1.6-fold. Currently available animal and human data do not support the notion that the nephrotoxic risk from coformulated ASA and acetaminophen is higher than the risk from either ASA or acetaminophen alone, in equivalent analgesic doses. There are no epidemiological data that implicate caffeine in AAN, and only limited evidence that links excessive acetaminophen usage to renal disease. There is no evidence that caffeine increases analgesics papillotoxicity directly. The presence of caffeine in mixtures of analgesics are no more addictive than other sources of caffeine. There is no evidence to suggest that adding caffeine to analgesic mixtures enhances the potential for promoting analgesic misuse in the general population. Thus distinct therapeutic benefits of ASA, acetaminophen and caffeine appear to outweigh any known risk. It is doubtful if preventing the availability of these products will significantly affect the role of analgesic abuse/overuse in end-stage renal disease. Better risk management would come from a focused educational program, developed in a close collaboration between industry, healthcare professionals and consumer organizations, such a program must warn against the potential dangers of

  19. Mechanism of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of hypertension is observed in diabetic patients of both the types. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major reason for high morbidity, mortality and financial burden in such hypertensive diabetic patients. For this review, electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Google scholar were searched from 1990-2013. Multiple inter-related factors are responsible for the development of hypertension and therefore nephropathy in the chronic diabetic patients. Majority of such factors are identified to lead to extensive sodium reabsorption and peripheral vasoconstriction and thus leading to microvascular complications like nephropathy. Management of hypertension by targeting such mediators is the highly recommended therapy for controlling and treating diabetic nephropathy. Clinical trials suggests that drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway should be used as the first-line agents for the management of hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients. These agents are effective in slowing the progression of the end-stage kidney disease as well as lowering albuminuria. Researchers are also investigating the effectiveness of drug combination for better management of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. The present article is a review of the evidences which explains the underlying pathological changes which leads to the development of nephropathy in a hypertensive diabetic patients. The review also observes the clinical trials for different anti-hypertensive drugs which are recommended for the treatment of such patients. PMID:28197463

  20. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  1. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  2. Bile cast nephropathy: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaymon; Walayat, Saqib; Kalva, Nikhil; Palmer-Hill, Sidney; Dhillon, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Bile cast nephropathy is a condition of renal dysfunction in the setting of hyperbilirubinemia. There are very few cases of this condition reported in the last decade and a lack of established treatment guidelines. While the exact etiology remains unknown, bile cast nephropathy is presumed to be secondary to multiple concurrent insults to the kidney including direct toxicity from bile acids, obstructive physiology from bile casts, and systemic hypoperfusion from vasodilation. Therapy directed at bilirubin reduction may improve renal function, but will likely need dialysis or plasmapheresis as well. We report our case of bile cast nephropathy and the therapeutic measures undertaken in a middle-aged male with chronic renal insufficiency that developed hyperbilirubinemia and drug-induced liver injury secondary to antibiotic use. He developed acute renal injury in the setting of rising bilirubin. He subsequently had a progressive decline in renal and hepatic function, requiring dialysis and plasmapheresis with some improvement, ultimately requiring transplantation. PMID:27468221

  3. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to 'Averrhoa bilimbi' fruit juice ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bakul, G; Unni, V N; Seethaleksmy, N V; Mathew, A; Rajesh, R; Kurien, G; Rajesh, J; Jayaraj, P M; Kishore, D S; Jose, P P

    2013-07-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management.

  4. Clinical impact of albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Toyama, Tadashi; Hara, Akinori; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2012-02-01

    Patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, resulting in end-stage renal failure, are increasing in number. The pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy remains to be fully investigated. In the clinical setting, the presence of albuminuria/overt proteinuria and a low glomerular filtration rate may predict poor renal prognosis, but the prognosis of the normoalbuminuric renally insufficient diabetic patient remains controversial. In addition to the measurement of urinary albumin excretion, biomarker studies to detect diabetic nephropathy more specifically at the early stage have been performed worldwide. There is a growing body of evidence for remission and/or regression of diabetic nephropathy, which may be an indicator for cardiovascular and renal risk reduction. Deeper insights into the pathological characteristics as well as the clinical impact of albuminuria on renal and cardiovascular outcome are required.

  5. Reconciling the clinical practice guidelines on Bell's palsy from the AAO-HNSF and the AAN.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Seth R; Jones, Stephanie L; Getchius, Thomas S D; Gronseth, Gary S

    2014-05-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mononeuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. In the past 2 years, both the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) have published clinical practice guidelines aimed to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy. This commentary aims to address the similarities and differences in the scope and final recommendations made by each guideline development group.

  6. Antiepileptic drug selection for people with HIV/AIDS: evidence-based guidelines from the ILAE and AAN.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Simpson, David M; Fraimow, Henry; George, Jomy M; Okulicz, Jason F; Clifford, David B; Hachad, Houda; Levy, René H

    2012-01-01

    A joint panel of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) convened to develop guidelines for selection of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) among people with HIV/AIDS. The literature was systematically reviewed to assess the global burden of relevant comorbid entities, to determine the number of patients who potentially utilize AEDs and antiretroviral agents (ARVs), and to address AED-ARV interactions. Key findings from this literature search included the following: AED-ARV administration may be indicated in up to 55% of people taking ARVs. Patients receiving phenytoin may require a lopinavir/ritonavir dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged serum concentrations (Level C). Patients receiving valproic acid may require a zidovudine dosage reduction to maintain unchanged serum zidovudine concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of valproic acid and efavirenz may not require efavirenz dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients receiving ritonavir/atazanavir may require a lamotrigine dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged lamotrigine serum concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir/atazanavir and lamotrigine may not require lamotrigine dosage adjustment (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir and midazolam may not require midazolam dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients may be counseled that it is unclear whether dosage adjustment is necessary when other AEDs and ARVs are combined (Level U). It may be important to avoid enzyme-inducing AEDs in people on ARV regimens that include protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors because pharmacokinetic interactions may result in virologic failure, which has clinical implications for disease progression and development of ARV resistance. If such regimens are required for seizure control, patients may be monitored through pharmacokinetic assessments to ensure efficacy of the ARV regimen (Level C).

  7. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  8. AAN Epilepsy Quality Measures in clinical practice: a survey of neurologists.

    PubMed

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Spanaki, Marianna; Iyengar, Revathi; Barkley, Gregory L; Schultz, Lonni

    2012-08-01

    Epilepsy Quality Measures (EQM) were developed by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) to convey standardization and eliminate gaps and variations in the delivery of epilepsy care (Fountain et al., 2011 [1]). The aim of this study was to identify adherence to these measures and other emerging practice standards in epilepsy care. A 15-item survey was mailed to neurologists in Michigan, USA, inquiring about their practice patterns in relation to EQM. One hundred thirteen of the 792 surveyed Michigan Neurologists responded (14%). The majority (83% to 94%) addressed seizure type and frequency, reviewed EEG and MRI, and provided pregnancy counseling to women of childbearing potential. Our survey identified gaps in practice patterns such as counseling about antiepileptic drug (AED) side effects and knowledge about referral for surgical therapy of intractable epilepsy. Statistical significance in the responses on the AAN EQM was noted in relation to number of years in practice, number of epilepsy patients seen, and additional fellowship training in epilepsy. Practice patterns assessment in relation to other comorbidities revealed that although bone health and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy are addressed mainly in patients at risk, depression is infrequently discussed. The findings in this study indicate that additional educational efforts are needed to increase awareness and to improve quality of epilepsy care at various points of health care delivery.

  9. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy: a long road of discovery.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Amy Jayne; Duffy, Seamus; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2015-07-01

    The global prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is rising in parallel with the increasing incidence of diabetes in most countries. Unfortunately, up to 40 % of persons diagnosed with diabetes may develop kidney complications. Diabetic nephropathy is associated with substantially increased risks of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. An inherited susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy exists, and progress is being made unravelling the genetic basis for nephropathy thanks to international research collaborations, shared biological resources and new analytical approaches. Multiple epidemiological studies have highlighted the clinical heterogeneity of nephropathy and the need for better phenotyping to help define important subgroups for analysis and increase the power of genetic studies. Collaborative genome-wide association studies for nephropathy have reported unique genes, highlighted novel biological pathways and suggested new disease mechanisms, but progress towards clinically relevant risk prediction models for diabetic nephropathy has been slow. This review summarises the current status, recent developments and ongoing challenges elucidating the genetics of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  11. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pozdzik, Agnieszka A.; Giordano, Laetitia; Li, Gang; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Quellard, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; De Prez, Eric; Husson, Cécile; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Arlt, Volker M.; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Brochériou-Spelle, Isabelle; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Caron, Nathalie; Nortier, Joëlle L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ)+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target. Aims In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) inhibition in a rat model of AAN. Materials and Methods Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11) and its control isotype (13C4) were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc) was injected daily. Results At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema) in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation. PMID:27379382

  12. A new classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014: a report from Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Haneda, Masakazu; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Koya, Daisuke; Babazono, Tetsuya; Moriya, Tatsumi; Makino, Hirofumi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Yoshiki; Wada, Takashi; Ogawa, Susumu; Inaba, Masaaki; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Shigematsu, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tsuchiya, Ken; Honda, Keiko; Ichikawa, Kazuko; Shide, Kenichiro

    2015-02-01

    The Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy has revised its Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy (Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014) in line with the widespread use of key concepts such as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and chronic kidney disease. In revising the Classification, the Committee carefully evaluated, as relevant to current revision, the report of a study conducted by the Research Group of Diabetic Nephropathy, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. Major revisions to the Classification are summarized as follows: (1) eGFR is substituted for GFR in the Classification; (2) the subdivisions A and B in stage 3 (overt nephropathy) have been reintegrated; (3) stage 4 (kidney failure) has been redefined as a GFR less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), regardless of the extent of albuminuria; and (4) stress has been placed on the differential diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy versus non-diabetic kidney disease as being crucial in all stages of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. A new Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014: a report from Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Haneda, Masakazu; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Koya, Daisuke; Babazono, Tetsuya; Moriya, Tatsumi; Makino, Hirofumi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Yoshiki; Wada, Takashi; Ogawa, Susumu; Inaba, Masaaki; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Shigematsu, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tsuchiya, Ken; Honda, Keiko; Ichikawa, Kazuko; Shide, Kenichiro

    2015-03-01

    The Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy has revised its Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy (Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014) in line with the widespread use of key concepts, such as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In revising the Classification, the Committee carefully evaluated, as relevant to current revision, the report of a study conducted by the Research Group of Diabetic Nephropathy, Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. Major revisions to the Classification are summarized as follows: (i) eGFR is substituted for GFR in the Classification; (ii) the subdivisions A and B in stage 3 (overt nephropathy) have been reintegrated; (iii) stage 4 (kidney failure) has been redefined as a GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), regardless of the extent of albuminuria; and (iv) stress has been placed on the differential diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy versus non-diabetic kidney disease as being crucial in all stages of diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Low-protein diet for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Otoda, Toshiki; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of progressive kidney disease, leading to end-stage renal disease and renal replacement therapy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers have been considered effective at slowing the progression of kidney function deterioration. However, these drugs cannot sufficiently halt the progression of nephropathy to the extent that is required. A low-protein diet (LPD) is believed to be a nutritional intervention that may slow kidney disease progression. In fact, preclinical animal experiments have demonstrated excellent renoprotective effects of an LPD. However, in human clinical trials, analyses of the effects of protein restriction on diabetic nephropathy have not yet revealed consistently positive outcomes of this nutritional intervention. In this review, we analyze the potential renoprotective effects of an LPD on diabetic nephropathy and summarize the outcomes of clinical trials that have systematically investigated the efficacy of an LPD in diabetic nephropathy. In addition, we discuss some potential approaches associated with nutritional interventions to combat progressive kidney disease.

  15. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    SciTech Connect

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela; Nebert, Daniel W.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  16. Diabetic nephropathy among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subrata; Thameem, Farook; Alves, Tahira; Nolen, Jacqueline; Al-Shahrouri, Hania; Bansal, Shweta; Abboud, Hanna E.; Fanti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is growing rapidly worldwide as a consequence of the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among U.S. ethnic groups, Mexican Americans have a disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of DN and associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In communities bordering Mexico, as many as 90% of Mexican American patients with ESRD also suffer from T2DM compared to only 50% of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Both socio-economic factors and genetic predisposition appear to have a strong influence on this association. In addition, certain pathogenetic and clinical features of T2DM and DN are different in Mexican Americans compared to NHW, raising questions as to whether the diagnostic and treatment strategies that are standard practice in the NHW patient population may not be applicable in Mexican Americans. This article reviews the epidemiology of DN in Mexican Americans, describes the pathophysiology and associated risk factors, and identifies gaps in our knowledge and understanding that needs to be addressed by future investigations. PMID:22445478

  17. IgA nephropathy enigma.

    PubMed

    Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Raska, Milan

    2016-11-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis in the world. The disease is characterized by the presence of IgA-containing immune complexes in the circulation and in mesangial deposits with ensuing glomerular injury. Although in humans there are two IgA subclasses, only IgA1 molecules are involved. The exclusivity of participation of IgA1 in IgAN prompted extensive structural and immunological studies of the unique hinge region (HR) of IgA1, which is absent in otherwise highly homologous IgA2. HR of IgA1 with altered O-glycans serves as an antigen recognized by autoantibodies specific for aberrant HR glycans leading to the generation of nephritogenic immune complexes. However, there are several unresolved questions concerning the phylogenetic origin of human IgA1 HR, the structural basis of its antigenicity, the origin of antibodies specific for HR with altered glycan moieties, the regulatory defects in IgA1 glycosylation pathways, and the potential approaches applicable to the disease-specific interventions in the formation of nephritogenic immune complexes. This review focuses on the gaps in our knowledge of molecular and cellular events that are involved in the immunopathogenesis of IgAN.

  18. Coexistence of Fabry Disease and Membranous Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xie, Hua; Lin, Hongli; Chen, Shuni; Wang, Weidong; Zhao, Guangben; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with no family history or characteristic symptoms of Fabry disease presented with proteinuria. Histological and immunofluorescent analysis of kidney tissue collected revealed stage 1 membranous nephropathy. Electron microscopy of the same tissue revealed a large number of myeloid bodies (zebra bodies) in the glomerular epithelial cytoplasm and a mild irregular thickening of basement membrane. A diagnosis of Fabry disease was supported by the low α-galactosidase A activity detected in the patient's plasma, and confirmed by the detection of a pathogenic homozygous mutation in the α-galactosidase A gene. Therefore, the final diagnosis was of coexistent Fabry disease and stage 1 membranous nephropathy. This is the first case study reporting the coexistence of Fabry disease and membranous nephropathy. Our results emphasize the importance of electron microscopy in Fabry disease diagnosis.

  19. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Stec, Donald F.; Wang, Suwan; Stothers, Cody; Avance, Josh; Denson, Deon; Harris, Raymond; Voziyan, Paul

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was employed to study urinary metabolite profile in diabetic mouse models. • Mouse urinary metabolome showed major changes that are also found in human diabetic nephropathy. • These models can be new tools to study urinary biomarkers that are relevant to human disease. - Abstract: Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be

  20. Soybeans Ameliolate Diabetic Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Eun; Ahn, Soo Kyung; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun; Park, Seung Hwa; Yoon, Bang Bu

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most frequent and serious complications of diabetes mellitus. Soybeans have been shown to reduce urinary albumin excretion and total cholesterol in non-diabetic patients with nephrotic syndrome. However, reports focusing specifically on diabetic nephropathy are scarce and the available results are inconsistent. It was reported that soybean consumption reduced urinary protein excretion in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy, whereas it was found to elicit an increase in urinary protein excretion when soybeans were consumed by type 2 diabetic patients. This study aims to investigate the effects of soybean in diabetic nephropathy, particularly the effects of consuming soybeans on the histopathology of diabetic nephropathy, using aquaporin (AQP) and osteopontin (OPN) expression as diagnostic markers. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three groups: control, diabetic with red chow diet and diabetic with soybean diet. For histological examination, the expression of OPN and AQP, renal function and hemoglobin A1c were evaluated at the end of the study. Improvements in glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were demonstrated in the diabetic rat group given a soybean diet. OPN and AQP expression were suppressed in the kidney specimens of diabetic rats with the soybean diet. In conclusion, soybeans may prevent the weight loss and morphological disruption of the kidney associated with diabetes mellitus. Soybeans also may improve glycemic control. It seems likely that long-term control of blood glucose levels using a soybean diet could prevent the progression of diabetes mellitus, and therefore, nephropathy could be prevented. PMID:18955330

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Transport Proteins in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsun, Joseph G. S.; Yung, Susan; Chau, Mel K. M.; Shiu, Sammy W. M.; Chan, Tak Mao; Tan, Kathryn C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid accumulation has been shown to accelerate renal injury, and the intracellular accumulation of lipids may be caused by alterations in synthesis as well as lipid uptake and efflux. We have investigated the role of cellular cholesterol transport proteins including adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), G1 (ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in diabetic nephropathy. Methods Protein expression and the ability to mediate cholesterol efflux of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI was determined in human renal mesangial cells and proximal tubular epithelial cells cultured under normal or high glucose conditions. Renal expression of these cholesterol transporters was examined in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes. Results ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI were expressed in both human renal mesangial cells and proximal tubular epithelial cells, and mediated cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI and HDL. In vitro, hyperglycemia reduced the expression and the ability to mediate cholesterol efflux of all three cholesterol transporters (p<0.05). In vivo studies showed that intra-renal accumulation of lipids was increased in diabetic mice, particularly in mice with nephropathy. This was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI in the kidneys. These changes were already seen in diabetic mice without nephropathy and preceded the development of nephropathy. Diabetic mice with nephropathy had the lowest level of these cholesterol transporters. Conclusion Inducing diabetes with streptozotocin significantly reduced renal expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI. Defects in cholesterol export pathway in renal cells could therefore promote cholesterol accumulation and might contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25181357

  2. [Treatment and metaphylaxis of gout complicated by nephropathy and urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Avdoshin, V P; Andriukhin, M I; Annenkov, A V; Israfilov, M N

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of clinical efficacy of combined treatment and metaphylaxis in 58 patients with gout complicated by nephropathy and urolithiasis was performed. The study included 41 (71%) men and 27 (29%) women aged 44 to 88 years (mean age - 58 +/- 7 years). All patients received parenteral therapy with trometamol H, 5 -10 infusion for the course, an average of 7 infusions. For the metaphylaxis, all patients received biologically active supplement urisan 2 tablets 2 times a day during next three months against the background of drug therapy. Findings indicate a high clinical efficacy of the trometamol H in the combined treatment of patients with gout, complicated by nephropathy and urolithiasis, considering that improvement of renal function, microcirculation in the renal parenchyma, increased glomerular filtration rate, normalization of nitrogenous wastes levels, partial or complete dissolution of concretions of the kidneys, a significant decrease in the tophs size, an increase in motor activity were observed, which ultimately improves the quality of life for these patients. Metaphylaxis using urisan for 3 months on a background of traditional therapy contributed to a stable normalization of blood uric acid levels, which prevented the exacerbation of underlying disease and recurrent stone formation. These data allow to recommend reducing the dose of traditional anti-gout drugs and conducting repeated course of metaphylaxis with the urisan after 5-6 months during 3 months.

  3. [Physiopathology of nephropathy studied with contrast media].

    PubMed

    Morales Buenrostro, L E; Tellez Zenteno, J F; Torre Delgadillo, A

    2000-01-01

    For the technological advances in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, the use of intravenous contrast media in the hospital is more and more frequent. It can produce acute renal failure secondary to its nephrotoxicity known as contrast media nephropathy. This review describes the pathophysiologic mechanisms of contrast media injury, including cytotoxicity caused by hyperosmoloarity of contrast media, the hemodynamic factors and the role of the renin-angiotensin system, prostaglandins, oxygen free radicals, endothelin-1, adenosine, nitric oxide and others. The understanding of this information is of vital importance for the development of prophylactic strategies for contrast media nephropathy.

  4. Effect of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) leaf extract on diabetic nephropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Doaa S; Abd El-Maksoud, Marwa A E

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by albuminuria, hypertension and progressive renal insufficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) leaf extract on diabetic nephropathy in rats. Streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats were orally treated with three doses (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) of strawberry leaf extract for 30 days. Nephropathy biomarkers in plasma and kidney were examined at the end of the experiment. The three doses of strawberry leaf extract significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, kidney injury molecule (Kim)-1, renal malondialdehyde (MDA), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)- 6 and caspase-3 in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, the levels of plasma insulin, albumin, uric acid, renal catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) were significantly elevated in diabetic rats treated with strawberry leaf extract. These results indicate the role of strawberry leaves extract as anti-diabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25645466

  5. Effect of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) leaf extract on diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Doaa S; Abd El-Maksoud, Marwa A E

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by albuminuria, hypertension and progressive renal insufficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) leaf extract on diabetic nephropathy in rats. Streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats were orally treated with three doses (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) of strawberry leaf extract for 30 days. Nephropathy biomarkers in plasma and kidney were examined at the end of the experiment. The three doses of strawberry leaf extract significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, kidney injury molecule (Kim)-1, renal malondialdehyde (MDA), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)- 6 and caspase-3 in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, the levels of plasma insulin, albumin, uric acid, renal catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) were significantly elevated in diabetic rats treated with strawberry leaf extract. These results indicate the role of strawberry leaves extract as anti-diabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy: an update.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mandeep Kumar; Singh, Umesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to trigger retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy, a long-term major microvascular complication of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, affects a large population worldwide. Recent findings suggest that numerous pathways are activated during the course of diabetes mellitus and that these pathways individually or collectively play a role in the induction and progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, clinical strategies targeting these pathways to manage diabetic nephropathy remain unsatisfactory, as the number of diabetic patients with nephropathy is increasing yearly. To develop ground-breaking therapeutic options to prevent the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the disease is mandatory. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the underlying mechanisms and downstream pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. IgA nephropathy complicating diabetic glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orfila, C; Lepert, J C; Modesto, A; Pipy, B; Suc, J M

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was done on 66 diabetic patients who had renal biopsies performed during 1979-1994. This review shows 10 patients who presented IgA nephropathy associated with diabetic nephropathy. Six patients had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 4 patients non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. All patients presented with proteinuria and 7 had hematuria. Four patients presented with renal impairment. Histologic evaluation disclosed the presence of thickened glomerular basement membranes and increased mesangial matrix in all cases, associated with nodular sclerosis in 8 cases. By immunofluorescence, diffuse mesangial IgA deposits were observed in all cases. The high incidence of the coexistence of IgA nephropathy and diabetes seems not merely coincidental. Structural and/or functional abnormalities of the glomerular basement membranes might facilitate the development of immune complex glomerular diseases. In patients with diabetes, the appearance of urinary abnormalities and/or deterioration in renal function altered the clinical history of diabetic nephropathy. The disorders are clinically suggestive of the presence of nondiabetic renal disease and raised the possibility of another pathogenetic mechanism.

  8. Lessons From the KK-Ay Mouse, a Spontaneous Animal Model for the Treatment of Human Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes throughout the world. In human glomeruli, expansion of diffuse mesangial matrices, exudative lesions and/or segmental nodular sclerosis are pathological features of diabetic nephropathy. There have been many reports on the pathogenesis and treatment of type 2 diabetes using various animal models. It appears that KK-Ay mice, especially in terms of their immunohistological findings, are a suitable animal model for human type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Many compounds have been reported to be advanced glycation end product (AGE) inhibitors such as aminoguanidine, angiotensin II receptor inhibitors and pyridoxamine, and these are useful in therapeutic interventions for reducing AGEs. Pyridoxamine ameliorates lipid peroxidation and insulin resistance in KK-Ay mice. Combination therapy with angiotensin converting inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARB), including an ARB and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, i.e. anti-hypertensive and anti-reactive oxygen species effects, or with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), i.e. anti-microinflammation effect, have shown efficacy in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy in KK-Ay mice. It appears that KK-Ay mice are a useful spontaneous animal model for the evaluation of pathogenesis and treatment in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Fenofibrate and dipyridamole treatments in low-doses either alone or in combination blunted the development of nephropathy in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Varatharajan, Rajavel; Nyo, Ying Hui; Renushia, Raja; Raaginey, Devarajan; Oh, Ann Nah; Akhtar, Shaikh Sohrab; Rupeshkumar, Mani; Sundram, Karupiah; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A

    2014-12-01

    Low-doses of fenofibrate and dipyridamole have pleiotropic renoprotective actions in diabetic rats. This study investigated their combined effect relative to their individual treatments and lisinopril in rats with diabetic nephropathy. Streptozotocin (55mg/kg, i.p., once)-administered diabetic rats were allowed for 10 weeks to develop nephropathy. Diabetic rats after 10 weeks developed nephropathy with discernible renal structural and functional changes as assessed in terms of increase in kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW), and elevations of serum creatinine, urea and uric acid, which accompanied with elevated serum triglycerides and decreased high-density lipoproteins. Hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid Schiff and Masson trichrome staining confirmed renal pathological changes in diabetic rats that included glomerular capsular wall distortion, mesangial cell expansion, glomerular microvascular condensation, tubular damage and degeneration and fibrosis. Low-dose fenofibrate (30mg/kg, p.o., 4 weeks) and low-dose dipyridamole (20mg/kg, p.o., 4 weeks) treatment either alone or in combination considerably reduced renal structural and functional abnormalities in diabetic rats, but without affecting the elevated glucose level. Fenofibrate, but not dipyridamole, significantly prevented the lipid alteration and importantly the uric acid elevation in diabetic rats. Lisinopril (5mg/kg, p.o., 4 weeks, reference compound), prevented the hyperglycemia, lipid alteration and development of diabetic nephropathy. Lipid alteration and uric acid elevation, besides hyperglycemia, could play key roles in the development of nephropathy. Low-doses of fenofibrate and dipyridamole treatment either alone or in combination markedly prevented the diabetes-induced nephropathy. Their combination was as effective as to their individual treatment, but not superior in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Unambiguous Detection of Multiple TP53 Gene Mutations in AAN-Associated Urothelial Cancer in Belgium Using Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Selda; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Ambroise, Jérôme; Durant, Jean-François; Heusterspreute, Michel; Guiot, Yves

    2014-01-01

    In the Balkan and Taiwan, the relationship between exposure to aristolochic acid and risk of urothelial neoplasms was inferred from the A>T genetic hallmark in TP53 gene from malignant cells. This study aimed to characterize the TP53 mutational spectrum in urothelial cancers consecutive to Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy in Belgium. Serial frozen tumor sections from female patients (n = 5) exposed to aristolochic acid during weight-loss regimen were alternatively used either for p53 immunostaining or laser microdissection. Tissue areas with at least 60% p53-positive nuclei were selected for microdissecting sections according to p53-positive matching areas. All areas appeared to be carcinoma in situ. After DNA extraction, mutations in the TP53 hot spot region (exons 5–8) were identified using nested-PCR and sequencing. False-negative controls consisted in microdissecting fresh-frozen tumor tissues both from a patient with a Li-Fraumeni syndrome who carried a p53 constitutional mutation, and from KRas mutated adenocarcinomas. To rule out false-positive results potentially generated by microdissection and nested-PCR, a phenacetin-associated urothelial carcinoma and normal fresh ureteral tissues (n = 4) were processed with high laser power. No unexpected results being identified, molecular analysis was pursued on malignant tissues, showing at least one mutation in all (six different mutations in two) patients, with 13/16 exonic (nonsense, 2; missense, 11) and 3/16 intronic (one splice site) mutations. They were distributed as transitions (n = 7) or transversions (n = 9), with an equal prevalence of A>T and G>T (3/16 each). While current results are in line with A>T prevalence previously reported in Balkan and Taiwan studies, they also demonstrate that multiple mutations in the TP53 hot spot region and a high frequency of G>T transversion appear as a complementary signature reflecting the toxicity of a cumulative dose of aristolochic acid ingested over a

  11. [Berger's disease or primary IgA nephropathy in children].

    PubMed

    Renoult, E; Cochat, P; Jonon, B; Kessler, M

    1989-01-01

    Primary IgA mesangial nephropathy was first described in adults by Berger, and has been increasingly recognized in children. IgA nephropathy is a frequent type of glomerulonephritis in 3 to 15 year-old children in France. Clinical features and outcome have been defined and the progression to renal failure is possible. The pathogeny of IgA nephropathy remains unclear and is under multifactorial control and, at present, no satisfactory specific treatment is available.

  12. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms.

  13. Complex networks analysis of obstructive nephropathy data.

    PubMed

    Zanin, M; Boccaletti, S

    2011-09-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy (ON) is one of the most frequent nephropathy observed among newborns and children, and the first cause of end-stage renal diseases treated by dialysis or transplantation. This pathology is characterized by the presence of an obstacle in the urinary tract, e.g., stenosis or abnormal implantation of the urethra in the kidney. In spite of important advances, pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this contribution, the topology of complex networks created upon vectors of features for control and ON subjects is related with the severity of the pathology. Nodes in these networks represent genetic and metabolic profiles, while connections between them indicate an abnormal relation between their expressions. Resulting topologies allow discriminating ON subjects and detecting which genetic or metabolic elements are responsible for the malfunction.

  14. Classification and Differential Diagnosis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world in both developed and developing countries. This review briefly introduces the characteristic pathological changes of DN and Tervaert pathological classification, which divides DN into four classifications according to glomerular lesions, along with a separate scoring system for tubular, interstitial, and vascular lesions. Given the heterogeneity of the renal lesions and the complex mechanism underlying diabetic nephropathy, Tervaert classification has both significance and controversies in the guidance of diagnosis and prognosis. Applications and evaluations using Tervaert classification and indications for renal biopsy are summarized in this review according to recent studies. Meanwhile, differential diagnosis with another nodular glomerulopathy and the situation that a typical DN superimposed with a nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD) are discussed and concluded in this review. PMID:28316995

  15. Enzyme replacement therapy and Fabry nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Warnock, David G; Daina, Erica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; West, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Involvement of the kidneys in Fabry disease ("nephropathy") occurs in male and female individuals. The majority of patients with progressive nephropathy will have significant proteinuria and develop progressive loss of kidney function, leading to ESRD. All too often, treating physicians may ignore "normal" serum creatinine levels or "minimal" proteinuria and fail to assess properly the severity of kidney involvement and institute appropriate management. Fabry nephropathy is treatable, even in patients with fairly advanced disease. Although the cornerstone of therapy remains enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase, this treatment alone does not reduce urine protein excretion. Treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors must be added to enzyme replacement therapy to reduce urine protein excretion with the hope that this will stabilize kidney function. Kidney function, with at least estimated GFR based on serum creatinine and measurements of urinary protein, should be measured at every clinic visit, and the rate of change of the estimated GFR should be followed over time. Antiproteinuric therapy can be dosed to a prespecified urine protein target rather than a specific BP goal, with the proviso that successful therapy will usually lower the BP below the goal of 130/80 mmHg that is used for other forms of kidney disease. The overall goal for treating Fabry nephropathy is to reduce the rate of loss of GFR to -1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)/yr, which is that seen in the normal adult population. A systematic approach is presented for reaching this goal in the individual patient.

  16. Pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kar Neng

    2012-03-20

    Since its first description in 1968, IgA nephropathy has remained the most common form of idiopathic glomerulonephritis leading to chronic kidney disease in developed countries. The exact pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy is still not well defined. Current data implicate an important genetic factor, especially in promoting the overproduction of an aberrant form of IgA1. The immunochemical aberrancy of IgA nephropathy is characterized by the undergalactosylation of O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1. However, such aberrant glycosylation alone does not cause renal injury. The next stage of disease development requires the formation of glycan-specific IgG and IgA antibodies that recognize the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecule. These antibodies often have reactivity against antigens from extrinsic microorganisms and might arise from recurrent mucosal infection. B cells that respond to mucosal infections, particularly tonsillitis, might produce the nephritogenic IgA1 molecule. With increased immune-complex formation and decreased clearance owing to reduced uptake by the liver, IgA1 binds to the glomerular mesangium via an as yet unidentified receptor. Glomerular IgA1 deposits trigger the local production of cytokines and growth factors, leading to the activation of mesangial cells and the complement system. Emerging data suggest that mesangial-derived mediators following glomerular deposition of IgA1 lead to podocyte and tubulointerstitial injury via mesangio-podocytic-tubular crosstalk. This Review summarizes the latest findings in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

  17. Pathology of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ian S D

    2014-08-01

    IgA nephropathy is defined by the presence of IgA-dominant or co-dominant immune deposits within glomeruli. Biopsy specimens meeting these diagnostic criteria have a range of histological changes that are reflected in the variable clinical course of IgA nephropathy. The impact of histology on outcomes in IgA nephropathy has been clarified in a number of large retrospective clinicopathological studies. These studies have consistently demonstrated that the stage of disease at presentation, as indicated by the extent of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in the biopsy, is the strongest histological predictor of renal survival. The effect of active proliferative lesions on the disease course is less clear cut, owing in part to considerable treatment bias in most published retrospective studies. There is evidence that endocapillary hypercellularity and cellular crescents are responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, but this observation requires confirmation in prospective randomized controlled trials. Future challenges include improving the reproducibility of histological scoring, particularly for the presence and extent of endocapillary lesions, and to improve prognostic modelling by combining histological data with clinical variables and biomarker data.

  18. BASP1 Promotes Apoptosis in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Lorz, Corina; Gnirke, Andrea; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Nair, Viji; Egido, Jesus; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the mechanisms that lead to diabetes-induced cell death are not fully understood. Here, we combined a functional genomics screen for cDNAs that induce apoptosis in vitro with transcriptional profiling of renal biopsies from patients with DN. Twelve of the 138 full-length cDNAs that induced cell death in human embryonic kidney cells matched upregulated mRNA transcripts in tissue from human DN. Confirmatory screens identified induction of BASP1 in tubular cross sections of human DN tissue. In vitro, apoptosis-inducing conditions such as serum deprivation, high concentrations of glucose, and proinflammatory cytokines increased BASP1 mRNA and protein in human tubular epithelial cells. In normal cells, BASP1 localized to the cytoplasm, but in apoptotic cells, it colocalized with actin in the periphery. Overexpression of BASP1 induced cell death with features of apoptosis; conversely, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of BASP1 protected tubular cells from apoptosis. Supporting possible involvement of BASP1 in renal disease other than DN, we also observed significant upregulation of renal BASP1 in spontaneously hypertensive rats and a trend toward increased tubulointerstitial BASP1 mRNA in human hypertensive nephropathy. In summary, a combined functional genomics approach identified BASP1 as a proapoptotic factor in DN and possibly also in hypertensive nephropathy. PMID:20110383

  19. Histological changes of kidney in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pourghasem, Mohsen; Shafi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of chronic renal disorders and end-stage kidney disease in developed countries. It is the major cause of dialysis and transplantation. Failure in renal function causes wide disorders in the body. Diabetes results in wide range of alterations in the renal tissue. It is believed that early histological changes in diabetic nephropathy are detectable 2 years after diabetes is diagnosed. The glomerular alterations are the most important lesions in the diabetic nephropathy (DN). The Renal Pathology Society provides a new pathological classification for the detection of histopathology of DN. It divides diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions. Alloxan or streptozotocin induced diabetic rat is the one most widely used specie to study DN. Histological changes in the rat DN closely resemble the human disease and the most information of this review was obtained through the study of rat DN. All cell types of the kidney such as mesangial cells, podocytes and tubulointerstitial cells are liable to be affected in the event of DN. Severity of renal lesions is associated to the clinical aspect of renal outcome, but the aim of this article was only to review the histological changes of kidney in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26644877

  20. Methenamine silver staining quantitative digital histochemistry in chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Sakar, M; Sonmez, D; Tekis, D

    2004-12-01

    Renal function and final outcome of renal allografts have been correlated with irreversible damage. This study describes a quantitative histochemical method relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining of all renal compartments. Among 60 renal allograft biopsies from 43 patients, 15 biopsies showing pure chronic allograft nephropathy were selected to determine PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP), using image analysis with quantitative histochemistry. Of the 15 cases, 9 (60%) were grade I and 6 (40%) were grade II chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The mean serum creatinine (sCr) value was 1.86 +/- 0.47 for allograft biopsies. The mean (+/-SD) SAP for the implantation biopsies was 10.58 +/- 1.87%, and for allograft biopsies 25.26 +/- 9.67 (P <.000). The serum creatinine (sCr) values for grade I versus II CAN were 1.63 +/- 0.24 versus 2.20 +/- 0.54 mg/dL, respectively (P=.019), and SAP values were 18.97 +/- 0.24 versus 34.7 +/- 5.89 (P=.003). There was a strong positive correlation between sCr values and SAP (P=.005; r=0.64). These findings show the PAMS approach to be a useful alternative method for reflecting damage in more than one compartment of the renal tissue. Also, the method can discriminated implantation and allograft biopsies as well as grade I and II CAN cases. The series is small for a multivariate analysis of the value of SAP measurements in PAMS-stained sections as a prognosticator, but the data support its use.

  1. Anticoagulant-related nephropathy in a patient with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Góis, Mário; Azevedo, Ariana; Carvalho, Fernanda; Nolasco, Fernando

    2017-02-20

    Anticoagulant-related nephropathy is a type of acute kidney injury caused by overcoagulation. We describe a case of an 84-year-old man with arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation treated with acenocoumarol, who presented with haematoproteinuria and acute kidney injury during a phase of excessive anticoagulation. In addition to IgA nephropathy, renal biopsy also revealed acute tubular necrosis, red blood cell casts and positive iron staining in tubular cells. After this acute episode, renal function improved and proteinuria decreased below the nephrotic range.

  2. [Evaluation of nephropathies in children with rheumatoid arthritis and prolonged therapy with salicylates].

    PubMed

    Salazar, A C; López, E; Vargas, R

    1980-01-01

    The study included 18 school-age and adolescent patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who had consumed from 351 to 6393 gm. (average 2813 gm.) as total dose for the control of their disease. All of them underwent a complete physical examination, general laboratory tests and as specific tests of renal function; urinalysis, urine culture, endogenous creatinine clearance, Addis count (red and white cells), sodium and potassium urinary excretion, urinary acidity capacity, administration of ammonium chloride and capacity of urinary concentration following water restriction. Normal results in practically all parameters led to conclude that a clear evidence of nephropathy due to salicylic acid consumption, was not found in any of the patients studied.

  3. Risk factor control is key in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gareth; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged duration of diabetes, poor glycaemic control and hypertension are major risk factors for both diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Optimising blood sugar control together with excellent control of blood pressure can reduce the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy should be considered in any patient with diabetes when persistent albuminuria develops. Microalbuminuria is the earliest clinically detectable indicator of diabetic nephropathy risk. The majority of patients with diabetic nephropathy are appropriately diagnosed based on elevated urinary albumin excretion and/or reduced 0032-6518 renal function. Patients with type 2 diabetes should have annual urinary ACR measurements from the time of diabetes diagnosis while those with type 1 diabetes should commence five years after diagnosis. Blood pressure lowering to 130/80mmHg and reduction of proteinuria to <1 g/day retards progression of diabetic nephropathy and reduces the number of cardiovascular events. Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are effective in reducing proteinuria, managing hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk. Unless there are clear contraindications or intolerance all patients with diabetic nephropathy should be prescribed an ACEI or ARB. Stopping an ACEI or ARB during intercurrent illness or times of volume depletion is critically important. Patients with diabetic nephropathy should have at least yearly measurements of blood pressure, renal function and urinary ACR.

  4. Ameliorative effect of the cinnamon oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum upon early stage diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Awanish; Bhatti, Rajbir; Singh, Amarjit; Singh Ishar, Mohan Paul

    2010-03-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the ameliorative effect of the cinnamon oil upon early stage diabetic nephropathy owing to its antioxidant and antidiabetic effect. Cinnamon oil was extracted by hydro-distillation of the dried inner bark of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume. Further characterization of the extracted oil was carried out using IR, (1)H-NMR, and (13)C-NMR techniques. Early stage of diabetic nephropathy was induced by administration of alloxan (150 mg/kg, I. P.). Cinnamon oil was administered at varying doses (5, 10, 20 mg/kg; I. P.) while the level of fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, urea, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, and catalase were determined. These parameters in cinnamon oil treated groups were compared with those of standard (glipizide; 10 mg/kg) and vehicle treated groups in order to investigate if cinnamon oil confers a significant protection against diabetic nephropathy. Histological studies of the kidney proved the protective effect of cinnamon oil by reducing the glomerular expansion, eradicating hyaline casts, and decreasing the tubular dilatations. Our results indicate that the volatile oil from cinnamon contains more than 98 % cinnamaldehyde and that it confers dose-dependent, significant protection against alloxan-induced renal damage, the maximum decrease in fasting blood glucose having been achieved at the dose of 20 mg/kg.

  5. Mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy--old buddies and newcomers part 2.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, P P; Isermann, B

    2010-11-01

    The clinical translation of established pathomechanisms of diabetic nephropathy improved the outcome in patients with diabetic nephropathy. However, they fail to halt or even reverse diabetic nephropathy, even though the feasibility of disease reversal has been established. The second part of this review summarizes recent novel insights into the mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy focusing on novel candidate mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy. These studies emphasize a crucial role of endothelial dependent mechanisms, which, however, can not be viewed as independent determinants of diabetic nephropathy. Rather, the endothelial dependent mechanisms act in concert with other cellular systems, establishing an intra-glomerular cross-talk which determines the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Rodent models of diabetic nephropathy: their utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease. Therefore, novel therapies for the suppression of diabetic nephropathy must be developed. Rodent models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases and testing novel therapies, and many type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodent models have been established for the study of diabetes and diabetic complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals are widely used as a model of type 1 diabetes. Akita diabetic mice that have an Ins2+/C96Y mutation and OVE26 mice that overexpress calmodulin in pancreatic β-cells serve as a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In addition, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, Wistar fatty rats, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats serve as rodent models of type 2 diabetes. An animal model of diabetic nephropathy should exhibit progressive albuminuria and a decrease in renal function, as well as the characteristic histological changes in the glomeruli and the tubulointerstitial lesions that are observed in cases of human diabetic nephropathy. A rodent model that strongly exhibits all these features of human diabetic nephropathy has not yet been developed. However, the currently available rodent models of diabetes can be useful in the study of diabetic nephropathy by increasing our understanding of the features of each diabetic rodent model. Furthermore, the genetic background and strain of each mouse model result in differences in susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria and the development of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Therefore, the validation of an animal model reproducing human diabetic nephropathy will significantly facilitate our understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we focus on rodent models of diabetes and discuss the utility and limitations of these models for the study of diabetic

  7. Rodent models of diabetic nephropathy: their utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease. Therefore, novel therapies for the suppression of diabetic nephropathy must be developed. Rodent models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases and testing novel therapies, and many type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodent models have been established for the study of diabetes and diabetic complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals are widely used as a model of type 1 diabetes. Akita diabetic mice that have an Ins2+/C96Y mutation and OVE26 mice that overexpress calmodulin in pancreatic β-cells serve as a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In addition, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, Wistar fatty rats, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats serve as rodent models of type 2 diabetes. An animal model of diabetic nephropathy should exhibit progressive albuminuria and a decrease in renal function, as well as the characteristic histological changes in the glomeruli and the tubulointerstitial lesions that are observed in cases of human diabetic nephropathy. A rodent model that strongly exhibits all these features of human diabetic nephropathy has not yet been developed. However, the currently available rodent models of diabetes can be useful in the study of diabetic nephropathy by increasing our understanding of the features of each diabetic rodent model. Furthermore, the genetic background and strain of each mouse model result in differences in susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria and the development of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Therefore, the validation of an animal model reproducing human diabetic nephropathy will significantly facilitate our understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we focus on rodent models of diabetes and discuss the utility and limitations of these models for the study of diabetic

  8. SGLT2 Expression is increased in Human Diabetic Nephropathy: SGLT2 Inhibition Decreases Renal Lipid Accumulation, Inflammation and the Development of Nephropathy in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxin X; Levi, Jonathan; Luo, Yuhuan; Myakala, Komuraiah; Herman-Edelstein, Michal; Qiu, Liru; Wang, Dong; Peng, Yingqiong; Grenz, Almut; Lucia, Scott; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; D'Agati, Vivette D; Koepsell, Hermann; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Rosenberg, Avi; Levi, Moshe

    2017-02-14

    There is very limited human renal sodium gradient dependent glucose transporter protein SGLT2 mRNA and protein expression data reported in the literature. Aim 1 of this study was to determine SGLT2 mRNA and protein levels in human and animal models of diabetic nephropathy. We have found that the expression of SGLT2 mRNA and protein is increased in renal biopsies from human subjects with diabetic nephropathy. This is in contrast to db-db mice which had no changes in renal SGLT-2 protein expression. Furthermore, the effect of SGLT2 inhibition on renal lipid content and inflammation is not known. Aim 2 of this study was to determine the potential mechanisms of beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition in progression of diabetic renal disease. We treated db/db mice with a selective SGLT2 inhibitor JNJ 39933673. We found that SGLT2 inhibition caused marked decreases in systolic blood pressure, kidney weight/body weight ratio, urinary albumin and urinary thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS). SGLT2 inhibition prevented renal lipid accumulation via inhibition of ChREBP-β, LPK, SCD-1 and DGAT1, key transcriptional factors and enzymes that mediate fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. SGLT2 inhibition also prevented inflammation via inhibition of CD68 macrophage accumulation, and expression of p65, TLR4, MCP-1 and OPN. These effects were associated with reduced mesangial expansion, accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and type IV collagen, and loss of podocyte markers WT1 and synaptopodin, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. In summary, our study showed that SGLT2 inhibition modulates renal lipid metabolism and inflammation and prevents the development of nephropathy in db/db mice.

  9. Possible genetic defects in regulation of glycosaminoglycans in patients with diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Deckert, T.; Horowitz, I.M.; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, A.; Kjellen, L.; Deckert, M.; Lykkelund, C.; Burcharth, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis of genetic defects in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) regulation among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nephropathy was assessed by studies in tissue cultures of fibroblasts obtained from 7 patients with normal urinary albumin excretion, 11 patients with diabetic nephropathy, and 6 nondiabetic control subjects. The incorporation of (2H) glucosamine and (35S) sulfate into hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate (CS + DS), and heparan sulfate (HS) was measured in cells, matrix, and medium and related to micrograms of tissue protein. Large interindividual variations were seen in all three groups, and the incorporation of (3H) glucosamine into HA, CS + DS, and HS and (35S) sulfate into CS + DS and HS were not significantly different between the three groups. However, the fractional incorporation of (3H)glucosamine into HS was significantly reduced in diabetic patients with nephropathy compared with control subjects. This was the case not only when related to the total amount of GAGs (P = 0.014) but also when related to HA (P = 0.014). No significant difference was seen between control subjects and normoalbuminuric diabetic patients. The degree of N-sulfation of HS was not significantly different between the experimental groups. The results suggest that patients with diabetic nephropathy may suffer from deficiencies of coordinate regulation in the biosynthesis of GAG in fibroblasts, which may lead to a reduced density of HS in the extracellular matrix. If these changes reflect alterations in the biosynthesis of GAG from endothelial, myomedial, and mesangial cells, this observation may be relevant for the pathogenesis of severe diabetic complications.

  10. Diabetic nephropathy in Africa: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Naidoo, Jashira; Kengne, Andre P

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and incidence of diabetic nephropathy in Africa. METHODS: We performed a systematic narrative review of published literature following the MOOSE Guidelines for Meta-Analysis and Systematic Reviews of Observational Studies. We searched PubMed-MEDLINE for all articles published in English and French languages between January 1994 and July 2014 using a predefined strategy based on the combination of relevant terms and the names of each of the 54 African countries and African sub-regions to capture the largest number of studies, and hand-searched the reference lists of retrieved articles. Included studies reported on the prevalence, incidence or determinants of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes within African countries. RESULTS: Overall, we included 32 studies from 16 countries; two being population-based studies and the remaining being clinic-based surveys. Most of the studies (90.6%) were conducted in urban settings. Methods for assessing and classifying CKD varied widely. Measurement of urine protein was the most common method of assessing kidney damage (62.5% of studies). The overall prevalence of CKD varied from 11% to 83.7%. Incident event rates were 94.9% for proteinuria at 10 years of follow-up, 34.7% for end-stage renal disease at 5 years of follow-up and 18.4% for mortality from nephropathy at 20 years of follow-up. Duration of diabetes, blood pressure, advancing age, obesity and glucose control were the common determinants of kidney disease. CONCLUSION: The burden of CKD is important among people with diabetes in Africa. High quality data from large population-based studies with validated measures of kidney function are still needed to better capture the magnitude and characteristics of diabetic nephropathy in Africa. PMID:26069725

  11. Membranous nephropathy that first presented in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Yumie; Iyoda, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Ai; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Kuroki, Aki; Shibata, Takanori; Akizawa, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman at 17 weeks of gestation who was first noted to have proteinuria and microscopic hematuria at 13 weeks of gestation was admitted to our hospital with proteinuria that progressed to nephrotic syndrome (NS). Despite the treatment with prednisolone, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy, the NS worsened. The patient underwent an elective abortion at 21 weeks of gestation, and the NS then went into partial remission. A renal biopsy revealed membranous nephropathy (MN). There was no evidence of secondary MN. This is the first reported case of subclinical idiopathic MN that first developed in pregnancy.

  12. [Pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Meza Letelier, Carlos Eduardo; San Martín Ojeda, Camilo Alfredo; Ruiz Provoste, José Javier; Frugone Zaror, Cristobal Jesus

    2017-01-12

    Chronic kidney disease is a common complication of diabetes. Its importance lies in its high prevalence and future projection. It is associated with high health costs and global cardiovascular deterioration as well. The development of this disease pathophysiology is being studied and it is known that a series of complex molecular pathways determining a microvascular disease are involved. This review addresses the known pathways in the development of diabetic nephropathy aiming to improve the understanding of potential therapeutic targets that could be developed in the future.

  13. [Contrast-induced nephropathy: An update].

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, V; Azzalini, L; Tadros, V X; Picard, F; Ly, H Q

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is common in hospitalized patients. Its occurrence is associated with an increased hospitalization stay and cost, morbidity and mortality. Thus, preventives strategies remain a major issue. Patients that are referred for cardiac catheterization are among the most vulnerable to develop CIN due to their comorbidities. Moreover, in some cases, such preventives measures cannot be introduced due to emergent clinical settings. After a summary regarding the properties of iodinated contrast medium, the aim of this work was to review the definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis and preventive strategies related to CIN.

  14. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  15. Beethoven's nephropathy and death: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P J

    1993-01-01

    The autopsy description of Beethoven's nephropathy is so typical of renal papillary necrosis, that the diagnosis is as near to certain as is possible, in the absence of a histological examination. A review of the symptoms and clinical course of Beethoven's final illness is consistent with this diagnosis. It is proposed that the cause was an acute onset diabetes mellitus, complicating chronic pancreatitis. Beethoven's case appears to be the first report in the literature of an autopsy proven case of renal papillary necrosis. PMID:8459382

  16. The functional Q84R polymorphism of TRIB3 gene is associated with diabetic nephropathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyong; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Suijun; Wang, Xuanchun; Zhou, Houguang; Fang, Wenjun; Qin, Li; Su, Qing

    2015-01-25

    Increased oxidative stress and circulating free fatty acids (FFA) has been suggested to involve in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. TRIB3 can inhibit FFA and reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulated podocyte production of MCP-1. Smoking increases the production of reactive oxygen species, which accelerates oxidative stress under hyperglycemia. To determine whether the Q84R polymorphism (rs2295490), alone or in combination with smoking, contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy, a case-control study was performed in 812 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Among patients, 214 had diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria (n=156) or overt albuminuria (n=58), and 598 did not show either of these symptoms but had diabetes for ≥10 years and were not undergoing antihypertension treatment. After adjustment for confounders, TRIB3 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2295490 was associated with DN (OR 1.318, 95% CI 1.075, 1.653, p=0.017); smoking was also an independent risk factor for diabetic nephropathy (1.42 [1.25-2.04], p<0.001). In addition, we identified possible synergistic effects; i.e., the high-risk group (smokers with the AG+GG genotype) showed 2.13 times higher risk (1.51-3.96, p<0.001) of diabetic nephropathy than the low-risk group (nonsmokers with the AA genotype) in a multiple logistic regression analysis controlled for the confounders, but no departure from additivity was found. Our results indicate that smoking and the TRIB3 G-allele is associated with an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy, which supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Preventive Effect of Salicylate and Pyridoxamine on Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abouzed, Tarek Kamal; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio; Khailo, Khaled; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic nephropathy is a life-threatening complication in patients with long-standing diabetes. Hemodynamic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors are considered as developmental factors for diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we evaluated whether pharmacological interventions with salicylate, compared to pyridoxamine, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in mice. Methods. Male mice overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase in pancreatic β-cells were employed as a diabetic model. Salicylate (3 g/kg diet) or pyridoxamine (1 g/L drinking water; ~200 mg/kg/day) was given for 16 weeks to assess the development of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with long-acting insulin (Levemir 2 units/kg twice a day) was used as a control. Results. Although higher blood glucose levels were not significantly affected by pyridoxamine, early to late stage indices of nephropathy were attenuated, including kidney enlargement, albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and inflammatory and profibrotic gene expressions. Salicylate showed beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy similar to those of pyridoxamine, which include lowering blood glucose levels and inhibiting macrophage infiltration into the kidneys. Attenuation of macrophage infiltration into the kidneys and upregulation of antiglycating enzyme glyoxalase 1 gene expression were found only in the salicylate treatment group. Conclusions. Treatment with salicylate and pyridoxamine could prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice and, therefore, would be a potentially useful therapeutic strategy against kidney problems in patients with diabetes. PMID:28042580

  18. BMP-7 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IS DOWNREGULATED IN HUMAN DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ivanac-Janković, Renata; Ćorić, Marijana; Furić-Čunko, Vesna; Lovičić, Vesna; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar

    2015-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is expressed in all parts of the normal kidney parenchyma, being highest in the epithelium of proximal tubules. It protects kidney against acute and chronic injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease, and is characterized by decreased expression of BMP-7. The aim of our study was to analyze whether the expression of BMP-7 is significantly changed in advanced stages of human diabetic nephropathy. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of BMP-7 was performed on archival material of 30 patients that underwent renal biopsy and had confirmed diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Results showed that BMP-7 was differently expressed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of proximal tubules and podocytes among all stages of diabetic nephropathy. At early stages of diabetic nephropathy, BMP-7 was strongly positive in proximal tubules and podocytes, while low expression was recorded in the majority of samples at advanced stages. In conclusion, increased expression of BMP-7 at initial stages of diabetic nephropathy with subsequent decrease at advanced stage highlights the role of BMP-7 in the protection of kidney structure and function. Further investigations should be focused on disturbances of BMP-7 receptors and signaling pathways in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Preventive Effect of Salicylate and Pyridoxamine on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abouzed, Tarek Kamal; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio; Khailo, Khaled; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic nephropathy is a life-threatening complication in patients with long-standing diabetes. Hemodynamic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors are considered as developmental factors for diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we evaluated whether pharmacological interventions with salicylate, compared to pyridoxamine, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in mice. Methods. Male mice overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase in pancreatic β-cells were employed as a diabetic model. Salicylate (3 g/kg diet) or pyridoxamine (1 g/L drinking water; ~200 mg/kg/day) was given for 16 weeks to assess the development of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with long-acting insulin (Levemir 2 units/kg twice a day) was used as a control. Results. Although higher blood glucose levels were not significantly affected by pyridoxamine, early to late stage indices of nephropathy were attenuated, including kidney enlargement, albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and inflammatory and profibrotic gene expressions. Salicylate showed beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy similar to those of pyridoxamine, which include lowering blood glucose levels and inhibiting macrophage infiltration into the kidneys. Attenuation of macrophage infiltration into the kidneys and upregulation of antiglycating enzyme glyoxalase 1 gene expression were found only in the salicylate treatment group. Conclusions. Treatment with salicylate and pyridoxamine could prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice and, therefore, would be a potentially useful therapeutic strategy against kidney problems in patients with diabetes.

  20. Diabetic Nephropathy: New Risk Factors and Improvements in Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with diabetic nephropathy have a high cardiovascular risk, comparable to patients with coronary heart disease. Accordingly, identification and management of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy as well as timely diagnosis and prompt management of the condition are of paramount importance for effective treatment. A variety of risk factors promotes the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, including elevated glucose levels, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Most of these risk factors are modifiable by antidiabetic, antihypertensive, or lipid-lowering treatment and lifestyle changes. Others such as genetic factors or advanced age cannot be modified. Therefore, the rigorous management of the modifiable risk factors is essential for preventing and delaying the decline in renal function. Early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is another essential component in the management of diabetes and its complications such as nephropathy. New markers may allow earlier diagnosis of this common and serious complication, but further studies are needed to clarify their additive predictive value, and to define their cost-benefit ratio. This article reviews the most important risk factors in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy and summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis of this disease.

  1. Smoking in diabetic nephropathy: sparks in the fuel tank?

    PubMed

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2012-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is associated with high morbidity and mortality and the prevalence of this disease is continuously increasing worldwide. Long-term diabetes increases the likelihood of developing secondary complications like nephropathy, the most common cause of end stage renal disease. Usually, other factors like hypertension, alcoholism and smoking also partly contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Among this, cigarette smoking in diabetes has been repeatedly confirmed as an independent risk factor for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various studies suggest that smoking is a major fuel in the development of high oxidative stress and subsequently hyperlipidemia, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, activation of the renin angiotensin system and Rho-kinase, which are observed to play a pathogenic role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, cigarette smoking in diabetic patients with vascular complications produces a variety of pathological changes in the kidney, such as thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial expansion with progression in glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, which ultimately results in end stage renal failure. Strong associations are consistently found between chronic cigarette smoking and diabetic microvascular complications. A diverse group of studies unveil potential mechanisms that may explain the role of cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Tremendous efforts are being made to control smoking mediated progression of diabetic nephropathy, but no promising therapy is yet available. The present review critically discusses the possible detrimental role of chronic cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and various possible pharmacological interventions to attenuate the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Smoking in diabetic nephropathy: sparks in the fuel tank?

    PubMed Central

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is associated with high morbidity and mortality and the prevalence of this disease is continuously increasing worldwide. Long-term diabetes increases the likelihood of developing secondary complications like nephropathy, the most common cause of end stage renal disease. Usually, other factors like hypertension, alcoholism and smoking also partly contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Among this, cigarette smoking in diabetes has been repeatedly confirmed as an independent risk factor for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various studies suggest that smoking is a major fuel in the development of high oxidative stress and subsequently hyperlipidemia, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, activation of the renin angiotensin system and Rho-kinase, which are observed to play a pathogenic role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, cigarette smoking in diabetic patients with vascular complications produces a variety of pathological changes in the kidney, such as thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial expansion with progression in glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, which ultimately results in end stage renal failure. Strong associations are consistently found between chronic cigarette smoking and diabetic microvascular complications. A diverse group of studies unveil potential mechanisms that may explain the role of cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Tremendous efforts are being made to control smoking mediated progression of diabetic nephropathy, but no promising therapy is yet available. The present review critically discusses the possible detrimental role of chronic cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and various possible pharmacological interventions to attenuate the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23301120

  3. AGE, RAGE, and ROS in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Adeline L Y; Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

    2007-03-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Two key mechanisms implicated in the development of diabetic nephropathy include advanced glycation and oxidative stress. Advanced glycation is the irreversible attachment of reducing sugars onto amino groups of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGE modification of proteins may lead to alterations in normal function by inducing cross-linking of extracellular matrices. Intracellular formation of AGEs also can cause generalized cellular dysfunction. Furthermore, AGEs can mediate their effects via specific receptors, such as the receptor for AGE (RAGE), activating diverse signal transduction cascades and downstream pathways, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress occurs as a result of the imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant defenses. Sources of ROS include the mitochondria, auto-oxidation of glucose, and enzymatic pathways including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NAD[P]H) oxidase. Beyond the current treatments to treat diabetic complications such as the optimization of blood pressure and glycemic control, it is predicted that new therapies designed to target AGEs, including AGE formation inhibitors and cross-link breakers, as well as targeting ROS using novel highly specific antioxidants, will become part of the treatment regimen for diabetic renal disease.

  4. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  5. Experimental model of lead nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil-Manesh, F.; Gonick, H.C. ); Cohen, A. ); Bergamaschi, E.; Mutti, A. )

    1992-06-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to high-dose (0.5%) lead acetate for periods ranging from 1 to 9 months; then lead exposure was discontinued, and animals were sacrificed after 12 months. Two additional groups of low-dose (0.01%) and high-dose (0.5%) rats were exposed to lead for 6 months, then lead was discontinued and the rats were treated with three 5-day courses of 0.5% DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid) over the next 6 months. Low-dose lead-treated rats showed no significant pathological changes with or without DMSA treatment, but exhibited a significant increase in GFR after DMSA. High-dose lead-treated animals showed no functional or pathological changes when lead exposure was discontinued after 1 month. However, when duration of exposure was 6 or 9 months, GFR was decreased and serum creatinine and urea nitrogen were increased as compared to controls. Tubulointerstitial disease was severe. Administration of DMSA resulted in an improvement in GFR and a decrease in albuminuria, together with a reduction in size and number of nuclear inclusion bodies in proximal tubules. However, tubulointerstitial scarring was only minimally reduced. It may be concluded that, except for brief initial exposure, discontinuation of high-dose lead exposure fails to reverse lead-induced renal damage. Treatment with the chelator, DMSA, improves renal function but has less effect on pathological alterations. As GFR improved after DMSA treatment in both low-dose and high-dose lead-treated rats, irrespective of the degree of pathological alterations, it may be concluded that the DMSA effect is most likely mediated by hemodynamic changes.

  6. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to ‘Averrhoa bilimbi’ fruit juice ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Bakul, G.; Unni, V. N.; Seethaleksmy, N. V.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurien, G.; Rajesh, J.; Jayaraj, P. M.; Kishore, D. S.; Jose, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management. PMID:23960349

  7. Chronic kidney disease in an adolescent with hyperuricemia: familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Alaygut, Demet; Torun-Bayram, Meral; Soylu, Alper; Kasap, Belde; Türkmen, Mehmet; Kavukçu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a life-long condition associated with substantial morbidity and premature death due to complications from a progressive decrease in kidney function. Especially in children, early diagnosis and detection of the etiologic factors are important to improve their health outcomes. Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by hyperuricemia with renal uric acid under-excretion and CKD. Genetic studies have revealed mutations in the uromodulin (UMOD) gene. Highlighting the importance of CKD in children, a 14-year-old girl with the rare diagnosis of FJHN is reported herein.

  8. Gremlin-mediated decrease in bone morphogenetic protein signaling promotes aristolochic acid-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HK-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Zihua; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jinghong; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian

    2012-07-16

    Ingestion of aristolochic acid (AA) is associated with the development of aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), which is characterized by progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis, chronic renal failure and urothelial cancer. Our previous study showed that bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) could attenuate AA-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC). However, how gremlin (a BMP-7 antagonist) antagonizes the BMP-7 action in PTEC remained unsolved. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of gremlin in AA-induced EMT in PTEC (HK-2 cells). HK-2 cells were treated with AA (10 μmol/L) for periods up to 72 h. Cell viability was determined by tetrazolium dye (MTT) assay. Morphological changes were assessed by phase-contrast microscopy. Markers of EMT, including E-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were detected by indirect immunofluorescence stains. The BMP-7 and gremlin mRNA and protein expression in HK-2 cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (real-time RT-PCR) and western blotting after exposure to AA. The level of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8, a marker of BMP-7 activity, was also determined by western blot analysis. Cells were transfected with gremlin siRNA to determine the effects of gremlin knockdown on markers of EMT following treatment with AA. Our results indicated that AA-induced EMT was associated with acquisition of fibroblast-like cell shape, loss of E-cadherin, and increases of alpha-SMA and collagen type I. Interestingly, exposure of HK-2 cells to 10 μmol/L AA increased the mRNA and protein expression of gremlin in HK-2 cells. This increase was in parallel with a decrease in BMP-7 expression and a down-regulation of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 protein levels. Moreover, transfection with siRNA to gremlin was able to recover BMP-7 signaling activity, and attenuate EMT-associated phenotypic changes induced by AA. Together, these observations strongly suggest that gremlin

  9. Early Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes – New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Cherney, David; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite improvements in glycemic and blood pressure control in patients with T1D, diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains the most common cause of chronic kidney disease worldwide. A major challenge in preventing DN is the inability to identify high-risk patients at an early stage, emphasizing the importance of discovering new therapeutic targets and implementation of clinical trials to reduce DN risk. Recent findings Limitations of managing patients with DN with renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade have been identified in recent clinical trials, including the failure of primary prevention studies in T1D and the demonstration of harm with dual RAAS blockade. Fortunately, several new targets, including serum uric acid, insulin sensitivity, vasopressin and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibition are promising in the prevention and treatment of DN. Summary DN is characterized by a long clinically silent period without signs or symptoms of disease. There is an urgent need for improved methods of detecting early mediators of renal injury, to ultimately prevent initiation and progression of DN. In this review, we will focus on early DN and summarize potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:24983394

  10. Nutritional intervention for a patient with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing every year, and also the acute and chronic complications accompanying this disease are increasing. Diabetic nephropathy is one of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus, and food intake which is burden to kidney function should be limited. At the same time, diet restriction could deteriorate quality of life of patient with diabetic nephropathy. According to the results of previous studies, the aggressive management is important for delaying of the progression to diabetic nephropathy. Also, the implementation of a personalized diet customized to individuals is an effective tool for preservation of kidney function. This is a case report of a patient with diabetic nephropathy who was introduced to a proper diet through nutrition education to prevent malnutrition, uremia and to maintain blood glucose levels.

  11. Nutritional Intervention for a Patient with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing every year, and also the acute and chronic complications accompanying this disease are increasing. Diabetic nephropathy is one of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus, and food intake which is burden to kidney function should be limited. At the same time, diet restriction could deteriorate quality of life of patient with diabetic nephropathy. According to the results of previous studies, the aggressive management is important for delaying of the progression to diabetic nephropathy. Also, the implementation of a personalized diet customized to individuals is an effective tool for preservation of kidney function. This is a case report of a patient with diabetic nephropathy who was introduced to a proper diet through nutrition education to prevent malnutrition, uremia and to maintain blood glucose levels. PMID:24527422

  12. Canine IgA nephropathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akira; Shimokawa Miyama, Takako; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy is a rare form of canine glomerular disease. This report describes a case of canine IgA nephropathy showing characteristics typical of human IgA nephropathy. An 8-year-old, spayed female Miniature Dachshund showed persistent severe proteinuria without azotemia. She was receiving long-term glucocorticoid therapy due to chronic gastritis and an intra-abdominal suture granuloma. A renal biopsy demonstrated mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with predominantly mesangial IgA deposition and electron-dense deposits in the paramesangium. These findings closely resembled those of human IgA nephropathy. Glucocorticoid treatment was discontinued, and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril was administrated as an antiproteinuric agent. The proteinuria subsequently went into remission, and the patient has maintained good condition without recurrence.

  13. Telmisartan in the management of diabetic nephropathy: a contemporary view.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Bishnoi, Harish K; Mahadevan, Nanjaian

    2012-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, a complex disorder with heterogeneous etiologies, remains one of the most threatening diseases worldwide. There were around 177 million people with diabetes mellitus worldwide, and it has been estimated to be increased to 360 million by 2030. Given that about 20-30% of these people develop diabetic nephropathy, the present treatment protocols primarily aim for an efficient glucose and blood pressure control to arrest the initiation and progression of diabetic nephropathy. The treatment of diabetic nephropathy near the beginning at microalbuminuria stage with angiotensin-II-AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves blood pressure control and halts disease progression of diabetic nephropathy. In fact, ARBs exert renoprotective effects independently of their blood pressure lowering effect, as they have direct defensive action on the diabetic kidney. Indubitably, it would be better if an ARB has both glucose-lowering and blood pressure controlling potentials efficiently. Intriguingly, telmisartan has such possessions considering its dual role of AT1 receptor blocking action and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) partial agonistic property. The additional PPARγ agonistic potential of telmisartan could make it a distinctive intervention in the ARB class to prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy through activation of PPARγ-mediated insulin sensitization, and renal anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions. Indeed, telmisartan reduced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, and halted the progressive renal dysfunction associated with diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the incidence of albuminuria, and preventing the progression of glomerulosclerosis, renal interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. This review will discuss the current status of therapeutic potentials of telmisartan in treating diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Essential hypertension and risk of nephropathy: a reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Murea, Mariana; Freedman, Barry I.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the controversial relationship between hypertension and initiation of kidney disease. We focus on ethnic differences in renal histopathology and associated gene variants comprising the spectrum of MYH9-nephropathy. Purpose of review Treating mild to moderate essential hypertension in non-diabetic African Americans fails to halt nephropathy progression; while hypertension control slows nephropathy progression in European Americans. The pathogenesis of these disparate renal syndromes is reviewed. Recent findings The non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) is associated with a spectrum of kidney diseases in African Americans, including idiopathic focal global glomerulosclerosis historically attributed to hypertension, idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and the collapsing variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (HIV-associated nephropathy). Risk variants in MYH9 likely contribute to the failure of hypertension control to slow progressive kidney disease in non-diabetic African Americans. Summary Early and intensive hypertension control fails to halt progression of “hypertensive nephropathy” in African Americans. Genetic analyses in patients with essential hypertension and nephropathy attributed to hypertension, FSGS and HIVAN reveal that MYH9 gene polymorphisms are associated with a spectrum of kidney diseases in this ethnic group. Mild to moderate hypertension may cause nephropathy in European Americans with intra-renal vascular disease improved by the treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking cessation. PMID:20051853

  15. Predictors of prognosis in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-10-01

    IgA nephropathy (nephropathy with mesangial IgA and IgG deposits, so-called Berger's disease) is the most common primary chronic glomerulonephritis worldwide, and was first described in 1968. Histopathologically, IgA nephropathy is characterized by expansion of the glomerular mesangial matrix with mesangial cell proliferation and/or mononuclear cell infiltration. Glomeruli typically contain generalized-diffuse granular mesangial deposits of IgA (mainly IgA1), IgG and C3. This disease, therefore, is considered to be an immune-complex-mediated glomerulonephritis although the antigenic agents are still obscure. Clinically, patients with IgA nephropathy show microscopic and macroscopic hematuria and/or proteinuria. Although the clinical course is generally gradual in patients with IgA nephropathy, progression to renal hypertension, renal anemia, and end-stage kidney disease is not as rare as originally thought. Since pathogenesis and radical treatment for IgA nephropathy are still not established, it is necessary to study them using various clinical findings.

  16. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Sanford, Ryan B.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Although the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have a beneficial effect on diabetic nephropathy independently of their effects on blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II levels. This suggests that the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is also involved in the disease. To study the role of the KKS in diabetic nephropathy, mice lacking either the bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) or the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) have been commonly used. However, because absence of either receptor causes enhanced expression of the other, it is difficult to determine the precise functions of each receptor. This difficulty has recently been overcome by comparing mice lacking both receptors with mice lacking each receptor. Deletion of both B1R and B2R reduces nitric oxide (NO) production and aggravates renal diabetic phenotypes, relevant to either lack of B1R or B2R, demonstrating that both B1R and B2R exert protective effects on diabetic nephropathy presumably via NO. Here, we review previous epidemiological and experimental studies, and discuss novel insights regarding the therapeutic implications of the importance of the KKS in averting diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22318421

  17. Role of Toll-like receptors in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Harshini; Pollock, Carol; Panchapakesan, Usha

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of kidney failure and its increasing prevalence and incidence has imposed global socio-economic stress on healthcare systems worldwide. Although historically considered a metabolic disorder, recent studies have established that inflammatory responses are central to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. TLRs (Toll-like receptors) are a family of pattern recognition receptors responsible for the initiation of inflammatory and immune responses. The regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various kidney diseases, and emerging evidence shows their involvement in the perpetuation of inflammation in the diabetic kidney. The present review focuses on the relative contributions of TLR2 and TLR4 in recognizing endogenous ligands relevant to diabetic nephropathy and their subsequent activation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), which results in the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, we discuss the pro-inflammatory signalling pathways of TLR2 and TLR4, in which their interruption or blockade may prove to be important therapeutic targets, potentially translated into clinical treatments for diabetic nephropathy. Currently, inhibitors to TLR2 and TLR4 are undergoing clinical trials in various inflammatory models of disease, but none in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Given the existing literature, there is a fundamental necessity to undertake trials in patients with diabetic nephropathy with a focus on renal end points.

  18. Inherited forms of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    Simplex and multiplex families with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) have been reported from several ethnic backgrounds, providing the strongest evidence of a role for genetic factors in pathogenesis of IgAN. From a phenotypic point of view, familial and sporadic IgAN cannot be differentiated, and the main clinical and histological features are similar. Traditionally, the case-control study design was employed to identify associations between particular candidate genes, for example, HLA antigens the uteroglobin gene and IgAN, giving conflicting results. Recently, a different approach, using linkage analysis, was undertaken by geneticists at Yale University. A 10-cM genome-wide screen was performed in 30 multiplex IgAN pedigrees, and one locus was mapped (IGAN-1) on chromosome 6q22-23. Future study will be focused on the identification of the gene underlying IGAN-1. This will enable us to understand the molecular pathogenetic basis of IgAN.

  19. Treatment of membranous nephropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Makker, Sudesh P

    2003-07-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is not a common pediatric glomerular disease and not a common cause of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (NS) in children. Because of the rarity of the disease, there is only a limited amount of uncontrolled data and no controlled data available in children regarding the treatment of MN. Older uncontrolled data indicate that nearly a quarter of children with NS, whether untreated or treated with various immunosuppressive agents, develop chronic renal failure. Current recommendations for treatment both for children presenting with or without NS therefore are based on controlled data obtained in adults with MN. All children should receive angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Children with NS may be treated initially with corticosteroids. If a satisfactory response is not obtained with corticosteroids, then treatment with cyclosporine or chlorambucil can be tried. The protocols of treatment with these drugs are described in this article.

  20. Complex networks analysis of obstructive nephropathy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, M.; Boccaletti, S.

    2011-09-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy (ON) is one of the most frequent and complex diseases affecting children, characterized by an abnormal flux of the urine, due to a partial or complete obstruction of the urinary tract; as a consequence, urine may accumulate in the kidney and disturb the normal operation of the organ. Despite important advances, pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this contribution, the topology of complex networks, based on vectors of features of control and ON subjects, is related with the severity of the pathology. Nodes in these networks represent genetic and metabolic profiles, while connections between them indicate an abnormal relation between their expressions. Resulting topologies allow discriminating ON subjects and detecting which genetic or metabolic elements are responsible for the malfunction.

  1. BK Virus Nephropathy in Heart Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alin; Pilichowska, Monika; Boucher, Helen; Kiernan, Michael; DeNofrio, David; Inker, Lesley A

    2015-06-01

    Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) has become an important cause of kidney failure in kidney transplant recipients. PVAN is reported to affect 1% to 7% of kidney transplant recipients, leading to premature transplant loss in approximately 30% to 50% of diagnosed cases. PVAN occurring in the native kidneys of solid-organ transplant recipients other than kidney only recently has been noted. We report 2 cases of PVAN in heart transplant recipients, which brings the total of reported cases to 7. We briefly review the literature on the hypothesized causes of PVAN in kidney transplant recipients and comment on whether these same mechanisms also may cause PVAN in other solid-organ transplant recipients. PVAN should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating worsening kidney function. BK viremia surveillance studies of nonkidney solid-organ recipients should be conducted to provide data to assist the transplantation community in deciding whether regular monitoring of nonkidney transplant recipients for BK viremia is indicated.

  2. Association of Diabetic Nephropathy and Liver Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Malawadi, BN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver disorder is known to be a risk factor for Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and diabetic patients are at risk of developing liver disorders. Association of liver and renal disease is less explored in the field of research; hence, we conducted a retrospective study on this. Aim To compare the renal and liver profiles of type II DM patients compared to healthy controls and find the association between the two profiles in diabetics. Materials and Methods The renal and liver profiles of 68 type II DM patients and 58 controls were compared. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) (eGFR) was calculated using Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula and was taken as a tool to grade different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Comparison of liver profiles between different stages of diabetic nephropathy was done. Correlations and associations were studied between eGFR and liver enzymes and Bilirubin. Results A significant elevation in Total Bilirubin (TB) (p< 0.15), Direct Bilirubin (DB) (p< 0.0035), Aspartate Amino Transferase (AST) and Alanine Amino Transferase (ALT) (p<0.0001) levels in diabetics was noted. An elevated eGFR and a significant correlation between eGFR and liver enzymes were observed. A significant association between liver and renal disease has been obtained in diabetics (p=0.0136). Conclusion Significantly, high liver function tests and low eGFR were observed in type II diabetics. A significant positive correlation between liver enzymes (AST and ALT) and eGFR suggest a possible association between liver and kidney functions in DM. PMID:27891331

  3. Exogenous kallikrein protects against diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Yeping; Liu, Yemei; Lu, Xiaolan; Guo, Shizhe; Wu, Meng; Wang, Meng; Yan, Linling; Wang, Qinghua; Zhao, Xiaolong; Tong, Xian; Hu, Ji; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Stanton, Robert C; Zhang, Zhaoyun

    2016-11-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system has been shown to be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy, but specific mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we determined the renal-protective role of exogenous pancreatic kallikrein in diabetic mice and studied potential mechanisms in db/db type 2 diabetic and streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. After the onset of diabetes, mice were treated with either pancreatic kallikrein (db/db+kallikrein, streptozotocin+kallikrein) or saline (db/db+saline, streptozotocin+saline) for 16 weeks, while another group of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice received the same treatment after onset of albuminuria (streptozotocin'+kallikrein, streptozotocin'+saline). Db/m littermates or wild type mice were used as non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic kallikrein had no effects on body weight, blood glucose and blood pressure, but significantly reduced albuminuria among all three groups. Pathological analysis showed that exogenous kallikrein decreased the thickness of the glomerular basement membrane, protected against the effacement of foot process, the loss of endothelial fenestrae, and prevented the loss of podocytes in diabetic mice. Renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress were reduced in kallikrein-treated mice compared to diabetic controls. The expression of kininogen1, tissue kallikrein, kinin B1 and B2 receptors were all increased in the kallikrein-treated compared to saline-treated mice. Thus, exogenous pancreatic kallikrein both prevented and ameliorated diabetic nephropathy, which may be mediated by activating the kallikrein-kinin system.

  4. Differential effects of low-dose fenofibrate treatment in diabetic rats with early onset nephropathy and established nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kadian, Supriya; Mahadevan, Nanjaian; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2013-01-05

    We have previously shown that low-dose fenofibrate treatment has an ability to prevent diabetes-induced nephropathy in rats. We investigated here the comparative pre- and post-treatment effects of low-dose fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o.) in diabetes-induced onset of nephropathy. Rats were made diabetics by single administration of streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg i.p.). The development of diabetic nephropathy was assessed biochemically and histologically. Moreover, lipid profile and renal oxidative stress were assessed. Diabetic rats after 8 weeks of STZ-administration developed apparent nephropathy by elevating serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and microproteinuria, and inducing glomerular-capsular wall distortion, mesangial expansion and tubular damage and renal oxidative stress. Fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 4 weeks) pretreatment (4 weeks after STZ-administration) markedly prevented diabetes-induced onset of diabetic nephropathy, while the fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 4 weeks) post-treatment (8 weeks after STZ-administration) was less-effective. However, both pre-and post fenofibrate treatments were effective in preventing diabetes-induced renal oxidative stress and lipid alteration in diabetic rats though the pretreatment was slightly more effective. Conversely, both pre-and post fenofibrate treatments did not alter elevated glucose levels in diabetic rats. It may be concluded that diabetes-induced oxidative stress and lipid alteration, in addition to a marked glucose elevation, play a detrimental role in the onset of nephropathy in diabetic rats. The pretreatment with low-dose fenofibrate might be a potential therapeutic approach in preventing the onset of nephropathy in diabetic subjects under the risk of renal disease induction. However, low-dose fenofibrate treatment might not be effective in treating the established nephropathy in diabetic subjects.

  5. Computational Prediction of Phylogenetically Conserved Sequence Motifs for Five Different Candidate Genes in Type II Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sindhu, T; Rajamanikandan, S; Srinivasan, P

    2012-01-01

    Background: Computational identification of phylogenetic motifs helps to understand the knowledge about known functional features that includes catalytic site, substrate binding epitopes, and protein-protein interfaces. Furthermore, they are strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. The study aimed to analyze five candidate genes involved in type II diabetic nephropathy and to predict phylogenetic motifs from their corresponding orthologous protein sequences. Methods: AKR1B1, APOE, ENPP1, ELMO1 and IGFBP1 are the genes that have been identified as an important target for type II diabetic nephropathy through experimental studies. Their corresponding protein sequences, structures, orthologous sequences were retrieved from UniprotKB, PDB, and PHOG database respectively. Multiple sequence alignments were constructed using ClustalW and phylogenetic motifs were identified using MINER. The occurrence of amino acids in the obtained phylogenetic motifs was generated using WebLogo and false positive expectations were calculated against phylogenetic similarity. Results: In total, 17 phylogenetic motifs were identified from the five proteins and the residues such as glycine, leucine, tryptophan, aspartic acid were found in appreciable frequency whereas arginine identified in all the predicted PMs. The result implies that these residues can be important to the functional and structural role of the proteins and calculated false positive expectations implies that they were generally conserved in traditional sense. Conclusion: The prediction of phylogenetic motifs is an accurate method for detecting functionally important conserved residues. The conserved motifs can be used as a potential drug target for type II diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23113206

  6. Oxalate Nephropathy After Continuous Infusion of High-Dose Vitamin C as an Adjunct to Burn Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pamplin, Jeremy; Studer, Lynette; Hughes, Rhome L.; King, Booker T.; Graybill, John C.; Chung, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is the foundation of management in burn patients and is the topic of considerable research. One adjunct in burn resuscitation is continuous, high-dose vitamin C (ascorbic acid) infusion, which may reduce fluid requirements and thus decrease the risk for over resuscitation. Research in preclinical studies and clinical trials has shown continuous infusions of high-dose vitamin C to be beneficial with decrease in resuscitative volumes and limited adverse effects. However, high-dose and low-dose vitamin C supplementation has been shown to cause secondary calcium oxalate nephropathy, worsen acute kidney injury, and delay renal recovery in non-burn patients. To the best of our knowledge, the authors present the first case series in burn patients in whom calcium oxalate nephropathy has been identified after high-dose vitamin C therapy. PMID:25812044

  7. Impact of the implementation of the AAN epilepsy quality measures on the medical records in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) suggested eight quality measures to be observed at every patient visit. The aim of this work is to compare the percentage of documentation of each measure before and after the implementation of a new worksheet in a third-level center. Methods Quasi-experimental study including medical records filled by medical school seniors and junior residents supervised by an epileptologist. The authors surveyed 80 consecutive charts of people with epilepsy who were seen in the outpatient clinic before and after the intervention. McNemar change test was used to compare the percentages of documentation of each quality measure–i.e., seizure type and frequency, etiology, EEG, MRI/CT head scans, AED side effects, surgical therapy referral, safety counseling, preconception counseling–and physical exam. Each quality measure was considered to be fulfilled only if it was assessed and properly recorded. Results Mean age was 35(±13) years, 55% women, mean epilepsy onset at age 18(±15), 82% presented with partial-onset seizures. The reporting rate improved for all quality measures (previous vs new), reaching statistical significance for: seizure type 80vs94% (p < 0.05), AED side effects 8vs24%, etiology 66vs88% (p < 0.01), safety counseling 5vs64%, preconception counseling 4vs20%, and physical exam 63vs94% (p < 0.001). Conclusion A quality-oriented epilepsy worksheet led to a better practice standardization and documentation of AAN standards for diagnostic and counseling purposes. Further evaluations should be undertaken to assess the impact on medical education and patient care. PMID:23984949

  8. Biomarkers in IgA nephropathy: relationship to pathogenetic hits

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Margaret Colleen; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Berthoux, Francois; Julian, Bruce A; Sanders, John T; Renfrow, Matthew B; Novak, Jan; Wyatt, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction IgA nephropathy, the most prevalent glomerular disease in the world, requires a renal biopsy for diagnosis. Reliable biomarkers are needed for the non-invasive diagnosis of this disease and to more fully delineate its natural history and risk for progression. Areas covered In this review, the authors examine serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) and glycan-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies that are integral to pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. They also explore biomarkers related to alternative and lectin pathways of complement activation and serum and urinary peptide biomarkers detected by mass spectrometric methods. The literature search included review of all publications having IgA nephropathy in the title that were cited in PubMed and Scopus over the past 10 years and a non-systematic review of abstracts published for the annual meetings of the American Society of Nephrology and the International Symposia on IgA Nephropathy. Expert opinion Serum Gd-IgA1 level and glycan-specific autoantibody levels are prime candidates to become diagnostic biomarkers for IgA nephropathy because of their central role in the earliest stages of disease pathogenesis. Assays for serum levels of complement proteins C3 and factor H are readily available in clinical practice and deserve continued study, either alone or in tandem with total serum IgA or serum Gd-IgA1 levels, as prognostic biomarkers for patients with IgA nephropathy. Urinary peptidomic data are also reviewed because this approach can successfully differentiate patients with IgA nephropathy from healthy controls and from patients with other forms of renal disease. PMID:24175678

  9. Mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy--old buddies and newcomers part 1.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, P P; Isermann, B

    2010-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of terminal kidney failure in industrialized countries. In addition, the manifestation of diabetic nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis for affected patients. Current therapies are based on established pathophysiological models. However, despite reflecting significant progress in our understanding of diabetic nephropathy, the translational efforts fell short their expectations. The current review summarizes recent studies which provided new insights into established mechanisms (part 1) and studies identifying new candidate mechanisms (part 2) underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Tubular overexpression of Gremlin in transgenic mice aggravates renal damage in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Vanessa; Droguett, Alejandra; Valderrama, Graciela; Burgos, M Eugenia; Carpio, Daniel; Kerr, Bredford; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesús; Mezzano, Sergio

    2015-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is currently a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Gremlin was identified as a gene differentially expressed in mesangial cells exposed to high glucose and in experimental diabetic kidneys. We have described that Gremlin is highly expressed in biopsies from patients with diabetic nephropathy, predominantly in areas of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetes, Gremlin deletion using Grem1 heterozygous knockout mice or by gene silencing, ameliorates renal damage. To study the in vivo role of Gremlin in renal damage, we developed a diabetic model induced by STZ in transgenic (TG) mice expressing human Gremlin in proximal tubular epithelial cells. The albuminuria/creatinuria ratio, determined at week 20 after treatment, was significantly increased in diabetic mice but with no significant differences between transgenic (TG/STZ) and wild-type mice (WT/STZ). To assess the level of renal damage, kidney tissue was analyzed by light microscopy (periodic acid-Schiff and Masson staining), electron microscopy, and quantitative PCR. TG/STZ mice had significantly greater thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, increased mesangial matrix, and podocytopenia vs. WT/STZ. At the tubulointerstitial level, TG/STZ showed increased cell infiltration and mild interstitial fibrosis. In addition, we observed a decreased expression of podocin and overexpression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and fibrotic-related markers, including transforming growth factor-β1, Col1a1, and α-smooth muscle actin. Together, these results show that TG mice overexpressing Gremlin in renal tubules develop greater glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury in response to diabetic-mediated damage and support the involvement of Gremlin in diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Membranous nephropathy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fareha A; Larsen, Christopher P; Troxell, Megan L

    2013-11-01

    Membranous nephropathy presents clinically as nephrotic syndrome, with subepithelial immune complex deposits seen on biopsy. Historically, in about three-quarters of membranous cases, no obvious etiologic agent or condition can be identified. More recently, serum antibodies to the phospholipase A2 receptor have been discovered in many patients with primary/idiopathic membranous nephropathy. About one-quarter of patients have membranous nephropathy as a manifestation of another systemic disorder, such as autoimmune conditions, infection, malignancy, toxin exposure, or drugs (classically gold or penicillamine). In this report, we present a case of recurrent nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy closely associated with use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) naproxen and piroxicam. Characterization of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass profile of the deposits showed abundant IgG1, weak IgG4, and positive staining for phospholipase A2 receptor. This case serves to highlight membranous nephropathy as an under-recognized renal complication of NSAID use. Other kidney effects of NSAIDs, such as hemodynamic compromise, interstitial nephritis, and minimal change disease, are more broadly recognized.

  12. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kume, Shinji; Koya, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Network-centric Analysis of Genetic Predisposition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ntemka, A; Iliadis, F; Papanikolaou, NA; Grekas, D

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious, long-term complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world. Although this disease is progressively imposing a heavier burden on the health care system, in many aspects it remains poorly understood. In addition to environmental influences, there is abundant evidence in support of genetic susceptibility to microvascular complications of nephropathy in diabetic patients. Familial clustering of phenotypes such as end-stage renal disease, albuminuria and kidney disease have been reported in large scale population studies throughout the world demonstrating strong contribution of inherited factors. Recent genome-wide linkage scans identified several chromosomal regions that are likely to contain diabetic nephropathy susceptibility genes, and association analyses have evaluated positional candidate genes under linkage peaks. In this review we have extracted from the literature the most promising candidate genes thought to confer susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy and mapped them to affected pathways by using network-centric analysis. Several of the top susceptibility genes have been identified as network hubs and bottlenecks suggesting that they might be important agents in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22435020

  14. Renal involvement in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)-APS nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tektonidou, Maria G

    2009-06-01

    Although the kidney represents a major target organ in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), renal involvement in APS was poorly recognized until recently. The most well-recognized renal manifestations of APS are the renal artery thrombosis/stenosis, renal infarction, hypertension, renal vein thrombosis, end-stage renal disease, increased allograft vascular thrombosis, some types of glomerular disease, and a small-vessel vaso-occlusive nephropathy, recently defined as APS nephropathy. APS nephropathy was first described in primary APS patients, characterized by acute thrombotic lesions in glomeruli and/or arterioles (thrombotic microangiopathy) and chronic vascular lesions such as fibrous intimal hyperplasia of arterioles and interlobular arteries, organized thrombi with or without recanalization, and fibrous arterial and arteriolar occlusions or focal cortical atrophy. APS nephropathy was also detected in further studies including patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related APS and SLE/non-APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies, independently of lupus nephritis. The same histologic lesions, especially thrombotic mictroangiopathy, were also observed in patients with catastrophic APS. The most frequent clinical and laboratory characteristics of APS nephropathy in all the above groups of patients are hypertension (often severe), proteinuria (ranging from mild to nephrotic range), hematuria, and acute or chronic renal insufficiency.

  15. Treatment of acute kidney injury with cast nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Walther, Carl; Podoll, Amber S; Finkel, Kevin W

    2014-07-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with multiple myeloma develop renal disease; acute kidney injury (AKI) from cast nephropathy, or "myeloma kidney" is the most common type. Development of AKI is associated with worse 1-year survival and reduces the therapeutic options available to patients. Therefore, there is a great need to develop more effective therapies. Cast nephropathy is due to the interaction and aggregation of filtered free light chains (FLCs) and Tamm- Horsfall protein (THP) causing intratubular obstruction and damage. The key to treating cast nephropathy is rapid lowering of FLCs as this correlates with renal recovery. Newer chemotherapy agents lower FLCs and have been referred to as "renoprotective". However there remains great interest in using various extracorporeal therapies to remove serum FLCs. Initially, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was thought to improve renal outcomes in cast nephropathy based on small trials. The largest randomized trial of TPE, however, failed to show any benefit. A newer technique is extended high cut-off hemodialysis (HCO-HD). This modality uses a high molecular weight cut-off filter to remove FLCs. To date, trials with HCO-HD in patients with cast nephropathy have been encouraging. However, there are no randomized trials demonstrating the benefit of HCOHD when used in addition to newer chemotherapeutic regimens. Until these studies are available, HCO-HD cannot be recommended as standard of care.

  16. The role of sulodexide in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Niecestro, Robert; Raz, Itamar

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pathogenesis and natural history of diabetic nephropathy, characterised by a progressive decline in glomerular function, were initially described in patients with type 1 diabetes. Reports that describe the glomerulopathy and progression of renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes suggest that the disease process is similar to that observed in patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy. An emerging body of evidence supports the notion that glomerular capillary wall and mesangial alterations in diabetic nephropathy involve pathobiochemical alterations of glycoproteins in these structures. Evidence in experimental animals rendered diabetic, reveal that the administration of heparin and other anionic glycoproteins can effectively prevent the biochemical alterations that promote albuminuria. Clinical reports of the use of sulodexide, a preparation of low molecular weight glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides, have shown that proteinuria is significantly diminished in patients with diabetic nephropathy, even when these patients are receiving either an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor antagonist.

  17. Clinico-biochemical studies on acute toxic nephropathy in goats due to uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, P.K.; Joshi, H.C.

    1989-02-01

    Acute toxic nephropathy was produced in 6 healthy goats by injecting intravenously 1% uranyl nitrate (UN) (15 mg/kg body weight). The early painful clinical signs simulating shock progressed with subnormal temperature, slow-shallow respiration and arrhythmic pulse followed by death due to respiratory failure within 96 to 120 hr. All the affected goats had normocytic normochromic anemia, leucocytosis, neutrophilia with left shift eosinopenia, decreased monocytes and presence of 1-2% reticulocytes in the peripheral blood smears. On blood chemical analysis, a uniform and continuous rise was seen in serum creatinine with a concomitant daily increase of serum urea and uric acid. Simultaneous analysis of urine indicated polyuria leading to oliguria, acidic pH, albuminuria, glycosuria with presence of neutrophils, RBC's, epithelial and fatty casts, increase of triple phosphate, and cystine crystals reflecting acute damage of kidneys in the affected goats.

  18. [IgA nephropathy in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Marinaki, M; Benini, D; Fasoli, E; Fanos, V

    2003-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is a primitive cronic idiopatic glomerulonephritis, characterized by diffuse depositis of IgA in the glomeruler mesangium. Familial cases are also descripted. IgA nephropaty is more frequent in males and in white rase. In Italy it's the most frequently recognized glomerulonephritis in renal biopsia (20%), especially in patients with dismorfic micro or macroematuria and nephrotic proteinuria. Clinical presentation is often in association with respiratory tract or gastrointestinal disorders. The most relevant pathogenetic hypothesis suggest an IgA abnormal glycosilation, with mesangial IgA aggregation, increased mesangial reactivity and release of inflammatory mediators and fibrotic agents. Treatment is considered in rapidly progressing forms. At the present, there is no treatment of proven value in all patients, althoug interesting results have been published with prednison, ACE-inhibitors or fish-oil in decresing renal deterioration rate. Natural history varies in different series. Renal survival at 10 years is 85% in Italy, 94% in France, 97% in the USA. Poor prognostic factor are heavy proteinuria and hypertension. However a wide inter-individual variability is observed.

  19. Resveratrol Attenuates Diabetic Nephropathy via Modulating Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Liying; Chen, Jing; Gu, Yong; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of resveratrol, a polyphenol with antiangiogenic activity in DN. In a type 1 diabetic rat model, resveratrol treatment blunted the increases of urine albumin excretion, kidney weight and creatinine clearance rate. The increases of glomerular diameter, mesangium accumulation, glomerular basement membrane thickness and renal fibrosis in diabetic rats were also reduced by resveratrol treatment. In the diabetic kidney, increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flk-1 and angiopoietin 2, and reduced expression of Tie-2 were observed. These changes in angiogenic hormones and associated receptors were attenuated by resveratrol treatment. No changes in angiopoietin 1 expression were detected among each group of rats. Resveratrol also significantly downregulated high glucose-induced VEGF and Flk-1 expressions in cultured mouse glomerular podocytes and endothelial cells, respectively. These effects were attenuated by knocking-down silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) expression. In contrast, upregulation of Sirt1 in cultured endothelial cells reduced Flk-1 expression. Increased permeability and cellular junction disruption of cultured endothelial cells caused by VEGF were also inhibited by resveratrol pretreatment. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that resveratrol may attenuate DN via modulating angiogenesis. PMID:24312656

  20. Oxidative stress in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Coppo, R; Camilla, R; Amore, A; Peruzzi, L

    2010-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by mesangial deposits of IgA1, likely due to accumulation of IgA immune complexes. The activation of intracellular signaling mostly results in oxidative stress, as detected in mesangial cells cultured with aberrantly glycosylated IgA or IgA aggregates and in renal biopsies of patients with IgAN. Signs of altered oxidation/antioxidation balance have been detected in sera and/or in erythrocytes of patients with IgAN, including increased levels of lipoperoxide or malondialdehyde and reduced activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Moreover, increased levels of a marker of oxidative stress, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), have been reported to be significantly associated with proteinuria and disease progression in patients with IgAN. AOPPs are often carried by albumin and can in turn enhance the oxidative stress in the circulation. Recent research suggests that the nephrotoxicity of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgAN is enhanced in the presence of systemic signs of oxidative stress, and it is tempting to hypothesize that the level of the oxidative milieu conditions the different expression and progression of IgAN.

  1. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  2. New therapeutic agents in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaeni; Park, Cheol Whee

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating diabetic nephropathy (DN) have mostly focused on interpreting the pathologic molecular mechanisms of DN, which may provide valuable tools for early diagnosis and prevention of disease onset and progression. Currently, there are few therapeutic drugs for DN, which mainly consist of antihypertensive and antiproteinuric measures that arise from strict renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inactivation. However, these traditional therapies are suboptimal and there is a clear, unmet need for treatments that offer effective schemes beyond glucose control. The complexity and heterogeneity of the DN entity, along with ambiguous renal endpoints that may deter accurate appraisal of new drug potency, contribute to a worsening of the situation. To address these issues, current research into original therapies to treat DN is focusing on the intrinsic renal pathways that intervene with intracellular signaling of anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and metabolic pathways. Mounting evidence in support of the favorable metabolic effects of these novel agents with respect to the renal aspects of DN supports the likelihood of systemic beneficial effects as well. Thus, when translated into clinical use, these novel agents would also address the comorbid factors associated with diabetes, such as obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease. This review will provide a discussion of the promising and effective therapeutic agents for the management of DN. PMID:28049280

  3. The Death Ligand TRAIL in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorz, Corina; Benito-Martín, Alberto; Boucherot, Anissa; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Henger, Anna; Armelloni, Silvia; Santamaría, Beatriz; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death contributes to diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its role is not well understood. The tubulointerstitium from DN biopsy specimens was microdissected, and expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis were analyzed. A total of 112 (25%) of 455 cell death–related genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated. Among those that showed the greatest changes in regulation were two death receptors, OPG (the gene encoding osteoprotegerin) and Fas, and the death ligand TRAIL. Glomerular and proximal tubular TRAIL expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was higher in DN kidneys than controls and was associated with clinical and histologic severity of disease. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines but not glucose alone regulated TRAIL expression in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2. TRAIL induced tubular cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependant manner, an effect that was more marked in the presence of high levels of glucose and proinflammatory cytokines. TRAIL also activated NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. It is proposed that TRAIL-induced cell death could play an important role in the progression of human DN. PMID:18287563

  4. [Case of MMF monotherapy for membranous nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mioko; Kojima, Chiari; Sugiura, Hidekazu; Aoki, Asuka; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Tsukada, Misao; Takei, Takashi; Uchida, Keiko; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old male patient who visited our hospital for the management of edema and proteinuria. He was diagnosed as having nephrotic syndrome, with serum total protein and albumin levels of 4.6 g/dL and 2.1 g/dL, respectively, and a urinary protein excretion level of 6.0 g/day. A percutaneous renal biopsy showed features of membranous glomerulonephritis, with capillary-wall granular deposits of IgG and C3 on immunofluorescence and subepithelial immune complex deposits on electron microscopy. No other secondary cause of membranous glomerulopathy was found even after extensive investigations. The patient was started on mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) monotherapy (1,500 mg/day), and 18 months after the start of this therapy, the proteinuria decreased to 0.5 g/day, with return to a normal serum albumin level. No digestive symptoms, kidney function worsening or increase in blood pressure were noted during treatment. These findings suggest that MMF monotherapy is effective and safe for the treatment of membranous nephropathy.

  5. Histone Lysine Methylation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guang-dong; Cui, Wen-peng; Guo, Qiao-yan; Miao, Li-ning

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) belongs to debilitating microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage renal diseases worldwide. Furthermore, outcomes from the DCCT/EDIC study showed that DN often persists and progresses despite intensive glucose control in many diabetes patients, possibly as a result of prior episode of hyperglycemia, which is called “metabolic memory.” The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of DN remain poorly understood. Activation of multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors can lead to aberrant expression of DN-related pathologic genes in target renal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms in chromatin such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and methylation can influence the pathophysiology of DN and metabolic memory. Exciting researches from cell culture and experimental animals have shown that key histone methylation patterns and the related histone methyltransferases and histone demethylases can play important roles in the regulation of inflammatory and profibrotic genes in renal cells under diabetic conditions. Because histone methylation is dynamic and potentially reversible, it can provide a window of opportunity for the development of much-needed novel therapeutic potential for DN in the future. In this minireview, we discuss recent advances in the field of histone methylation and its roles in the pathogenesis and progression of DN. PMID:25215303

  6. Nephropathy associated with animal, plant, and chemical toxins in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Jha, Vivekanand; Chugh, Kirpal S

    2003-01-01

    accidental occupational exposure in industrial work places (eg, chromic acid), or after suicidal or homicidal use (eg, copper sulphate, ethylene dibromide, ethylene glycol). Late presentation and multiorgan dysfunction are associated with a high mortality. A high index of suspicion, careful history taking, and an awareness of local practices are essential for proper diagnosis and management of toxic nephropathies in the tropics.

  7. Membranous nephropathy with acquired factor V inhibitor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membranous nephropathy is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. In contrast, acquired factor V inhibitor is a rare bleeding disorder. Case presentation A 62-year-old Asian man with a history of cerebral hemorrhage, purpura, eosinophilia and hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome developed proteinuria. The bleeding disorder was diagnosed with acquired factor V inhibitors. A renal biopsy revealed that he suffered from membranous nephropathy with glomerular endothelial damage which is reported to be involved in another factor disorder. After the steroid administration, the coagulation test and proteinuria were improved. Conclusions The presence of factor V inhibitors may have been involved in the development of membranous nephropathy. PMID:24360027

  8. Treatment and impact of dyslipidemia in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Tadashi; Shimizu, Miho; Furuichi, Kengo; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Recent epidemiological research revealed that dyslipidemia is a risk factor for development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Results from interventional studies revealed the possibility that anti-hyperlipidemic agents have a better effect on diabetic nephropathy through improvement of albuminuria and loss of renal function. In addition, dyslipidemia may be a consequence of albuminuria and renal dysfunction, thereby perpetuating kidney damage. Today, the proportion of diabetic patients receiving statins is increasing due to their beneficial effect on cardiovascular mortality. However, treatment for patients should be determined based on consideration of the risk and benefit of the treatment. More insight into the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and the effects of life-style changes is required.

  9. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  10. Towards microRNA-based therapeutics for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M L; DiStefano, J K

    2013-03-01

    There is no cure for diabetic nephropathy and the molecular mechanisms underlying disease aetiology remain poorly understood. While current paradigms for clinical management of diabetic nephropathy are useful in delaying disease onset and preventing its progression, they do not do so for a significant proportion of diabetic individuals, who eventually end up developing renal failure. Thus, novel therapeutic targets are needed for the treatment and prevention of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, have recently been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. It is widely recognised that dysregulation of miRNA expression or action contributes to the development of a number of different human diseases, and evidence of a role for miRNAs in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is emerging. The discovery that modulation of miRNA expression in vivo is feasible, combined with recent results from successful clinical trials using this technology, opens the way for future novel therapeutic applications. For instance, inhibition of miRNAs that are commonly upregulated in diabetic nephropathy decreases albuminuria and mesangial matrix accumulation in animal models, suggesting that a therapeutic agent against these molecules may help to prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy. Certain challenges, including the development of safe and reliable delivery systems, remain to be overcome before miRNA-based therapeutics become a reality. However, the findings accumulated to date, in conjunction with newly emerging results, are expected to yield novel insights into the complex pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, and may eventually lead to the identification of improved therapeutic targets for treatment of this disease.

  11. Hypertension Is a Major Contributor to 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid–Mediated Kidney Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gangadhariah, Mahesha H.; Luther, James M.; Garcia, Victor; Paueksakon, Paisit; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Hayward, Simon W.; Love, Harold D.; Falck, John R.; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Imig, John D.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; Zent, Roy; Capdevila, Jorge H.

    2015-01-01

    In the kidney, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a primary cytochrome P450 4 (Cyp4)–derived eicosanoid that enhances vasoconstriction of renal vessels and induces hypertension, renal tubular cell hypertrophy, and podocyte apoptosis. Hypertension and podocyte injury contribute to diabetic nephropathy and are strong predictors of disease progression. In this study, we defined the mechanisms whereby 20-HETE affects the progression of diabetic nephropathy. We used Cyp4a14KO male mice that exhibit androgen-sensitive hypertension due to increased Cyp4a12-mediated 20-HETE production. We show that, upon induction of diabetes type 1 via streptozotocin injection, Cyp4a14KO male mice developed worse renal disease than streptozotocin-treated wild-type mice, characterized by increased albuminuria, mesangial expansion, glomerular matrix deposition, and thickness of the glomerular basement membranes. Castration blunted androgen-mediated Cyp4a12 synthesis and 20-HETE production, normalized BP, and ameliorated renal damage in diabetic Cyp4a14KO mice. Notably, treatment with a 20-HETE antagonist or agents that normalized BP without affecting Cyp4a12 expression and 20-HETE biosynthesis also ameliorated diabetes-mediated renal damage and albuminuria in Cyp4a14KO male mice. Taken together, these results suggest that hypertension is the major contributor to 20-HETE–driven diabetes-mediated kidney injury. PMID:25071086

  12. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy associated with Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dong Eun; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kie, Jeong Hae; Park, Yoonseon; Chang, Tae Ik; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Seung Jun; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Kyu Hun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2012-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis occurs as a rare form of renal manifestation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Herein, we report a case of falciparum malaria-associated IgA nephropathy for the first time. A 49-yr old male who had been to East Africa was diagnosed with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Microhematuria and proteinuria along with acute kidney injury developed during the course of the disease. Kidney biopsy showed mesangial proliferation and IgA deposits with tubulointerstitial inflammation. Laboratory tests after recovery from malaria showed disappearance of urinary abnormalities and normalization of kidney function. Our findings suggest that malaria infection might be associated with IgA nephropathy.

  13. Metadherin facilitates podocyte apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Ting; Peng, Fen-Fen; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Wen; Gong, Wang-Qiu; Chen, Wen-Jing; Chen, Yi-Hua; Li, Pei-Lin; Li, Shu-Ting; Xu, Zhao-Zhong; Long, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis, one of the major causes of podocyte loss, has been reported to have a vital role in diabetic nephropathy (DN) pathogenesis, and understanding the mechanisms underlying the regulation of podocyte apoptosis is crucial. Metadherin (MTDH) is an important oncogene, which is overexpressed in most cancers and responsible for apoptosis, metastasis, and poor patient survival. Here we show that the expression levels of Mtdh and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) are significantly increased, whereas those of the microRNA-30 family members (miR-30s) are considerably reduced in the glomeruli of DN rat model and in high glucose (HG)-induced conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes (MPC5). These levels are positively correlated with podocyte apoptosis rate. The inhibition of Mtdh expression, using small interfering RNA, but not Mtdh overexpression, was shown to inhibit HG-induced MPC5 apoptosis and p38 MAPK pathway, and Bax and cleaved caspase 3 expression. This was shown to be similar to the effects of p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580). Furthermore, luciferase assay results demonstrated that Mtdh represents the target of miR-30s. Transient transfection experiments, using miR-30 microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors, led to the increase in Mtdh expression and induced the apoptosis of MPC5, whereas the treatment with miR-30 miRNA mimics led to the reduction in Mtdh expression and apoptosis of HG-induced MPC5 cells in comparison with their respective controls. Our results demonstrate that Mtdh is a potent modulator of podocyte apoptosis, and that it represents the target of miR-30 miRNAs, facilitating podocyte apoptosis through the activation of HG-induced p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. PMID:27882943

  14. [Genetics of mesangial IgA nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Delbarba, Elisa; Pedroni, Bruno; Dallera, Nadia; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis, with a variable prevalence depending on the geographic area of examination. Marked differences in disease prevalence has suggested that genetics could play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, indicating the existence of susceptibility genes detected with different frequencies in geographically separated populations. Moreover, familial forms of IgAN have been reported worldwide, in sibling pairs, families and extended pedigrees belonging to geographically isolated populations. In this article we describe recent discoveries in genetic studies on IgAN. If candidate-gene association studies require first survey on the pathogenesis of the disease, since the candidate loci are selected on the basis of information gathered from traditional biology, the linkage analysis consist in an alternative approach. Several susceptibility loci have been identified in pedigrees segregating for IgAN, but not the causative mutations of the disease. Further progress in the field of knowledge about the genetics of IgAN has recently been obtained by the application of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in large cohorts of cases and controls of IgAN. GWAS have identified multiple susceptibility loci coding for genes involved in critical mechanisms for the development of IgAN and, accordingly, have shed new light on the biology of the disease, revealing unknown pathogenic pathways. The close connection between IgAN and many autoimmune diseases has been demonstrated. Moreover, these studies have made the correlation of genetic risk score of developing IgAN with the geo-epidemiological aspect of the disease possible. The goal of the integrated genomic approach will be to discover new potential therapeutic targets.

  15. The Nephropathy of Experimental Hepatosplenic Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Tito; Galvanek, Eleonora G.; Ward, Peter A.; von Lichtenberg, Franz

    1974-01-01

    The glomerular lesions induced in 10 chimpanzees infected with variable numbers of Schistosoma japonicum cercariae were studied by means of light and electron microscopy and fluorescent antibody technic. Ten animals served as controls; 5 were uninfected and 5 were only lightly infected. The animals were observed for periods ranging from 3 to 17 months, and by the time of sacrifice, all had developed advanced liver fibrosis. In general, the degree of glomerular injury was related to infection intensity and degree and duration of portal liver fibrosis. Some animals had terminal BUN elevation and slight proteinuria. By light and electron microscopy, in the initial stages, only part of the glomeruli were involved and exhibited mesangial matrix expansion and mesangial cell proliferation with intracellular hyaline droplets. At later stages, a larger number of glomeruli were affected and exhibited diffuse hypercellularity, glomerular basement thickening, mesangial sclerosis and less often, focal necrosis, crescent formation, synechiae and global hyalinization. In addition, there were discrete electron-dense deposits localized in the mesangial area in some glomeruli. Immunofluorescent studies utilizing antisera to chimpanzee γ-globulin and complement (C3) and to human properdin disclosed only faint deposits of C3, apparently in mesangial areas. The association of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and nephropathy, the possible role of schistosomal antigen and the mechanism(s) of such glomerular injuries are reviewed and compared with the disease in humans and other host species infected with Schistosoma. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Figs 5-8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:4137991

  16. Treatment with rituximab in idiopathic membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Marco; Tondolo, Francesco; Bruno, Francesca; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab represents a valid therapeutic option to induce remission in patients with primary glomerulonephritis. Despite several studies proving its efficacy in improving outcomes in patients with membranous nephropathy (MN), its role in therapeutic protocols is not yet defined. Methods We studied 38 patients with idiopathic MN treated with rituximab (in 13 patients as first-line therapy, in the remaining 25 after conventional immunosuppressive therapy). The patients were analyzed for a 15-month median (interquartile range 7.7–30.2) follow-up, with serial monitoring of 24-h proteinuria, renal function and circulating CD19+ B cells. Results The percentages of patients who achieved complete remission, partial remission and the composite endpoint (complete or partial remission) were 39.5% (15 patients), 36.8% (14 patients) and 76.3% (29 patients), respectively. The 24-h proteinuria was reduced significantly during the entire period of follow-up (from a baseline value of 6.1 to 0.9 g/day in the last visit; P < 0.01), while albuminemia increased constantly (from a baseline value of 2.6 to 3.5 g/dL in the last observation; P < 0.01). Renal function did not significantly change during the observation period. Circulating CD19+ B cells were reduced significantly from the baseline value to the 24-month value (P < 0.01); data about anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies were available in 14 patients, 10 of which experienced a decreasing trend after treatment. No significant adverse events were described during and after infusions. Conclusions The present study confirmed that treatment with rituximab was remarkably safe and allowed for a large percentage of complete or partial remissions in patients with MN. PMID:27994855

  17. Antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Daugas, Eric; Nochy, Dominique; Huong, Du Le Thi; Duhaut, Pierre; Beaufils, Hélène; Caudwell, Valérie; Bariety, Jean; Piette, Jean-Charles; Hill, Gary

    2002-01-01

    In the course of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the existence of vaso-occlusive lesions capable of affecting numerous organs is now well established. The renal involvement attributable to primary APS, APS nephropathy (APSN), corresponds to vaso-occlusive lesions of the intrarenal vessels, associating side-by-side, acute thromboses with chronic arterial and arteriolar lesions, leading to zones of cortical ischemic atrophy. A retrospective study of 114 lupus patients undergoing renal biopsy was undertaken to determine the following: (1) if APSN can be found in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); (2) if certain clinical and biologic factors can permit the prediction of the presence of APSN; and (3) if APSN is a superadded renal morbidity factor in lupus patients. This study shows the following: (1) APSN occurs in SLE (32% of patients with renal biopsies) in addition to, and independently of, lupus nephritis; (2) APSN is statistically associated with lupus anticoagulant but not with anticardiolipin antibodies; (3) APSN is associated with extrarenal APS, mainly arterial thromboses and obstetrical fetal loss, but not with the venous thromboses of APS; (4) APSN is an independent risk factor, over and above lupus nephritis, that contributes to an elevated prevalence of hypertension, elevated serum creatinine, and increased interstitial fibrosis. Thus, it seems likely that, because of its associations with hypertension, elevated serum creatinine, and increased interstitial fibrosis, APSN may worsen the prognosis in these patients. APSN may also have therapeutic significance in that its recognition should permit a better balance between immunosuppressor and antithrombotic and/or vasoprotective therapy. Finally, this study suggests that APSN should be considered as an element to be included in the classification criteria of APS.

  18. Inflammation in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen

    2017-03-14

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most frequently occurring primary glomerulonephritis in Caucasian and Asian populations. Nonetheless, therapeutic recommendations are based on weak evidence, large controlled trials are scarce and, in particular, the additional value of immunosuppression beyond comprehensive supportive measures is not well-established. The use of immunosuppressants is supported by experimental insights into IgAN pathogenesis that suggest an autoimmune component in disease development. The so-called "multi-hit" theory comprises multiple steps, starting with defective glycosylation of IgA subclass IgA1 that results in overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1), occurrence of anti-Gd-IgA1 autoantibodies, and mesangial deposition of nephritogenic immune complexes. This eventually results in an increased mesangial cell proliferation, inflammatory responses, and complement activation. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several susceptibility genes, many of which support the "multi-hit" concept. In light of these discoveries, it is astonishing that the vast majority of adult IgAN patients obviously do not need and/or benefit from immunosuppressive therapies in the first place. In fact, a number of supportive measures are highly effective in reducing the risk for disease progression in many patients. These measures need to be optimized before immunosuppression should be considered at all. In this review we focus on the underlying pathogenetic cornerstones and the central question of whether systemic inflammation in adult IgAN patients should be treated. Treatment options in children with IgAN are also discussed.

  19. Genetics and Epigenetics of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Lee, Kyung; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the USA and worldwide, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. A genetic factor for the development of DN is strongly implicated, as only one third of diabetic patients eventually develop kidney disease. Growing evidence also supports an important role of epigenetic modifications in DN. Summary Multiple studies have been performed to identify risk genes and loci associated with DN. So far, only several genes and loci have been identified, none of which showed a strong association with DN. Therefore, a better study design with a larger sample size to identify rare variants and a clinically defined patient population to identify genes and loci associated with progressive DN are still needed. In addition to genetic factors, epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs, also play a major role in the pathogenesis of DN through a second layer of gene regulation. Although a major progress has been made in this field, epigenetic studies in DN are still in the early phase and have been limited mostly due to the heterogeneity of kidney tissue samples with multiple cells. However, rapid development of high-throughput genome-wide techniques will help us to better identify genetic variants and epigenetic changes in DN. Key Message Understanding of genetic and epigenetic changes in DN is needed for the development of new biomarkers and better drug targets against DN. Summarized in this review are important recent findings on genetic and epigenetic studies in the field of DN. PMID:27536664

  20. Pyridorin in Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Tom; Spitalewiz, Samuel; Blumenthal, Samuel; Berl, Tomas; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Pohl, Marc A.; Rohde, Richard D.; Raz, Itamar; Yerushalmy, Yair; Yagil, Yoram; Herskovits, Tommy; Atkins, Robert C.; Reutens, Anne T.; Packham, David K.; Lewis, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Pyridoxamine dihydrochloride (Pyridorin, NephroGenex) inhibits formation of advanced glycation end products and scavenges reactive oxygen species and toxic carbonyls, but whether these actions translate into renoprotective effects is unknown. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 317 patients with proteinuric type 2 diabetic nephropathy to twice-daily placebo; Pyridorin, 150 mg twice daily; or Pyridorin, 300 mg twice daily, for 52 weeks. At baseline, the mean age ± SD was 63.9±9.5 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 17.6±8.5 years; the mean serum creatinine level was 2.2±0.6 mg/dl, and the mean protein-to-creatinine ratio was 2973±1932 mg/g. Regarding the primary end point, a statistically significant change in serum creatinine from baseline to 52 weeks was not evident in either Pyridorin group compared with placebo. However, analysis of covariance suggested that the magnitude of the treatment effect differed by baseline renal function. Among patients in the lowest tertile of baseline serum creatinine concentration, treatment with Pyridorin associated with a lower average change in serum creatinine concentration at 52 weeks (0.28, 0.07, and 0.14 mg/dl for placebo, Pyridorin 150 mg, and Pyridorin 300 mg, respectively; P=0.05 for either Pyridorin dose versus placebo); there was no evidence of a significant treatment effect in the middle or upper tertiles. In conclusion, this trial failed to detect an effect of Pyridorin on the progression of serum creatinine at 1 year, although it suggests that patients with less renal impairment might benefit. PMID:22034637

  1. Apelin retards the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Day, Robert T; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Feliers, Denis

    2013-03-15

    Apelin and its receptor APJ have pleiotropic effects in mice and humans and play a protective role in cardiovascular diseases at least partially by inhibiting oxidative stress. Our objective was to study the effect of apelin on the progression of kidney disease in mice with established type 1 diabetes. Ove26 mice with type 1 diabetes received daily subcutaneous injections of apelin for 2 or 14 wk. APJ localizes in the glomeruli and blood vessels of kidneys. Renal APJ expression was reduced in diabetic mice but increased after treatment with apelin. Apelin treatment did not affect glycemia, body weight, or blood pressure in diabetic mice. Whole kidney and glomerular hypertrophy, as well as renal inflammation, including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression, NF-κB activation, and monocyte infiltration, was inhibited after short and long treatment with apelin. Apelin administration significantly reduced albuminuria at 6 mo. Short treatment with apelin was sufficient to reverse the downregulation of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Expression of angiotensin II and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1) in kidneys from diabetic mice treated was not affected by apelin. These findings show for the first time that apelin exerts a protective effect on the diabetic kidney. Short administration is sufficient to reduce kidney and glomerular hypertrophy as well as renal inflammation, but prolonged treatment is required to improve albuminuria. This effect was independent of the activation of the renin angiotensin system but correlated with upregulation of the antioxidant catalase. Apelin may represent a novel tool to treat diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Prospective study of cost of care at multidisciplinary ALS centers adhering to American Academy of Neurology (AAN) ALS practice parameters.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Kevin; Levine, Todd; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Lyon, Mary; Maginnis, Kimberly; Callas, Peter; Gaspari, Celeste; Tandan, Rup

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary care in ALS is associated with longer survival, improved quality of life, and reduced hospital admissions, but there are no published data on institutional costs associated with multidisciplinary ALS care at U.S. centers. We prospectively examined institutional costs, adherence to AAN Practice Parameters and patient satisfaction in multidisciplinary ALS clinics at 18 U.S. ALS centers. Centers reported patient volumes; direct costs for staff salary/benefits, supplies and equipment; and institutional non-salary and overhead costs over a three-month period. In 1117 patients seen during this period, mean age was 61.5 years (range 25-91 years), 56% were male, and mean ALSFRS-R score was 29. Mean total salary/benefit cost per clinic day for all providers was $2964 (range $1692-$5236 across centers). Mean salary/benefit cost per patient per clinic was $507 (range $258-$806 across centers). Differences among centers in reporting non-salary costs prevented meaningful analysis. Practice parameter adherence and patient satisfaction were high. This prospective collaborative study demonstrates the direct financial burden of evidence-based multidisciplinary ALS care in the U.S.; more refined non-salary and overhead cost data are needed to evaluate the full cost impact of care. These data may be useful in supporting evidence-based models of patient centered care for ALS.

  3. Acute oxalate nephropathy after ingestion of star fruit.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Fang, H C; Chou, K J; Wang, J S; Chung, H M

    2001-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of star fruit (carambola) has not been reported before. We report the first two cases. These patients developed nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and backache within hours of ingesting large quantities of sour carambola juice; then acute renal failure followed. Both patients needed hemodialysis for oliguric acute renal failure, and pathologic examinations showed typical changes of acute oxalate nephropathy. The renal function recovered 4 weeks later without specific treatment. Sour carambola juice is a popular beverage in Taiwan. The popularity of star fruit juice is not compatible with the rare discovery of star fruit-associated acute oxalate nephropathy. Commercial carambola juice usually is prepared by pickling and dilution processes that reduce oxalate content markedly, whereas pure fresh juice or mild diluted postpickled juice for traditional remedies, as used in our cases, contain high quantities of oxalate. An empty stomach and dehydrated state may pose an additional risk for development of renal injury. To avoid acute oxalate nephropathy, pure sour carambola juice or mild diluted postpickled juice should not be consumed in large amounts, especially on an empty stomach or in a dehydrated state.

  4. Tacrolimus monotherapy in membranous nephropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Praga, M; Barrio, V; Juárez, G Fernández; Luño, J

    2007-05-01

    Membranous nephropathy is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Although some patients with membranous nephropathy achieve a spontaneous remission, renal function continues to deteriorate in others. We conducted a prospective randomized trial evaluating monotherapy with tacrolimus to achieve complete or partial remission in patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Twenty-five patients received tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) over 12 months with a 6-month taper, whereas 23 patients were in the control group. The probability of remission in the treatment group was 58, 82, and 94% after 6, 12, and 18 months but only 10, 24, and 35%, respectively in the control group. The decrease in proteinuria was significantly greater in the treatment group. Notably, six patients in the control group and only one in the treatment group reached the secondary end point of a 50% increase in their serum creatinine. No patient in the tacrolimus group showed a relapse during the taper period. Nephrotic syndrome reappeared in almost half of the patients who were in remission by the 18th month after tacrolimus withdrawal. We conclude that tacrolimus is a very useful therapeutic option for patients with membranous nephropathy and preserved renal function. The majority of patients experienced remission with a significant reduction in the risk for deteriorating renal function.

  5. [The role of ramipril in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Csaba András

    2014-02-16

    In the past two decades the number of diabetic patients has increased dramatically. According to the data of the International Diabetes Federation published in 2012, more than 371 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus, which is responsible for the death of 4.8 million people yearly. Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of terminal renal failure. The first stage of its development is microalbuminuria. Without an efficient treatment 20-40% of the patients with microalbuminuria suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus develop chronic renal failure, but only 20% of them become uremic because most of them die beforehand mainly due to cardiovascular disease. The renin-angiotensin-system, which is one of the most important elements of the regulation of blood pressure and water-salt metabolism, plays an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Drugs affecting the function of this system are of great significance in the treatment of hypertension. The author rewiews the results of several important studies and animal experiments to demonstrate the role of ramipril in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy. The author concludes that ramipril is one of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors with the highest number of evidence based beneficial results. Apart from its blood pressure decreasing effect, ramipril protects target organs and it proved to be effective in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy according to most international multicenter clinical trials. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(7), 263-269.

  6. Calorie restriction mimicking effects of roflumilast prevents diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Lodea, Saritha; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-08-08

    Little is known about role of PDE4 in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we investigated the effect of roflumilast, a selective PDE 4 inhibitor in type 1 diabetic nephropathy. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats using streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). Diabetic rats showed elevated plasma glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and decrease in plasma albumin confirming signs of nephropathy. Roflumilast at 2 and 3mg/kg normalized these alterations. Roflumilast also suppressed oxidative stress and deposition of an extracellular matrix protein such as fibronectin and collagen in kidney of diabetic rats. TUNEL assay revealed apoptosis in diabetic kidney than control and that roflumilast prevents this effect. We show that kidney of diabetic rats displayed a state of p-AMPK and SIRT1 deficiency and that roflumilast, interestingly, was able to restore their levels. Further, roflumilast prevented an increase in HO-1 and loss in the FoxO1 expression in diabetes. However, it did not improve the reduced NRF2 levels in diabetes. This is the first report to show that, like resveratrol and other SIRT1 activators, roflumilast also mimics calorie restriction effects through activation of AMPK/SIRT1 and protects against diabetic nephropathy. This study unveils the unexplored potential of roflumilast which can be used in treatment of metabolic disorders.

  7. Predicting Diabetic Nephropathy Using a Multifactorial Genetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Blech, Ilana; Wainstein, Julio; Rubinstein, Ardon; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Cohen, Joseph; Pollin, Toni I.; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Aims The tendency to develop diabetic nephropathy is, in part, genetically determined, however this genetic risk is largely undefined. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the hypothesis that combined analysis of multiple genetic variants can improve prediction. Methods Based on previous reports, we selected 27 SNPs in 15 genes from metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and genotyped them in 1274 Ashkenazi or Sephardic Jewish patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes of >10 years duration. A logistic regression model was built using a backward selection algorithm and SNPs nominally associated with nephropathy in our population. The model was validated by using random “training” (75%) and “test” (25%) subgroups of the original population and by applying the model to an independent dataset of 848 Ashkenazi patients. Results The logistic model based on 5 SNPs in 5 genes (HSPG2, NOS3, ADIPOR2, AGER, and CCL5) and 5 conventional variables (age, sex, ethnicity, diabetes type and duration), and allowing for all possible two-way interactions, predicted nephropathy in our initial population (C-statistic = 0.672) better than a model based on conventional variables only (C = 0.569). In the independent replication dataset, although the C-statistic of the genetic model decreased (0.576), it remained highly associated with diabetic nephropathy (χ2 = 17.79, p<0.0001). In the replication dataset, the model based on conventional variables only was not associated with nephropathy (χ2 = 3.2673, p = 0.07). Conclusion In this proof-of-concept study, we developed and validated a genetic model in the Ashkenazi/Sephardic population predicting nephropathy more effectively than a similarly constructed non-genetic model. Further testing is required to determine if this modeling approach, using an optimally selected panel of genetic markers, can provide clinically useful prediction and if generic models can be developed for

  8. Risk prediction models for contrast induced nephropathy: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Samuel A; Shah, Prakesh M; Chertow, Glenn M; Wald, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To look at the available literature on validated prediction models for contrast induced nephropathy and describe their characteristics. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature) databases. Review methods Databases searched from inception to 2015, and the retrieved reference lists hand searched. Dual reviews were conducted to identify studies published in the English language of prediction models tested with patients that included derivation and validation cohorts. Data were extracted on baseline patient characteristics, procedural characteristics, modelling methods, metrics of model performance, risk of bias, and clinical usefulness. Eligible studies evaluated characteristics of predictive models that identified patients at risk of contrast induced nephropathy among adults undergoing a diagnostic or interventional procedure using conventional radiocontrast media (media used for computed tomography or angiography, and not gadolinium based contrast). Results 16 studies were identified, describing 12 prediction models. Substantial interstudy heterogeneity was identified, as a result of different clinical settings, cointerventions, and the timing of creatinine measurement to define contrast induced nephropathy. Ten models were validated internally and six were validated externally. Discrimination varied in studies that were validated internally (C statistic 0.61-0.95) and externally (0.57-0.86). Only one study presented reclassification indices. The majority of higher performing models included measures of pre-existing chronic kidney disease, age, diabetes, heart failure or impaired ejection fraction, and hypotension or shock. No prediction model evaluated its effect on clinical decision making or patient outcomes. Conclusions Most predictive models for contrast induced nephropathy in clinical use have modest ability, and are only relevant to patients receiving contrast for

  9. Immunoglobulin M Nephropathy in a Patient with Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ul Abideen, Zain; Sajjad, Zoya; Haroon Khan, Asna; Mamoon, Nadira; Bilal, Muhammad; Mujtaba Quadri, Khaja Hameeduddin

    2016-12-13

    Immunoglobulin M nephropathy (IgMN) is characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulin M in a dominant distribution in the renal glomeruli. Primary immunoglobulin M nephropathy is diagnosed after consistent light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy (EM) results, and exclusion of known systemic disorders causing immunoglobulin M deposition in the glomeruli. The secondary disease has been reported with a few conditions though it has never been reported with any primary disease of the liver. We report the case of an adolescent male patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and worsening anasarca. He was found to have nephrotic-range proteinuria that did not respond to conventional corticosteroid treatment. He was subjected to a renal biopsy which revealed a diagnosis of immunoglobulin M nephropathy. His liver function tests were deranged and an ultrasound scan of the abdomen revealed a coarse irregular liver. Workup revealed elevated urine copper excretion and a low ceruloplasmin level. He was diagnosed as a case of Wilson's disease and started on penicillamine and pyridoxine. He was also started on intravenous cyclophosphamide for the corticosteroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome to which he responded remarkably well. His edema settled, proteinuria resolved, and liver functions normalized. Currently, he is in remission and enjoying good health. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first known association between IgM nephropathy and Wilson's disease. It is presently not clear if causation can necessarily be established. This may be the result of defective IgM clearance by the liver or an altered metabolism of the antibody or immune complexes, as with hepatic-associated immunoglobulin M (IgM) nephropathy. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of this disease.

  10. Current concepts in the management of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Waanders, F; Visser, F W; Gans, R O B

    2013-11-01

    Although much progress has been made in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy, renal dysfunction and development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain major concerns in diabetes. In addition, diabetic patients with microalbuminuria have an increased cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, new treatment modalities or strategies are needed to prevent or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy and prevent cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this review we describe current concepts in pathophysiology, treatment goals and we discuss future developments in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Common risk factors for diabetic nephropathy and its progression are longer duration, poor glycaemic control, hypertension and the presence of albuminuria. Available treatment options, especially renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, but also better blood pressure and blood glucose control, decrease the incidence of cardiovascular disease and renal disease in diabetes. It is important that treatment goals are tailored to the individual patient with individual treatment goals of glycaemic control and blood pressure, depending on age, type of diabetes and diabetes duration. Aggressive treatment of glucose control and blood pressure might not always be best practice for every patient. Since the proportion of ESRD due to diabetic nephropathy remains high, optimisation of RAAS blockade is advocated and can be achieved by adequate sodium restriction and/or diuretic treatment. Moreover, aldosterone blockade might be a valuable strategy, which has potency to slow the progression of diabetic renal disease. Other possible future interventions are under investigation, but large clinical trials have to be awaited to confirm the safety and efficacy of these drugs.

  11. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hovind, Peter; Hansen, Tine W; Rossing, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them with previous data, obtained using identical criteria at our hospital. The glomerular filtration rate, measured yearly by 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance, was a mean of 71 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline. The mean glomerular filtration rate decline was significantly reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 5-34) from previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal function has improved along with better control of modifiable risk factors.

  12. [Clinical studies on chronic diabetic nephropathy and recent data concerning prevention of risks of nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Esnault, Vincent

    2006-05-01

    Considering the increasing incidence of diabetic nephropathy and its serious complications, the prevention of nephropathy evolution risk in diabetic patients is the subject of several recently initiated studies. In diabetic patients with advanced nephropathy, the lowering of proteinuria by renin angiotensin system blockers induces an evolution risk reduction, which can be further improved by increasing the dose of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARA II). Such a synergy can be also obtained with the association of an ARA II and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, provided that the diuretic dose given to the patient is increased. In terms of cardiovascular risk, diabetic patients benefit from this type of treatment, as cardiovascular events increase with the level of proteinuria. In micro-albuminuria patients, sufficient doses of ARA II or ACE inhibitors are needed to avoid relapse after treatment discontinuation. In normo-albuminuria patients also, the treatment with a renin angiotensin system blocker significantly decreases the risk of development of microalbuminuria. Thus, the reduction of proteinuria or the prevention of its appearance with renin angiotensin system blockers is the main therapeutic strategy to prevent the evolution of nephropathy in diabetic patients.

  13. Diabetic Nephropathy in Women With Preexisting Diabetes: From Pregnancy Planning to Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Ringholm, Lene; Damm, Julie Agner; Vestgaard, Marianne; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2016-02-01

    In women with preexisting diabetes and nephropathy or microalbuminuria, it is important to deliver careful preconception counselling to assess the risk for the mother and the foetus, for optimizing glycaemic status and to adjust medical treatment. If serum creatinine is normal in early pregnancy, kidney function is often preserved during pregnancy, but complications such as severe preeclampsia and preterm delivery are still common. Perinatal mortality is now comparable with that in women with diabetes and normal kidney function. Besides strict glycaemic control before and during pregnancy, early and intensive antihypertensive treatment is important to optimize pregnancy outcomes. Methyldopa, labetalol, nifedipine and diltiazem are considered safe, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers should be stopped before or at confirmation of pregnancy. Supplementation with folic acid in early pregnancy and low-dose aspirin from 10 to 12 weeks reduces the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. During breastfeeding, several ACE inhibitors are considered safe.

  14. Effects of pregnancy on the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy and of diabetic nephropathy on pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Young, Esther Cytrynbaum; Pires, Maria Lucia Elias; Marques, Luiz Paulo José; de Oliveira, José Egídio Paulo; Zajdenverg, Lenita

    2011-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effect of pregnancy on the development and course of diabetic nephropathy. This study followed 43 pregnant women with previous diabetes mellitus, 32 without nephropathy (Group I) and 11 with nephropathy (Group II). Urinary albumin excretion (UAE), serum creatinine (Cr) and creatinine clearance (CCr) in the pre-pregnancy (Pre-P), first trimester (1T), third trimester (3T) and 1 year postpartum (PP) were evaluated. In both groups there were an increase in 3T compared to Pre-P of CCr (137 vs. 98 ml/min and 110 vs. 81 ml/min, p=0.0001, respectively) and UAE (7.78 vs. 3.15 mg/24 h and 592 vs. 119 mg/24 h, p=0.0001, respectively). Increase of Cr in the PP compared to 1T in Group II (0.88 vs. 0.70 mg/dL, p=0.031) was observed. There were no difference in UAE, CCr and Cr in the PP when compared to pre-P as well variance over time between groups. Group II showed higher prevalence of chronic hypertension (72.7 vs. 21.9%, p=0.004), preeclampsia (63.6 vs. 6.3%, p=0.0003) and lower gestational age at birth (36 vs. 38 weeks, p=0.003). We conclude that pregnancy was not associated with development and progression of diabetic nephropathy in women with or without mild renal dysfunction. The presence of diabetic nephropathy was associated with increased risk of perinatal complications.

  15. The role of atmospheric stability/turbulence on wakes at the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, R. J.; Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Lundquist, J. K.; Oxley, G. S.; Hahn, S.; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results from the NREL SOWFA project that compares simulations from models of different fidelity to meteorological and turbine data from the Egmond aan Zee wind farm. Initial results illustrate that wake behavior and impacts are strongly impacted by turbulence intensity [1]. This includes both power losses from wakes and loading illustrated by the out of plane bending moment. Here we focus on understanding the relationship between turbulence and atmospheric stability and whether power losses due to wakes can effectively be characterized by measures of turbulence alone or whether atmospheric stability as a whole plays a fundamental role in wake behavior. The study defines atmospheric stability using the Monin-Obukhov length estimated based on the temperature difference between 116 and 70 m. The data subset selected using this method for the calculation of the Monin-Obukhov length indicate little diurnal or directional dependence of the stability classes but a dominance of stable classes in the spring/unstable classes in fall and of near-neutral classes at high wind speeds (Figure 2). The analysis is complicated by the need to define turbulence intensity. We can select the ratio of the standard deviation of wind speed to mean wind speed in each observation period using data from the meteorological mast, in which case a substantial amount of data must be excluded due to the presence of the wind farm. An alternative is to use data from the wind turbines which could provide a larger data set for analysis. These approaches are examined and compared to illustrate their robustness. Finally, power losses from wakes are categorized according to stability and/or turbulence in order to understand their relative importance in determining the behavior of wind turbine wakes.

  16. Effects of CP-900691, a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, agonist on diabetic nephropathy in the BTBR ob/ob mouse.

    PubMed

    Askari, Bardia; Wietecha, Tomasz; Hudkins, Kelly L; Fox, Edward J; O'Brien, Kevin D; Kim, Jinkyu; Nguyen, Tri Q; Alpers, Charles E

    2014-08-01

    Piperidine-based peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α agonists are agents that are efficacious in improving lipid, glycemic, and inflammatory indicators in diabetes and obesity. This study sought to determine whether CP-900691 ((S)-3-[3-(1-carboxy-1-methyl-ethoxy)-phenyl]-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid 4-trifluoromethyl-benzyl ester; CP), a member of this novel class of agents, by decreasing plasma triglycerides, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in the Black and Tan, BRachyuric (BTBR) ob/ob mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Four-week old female BTBR WT and BTBR ob/ob mice received either regular chow or one containing CP (3 mg/kg per day) for 14 weeks. CP elevated plasma high-density lipoprotein, albuminuria, and urinary excretion of 8-epi PGF(2α), a product of the nonenzymatic metabolism of arachidonic acid and whose production is elevated in oxidative stress, in BTBR WT mice. In BTBR ob/ob mice, CP reduced plasma triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids, fasting blood glucose, body weight, and plasma interleukin-6, while concomitantly improving insulin resistance. Despite these beneficial metabolic effects, CP had no effect on elevated plasma insulin, 8-epi PGF(2α) excretion, and albuminuria, and surprisingly, did not ameliorate the development of diabetic nephropathy, having no effect on the accumulation of renal macrophages, glomerular hypertrophy, and increased mesangial matrix expansion. In addition, CP did not increase plasma high-density lipoprotein in BTBR ob/ob mice, while paradoxically increasing total cholesterol levels. These findings indicate that 8-epi PGF(2α), possibly along with hyperinsulinemia and inflammatory and dysfunctional lipoproteins, is integral to the development of diabetic nephropathy and should be considered as a potential target of therapy in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  17. The role of IL-18 in type 1 diabetic nephropathy: The problem and future treatment.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H

    2016-05-01

    Diabetic vascular complication is a leading cause of diabetic nephropathy, a progressive increase in urinary albumin excretion coupled with elevated blood pressure leading to declined glomerular filtration and eventually end stage renal failure. There is growing evidence that activated inflammation is contributing factor to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Meanwhile, IL-18, a member of the IL-1 family of inflammatory cytokines, is involved in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, the benefits derived from the current therapeutics for diabetic nephropathy strategies still provide imperfect protection against renal progression. This imperfection points to the need for newer therapeutic agents that have potential to affect primary mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, the recognition of IL-18 as significant pathogenic mediators in diabetic nephropathy leaves open the possibility of new potential therapeutic targets.

  18. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Jan; Rizk, Dana; Takahashi, Kazuo; Zhang, XianWen; Bian, Qi; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshimi; Reily, Colin; Lai, Ling-Yun; Hao, Chuanming; Novak, Lea; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Julian, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy, a frequent cause of end-stage renal disease, is an autoimmune disease wherein immune complexes consisting of IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-glycans (autoantigen) and anti-glycan autoantibodies deposit in glomeruli and induce renal injury. Multiple genetic loci associated with disease risk have been identified. The prevalence of risk alleles varies geographically: it is the highest in eastern Asia and northern Europe, lower in other parts of Europe and North America, and the lowest in Africa. IgA nephropathy is diagnosed by the pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen. Currently, therapy is not disease targeted but rather focused on maintaining control of blood pressure and proteinuria, ideally with suppression of angiotensin II. Possible additional approaches differ between countries. Disease-specific therapy as well as new tools for the diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of responses to therapy are needed. Summary Glycosylation pathways associated with aberrant O-glycosylation of IgA1 and, thus, production of autoantigen, have been identified. Furthermore, unique characteristics of the autoantibodies in IgA nephropathy have been uncovered. Many of these biochemical features are shared by patients with IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis, suggesting that the two diseases may represent opposite ends of a spectrum of a disease process. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of pathogenic IgA1-containing immune complexes will enable the development of disease-specific therapies as well as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Key Message IgA nephropathy is an autoimmune disease caused by the glomerular deposition of nephritogenic circulating immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen) bound by anti-glycan autoantibodies. A better understanding of the multi-step process of the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy and the genetic and environmental contributing

  19. Nlrp3-inflammasome activation in non-myeloid-derived cells aggravates diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Khurrum; Bock, Fabian; Dong, Wei; Wang, Hongjie; Kopf, Stefan; Kohli, Shrey; Al-Dabet, Moh'd Mohanad; Ranjan, Satish; Wolter, Juliane; Wacker, Christian; Biemann, Ronald; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Reymann, Klaus; Söderkvist, Peter; Groß, Olaf; Schwenger, Vedat; Pahernik, Sascha; Nawroth, Peter P; Gröne, Herman-Josef; Madhusudhan, Thati; Isermann, Berend

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a growing health concern with characteristic sterile inflammation. As the underlying mechanisms of this inflammation remain poorly defined, specific therapies targeting sterile inflammation in diabetic nephropathy are lacking. Intriguingly, an association of diabetic nephropathy with inflammasome activation has recently been shown, but the pathophysiological relevance of this finding remains unknown. Within glomeruli, inflammasome activation was detected in endothelial cells and podocytes in diabetic humans and mice and in glucose-stressed glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes in vitro. Abolishing Nlrp3 or caspase-1 expression in bone marrow-derived cells fails to protect mice against diabetic nephropathy. Conversely, Nlrp3-deficient mice are protected against diabetic nephropathy despite transplantation of wild-type bone marrow. Pharmacological IL-1R antagonism prevented or even reversed diabetic nephropathy in mice. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome in glucose or advanced glycation end product stressed podocytes. Inhibition of mitochondrial ROS prevents glomerular inflammasome activation and nephropathy in diabetic mice. Thus, mitochondrial ROS and Nlrp3-inflammasome activation in non-myeloid-derived cells aggravate diabetic nephropathy. Targeting the inflammasome may be a potential therapeutic approach to diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Visceral leishmaniasis in a patient with sicca syndrome and nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kaaroud, H; Mhibik, S; B Ji, S; Moussa, F Ben; Abdallah, T Ben; Maiz, H Ben

    2003-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with severe volume depletion and pre-renal azotemia. She had xerostomia, xerophthalmia and cervical lymhadenopathy. Urine examination revealed proteinuria, hematuria and glycosuria. Laboratory studies, after volume repletion, revealed hyper-gammaglobulinemia. Renal biopsy showed interstitial nephropathy and salivary-gland biopsy showed glandular atrophy and diffuse fibrosis. Diagnosis of leishmaniasis was established by bone marrow examination and serology. The patient was treated with pentavalent antimonial (Glucantime) with an excellent response. The treatment, however, had to be interrupted because of transient nephrotoxicity. After a break of four weeks, the antimonial was reinstituted with no more side effects. Both the sicca syndrome and the nephropathy responded very well to the treatment at nine months follow-up. In this case the presentation of visceral leishmaniasis was atypical, probably because of the partially suppressed immunity. The clue to the diagnosis was the polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia.

  1. Evaluation of reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis and renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen B; Jones, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    MR urography has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux nephropathy, pyelonephritis, vesicoureteric reflux and renal dysplasia. MR urography utilizes multiple parameters to assess both renal anatomy and function and provides a more complete characterization of acquired and congenital disease. Pyelonephritis and renal scarring can be distinguished by assessing the parenchymal contours and signal intensity. Characteristic imaging features of renal dysplasia include small size, subcortical cysts, disorganized architecture, decreased and patchy contrast enhancement as well as a dysmorphic pelvicalyceal system. Because of its ability to subdivide and categorize this heterogeneous group of disorders, it seems inevitable that MR urography will replace DMSA renal scintigraphy as the gold standard for assessment of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. MR urography will contribute to our understanding of renal dysplasia and its relationship to reflux nephropathy.

  2. [IgA nephropathy (Berger's disease) in children].

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Jones, L; Sánchez-Aguilar, J R; Ramòn-Garcia, G; Rosado-Tun, M A; Romero-Navarro, B; Gómez-Chico, R; Muñoz-Arizpe, R

    1992-12-01

    IgA nephropathy, also called Berger's disease, is characterized by recurrent gross hematuria or persistent microscopic hematuria, together with mesangial glomerular deposits of IgA found in the renal biopsy. Seven children with IgA nephropathy were studied. Most of them presented initially with recurrent macroscopic hematuria and low or moderate-grade proteinuria, without hypertension or renal function impairment. Only one patient presented with a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Four patients did not receive any treatment; one of them is in remission, one has improved and two remain with moderate proteinuria and hematuria. One patient with significant proteinuria improved after prednisone and azathioprine treatment. The patient with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis improved his renal function after oral prednisone and intravenous boluses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide.

  3. Pathophysiological role and therapeutic implications of inflammation in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Luis-Rodríguez, Desirée; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Górriz, José Luis; De-Álvaro, Fernando; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are becoming one of the most important health problems in the world. Diabetic nephropathy is now the main cause of end-stage renal disease. The mechanisms leading to the development and progression of renal injury are not well known. Therefore, it is very important to find new pathogenic pathways to provide opportunities for early diagnosis and targets for novel treatments. At the present time, we know that activation of innate immunity with development of a chronic low grade inflammatory response is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have shown the participation of different inflammatory molecules and pathways in the pathophysiology of this complication. PMID:22253941

  4. Pathophysiological role and therapeutic implications of inflammation in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luis-Rodríguez, Desirée; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Górriz, José Luis; De-Álvaro, Fernando; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2012-01-15

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are becoming one of the most important health problems in the world. Diabetic nephropathy is now the main cause of end-stage renal disease. The mechanisms leading to the development and progression of renal injury are not well known. Therefore, it is very important to find new pathogenic pathways to provide opportunities for early diagnosis and targets for novel treatments. At the present time, we know that activation of innate immunity with development of a chronic low grade inflammatory response is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have shown the participation of different inflammatory molecules and pathways in the pathophysiology of this complication.

  5. Impaired Tubular Uptake Explains Albuminuria in Early Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Leileata M.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Campos, Silvia B.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Comper, Wayne D.; Brown, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy is important to improve methods for early diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we addressed whether albuminuria in diabetes results from altered glomerular filtration and/or altered processing of filtered albumin by the proximal tubule. Type 1 diabetic Munich Wistar rats developed albuminuria after 12 wk of diabetes. Intravital two-photon microscopy revealed similar glomerular permeability in the diabetic and control animals, assessed using both albumin-Alexa568 and 69-kD FITC-dextran; however, diabetic animals demonstrated significantly less filtered fluorescent albumin in renal proximal tubule (PT) cells compared with control animals. We also observed increased albumin-derived urinary peptide excretion in diabetic animals, and hyperglycemia modulated this peptideuria. In conclusion, in the early stages of diabetic nephropathy, the PT plays a major role in the development of albuminuria, which may be preceded by peptideuria. PMID:19118149

  6. APOL1 and nephropathy progression in populations of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I

    2013-09-01

    Marked familial aggregation of chronic kidney disease suggests that inherited factors play a major role in nephropathy susceptibility. Molecular genetics analyses have identified a number of genes reproducibly associated with a broad range of renal phenotypes. Most associations show polygenic inheritance patterns with limited effect size. In contrast, genetic association between the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) gene and several severe nondiabetic forms of kidney disease in African Americans approach Mendelian inheritance patterns and account for a large proportion of glomerulosclerosis in populations of African ancestry. Emerging data support an important role for APOL1 in the progression of diverse etiologies of kidney disease, in concert with requisite environmental (gene*environment) and inherited (gene*gene) interactions. This article reviews the current status of APOL1-associated nephropathy and discusses research questions under active investigation in the search for a cure for these severe and often progressive kidney diseases.

  7. 2,8-Dihydroxyadenine Nephropathy Identified as Cause of End-Stage Renal Disease After Renal Transplant.

    PubMed

    George, Smiley Annie; Al-Rushaidan, Sulaiman; Francis, Issam; Soonowala, Darius; Nampoory, M R Narayanan

    2016-07-22

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of uric acid metabolism that leads to formation and excretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine into urine. The low solubility of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine results in precipitation and formation of urinary crystals and renal stones. Patients with this disorder usually have recurrent nephrolithiasis and can develop nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation in the renal parenchyma. The disease is most often underdiagnosed and can recur in renal transplant, causing graft failure. Lack of specific clinical manifestations, chemical and radiologic features identical to those shown with uric acid stones, and lack of awareness among clinicians are among the causes for the underdiagnoses of this treatable disease. Allopurinol, a xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor, is the mainstay of treatment, supported by high fluid intake and dietary modifications. The possibility of adenine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency should be considered in all cases of urolithiasis in children, patients with recurrent urolithiasis, and patients with urolithiasis associated with renal failure of unknown cause, including patients with end-stage renal disease and renal transplant recipients. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female patient who had a late diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine nephropathy-induced end-stage renal disease, made on the native nephrectomy that accompanied the renal transplant, and who had a timely intervention that prevented recurrence in the graft.

  8. [Problems with immunosuppressive agents in nephropathies with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Savoldi, S; Mesiano, P; Rocchietti, M

    2008-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment is widely used in transplant patients, who often have chronic renal failure, while its use in nephropathies of native kidneys with chronic renal insufficiency is still limited. In recent years a number of papers have reported advantages of its use also in this setting. A prerequisite for immunosuppression in this condition is accurate renal histology, in order to define the etiology, activity/chronicity index and prognosis. Although clinicians agree on the use of aggressive treatment for secondary nephropathies, the approach to primary forms in the presence of chronic renal failure remains controversial, as does the definition of a ''point of no return'' beyond which treatment could be ineffective or unsafe. Nonrandomized studies found that immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide can be useful in membranous nephropathy with renal insufficiency. The use of immunosuppressive drugs in IgA nephropathy in the presence of established renal insufficiency seems to improve renal survival with a limited occurrence of side effects. Since the pharmacokinetics of the current immunosuppressive agents (steroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, mycophenolate mofetil) is modified by renal insufficiency, attention should be paid to reducing drug doses and monitoring toxicity. Immunosuppressive treatment is a critical procedure in patients with chronic renal failure, in whom an increased risk of infection is already present. In conclusion, on the basis of the data of the literature, we can hypothesize that the ''point of no return'' exceeds the threshold generally considered safe by clinicians. Nevertheless, a strict definition of a cutoff value for renal function to establish whether or not a certain treatment should be given is not applicable in clinical practice, where the choice of an immunosuppressive approach must be tailored to the individual patient based on a global evaluation including renal histology, clinical conditions

  9. Fifty years of Balkan endemic nephropathy: daunting questions, elusive answers.

    PubMed

    Batuman, V

    2006-02-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) has remained a geographically constant endemic for 50 years. Despite extensive research, its etiology remains unknown. In the current issue, in a study in one of the earliest sites where the endemic was first recognized, Dimitrov et al. confirm the persistance of the endemic into a new generation and also identify a maternal link in the pathogenesis of BEN. This intriguing finding needs to be confirmed in other endemic areas.

  10. Infantile immunoglobulin A nephropathy showing features of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Akira; Oka, Noriko; Hamaguchi, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Joh, Kensuke

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) showing predominant IgA and complement 3 (C3) deposition on the mesangium is an immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. This renal disease is the most common primary glomerular disease worldwide. However, infantile onset of IgAN is rare. In the present patient, urinary protein and occult blood were detected in a girl aged 1 year and 8 months on urinalysis at a nursery school. Despite being young, a kidney biopsy was performed for diagnosis and the correct choice of therapy. Glomerular mesangial cell proliferation and a double contour of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) resembling a railroad track were noted on light microscopy. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed morphologically with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), because mesangial hypercellularity and thickening of the GBM were identified. However, on immunofluorescent staining, the deposition of immune complexes mainly consisting of IgA, IgG, and C3 was noted in the mesangial region and glomerular capillary loops. On electron microscopy, electron-dense deposits were recognized in the subendothelial and paramesangial regions associated with mesangial cell interposition into the subendothelial space. Autoimmune diseases and infection-associated secondary glomerulonephritis were clinically excluded, because there were no relevant signs or symptoms. Steroid treatment was initiated and findings of urinalysis were normalized within 8 months. This patient was finally diagnosed with IgA nephropathy showing the features of MPGN. The present patient was the youngest among reported cases of IgA nephropathy, suggesting that early onset of IgAN is associated with an MPGN-like lesion. The present report provides information for pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

  11. A Glimpse of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X.; Xiao, L.; Xiao, P.; Yang, S.; Chen, G.; Liu, F.; Kanwar, Y.Y.; Sun, L.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes belonging to the family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that are capable of degrading almost all the proteinaceous components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). It is known that MMPs play a role in a number of renal diseases, such as, various forms of glomerulonephritis and tubular diseases, including some of the inherited kidney diseases. In this regard, ECM accumulation is considered to be a hallmark morphologic finding of diabetic nephropathy, which not only is related to the excessive synthesis of matrix proteins, but also to their decreased degradation by the MMPs. In recent years, increasing evidence suggest that there is a good correlation between the activity or expression of MMPs and progression of renal disease in patients with diabetic nephropathy in humans and in various experimental animal models. In such a diabetic milieu, the expression of MMPs is modulated by high glucose, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), TGF-β, reactive oxygen species (ROS), transcription factors and some of the microRNAs. In this review, we focused on the structure and functions of MMPs, and their role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25039784

  12. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  13. IgG deposition in IgA nephropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of glomerular disease among young adults. The aim of this study is to determine the correlation of IgG deposition with morphologic variables of Oxford classification and some clinical data of patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN).A total of 114 biopsies were enrolled to the study (70.2% were male). Mean age of the patients was 37.7±13.6 years. This study showed that, IgG deposition intensity had not significant correlation with serum creatinine. No significant association of sex with IgG was found. There was not significant association of IgG deposits with age below and more that 40 years. There was not significant association of IgG deposit intensity with four morphologic variables of Oxford classification. Less studied published regarding the immunostaining findings in IgA nephropathy patients. Location of deposited immunoglobulin (mesangial versus mesangial-capillary) or the type of immunoglobulin (IgG or IgM) may have prognostic significant. More studies needs to find the clinical significance of immunostaining data.

  14. Spontaneous Remission of Nephrotic Syndrome in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Natalia; Gutiérrez, Elena; Covarsí, Adelardo; Ariza, Francisco; Carreño, Agustín; Vigil, Ana; Baltar, José; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Martín, Carmen; Pons, Salvador; Lorenzo, Dolores; Bernis, Carmen; Arrizabalaga, Pilar; Fernández-Juárez, Gema; Barrio, Vicente; Sierra, Milagros; Castellanos, Ines; Espinosa, Mario; Rivera, Francisco; Oliet, Aniana; Fernández-Vega, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous remission is a well known characteristic of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, but contemporary studies describing predictors of remission and long-term outcomes are lacking. We conducted a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of 328 patients with nephrotic syndrome resulting from idiopathic membranous nephropathy that initially received conservative therapy. Spontaneous remission occurred in 104 (32%) patients: proteinuria progressively declined after diagnosis until remission of disease at 14.7 ± 11.4 months. Although spontaneous remission was more frequent with lower levels of baseline proteinuria, it also frequently occurred in patients with massive proteinuria: 26% among those with baseline proteinuria 8 to 12 g/24 h and 22% among those with proteinuria >12 g/24 h. Baseline serum creatinine and proteinuria, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists, and a >50% decline of proteinuria from baseline during the first year of follow-up were significant independent predictors for spontaneous remission. Only six patients (5.7%) experienced a relapse of nephrotic syndrome. The incidence of death and ESRD were significantly lower among patients with spontaneous remission. In conclusion, spontaneous remission is common among patients with nephrotic syndrome resulting from membranous nephropathy and carries a favorable long-term outcome with a low incidence of relapse. A decrease in proteinuria >50% from baseline during the first year predicts spontaneous remission. PMID:20110379

  15. Interstitial capillary changes in lithium nephropathy: effects of antihypertensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Skyum, Helle; Marcussen, Niels; Nielsen, Steen Horne; Christensen, Sten

    2004-10-01

    Histopathological changes were investigated in the tubulointerstitium and in the capillaries of male Wistar rats with lithium-induced nephropathy using stereological methods. Two antihypertensive drugs with opposite effects on the renin-angiotensin system, an ACE inhibitor (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) and a thiazide diuretic, modified the nephropathy. Generally, there was a significant positive correlation between the reduction in GFR (glomerular filtration rate) and the reduction in the volume of intact tubular structures and interstitial capillaries. A significant negative correlation was seen between the reduction in GFR and the increase in tubulocapillary distance and the absolute volume of interstitial connective tissue, respectively. Treatment with perindopril, and to some extent hydrochlorothiazide, reversed the rise in systolic blood pressure associated with lithium-induced nephropathy but did not affect the progression to terminal uraemia, the structural renal changes or the mortality. In conclusion, severe tubular and capillary changes are seen in this model of chronic renal failure. Tubular atrophy is associated with a decrease in interstitial capillaries and with an increase in the tubulocapillary distance. Systemic hypertension or activation of the renin-angiotensin system may not be important factors for the progression to terminal renal failure.

  16. Spontaneous remission of nephrotic syndrome in idiopathic membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Natalia; Gutiérrez, Elena; Covarsí, Adelardo; Ariza, Francisco; Carreño, Agustín; Vigil, Ana; Baltar, José; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Martín, Carmen; Pons, Salvador; Lorenzo, Dolores; Bernis, Carmen; Arrizabalaga, Pilar; Fernández-Juárez, Gema; Barrio, Vicente; Sierra, Milagros; Castellanos, Ines; Espinosa, Mario; Rivera, Francisco; Oliet, Aniana; Fernández-Vega, Francisco; Praga, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    Spontaneous remission is a well known characteristic of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, but contemporary studies describing predictors of remission and long-term outcomes are lacking. We conducted a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of 328 patients with nephrotic syndrome resulting from idiopathic membranous nephropathy that initially received conservative therapy. Spontaneous remission occurred in 104 (32%) patients: proteinuria progressively declined after diagnosis until remission of disease at 14.7 +/- 11.4 months. Although spontaneous remission was more frequent with lower levels of baseline proteinuria, it also frequently occurred in patients with massive proteinuria: 26% among those with baseline proteinuria 8 to 12 g/24 h and 22% among those with proteinuria >12 g/24 h. Baseline serum creatinine and proteinuria, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists, and a >50% decline of proteinuria from baseline during the first year of follow-up were significant independent predictors for spontaneous remission. Only six patients (5.7%) experienced a relapse of nephrotic syndrome. The incidence of death and ESRD were significantly lower among patients with spontaneous remission. In conclusion, spontaneous remission is common among patients with nephrotic syndrome resulting from membranous nephropathy and carries a favorable long-term outcome with a low incidence of relapse. A decrease in proteinuria >50% from baseline during the first year predicts spontaneous remission.

  17. Urinary exosomal microRNAs in incipient diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Federica; Tricarico, Marinella; Corbelli, Alessandro; Annaratone, Laura; Pinach, Silvia; Grimaldi, Serena; Bruno, Graziella; Cimino, Daniela; Taverna, Daniela; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Perin, Paolo Cavallo; Gruden, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-protein-encoding RNAs, regulate gene expression via suppression of target mRNAs. MiRNAs are present in body fluids in a remarkable stable form as packaged in microvesicles of endocytic origin, named exosomes. In the present study, we have assessed miRNA expression in urinary exosomes from type 1 diabetic patients with and without incipient diabetic nephropathy. Results showed that miR-130a and miR-145 were enriched, while miR-155 and miR-424 reduced in urinary exosomes from patients with microalbuminuria. Similarly, in an animal model of early experimental diabetic nephropathy, urinary exosomal miR-145 levels were increased and this was paralleled by miR-145 overexpression within the glomeruli. Exposure of cultured mesangial cells to high glucose increased miR-145 content in both mesangial cells and mesangial cells-derived exosomes, providing a potential mechanism for diabetes-induced miR-145 overexpression. In conclusion, urinary exosomal miRNA content is altered in type 1 diabetic patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy and miR-145 may represent a novel candidate biomarker/player in the complication.

  18. [DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY AS A CAUSE OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Kos, Ivan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage chronic kidney disease in most developed countries. Hyperglycemia, hypertension and genetic predisposition are the main risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Elevated serum lipids, smoking habits, and the amount and origin of dietary protein also seem to play a role as risk factors. Clinical picture includes a progressive increase in albuminuria, decline in glomerular filtration, hypertension, and a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening for albuminuria should be performed yearly, starting 5 years after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes or earlier in the presence of adolescence or poor metabolic control. In patients with type 2 diabetes, screening should be performed at diagnosis and yearly thereafter. Patients with albuminuria should undergo evaluation regarding the presence of associated comorbidities, especially retinopathy and macrovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control (HbA1c < 7%), treating hypertension (target blood pressure < 140/85 mm Hg), using drugs with blockade effect on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, treating dyslipidemia and anemia are effective strategies for preventing the development of albuminuria, delaying the progression to more advanced stages of nephropathy and reducing cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

  19. Epigenetic profiles of pre-diabetes transitioning to type 2 diabetes and nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    VanderJagt, Thomas A; Neugebauer, Monica H; Morgan, Marilee; Bowden, Donald W; Shah, Vallabh O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine DNA methylation profiles in a longitudinal comparison of pre-diabetes mellitus (Pre-DM) subjects who transitioned to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: We performed DNA methylation study in bisulphite converted DNA from Pre-DM (n = 11) at baseline and at their transition to T2DM using Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, that enables the query of 27578 individual cytosines at CpG loci throughout the genome, which are focused on the promoter regions of 14495 genes. RESULTS: There were 694 CpG sites hypomethylated and 174 CpG sites hypermethylated in progression from Pre-DM to T2DM, representing putative genes involved in glucose and fructose metabolism, inflammation, oxidative and mitochondrial stress, and fatty acid metabolism. These results suggest that this high throughput platform is able to identify hundreds of prospective CpG sites associated with diverse genes that may reflect differences in Pre-DM compared with T2DM. In addition, there were CpG hypomethylation changes associated with a number of genes that may be associated with development of complications of diabetes, such as nephropathy. These hypomethylation changes were observed in all of the subjects. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that some epigenomic changes that may be involved in the progression of diabetes and/or the development of complications may be apparent at the Pre-DM state or during the transition to diabetes. Hypomethylation of a number of genes related to kidney function may be an early marker for developing diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26265998

  20. Rice endosperm protein slows progression of fatty liver and diabetic nephropathy in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Reiko; Yamaguchi, Miki; Hosojima, Michihiro; Saito, Akihiko; Fujii, Mikio; Fujimura, Shinobu; Kadowaki, Motoni

    2016-10-01

    We previously reported that rice endosperm protein (REP) has renoprotective effects in Goto-Kakizaki rats, a non-obese diabetic model. However, whether these effects occur in obese diabetes remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the effects of REP on obese diabetes, especially on fatty liver and diabetic nephropathy, using the obese diabetic model Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. In total, 7-week-old male ZDF rats were fed diets containing 20 % REP or casein (C) for 8 weeks. Changes in fasting blood glucose levels and urinary markers were monitored during the experimental period. Hepatic lipids and metabolites were measured and renal glomeruli were observed morphologically. HbA1c levels were significantly lower in rats fed REP, compared with C (P<0·05). Compared with C in the liver, REP prevented lipid accumulation (total lipid, TAG and total cholesterol, P<0·01). Liver metabolome analysis indicated that levels of metabolites associated with glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and carnitine metabolism were significantly greater in the REP group than in the C group (P<0·05), suggesting activation of both glucose catabolism and fatty acid oxidation. The metabolite increases promoted by REP may contribute to suppression of liver lipid accumulation. Urinary excretion of albumin and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase was significantly reduced in rats fed REP for 8 weeks (P<0·01). In addition, there was a distinct suppression of mesangial matrix expansion and glomerular hypertrophy in response to REP (P<0·01). Thus, REP had preventive effects on obese diabetes, fatty liver and diabetic nephropathy.

  1. BIOPSY-PROVEN BK VIRUS NEPHROPATHY WITHOUT DETECTABLE BK VIREMIA IN A ONE-YEAR POST-KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Pumchandh, Norawee; Satirapoj, Bancha; Termmathurapoj, Sumeth; Pongthanapisith, Viroj

    2015-07-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) is an important clinical problem in kidney transplant (KT) recipients. The sequence of disease is usually viruria, viremia and then nephropathy. Diagnosis of BK virus (BKV) infection includes checking BKV DNA in the urine, in the plasma and histology on renal biopsy. This last method is used to diagnose BKVN. We describe a KT patient with BKVN without detectable BK viremia. A 62-year-old female with hypertensive nephropathy underwent renal transplant from a living relative donor in December 2011. Fourteen months after transplantation, her serum creatinine(SCr) rose up from 1.2 to 1.6 mg/dl with biopsy-proven acute antibody-mediated and cellular rejection. After pulse methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin, her SCr decreased to baseline but she subsequently developed cytomegalovirus infection with pancytopenia and transaminitis. The SCr rose to 1.9 mg/dl despite ganciclovir treatment. Renal ultrasound and antegrade pyelogram showed partial obstruction of the proximal ureter with moderate hydronephrosis. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for BKV DNA was negative (less than 10 copies/ml). A renal biopsy was performed and the pathology revealed viral cytopathic changes in the tubular epithelium with interstitial inflammation. The renal biopsy also showed BKV nucleic acid sequences by in-situ hybridization confirming BKVN. Immunosuppression regimen was changed to cyclosporine, low-dose prednisolone and leflunomide. A temporary percutaneous nephrostomy was performed. Her renal function improved within one week. The diagnosis of BKVN should be considered in a KT recipient with a rising SCr with or without BK viremia and should be made by renal biopsy.

  2. Differences in susceptibility to develop parameters of diabetic nephropathy in four mouse strains with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Stephanie; Friederich-Persson, Malou; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Palm, Fredrik

    2014-05-15

    One-third of diabetes mellitus patients develop diabetic nephropathy, and with underlying mechanisms unknown it is imperative that diabetic animal models resemble human disease. The present study investigated the susceptibility to develop diabetic nephropathy in four commonly used and commercially available mouse strains with type 1 diabetes to determine the suitability of each strain. Type 1 diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6, NMRI, BALB/c, and 129Sv mice by alloxan, and conscious glomerular filtration rate, proteinuria, and oxidative stress levels were measured in control and diabetic animals at baseline and after 5 and 10 wk. Histological alterations were analyzed using periodic acid-Schiff staining. Diabetic C57Bl/6 displayed increased glomerular filtration rate, i.e., hyperfiltration, whereas all other parameters remained unchanged. Diabetic NMRI developed the most pronounced hyperfiltration as well as increased oxidative stress and proteinuria but without glomerular damage. Diabetic BALB/c did not develop hyperfiltration but presented with pronounced proteinuria, increased oxidative stress, and glomerular damage. Diabetic 129Sv displayed proteinuria and increased oxidative stress without glomerular hyperfiltration or damage. However, all strains displayed intrastrain correlation between oxidative stress and proteinuria. In conclusion, diabetic C57Bl/6 and NMRI both developed glomerular hyperfiltration but neither presented with histological damage, although NMRI developed low-degree proteinuria. Thus these strains may be suitable when investigating the mechanism causing hyperfiltration. Neither BALB/c nor 129Sv developed hyperfiltration although both developed pronounced proteinuria. However, only BALB/c developed detectable histological damage. Thus BALB/c may be suitable when studying the roles of proteinuria and histological alterations for the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Evaluating Weight of Evidence in the Mystery of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bui-Klimke, Travis; Wu, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN) is a chronic, progressive wasting disease of the kidneys, endemic in certain rural regions of the Balkan nations Croatia, Serbia, Bulgaria, and Romania. It is irreversible, and ultimately fatal. Though this disease was first described in the 1920s, its causes have been a mystery and a source of much academic and clinical contention. Possible etiologic agents that have been explored include exposure to metals and metalloids, viruses and bacteria, and the environmental toxins aristolochic acid (AA) and ochratoxin A (OTA). Aristolochic acid is a toxin produced by weeds of the genus Aristolochia, common in Balkan wheat fields. Aristolochia seeds may intermingle with harvested grains and thus inadvertently enter human diets. Ochratoxin A is a mycotoxin (fungal toxin) common in many foods, including cereal grains. In this study, we analyzed the weight of evidence for each of the suspected causes of BEN using the Bradford Hill Criteria (BHC): nine conditions that determine weight of evidence for a causal relationship between an agent and a disease. Each agent postulated to cause BEN was evaluated using the nine criteria, and for each criterion was given a rating based on the strength of the association between exposure to the substance and BEN. From the overall available scientific evidence for each of these suspected risk factors, aristolochic acid is the agent with the greatest weight of evidence in causing BEN. We describe other methods for testing causality from epidemiological studies, which support this conclusion of AA causing BEN. PMID:24954501

  4. Obstructive nephropathy due to sulfa crystals in two HIV seropositive patients treated with sulfadiazine.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, R; Depraetere, K; De Droogh, E; Kamper, A; Corthout, B; Bottiau, E

    1999-08-01

    Two HIV seropositive patients receiving sulfadiazine for presumed cerebral toxoplasmosis who developed an obstructive nephropathy are described. Ultrasound examination showed respectively a bilateral hydro-ureteronephrosis in one patient and unilateral hydro-ureteronephrosis in the other. The obstructive nephropathy resolved in both patients with alkalic hydration and discontinuation of the sulfadiazine.

  5. Coexistence of immunoglobulin M nephropathy and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: 2 rare entities.

    PubMed

    Bayrakci, Nergiz; Ozkayar, Nihal; Ersozen, Muge Erek; Colak, Aysel; Oguz, Ebru Gok; Dede, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin M (IgM) nephropathy is described as mesengial proliferative glomerulonephritis with diffuse mesengial IgM deposition. We report a patient diagnosed with IgM nephropathy and concomitant autoimmune hemolytic anemia syndrome associated with cold-reacting autoantibodies. Complete remission was achieved with systemic corticosteroid and plasmapheresesis.

  6. Interplay between vesicoureteric reflux and kidney infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Samantha E; Watt, Christine L; Murawski, Inga J; Gupta, Indra R; Abraham, Soman N

    2013-07-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital defect of the urinary tract that is usually discovered after a child develops a urinary tract infection. It is associated with reflux nephropathy, a renal lesion characterized by the presence of chronic tubulointersitial inflammation and fibrosis. Most patients are diagnosed with reflux nephropathy after one or more febrile urinary tract infections, suggesting a potential role for infection in its development. We have recently shown that the C3H mouse has a 100% incidence of VUR. Here, we evaluate the roles of VUR and uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in the C3H mouse. We find that VUR in combination with sustained kidney infection is crucial to the development of reflux nephropathy, whereas sterile reflux alone fails to induce reflux nephropathy. A single bout of kidney infection without reflux fails to induce reflux nephropathy. The host immune response to infection was examined in two refluxing C3H substrains, HeN and HeJ. HeJ mice, which have a defect in innate immunity and bacterial clearance, demonstrate more significant renal inflammation and reflux nephropathy compared with HeN mice. These studies demonstrate the crucial synergy between VUR, sustained kidney infection and the host immune response in the development of reflux nephropathy in a mouse model of VUR.

  7. Glycopatterns of Urinary Protein as New Potential Diagnosis Indicators for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hanyu; Liu, Moyan; Zhong, Yaogang; Shu, Jian; Fu, Xinle; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei; Geng, Wenjia; Yang, Xiaoli; Wu, Minghui

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. However, so little is known about alterations of the glycopatterns in urine with the development of diabetic nephropathy. Presently, we interrogated glycopatterns in urine specimens using a lectin microarray. The results showed that expression levels of Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc recognized by SNA exhibited significantly increased tendency with the development of diabetic nephropathy; moreover, SNA blotting indicated glycoproteins (90 kDa, 70 kDa, and 40 kDa) in urine may contribute to this alteration. Furthermore, the glycopatterns of (GlcNAc)2–4 recognized by STL exhibited difference between diabetic and nondiabetic nephropathy. The results of urinary protein microarray fabricated by another 48 urine specimens also indicated (GlcNAc)2–4 is a potential indictor to differentiate the patients with diabetic nephropathy from nondiabetic nephropathy. Furtherly, STL blotting showed that the 50 kDa glycoproteins were correlated with this alteration. In conclusion, our data provide pivotal information to monitor the development of diabetic nephropathy and distinguish between diabetic nephropathy and nondiabetic renal disease based on precise alterations of glycopatterns in urinary proteins, but further studies are needed in this regard.

  8. Discovery of (3S,3aR)-2-(3-chloro-4-cyanophenyl)-3-cyclopentyl-3,3a,4,5-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[g]indazole-7-carboxylic acid (PF-3882845), an orally efficacious mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist for hypertension and nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marvin J; Arhancet, Graciela B; Hockerman, Susan L; Chen, Xiangyang; Long, Scott A; Mahoney, Matthew W; Rico, Joseph R; Garland, Danny J; Blinn, James R; Collins, Joe T; Yang, Shengtian; Huang, Horng-Chih; McGee, Kevin F; Wendling, Jay M; Dietz, Jessica D; Payne, Maria A; Homer, Bruce L; Heron, Marcia I; Reitz, David B; Hu, Xiao

    2010-08-26

    We have discovered a novel class of nonsteroidal pyrazoline antagonists of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) that show excellent potency and selectivity against other nuclear receptors. Early analogues were poorly soluble and had a propensity to inhibit the hERG channel. Remarkably, both of these challenges were overcome by incorporation of a single carboxylate moiety. Structural modification of carboxylate-containing lead R-4g with a wide range of substituents at each position of the pyrazoline ring resulted in R-12o, which shows excellent activity against MR and reasonable pharmacokinetic profile. Introduction of conformational restriction led to a novel series characterized by exquisite potency and favorable steroid receptor selectivity and pharmacokinetic profile. Oral dosing of 3S,3aR-27d (PF-3882845) in the Dahl salt sensitive preclinical model of salt-induced hypertension and nephropathy showed blood pressure attenuation significantly greater than that with eplerenone, reduction in urinary albumin, and renal protection. As a result of these findings, 3S,3aR-27d was advanced to clinical studies.

  9. Berberine as a promising anti-diabetic nephropathy drug: An analysis of its effects and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei-Jian; Ding, Hai-Hua; Tang, Li-Qin

    2015-08-05

    Diabetic nephropathy is a progressive kidney disorder and is pathologically characterized by thickened glomerular and tubular basement membranes, accumulation of the extracellular matrix and increased mesangial hypertrophy. Growing evidence has suggested that diabetic nephropathy is induced by multiple factors, such as dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hemodynamic abnormalities and oxidative stress, based on genetic susceptibility. Berberine (BBR; [C20H18NO4](+)), an isoquinoline alkaloid, is the major active constituent of Rhizoma coptidis and Cortex phellodendri. Recent studies have demonstrated that berberine has various pharmacological activities, including lowering blood glucose, regulating blood lipids and reducing inflammation in addition to its antioxidant activity. These findings suggest that berberine has potential applications as a therapeutic drug for diabetic nephropathy, and has significant research value. However, the possible mechanisms have not been fully established. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the renoprotective mechanisms of berberine in diabetic nephropathy and highlight the importance of berberine as a potential therapeutic reagent for diabetic nephropathy treatment.

  10. G protein-coupled receptors: potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hai-Hua; Ni, Wei-Jian; Tang, Li-Qin; Wei, Wei

    2015-12-16

    Diabetic nephropathy, a lethal microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is characterized by progressive albuminuria, excessive deposition of extracellular matrix, thickened glomerular basement membrane, podocyte abnormalities, and podocyte loss. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have attracted considerable attention in diabetic nephropathy, but the specific effects have not been elucidated yet. Likewise, abnormal signaling pathways are closely interrelated to the pathologic process of diabetic nephropathy, despite the fact that the mechanisms have not been explored clearly. Therefore, GPCRs and its mediated signaling pathways are essential for priority research, so that preventative strategies and potential targets might be developed for diabetic nephropathy. This article will give us comprehensive overview of predominant GPCR types, roles, and correlative signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy.

  11. [Creatinine clearance and contrast nephropathy in patients with normal creatinine levels].

    PubMed

    de Agustín, José A; Carda, Rocío; Manzano, María del C; Ruiz-Mateos, Borja; García-Rubira, Juan C; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Vilacosta, Isidre; Macaya, Carlos

    2007-07-01

    The main risk factor for contrast nephropathy is the presence of poor renal function. Plasma creatinine level is not a reliable measure of renal function as its value could lie within the normal range despite the presence of significant nephropathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the creatinine clearance rate as a predictor of contrast nephropathy in patients with a normal plasma creatinine level. The study included 273 consecutive patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) and a normal plasma creatinine level at admission who underwent coronary angiography. Patients who developed contrast nephropathy had a lower creatinine clearance rate at admission (66.3 mL/min vs. 83.4 mL/min; P<.001). A creatinine clearance rate < 80 mL/min had a sensitivity of 81% for predicting contrast nephropathy. Creatinine clearance should be measured routinely in patients with NSTEACS who are scheduled for coronary angiography.

  12. Diabetic nephropathy: new approaches for improving glycemic control and reducing risk.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Schernthaner, Gerit Holger

    2013-01-01

    Nephropathy is a common consequence of diabetes, with a high prevalence in patients with type 1 (15%-25%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 30%-40%). Nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis and high economic burden. The risk of developing nephropathy increases with the duration of diabetes, and early diagnosis and treatment of risk factors for nephropathy (e.g., tight control of glycemia and hypertension) can reduce the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal complications associated with diabetes and the etiology of nephropathy have identified additional risk factors for nephropathy, and novel therapeutic options are being explored. This review discusses the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and common risk factors. Furthermore, we discuss emerging treatments for T2DM that could potentially slow or prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The use of incretin-based therapies, such as the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, is growing in patients with T2DM, due to their efficacy and tolerability profiles. As renal safety is a key factor when choosing treatment options to manage patients with T2DM, drugs that are suitable for use in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment without a requirement for dose adjustment, such as the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, are of particular use. The ongoing advances in T2DM therapy may allow optimization of glycemic control in a wide range of patients, thereby helping to reduce the increasing morbidity and mortality associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Randomized control trial for the assessment of the anti-albuminuric effects of topiroxostat in hyperuricemic patients with diabetic nephropathy (the ETUDE study).

    PubMed

    Kato, Sawako; Ando, Masahiko; Mizukoshi, Toshihiro; Nagata, Takanobu; Katsuno, Takayuki; Kosugi, Tomoki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2016-05-01

    Proteinuria is an established risk factor for diabetic nephropathy. Recent studies indicate that some xanthine oxidase inhibitors have a renoprotective effect. The aim of this study was to assess whether topiroxostat reduces albuminuria in hyperuricemic patients with diabetic nephropathy and overt proteinuria. The ETUDE study is an ongoing 24-week, multicenter, open-label, randomized (1:1), parallel group study involving hyperuricemic patients with diabetic nephropathy (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥ 20 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and overt proteinuria (0.3 ≤ urine protein to creatinine ratio (UPCR) < 3.5 g/g Cr). Patients are randomly assigned to high dose (topiroxostat 160 mg daily) or low dose (topiroxostat 40 mg daily) on top of standard of care. The primary endpoint is the change in albuminuria indicated by urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio after 24 treated weeks relative to the baseline values. This trial was registered at the Japanese University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR: UMIN 000015403). The background, rationale, and study design of this trial are presented here. Seventy-six patients from four registered facilities have already been enrolled and received at least one dose of topiroxostat. This trial will end in 2017. The ETUDE trial is the first randomized controlled study of topiroxostat in hyperuricemic patients with diabetic nephropathy and overt proteinuria. We will clarify the pleiotropic function of topiroxostat including an anti-albumiuric effect as well as its effects on safely decreasing serum uric acid levels.

  14. Mangiferin Attenuates Diabetic Nephropathy by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress Mediated Signaling Cascade, TNFα Related and Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptotic Pathways in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy in hyperglycemic conditions. It has already been reported that mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone and polyhydroxy polyphenol compound protects kidneys from diabetic nephropathy. However, little is known about the mechanism of its beneficial action in this pathophysiology. The present study, therefore, examines the detailed mechanism of the beneficial action of mangiferin on STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy in Wister rats as the working model. A significant increase in plasma glucose level, kidney to body weight ratio, glomerular hypertrophy and hydropic changes as well as enhanced nephrotoxicity related markers (BUN, plasma creatinine, uric acid and urinary albumin) were observed in the experimental animals. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress related parameters, increased ROS production and decreased the intracellular antioxidant defenses were detected in the kidney. Studies on the oxidative stress mediated signaling cascades in diabetic nephropathy demonstrated that PKC isoforms (PKCα, PKCβ and PKCε), MAPKs (p38, JNK and ERK1/2), transcription factor (NF-κB) and TGF-β1 pathways were involved in this pathophysiology. Besides, TNFα was released in this hyperglycemic condition, which in turn activated caspase 8, cleaved Bid to tBid and finally the mitochorndia-dependent apoptotic pathway. In addition, oxidative stress also disturbed the proapoptotic-antiapoptotic (Bax and Bcl-2) balance and activated mitochorndia-dependent apoptosis via caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP cleavage. Mangiferin treatment, post to hyperglycemia, successfully inhibited all of these changes and protected the cells from apoptotic death. PMID:25233093

  15. A simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipient with IgA nephropathy limited to native kidneys and BK virus nephropathy limited to the transplant kidney.

    PubMed

    Ujire, Manasa P; Curry, Michael P; Stillman, Isaac E; Hanto, Douglas W; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition in the native kidneys of patients with liver disease is well described. Secondary IgA nephropathy usually is thought to be benign, but hematuria, proteinuria, and loss of kidney function have been reported in this context. BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney transplant loss; however, BK virus nephropathy is rare in the native kidneys of patients who underwent transplantation of other organs. We report the case of a patient with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease and chronic kidney disease with hematuria who underwent simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. His kidney function decreased over the course of several weeks posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplant kidney showed BK virus nephropathy, but no IgA deposits. In contrast, biopsy of the native kidneys showed IgA deposits, but no BK virus nephropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation wherein both the native and transplant kidneys were biopsied posttransplantation and showed exclusively different pathologies. These findings confirm the predilection of BK virus nephropathy for transplant rather than native kidneys.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of crystal-related kidney inflammation and injury. Implications for cholesterol embolism, crystalline nephropathies and kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Evan, Andrew; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-01

    Crystals are particles of endogenous inorganic or organic composition that can trigger kidney injury when deposited or formed inside the kidney. While decades of research have focused on the molecular mechanisms of solute supersaturation and crystal formation, the pathomechanisms of crystal-induced renal inflammation remain largely unknown. The recent discovery of the intracellular NLRP3 inflammasome as a pattern recognition platform that translates crystal uptake into innate immune activation via secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 revised the pathogenesis of gout, silicosis, asbestosis, atherosclerosis and other crystal-related disorders. As a proof of concept, the NLRP3 inflammasome was now shown to trigger inflammation and acute kidney injury (AKI) in oxalate nephropathy. It seems likely that this and potentially other innate immunity mechanisms drive crystalline nephropathies (CNs) that are associated with crystals of calcium phosphate, uric acid, cysteine, adenine, certain drugs or contrast media, and potentially of myoglobin during rhabdomyolysis and of light chains in myeloma. Here, we discuss the proven and potential mechanisms of renal inflammation and kidney injury in crystal-related kidney disorders. In addition, we list topics for further research in that field. This perspective may also provide novel therapeutic options that can help to avoid progressive tissue remodeling and chronic kidney disease in patients with kidney stone disease or other CNs.

  17. Probucol inhibited Nox2 expression and attenuated podocyte injury in type 2 diabetic nephropathy of db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ping; Li, Detian

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of probucol on the progression of diabetic nephropathy and the underlying mechanism in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Eight weeks db/db mice were treated with regular diet or probucol-containing diet (1%) for 12 weeks. Non-diabetic db/m mice were used as controls. We examined body weight, blood glucose, and urinary albumin. At 20 weeks, experimental mice were sacrificed and their blood and kidneys were extracted for the analysis of blood chemistry, kidney histology, oxidative stress marker, and podocyte marker. As a result, 24 h urinary albumin excretions were reduced after probucol treatment. There were improvements of extracellular matrix accumulation and fibronectin and collagen IV deposition in glomeruli in the probucol-treated db/db mice. The reduction of nephrin and the loss of podocytes were effectively prevented by probucol in db/db mice. Furthermore, probucol significantly decreased the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), an index of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and down-regulated the expression of Nox2. Taken together, our findings support that probucol may have the potential to protect against type 2 diabetic nephropathy via amelioration of podocyte injury and reduction of oxidative stress.

  18. Common drugs for stabilization of renal function in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and their relations with hypertension therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Xiuli; Gu, Harvest F; Wu, Liang

    2017-02-14

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by hypertension, progressive albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis and declines in glomerular filtration rate leading to end stage renal disease. Although the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is not fully understood, current treatment of the patients with diabetic nephropathy is mainly based upon the control of hyperglycaemia and management of blood pressures. Several drugs, which are originally developed for hypertension therapy, have been adopted for stabilization of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we first discuss the relationships between diabetic nephropathy and hypertension particularly in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We then summarize chemical structures, pharmacological characteristics and clinical studies of the common drugs used for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, while these drugs have effects against hypertension. This review may provide the constructive information for further drug development in diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs in human blood: causes or consequences of diabetic nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Everett, Charles J; Thompson, Olivia M

    2014-07-01

    Nephropathy, or kidney disease, is a major, potential complication of diabetes. We assessed the association of 6 chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, 9 chlorinated dibenzofurans and 8 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in blood with diabetic nephropathy in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (unweighted N=2588, population estimate=117,658,357). Diabetes was defined as diagnosed or undiagnosed (glycohemoglobin ≥ 6.5%) and nephropathy defined as urinary albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g, representing microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria. For the 8 chemicals analyzed separately, values above the 75th percentile were considered elevated, whereas for the other 15 compounds values above the maximum limit of detection were considered elevated. Seven of 8 dioxins and dioxin-like compounds, analyzed separately, were found to be associated with diabetic nephropathy. The chemicals associated with diabetic nephropathy were: 1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran; PCB 126; PCB 169; PCB 118; and PCB 156. Three of the 8 dioxins and dioxin-like compounds; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran and PCB 118; expressed as log-transformed continuous variables; were associated with diabetes without nephropathy. When 4 or more of the 23 chemicals were elevated the odds ratios were 7.00 (95% CI=1.80-27.20) for diabetic nephropathy and 2.13 (95% CI=0.95-4.78) for diabetes without nephropathy. Log-transformed toxic equivalency (TEQ) was associated with both diabetic nephropathy, and diabetes without nephropathy, the odds ratios were 2.35 (95% CI=1.57-3.52) for diabetic nephropathy, and 1.44 (95% CI=1.11-1.87) for diabetes without nephropathy. As the kidneys function to remove waste products from the blood, diabetic nephropathy could be either the cause or the consequence (or both) of exposure to dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs.

  20. Lupus vulgaris with tubercular lymphadenitis and IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Khaira, Ambar; Rathi, Om P; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sharma, Alok; Dinda, Amit K; Tiwari, Suresh C

    2008-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 10-year history of a large crusted plaque over the right thigh for 10 years and small reddish plaque over the left upper back for 3 months. On routine evaluation, she was found to have hematuria. Skin biopsy from the lesion was suggestive of skin tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris), and kidney biopsy showed features of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Fine-needle aspiration from the inguinal lymph node was consistent with granulomatous disease. The patient has been on anti-tubercular treatment, and the hematuria has subsided.

  1. [Reflux nephropathy in absence of obvious vesicoureteral reflux].

    PubMed

    Vino, L; Pedrolli, A; Portuese, A; Dal Cerè, M; Pizzini, C; Sinaguglia, G; Fanos, V

    2000-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with vesicoureteric reflux presents DMSA scan alterations, parenchimal renal scars are found also in children without vesicoureteric reflux. Two clinical cases of reflux nephropathy without evidence of reflux are presented. Several explanations could be advocated to justify this picture, including haematogenous source of infection, inadequate timing and/or procedure of cystouretrography, intermittency of reflux, ascending bacteria, previous presence of reflux, and appearance of controlateral reflux during the natural history of a monolateral documented reflux. Tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategy should discussed for each patient.

  2. The genetics and immunobiology of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents the leading cause of kidney failure among East Asian populations and the most frequent form of primary glomerulonephritis among Europeans. Patients with IgAN develop characteristic IgA1-containing immune complexes that deposit in the glomerular mesangium, producing progressive kidney injury. Recent studies define IgAN as an autoimmune trait of complex architecture with a strong genetic determination. This Review summarizes new insights into the role of the O-glycosylation pathway, anti-glycan immune response, mucosal immunity, antigen processing and presentation, and the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:24892706

  3. Ischemic nephropathy in South Dakota: case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Malarvizhi; Larson, Christopher; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-09-01

    Ischemic nephropathy, a relatively new term coined to describe renal insufficiency due to renal artery disease, is neither a new subject for medicine throughout the country, nor a new problem here in South Dakota. It is an important and overlooked cause of renal insufficiency and is almost certainly under-diagnosed. Five case reports and a review of the entity are described to illustrate the diversity of this clinical presentation. Intervention in such cases was thought to preserve, or even improve renal function, delaying the onset of end stage renal disease (ERSD).

  4. Should acetylcysteine be used to prevent contrast induced nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Izcovich, Ariel; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-04-15

    Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that require the infusion of iodine containing contrast solutions are associated with the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy, a condition that can cause significant morbidity. Acetylcysteine has been proposed as a measure to prevent this condition. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 20 systematic reviews including 64 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that even though acetylcysteine might not cause important adverse effects, it does not decrease need for dialysis, mortality or other important outcomes.

  5. Emerging therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, Jehrod; Hill, Jon; Pullen, Steve

    2016-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common pathology contributing to the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). DN caused by hypertension and unmitigated inflammation in diabetics, renders the kidneys unable to perform normally, and leads to renal fibrosis and organ failure. The increasing global prevalence of DN has been directly attributed to rising incidences of Type II diabetes, and is now the largest non-communicable cause of death worldwide. Despite the high morbidity, successful new treatments for DN are lacking. This review seeks to provide new insight on emerging clinical candidates under investigation for the treatment of DN.

  6. Redox Signaling in Diabetic Nephropathy: Hypertrophy versus Death Choices in Mesangial Cells and Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Manda, Gina; Checherita, Alexandru-Ionel; Comanescu, Maria Victoria; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, acting as trigger, modulator, and linker within the complex network of pathologic events. It highlights key molecular pathways and new hypothesis in diabetic nephropathy, related to the interferences of metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory stresses. Main topics this review is addressing are biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, the sources of reactive oxygen species (mitochondria, NADPH-oxidases, hyperglycemia, and inflammation), and the redox-sensitive signaling networks (protein kinases, transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators). Molecular switches deciding on the renal cells fate in diabetic nephropathy are presented, such as hypertrophy versus death choices in mesangial cells and podocytes. Finally, the antioxidant response of renal cells in diabetic nephropathy is tackled, with emphasis on targeted therapy. An integrative approach is needed for identifying key molecular networks which control cellular responses triggered by the array of stressors in diabetic nephropathy. This will foster the discovery of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis, and will guide the discovery of new therapeutic approaches for personalized medicine in diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Association between interleukin-10 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ma, D H; Xu, Q Y; Liu, Y; Zhai, Q Q; Guo, M H

    2016-05-09

    In this study, we investigated the association between the interleukin (IL)-10 -592C/A, -819C/T, and -1082G/A genetic variations and susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy in a Chinese population. The IL-10 -592C/A, -819C/T, and -1082G/A polymorphisms were genotyped in diabetic nephropathy patient and control samples by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results were then statistically analyzed using SPSS 17.0. The results of the χ(2) test revealed a significant difference in the frequencies of the GG, GA, and AA genotypes of IL-10 -1082G/A between patients with diabetic nephropathy and control subjects (χ(2) = 10.03, P = 0.007). Unconditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the AA genotype of IL-10 -1082G/A significantly increased the susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31-4.82] compared to the wild-type genotype. Moreover, the A allele of this polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy compared to the G allele (adjusted OR = 1.51, 95%CI = 1.15-1.99). However, the IL-10 -819T/C and -592A/C genetic polymorphisms did not increase the risk of diabetic nephropathy. In conclusion, the IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism was found to be correlated with the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  8. Urinary peptidomics provides a noninvasive humanized readout of diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; Ericsson, Anette; Huang, Yufeng; Breuil, Benjamin; Siwy, Justyna; Mischak, Harald; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-11-01

    Nephropathy is among the most frequent complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Despite the success of novel drugs in animal models, the majority of the subsequent clinical trials employing those drugs targeting diabetic nephropathy failed. This lack of translational value may in part be due to an inadequate comparability of human disease and animal models that often capture only a few aspects of disease. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a multimolecular noninvasive humanized readout of diabetic nephropathy based on urinary peptidomics. The disease-modified urinary peptides of 2 type 2 diabetic nephropathy mouse models were identified and compared with previously validated urinary peptide markers of diabetic nephropathy in humans to generate a classifier composed of 21 ortholog peptides. This classifier predicted the response to disease and treatment with inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in mice. The humanized classifier was significantly correlated with glomerular lesions. Using a human type 2 diabetic validation cohort of 207 patients, the classifier also distinguished between patients with and without diabetic nephropathy, and their response to renin-angiotensin system inhibition. Thus, a combination of multiple molecular features common to both human and murine disease could provide a significant change in translational drug discovery research in type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Management of Hypertension in Diabetic Nephropathy: How Low Should We Go?

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Hillel; Bakris, George L

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a frequent comorbidity often following the development of diabetic nephropathy among individuals with type 1 diabetes and affecting most patients with type 2 diabetes at the time of diagnosis. Multiple prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that tight blood pressure control among patients with diabetic nephropathy reduces the rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. While randomized trials exist and support a blood pressure goal of <140/90 mm Hg for patients with nondiabetic kidney disease, there are no prospective data regarding a specific blood pressure goal on progression of diabetic nephropathy. Retrospective data analyses from trials show a linear relationship between either baseline or achieved study blood pressure and progression of nephropathy. Very high albuminuria is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy with reductions by either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) monotherapy associated with slowed nephropathy progression. However, combination antihypertensive therapy, while decreasing proteinuria, augments the risk of hyperkalemia, hypotension, and kidney dysfunction. Given the lack of trial data for a BP goal among patients with diabetic nephropathy, prospective trials are needed to define the optimal blood pressure necessary to preserve kidney function. At present, guideline blood pressure goals of less than 140/90 mm Hg and the use of ACEi or ARB therapy for those with more than 300 mg of albuminuria are mandated.

  10. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used.

  11. Harnessing the immunological properties of stem cells as a therapeutic option for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Francesca; Trevisani, Alessio; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Bassi, Roberto; El Essawy, Basset; Abdi, Reza; Secchi, Antonio; Fiorina, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading and possibly the most devastating complication of diabetes, with a prevalence ranging from 25 to 40 % in diabetic individuals, and as such represents an important challenge for public health worldwide. As a major cause of end-stage renal disease, diabetic nephropathy also accounts for a large proportion of deaths in diabetic individuals. To date, therapeutic options for overt diabetic nephropathy include medical interventions to reduce blood glucose levels and to control blood pressure and proteinuria. Recent evidence suggests a strong role for inflammation in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various immune cells, cytokines and chemokines have been implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy, while immune-related transcription factors and adhesion molecules have been correlated with the establishment of a renal proinflammatory microenvironment. Both inflammation and immune activation may promote severe distress in the kidney, with subsequent increased local fibrosis, ultimately leading to the development of end-stage renal disease. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells capable of regenerating virtually any organ or tissue and bearing important immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Due to the aforementioned considerations, significant interest has been ignited with regard to the use of stem cells as novel therapeutics for diabetic nephropathy. Here, we will be examining in detail how anti-inflammatory properties of different populations of stem cells may offer novel therapy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Potential renoprotective effects of piceatannol in ameliorating the early-stage nephropathy associated with obesity in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Llarena, Marta; Andrade, Fernando; Hasnaoui, Mounia; Portillo, María P; Pérez-Matute, Patricia; Arbones-Mainar, Jose M; Hijona, Elizabeth; Villanueva-Millán, María Jesús; Aguirre, Leixuri; Carpéné, Christian; Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Obesity-associated nephropathy is considered to be a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Resveratrol supplementation represents a promising therapy to attenuate kidney injury, but the poor solubility and limited bioavailability of this polyphenol limits its use in dietary intervention. Piceatannol, a resveratrol analogue, has been suggested as a better option. In this study, we aimed to provide evidence of a preventive action of piceatannol in very early stages of obesity-associated nephropathy. Thirty obese Zucker rats were divided into three experimental groups: one control and two groups orally treated for 6 weeks with 15 and 45 mg piceatannol/kg body weight/day. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to determine renal and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1), renal fibrosis markers (transforming growth factor β1 and fibronectin) and renal sirtuin-1 protein. Oxidative stress was assessed in the kidney by measuring lipid peroxidation and nitrosative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates and 3-nitrotyrosine levels, respectively) together with the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase. Renal fatty acids profile analysis was performed by thin-layer and gas chromatography. Piceatannol-treated rats displayed lower levels of urinary and renal Kim-1. Renal fibrosis biomarkers and lipid peroxidation exhibited a tendency to decrease in the piceatannol-treated groups. Piceatannol treatment did not modify superoxide dismutase activity or sirtuin-1 protein levels, while it seemed to increase the levels of polyunsaturated and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the kidneys. Our findings suggest a mild renoprotective effect of piceatannol in obese Zucker rats and the need of intervention at early stages of renal damage.

  13. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fokas, Alexander S.; Cole, Daniel J.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function. PMID:27623708

  14. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokas, Alexander S.; Cole, Daniel J.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-09-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function.

  15. Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy: An Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Sudesh P.; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Summary For more than 50 years researchers have debated the evidence for an autoimmune basis of human idiopathic membranous nephritis (MN). Work published in the past 2 years has substantially strengthened the belief that MN is indeed an autoimmune disease of the kidney. Autoantibodies of the IgG4 subclass to at least three podocyte membrane proteins including phospholipase A2-receptor, aldose reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase have been detected by immunoblotting in sera as well as in acid eluates prepared from renal biopsy tissue of patients with this disease, using either whole tissue or microdissected glomeruli from frozen sections. In each case the podocyte antigen has been shown to co-localize with the subepithelial glomerular immune deposits in renal tissue of the same patients. It is not certain if any of these podocyte proteins is an inciting/primary autoantigen or whether they are secondary antigens recruited by intermolecular epitope-spreading, initiating from a yet-to-be-discovered autoantigen. Although it is clear that autoantibodies to podocyte membrane proteins are elicited in idiopathic MN and contribute to the formation of the subepithelial deposits, many questions remain concerning the triggers for their development and their contribution toward proteinuria and progression of the disease. PMID:21839366

  16. Idiopathic membranous nephropathy: an autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Makker, Sudesh P; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2011-07-01

    For more than 50 years researchers have debated the evidence for an autoimmune basis of human idiopathic membranous nephritis (MN). Work published in the past 2 years has substantially strengthened the belief that MN is indeed an autoimmune disease of the kidney. Autoantibodies of the IgG4 subclass to at least three podocyte membrane proteins including phospholipase A(2)-receptor, aldose reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase have been detected by immunoblotting in sera as well as in acid eluates prepared from renal biopsy tissue of patients with this disease, using either whole tissue or microdissected glomeruli from frozen sections. In each case the podocyte antigen has been shown to co-localize with the subepithelial glomerular immune deposits in renal tissue of the same patients. It is not certain if any of these podocyte proteins is an inciting/primary autoantigen or whether they are secondary antigens recruited by intermolecular epitope-spreading, initiating from a yet-to-be-discovered autoantigen. Although it is clear that autoantibodies to podocyte membrane proteins are elicited in idiopathic MN and contribute to the formation of the subepithelial deposits, many questions remain concerning the triggers for their development and their contribution toward proteinuria and progression of the disease.

  17. M-Type Phospholipase A2 Receptor as Target Antigen in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Laurence H.; Bonegio, Ramon G.B.; Lambeau, Gérard; Beck, David M.; Powell, David W.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Klein, Jon B.; Salant, David J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic membranous nephropathy, a common form of the nephrotic syndrome, is an antibody-mediated autoimmune glomerular disease. Serologic diagnosis has been elusive because the target antigen is unknown. METHODS We performed Western blotting of protein extracts from normal human glomeruli with serum samples from patients with idiopathic or secondary membranous nephropathy or other proteinuric or autoimmune diseases and from normal controls. We used mass spectrometry to analyze the reactive protein bands and confirmed the identity and location of the target antigen with a monospecific antibody. RESULTS Serum samples from 26 of 37 patients (70%) with idiopathic but not secondary membranous nephropathy specifically identified a 185-kD glycoprotein in non-reduced glomerular extract. Mass spectrometry of the reactive protein band detected the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R). Reactive serum specimens recognized recombinant PLA2R and bound the same 185-kD glomerular protein as did the monospecific anti-PLA2R antibody. Anti-PLA2R autoantibodies in serum samples from patients with membranous nephropathy were mainly IgG4, the predominant immunoglobulin subclass in glomerular deposits. PLA2R was expressed in podocytes in normal human glomeruli and colocalized with IgG4 in immune deposits in glomeruli of patients with membranous nephropathy. IgG eluted from such deposits in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, but not in those with lupus membranous or IgA nephropathy, recognized PLA2R. CONCLUSIONS A majority of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy have antibodies against a conformation-dependent epitope in PLA2R. PLA2R is present in normal podocytes and in immune deposits in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, indicating that PLA2R is a major antigen in this disease. PMID:19571279

  18. SnoN upregulation ameliorates renal fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lirong; Shi, Mingjun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Changzhi; Su, Bo; Xiao, Ying; Guo, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Progressive reduction of SnoN is associated with gradual elevation of TGF-β1 during diabetic nephropathy progression, suggesting SnoN to be a possible mediator of TGF-β1 signaling, with potential therapeutic benefits against TGF- β1 –induced renal fibrosis. To characterize SnoN for its role in renal fibrosis, we assessed SnoN expression patterns in response to high glucose stress, and evaluated the effects of upregulating SnoN on renal fibrosis. High glucose stress induced significantly elevated SnoN, TGF-β1, and Arkadia transcription; however, significantly reduced SnoN protein levels were observed under these conditions. Upregulating the SnoN protein was achieved by Arkadia knockdown, which resulted in inhibited high glucose-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal tubular cells, the onset phase of renal fibrosis. Alternatively, EMT was suppressed by dominantly expressed exogenous SnoN without interfering with TGF-β1. Overall, renal SnoN upregulation ameliorates renal fibrosis by relieving high glucose-induced EMT; these findings support a translational approach targeting SnoN for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:28350874

  19. Oxalate nephropathy due to 'juicing': case report and review.

    PubMed

    Getting, Jane E; Gregoire, James R; Phul, Ashley; Kasten, Mary J

    2013-09-01

    A patient presented with oxalate-induced acute renal failure that was attributable to consumption of oxalate-rich fruit and vegetable juices obtained from juicing. We describe the case and also review the clinical presentation of 65 patients seen at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from 1985 through 2010 with renal failure and biopsy-proven renal calcium oxalate crystals. The cause of renal oxalosis was identified for all patients: a single cause for 36 patients and at least 2 causes for 29 patients. Three patients, including our index patient, had presumed diet-induced oxalate nephropathy in the context of chronic kidney disease. Identification of calcium oxalate crystals in a kidney biopsy should prompt an evaluation for causes of renal oxalosis, including a detailed dietary history. Clinicians should be aware that an oxalate-rich diet may potentially precipitate acute renal failure in patients with chronic kidney disease. Juicing followed by heavy consumption of oxalate-rich juices appears to be a potential cause of oxalate nephropathy and acute renal failure.

  20. The pattern of acute toxic nephropathy in Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adelekun, T A; Ekwere, T R; Akinsola, A

    1999-01-01

    All cases of acute renal failure (ARF) seen over a two year (1993-94) period were evaluated. Those that had acute toxic nephropathy were further studied to determine the aetiologic agents involved, the clinical features and the effect of available treatment on its prognosis. Ten cases (33.3%) out of 30 ARF had toxins responsible for their renal failure. They were 8 males and 2 females. Agents responsible were green water in 2, naphthalene containing remedies in 2 and analgesic combination in 1 while herbal remedies were implicated in 5 cases. Anuria was a prominent feature occurring in 9 (90%) of the patients. The patients were uraemic with a mean serum creatinine of 1460 +/- 485.0 umol/1 and urea of 33.1 +/- 5.3 mmol/1 on admission. They were all anaemic with packed cell volume less than 18% in eight of the patients. Six (60%) of the patients required haemodialysis while 4 were managed conservatively. Prognosis was good as 8 (80%) of the patients survived and were followed up in the clinic for periods anging 6 to 18 months and their serum creatinine and urea levels normalised. It is concluded that acute toxic nephropathy is common in our practice, and it is eminently preventable. The prognosis is good if dialytic therapy is available.

  1. Vitamin E and diabetic nephropathy in mice model and humans.

    PubMed

    Farid, Nakhoul; Inbal, Dahan; Nakhoul, Nakhoul; Evgeny, Farber; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Levy, Andrew P; Rabea, Asleh

    2013-11-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. Glucose promotes glycosylation of both plasma and cellular proteins with increased risk for vascular events. Diabetic patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Haptoglobin (Hp) is an antioxidant plasma protein which binds free hemoglobin, thus preventing heme-iron mediated oxidation. Two alleles exist at the Hp gene locus (1 and 2) encoding three possible Hp genotypes that differ in their antioxidant ability, and may respond differently to vitamin E treatment. Several clinical studies to have shown that Hp 1-1 genotype is a superior antioxidant to the Hp 2-2 genotype and Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E was found to have beneficial effect in patient and mice with Hp 2-2 genotype. In this review we have summarized the results of our studies in patients with diabetic nephropathy treated with vitamin E and in diabetic mice with different haptoglobin genotypes.

  2. Assessment of diabetic nephropathy in the Akita mouse.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae-Hyung; Gurley, Susan B

    2012-01-01

    Akita mice have type 1 diabetes mellitus caused by a spontaneous point mutation in the Ins2 gene which leads to misfolding of insulin, resulting in pancreatic β-cell failure. Akita mice develop pronounced and sustained hyperglycemia, high levels of albuminuria, and consistent histopathological changes, suggesting that these mice may be suitable as an experimental platform for modeling diabetic nephropathy. One key feature of diabetic kidney disease in Akita mice is that the severity of renal injury is significantly influenced by genetic background. In this chapter, we describe the Akita model and present some of the experimental studies utilizing Akita mice as a model of type 1 diabetes. For example, deficiency in bradykinin receptors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 leads to development of functionally and structurally more advanced diabetic nephropathy in these mice, while ketogenic diet has been shown to reverse kidney injury associated with diabetes. This chapter also describes the application of 24-h urine collections from mice for careful measurement of urinary albumin excretion.

  3. Apoptosis modulated by oxidative stress and inflammation during obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter; Vallés, Patricia G

    2012-08-01

    Kidney apoptosis and fibrosis are an inevitable outcome of progressive chronic kidney diseases where congenital obstructive nephropathy is the primary cause of the end-stage renal disease in children, and is also a major cause of renal failure in adults. The injured tubular cells linked to interstitial macrophages, and myofibroblasts produce cytokines and growth factors that promote an inflammatory state in the kidney, induce tubular cell apoptosis, and facilitate the accumulation of extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II plays a central role in the renal fibrogenesis at a very early stage leading to a rapid progression in chronic kidney disease. The increasing levels of angiotensin II induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, NF-κB activation, adhesion molecules, chemokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress. Furthermore, growing evidence reports that angiotensin II (a pro-inflammatory hormone) increases the mitochondrial oxidative stress regulating apoptosis induction. This review summarizes our understanding about possible mechanisms that contribute to apoptosis modulated by inflammation and/or oxidative stress during obstructive nephropathy. The new concept of antiinflammatory tools regulating mitochondrial oxidative stress will directly affect the inflammatory process and apoptosis. This idea could have attractive consequences in the treatment of renal and other inflammatory pathologies.

  4. The continuing medical mystery of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosby, Lynn M.; Tatu, Calin A.; Orem, William H.; Pavlovic MD PhD, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN) is a disease of subtle onset and insidious progression that typically occurs between the 4th and 6th decade in long‐resident individuals in highly specific geographic locations of the Balkan region and affects 1 – 5% of the population. Though it does not follow typical Mendelian genetics, there is a familial pattern of occurrence. Although residents may live only a few kilometers apart, certain locations are highly affected while others close by, even as close as across the road, remain unscathed. Because of this geographic selectivity scientists have searched for an environmental cause. It is thought that exposure to the toxic plant Aristolochia clematitis is to blame. Genotoxic N‐heterocyclic or polycyclic aromatic containing coal water leachates entering cultivated soil and drinking water are also a possible cause due to the proximity and predictive power of endemic foci to coal deposits. Evidence for Ochratoxin A fungal poisoning also exists. High levels of phthalates have been measured in BEN‐endemic drinking water. BEN is a probably a multifactorial disease that may result from exposure through some of above‐mentioned environmental sources, with genetic factors contributing. This review will discuss recent research concerning the etiology, potential therapies for the treatment of nephropathy, and unexplored research directions for this chronic kidney disease.

  5. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Evaluating weight of evidence in the mystery of Balkan endemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bui-Klimke, Travis; Wu, Felicia

    2014-09-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) is a chronic, progressive wasting disease of the kidneys, endemic in certain rural regions of the Balkan nations Croatia, Serbia, Bulgaria, and Romania. It is irreversible and ultimately fatal. Though this disease was first described in the 1950s, its causes have been a mystery and a source of much academic and clinical contention. Possible etiologic agents that have been explored include exposure to metals and metalloids, viruses and bacteria, and the dietary toxins aristolochic acid (AA) and ochratoxin A (OTA). AA is a toxin produced by weeds of the genus Aristolochia, common in Balkan wheat fields. Aristolochia seeds may intermingle with harvested grains and thus inadvertently enter human diets. OTA is a mycotoxin (fungal toxin) common in many foods, including cereal grains. In this study, we analyzed the weight of evidence for each of the suspected causes of BEN using the Bradford Hill criteria (BHC): nine conditions that determine weight of evidence for a causal relationship between an agent and a disease. Each agent postulated to cause BEN was evaluated using the nine criteria, and for each criterion was given a rating based on the strength of the association between exposure to the substance and BEN. From the overall available scientific evidence for each of these suspected risk factors, AA is the agent with the greatest weight of evidence in causing BEN. We describe other methods for testing causality from epidemiological studies, which support this conclusion of AA causing BEN.

  7. Polymeric IgA rheumatoid factor in idiopathic IgA mesangial nephropathy (Berger's disease).

    PubMed

    Sinico, R A; Fornasieri, A; Oreni, N; Benuzzi, S; D'Amico, G

    1986-07-15

    A specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect IgA rheumatoid factor (RF) in sera from 88 patients with IgA nephropathy (IgA GN), a disease characterized by abnormalities of IgA production. Significantly higher levels of IgA antiglobulins were demonstrated in IgA GN patients than in normal healthy controls and patients with other forms of chronic primary glomerulonephritis (mean +/- SEM 28.4 +/- 6.6 vs 6.0 +/- 0.4 and 8.3 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml respectively; p less than 0.002). Interestingly, in contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, IgA RF activity was not associated with IgM antiglobulins. Analysis of sera fractionated by gel chromatography at acid pH revealed that anti-IgG activity resided predominantly in the polymeric fractions of IgA as confirmed by the ability to bind "free" secretory component. Several findings in patients with IgA GN suggest that the IgA deposited in the glomeruli is polymeric, and levels of circulating macromolecular IgA are increased. Our findings confirm a general perturbation of IgA metabolism in this disease. Although the polymeric nature of the IgA RF is suggestive of a mucosal origin, additional evidence is needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. A novel protective formulation of Palmitoylethanolamide in experimental model of contrast agent induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Cordaro, M; Impellizzeri, D; Bruschetta, G; Siracusa, R; Crupi, R; Di Paola, R; Esposito, E; Cuzzocrea, S

    2016-01-05

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a complication in patients after administration of iodinated contrast media. Several risk factors contribute to the development and progression of CIN, including hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Animal models of CIN by surgical intervention to reproduce its clinical and pathology has been developed, and thus, therapeutic methods tested. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a member of the fatty acid ethanolamine family with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we analyzed streptozotocin-induced diabetes model and in an another set of experiment a surgical remotion of the kidney with the aim of evaluating effect of ultramicronized Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-um(®)) on contrast induced renal disfunction and glomerular morphology alteration. In a first step of our study, we demonstrated that PEA-um(®) significantly reduced CIN-mediated glomerular dysfunction, modulates Na(+) and K(+) levels in plasma and decreased urine and plasma NGAL levels and α-GST urine levels. Moreover, in a second set of experiment we investigated how PEA-um(®) reduced creatinine and BUN plasma levels after nephrectomy, ameliorate renal and medullary blood flow and re-established renal parenchymal after CIN induction as well as after nephrectomy. Take together our results demonstrated that PEA-um(®) are able to preventing CIN in diabetic rats and alteration of biochemical parameters after nephrectomy.

  9. Galactosialidosis associated with IgA nephropathy: morphological study of renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Koike, Kentaro; Hamaguchi, Takeshi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Imasawa, Toshiyuki; Joh, Kensuke

    2008-05-01

    Galactosialidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disease associated with a deficiency of beta-galactosidase and neuraminidase. Described herein is the case of a young adult who had been diagnosed with galactosialidosis at 8 years of age. At the age of 30 years, proteinuria and hematuria appeared and the patient underwent a renal biopsy 1 year later. Light microscopy of the kidney sections indicated fine granular contents in the cytoplasm of glomerular endothelial and epithelial cells, arteriolar smooth muscles and proximal tubular epithelial cells on periodic acid silver-methenamin (PAM) stain. Electron microscopy of these cells indicated enlarged, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes containing 150 nm-wide rods with a fine lattice structure at 66 A periodicity. Moreover, electron-dense deposits were located in the paramesangial area. Immunofluorescence staining indicated diffuse and global anti-human IgA and C3-positive staining as a mesangial pattern. Given these findings this patient was therefore diagnosed with both galactosialidosis and IgA nephropathy. This is the first report to describe light and electron microscopy observations of storage materials in the kidneys in young/adult galactosialidosis.

  10. Effect of bilirubin on triglyceride synthesis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianwei; Lee, Eun Seong; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of bilirubin on dyslipidemia and nephropathy in a diabetes mellitus (DM) type I animal model. Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into control, DM, and bilirubin-treated DM (Bil) groups. The Bil group was injected intraperitoneally with 60 mg/kg bilirubin 3 times per week and hepatoma cells were cultured with bilirubin at a concentration of 0.3 mg/dL. The Bil group showed lower serum creatinine levels 5 weeks after diabetes onset. Bilirubin treatment also decreased the amount of mesangial matrix, lowered the expression of renal collagen IV and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and reduced the level of apoptosis in the kidney, compared to the DM group. These changes were accompanied by decreased tissue levels of hydrogen superoxide and NADPH oxidase subunit proteins. Bilirubin decreased serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), free fatty acids, and triglycerides (TGs), as well as the TG content in the liver tissues. Bilirubin suppressed protein expression of LXRα, SREBP-1, SCD-1, and FAS, factors involved in TG synthesis that were elevated in the livers of DM rats and hepatoma cells under high-glucose conditions. In conclusion, bilirubin attenuates renal dysfunction and dyslipidemia in diabetes by suppressing LXRα and SREBP-1 expression and oxidative stress.

  11. MicroRNA Profiling in Patients with Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma Associated with Balkan Endemic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Popovska-Jankovic, Katerina; Noveski, Predrag; Jankovic-Velickovic, Ljubinka; Stojnev, Slavica; Cukuranovic, Rade; Stefanovic, Vladisav; Toncheva, Draga; Staneva, Rada; Polenakovic, Momir; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2016-01-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) is a disease that affects people that live in the alluvial plains along the tributaries of the Danube River in the Balkan region. BEN is a chronic tubulointerstitial disease with a slow progression to terminal renal failure and has strong association with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). There are several hypotheses about the etiology of BEN, but only the toxic effect of aristolochic acid has been confirmed as a risk factor in the occurrence of the disease. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been shown to be associated with many types of cancers. A number of studies have investigated the expression of microRNAs in urothelial carcinoma, mainly on urothelial bladder cancer, and only a few have included patients with UTUC. Here we present the first study of microRNA profiling in UTUC tissues from patients with BEN (BEN-UTUC) and patients with UTUC from nonendemic Balkan regions (non-BEN-UTUC) in comparison to normal kidney tissues. We found 10 miRNAs that were differentially expressed in patients with BEN-UTUC and 15 miRNAs in patients with non-BEN-UTUC. miRNA signature determined in BEN-UTUC patients differs from the non-BEN-UTUC patients; only miR-205-5p was mutual in both groups. PMID:27218105

  12. Arginase inhibition: a new treatment for preventing progression of established diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Cooper, Timothy K; Morris, Sidney M; Awad, Alaa S

    2015-09-01

    Our previous publication showed that inhibition of arginase prevents the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, identification of targets that retard the progression of established DN-which is more clinically relevant-is lacking. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that arginase inhibition would prevent the progression of established DN. Effects of arginase inhibition were compared with treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, a current standard of care in DN. Experiments were conducted in Ins2(Akita) mice treated with the arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine (BEC) or captopril starting at 6 wk of age for 12 wk (early treatment) or starting at 12 wk of age for 6 wk (late treatment). Early and late treatment with BEC resulted in protection from DN as indicated by reduced albuminuria, histological changes, kidney macrophage infiltration, urinary thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and restored nephrin expression, kidney nitrate/nitrite, kidney endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation, and renal medullary blood flow compared with vehicle-treated Ins2(Akita) mice at 18 wk of age. Interestingly, early treatment with captopril reduced albuminuria, histological changes, and kidney macrophage infiltration without affecting the other parameters, but late treatment with captopril was ineffective. These findings highlight the importance of arginase inhibition as a new potential therapeutic intervention in both early and late stages of diabetic renal injury.

  13. Rtn1a-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Podocyte Injury and Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Wenzhen; Lee, Kyung; Li, Zhengzhe; Wen, Jiejun; He, Li; Gui, Dingkun; Xue, Rui; Jian, Guihua; Sheng, Xiaohua; He, John Cijiang; Wang, Niansong

    2017-03-23

    We previously reported a critical role of reticulon (RTN) 1A in mediating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in kidney tubular cells and the expression of RTN1A correlates with the renal function and the severity of kidney injury in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we determined the roles of RTN1A and ER stress in podocyte injury and DN. We used db/db mice with early unilateral nephrectomy (Unx) as a murine model of progressive DN and treated mice with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a specific inhibitor of ER stress. We found increased expression of RTN1A and ER stress markers in the kidney of db/db-Unx mice. Treatment of TUDCA not only attenuated proteinuria and kidney histological changes, but also ameliorated podocyte and glomeruli injury in diabetic mice, which were associated with reduction of RTN1A and ER stress marker expression in the podocytes of TUDCA-treated mice. In vitro, we showed RTN1A mediates albumin-induced ER stress and apoptosis in human podocytes. A positive feedback loop between RTN1A and CHOP was found leading to an enhanced ER stress in podocytes. Our data suggest that ER stress plays a major role in podocyte injury in DN and RTN1A might be a key regulator of ER stress in podocytes.

  14. Genetic counselling in hereditary osteo-onychodysplasia (HOOD, nail-patella syndrome) with nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Looij, B J; te Slaa, R L; Hogewind, B L; van de Kamp, J J

    1988-01-01

    Hereditary osteo-onychodysplasia (HOOD, nail-patella syndrome) is an autosomal dominant condition characterised by nail dysplasia, patellar hypoplasia or aplasia, and nephropathy. The risk for HOOD patients to have a child with HOOD who will develop renal failure cannot easily be deduced from published pedigrees. We have studied a large family with 30 patients with HOOD and have analysed 34 kindreds with HOOD nephropathy from published reports, comprising 213 patients. For a patient with HOOD from a family in which HOOD nephropathy occurs, the risk of having a child with HOOD nephropathy is about 1:4; the risk of having a child in whom renal failure will develop is about 1:10. PMID:3225824

  15. Polyomavirus nephropathy of the native kidney in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Krystel-Whittemore, Melissa; McCarthy, Ellen T; Damjanov, Ivan; Fields, Timothy A

    2015-08-28

    Polyomavirus nephropathy is commonly seen in the renal allograft setting but is uncommon in native kidneys. This paper describes polyomavirus nephropathy that developed in the native kidneys of a patient following immunosuppressive therapy for rheumatoid arthritis/Sjögren's syndrome associated lung disease. The patient presented with dyspnoea and a slow steady rise in serum creatinine. Owing to chronic immunosuppression, calcineurin-inhibitor toxicity was suspected. However, renal biopsy revealed polyomavirus nephropathy. The treatment of choice, lowered immunosuppression, was complicated by exacerbation of the patient's lung disease. This case highlights features of polyomavirus nephropathy in the native kidney, as well as the difficulty in its treatment when immunosuppressive treatment is necessary for medical comorbidities.

  16. [Reflux and obstructive nephropathy as a cause of renal failure in chronic dialysis children].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Anna; Jander, Anna; Puczko-Nogal, Barbara; Nowicki, Michał

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of medical files to evaluate causes of chronic renal failure in 80 children (M--49, F--31), age 1 month to 20 years) who started renal replacement therapy in the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis of the Polish Mothers Memorial Hospital in the years 1990-2007. In 28 children (35%) reflux and obstructive nephropathy was a cause of renal failure. In 5 children the disease was secondary to the neurogenic bladder. The incidence of these nephropathies in our population was constant in the analyzed years. In our group there were 2 neonates and 7 adolescent who were diagnosed with nephropathy as late as in the endstage phase. Boys with posterior urethral valve required renal replacement therapy earlier (146 +/- 55 months). We conclude that obstructive and reflux nephropathy are still the essential cause of end stage renal disease in children.

  17. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma Associated with IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yukinori; Sakai, Kei; Asaka, Shiho; Nakayama, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    Few cases of IgA nephropathy with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) have been reported. We herein present the case of a 79-year-old Japanese man with AITL and IgA nephropathy. The patient presented with generalized edema, fatigue, and fever. Laboratory investigations revealed polyclonal gammopathy with a high level of IgA, microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and some other immunological abnormalities. Computed tomography revealed generalized lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of AITL and IgA nephropathy was made based on inguinal lymph node and renal biopsies. Following chemotherapy for AITL, the patient's edema, microscopic hematuria, and proteinuria were alleviated. These findings indicate that IgA nephropathy may occur in AITL patients. PMID:28050005

  18. Emerging roles for miRNAs in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Johanna K; Taila, Matthew; Alvarez, M Lucrecia

    2013-08-01

    Although the causes of diabetic nephropathy are not yet fully known, emerging evidence suggests a role for epigenetic factors in the development of the disease. In particular, microRNAs (miRNAs) are becoming recognized as important mediators of biological processes relevant to diabetic nephropathy. Until recently, investigations of miRNAs in the development of diabetic nephropathy have remained relatively limited; however, the number of reports identifying potential new candidates and mechanisms of impact is presently expanding at a rapid pace. This review seeks to summarize these recent findings, focusing on new candidates and/or novel mechanisms, including the intersection between genetic variation and miRNA function in modulating disease expression, emerging in the field. We also review the latest advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  19. The Application of AN Electronic Nose as a Predictive Technique against Human Diabetic Nephropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, E. I.; Festuccia, A. M.; Martinelli, E.; Andreoli, A.; Martini, A.; di Natale, C.; de Lorenzo, A.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study is to apply electronic nose (EN) technology as an alternative method for fast monitoring of metabolic clearances and nephropathy insurgence in diabetics. This will be performed through urine analyses of diabetic patients and healthy subjects.

  20. [Importance of diabetic nephropathy in childhood. Clinical findings and basic research in recent decades].

    PubMed

    Fekete, Andrea; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-01-26

    Over the past decades diabetes mellitus is becoming a global pandemic affecting more than 371 million people worldwide. Parallel with the increasing prevalence of type 1 diabetes, there is a growing number of type 2 diabetes cases among children and adolescents that poses new challenges to pediatricians. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major causes of end stage renal disease, developing in approximately 30% of diabetic patients. However, overt nephropathy is rare in childhood; screening and ongoing assessment for the earliest manifestation of renal injury is extremely important in this young population, as well. Although in the past decades intensive research activity focused on understanding of the pathomechanism of diabetic nephropathy and invention of new therapeutic approaches, prevention and definitive care are still urgently needed. The clinical section of the article summarizes the present state of epidemiology, diagnosis and current therapies of childhood diabetic nephropathy. Then, the authors discuss the state of basic research and show a few promising targets for drug development.

  1. A study on the correlation between MTHFR promoter methylation and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Hui; Cao, Ren-Fang; Yu, Yang; Sui, Miao; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Jing-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In order to observe the relationship between MTHFR promoter and DN, the determinations on MTHFR promoter methylation level and expression of HCY from DN patients have been carried out. Methods: According to the Diabetes diagnosis and classification standard from WHO in 1999, 85 patients with DM diagnosed by Endocrinology and 30 healthy participants from our medical examination center were chosen as control specimen to study in this paper. All this specimen were divided into A, B, C and D four groups , which are corresponding simple diabetes mellitus group (SDM), early diabetic nephropathy group (EDN), clinical diabetic nephropathy group (CDN) and normal control group. And then, all common materials and clinical experiments data have been collected respectively. (1) Extracted the peripheral blood DNA of each group and determinate the methylation status of MTHFR gene promoter by PCR (MSP). (2) Determinated the serum HCY protein expression of each group. Results: (1) The MTHFR promoter methylation of SDM and diabetic nephropathy group are wear off comparied with normal control group. And MTHFR promoter was in demethylation state in normal control group, a slightly weak in SDN, a obviously weak in early diabetic nephropathy group; the MTHFR promoter was in methylation state in clinical diabetic nephropathy group. (2) The HCY protein of simple diabetes mellitus group, early diabetic nephropathy group and clinical diabetic nephropathy group are Pitch with normal control group. HCY protein level of each group are as 7.41±1.61 umol/L, 10.34±2.89 umol/L, 10.95±5.89 umol/L and 13.03±6.14 umol/L corresponding normal control group, simple diabetes mellitus group, early diabetic nephropathy group and clinical diabetic nephropathy group. And there is no statistical significance about the differences among four groups. Conclusion: The demethylation state of MTHFR promoter was obviously weaker in clinical diabetic nephropathy group than in SDM. The level of serum

  2. Uric Acid and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The interrelationship between uric acid and renal disease is reviewed in a historical context. Four phases can be distinguished--the descriptions of uric acid stones and gravel in the eighteenth century, of chronically scarred kidneys containing urate crystals in the nineteenth, the appearance of the syndrome of acute urate nephropathy following tumour lysis in the mid twentieth century, and finally the realization that soluble urate affects both systemic and glomerular blood vessels, and may play a role in both hypertension and chronic renal damage.

  3. Hepatic-Associated Immunoglobulin-A Nephropathy in a Child with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Sharifa A.; Saadah, Omar I.; Almatury, Nesreen; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic-associated immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy is a relatively common condition that occurs in adults with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. However, it is rare in children. This condition is characterized by the deposition of IgA in the renal glomeruli. The present report describes a 14-year-old boy with cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension who presented with hematuria and proteinuria associated with histological changes of IgA nephropathy. PMID:22626802

  4. Capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry as a potential tool to detect lithium-induced nephropathy: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Raedler, Thomas J; Wittke, Stefan; Jahn, Holger; Koessler, Andreas; Mischak, Harald; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2008-04-01

    Lithium remains the treatment of choice for many patients suffering from bipolar disorder. However, long-term treatment with lithium carries the potential to cause renal and thyroid dysfunction. Lithium-induced nephropathies are characterised by deterioration of urinary concentrating ability as well as, less frequently, a progressive and potentially irreversible decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Pathological changes after treatment with lithium include both tubulointerstitial and glomerular changes. Besides monitoring of the kidney-function, no screening-instruments exist for early identification of patients at risk of lithium-induced nephropathy. CE-MS (capillary electrophoresis coupled to a mass spectrometer) is a new technique that has been applied to the differential diagnosis of nephropathies. We sought to determine if CE-MS can be used to identify lithium-induced renal changes. A urine-sample was obtained from 14 subjects (7 males, 7 females, mean age 51.1 years) under long-term treatment with lithium (mean duration 17.4 years, range 8-35 years) without known nephropathy (mean creatinine 0.96 mg/dl; range 0.7-1.6). Urine samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analysis. CE-MS was performed according to standard procedures and a screen for nephropathies was used. Among the 14 urine samples, two subjects tested positive for a nephropathy. One further subject had a borderline result. Since 3/14 subjects with no known nephropathy showed some degree of pathological findings, CE-MS from a urine-sample may be helpful for the early detection of renal damage under treatment with lithium. However, a specific screen for lithium-induced nephropathies still needs to be developed.

  5. Oxalate Nephropathy in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ligon, Colin B.; Hummers, Laura K.; McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To increase awareness of oxalate nephropathy as a cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) among systemic sclerosis patients with small intestinal dysmotility and malabsorption, and to prompt consideration of dietary modification and early treatment of predisposing causes of oxalate nephropathy in this population. Methods Two cases of biopsy-proven oxalate nephropathy were identified among systemic sclerosis patients in the course of direct clinical care. Subsequently, a retrospective search of the Johns Hopkins Pathology databases identified a third patient with systemic sclerosis who developed oxalate nephropathy. Results Among the three patients with qualifying biopsies, all three had systemic sclerosis with lower gastrointestinal involvement. All three presented with diarrhea, malabsorption, and AKI. In two of the three patients, diarrhea was present for at least two years before the development of AKI; in the third, incidental oxalate nephropathy was noted three years before she developed AKI and extensive oxalate nephropathy in the setting of a prolonged mycobacterium avium-intracellulare enteritis. In one case, oxalate crystals were present by urinalysis months before diagnosis by biopsy, in the second, hyperoxaluria was diagnosed by urine collection immediately after biopsy, and in the third, oxalate crystals had been noted incidentally on post-transplant renal biopsy three years before the development of fulminant oxalate nephropathy. All three patients died within a year of diagnosis. Conclusions Patients with systemic sclerosis and bowel dysmotility associated with chronic diarrhea and malabsorption may be at risk for an associated oxalate nephropathy. Regular screening of systemic sclerosis patients with small bowel malabsorption syndromes through routine urinalysis or 24 hour urine oxalate collection, should be considered. Further studies defining the prevalence of this complication in systemic sclerosis, the benefit of dietary modification on

  6. Effect of nephrotoxic drugs on the development of radiation nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1994-03-01

    Chronic renal failure is a significant cause of late morbidity in bone marrow transplant patients whose conditioning regimen includes total body irradiation (TBI). Radiation is a major cause of this syndrome (bone marrow transplant nephropathy), but it may not be the only cause. These studies use a rat syngeneic bone marrow transplant model to determine whether nephrotoxic agents used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be enhancing or accelerating the development of radiation nephropathy. Rats received 11-17 Gy TBI in six fractions over 3 days followed by syngeneic bone marrow transplant. In conjunction with the bone marrow transplants, animals received either no drugs, cyclosporine, amphotericin, gentamicin, or busulfan. Drugs were given in schedules analogous to their use in clinical bone marrow transplantation. Drug doses were chosen so that the drug regimen alone caused detectable acute nephrotoxicity. Animals were followed for 6 months with periodic renal function tests. Gentamicin had no apparent interactions with TBI. Amphotericin increased the incidence of engraftment failure, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Cyclosporin with TBI caused late morbidity that appeared to be due to neurological problems, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Busulfan resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation nephropathy. Of the nephrotoxins used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation only radiation and busulfan were found to be risk factors for bone marrow transplant nephropathy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Differentiation and recruitment of IL-22-producing helper T cells in lgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chenggen; Zhou, Qiaoling; Li, Xiaozhao; Li, Hui; Meng, Ting; Zhong, Yong; Pu, Jiaxi; Zhu, Mengyuan; Xu, Yan; Gan, Lu; Sun, Hong; Xiao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    IL-22-producing helper T cells (Th22 cells) have been reported to be involved in lgA nephropathy. However, the mechanisms underlying the differentiation and immune regulation of Th22 cells in lgA nephropathy remain unknown. To elucidate the mechanisms by which Th22 cells differentiate and are recruited into the kidney in lgA nephropathy, the distribution of Th22 cells in both the kidney and blood was determined. Additionally, the impacts of proinflammatory cytokines and antigen presentation in the kidney on Th22 cell differentiation were explored. Specifically, the chemoattractant activities of chemokines produced by the kidney for Th22 cells were investigated. Th22 cells were significantly higher both in the kidney and in the blood in lgA nephropathy mice. IL-1β, IL-6, IL-21 and/or TNF-a promoted Th22 cells differentiation from CD4+ T cells. It was observed that kidneys undergoing lgA nephropathy expressed CCL20, CCL22 and CCL27, and kidney supernatants were chemotactic for Th22 cells. This activity was partially blocked by anti-CCL20, anti-CCL22, and anti-CCL27 antibodies, which also potentially improved renal lesions simultaneously. The overrepresentation of Th22 cells in lgAN may be attributable to the actions of kidney chemokines and cytokines. Our data suggest a collaborative loop between the kidney and Th22 cells in lgA nephropathy. PMID:27725866

  8. Cell biology of diabetic nephropathy: Roles of endothelial cells, tubulointerstitial cells and podocytes.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Yoshiro; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal failure throughout the world in both developed and developing countries. Diabetes affects all cell types of the kidney, including endothelial cells, tubulointerstitial cells, podocytes and mesangial cells. During the past decade, the importance of podocyte injury in the formation and progression of diabetic nephropathy has been established and emphasized. However, recent findings provide additional perspectives on pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular endothelial damage is already present in the normoalbuminuric stage of the disease when podocyte injury starts. Genetic targeting of mice that cause endothelial injury leads to accelerated diabetic nephropathy. Tubulointerstitial damage, previously considered to be a secondary effect of glomerular protein leakage, was shown to have a primary significance in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Emerging evidence suggests that the glomerular filtration barrier and tubulointerstitial compartment is a composite, dynamic entity where any injury of one cell type spreads to other cell types, and leads to the dysfunction of the whole apparatus. Accumulation of novel knowledge would provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, and might lead to a development of a new therapeutic strategy for the disease.

  9. Current Challenges in Diabetic Nephropathy: Early Diagnosis and Ways to Improve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Jong Ho; Kim, In Joo

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes is often associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is the primary cause of kidney failure in half of patients who receive dialysis therapy. Given the increasing prevalence of diabetes and its high morbidity and mortality, diabetic nephropathy is a serious drawback in individual patients and a tremendous socioeconomic burden on society. Despite growing concern for the management of diabetic nephropathy, the prevalence of CKD with diabetes is the same today as it was 20 years ago. The current strategy to manage diabetic nephropathy, including the control of hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure and the wide-spread use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, is well established to be beneficial in the early stages of diabetic nephropathy. However, the effects are uncertain in patients with relatively progressed CKD. Therefore, early diagnosis or risk verification is extremely important in order to reduce the individual and socioeconomic burdens associated with diabetic nephropathy by providing appropriate management to prevent the development and progression of this condition. This review focuses on recent research and guidelines regarding risk assessment, advances in medical treatment, and challenges of and future treatments for diabetic nephropathy.

  10. JC polyoma virus interacts with APOL1 in African Americans with nondiabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Jasmin; Núñez, Marina; High, Kevin P; Murea, Mariana; Rocco, Michael V; Ma, Lijun; Bowden, Donald W; Hicks, Pamela J; Spainhour, Mitzie; Ornelles, David A; Kleiboeker, Steven B; Duncan, Kara; Langefeld, Carl D; Turner, Jolyn; Freedman, Barry I

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with HIV infection and two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) risk variants frequently develop nephropathy. Here we tested whether non-HIV viral infections influence nephropathy risk via interactions with APOL1 by assessing APOL1 genotypes and presence of urine JC and BK polyoma virus and plasma HHV6 and CMV by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed 300 samples from unrelated and related first-degree relatives of African Americans with nondiabetic nephropathy using linear and nonlinear mixed models to account for familial relationships. The four groups evaluated were APOL1 zero/one versus two risk alleles, with or without nephropathy. Urine JCV and BKV were detected in 90 and 29 patients, respectively, whereas HHV6 and CMV were rare. Adjusting for family age at nephropathy, gender, and ancestry, presence of JCV genomic DNA in urine and APOL1 risk alleles were significantly negatively associated with elevated serum cystatin C, albuminuria (albumin-to-creatinine ratio over 30 mg/g), and kidney disease defined as an eGFR under 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and/or albuminuria in an additive (APOL1 plus JCV) model. BK viruria was not associated with kidney disease. Thus, African Americans at increased risk for APOL1-associated nephropathy (two APOL1 risk variants) with JC viruria had a lower prevalence of kidney disease, suggesting that JCV interaction with APOL1 genotype may influence kidney disease risk.

  11. CD73-Dependent Generation of Adenosine and Endothelial Adora2b Signaling Attenuate Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Eunyoung; Ridyard, Douglas; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Zimmerman, Michael; Werner, Tilmann; Wang, Xiaoxin X.; Shabeka, Uladzimir; Seo, Seong-Wook; Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jost; Moldovan, Radu; Garcia, Gabriela; Levi, Moshe; Haase, Volker; Ravid, Katya; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide phosphohydrolysis by the ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is the main source for extracellular generation of adenosine. Extracellular adenosine subsequently signals through four distinct adenosine A receptors (Adora1, Adora2a, Adora2b, or Adora3). Here, we hypothesized a functional role for CD73-dependent generation and concomitant signaling of extracellular adenosine during diabetic nephropathy. CD73 transcript and protein levels were elevated in the kidneys of diabetic mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 was associated with more severe diabetic nephropathy, whereas treatment with soluble nucleotidase was therapeutic. Transcript levels of renal adenosine receptors showed a selective induction of Adora2b during diabetic nephropathy. In a transgenic reporter mouse, Adora2b expression localized to the vasculature and increased after treatment with streptozotocin. Adora2b−/− mice experienced more severe diabetic nephropathy, and studies in mice with tissue-specific deletion of Adora2b in tubular epithelia or vascular endothelia implicated endothelial Adora2b signaling in protection from diabetic nephropathy. Finally, treatment with a selective Adora2b agonist (BAY 60–6583) conveyed potent protection from diabetes-associated kidney disease. Taken together, these findings implicate CD73-dependent production of extracellular adenosine and endothelial Adora2b signaling in kidney protection during diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24262796

  12. Cell biology of diabetic nephropathy: Roles of endothelial cells, tubulointerstitial cells and podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Yoshiro; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal failure throughout the world in both developed and developing countries. Diabetes affects all cell types of the kidney, including endothelial cells, tubulointerstitial cells, podocytes and mesangial cells. During the past decade, the importance of podocyte injury in the formation and progression of diabetic nephropathy has been established and emphasized. However, recent findings provide additional perspectives on pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular endothelial damage is already present in the normoalbuminuric stage of the disease when podocyte injury starts. Genetic targeting of mice that cause endothelial injury leads to accelerated diabetic nephropathy. Tubulointerstitial damage, previously considered to be a secondary effect of glomerular protein leakage, was shown to have a primary significance in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Emerging evidence suggests that the glomerular filtration barrier and tubulointerstitial compartment is a composite, dynamic entity where any injury of one cell type spreads to other cell types, and leads to the dysfunction of the whole apparatus. Accumulation of novel knowledge would provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, and might lead to a development of a new therapeutic strategy for the disease. PMID:25621126

  13. Association between subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shinya; Yamamoto, Shin; Todo, Yasuhiko; Maruyama, Kotatsu; Miyake, Teruki; Ueda, Teruhisa; Niiya, Tetsuji; Senba, Takatoshi; Torisu, Masamoto; Kumagi, Teru; Miyauchi, Syozo; Sakai, Takenori; Minami, Hisaka; Miyaoka, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Bunzo; Hiasa, Yoichi; Onji, Morikazu; Tanigawa, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, it is unknown whether common complications of type 2 diabetes, such as diabetic nephropathy, are also present with SCH. Here, we investigated the association between SCH and diabetic nephropathy among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, we recruited 414 such patients who had no previous history of thyroid disease. Serum thyroid hormone levels and the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio were measured. SCH was defined as an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (>4.0 mIU/L), and diabetic nephropathy was defined as urinary albumin/creatinine ratio ≥300 mg/g. The prevalence of SCH was 8.7% (n = 36) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The SCH group had a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (p = 0.008) and diabetic nephropathy (p = 0.014) than the euthyroid group. Multivariate analysis identified significant positive associations between diabetic nephropathy and SCH (odds ratio [OR], 3.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-10.0; p = 0.034), hypertension (OR, 4.56; 95% CI, 1.69-14.7; p = 0.001), and smoking (OR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.14-7.91; p = 0.026). SCH may be independently associated with diabetic nephropathy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Diabetic nephropathy--a review of the natural history, burden, risk factors and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ayodele, Olugbenga E.; Alebiosu, C. Olutayo; Salako, Babatunde L.

    2004-01-01

    The earliest clinical evidence of diabetic nephropathy is microalbuminuria. Progression from microalbuminuria to overt nephropathy occurs in 20-40% within a 10-year period with approximately 20% of these patients progressing to end-stage renal disease. End-stage renal disease develops in 50% of type-1 diabetes patients with overt nephropathy within 10 years and in more than 75% by 20 years in the absence of treatment. In type-2 diabetes, a greater proportion of patients have microalbuminuria and overt nephropathy at or shortly after diagnosis of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with subsequent increase in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy. The risk factors identified in the development of DN from longitudinal and cross-sectional studies include race, genetic susceptibility, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperfiltration, smoking, advanced age, male sex, and high-protein diet. Treatment interventions in diabetic nephropathy include glycemic control, treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cessation of smoking, protein restriction, and renal replacement therapy. Multifactorial approach includes combined therapy targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, microalbuminuria, and dyslipidemia. PMID:15586648

  15. Obstetric nephrology: pregnancy in women with diabetic nephropathy--the role of antihypertensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Ringholm, Lene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Clausen, Peter; Damm, Peter

    2012-12-01

    This review highlights factors of importance for the clinical care of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes and microalbuminuria or diabetic nephropathy with particular focus on the role of intensive antihypertensive treatment during pregnancy. Most information in the literature comes from women with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy, but this is probably also valid for women with type 2 diabetes. Careful counseling of women with diabetic nephropathy before pregnancy with estimation of the risk for the mother and fetus is important. Pregnancy does not result in worsening of kidney function in women with diabetic nephropathy and normal serum creatinine, but pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and preterm delivery are common. Intensive metabolic control before and during pregnancy, low-dose aspirin from 12 gestational weeks onward, and intensive antihypertensive treatment are important. Methyldopa, labetalol, and nifedipine are regarded safe in pregnancy, whereas angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, AngII antagonists, or statins should be paused before pregnancy. Case series and pathophysiological studies support the use of a stringent goal for BP and albumin excretion in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. Screening for diabetic retinopathy before and during pregnancy is mandatory and laser treatment should be performed if indicated. Pregnancy outcome in women with diabetic nephropathy has improved considerably with a take-home-baby rate of approximately 95%. Further research on the benefits and risks of intensive antihypertensive treatment in this population is needed.

  16. Immunosuppression for progressive membranous nephropathy: a UK randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Howman, Andrew; Chapman, Tracey L; Langdon, Maria M; Ferguson, Caroline; Adu, Dwomoa; Feehally, John; Gaskin, Gillian J; Jayne, David RW; O'Donoghue, Donal; Boulton-Jones, Michael; Mathieson, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Membranous nephropathy leads to end-stage renal disease in more than 20% of patients. Although immunosuppressive therapy benefits some patients, trial evidence for the subset of patients with declining renal function is not available. We aimed to assess whether immunosuppression preserves renal function in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy with declining renal function. Methods This randomised controlled trial was undertaken in 37 renal units across the UK. We recruited patients (18–75 years) with biopsy-proven idiopathic membranous nephropathy, a plasma creatinine concentration of less than 300 μmol/L, and at least a 20% decline in excretory renal function measured in the 2 years before study entry, based on at least three measurements over a period of 3 months or longer. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) by a random number table to receive supportive treatment only, supportive treatment plus 6 months of alternating cycles of prednisolone and chlorambucil, or supportive treatment plus 12 months of ciclosporin. The primary outcome was a further 20% decline in renal function from baseline, analysed by intention to treat. The trial is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number 99959692. Findings We randomly assigned 108 patients, 33 of whom received prednisolone and chlorambucil, 37 ciclosporin, and 38 supportive therapy alone. Two patients (one who received ciclosporin and one who received supportive therapy) were ineligible, so were not included in the intention-to-treat analysis, and 45 patients deviated from protocol before study end, mostly as a result of minor dose adjustments. Follow up was until primary endpoint or for minimum of 3 years if primary endpoint was not reached. Risk of further 20% decline in renal function was significantly lower in the prednisolone and chlorambucil group than in the supportive care group (19 [58%] of 33 patients reached endpoint vs 31 [84%] of 37, hazard

  17. Normoglycemic Diabetic Nephropathy: The Role of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Filippone, Edward J.; Gupta, Astha; Farber, John L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is complex and incompletely understood. Whereas hyperglycemia is clearly important, the role of insulin resistance (IR) is increasingly recognized. We present the case of a normotensive non-smoking obese woman with nephrotic syndrome who was found to have DN by biopsy. All measures of glucose metabolism, including fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, and oral glucose tolerance testing, were repeatedly normal with little exception. IR was documented, however, based on the presence of the metabolic syndrome and an elevated homeostasis model assessment of IR. We posit that this IR is central to the pathogenesis of our patient's lesion, and this may explain other cases of DN with normoglycemia. The literature supporting this concept is discussed. PMID:25076962

  18. Treatment of renal failure from diabetic nephropathy with cadaveric homograft

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Claude; Laplante, Louis

    1973-01-01

    We report two patients with terminal renal failure secondary to diabetic nephropathy treated with cadaveric kidney transplantation. Neither of these patients had peripheral vascular disease or peripheral neuropathy. There was a proliferative diabetic retinopathy with hemorrhages and exudates in one patient and only background diabetic changes in the ocular fundi of the other; there have been no significant changes in visual acuity or retinopathy in either patient following the transplantation. Both have good kidney function after 8 and 15 months and are completely rehabilitated. The requirement for insulin decreased in both patients during the period of renal insufficiency and increased following transplantation; this seemed to be related to the large dose of steroids given because now that a maintenance level of steroids has been established, both patients require the same dosage of insulin as they did before the onset of renal insufficiency. PMID:4574972

  19. "Contrast nephropathy" in renal transplantation: Is it real?

    PubMed

    Abbas, Fedaey Mohammed; Julie, Bridson M; Sharma, Ajay; Halawa, Ahmed

    2016-12-24

    The risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in renal transplant recipients is increased in diabetics, patients with impaired basal kidney function, patients in shock, patients presenting with acute emergency and in old age recipients. Approximately one-third of all hospitalized patients with acute kidney injury is attributed to CIN. In the United States, it is the third leading cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. Therefore, efforts should be directed to minimize CIN-related morbidity and mortality as well as to shorten hospital stay. While the role of peri-procedural prophylactic hydration with saline is unequivocal; the use of acetyl cysteine is not based on robust evidence. The utility of theophylline, aminophylline, calcium channel blockers, natriuretic peptide, and diuretics does not have proven role in attenuating CIN incidence. We aim to analyze the evidence for using various protocols in published literature to limit CIN-associated morbidity and mortality, particularly during surveillance of the renal allograft survival.

  20. Diabetic nephropathy: Treatment with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cecil Stanley

    2013-08-15

    The importance of nitric oxide (NO) in vascular physiology is irrefutable; it stimulates the intracellular production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), initiating vascular smooth muscle relaxation. This biochemical process increases the diameter of small arteries, regulating blood flow distribution between arterioles and the microvasculature. The kidney is no exception, since NO predominantly dilates the glomerular afferent arterioles. It is now evident that the vascular production of cGMP can be augmented by inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE 5), the enzyme which breakdowns this cyclic nucleotide. This has clinical relevance, since diabetic nephropathy (DN) a major microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of end-stage renal disease, increases intraglomerular capillary pressure, leading to glomerular hypertension. PDE 5 inhibitors may have, therefore, the potential to reduce glomerular hypertension. This review describes the use of PDE 5 inhibitors to improve the metabolic, haemodynamic and inflammatory pathways/responses, all of which are dysfunctional in DN.

  1. [Preclinical diagnosis of the familial nephropathy associated to hyperuricemia].

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Martínez Ara, J; Mora, M; García Puig, J

    2006-01-01

    We describe one patient with the pre-symptomatic diagnosis of the disease named afamilial nephropathy associated to hyperuricemia)) (OMIM 162000; FJHN). This is a hereditary disease, autosomic dominant, characterized by its progression to renal insufficiency. Several mutations in the gene that codifies uromodulin or Tannn-Horsfall protein (UMOD) have been identified in some families. The clinical presentation is heterogeneous. In some cases the disease appears as juvenile hyperuricemia due to a diminished renal urate excretion, with or without gout, but in some other cases the first manifestation is renal insuffciency. The study of the UMOD gene shows that patient is heterozygous for the mutation C869 --> A, which results in C255Y change, and enabled to establish the diagnosis of FJHN. This patient shows the possibility to identify the genetic alteration associated to FJHN in early stages. This fact implies a clinical follow-up and eventual treatment to reduce the inexorable progression to renal insuffciency.

  2. An update on pathology of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria Fernanda

    2016-12-01

    IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) is the commonest of the glomerular diseases in the world. Its progression rate of 30-40% of the cases em 20-30 years makes IgAN an important healthcare issue in Nephrology. Diagnosis of IgAN depends on biopsy findings, particularly at immunofluorescence microscopy. The frequence of IgAN diagnosis is variable in different populations and depends on screening and biopsy indication policies. IgAN pathogenesis is considered multifactorial; its primordial defect is the production of galactosis-deficient IgA molecules. This review paper discusses the most uptodate aspects of the pathogenesis, pathological classification and clinical implications of IgAN.

  3. The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lili; Cui, Wenpeng; Li, Xiangqi; Tan, Yi; Miao, Lining

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), as one of the chronic complications of diabetes, is the major cause of end-stage renal disease. However, the pathogenesis of this disease is not fully understood. In recent years, research on microRNAs (miRNAs) has become a hotspot because of their critical role in regulating posttranscriptional levels of protein-coding genes that may serve as key pathogenic factors in diseases. Several miRNAs were found to participate in the pathogenesis of DN, while others showed renal protective effects. Therefore, targeting miRNAs that are involved in DN may have a good prospect in the treatment of the disease. The aim of this review is to summarize DN-related miRNAs and provide potential targets for diagnostic strategies and therapeutic intervention. PMID:25258717

  4. Membranous nephropathy PLA2R+ associated with Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vanessa dos Santos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) — a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi — is a major health problem in Latin America. The immune response against the parasite is responsible for chronic CD lesions. Currently, there are no reports of an association between CD and membranous nephropathy (MN). The detection of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) as a target antigen in idiopathic MN can improve the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary forms of MN. The authors report the case of a male patient with positive serology for CD who presented sudden death and underwent autopsy. Histological sections of the heart showed multifocal inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of mononuclear cells, leading to myocardiocytes necrosis and interstitial fibrosis. The kidneys showed a MN with positive expression for PLA2R. As far as we know, this is the first report of a case of primary MN in a patient with CD, with severe chronic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:26558244

  5. A Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Structure on the Induction of Male Rat Nephropathy and Metabolite Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-17

    Hydrocarbon Structure on the PE - 61102f Induction of Male Rat Nephropathy and Mfetabolite Scructur( PP - 2312...spectronetrv (GC/YS). Histopathologic examination of the kidneys revealed minimal hyaline droplet formation (a2u-globulin nephropathy ) in the proximal tubule...spectrometry (GC/MS). Ilistopathologic examination of the kidneys revealed minimal hyaline droplet formation (a2u-globulin nephropathy ) in the proximal

  6. Beneficial effect of camel milk in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rajendra Prasad; Dogra, Rutba; Mohta, Niranjana; Tiwari, Raksha; Singhal, Sushma; Sultania, Surender

    2009-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is originally microvascular in nature and is widely considered an important complication of diabetes. The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of camel milk in controlling diabetic nephropathy. Twenty-four type-1 diabetic patients were randomly recruited from the outpatient diabetic clinic in PBM Hospital, Bikaner, India. All subjects gave their written consent before participation in the study. Patients with any acute metabolic complications were not included in the study. Eligible patients entered a run-in period of 1 month in which they were oriented to achieve the best possible glycemic control through standardized diet, standardized exercise regimen and insulin administration. During this period frequent monitoring of blood sugar was performed to maintain euglycemia. At the end of the run-in period, a base line evaluation was performed, then these patients were given camel milk in addition with usual care for six months. Urine microalbumin and blood sugar was measured twice a week before breakfast and dinner. There was a significant improvement in the microalbuminuria (119.48 +/- 1.68 to 22.52 +/- 2.68; p < 0.001) after receiving camel milk for 6 months. A significant reduction in the mean dose of insulin for obtaining glycemic control was achieved (41.61 +/- 3.08 to 28.32 +/- 2.66; p < 0.01). This study was performed to observe the role of camel milk in controlling microalbuminuria levels in type-1 diabetic patients. It was observed that after adding camel milk to the usual regimen an improvement in microalbuminuria was reached (119.48 +/- 1.68 to 22.52 +/- 2.68; p < 0.001). This may be due to good glycemic control or to the direct effect of camel milk. The mechanism behind this effect is still unknown.

  7. Reducing the Risks for Contrast-Induced Nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Stacul, Fulvio

    2005-12-15

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is one of the most serious adverse events associated with the use of contrast media (CM). Patients who develop this complication can have increased morbidity, higher rates of mortality, lengthy hospital stays, and poor long-term outcomes. Although CIN cannot be eliminated, the chances of developing this condition can be reduced by using appropriate prevention strategies. An important first step to reduce the chance of CIN is to identify risk factors associated with this condition. Patients with a previously elevated serum creatinine level, especially when secondary to diabetic nephropathy, are at great risk for developing CIN. Other patient-related risk factors include concurrent use of nephrotoxic medications, dehydration, congestive heart failure, age greater than 70 years, and probably the presence of diabetes mellitus even if serum creatinine is normal. Adequate hydration is widely accepted as an important prophylactic measure for preventing CIN, but the optimal hydration regimen is still debatable. The risk of CIN increases with greater doses of CM, as well as with the type of CM used. A high-osmolar CM poses a greater risk of CIN than does a low-osmolar CM and, as recent but limited data suggest, the use of an iso-osmolar CM is less nephrotoxic than a low-osmolar CM in patients with renal impairment following intra-arterial procedures, although this finding needs to be verified in future clinical studies. Pharmacologic agents such as calcium channel blockers, dopamine, atrial natriuretic peptide, fenoldopam, prostaglandin E1, and endothelin receptor antagonist have not been proven effective against CIN development. Controversies still exist on the possible effectiveness of theophylline and N-acetylcysteine. Simple strategies for the prevention of CIN in at-risk patients are reviewed and unproven interventions are discussed.

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of galectin-3 protects against hypertensive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Yu, Lili; van der Velde, A Rogier; Vreeswijk-Baudoin, Inge; López-Andrés, Natalia; van Goor, Harry; Silljé, Herman H; Ruifrok, Willem P; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2015-03-01

    Galectin-3 activation is involved in the pathogenesis of renal damage and fibrogenesis. Limited data are available to suggest that galectin-3-targeted intervention is a potential therapeutic candidate for the prevention of chronic kidney disease. Homozygous TGR(mREN)27 (REN2) rats develop severe high blood pressure (BP) and hypertensive end-organ damage, including nephropathy and heart failure. Male REN2 rats were treated with N-acetyllactosamine [galectin-3 inhibitor (Gal3i)] for 6 wk; untreated REN2 and Sprague-Dawley rats served as controls. We measured cardiac function with echocardiogram and invasive hemodynamics before termination. BP and proteinuria were measured at baseline and at 3 and 6 wk. Plasma creatinine was determined at 6 wk. Renal damage was assessed for focal glomerular sclerosis, glomerular desmin expression, glomerular and interstitial macrophages, kidney injury molecule-1 expression, and α-smooth muscle actin expression. Inflammatory cytokines and extracellular matrix proteinases were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. Systolic BP was higher in control REN2 rats, with no effect of Gal3i treatment. Plasma creatinine and proteinuria were significantly increased in control REN2 rats; Gal3i treatment reduced both. Renal damage (focal glomerular sclerosis, desmin, interstitial macrophages, kidney injury molecule-1, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen type I, and collagen type III) was also improved by Gal3i. All inflammatory markers (CD68, IL-68, galectin-3, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) were elevated in control REN2 rats and attenuated by Gal3i. Markers of extracellular matrix turnover were marginally altered in untreated REN2 rats compared with Sprague-Dawley rats. In conclusion, galectin-3 inhibition attenuated hypertensive nephropathy, as indicated by reduced proteinuria, improved renal function, and decreased renal damage. Drugs binding to galectin-3 may be therapeutic candidates for the prevention of chronic kidney disease.

  9. The Clinical Epidemiology of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Recent improvements in contrast agents and radiologic imaging tools have resulted in an increasing number of patients undergoing contrast media (CM)-enhanced examinations. Although the majority of patients undergoing these diagnostic and therapeutic procedures experience only mild adverse events, some patient subpopulations are at risk for developing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN), an adverse event that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Contrast-induced nephropathy is usually defined as an increase of {>=}25% in the serum creatinine level relative to baseline. Pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this disorder are not fully understood, but it is currently believed that disturbances in renal hemodynamics and a direct effect of CM on renal tubules are involved. In the general population, the incidence of CIN is estimated to be 1% to 6%. However, the risk may be as high as 50% in some patient subgroups. Patients with diabetes and pre-existing renal impairment are at high risk, and CIN incidence increases in patients with multiple comorbidities. The volume and osmolality of CM used also play a role in the development of CIN. Patients who develop CIN are more likely to die in-hospital and, for those who are discharged, 1-year mortality rates are high. Whether this is due to CM, comorbidity, or concurrent comorbid events is unclear. Randomized controlled trials that measure non-renal clinical outcomes are necessary to determine whether interventions that prevent CIN can also prevent non-renal adverse events. A review of the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical consequences of CIN is provided.

  10. Membranous nephropathy: A fairy tale for immunopathologists, nephrologists and patients.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Pierre; Debiec, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the considerable progress which has been made in the recent years in the understanding of the pathophysiology of membranous nephropathy, a model of organ-specific auto-immune disease. It shows how experimental models developed more than 30 years ago have led to the identification of several human antigens including neutral endopeptidase in the neonate, phospholipase A2 receptor, and thrombospondin 1 domain 7A in the adult, and cationic bovine serum albumin in children. Thanks to a successful GWAS performed in European Caucasians, the genetics of the disease begins to be understood. These groundbreaking findings already have a major impact on patients' care owing to the development of reliable ELISA and immunofluorescence test for the detection of PLA2R antibodies and of PLA2R antigen screening in biopsies. This review will tell the story from the careful clinical observation of cases to the most recent therapeutic perspectives which have been made possible by these advances. Advances in medical science often proceed by steps which are highly interdependent. New, groundbreaking findings with important clinical implications often result from the combination of faithful experimental models and careful clinical observations. This is well illustrated by the story of membranous nephropathy which started more than 50 years ago. It is remarkable that in this disease, the experimental models predicted the pathophysiology of the human glomerulopathy. The stories that we will tell in this article are aimed at young clinical investigators who are sometimes reluctant to embark on research projects. We hope that they will convince them that bedside research performed with intellectual curiosity and a bit of chance can lead to significant progress in clinical medicine.

  11. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A165b Is Protective and Restores Endothelial Glycocalyx in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Sebastian; Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne K; Stevens, Megan; Neal, Chris; Russell, Amy; Kaura, Amit; Arkill, Kenton P; Harris, Kirstie; Symonds, Clare; Lacey, Katja; Wijeyaratne, Lihini; Gammons, Melissa; Wylie, Emma; Hulse, Richard P; Alsop, Chloe; Cope, George; Damodaran, Gopinath; Betteridge, Kai B; Ramnath, Raina; Satchell, Simon C; Foster, Rebecca R; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Donaldson, Lucy F; Barratt, Jonathan; Baelde, Hans J; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O; Salmon, Andrew H J

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of ESRD in high-income countries and a growing problem across the world. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is thought to be a critical mediator of vascular dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy, yet VEGF-A knockout and overexpression of angiogenic VEGF-A isoforms each worsen diabetic nephropathy. We examined the vasculoprotective effects of the VEGF-A isoform VEGF-A165b in diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of VEGF-A165b mRNA was upregulated in diabetic individuals with well preserved kidney function, but not in those with progressive disease. Reproducing this VEGF-A165b upregulation in mouse podocytes in vivo prevented functional and histologic abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy. Biweekly systemic injections of recombinant human VEGF-A165b reduced features of diabetic nephropathy when initiated during early or advanced nephropathy in a model of type 1 diabetes and when initiated during early nephropathy in a model of type 2 diabetes. VEGF-A165b normalized glomerular permeability through phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 in glomerular endothelial cells, and reversed diabetes-induced damage to the glomerular endothelial glycocalyx. VEGF-A165b also improved the permeability function of isolated diabetic human glomeruli. These results show that VEGF-A165b acts via the endothelium to protect blood vessels and ameliorate diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A165b Is Protective and Restores Endothelial Glycocalyx in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oltean, Sebastian; Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne K.; Stevens, Megan; Neal, Chris; Russell, Amy; Kaura, Amit; Arkill, Kenton P.; Harris, Kirstie; Symonds, Clare; Lacey, Katja; Wijeyaratne, Lihini; Gammons, Melissa; Wylie, Emma; Hulse, Richard P.; Alsop, Chloe; Cope, George; Damodaran, Gopinath; Betteridge, Kai B.; Ramnath, Raina; Satchell, Simon C.; Foster, Rebecca R.; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Donaldson, Lucy F.; Barratt, Jonathan; Baelde, Hans J.; Harper, Steven J.; Bates, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of ESRD in high-income countries and a growing problem across the world. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is thought to be a critical mediator of vascular dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy, yet VEGF-A knockout and overexpression of angiogenic VEGF-A isoforms each worsen diabetic nephropathy. We examined the vasculoprotective effects of the VEGF-A isoform VEGF-A165b in diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of VEGF-A165b mRNA was upregulated in diabetic individuals with well preserved kidney function, but not in those with progressive disease. Reproducing this VEGF-A165b upregulation in mouse podocytes in vivo prevented functional and histologic abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy. Biweekly systemic injections of recombinant human VEGF-A165b reduced features of diabetic nephropathy when initiated during early or advanced nephropathy in a model of type 1 diabetes and when initiated during early nephropathy in a model of type 2 diabetes. VEGF-A165b normalized glomerular permeability through phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 in glomerular endothelial cells, and reversed diabetes-induced damage to the glomerular endothelial glycocalyx. VEGF-A165b also improved the permeability function of isolated diabetic human glomeruli. These results show that VEGF-A165b acts via the endothelium to protect blood vessels and ameliorate diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25542969

  13. Methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia as a novel risk factor for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ukinc, Kubilay; Ersoz, Halil Onder; Karahan, Caner; Erem, Cihangir; Eminagaoglu, Selcuk; Hacihasanoglu, Arif Bayram; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kocak, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a well-defined risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. A point mutation (677 C-T) of MTHFR gene results in a significant increase at plasma homocysteine levels. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effects of MTHFR gene mutation and consequent hyperhomocysteinemia on the development of diabetic microvascular complications in comparison with the other defined risk factors. Diabetic patients without a history of macrovascular complication or overt nephropathy enrolled into the study. The presence of MTHFR 677 C-T point mutation was evaluated by Real-Time PCR technique by using a LightCycler. MTHFR heterozygous mutation was present in 24 patients over 52. Patients with diabetes were divided into two groups according to the presence of MTHFR gene mutation. Both groups were well matched regarding age and diabetes duration. Metabolic parameters, plasma homocysteine, microalbuminuria, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels were also studied. Presence of neuropathy and retinopathy were evaluated by specific tests. Duration of diabetes, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma CRP, HbA1c, and lipid levels were not different between the two groups. Plasma homocysteine (12.89 +/- 1.74 and 8.98 +/- 1.91 micromol/l; P < 0.0001) and microalbuminuria levels (73.40 +/- 98.15 and 29.53 +/- 5.08 mg/day; P = 0.021) were significantly higher in the group with MTHFR gene mutation while creatinine clearance levels (101.1 +/- 42.6 and 136.21 +/- 51.50 ml/min; P = 0.008) were significantly lower. Sixteen over 22 (73%) of the patients with diabetic nephropathy had MTHFR gene mutation, while this was only 27% (8 over 30) in normoalbuminuric patients (P = 0.017). There was a significant correlation of plasma homocysteine level with microalbuminuria (r = 0.54; P = 0.031) in the patients with diabetic nephropathy who had C677T polymorphism. We did not find any specific association of MTHFR gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia with

  14. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for evaluation of renal parenchyma elasticity in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Goya, Cemil; Kilinc, Faruk; Hamidi, Cihad; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Yildirim, Yasar; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli; Hattapoglu, Salih

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The goal of this study is to evaluate the changes in the elasticity of the renal parenchyma in diabetic nephropathy using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. The study included 281 healthy volunteers and 114 patients with diabetic nephropathy. In healthy volunteers, the kidney elasticity was assessed quantitatively by measuring the shear-wave velocity using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging based on age, body mass index, and sex. The changes in the renal elasticity were compared between the different stages of diabetic nephropathy and the healthy control group. RESULTS. In healthy volunteers, there was a statistically significant correlation between the shear-wave velocity values and age and sex. The shear-wave velocity values for the kidneys were 2.87, 3.14, 2.95, 2.68, and 2.55 m/s in patients with stage 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 diabetic nephropathy, respectively, compared with 2.35 m/s for healthy control subjects. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging was able to distinguish between the different diabetic nephropathy stages (except for stage 5) in the kidneys. The threshold value for predicting diabetic nephropathy was 2.43 m/s (sensitivity, 84.1%; specificity, 67.3%; positive predictive value, 93.1%; negative predictive value 50.8%; accuracy, 72.1%; positive likelihood ratio, 2.5; and negative likelihood ratio, 0.23). CONCLUSION. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging could be used for the evaluation of the renal elasticity changes that are due to secondary structural and functional changes in diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Angiotensin 1-7 mediates renoprotection against diabetic nephropathy by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mori, Jun; Patel, Vaibhav B; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Alrob, Osama Abo; DesAulniers, Jessica; Scholey, James W; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-04-15

    The renin-angiotensin system, especially angiotensin II (ANG II), plays a key role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. ANG 1-7 has counteracting effects on ANG II and is known to exert beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy. We studied the mechanism of ANG 1-7-induced beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice. We administered ANG 1-7 (0.5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline to 5-mo-old db/db mice for 28 days via implanted micro-osmotic pumps. ANG 1-7 treatment reduced kidney weight and ameliorated mesangial expansion and increased urinary albumin excretion, characteristic features of diabetic nephropathy, in db/db mice. ANG 1-7 decreased renal fibrosis in db/db mice, which correlated with dephosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. ANG 1-7 treatment also suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species via attenuation of NADPH oxidase activity and reduced inflammation in perirenal adipose tissue. Furthermore, ANG 1-7 treatment decreased lipid accumulation in db/db kidneys, accompanied by increased expressions of renal adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). Alterations in ATGL expression correlated with increased SIRT1 expression and deacetylation of FOXO1. The upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 levels in diabetic nephropathy was normalized by ANG 1-7. ANG 1-7 treatment exerts renoprotective effects on diabetic nephropathy, associated with reduction of oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and lipotoxicity. ANG 1-7 can represent a promising therapy for diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Glomerular IgG deposition predicts renal outcome in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Ho; Lim, Beom Jin; Han, In Mi; Han, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Mi Jung; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Glomerular IgG deposition is frequently observed in patients with IgA nephropathy. However, the association between glomerular IgG deposition and progression of IgA nephropathy is uncertain. Six hundred and twenty-seven patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy were recruited. Histological variables of the Oxford classification (Oxford-MEST) and the presence of glomerular IgG deposits were assessed. Renal progression defined as end-stage renal disease or 50% reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Of the study population, 200 patients (31.9%) had glomerular IgG deposition on immunofluorescence staining. During a mean follow-up of 56.8±37.5 months, the rate of renal progression was significantly higher in the IgA nephropathy patients with glomerular IgG deposition compared with the IgA nephropathy patients without glomerular IgG deposition (39.8 vs 12.3 per 1000 patient-years; P<0.001). Of patients with IgG deposition, 178 (28.3%), 20 (3.2%), and 2 (0.3%) patients had mild, moderate, and marked glomerular IgG deposits, receptively. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that cumulative renal survival was significantly lower in IgA nephropathy patients with the higher intensity of glomerular IgG deposits (P<0.001). In addition, Cox regression analysis revealed that moderate and marked glomerular IgG deposits significantly predicted renal outcome independent of Oxford-MEST and clinical variables (HR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.01-8.77; P=0.04). This study showed that that glomerular IgG deposition was independently associated with poor renal outcome in patient with IgA nephropathy.

  17. Comparison of the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model, Large-Eddy Simulation, and Field Data at the Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Hao, Y.; Lackner, M. A.; Barthelmie, R.; Lundquist, J.; Oxley, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this work is the comparison of the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation with field data from the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind plant composed of 36 3-MW turbines. The field data includes meteorological mast measurements, SCADA information from all turbines, and strain-gauge data from two turbines. The dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation are means of computing unsteady wind plant aerodynamics, including the important unsteady meandering of wakes as they convect downstream and interact with other turbines and wakes. Both of these models are coupled to a turbine model such that power and mechanical loads of each turbine in the wind plant are computed. We are interested in how accurately different types of waking (e.g., direct versus partial waking), can be modeled, and how background turbulence level affects these loads. We show that both the dynamic wake meandering model and large-eddy simulation appear to underpredict power and overpredict fatigue loads because of wake effects, but it is unclear that they are really in error. This discrepancy may be caused by wind-direction uncertainty in the field data, which tends to make wake effects appear less pronounced.

  18. TNO Contribution to the Quest 303 Trial - Human Performance Assessed by a Vigilance and Tracking Test, a Multi-Attribute Task, and by Dynamic Visual Acuity (TNO Bijdrage aan het Quest 303 Onderzoek)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    TNO Report TI Knweg for. siesIN Nederlandse Organisatie voor toegepast-natuurwetenschappelijk TNO Defence, Security and Safety fo ple cetfcRsac...objectieve maten voor taakprestatie te verzamelen onder invloed van echte scheepsbewegingen. In opdracht van de Nederlandse marine heeft TNO aan dit...rapport wordt het protocol beschreven, de bewegingscondities, en de resultaten van de Nederlandse tests. De resultaten laten zien dat cognitief

  19. Color Doppler sonography in the study of chronic ischemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Meola, M; Petrucci, I

    2008-06-01

    In western countries, the risk of cardiovascular disease has increased considerably in recent decades. This trend has been paralleled by an increase in cases of atherosclerotic renal disease, which is related to the improved prognosis of cardiovascular diseases, aging, and the increasing mean age of the general population. It is reasonable to expect that in the near future, there will be a sharp increase in the number of elderly patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic dialysis programs. The result will be a dramatic rise in the social and economic costs of dialysis that could constitute a true clinical emergency. In this epidemiologic scenario, one of the most important targets of 21st century nephrology will be the early diagnosis of chronic ischemic nephropathy and the development of new and more effective strategies for its treatment.Color Doppler (CD) ultrasonography has displayed high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values in the diagnosis of this disease in selected population, making it an ideal tool for use in screening programs. Eligibility for screening should be based on clinical criteria. For the most part, it will be aimed at adults (especially those who are elderly) with atherosclerotic vascular disease involving multiple districts and chronic kidney disease (CKD), stage 2-3, in the absence of a documented history of renal disease. In these patients, hypertension may be a secondary manifestation or a symptom of the ischemic nephropathy itself. The objectives of sonographic screening should be (1) to identify subjects in the population at risk who are affected by stenosis of the main renal artery (RAS); (2) to identify and characterize patients without RAS who have chronic ischemic nephropathy caused by nephroangiosclerosis and/or atheroembolic disease. The former group will require second-level diagnostic studies or angioplasty with stenting; the latter can be managed conservatively. The most important

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  1. HIV-Associated Nephropathy: Clinical Presentation, Pathology, and Epidemiology in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Christina M.; Klotman, Paul E.; D’Agati, Vivette D.

    2008-01-01

    The classic kidney disease of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, HIV-associated nephropathy, is characterized by progressive acute renal failure, often accompanied by proteinuria and ultrasound findings of enlarged, echogenic kidneys. Definitive diagnosis requires kidney biopsy, which demonstrates collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with associated microcystic tubular dilatation and interstitial inflammation. Podocyte proliferation is a hallmark of HIV-associated nephropathy, although this classic pathology is observed less frequently in antiretroviral-treated patients. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy involves direct HIV infection of renal epithelial cells, and the widespread introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy has had a significant impact on the natural history and epidemiology of this unique disease. These observations have established antiretroviral therapy as the cornerstone of treatment for HIV-associated nephropathy, in the absence of prospective clinical trials. Adjunctive therapy for HIV-associated nephropathy includes ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, as well as corticosteroids in selected patients with significant interstitial inflammation or rapid progression. PMID:19013322

  2. [BK virus nephropathy after renal transplantation. Diagnosis and prognosis by real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Echavarría, Marcela; Basilotta, Natalia; Aguiar, Ana; Davalos, Mario; Ricarte, Carmen; Iotti, Alejandro; Carballal, Guadalupe

    2007-01-01

    BK virus nephropathy may lead to kidney transplant failure. BK infection and acute rejection are clinically undistinguishable, therefore diagnosis of these entities is critical to establish the correct treatment. The new molecular methods using PCR and real time PCR have significantly contributed to the rapid and sensitive diagnosis of BK virus. Furthermore, viral load determination in-plasma has significantly been associated with BK virus nephropathy. Definite diagnosis of nephropathy requires renal biopsy, although due to the multifocal nature of the disease sensitivity may be less than 100%. BK detection in blood and urine by PCR has contributed to the diagnosis of nephropathy in a more standardized and less invasive way. Recently, quantification of BK virus in plasma has been used for the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. In the present study, we describe the validation of a real time PCR method for BK virus detection in plasma and urine and its application for diagnosis and monitoring in a renal transplant patient with nephropathy.

  3. Expression of prorenin receptor in renal biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Nagisa; Murata, Ichijiro; Takemura, Genzou; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Matsumoto-Miyazaki, Jun; Yoshida, Gakuro; Izumi, Kumiko; Kashi, Hitomi; Niimi, Kaori; Nishiwaki, Ayuko; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Ohno, Michiya; Ohashi, Hiroshige; Suzuki, Fumiaki; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Prorenin receptor (PRR) has been implicated in the onset and progression of various renal diseases, though its possible association with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy remains unclear. In the present study, we tried to clarify expression and pathophysiological significance of PRR in IgA nephropathy. We immunohistochemically assessed PRR levels in renal biopsy specimens from 48 patients with IgA nephropathy and evaluated its relevance to the clinical and pathological features of the disease. PRR was detected mainly in renal tubular cells, which was confirmed at the subcellular level using immunoelectron microscopy. The PRR-positive area (%PRR area) correlated with daily urinary protein, which is known to reflect disease severity (r=0.286, P=0.049). PRR levels were weaker in tubular cells bordering areas of severe interstitial fibrosis, where α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts were present. We also used immunohistochemical detection of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3) and electron microscopy to assess autophagy, a cytoprotective mechanism downstream of PRR. We noted an apparent coincidence between autophagy activation in tubular cells and PRR expression in the same cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that renal expression of PRR in IgA nephropathy may be a compensatory response slowing disease progression by preventing tubular cell death and subsequent fibrosis through activation of cytoprotective autophagic machinery. Further studies using different type of kidney diseases could draw conclusion if the present finding is a generalized observation beyond IgA nephropathy.

  4. IgA nephropathy in a tertiary care center from south India.

    PubMed

    Siddappa, S; Kowsalya, R; Mythri, K M

    2011-10-01

    IgA nephropathy is being recognized as the commonest glomerular disease worldwide. The prevalence and clinical picture varies from region to region. A retrospective analysis of 400 native renal biopsies performed over a period of 3 years at our center was done to know the prevalence and clinicopathological profile of patients with IgA nephropathy. All the biopsies were processed for both light microscopy and immunofluorescence studies. Patients with predominant IgA deposits were labeled as IgA nephropathy and further classified histopathologically into five subclasses according to the Haas classification. We noted a prevalence of 7.8% (31 cases) of IgA nephropathy. Nephrotic syndrome and chronic renal failure were the most common mode of presentation. Majority of cases fell into subclass III (focal segmental glomerular sclerosis) with 35.5% followed by subclasses IV (diffuse proliferative glomerular sclerosis) and V (global sclerosis) with 25.8% and 22.6% prevalence, respectively. As about 50% cases presented with varying degree of renal insufficiency, many ending with ESRD, IgA nephropathy can be considered as a serious problem in India.

  5. Diabetic nephropathy in a nonobese mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mallipattu, Sandeep K; Gallagher, Emily J; LeRoith, Derek; Liu, Ruijie; Mehrotra, Anita; Horne, Sylvia J; Chuang, Peter Y; Yang, Vincent W; He, John C

    2014-05-01

    A large body of research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Yet, many questions remain regarding the progression of a disease that accounts for nearly half the patients entering dialysis yearly. Several murine models of diabetic nephropathy secondary to Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do exist, and some are more representative than others, but all have limitations. In this study, we aimed to identify a new mouse model of diabetic nephropathy secondary to T2DM in a previously described T2DM model, the MKR (MCK-KR-hIGF-IR) mouse. In this mouse model, T2DM develops as a result of functional inactivation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in the skeletal muscle. These mice are lean, with marked insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia and thus are representative of nonobese human T2DM. We show that the MKR mice, when under stress (high-fat diet or unilateral nephrectomy), develop progressive diabetic nephropathy with marked albuminuria and meet the histopathological criteria as defined by the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium. Finally, these MKR mice are fertile and are on a common background strain, making it a novel model to study the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy in horseshoe kidney: case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Panpan; Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Pu; Zhang, Xueguang; Yin, Zhong; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2014-10-01

    Horseshoe kidney is the most common congenital renal fusion anomaly. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is a common glomerulonephritis worldwide. However, the co-occurrence of these diseases had not been reported in the literature. We report the first two cases with the occurrence of immunoglobulin A nephropathy in horseshoe kidney. The first case was a 26-year-old male with hypertension and proteinuria (1.4 g/24 h), his pathological finding was primary immunoglobulin A nephropathy. The second case was a 15-year-old female who presented with recurrent peliosis on bilateral lower extremities, haematuria and proteinuria (1.7 g/24 h). Her renal biopsy finding was Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (secondary immunoglobulin A nephropathy). In both cases, renal biopsy was performed by experienced doctors under ultrasonic guidance at the renal upper pole and no postoperative complications were observed. After they were treated based on the renal pathological findings for 6 months, urine protein excretion decreased significantly and blood pressure and serum creatinine stabilized. It is possible that immunoglobulin A nephropathy occurs in a horseshoe kidney patient. Renal biopsy may be valuable and viable for horseshoe kidney patients with heavy proteinuria to identify pathologic type of glomerulopathy and to guide treatment, if renal biopsy is performed by experienced doctors at the renal upper pole under renal ultrasonic guidance.

  7. Differential expression of laminin isoforms in diabetic nephropathy and other renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Setty, Suman; Michael, Alfred A; Fish, Alfred J; Michael Mauer, S; Butkowski, Ralph J; Virtanen, Ismo; Kim, Youngki

    2012-06-01

    Laminin a non-collagenous glycoprotein is a major component of the renal glomerular basement membrane and mesangium. Thus far eleven distinct chains have been described, permutations of which make up 15 laminin isoforms. Laminin molecules interact with cells and other matrix molecules during organ development and differentiation. We studied the distribution of laminin isoforms in patients with type 1 diabetic nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and IgA nephropathy/ Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Immunofluorescence microscopic studies with laminin-chain-specific antibodies to the α1, α2, α5, β1, β2 and γ1 chains detected α2, β1 and γ1 chain expression in the normal mesangium and α5, β2 and γ1 in normal glomerular basement membrane. Significantly, constituents of the glomerular basement membrane, α5, β2 and γ1 chains were overexpressed in kidneys with diabetic nephropathy. Initially the constituents of the mesangium increased commensurate with the degree of mesangial expansion and degree of diabetic nephropathy. Reduction in α2 chain intensity was observed with severe mesangial expansion and in the areas of nodular glomerulosclerosis. In addition, with late disease aberrant expression of α2 and β2 chains was observed in the mesangium. Glomerular basement membrane in renal disease overexpressed molecules normally present in that location. In summary, the alterations in basement membrane composition in various renal diseases seem to not only reflect the balance between synthesis and degradation of normal basement membrane constituents, but also their aberrant expression.

  8. Overactive cannabinoid 1 receptor in podocytes drives type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Tony; Szanda, Gergő; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Tam, Joseph; Earley, Brian James; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Cinar, Resat; Liu, Ziyi; Liu, Jie; Ju, Cynthia; Pacher, Pál; Kunos, George

    2014-12-16

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end-stage kidney disease, and overactivity of the endocannabinoid/cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) system contributes to diabetes and its complications. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats develop type 2 diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria, reduced glomerular filtration, activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), oxidative/nitrative stress, podocyte loss, and increased CB1R expression in glomeruli. Peripheral CB1R blockade initiated in the prediabetic stage prevented these changes or reversed them when animals with fully developed diabetic nephropathy were treated. Treatment of diabetic ZDF rats with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 (Agtr1) antagonist, attenuated the development of nephropathy and down-regulated renal cortical CB1R expression, without affecting the marked hyperglycemia. In cultured human podocytes, CB1R and desmin gene expression were increased and podocin and nephrin content were decreased by either the CB1R agonist arachydonoyl-2'-chloroethylamide, angiotensin II, or high glucose, and the effects of all three were antagonized by CB1R blockade or siRNA-mediated knockdown of CNR1 (the cannabinoid type 1 receptor gene). We conclude that increased CB1R signaling in podocytes contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy and represents a common pathway through which both hyperglycemia and increased RAS activity exert their deleterious effects, highlighting the therapeutic potential of peripheral CB1R blockade.

  9. Kidney hypoxia, attributable to increased oxygen consumption, induces nephropathy independently of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Thörn, Erik; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Levin, Max; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is strongly associated with both increased oxidative stress and kidney tissue hypoxia. The increased oxidative stress causes increased kidney oxygen consumption resulting in kidney tissue hypoxia. To date, it has been difficult to determine the role of kidney hypoxia, per se, for the development of nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that kidney hypoxia, without confounding factors such as hyperglycemia or elevated oxidative stress, results in nephropathy. To induce kidney hypoxia, dinitrophenol (30 mg per day per kg bodyweight by gavage), a mitochondrial uncoupler that increases oxygen consumption and causes kidney hypoxia, was administered for 30 consecutive days to rats. Thereafter, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, kidney oxygen consumption, kidney oxygen tension, kidney concentrations of glucose and glycogen, markers of oxidative stress, urinary protein excretion, and histological findings were determined and compared with vehicle-treated controls. Dinitrophenol did not affect arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, or markers of oxidative stress but increased kidney oxygen consumption, and reduced cortical and medullary concentrations of glucose and glycogen, and resulted in intrarenal tissue hypoxia. Furthermore, dinitrophenol treatment increased urinary protein excretion, kidney vimentin expression, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption results in kidney hypoxia and subsequent nephropathy. Importantly, these results demonstrate that kidney tissue hypoxia, per se, without confounding hyperglycemia or oxidative stress, may be sufficient to initiate the development of nephropathy and therefore demonstrate a new interventional target for treating kidney disease.

  10. Has RAAS Blockade Reached Its Limits in the Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Majewski, Collen; Bakris, George L

    2016-04-01

    Medications that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are a cornerstone of diabetic nephropathy treatment. These agents play an important role in slowing the nephropathy progression in patients with diabetes. Clinical outcome trials that investigated use of these drug classes in patients with diabetic nephropathy have demonstrated clinical significant benefit in slowing nephropathy progression only in people with >300 mg/day of proteinuria. Thus, guidelines mandate their use in such patients. Conversely, combinations of RAAS blocking agents in these patients can worsen renal outcomes. Moreover, use of RAAS blockers in patients with a glomerular filtration rate below 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) is limited by hyperkalemia. New agents that predictably bind excess potassium in the colon offer the possibility of extending RAAS inhibitor use in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) to allow evaluation of RAAS blockade for nephropathy and cardiovascular outcomes. These new potassium-binding agents may provide an opportunity to continue full-dose RAAS inhibition and assess if the benefits of RAAS blockade seen in stage 3 CKD can be extrapolated to persons with stages 4 and 5 CKD, not previously tested due to hyperkalemia.

  11. HDL cholesterol and risk of diabetic nephropathy in patient with type 1 diabetes: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhi, Yunqing; Li, Chengqian; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Lifang; Wang, Yangang; Che, Kui

    2016-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of HDL on risk of diabetic nephropathy in T1DM patients. Ten papers containing (7698) participants were included in this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis suggest that the risk of diabetic nephropathy was decreased with HDL in type 1 diabetes.

  12. Involvement of the NLRC4-Inflammasome in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Kolb, Ryan; Pandey, Gaurav; Li, Wei; Sun, Lin; Liu, Fuyou; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Liu, Yinghong; Zhang, Weizhou

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide but current treatments remain suboptimal. The role of inflammation in DN has only recently been recognized. It has been shown that the NLRP3-inflammasome contributes to DN development by inducing interleukin (IL)-1β processing and secretion. In an effort to understand other IL-1β activating mechanism during DN development, we examined the role of the NLRC4-inflammasome in DN and found that NLRC4 is a parallel mechanism, in addition to the NLRP3-inflammasome, to induce pro-IL-1β processing and activation. We found that the expression of NLRC4 is elevated in DN kidneys. NLRC4-deficiency results in diminished DN disease progression, as manifested by a decrease in blood glucose and albumin excretion, as well as preserved renal histology. We further found that DN kidneys have increased F4/80+ macrophages, increased IL-1β production, and other signaling pathways related to kidney pathology such as activation of NF-κB and MAP kinase pathways, all of which were rescued by NLRC4-deficiency. This study demonstrates NLRC4-driven IL-1β production as critical for the progression of DN, which underscores the importance to target this pathway to alleviate this devastating disease. PMID:27706238

  13. Association of Serum Adropin Concentrations with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Adropin is a newly identified regulatory protein encoded by the Enho gene and is critically involved in energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. This study aims to determine the correlation of serum adropin concentrations with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Methods. This study consisted of 245 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 81 healthy subjects. Then T2DM patients were divided into normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, and macroalbuminuria subgroups based on urine albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR). Results. T2DM patients showed significantly lower serum adropin concentrations than those in the controls. T2DM patients with macroalbuminuria had significantly decreased serum adropin concentrations compared with the other three groups. In addition, T2DM patients with microalbuminuria showed lower serum adropin concentrations than those in patients with normoalbuminuria. Logistic regression analysis showed that serum adropin was correlated with decreased risk of developing T2DM and DN. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that serum adropin was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI), blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and ACR and positively correlated with glomerular filtration rate. Furthermore, multiple linear regression analysis showed that BMI and ACR were negatively correlated with serum adropin levels. Conclusion. Serum adropin concentrations are negatively associated with renal function. Adropin may be implicated in the pathogenesis of DN development. PMID:27546995

  14. Curcumin Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy by Suppressing NLRP3 Inflammasome Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Miaomiao; Yin, Nanchang; Liu, Wei; Cui, Xiangfei; Chen, Shuo; Wang, Ermin

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease, partly because of the lack of effective treatments for DN. Curcumin has been shown to exert strong antifibrotic effects in DN, but the underlying mechanisms are not well characterized. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of curcumin on diabetic renal disease in db/db mice and characterize the underlying mechanism of action. We administered curcumin to db/db mice for 16 weeks. In comparison to mock-treated db/db mice, curcumin-treated mice showed diminished renal hypertrophy, reduced mesangial matrix expansion, and a lower level of albuminuria. Furthermore, the upregulated protein and mRNA expressions of collagen IV and fibronectin in the renal cortices of the db/db mice were inhibited by curcumin treatment. Additionally, curcumin treatment was associated with significant reductions in mature interleukin-1β, cleaved caspase-1, and NLRP3 protein levels in the renal cortices of db/db mice as well as in HK-2 cells exposed to high glucose concentration. In summary, curcumin, a potent antifibrotic agent, is a promising treatment for DN, and its renoprotective effects appear to be mediated by the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activity.

  15. Patients' perception on the nutritional therapy for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shide, Kenichiro; Takada, Yuka; Nakashima, Asuka; Tsuji, Hidemi; Wada, Keiko; Kuwabara, Akiko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-01-01

    Low protein diet (LPD) plays an important role in preventing the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, it is a great burden to the patients. In this paper, we have studied the quality of life (QOL) in such patients. The study subjects were 59 patients (male 38, female 21) with type 2 diabetes. The patients were classified into tertiles based on their protein intake (g/kg BW). Scores from the diet-related QOL questionnaire were summarized by principal component analysis into four components; mental health, less burden, satisfaction and merit, and less social restriction. Higher protein intake was associated with less burden and less social restriction. In multiple regression analysis, the significant predictors for the "less burden" component were higher protein intake/BW and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In summary, registered dietitians and clinicians must keep in mind that LPD is a serious burden to the patients and efforts must be made to minimize their burden in order to avoid discontinuation.

  16. Patients’ Perception on the Nutritional Therapy for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Shide, Kenichiro; Takada, Yuka; Nakashima, Asuka; Tsuji, Hidemi; Wada, Keiko; Kuwabara, Akiko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-01-01

    Low protein diet (LPD) plays an important role in preventing the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, it is a great burden to the patients. In this paper, we have studied the quality of life (QOL) in such patients. The study subjects were 59 patients (male 38, female 21) with type 2 diabetes. The patients were classified into tertiles based on their protein intake (g/kg BW). Scores from the diet-related QOL questionnaire were summarized by principal component analysis into four components; mental health, less burden, satisfaction and merit, and less social restriction. Higher protein intake was associated with less burden and less social restriction. In multiple regression analysis, the significant predictors for the “less burden” component were higher protein intake/BW and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In summary, registered dietitians and clinicians must keep in mind that LPD is a serious burden to the patients and efforts must be made to minimize their burden in order to avoid discontinuation. PMID:24855408

  17. Curcumin Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy by Suppressing NLRP3 Inflammasome Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Nanchang; Liu, Wei; Cui, Xiangfei; Chen, Shuo; Wang, Ermin

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease, partly because of the lack of effective treatments for DN. Curcumin has been shown to exert strong antifibrotic effects in DN, but the underlying mechanisms are not well characterized. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of curcumin on diabetic renal disease in db/db mice and characterize the underlying mechanism of action. We administered curcumin to db/db mice for 16 weeks. In comparison to mock-treated db/db mice, curcumin-treated mice showed diminished renal hypertrophy, reduced mesangial matrix expansion, and a lower level of albuminuria. Furthermore, the upregulated protein and mRNA expressions of collagen IV and fibronectin in the renal cortices of the db/db mice were inhibited by curcumin treatment. Additionally, curcumin treatment was associated with significant reductions in mature interleukin-1β, cleaved caspase-1, and NLRP3 protein levels in the renal cortices of db/db mice as well as in HK-2 cells exposed to high glucose concentration. In summary, curcumin, a potent antifibrotic agent, is a promising treatment for DN, and its renoprotective effects appear to be mediated by the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activity. PMID:28194406

  18. Crystal nephropathies: mechanisms of crystal-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Crystals can trigger a wide range of kidney injuries that can lead to acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal colic or nephrocalcinosis, depending on the localization and dynamics of crystal deposition. Studies of the biology of crystal handling by the kidney have shown that the formation of different crystals and other microparticles and the associated mechanisms of renal damage share molecular mechanisms, such as stimulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome or direct cytotoxicity through activation of the necroptosis signalling pathway. By contrast, crystal granuloma formation is limited to chronic crystallopathies that lead to chronic kidney disease and renal fibrosis. Here, we discuss current understanding of the pathomechanisms underlying the different types of crystal-induced kidney injury and propose a classification of crystal nephropathies based on the localization of crystal deposits in the renal vasculature (type 1), the nephron (type 2), or the draining urinary tract (type 3). Further exploration of the molecular mechanisms of crystal-induced kidney injury and renal remodelling might aid the development of innovative cures for these diseases.

  19. NEPHROPATHIES IN THE EUROPEAN CAPTIVE CHEETAH (ACINONYX JUBATUS) POPULATION.

    PubMed

    Url, Angelika; Krutak, Verena; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Chvala-Mannsberger, Sonja; Robert, Nadia; Dinhopl, Nora; Schmidt, Peter; Walzer, Chris

    2016-09-01

    According to previous studies in captive cheetah ( Acinonyx jubatus ) populations, one of the most threatening diseases besides amyloidosis, myelopathy, veno occlusive disease, and gastritis, is renal failure. Contrary to captive cheetahs in North America and South Africa, morphological data concerning renal lesions in the cheetah European Endangered Species Program (EEP) are lacking. This study details the histological characterization as well as immunohistochemical and morphometrical analysis of nephropathies in 35 captive cheetahs from the EEP, which were necropsied between 1985 and 2003. Examination of paraffin- and glycolmethacrylate-methylmethacrylate (GMA-MMA) embedded kidney samples by light microscopy revealed glomerulonephritis in 91%, with a high prevalence for glomerulosclerosis and glomerulonephritis with the histologic pattern of membranous glomerulonephritis (77%). Besides these predominating glomerulopathies, a wide range of other renal lesions, like acute tubular necrosis, interstitial nephritis, calcinosis, and amyloidosis, were present. Pathological expression of collagen type IV, complement C3, fibronectin, and IgG was demonstrated in the glomeruli of the cheetah kidneys with the use of the avidin-biotin complex method. Morphometrical analysis was performed on GMA-MMA embedded kidney samples to obtain glomerulosclerosis index and glomerulosclerosis incidence.

  20. The Diabetic Nephropathy and the Development of Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zuccollo, Adriana; Navarro, Monica

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the development of hypertension in diabetic rats treated with streptozotocin (STZ, 1mg/g bw). The rats were studied at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 weeks. From the third week the rats were divided in diabetic rats according their glycemias and controls, along 15 weeks. After the third week a group, of rats showed increased urinary protein excretion (93, 134, 155 and 191%) compared to controls. In this group of rats the urinary kallikrein excretion was lower than control and the systolic blood pressure became significantly elevated between 3 and 6 weeks and persisted up to 15 weeks. On the other hand a group of diabetic rats were normotensive with urinary protein excretion similar to controls and urinary kallikrein lower compared to control but significantly higher compared diabetic hypertensive rats. These data suggest that the association of progressive diabetic nephropathy with abnormal endothelium-dependent vasodilation may produce a high prevalence of hypertensive diabetes. PMID:12369707

  1. Schistosomal specific nephropathy leading to end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sobh, M A; Moustafa, F E; el-Housseini, F; Basta, M T; Deelder, A M; Ghoniem, M A

    1987-04-01

    In this study 17 patients, 11 with end-stage renal failure and six with nephrotic syndrome were selected. The selection criteria were presence of active intestinal schistosomiasis and absence of any surgical or other medical disease which could explain the renal disease. When examined by light microscopy, kidney biopsies showed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in nine, membranous in four, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in two, sclerosing glomerulonephritis in one case, and no changes in another case. Direct immunofluorescence showed IgG deposits in 13 cases, IgM in 10 and different complement components (C3, C1q) in eight cases. Eluates from the kidney biopsies of the 17 schistosomal as well as six control cases were examined by ELISA against schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen (AWA). This test showed the presence of antibodies against the AWA in 12 out of 17 of the schistosomal cases, and zero out of six of the controls. When examined by direct IFA using sheep anti-circulating anodic antigen/FITC and by indirect IFA using monoclonal antischistosomal CAA IgG3, kidney biopsies of the ELISA positive cases showed granular deposits of circulating anodic antigen (CAA). We conclude that schistosomal specific nephropathy does exist in the clinical settings and can lead to end-stage renal disease, with CAA probably being a major responsible antigen.

  2. Urinary biomarkers for early diabetic nephropathy: beyond albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Choi, Mary E

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease in the USA and accounts for a significant increase in morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Early detection is critical in improving clinical management. Although microalbuminuria is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosing the onset of DN, its predictive powers are limited. Consequently, great efforts have been made in recent years to identify better strategies for the detection of early stages of DN and progressive kidney function decline in diabetic patients. Here, we review the various urinary biomarkers that have emerged from these studies which hold promise as more sensitive diagnostic tools for the earlier detection of diabetic kidney disease and the prediction of progression to end-stage kidney disease. A number of key biomarkers present in the urine have been identified that reflect kidney injury at specific sites along the nephron, including glomerular/podocyte damage and tubular damage, oxidative stress, inflammation and activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system. We also describe newer approaches, including urinary microRNAs, which are short noncoding mRNAs that regulate gene expression, and urine proteomics, that can be used to identify potential novel biomarkers in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease.

  3. Vitamin D, proteinuria, diabetic nephropathy, and progression of CKD.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2009-09-01

    Although the endocrine effects of vitamin D are widely recognized, somewhat less appreciated is that vitamin D may serve paracrine functions through local activation by 1-alpha-hydroxylase and thus maintain immunity, vascular function, cardiomyocyte health, and abrogate inflammation and insulin resistance. In the kidney, vitamin D may be important for maintaining podocyte health, preventing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation, and suppressing renin gene expression and inflammation. Replacement with pharmacologic dosages of vitamin D receptor agonists (VDRA) in animal models of kidney disease consistently show reduction in albuminuria, abrogation of glomerulosclerosis, glomerulomegaly, and glomerular inflammation, effects that may be independent of BP and parathyroid hormone, but the effects of VDRA in preventing tubulointerstitial fibrosis and preventing the progression of kidney failure in these animal models are less clear. Emerging evidence in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show that vitamin D can reduce proteinuria or albuminuria even in the presence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. In addition to reducing proteinuria, VDRA may reduce insulin resistance, BP, and inflammation and preserve podocyte loss providing biologic plausibility to the notion that the use of VDRA may be associated with salubrious outcomes in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Patients with CKD have a very high prevalence of deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Whether pharmacologic dosages of vitamin D instead of VDRA in patients with CKD can overcome the paracrine and endocrine functions of this vitamin remains unknown. To demonstrate the putative benefits of native vitamin D and VDRA among patients with CKD, randomized, controlled trials are needed.

  4. MicroRNAs in Diabetic Nephropathy: From Biomarkers to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate; Wonnacott, Alexa; Fraser, Donald J; Bowen, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Recent estimates suggest that 1 in 12 of the global population suffers from diabetes mellitus. Approximately 40 % of those affected will go on to develop diabetes-related chronic kidney disease or diabetic nephropathy (DN). DN is a major cause of disability and premature death. Existing tests for prognostic purposes are limited and can be invasive, and interventions to delay progression are challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently described class of molecular regulators found ubiquitously in human tissues and bodily fluids, where they are highly stable. Alterations in miRNA expression profiles have been observed in numerous diseases. Blood and tissue miRNAs are already established cancer biomarkers, and cardiovascular, metabolic and immune disease miRNA biomarkers are under development. Urinary miRNAs represent a potential novel source of non-invasive biomarkers for kidney diseases, including DN. In addition, recent data suggest that miRNAs may have therapeutic applications. Here, we review the utility of miRNAs as biomarkers for the early detection and progression of DN, assess emerging data on miRNAs implicated in DN pathology and discuss how the data from both fields may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  5. Use and Isolation of Urinary Exosomes as Biomarkers for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Musante, Luca; Tataruch, Dorota Ewa; Holthofer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes represents a major threat to public health and the number of patients is increasing alarmingly in the global scale. Particularly, the diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy, DN) together with its cardiovascular complications cause immense human suffering, highly increased risk of premature deaths, and lead to huge societal costs. DN is first detected when protein appears in urine (microalbuminuria). As in other persisting proteinuric diseases (like vasculitis) it heralds irreversible damage of kidney functions up to non-functional (end-stage) kidney and ultimately calls for kidney replacement therapy (dialysis or kidney transplantation). While remarkable progress has been made in understanding the genetic and molecular factors associating with chronic kidney diseases, breakthroughs are still missing to provide comprehensive understanding of events and mechanisms associated. Non-invasive diagnostic tools for early diagnostics of kidney damage are badly needed. Exosomes – small vesicular structures present in urine are released by all cell types along kidney structures to present with distinct surface assembly. Furthermore, exosomes carry a load of special proteins and nucleic acids. This “cargo” faithfully reflects the physiological state of their respective cells of origin and appears to serve as a new pathway for downstream signaling to target cells. Accordingly, exosome vesicles are emerging as a valuable source for disease stage-specific information and as fingerprints of disease progression. Unfortunately, technical issues of exosome isolation are challenging and, thus, their full potential remains untapped. Here, we review the molecular basis of exosome secretion as well as their use to reveal events along the nephron. In addition to novel molecular information, the new methods provide the needed accurate, personalized, non-invasive, and inexpensive future diagnostics. PMID:25309511

  6. Effects of long-term antihypertensive treatment on kidney function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Parving, H H; Andersen, A R; Hommel, E; Smidt, U

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of our prospective study was to evaluate the long-term effect of aggressive antihypertensive treatment on glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria in young female and male patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy and blood pressure greater than 90 mm Hg. Eight patients received treatment with metoprolol (200-400 mg/day), hydralazine (100-200 mg/day), and furosemide (80-500 mg/day). The untreated control group consisted of eight patients matched for age (mean 32 years), diabetes duration (mean 17 years), and sex (two female and six male patients). All patients except one had diabetic retinopathy. Glomerular filtration rate was measured after a single intravenous injection of 51Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Urinary albumin concentration was determined with a radial immunodiffusion method. The investigations were performed two to four times per year in each patient. The mean observation period was 59 and 27 months in the treated and untreated groups respectively. Due to a considerable rise in arterial blood pressure, it was considered unethical to prolong the observation in the untreated group. Arterial blood pressure rose from 140/96 +/- 4/1 to 150/100 +/- 3/2 mm Hg; albuminuria increased from 1517 +/- 502 to 1911 +/- 120 micrograms/min; and glomerular filtration rate decreased by a mean of 0.84 +/- 0.17 ml/min/mo in the untreated group. Antihypertensive treatment induced blood pressure reduction 151/100 +/- 3/2 to 131/87 +/- 2/1 mm Hg; diminished albuminuria 1467 +/- 515 to 729 +/- 65 micrograms/min; and caused a slow rate of decline in GFR, mean 0.37 +/- 0.08 ml/min/mo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Urine metabolomic analysis to detect metabolites associated with the development of contrast induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Diercks, Deborah B.; Owen, Kelly P.; Kline, Jeffrey A.; Sutter, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is a result of injury to the proximal tubules. The incidence of CIN is around 11% for imaging done in the acute care setting. We aim to analyze the metabolic patterns in the urine, before and after dosing with intravenous contrast for computed tomography (CT) imaging of the chest, to determine if metabolomic changes exist in patients who develop CIN. Methods A convenience sample of high risk patients undergoing a chest CT with intravenous contrast were eligible for enrollment. Urine samples were collected prior to imaging and 4 to 6 hours post imaging. Samples underwent gas chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling. Peak metabolite values were measured and data was log transformed. Significance analysis of microarrays and partial least squares was used to determine the most significant metabolites prior to CT imaging and within subject. Analysis of variance was used to rank metabolites associated with temporal change and CIN. CIN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine level of ≥ 0.5 mg/dL or ≥ 25% above baseline within 48 hours after contrast administration. Results We sampled paired urine samples from 63 subjects. The incidence of CIN was 6/63 (9.5%). Patients without CIN had elevated urinary citric acid and taurine concentrations in the pre-CT urine. Xylulose increased in the post CT sample in patients who developed CIN. Conclusion Differences in metabolomics patterns in patients who do and do not develop CIN exist. Metabolites may be potential early identifiers of CIN and identify patients at high-risk for developing this condition prior to imaging. PMID:28168227

  8. Role of galectin-3 in autoimmune and non-autoimmune nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Saccon, Francesca; Gatto, Mariele; Ghirardello, Anna; Iaccarino, Luca; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Galectins are evolutionary conserved β-galactoside binding proteins with a carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of approximately 130 amino acids. In mammals, 15 members of the galectin family have been identified and classified into three subtypes according to CRD organization: prototype, tandem repeat-type and chimera-type galectins. Galectin-3 (gal-3) is the only chimera type galectin in vertebrates containing one CRD linked to an unusual long N-terminal domain which displays non-lectin dependent activities. Although recent studies revealed unique, pleiotropic and context-dependent functions of gal-3 in both extracellular and intracellular space, gal-3 specific pathways and its ligands have not been clearly defined yet. In the kidney gal-3 is involved in later stages of nephrogenesis as well as in renal cell cancer. However, gal-3 has recently been associated with lupus glomerulonephritis, with Familial Mediterranean Fever-induced proteinuria and renal amyloidosis. Gal-3 has been studied in experimental acute kidney damage and in the subsequent regeneration phase as well as in several models of chronic kidney disease, including nephropathies induced by aging, ischemia, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, unilateral ureteral obstruction and chronic allograft injury. Because of the pivotal role of gal-3 in the modulation of immune system, wound repair, fibrosis and tumorigenesis, it is not surprising that gal-3 can be an intriguing prognostic biomarker as well as a promising therapeutic target in a great variety of diseases, including chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure and cardio-renal syndrome. This review summarizes the functions of gal-3 in kidney pathophysiology focusing on the reported role of gal-3 in autoimmune diseases.

  9. Patients with analgetic nephropathy on chronic hemodialysis have a high incidence of severe secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pecovnik Balon, B; Krpan, D

    1998-12-01

    Between 1996 and 1997, 86 patients were treated for terminal renal failure by hemodialysis at Maribor Teaching Hospital. Among them were 12 with iPTH over 900 pg/ml and symptoms of bone disease. In these patients bone biopsy was carried out with the aim of determining the type of renal osteodystrophy (RO) and establishing a possible correlation with the clinical picture, with densitometry and laboratory results. Histomorphologically, 6 patients fulfilled the criteria for secondary hyperparathyroidism (HT) - 3 with analgetic nephropathy (AN), one with chronic pyelonephritis (CPN), one with vascular nephropathy (VN), one with chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN). Six patients fulfilled the criteria for mixed osteodystrophy (MO) - 3 AN, 2 CGN, one VN. According to laboratory findings and bone mineral density (BMD), a statistically significant difference between HT and MO was present only in AP (Table 1). The most frequent diagnosis in patients with iPTH >900 pg/ml was analgetic nephropathy.

  10. Active and chronic phases of Berger's disease (IgA nephropathy).

    PubMed

    Feltis, J T; Churg, J; Holley, K M; Feiner, H; Gallo, G; Ackad, A S

    1984-03-01

    Berger's disease, or IgA nephropathy, is generally considered as pursuing a chronic course, often with recurrent attacks of gross hematuria or persistent microscopic hematuria. However, little attention has been paid to the acute changes that may accompany this nephropathy, and there are few reports of follow-up renal biopsy studies in these patients. We have had the opportunity to study two patients with Berger's disease (IgA nephropathy) in whom initial and follow-up renal biopsy studies were available. Both of these patients presented clinically with gross hematuria and moderately heavy proteinuria. In both cases, the initial renal biopsy disclosed diffuse mesangial proliferation associated with crescent formation, while follow-up biopsy disclosed only mild mesangial proliferation and no crescents. In one case electron microscopy revealed prominent subendothelial and small mesangial deposits in the initial biopsy, which became almost solely large mesangial in the second biopsy. The other case demonstrated only mesangial deposits in both biopsies.

  11. Concurrent Drug-Induced Linear Immunoglobulin A Dermatosis and Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Seok; Choi, Misoo; Nam, Chan Hee; Kim, Jee Young; Park, Byung Cheol; Kim, Myung Hwa; Hong, Seung Phil

    2015-06-01

    Diseases associated with immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody include linear IgA dermatosis, IgA nephropathy, Celiac disease, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, etc. Although usually idiopathic, IgA antibody is occasionally induced by drugs (e.g., vancomycin, carbamazepine, ceftriaxone, and cyclosporine), malignancies, infections, and other causes. So far, only a few cases of IgA bullous dermatosis coexisting with IgA nephropathy have been reported. A 64-year-old female receiving intravenous ceftriaxone and metronidazole for liver abscess had purpuric macules and papules on her extremities. One week later, she had generalized edema and skin rash with bullae and was diagnosed with concurrent linear IgA dermatosis and IgA nephropathy. After steroid treatment, the skin lesion subsided within two weeks, and kidney function slowly returned to normal. As both diseases occurred after a common possible cause, we predict their pathogeneses are associated.

  12. Common Analgesic Agents and Their Roles in Analgesic Nephropathy: A Commentary on the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An association between non-opioid analgesic agents and chronic kidney disease has long been suspected. The presumed development of chronic renal impairment following protracted and excessive use of non-opioid analgesia is known as analgesic nephropathy. Many clinicians accept analgesic nephropathy as a real entity despite the paucity of scientific evidence. This narrative review aims to summarize the literature in the field. The weight of available observational literature suggests that long-term ingestion of paracetamol and combination mixtures of aspirin and paracetamol are likely to contribute to chronic renal impairment. However, there is no convincing data to implicate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or aspirin monotherapy in the development of analgesic nephropathy. In the absence of high-level evidence, while controversy persists, it may be prudent for physicians to consider all non-narcotic analgesics to be nephrotoxic with long-term use. PMID:27900067

  13. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration.

  14. [Diagnostic value of IgG subtypes in membranous nephropathy: A case report].

    PubMed

    Asmandar, Safaa; Figuères, Marie-Lucile; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Hummel, Aurélie

    2015-06-01

    The study of immunoglobulin G subtypes constituting immune deposits present in membranous nephropathy is useful to guide diagnosis. IgG4 deposits are more often seen in primitive forms of membranous nephropathy due to autoantibody (anti-phospholipase A2 receptor in a majority of cases). These deposits are polytypic. In secondary forms, deposits are constituted of IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman whose renal biopsy, done for glomerular proteinuria, shows membranous nephropathy with monotypic IgG4 deposits with no overt hematologic malignancy and no anti-PLA2R antibodies.

  15. A case of IgA nephropathy in three sisters with thin basement membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Suzuki, J; Suzuki, S; Kume, K; Suzuki, H; Hujiki, T

    1998-01-01

    IgA nephropathy associated with thin basement membrane disease is reported in a 9-year-old female. The diagnosis of IgA nephropathy was made by means of an immunofluorescence investigation, which showed generalized diffuse mesangial deposits. Thin basement membrane disease was identified by electron-microscopic investigations, which disclosed thinning of the basement membrane of several capillary loops and prominence of the lamina densa. Her father, elder sister and younger sister were also found to have hematuria and her sisters were diagnosed as having thin basement membrane disease by renal biopsy. Patients with IgA nephropathy have focal thinning of the glomerular basement membrane, but we consider that urinalysis of the family needs to be done for the diagnosis of familial thin basement membrane disease, when diffuse thinning of the glomerular basement membrane is detected in such patients.

  16. Megabladder mouse model of congenital obstructive nephropathy: genetic etiology and renal adaptation.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Kirk M

    2014-04-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy remains one of the leading causes of chronic renal failure in children. The direct link between obstructed urine flow and abnormal renal development and subsequent dysfunction represents a central paradigm of urogenital pathogenesis that has far-reaching clinical implications. Even so, a number of diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic quandaries still exist in the management of congenital obstructive nephropathy. Studies in our laboratory have characterized a unique mutant mouse line that develops in utero megabladder, variable hydronephrosis, and progressive renal failure. Megabladder mice represent a valuable functional model for the study of congenital obstructive nephropathy. Recent studies have begun to shed light on the genetic etiology of mgb (-/-) mice as well as the molecular pathways controlling disease progression in these animals.

  17. Phospholipase A2 receptor positive membranous nephropathy long after living donor kidney transplantation between identical twins.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hisako; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Tojo, Akihiro; Shintani, Yukako; Shimizu, Akira; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-07-01

    Although membranous nephropathy (MN) is a commonly observed cause of post-transplant glomerulonephritis, distinguishing de novo from recurrent MN in kidney allograft is often difficult. Phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) staining is useful for diagnosing recurrent MN in allografts similarly to idiopathic MN in native kidney. No specific treatment strategy has been established for MN, especially when accompanied with HCV infection in kidney transplant recipients. This report describes a 66-year-old man who was diagnosed as having PLA2R positive membranous nephropathy accompanied with already-known IgA nephropathy and HCV infection 26 years after kidney transplantation conducted between identical twins. PLA2R was detected along capillary loops, implying that this patient is affected by the same pathogenic mechanism as idiopathic MN, not secondary MN associated with other disorders such as HCV infection. The patient successfully achieved clinical remission after steroid therapy.

  18. Effects of vitamin D on renal fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy model rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yanyan; Lv, Guodong; Yang, Ye; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Rui; Zhu, Jia; Xiao, Lati; Zhu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effects of vitamin D on renal fibrosis in rat diabetic nephropathy models, as well as the changes and interactions in the expressions of renal fibrogenesis- and inflammation-related genes. Rat diabetic nephropathy models were established by high-fat diets, which were subjected to TGF-β1 manipulation, as well as vitamin D treatment. H&E staining, Masson staining, and TEM detection were performed to assess the effects of vitamin D treatment and/or TGF-β1 manipulation on pathological changes in the renal tissues in these rat diabetic nephropathy models. Immunohistology and real-time PCR were used to evaluate the expressions of TGF-β1, MCP-1, CTGF, and VDR. Histological staining and TEM detection showed that, in both TGF-β1 over-expressed and interfered groups, vitamin D administration alleviated the renal fibrosis, compared with the vehicle treatment. Similar results were observed with the immunohistological staining. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that, when TGF-β1 was over-expressed in diabetic nephropathy, the expressions of MCP-1 and CTGF were also up-regulated, which would be decreased by the treatment of vitamin D. On the other hand, when TGF-β1 was interfered in DN, the expressions of MCP-1 and CTGF were relatively down-regulated, which would be further lowered by vitamin D administration. The mRNA expression of VDR was elevated by vitamin D treatment in these diabetic nephropathy models. Active vitamin D3 and lentivirus-mediated TGF-β1 interference could effectively reduce the renal fibrosis and protect the renal function in diabetic nephropathy rat models, which makes a promising therapeutic strategy for the disease.

  19. The clinical course of IgA nephropathy after kidney transplantation and its management.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Sophia; Panagiotellis, Konstantinos; Melexopoulou, Christine; Boletis, John N

    2017-02-02

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy is one of the most common primary glomerulonephritides worldwide causing end stage renal disease in up to 20-40% of affected patients, nearly two decades post diagnosis. Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with renal failure, secondary to glomerular diseases. However, IgA nephropathy has a strong tendency to recur in the graft, and although initially thought to be a benign condition, several reports of graft loss, due to recurrent IgA nephropathy, there have been over the last three decades. Overall graft survival has been significantly improved in kidney transplantation, as a result of reduced incidence of acute rejection, as more potent and more specific immunosuppressive agents are now available in clinical practice. Thus, the rates of IgA nephropathy and other glomerulonephritides recurrence are expected to increase, since graft survival has been improved. However, the reported incidence of IgA nephropathy recurrence in the graft varies substantially across centers, as a consequence of different levels of interest, diverse biopsy policies and differing durations of follow up, of the published studies. Notably, recurrence rates of patients receiving graft biopsies by clinical indication only, ranges from 13% to 50% with graft loss being between 1.3% and 16%. The aim of this review is to underline important pathogenetic insights of IgA nephropathy, describe the clinical course of the disease after kidney transplantation, with emphasis on the incidence of recurrence and the associated risk factors, and finally provide all available options for its management in transplant recipients.

  20. Proliferative retinopathy predicts nephropathy: a 25-year follow-up study of type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Charlotte; Falk, Christine; Green, Anders; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Grauslund, Jakob

    2012-08-01

    We wanted to examine proliferative retinopathy as a marker of incident nephropathy in a 25-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients and to examine cross-sectional associations between nephropathy and retinopathy in long-term surviving patients of the same cohort. All type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, were identified as of 1 July 1973. One hundred and eighty four patients were examined in 1981-1982 (baseline) and in 2007-2008 (follow-up). The level of retinopathy was graded by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and nine-field digital colour fundus photographs at follow-up. Single spot urine was used to evaluate nephropathy at both examinations. Proliferative retinopathy was present in 29 patients (15.8%) at baseline. At follow-up, these patients were more likely to macroalbuminuria (20.7% vs. 6.5%) than patients without proliferative retinopathy at baseline. In a multivariate logistic regression adjusted for baseline age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, HbA(1,) systolic and diastolic blood pressure, odds ratio of nephropathy (micro- and macroalbuminuria combined) was 2.98 (95% confidence interval 1.18-7.51, p = 0.02) for patients with proliferative retinopathy at baseline as compared to those without. At follow-up, there was a close relation between retinopathy and nephropathy. The level of macroalbuminuria was 4.3, 4.6 and 13.0% for patients with no or mild non-proliferative retinopathy, moderate non-proliferative retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy, respectively. In conclusion, proliferative retinopathy is an independent marker of long-term nephropathy in type 1 diabetes. Upcoming studies should examine whether these microvascular complications are also causally linked in type 1 diabetes.

  1. Screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with diabetes: a nationwide survey in Korea.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sang-Ho; Ma, Seung Hyun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Jung, Kyu-Won; Park, Boyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify factors associated with screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed. Of 24,871 participants, 1,288 patients diagnosed with diabetes at ≥30 years of age were included. 36.3% received screening for diabetic retinopathy, and 40.5% received screening for diabetic nephropathy during the previous year. Patients living in rural areas, those with less education, those who had not received education about diabetes care, and those who did not receive medical care for diabetes were screened less often for retinopathy or nephropathy. Patients with poorer self-reported health status were screened more often. Occupation, smoking status, and diabetes duration were associated with retinopathy screening. Lower family income was associated with decreased nephropathy screening. Receiving education about diabetes care and receiving medical care for diabetes were significant factors in patients with a shorter duration of diabetes (the significant odds ratio [OR] of not receiving education varied between 0.27 and 0.51, and that of not receiving medical care varied between 0.34 and 0.42). Sociodemographic factors and health-related factors as well as education and medical care influenced screening for diabetic complications among those with a longer duration of diabetes (for retinopathy and nephropathy, the significant OR of living in a rural area varied between 0.56 and 0.61; for retinopathy, the significant OR of current smokers was 0.55, and the p-trend of subjective health status was <0.001; for nephropathy, the significant OR of a monthly household income of <3000 dollars was 0.61 and the p-trends of education and subjective health status were 0.030 and 0.007, respectively). Efforts to decrease sociodemographic disparities should be combined with education about diabetes care to increase the screening, especially for those with a

  2. Metformin attenuates streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in rats through modulation of oxidative stress genes expression.

    PubMed

    Alhaider, Abdulqader A; Korashy, Hesham M; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Mobark, Mohammed; Kfoury, Hala; Mansour, Mahmoud A

    2011-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion and/or action. One of the most important complications of this metabolic disease is diabetic nephropathy. Hyperglycemia promotes oxidative stress and hence generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Recent studies have established that metformin, an oral hypoglycemic drug, possesses antioxidant effects. However, whether metformin can protect against diabetic nephropathy has not been reported before. The overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential nephroprotective effect of metformin in a rat diabetic nephropathy model and explore the exact underlying mechanism(s) involved. The effect of metformin on the biochemical changes associated with hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin was investigated in rat kidney tissues. In addition, energy nucleotides (AMP and ATP), and Acetyl-CoA in the kidney homogenates and mitochondria, and the mRNA expression of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory mediators were assessed. Our results showed that treatment of normoglycemic rats with metformin caused significant increase in ATP, Acetyl-CoA, and CoA-SH contents in kidney homogenates and mitochondria along with profound decrease in AMP level. On the other hand, treatment of diabetic nephropathy rats with metformin normalized all biochemical changes and the energy status in kidney tissues. At the transcriptional levels, metformin treatment caused significant restoration in diabetic nephropathy-induced oxidative stress mRNA levels, particularly GSTα, NQO1, and CAT genes, whereas inhibited TNF-α and IL-6 pro-inflammatory genes. Our data lend further credence for the contribution of metformin in the nephroprotective effect in addition to its well known hypoglycemic action.

  3. New Experimental Models of Diabetic Nephropathy in Mice Models of Type 2 Diabetes: Efforts to Replicate Human Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Riera, Marta; Batlle, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. The use of experimental models of DN has provided valuable information regarding many aspects of DN, including pathophysiology, progression, implicated genes, and new therapeutic strategies. A large number of mouse models of diabetes have been identified and their kidney disease was characterized to various degrees. Most experimental models of type 2 DN are helpful in studying early stages of DN, but these models have not been able to reproduce the characteristic features of more advanced DN in humans such as nodules in the glomerular tuft or glomerulosclerosis. The generation of new experimental models of DN created by crossing, knockdown, or knockin of genes continues to provide improved tools for studying DN. These models provide an opportunity to search for new mechanisms involving the development of DN, but their shortcomings should be recognized as well. Moreover, it is important to recognize that the genetic background has a substantial effect on the susceptibility to diabetes and kidney disease development in the various models of diabetes. PMID:22461787

  4. Successful pregnancy in renal transplant recipient with previous known polyomavirus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Midtvedt, Karsten; Bjorang, Ola; Letting, Anne-Sofie

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy after renal transplantation has become increasingly common. Studies in non-immunocompromised patients have shown that pregnant women have increased susceptibility to infection or reactivation of latent virus such as BK virus. To what extent a renal transplant recipient is at risk for reactivation of polyoma virus during pregnancy remains unknown. We hereby report successful pregnancy outcome in a renal transplant recipient with a known history of BK virus nephropathy treated with cidofovir i.v. To our knowledge, this is the first published experience with a successful pregnancy in renal transplant recipients with known history of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy.

  5. Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor–Beta in Diabetic Nephropathy: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanqing; Kataoka Usui, Hitomi; Sharma, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The recognition of the drivers of matrix accumulation as a therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy is accepted by the Nephrology and pharmaceutical community. Interventions focused around Transforming Growth Factor–beta (TGF–β) will likely be an important area of clinical investigation in the near future. Understanding the various pathways involved in stimulating TGF–β in the diabetic kidney is of paramount importance in devising strategies to combat the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review we highlight the major pathways involved in stimulating TGF–β production by elevated glucose and discuss the therapeutic implications. PMID:17418684

  6. Cholestatic jaundice and IgA nephropathy induced by OTC muscle building agent superdrol.

    PubMed

    Jasiurkowski, Beata; Raj, Jaya; Wisinger, David; Carlson, Richard; Zou, Lixian; Nadir, Abdul

    2006-11-01

    Over the counter (OTC) medicines are commonly used in the United States despite a lack of scientific evidence for clinical utility and toxicity associated with their use. A case of jaundice and IgA nephropathy as a consequence of use of a muscle enhancing OTC supplement that was advertised as innocuous with no hormonal activity is described. IgA nephropathy has not been described previously in association with the use of testosterone. The case highlights that, besides adulteration, the misrepresentation of chemicals present in OTC medications and supplements can create confusion and a false sense of security with their use.

  7. Vesicoureteric reflux and reflux nephropathy: from mouse models to childhood disease.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Marie-Lyne; Watt, Christine L; Gupta, Indra R

    2014-04-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital urinary tract defect that predisposes children to recurrent kidney infections. Kidney infections can result in renal scarring or reflux nephropathy defined by the presence of chronic tubulo-interstitial inflammation and fibrosis that is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure. The discovery of mouse models with VUR and with reflux nephropathy has provided new opportunities to understand the pathogenesis of these conditions and may provide insight on the genes and the associated phenotypes that need to be examined in human studies.

  8. Lead nephropathy: In vivo x ray fluorescence (XRF) for assessing body lead stores

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P.; Batuman, V.; Quinless, F.; Williams, F.H. Jr.; Bogden, J.; Schidlovsky, G.; Jones, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EDTA lead mobilization test has proven of value in the diagnosis of renal disease due to lead (lead nephropathy) but is unsuitable for large scale studies in patients with end-stage renal disease. A rapid, safe, non-invasive technique for determining body lead stores by in vivo tibial x ray fluorescence (XRF) is described. These studies show that the chelation test can be replaced by in vivo XRF in patients with end-stage renal disease. XRF, for the first time, will permit epidemiologic studies of large populations which may be at risk for lead nephropathy from excessive exposure to environmental lead. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Effect of concomitant administration of coenzyme Q10 with sitagliptin on experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Rajesh; Balaraman, Ramachandran; Sen, Ashim Kumar; Shukla, Disha; Seth, Avinash

    2017-11-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of coenzyme Q10 and its combination with sitagliptin in experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy. The diabetic rats were treated with coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin and their concomitant administration. Various parameters of renal function like serum creatinine, urea, uric acid and markers of oxidative stress such as renal malondialdehyde content (MDA), glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase activities were measured. TNF-α, TGF-β, MPO activity and nitrite content were estimated in renal tissue with histopathological observation. Diabetic rats showed a significant reduction in renal function, which was reflected with an increase in serum creatinine, urea and uric acid levels. Streptozotocin-nicotinamide caused renal tubular damage with a higher MDA level, depletion of SOD and CAT activity and GSH level. In addition, TNF-α, TGF- β, MPO activity and nitrite content were significantly increased in diabetic rats. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin and their co-administration ameliorated STZ-nicotinamide-induced renal damage which was reflected by decreased oxidative stress, TNF-α, TGF-β, MPO activity, nitrite content along with histopathological changes. To conclude, concomitant administration of coenzyme Q10 and sitagliptin showed a better renoprotective effect than coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin when given alone.

  10. Prevalence and Management of Diabetic Nephropathy in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) often results in end-stage renal disease, and this is the most common reason for initiation of dialysis in the United States. Complications of diabetes, particularly renal disease, substantially increase the risk of subsequent severe illness and death. The prevalence of DN is still rising dramatically, with concomitant increases in associated mortality and cardiovascular complications. Summary Renal involvement in type 1 and type 2 diabetes reflects a complex pathogenesis. Various genetic and environmental factors determine the susceptibility and progression to advanced stages of the disease. DN should be considered in patients who have had type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years with microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. The glomerular characteristic features include mesangial expansion, thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. The optimal therapy of DN continues to evolve. For all diabetic patients, practical management including blood glucose and blood pressure control with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering the dietary protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Key Message DN is a complex disease linking hemodynamic and metabolic pathways with oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. We summarize the current evidence of epidemiology, clinical diagnosis, and the current management of DN in Western countries. Facts from East and West The prevalence of DN is increasing in Asia and Western countries alike. The deletion (D) allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene is associated with progression to end-stage renal disease in Asian patients with DN, but this association is

  11. Membranous nephropathy: integrating basic science into improved clinical management.

    PubMed

    Cattran, Daniel C; Brenchley, Paul E

    2017-03-01

    Idiopathic membranous nephropathy (INM) remains a common cause of the nephrotic syndrome in adults. The autoimmune nature of IMN was clearly delineated in 2009 with the identification of the glomerular-deposited IgG to be a podocyte receptor, phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in 70% to 75% of cases. This anti-PLA2R autoantibody, predominantly the IgG4 subclass, has been quantitated in serum using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and has been used to aid diagnosis and monitor response to immunosuppressive therapy. In 2014, a second autoantigen, thrombospondin type 1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A), was identified. Immunostaining of biopsy specimens has further detected either PLA2R or THSD7A antigen in the deposited immune complexes in 5% to 10% of cases autoantibody seronegative at the time of biopsy. Therefore, the term IMN should now be superseded by the term primary or autoimmune MN (AMN) (anti-PLA2R or anti-THSD7A positive) classifying ∼80% to 90% of cases previously designated IMN. Cases of secondary MN associated with other diseases show much lower association with these autoantibodies, but their true incidence in secondary cases still needs to be defined. How knowledge of the autoimmune mechanism and the sequential measurement of these autoantibodies is likely to change the clinical management and trajectory of AMN by more precisely defining its diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment is discussed. Their application early in the disease course to new and old therapies will provide additional precision to AMN management. We also review innovative therapeutic approaches on the horizon that are expected to lead to our ultimate goal of improved patient care in A(I)MN.

  12. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  13. Development of Animal Models of Human IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Yusuke; Novak, Jan; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world. IgAN is characterized by the mesangial accumulation of immune complexes containing IgA1, usually with co-deposits of complement C3 and variable IgG and/or IgM. Although more than 40 years have passed since IgAN was first described, the mechanisms underlying the disease development are not fully understood. Small-animal experimental models of IgAN can be very helpful in studies of IgAN, but development of these models has been hindered by the fact that only humans and hominoid primates have IgA1 subclass. Thus, multiple models have been developed, that may be helpful in studies of some specific aspects of IgAN. These models include a spontaneous animal model of IgAN, the ddY mouse first reported in 1985. These mice show mild proteinuria without hematuria, and glomerular IgA deposits, with a highly variable incidence and degree of glomerular injury, due to the heterogeneous genetic background. To obtain a murine line consistently developing IgAN, we intercrossed an earlyonset group of ddY mice, in which the development of IgAN includes mesangial IgA deposits and glomerular injury. After selective intercrossing for >20 generations, we established a novel 100% early-onset grouped ddY murine model. All grouped ddY mice develop proteinuria within eight weeks of age. The grouped ddY mouse model can be a useful tool for analysis of multiple aspects of the pathogenesis of IgAN and may aid in assessment of some approaches for the treatment of IgAN. PMID:25722731

  14. [Diabetic nephropathy and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in urine samples].

    PubMed

    Torii, Kunio; Kimura, Hideki; Li, Xuan; Okada, Toshiharu; Imura, Toshio; Oida, Koji; Miyamori, Isamu; Furusaki, Fumio; Ono, Tomoko; Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2004-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may contribute to renal fibrosis because of its involvement in matrix (ECM) accumulation through inhibition of plasmin-dependent ECM degradation. The aim of this study is to determine urinary PAI-1 concentrations and its intrarenal localization in patients with various renal diseases and to identify inducers for PAI-1 expression in human cultured proximal renal tubular cells (HRCs). Urinary PAI-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with overt diabetic nephropathy (DN, n=36) than in proliferative glomerulonephritis (PGN, n=8), nephrotic syndrome (NS, n=10) and healthy controls (n=12). Urinary PAI-1 concentrations (ng/gCr) were directly correlated with urinary N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG) levels (r=0.58, p<0.05). As for intrarenal localization of PAI-1 antigen, strong stainings for PAI-1 were observed in proximal tubular cells of renal biopsy samples from patients with DN, while no stainings for PAI-1 were found in renal tissues of PGN or NS. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of PAI-1 protein in whole cell lyzates from HRCs grown to semiconfluency. Exposure of growth-arrested HRCs with hypoxia (1% O2) or TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) for 24 hours increased the secretion rate of PAI-1 protein by about 2.0-fold, while 24-hour treatment with high glucose (450 mg/dl) did not increase PAI-1 secretion at all, compared with that of the control cells under normal glucose (100 mg/dl) and normoxia (18% O2). These findings suggest that PAI-1 expression is upregulated especially in the proximal renal tubular cells of DN, which may be explained partially by hypoxia and inflammatory cytokines but not high glucose.

  15. Rap1 Ameliorates Renal Tubular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Zhu, Xuejing; Yang, Shikun; Liu, Fuyou; Zhou, Zhiguang; Zhan, Ming; Xie, Ping; Zhang, Dongshan; Li, Jun; Song, Panai; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Sun, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Rap1b ameliorates high glucose (HG)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular cells. However, its role and precise mechanism in diabetic nephropathy (DN) in vivo remain unclear. We hypothesize that Rap1 plays a protective role in tubular damage of DN by modulating primarily the mitochondria-derived oxidative stress. The role and precise mechanisms of Rap1b on mitochondrial dysfunction and of tubular cells in DN were examined in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes that have Rap1b gene transfer using an ultrasound microbubble-mediated technique as well as in renal proximal epithelial tubular cell line (HK-2) exposed to HG ambiance. The results showed that Rap1b expression decreased significantly in tubules of renal biopsies from patients with DN. Overexpression of a constitutively active Rap1b G12V notably ameliorated renal tubular mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the kidneys of STZ-induced rats, which was accompanied with increased expression of transcription factor C/EBP-β and PGC-1α. Furthermore, Rap1b G12V also decreased phosphorylation of Drp-1, a key mitochondrial fission protein, while boosting the expression of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidants in HK-2 cells induced by HG. These effects were imitated by transfection with C/EBP-β or PGC-1α short interfering RNA. In addition, Rap1b could modulate C/EBP-β binding to the endogenous PGC-1α promoter and the interaction between PGC-1α and catalase or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, indicating that Rap1b ameliorates tubular injury and slows the progression of DN by modulation of mitochondrial dysfunction via C/EBP-β–PGC-1α signaling. PMID:24353183

  16. Immunopathological predictors of prognosis in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by the expansion of the glomerular mesangial matrix with mesangial cell proliferation and/or mononuclear cell infiltration. Glomeruli typically contain generalized diffuse granular mesangial deposits of IgA (mainly galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1), IgG and C3. Electron-dense deposits are observed in the glomerular mesangial area and glomerular basement membrane. Therefore, this disease is considered to be an immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. The detailed observations of electron-dense deposits are of value for the evaluation of the disease activity. The evidence- and lumped-system-based histological classification can identify the magnitude of the risk of disease progression and is useful for predicting long-term renal outcome in this disease. A study of IgAN patients showed that the number of angiotensin-II-positive cells was correlated with mast cells containing both tryptase and chymase and containing only tryptase in the interstitial lesions with the most severe pathological changes. Hypercomplementemia occurs in the progression of IgAN and is controlled by an increase of complement regulatory proteins. The measurement of urinary levels of membrane attack complex and factor H and extraglomerular C3 deposition could be useful indicators of renal injury in patients with IgAN. Development of glomerulosclerosis in IgAN patients is associated with podocytopenia and the alteration of the podocyte components, i.e. podocalyxin and dendrin. It appears that the number of urinary podocytes and levels of urinary podocalyxin are useful for predicting histological changes in IgAN patients. A positive correlation was observed between acute extracapillary changes and the number of dendrin-positive nuclei per glomerulus in patients with IgAN. It is concluded that there are many immunopathological predictors of prognosis, including genetic background, in this disease. Thus, the early diagnostic screening of prognosis

  17. Urinary Podocalyxin as a Biomarker to Diagnose Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakatochi, Masahiro; Akiyama, Shin’ichi; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kurosawa, Hiroyuki; Hirayama, Yoshiaki; Katsuno, Takayuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Hara, Masanori; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Background A non-invasive diagnostic marker of membranous nephropathy (MN) is desirable. The urinary level of podocalyxin (PCX) is higher in various glomerular diseases, including MN. The aim of this study was to construct a diagnostic model of MN with the combination of urinary PCX and clinical parameters. Methods We performed this cross-sectional study to construct the diagnostic models for MN by using data and samples from the multicenter kidney biopsy registry of Nagoya University and its affiliated hospitals. Urinary (u-) PCX was measured by sandwich ELISA. We constructed 3 types of diagnostic models in 105 training samples: u-PCX univariate model, the combined model of clinical parameters other than u-PCX (clinical model), and the combined model of both u-PCX and clinical parameters (combined model). We assessed the clinical usefulness of the diagnostic models through the comparison of c-statistics and decision curve analysis (DCA) in 209 validation samples. Results The clinical model consisted of age, glomerular filtration rate, and diabetes mellitus. In the training cohort, the c-statistics were 0.868 [95% CI, 0.799–0.937] in the combined model. In the validation cohort, sensitivity was 80.5% and specificity was 73.5% on the cut-off value. The net benefit of the combined model was better between threshold probabilities of 40–80% in DCA. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated the utility of u-PCX as a diagnostic marker for MN and the clinical usefulness of the diagnostic models, through the combination of u-PCX and clinical parameters including age, glomerular filtration rate, and diabetes mellitus. PMID:27668430

  18. Ibuprofen attenuates nephropathy in streptozotocin‑induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Wu; Zhu, Xia; Cheng, Ya-Qin; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Hao; Yin, Xiao-Xing

    2016-06-01

    Ibuprofen, a commonly administered nonsteroidal anti‑inflammatory therapeutic agent, is also a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ (PPARγ). The present study investigated the effects of ibuprofen on type 1 diabetic nephropathy (DN) in rats, and the potential mechanisms associated with the activation of PPARγ. Diabetic rats were induced through a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin before oral treatment with ibuprofen or pioglitazone for 8 weeks. The 24‑h urine collection was performed for measurement of total protein content. The kidney was fixed in 10% formalin for periodic acid‑Schiff and Masson's trichrome staining. Blood and residual kidney tissue samples were collected to measure the associated biochemical parameters. Chronic ibuprofen treatment decreased urinary protein excretion, blood urea nitrogen, glomerular basement membrane thickening and renal fibrosis, which were accompanied by increases in PPARγ protein expression, glutathione (GSH) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, decreases in cyclooxygenase 2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expressions, as well as a decreased interleukin 1β (IL‑1β) level in the renal cortex of DN rats. Furthermore, the reduced IL‑1β level, increased GSH quantities and stronger SOD activity in the rat serum were evaluated in ibuprofen‑treated diabetic rats and were compared with untreated diabetic rats. Regarding GSH and IL‑1β levels, ibuprofen was identified to be superior to the positive control, pioglitazone, while levels of the other indices were identified to be similar. Thus, ibuprofen was observed to prevent the development of DN, caused by type 1 diabetes, by anti‑inflammatory and anti‑oxidative action, potentially via PPARγ activation.

  19. Characterisation of kidney lesions in early schistosomal-specific nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sobh, M A; Moustafa, F E; Sally, S M; Deelder, A M; Ghoniem, M A

    1988-01-01

    In this work 42 patients with active Schistosoma mansoni infection and renal involvement were examined. Of these, 16 had asymptomatic proteinuria (group I) and 26 had the nephrotic syndrome (group II). Fifteen nonschistosomal patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome were included as control cases (group III). Renal biopsy specimens were obtained from all patients and controls. These were examined by light microscopy (LM), by direct immunofluorescence microscopy using antisera against human IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C4, C1q, and fibrinogen, and by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using monoclonal antibodies directed against the circulating schistosome antigens, circulating anodic antigen (CCA) and circulating cathodic antigen (CCA). Schistosomal-specific deposits were seen in the renal glomeruli in 24 of the 42 schistosomal patients but in none of the 15 control patients. Although schistosomal-specific deposits were seen in seven of the 16 patients presenting with asymptomatic proteinuria, no morphological changes could be seen by LM. On the other hand, schistosomal-specific deposits could be seen in the kidneys of 17 of the 26 patients presenting with the nephrotic syndrome. All but one specimen showed morphological changes when examined by LM. These were consistent with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis in seven, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in five, mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis in two, membranous glomerulonephritis in one, and focal segmental hyalinosis in one patient. The present study clearly suggests that (a) schistosomal-specific nephropathy does exist in human settings, (b) it is an immune complex disease, and (c) CAA and CCA are major responsible antigens.

  20. Biomarkers and targeted new therapies for IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Rosanna

    2017-05-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) has variable clinical presentation and outcome. There is a need to identify children who have the potential to progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD). Biomarkers related to the pathogenetic process of IgAN can detect risk factors and identify targets for new therapies. Galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) is a specific biomarker of IgAN and could be the first treatment target. In experimental mice, reduction of IgA1 deposits and hematuria was observed after treatment with a bacterial protease that selectively cleaves human IgA1. Glycan-targeted drugs that may act to neutralize Gd-IgA1 inhibit abnormal enzymatic glycosylation of IgA1 or deplete cells producing Gd-IgA1. The autoimmune response to Gd-IgA1 produces autoantibodies that are sensitive and specific biomarkers of IgAN development and progression and suggests the possible benefits of anti-B cell therapies directed against CD20, B-cell activating factor (BAFF), or B cell receptor, and also proteasome inhibitors. The activation of complement in IgAN offers new biomarkers and the rationale for using complement inhibitors, including eculizumab. Renal pathological features represent sensitive biomarkers of added value over clinical data and may drive steroid therapy in selected cases. Finally, the hypothesis of the involvement of intestinal mucosal immunity in the pathogenesis of IgAN suggests the possibility of avoiding the systemic effect of steroid. Enteric budesonide targeting Peyer's patches at the ileocecal junction is an interesting option that has provided some preliminary favorable results in IgAN. In conclusion, the identification of new biomarkers is a promising area for therapies targeting IgAN in patients at risk of progression.

  1. Ochratoxin A levels in human serum and foods from nephropathy patients in Tunisia: where are you now?

    PubMed

    Hmaissia Khlifa, K; Ghali, R; Mazigh, C; Aouni, Z; Machgoul, S; Hedhili, A

    2012-07-01

    Ochratoxin A is a natural mycotoxin with nephrotoxic properties that can contaminate food products. It has been detected in high amount in human serum collected from nephropathy patients, especially those categorized as having a chronic interstitial nephropathy of unknown etiology. In the present study, ochratoxin A levels were measured in commonly consumed food items and in serum samples from nephropathy and healthy subjects in Tunisia. To assess ochratoxin A, a high performance liquid chromatography method was optimized. The ochratoxin A assay showed very different scales of ochratoxin A serum and food contamination from 0.12 to 1.5 ng/mL and 0.11 to 6.1 ng/g respectively, and in healthy subjects and 0.11 to 33.8 ng/g for food and 0.12 to 3.8 ng/mL for serum in nephropathy patients suffering from chronic interstitial nephropathy of unknown etiology. The disease seems related to ochratoxin A serum levels and food contaminations, since the healthy group was significantly different from the nephropathy group (P<0.001) for both food and serum ochratoxin A contamination. Those results combined with data published already, emphasize the likely endemic aspect of ochratoxin A-related nephropathy occurring in Tunisia.

  2. The relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene polymorphism and diabetic nephropathy in Croatian type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Nives Gojo; Marusić, Srećko; Bozikov, Velimir; Kusec, Rajko; Bacić-Vrca, Vesna; Tadić, Mario

    2013-09-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism has been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic nephropathy in many ethnic groups. In this study, we examined the correlation between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and microalbuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in Croatian patients. 85 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 were recruited. Patients were classified into two groups--with and without diabetic nephropathy according to urinary albumin excretion rate in urine collected during 24 hours. The C677T genotype was determined by real-time PCR analysis. The genotype frequencies were CC 36.5%, CT 42.3% and TT 21.2% in diabetic patients without nephropathy versus CC 39.4%, CT 45.4% and TT 15.2% in those with nephropathy. There was no statistically significant difference in allele distribution between patients with nephropathy and those without (p = 0.788). Our study did not show a correlation between mutations in the MTHFR gene and diabetic nephropathy in Croatian patients. Diabetic nephropathy is influenced by multiple risk factors which can modify the importance of MTHFR polymorphism in its development.

  3. Association of Plasma Adiponectin and Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Georgoulidou, Anastasia; Roumeliotis, Athanasios; Roumeliotis, Stefanos; Giannakopoulou, Efstathia; Papanas, Nikolaos; Passadakis, Ploumis; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Vargemezis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We sought to determine the association between levels of adiponectin and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in patients with diabetic nephropathy as well as their effect on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Methods. Adiponectin and ox-LDL were determined in 25 diabetic patients without nephropathy and 94 patients at different stages of diabetic nephropathy including subjects on hemodialysis. cIMT was measured using real-time B-mode ultrasonography. Results. Plasma adiponectin levels increased significantly with severity of diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.002), on the contrary to ox-LDL which decreased with disease severity (P < 0.001). cIMT was significantly higher at late stages of diabetic nephropathy compared with early stages (P = 0.022). Adiponectin was a significant negative predictor of ox-LDL levels (β = −5.45, P = 0.023), independently of confounding factors. There was no significant correlation between cIMT and adiponectin or ox-LDL either in the total sample population or according to disease staging. Cluster analysis showed that patients with the highest cIMT values, highest levels of adiponectin, and lowest levels of ox-LDL were included in one cluster and all assigned to stage 5 of diabetic nephropathy. Conclusions. There was no significant association between adiponectin or ox-LDL and cIMT and, therefore, other factors affecting this surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease in diabetic nephropathy should be sought. PMID:26064982

  4. The efficacy of Aesculus hippocastanum seeds on diabetic nephropathy in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Onur; Erbas, Oytun; Yigitturk, Gurkan

    2016-10-01

    Cytokines, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-ß1, and increased oxidative stress are considered to be responsible for the development of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesized that Aesculus hippocastanum (AH) seeds may have preventive effects on oxidative stress and TGF-β-related diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy in rats. Twenty-one male Sprague-Dawley albino rats were divided into three groups (n=7). Except for the control group, they all had diabetic nephropathy induced by an intraperitoneal injection of STZ. While the diabetes group did not receive any medication, the diabetes+AH group was given the medication for 4 weeks. After the experiment, analyses were performed to evaluate the glomerular area, severity of sclerosis, and fibronectin immunoexpression, as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), TGF-β, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), blood glucose, creatinine, and proteinuria. It was found that glomerular area, severity of sclerosis, fibronectin immunoexpression, and levels of MDA, TGF-β, BUN, creatinine, and proteinuria were decreased in the diabetes+AH group. It is known that diabetic nephropathy is induced, to a large extent, by hyperglycemia. In the present study, AH extract ameliorated diabetic nephropathy without decrease in blood glucose levels. In the study, AH seeds showed beneficial effects on the functional properties of the kidney and microscopic improvements in diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Label-free quantitative urinary proteomics identifies the arginase pathway as a new player in congenital obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

  6. Label-free Quantitative Urinary Proteomics Identifies the Arginase Pathway as a New Player in Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25205225

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is not related to the incidence of diabetic nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Zhang, Chuan; Li, Li; Bi, Chun-Shan; Song, Xin; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2012-11-12

    To analyze the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the incidence of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, the incidence of diabetic nephropathy was assessed in 413 type 2 diabetic patients, by testing the 24 h urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER). The NAFLD was diagnosed based on patient's medical history and liver ultrasound. The difference in diabetic nephropathy incidence between patients with and without NAFLD was tested by X². Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the factors associated with diabetic nephropathy among type 2 diabetic patients. Total 363 out of 413 type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. The incidences of NAFLD and diabetic nephropathy in participants were approximately 56% (202/363) and 38% (137/363) respectively, and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy between patients with and without NAFLD (37.1% vs. 38.5%, p = 0.787). The duration of diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.014--1.120, p = 0.012), waist circumference (OR 1.077, 95% CI 1.040--1.116, p = 0.000), and fasting blood glucose (FBG; OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023--1.1262, p = 0.017) were significantly associated with diabetic nephropathy, whereas sex, high blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and ankle brachial pressure index (ABI) were not significantly associated with the disorder. The present results suggest that NAFLD is not related to the incidence of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes, but the duration of diabetes, waist circumference, and FBG are important factors for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes.

  8. A Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Structure on the Induction of Male Rat Nephropathy and Metabolic Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-31

    i AEOSRTR- 9 3 0 7 51 I AD-A270 969 I A STUDY OF THE EFFECt OF HYDROCARBON STRUCT7URE ON THE INDUCTION OF MALE RAT NEPHROPATHY AND METABOLIC...AFOSR 89-0396 INDUCTION OF MALE RATE NEPHROPATHY AND METABOLIC 61102F STRUCTURE 2312 • AU N@ ’ AS Dr M. Paul Serve’ Department of Chemistry Ih UK...Sumte By M. Pau Serve’ iila I I I A STUDY OF THE EFFECT• OF HYDROCARBON STRUCTURE ON THE INDUCTION OF MALE RAT NEPHROPATHY AND METABOLIC m STRUCTURE I

  9. Biotransformation effect of Bombyx Mori L. may play an important role in treating diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, La; Li, Yin; Guo, Xin-Feng; Liu, Xu-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Compared with herbal drugs, medicine processed from animals (animal medicine) was thought to have more bioactive substances and higher activities. Biotransformation effect often plays an important role in their effect. However, researches about effect of animal medicine on diabetic nephropathy and applying animal medicine as natural bio-transformer were seldom reported. The purpose of this paper was to reveal the use of Bombyx Mori L. on diabetic nephropathy from ancient to modern times. The classical literature indicated that Saosi Decoction (), which contains Bombyx Mori L. or silkworm cocoon, was applied to treat disorders congruent with modern disease diabetic nephropathy from the Ming to Qing Dynasty in ancient China. Modern studies showed that Bombyx Mori L. contains four main active constituents. Among these, 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ) and quercetin showed promising potential to be new agents in diabetic nephropathy treatment. The concentrations of 1-DNJ and the activities of quercetin in Bombyx Mori L. are higher than in mulberry leaves, because of the biotransformation in the Bombyx Mori L. body. However, these specifific components need further human and mechanistic studies to determine their therapeutic potential for this challenging condition.

  10. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  11. Ameliorating Effect of Gemigliptin on Renal Injury in Murine Adriamycin-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin Yeong; Kim, Jin Sug; Kim, Yang Gyun; Moon, Ju-Young; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun Gyoo

    2017-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have shown the antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory potential of DPP-IV inhibitor in experimental models of renal injury. We tested whether DPP-IV inhibitor (gemigliptin) ameliorates renal injury by suppressing apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in mice with adriamycin nephropathy. Methods. Mice were treated with normal saline (control), gemigliptin (GM), adriamycin (ADR), or adriamycin combined with gemigliptin (ADR+GM). Apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress were analyzed via western blotting, real-time PCR, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence. Results. In the ADR+GM group, urine albumin creatinine ratio decreased significantly compared with that in the ADR group on day 15. Glomerulosclerosis index and tubulointerstitial injury index in mice with adriamycin-induced nephropathy decreased after gemigliptin treatment. ADR group showed higher levels of apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress-related molecules compared with the control group. The upregulation of these molecules was significantly reduced by gemigliptin. In the ADR group, the staining intensities of WT-1 and nephrin reduced, but these changes were ameliorated in the ADR+GM group. Conclusion. We demonstrated that gemigliptin ameliorates nephropathy by suppressing apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in mice administered adriamycin. Our data demonstrate that gemigliptin has renoprotective effects on adriamycin-induced nephropathy. PMID:28326327

  12. Effects of exogenous desmopressin on a model of heat stress nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Milagres, Tamara; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Kuwabara, Masanari; Jensen, Thomas; Song, Zhilin; Bjornstad, Petter; Garcia, Gabriela E; Sato, Yuka; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    Recurrent heat stress and dehydration have recently been shown experimentally to cause chronic kidney disease (CKD). One potential mediator may be vasopressin, acting via the type 2 vasopressin receptor (V2 receptor). We tested the hypothesis that desmopressin accelerates CKD in mice subjected to heat stress and recurrent dehydration. Recurrent exposure to heat with limited water availability was performed in male mice over a 5-wk period, with one group receiving desmopressin two times daily and the other group receiving vehicle. Two additional control groups were not exposed to heat or dehydration and received vehicle or desmopressin. The effects of the treatment on renal injury were assessed. Heat stress and recurrent dehydration induced functional changes (albuminuria, elevated urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated protein), glomerular changes (mesangiolysis, matrix expansion), and tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammation). Desmopressin also induced albuminuria, glomerular changes, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in normal animals and also exacerbated injury in mice with heat stress nephropathy. Both heat stress and/or desmopressin were also associated with activation of the polyol pathway in the renal cortex, likely due to increased interstitial osmolarity. Our studies document both glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury and inflammation in heat stress nephropathy and may be clinically relevant to the pathogenesis of Mesoamerican nephropathy. Our data also suggest that vasopressin may play a role in the pathogenesis of the renal injury of heat stress nephropathy, likely via a V2 receptor-dependent pathway.

  13. Toward Noninvasive Diagnosis of IgA Nephropathy: A Pilot Urinary Metabolomic and Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Neprasova, Michaela; Suchanek, Miloslav; Tesar, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is diagnosed by renal biopsy, an invasive procedure with a risk of significant complications. Noninvasive approaches are needed for possible diagnostic purposes and especially for monitoring disease activity or responses to treatment. In this pilot project, we assessed the utility of urine samples as source of biomarkers of IgA nephropathy. We used spot urine specimens from 19 healthy controls, 11 patients with IgA nephropathy, and 8 renal-disease controls collected on day of renal biopsy. Urine samples were analyzed using untargeted metabolomic and targeted proteomic analyses by several experimental techniques: liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, immunomagnetic isolation of target proteins coupled with quantitation by mass spectrometry, and protein arrays. No single individual biomarker completely differentiated the three groups. Therefore, we tested the utility of several markers combined in a panel. Discriminant analysis revealed that combination of seven markers, three metabolites (dodecanal, 8-hydroxyguanosine, and leukotriene C4), three proteins (α1-antitrypsin, IgA-uromodulin complex, and galactose-deficient IgA1), and heparan sulfate, differentiated patients with IgA nephropathy from patients with other renal diseases and healthy controls. Future studies are needed to validate these preliminary findings and to determine the power of these urinary markers for assessment of responses to therapy. PMID:27799660

  14. Protective effect of yacon leaves decoction against early nephropathy in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Honoré, Stella M; Cabrera, Wilfredo M; Genta, Susana B; Sánchez, Sara S

    2012-05-01

    Nephropathy is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Prevention of this complication has a major relevance. Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) leaves have been shown to ameliorate hyperglycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. We examined the beneficial effects of yacon leaves decoction on diabetic nephropathy and explored the possible underlying action mechanism. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were orally administered 10% yacon leaves water decoction (70mg dry extract/kg body weight) once a day for 4weeks. Biochemical parameters in blood and urine were analyzed and immunohistochemistry staining, western immunoblotting and qRT-PCR were assessed. Yacon decoction significantly decreased high blood glucose level in diabetic rats and improved insulin production. Diabetic-dependent alterations in urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance, kidney hypertrophy and basement membrane thickening were attenuated by yacon decoction. These findings were associated with a marked decrease in TGF-β1/Smad2/3 signaling. The expression of molecular markers of diabetic nephropathy such as collagen IV, laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen III were also diminished in the yacon-treated group compared to control diabetic group. These results suggest that yacon leaves decoction is a protective agent against renal damage in diabetic nephropathy, whose action can be mediated by TGF-β/Smads signals.

  15. Recommendations and guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Fabry nephropathy in adults.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Oliveira, João P; Wanner, Christoph; Brenner, Barry M; Waldek, Stephen; Warnock, David G

    2008-06-01

    Progressive loss of kidney function complicates Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder that arises from deficiency of alpha-galactosidase activity. Heterozygous females with Fabry disease can be as severely affected as hemizygous males, who have the classic form of the disease. Enzyme-replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-galactosidase clears the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide from kidney cells, and can stabilize renal function in adults with mild to moderate Fabry nephropathy. However, adults with more advanced nephropathy and overt proteinuria do not respond as well. For these patients, antiproteinuric therapy given in conjunction with enzyme-replacement therapy might prevent further decline in kidney function. In this Review, we propose guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of Fabry nephropathy in adults, based on published data and on the consensus of opinion of participants in the 7(th) International Fabry Nephropathy Roundtable in 2007. These organ-specific guidelines could be easier to implement than general guidelines, provided they are used in the context of an overall multisystem care approach.

  16. Carvedilol Ameliorates Early Diabetic Nephropathy in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morsy, Mohamed A.; Ibrahim, Salwa A.; Amin, Entesar F.; Kamel, Maha Y.; Abdelwahab, Soha A.; Hassan, Magdy K.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy results in end-stage renal disease. On the other hand, carvedilol has been reported to have various pharmacological properties. The aim of this study therefore is to evaluate the possible protective effect of carvedilol on streptozotocin-induced early diabetic nephropathy and various mechanisms underlie this effect in rats. Single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) was administered to induce early diabetic nephropathy in Wistar rats. Oral administration of carvedilol at a dose level of 1 and 10 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks resulted in nephroprotective effect as evident by significant decrease in serum creatinine level, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, and kidney index as well as renal levels of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and cyclooxygenase-2 with a concurrent increase in creatinine clearance and renal reduced glutathione level compared to diabetic untreated rats. The protective effect of carvedilol was confirmed by renal histopathological examination. The electron microscopic examination indicated that carvedilol could effectively ameliorate glomerular basement membrane thickening and podocyte injury. In conclusion, carvedilol protects rats against streptozotocin-induced early diabetic nephropathy possibly, in part, through its antioxidant as well as anti-inflammatory activities, and ameliorating podocyte injury. PMID:24991534

  17. Can intensive treatment alter the progress of established diabetic nephropathy to end-stage renal failure?

    PubMed

    Feest, T G; Dunn, E J; Burton, C J

    1999-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is now the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in the Western world, and is associated with a higher patient morbidity and mortality than other causes of renal failure, largely because of associated cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have elucidated the factors which influence its onset and progression. The St Vincent Declaration in 1994 proposed standards for the appropriate management of patients with diabetic nephropathy. We assessed whether referral to a nephrology clinic attempting to apply these standards influenced the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The results show a significant improvement in blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin and serum cholesterol following referral. There was a significant reduction in the rate of decline of renal function following referral in 39% of patients. With the possible exception of diabetic control there were no significant differences in the management of those that did and did not show improvement. The results show that with intensive out-patient clinic monitoring it is possible to improve the quality of patient care, and that even in established diabetic nephropathy it is possible to slow the rate of progression to end-stage renal failure.

  18. Case Report: Acute Cerebellar Thrombosis in an Adult Patient with IgM Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Cherry, Mariyam; Awar, Melina

    2015-01-01

    IgM nephropathy is a relatively rare cause of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.1 It was initially described by van de Putte,2 then by Cohen and Bhasin in 1978, as a distinctive feature of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis.2 It is typically characterized by diffuse IgM deposits on the glomeruli and diffuse mesangial hypercellularity. Little is known about the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease.1,3 We describe a patient who presented with nonspecific symptoms of epigastric pain, nausea, and early satiety. Abdominal imaging and endoscopies were unremarkable. She was found to have significant proteinuria (6.4 g/24 hours), hyperlipidemia, and edema consistent with a diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome. Kidney biopsy was performed and confirmed an IgM nephropathy. Less than 2 weeks after her diagnosis of IgM nephropathy, she presented with an acute cerebellar stroke. Thrombophilia is a well-known complication of nephrotic syndrome, but a review of the literature failed to show an association between IgM nephropathy and acute central nervous system thrombosis. PMID:27057296

  19. Text mining of the classical medical literature for medicines that show potential in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Yin; Guo, Xinfeng; May, Brian H; Xue, Charlie C L; Yang, Lihong; Liu, Xusheng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To apply modern text-mining methods to identify candidate herbs and formulae for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Methods. The method we developed includes three steps: (1) identification of candidate ancient terms; (2) systemic search and assessment of medical records written in classical Chinese; (3) preliminary evaluation of the effect and safety of candidates. Results. Ancient terms Xia Xiao, Shen Xiao, and Xiao Shen were determined as the most likely to correspond with diabetic nephropathy and used in text mining. A total of 80 Chinese formulae for treating conditions congruent with diabetic nephropathy recorded in medical books from Tang Dynasty to Qing Dynasty were collected. Sao si tang (also called Reeling Silk Decoction) was chosen to show the process of preliminary evaluation of the candidates. It had promising potential for development as new agent for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. However, further investigations about the safety to patients with renal insufficiency are still needed. Conclusions. The methods developed in this study offer a targeted approach to identifying traditional herbs and/or formulae as candidates for further investigation in the search for new drugs for modern disease. However, more effort is still required to improve our techniques, especially with regard to compound formulae.

  20. Text Mining of the Classical Medical Literature for Medicines That Show Potential in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Yin; Guo, Xinfeng; May, Brian H.; Xue, Charlie C. L.; Yang, Lihong; Liu, Xusheng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To apply modern text-mining methods to identify candidate herbs and formulae for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Methods. The method we developed includes three steps: (1) identification of candidate ancient terms; (2) systemic search and assessment of medical records written in classical Chinese; (3) preliminary evaluation of the effect and safety of candidates. Results. Ancient terms Xia Xiao, Shen Xiao, and Xiao Shen were determined as the most likely to correspond with diabetic nephropathy and used in text mining. A total of 80 Chinese formulae for treating conditions congruent with diabetic nephropathy recorded in medical books from Tang Dynasty to Qing Dynasty were collected. Sao si tang (also called Reeling Silk Decoction) was chosen to show the process of preliminary evaluation of the candidates. It had promising potential for development as new agent for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. However, further investigations about the safety to patients with renal insufficiency are still needed. Conclusions. The methods developed in this study offer a targeted approach to identifying traditional herbs and/or formulae as candidates for further investigation in the search for new drugs for modern disease. However, more effort is still required to improve our techniques, especially with regard to compound formulae. PMID:24744808

  1. Interleukin-20 targets podocytes and is upregulated in experimental murine diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Hsing-Hui; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Wei-Yu; Hou, Ya-Chin; Weng, Yun-Han; Lai, Wei-Ting; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-20, a proinflammatory cytokine of the IL-10 family, is involved in acute and chronic renal failure. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of IL-20 during diabetic nephropathy development. We found that IL-20 and its receptor IL-20R1 were upregulated in the kidneys of mice and rats with STZ-induced diabetes. In vitro, IL-20 induced MMP-9, MCP-1, TGF-β1 and VEGF expression in podocytes. IL-20 was upregulated by hydrogen peroxide, high-dose glucose and TGF-β1. In addition, IL-20 induced apoptosis in podocytes by activating caspase-8. In STZ-induced early diabetic nephropathy, IL-20R1-deficient mice had lower blood glucose and serum BUN levels and a smaller glomerular area than did wild-type controls. Anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody (7E) treatment reduced blood glucose and the glomerular area and improved renal functions in mice in the early stage of STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy. ELISA showed that the serum IL-20 level was higher in patients with diabetes mellitus than in healthy controls. The findings of this study suggest that IL-20 induces cell apoptosis of podocytes and plays a role in the pathogenesis of early diabetic nephropathy. PMID:28360429

  2. Effect of edaravone in diabetes mellitus-induced nephropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Li Xin; Tan, Kelly; Tay, Chai Sze; Teoh, Yi Leng; Akhtar, Shaikh Sohrab; Rupeshkumar, Mani; Chung, Ivy; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Banik, Urmila; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A.; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2016-01-01

    Edaravone, a synthetic-free radical scavenger, has been reported to reduce ischemia-reperfusion-induced renal injury by improving tubular cell function, and lowering serum creatinine and renal vascular resistance. The present study investigated the effect of edaravone in diabetes mellitus-induced nephropathy in rats. A single administration of streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg, i.p.) was employed to induce diabetes mellitus in rats. The STZ-administered diabetic rats were allowed for 10 weeks to develop nephropathy. Mean body weight, lipid alteration, renal functional and histopathology were analysed. Diabetic rats developed nephropathy as evidenced by a significant increase in serum creatinine and urea, and marked renal histopathological abnormalities like glomerulosclerosis and tubular cell degeneration. The kidney weight to body weight ratio was increased. Moreover, diabetic rats showed lipid alteration as evidenced by a signifi cant increase in serum triglycerides and decrease in serum high-density lipoproteins. Edaravone (10 mg/kg, i.p., last 4-weeks) treatment markedly prevented the development of nephropathy in diabetic rats by reducing serum creatinine and urea and preventing renal structural abnormalities. In addition, its treatment, without significantly altering the elevated glucose level in diabetic rats, prevented diabetes mellitus-induced lipid alteration by reducing serum triglycerides and increasing serum high-density lipoproteins. Interestingly, the renoprotective effect of edaravone was comparable to that of lisinopril (5 mg/kg, p.o, 4 weeks, standard drug). Edaravone prevented renal structural and functional abnormalities and lipid alteration associated with experimental diabetes mellitus. Edaravone has a potential to prevent nephropathy without showing an anti-diabetic action, implicating its direct renoprotection in diabetic rats. PMID:27382349

  3. BK virus-specific immunity kinetics: a predictor of recovery from polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, T; Müller, K; Stein, M; Diezemann, C; Sefrin, A; Babel, N; Reinke, P

    2011-11-01

    Impaired BKV-specific immunity is associated with development of BKV-associated nephropathy. Suitable immunological parameters to identify patients at risk, however, are still debated. We monitored 18 kidney-transplant recipients through the course of self-limited BKV-reactivation (n = 11) and BKV-associated nephropathy (n = 7). BKV-specific cellular immunity directed to nonstructural small and Large T-antigen, and structural VP1-3 was analyzed in an interferon-γ Elispot assay. BKV-specific IgM and IgG were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay simultaneously. BKV-specific cellular immunity directed to five BKV-proteins increased significantly from diagnosis to resolution of BKV-reactivation (p < 0.001). Patients with self-limited BKV-reactivation developed BKV-specific T cells without therapeutic interventions, and cleared BKV-reactivation within a median period of 1 month. Patients with BKV-associated nephropathy, however, showed BKV-specific T cells after a median period of 5 months after therapeutic interventions only, and cleared BKV-reactivation after a median period of 8 months. Anti-structural T cells were detected earlier than anti-nonstructural T cells, which coincided with BKV-clearance. Patients with BKV-associated nephropathy showed the highest frequencies of BKV-specific T cells at recovery, the highest increase in BKV-specific IgG and persistence of increased IgM levels (p < 0.05). Our results suggest prognostic values of BKV-specific immune monitoring to identify those patients at risk of BKV-associated nephropathy and to aid in the management of therapeutic interventions.

  4. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Results Proteomic analysis of plasma from a cross-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric, gave rise to 290 peaks clusters of which 16 were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates based on statistical performance, including independent component analysis. Four of the peaks that were discovered have been identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein C1 and cystatin C. Several yet unidentified proteins discovered by this novel approach appear to have more potential as biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of plasma, by confirming the presence of known biomarkers as well as revealing new biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy in plasma in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20205888

  5. Efficacy of captopril in postponing nephropathy in normotensive insulin dependent diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, E R; Hommel, E; Giese, J; Parving, H H

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effectiveness of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy (albuminuria greater than 300 mg/24h). DESIGN--Open randomised controlled study of four years' duration. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--44 normotensive (mean blood pressure 127/78 (SD 12/10) mm Hg) insulin dependent diabetic patients with persistent microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/24h). INTERVENTIONS--The treatment group (n = 21) was initially given captopril (25 mg/24 h). The dose was increased to 100 mg/24 h during the first 16 months and thiazide was added after 30 months. The remaining 23 patients were left untreated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Albuminuria, kidney function, development of diabetic nephropathy (albuminuria greater than 300 mg/24 h), and arterial blood pressure. RESULTS--Clinical and laboratory variables were comparable at baseline. Urinary excretion of albumin was gradually reduced from 82 (66-106) to 57 (39-85) mg/24 h (geometric mean (95% confidence interval)) in the captopril treated group, whereas an increase from 105(77-153) to 166 (83-323) mg/24 h occurred in the control group (p less than 0.05). Seven of the untreated patients progressed to diabetic nephropathy, whereas none of the captopril treated patients developed clinical overt diabetic nephropathy (p less than 0.05). Systemic blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, haemoglobin A1c concentration, and urinary excretion of sodium and urea remained practically unchanged in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS--The findings suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition postpones the development of clinical overt diabetic nephropathy in normotensive insulin dependent diabetic patients with persistent microalbuminuria. PMID:1860008

  6. Immunoglobulin M Nephropathy in a Patient with Wilson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Zoya; Haroon Khan, Asna; Mamoon, Nadira; Bilal, Muhammad; Mujtaba Quadri, Khaja Hameeduddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M nephropathy (IgMN) is characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulin M in a dominant distribution in the renal glomeruli. Primary immunoglobulin M nephropathy is diagnosed after consistent light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy (EM) results, and exclusion of known systemic disorders causing immunoglobulin M deposition in the glomeruli. The secondary disease has been reported with a few conditions though it has never been reported with any primary disease of the liver. We report the case of an adolescent male patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and worsening anasarca. He was found to have nephrotic-range proteinuria that did not respond to conventional corticosteroid treatment. He was subjected to a renal biopsy which revealed a diagnosis of immunoglobulin M nephropathy. His liver function tests were deranged and an ultrasound scan of the abdomen revealed a coarse irregular liver. Workup revealed elevated urine copper excretion and a low ceruloplasmin level. He was diagnosed as a case of Wilson’s disease and started on penicillamine and pyridoxine. He was also started on intravenous cyclophosphamide for the corticosteroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome to which he responded remarkably well. His edema settled, proteinuria resolved, and liver functions normalized. Currently, he is in remission and enjoying good health. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first known association between IgM nephropathy and Wilson’s disease. It is presently not clear if causation can necessarily be established. This may be the result of defective IgM clearance by the liver or an altered metabolism of the antibody or immune complexes, as with hepatic-associated immunoglobulin M (IgM) nephropathy. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of this disease. PMID:28097080

  7. Effect of edaravone in diabetes mellitus-induced nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Varatharajan, Rajavel; Lim, Li Xin; Tan, Kelly; Tay, Chai Sze; Teoh, Yi Leng; Akhtar, Shaikh Sohrab; Rupeshkumar, Mani; Chung, Ivy; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Banik, Urmila; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2016-07-01

    Edaravone, a synthetic-free radical scavenger, has been reported to reduce ischemia-reperfusion-induced renal injury by improving tubular cell function, and lowering serum creatinine and renal vascular resistance. The present study investigated the effect of edaravone in diabetes mellitus-induced nephropathy in rats. A single administration of streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg, i.p.) was employed to induce diabetes mellitus in rats. The STZ-administered diabetic rats were allowed for 10 weeks to develop nephropathy. Mean body weight, lipid alteration, renal functional and histopathology were analysed. Diabetic rats developed nephropathy as evidenced by a significant increase in serum creatinine and urea, and marked renal histopathological abnormalities like glomerulosclerosis and tubular cell degeneration. The kidney weight to body weight ratio was increased. Moreover, diabetic rats showed lipid alteration as evidenced by a signifi cant increase in serum triglycerides and decrease in serum high-density lipoproteins. Edaravone (10 mg/kg, i.p., last 4-weeks) treatment markedly prevented the development of nephropathy in diabetic rats by reducing serum creatinine and urea and preventing renal structural abnormalities. In addition, its treatment, without significantly altering the elevated glucose level in diabetic rats, prevented diabetes mellitus-induced lipid alteration by reducing serum triglycerides and increasing serum high-density lipoproteins. Interestingly, the renoprotective effect of edaravone was comparable to that of lisinopril (5 mg/kg, p.o, 4 weeks, standard drug). Edaravone prevented renal structural and functional abnormalities and lipid alteration associated with experimental diabetes mellitus. Edaravone has a potential to prevent nephropathy without showing an anti-diabetic action, implicating its direct renoprotection in diabetic rats.

  8. Mice deficient in PAPP-A show resistance to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mader, Jessica R; Resch, Zachary T; McLean, Gary R; Mikkelsen, Jakob H; Oxvig, Claus; Marler, Ronald J; Conover, Cheryl A

    2013-10-01

    We investigated pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in diabetic nephropathy. Normal human kidney showed specific staining for PAPP-A in glomeruli, and this staining was markedly increased in diabetic kidney. To assess the possible contribution of PAPP-A in the development of diabetic nephropathy, we induced diabetes with streptozotocin in 14-month-old WT and Papp-A knockout (KO) mice. Renal histopathology was evaluated after 4 months of stable hyperglycemia. Kidneys from diabetic WT mice showed multiple abnormalities including thickening of Bowman's capsule (100% of mice), increased glomerular size (80% of mice), tubule dilation (80% of mice), and mononuclear cell infiltration (90% of mice). Kidneys of age-matched non-diabetic WT mice had similar evidence of tubule dilation and mononuclear cell infiltration to those of diabetic WT mice, indicating that these changes were predominantly age-related. However, thickened Bowman's capsule and increased glomerular size appeared specific for the experimental diabetes. Kidneys from diabetic Papp-A KO mice had significantly reduced or no evidence of changes in Bowman's capsule thickening and glomerular size. There was also a shift to larger mesangial area and increased macrophage staining in diabetic WT mice compared with Papp-A KO mice. In summary, elevated PAPP-A expression in glomeruli is associated with diabetic nephropathy in humans and absence of PAPP-A is associated with resistance to the development of indicators of diabetic nephropathy in mice. These data suggest PAPP-A as a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27(Kip1), p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27(Kip1) at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN.

  10. Association of DDT and heptachlor epoxide in human blood with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Everett, Charles J; Thompson, Olivia M

    2015-01-01

    Six organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites in human blood were tested to determine their relationships with diabetic nephropathy. The data were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004 (unweighted, n=2992, population estimate=133,088,752). The six chemicals were p,p'-DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), p,p'-DDE (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene), beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and heptachlor epoxide. In this research, total diabetes included diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes (glycohemoglobin, A1c ≥6.5%), and nephropathy was defined as a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g, representing microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. The pesticide p,p'-DDT and pesticide metabolite heptachlor epoxide were significantly associated with total diabetes with nephropathy, with odds ratios of 2.08 (95% CI 1.06-4.11) and 1.75 (95% CI 1.05-2.93), respectively. Organochlorine pesticides are thought to act through the constitutive androstane receptor/pregnane X receptor disease pathway, but this is not well established. When p,p'-DDT and heptachlor epoxide were both elevated, the odds ratio for diabetic nephropathy was 2.76 (95% CI 1.31-5.81), and when six of six organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites, were elevated, the odds ratio for diabetic nephropathy was 3.00 (95% CI 1.08-8.36). The differences in the odds ratios for these groups appear to be due to differences in the mean heptachlor epoxide concentration of each category. Organochlorine pesticides and pesticide metabolites are known to have estrogenic, antiestrogenic or antiandrogenic activity. The constitutive androstane receptor/pregnane X receptor pathway is thought to interact with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway, and the associations noted may be due to that interaction.

  11. Susceptibility of podocytes to palmitic acid is regulated by stearoyl-CoA desaturases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Jonas; Weins, Astrid; Kampe, Kapil; Gruber, Stefan; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Cohen, Clemens D; Orellana, Jana M; Mundel, Peter; Jehle, Andreas W

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by dyslipidemia with elevated free fatty acids (FFAs). Loss of podocytes is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy, and podocytes are highly susceptible to saturated FFAs but not to protective, monounsaturated FFAs. We report that patients with diabetic nephropathy develop alterations in glomerular gene expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism, including induction of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1, which converts saturated to monounsaturated FFAs. By IHC of human renal biopsy specimens, glomerular SCD-1 induction was observed in podocytes of patients with diabetic nephropathy. Functionally, the liver X receptor agonists TO901317 and GW3965, two known inducers of SCD, increased Scd-1 and Scd-2 expression in cultured podocytes and reduced palmitic acid-induced cell death. Similarly, overexpression of Scd-1 attenuated palmitic acid-induced cell death. The protective effect of TO901317 was associated with a reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. It was lost after gene silencing of Scd-1/-2, thereby confirming that the protective effect of TO901317 is mediated by Scd-1/-2. TO901317 also shifted palmitic acid-derived FFAs into biologically inactive triglycerides. In summary, SCD-1 up-regulation in diabetic nephropathy may be part of a protective mechanism against saturated FFA-derived toxic metabolites that drive endoplasmic reticulum stress and podocyte death.

  12. IgA nephropathy in Brazil: apropos of 600 cases.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria Fernanda; Caldas, M L R; Dos-Santos, W L C; Sementilli, A; Furtado, P; Araújo, S; Pegas, K L; Petterle, R R; Franco, M F

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is th e commonest primary glomerular disease worldwide. Studies on its prevalence in Brazil are however scarce. Databases and clinical records from 10 reference centres were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and laboratory features at the moment of the biopsy were retrieved (age, gender, presence of hematuria, serum creatinine [mg/dL], proteinuria [g/24 h]). Renal biopsy findings were classified according to Haas single grade classification scheme and the Oxford Classification of IgAN. 600 cases of IgAN were identified, of which 568 (94.7 %) were on native kidneys. Male to female ratio was 1.24:1. Patients averaged 32.76 ± 15.12 years old (range 4-89, median 32). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively in 56.63 and 72.29 % of patients. The association of both these findings occurred in 37.95 % of the cases. Serum creatinine averaged 1.65 ± 0.67 mg/dL (median 1.5 mg/dL) at diagnosis. Segmental sclerosis and mesangial hypercellularity were the main glomerular findings (47.6 and 46.2 %) The commonest combination by Oxford Classification of IgAN, was M0 E0 S0 T0 (22.4 %). Chronic tubulo-interstitial lesions with an extension wider than 25 % of the renal cortex could be identified in 32.2 % of the cases. Tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were more strongly associated with higher 24-h proteinuria and serum creatinine levels. Segmental sclerosis (S1) showed a stronger tendency of association with the presence of tubulo-interstitial lesions (T1 and T2) than other glomerular variables. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest series of IgAN in Brazil. It depicts the main biopsy findings and their possible clinical correlates. Our set of data is comparable to previous reports.

  13. Gene expression profiling in glomeruli of diabetic nephropathy rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Xinhua; Li, Ming; Li, Wenhui; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Huabing; Sun, Xiaofang; Mao, Lili; Xiang, Hongding

    2012-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) as the burden of diabetes increases worldwide. To find improved intervention strategies for this disease, it is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved. To obtain more insight into processes that lead to DN, mRNA expression profiles of diabetic and normal glomeruli from rat kidneys were compared. Rats were divided into a control group and a DN group randomly. The DN group was injected with streptozotocin. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and weight were measured monthly. On the 12th week, blood samples were collected and analyzed for plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Glomeruli were isolated and Illumina Rat Ref-12 V1.0 Expression Beadchip gene array was performed. Quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR) was used to confirm the results of gene array for a selected number of genes. We found FBG, 24-h urinary albumin, serum creatinine and BUN were significantly increased, while urinary creatinine and body weight were significantly decreased in the DN group. Glomeruli from the DN group had 624 genes with differential expression. DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and integrated Discovery) analysis showed that the three most enriched terms were 'cytosol' (GO:0005829), 'translational elongation' (GO:0006414) and 'mitochondion' (GO:0005739). Those genes could be mapped to eight pathways. The most common type of enriched pathway was related to 'extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction'. Other pathways included those for 'ribosome', 'focal adhesion', 'oxidative phosphorylation', 'transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling pathway', 'Parkinson's disease', 'Alzheimer's disease' and 'renin-angiotensin system'. Q-RT-PCR verified that Atp5b (F1-ATPase beta subunit), Col1a1 (collagen type 1 alpha 1), Cox6c (cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc), Ndufs3 (NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] Fe-S protein 3) and Tgfb1 (transforming

  14. Lithium nephrotoxicity: a progressive combined glomerular and tubulointerstitial nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, G S; Radhakrishnan, J; Kambham, N; Valeri, A M; Hines, W H; D'Agati, V D

    2000-08-01

    This study examines the clinical features, pathologic findings, and outcome of 24 patients with biopsy-proven lithium toxicity. The patient population was 50% male, 87.5% Caucasian, and had a mean age of 42.5 yr (range, 26 to 57). Mean duration of lithium therapy for bipolar disorder was 13.6 yr (range, 2 to 25). All patients were biopsied for renal insufficiency (mean serum creatinine 2.8 mg/dl; range, 1.3 to 8.0), with associated proteinuria >1.0 g/d in 41.7%. Nephrotic proteinuria (>3.0 g/d) was present in 25%. Other features included nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 87% and hypertension in 33.3%. Renal biopsy revealed a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy in 100%, with associated cortical and medullary tubular cysts (62.5%) or dilatation (33.3%). All of the renal cysts stained for epithelial membrane antigen, while 51.4% stained with lectin Arachis hypogaea, and only 3.8% stained with Tetragonolobus purpureas, indicating they originated from distal and collecting tubules. The degree of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis was graded as severe in 58.3%, moderate in 37.5%, and mild in 4.2% of cases. There was a surprisingly high prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (50%) and global glomerulosclerosis (100%), sometimes of equivalent severity to the chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The significant degree of foot process effacement (mean 34%, five of 14 cases with >50%) suggests a potential direct glomerular toxicity. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis correlated with proteinuria >1.0 g/d (P = 0.0014, Fisher exact test). Despite discontinuation of lithium, seven of nine patients with initial serum creatinine values >2.5 mg/dl progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Only three patients, all with initial serum creatinine <2.1 mg/dl, had subsequent improvement in renal function. By Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the only significant predictor of progression to ESRD was serum creatinine >2.5 mg/dl at biopsy (P = 0. 008). In conclusion

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68–5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15–11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68–3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10–1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02–1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72–2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16–4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87–2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11–1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  16. Chronic Dietary Exposure to Aristolochic Acid and Kidney Function in Native Farmers from a Croatian Endemic Area and Bosnian Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Karanović, Sandra; Dika, Živka; Kos, Jelena; Dickman, Kathleen; Šekoranja, Maja; Poljičanin, Tamara; Mišić, Maja; Premužić, Vedran; Abramović, Mirta; Matijević, Vesna; Miletić Medved, Marica; Cvitković, Ante; Edwards, Karen; Fuček, Mirjana; Leko, Ninoslav; Teskera, Tomislav; Laganović, Mario; Čvorišćec, Dubravka; Grollman, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Improvements in agricultural practices in Croatia have reduced exposure to consumption of aristolochic acid-contaminated flour and development of endemic (Balkan) nephropathy. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Bosnian immigrants who settled in an endemic area in Croatia 15–30 years ago would be at lower risk of developing endemic nephropathy because of reduced exposure to aristolochic acid. To test this hypothesis, past and present exposure to aristolochic acid, proximal tubule damage as a hallmark of endemic nephropathy, and prevalence of CKD in Bosnian immigrants were analyzed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this cross-sectional observational study from 2005 to 2010, 2161 farmers were divided into groups: indigenous inhabitants from endemic nephropathy and nonendemic nephropathy villages and Bosnian immigrants; α-1 microglobulin-to-creatinine ratio >31.5 mg/g and eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 were considered to be abnormal. Results CKD and proximal tubule damage prevalence was significantly lower in Bosnian immigrants than inhabitants of endemic nephropathy villages (6.9% versus 16.6%; P<0.001; 1.3% versus 7.3%; P=0.003, respectively); 20 years ago, Bosnian immigrants observed fewer Aristolochia clematitis in cultivated fields (41.9% versus 67.8%) and fewer seeds among wheat seeds (6.1% versus 35.6%) and ate more purchased than homemade bread compared with Croatian farmers from endemic nephropathy villages (38.5% versus 14.8%, P<0.001). Both Croatian farmers and Bosnian immigrants observe significantly fewer Aristolochia plants growing in their fields compared with 15–30 years ago. Prior aristolochic acid exposure was associated with proximal tubule damage (odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.58; P=0.02), whereas present exposure was not (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 2.30; P=0.33). Furthermore, immigrant status was an independent negative predictor of proximal tubule damage

  17. Back-regulation of six oxidative stress proteins with grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts in rat diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Ying; Cheng, Mei; Gao, Hai-Qing; Ma, Ya-Bing; Xu, Ling; Li, Xian-Hua; Li, Xiao-Li; You, Bei-An

    2008-05-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. To prevent the development of this disease and to improve advanced kidney injury, effective therapies directed toward the key molecular target are required. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts (GSPE) have been reported to be effective in treating DN, while little is known about the functional protein changes. In this study, we used streptozotocin (STZ) to induce diabetic rats. GSPE (250 mg/kg body weight/day) were administrated to diabetic rats for 24 weeks. Serum glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and advanced glycation end products were determined. Consequently, 2-D difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to investigate kidney protein profiles among the control, untreated and GSPE treated diabetic rats. Twenty-five proteins were found either up-regulated or down-regulated in the kidneys of untreated diabetic rats. Only nine proteins in the kidneys of diabetic rats were found to be back-regulated to normal levels after GSPE therapy. These back-regulated proteins are involved in oxidative stress, glycosylation damage, and amino acids metabolism. Our findings might help to better understanding of the mechanism of DN, and provide novel targets for estimating the effects of GSPE therapy.

  18. Defective immunoglobulin A (IgA) glycosylation and IgA deposits in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kolka, Ragnhildur; Valdimarsson, Helgi; Bodvarsson, Magnus; Hardarson, Sverrir; Jonsson, Thorbjorn

    2013-09-01

    Defective glycosylation and immune complex (IC) formation may be of primary importance in immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether defective IgA1 glycosylation might support renal deposition of IgA and disease activity. IgA was isolated from the serum of 44 IgAN patients and 46 controls and glycosylation analysed by ELISA using glycan-specific lectins. IgA was measured by immunodiffusion and immune complexes by ELISA. IgA subclasses in IC deposits in kidney glomeruli were identified by immunohistochemical methods. A significant increase in N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in terminal position (p = 0.02) observed in some of the IgAN patients, became more pronounced when sialic acid was removed from IgA1, indicating enhanced expression of α-2,6-sialyltransferase in patients compared with controls (p < 0.0001). Patients with defective galactosylation had lower serum IgA than other IgAN patients (p = 0.003). IgAN patients with both IgA1 and IgA2 glomerular deposits (21.7%) had increased GalNAc in terminal position (p = 0.003). Taken together, our results show that increased IgA glycosylation in IgAN associates with low levels of IgA, concomitant IgA1 and IgA2 glomerular deposits and poor clinical outcome.

  19. A novel heterozygous missense mutation in uromodulin gene in an Indian family with familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, D.; Srivastava, P.; Phadke, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN), characterized by early-onset hyperuricemia, reduced fractional excretion of uric acid, and chronic renal failure is caused due to mutation in uromodulin (UMOD) gene. We identified a novel mutation in a family with multiple members affected with FJHN. Ten coding exons of UMOD gene in three family members with clinical and biochemical features of FJHN and one unaffected family member were sequenced, and sequence variants were analyzed for the pathogenicity by bioinformatics studies. A heterozygous novel missense mutation (c. 949 T >G) in exon 5 leading to the replacement of cysteine by glycine at position 317 was identified in all three affected family members. This mutation has not been reported earlier in Human Gene Mutation Database, Human Genome Variation, Clinvar, and 1000 Genome. The mutation lies in the cysteine-rich 2 domain of the protein, and the affected residue is evolutionary conserved in other species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the identification of UMOD mutation in an Indian family. PMID:27795632

  20. Mild to severe lithium-induced nephropathy models and urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in rats.

    PubMed

    Ida, S; Yokota, M; Ueoka, M; Kiyoi, K; Takiguchi, Y

    2001-10-01

    Long-term treatment with lithium induces functional and/or structural disturbances in the kidneys. However, no procedure has been established for the early diagnosis of lithium intoxication. In this study, we prepared mild to severe lithium-induced nephropathy rat models and examined the usefulness of urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) for the early diagnosis of lithium-induced renal insufficiency. Lithium was administered by repeated intraperitoneal injection (1, 2 and 4 mEq/kg/day for 10 days). We also measured the plasma creatinine and paraaminohippuric acid (PAH) clearance, and observed renal histological changes. Lithium pretreatment elevated the plasma creatinine level and decreased PAH clearance in a dose-dependent manner. The NAG level in the lithium 4 mEq/kg group was very high. The levels in the lithium 1 mEq/kg and 2 mEq/kg groups were almost the same and were higher than the control group. A histological examination of the kidney revealed glomerular congestion and/or atrophy and tubular expansion in all of the groups except the control group. These histological changes were dose-dependent. In conclusion, urine NAG may be useful in the early diagnosis of renal side effects caused by lithium therapy. When the urine NAG level becomes high in a patient taking lithium for bipolar disorder, the physician may need to consider lithium-induced renal insufficiency.

  1. Associations between INSR and MTOR polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy in a Northeast Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhu, A N; Yang, X X; Sun, M Y; Zhang, Z X; Li, M

    2015-03-13

    We explored the associations of INSR and mTOR, 2 key genes in the insulin signaling pathway, and the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1799817, rs1051690, and rs2059806) in INSR and 3 SNPs (rs7211818, rs7212142, and rs9674559) in mTOR were genotyped using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform in 89 type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic nephropathy, 134 type 2 diabetes patients with diabetic nephropathy, and 120 healthy control subjects. Statistical analysis based on unconditional logistic regression was carried out to determine the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for each SNP. Combination analyses between rs2059806 and rs7212142 were also performed using the X(2) test and logistic regression. Among these 6 SNPs, 4 (rs1799817, rs1051690, rs7211818, and rs9674559) showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus or diabetic nephropathy. However, rs2059806 in INSR was associated with both type 2 diabetes mellitus (P = 0.033) and type 2 diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.018). The rs7212142 polymorphism in mTOR was associated with type 2 diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.010, OR = 0.501, 95%CI = 0.288- 0.871), but showed no relationship with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Combination analysis revealed that rs2059806 and rs7212142 had a combined effect on susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. Our results suggest that both INSR and mTOR play a role in the predisposition of the Han Chinese population to type 2 diabetic nephropathy, but the genetic predisposition may show some differences.

  2. Lack of Serologic Evidence to Link IgA Nephropathy with Celiac Disease or Immune Reactivity to Gluten

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Sina; Canetta, Pietro A.; Taylor, Annette K.; Arguelles-Grande, Carolina; Snyder, Holly; Green, Peter H.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Alaedini, Armin

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99), unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96), and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30). All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy. PMID:24732864

  3. Efficacy of Leflunomide, Telmisartan, and Clopidogrel for Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Duan, Shu-Wei; Sun, Xue-Feng; Li, Wen-Ge; Wang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Wen-Hu; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Lun, Li-De; Li, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Li, Ji-Jun; Liu, Shu-Wen; Xie, Yuan-Sheng; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ma, Lu; Huang, Wen; Wu, Hua; Jia, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy and safety of telmisartan combined with clopidogrel, leflunomide, or both drugs for immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) are unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of telmisartan combined with clopidogrel, leflunomide, or both drugs for IgAN. Methods: It is a multicenter, prospective, double-dummy randomized controlled trial. Primary IgAN patients were recruited in 13 renal units across Beijing, China, from July 2010 to June 2012. After a 4-week telmisartan (80 mg/d) wash-in, 400 patients continuing on 80 mg/d telmisartan were randomly assigned to additionally receive placebo (Group A), 50 mg/d clopidogrel (Group B), 20 mg/d leflunomide (Group C), or 50 mg/d clopidogrel and 20 mg/d leflunomide (Group D). The 24-week intervention was completed by 360 patients. The primary endpoint was change in 24-h proteinuria at 24 weeks. A linear mixed-effect model was used to analyze the changes at 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate changes in hematuria grade. This trial was registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. Results: The effects of telmisartan combined with leflunomide on changes in proteinuria (0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18–0.55] g/d, P < 0.001), in serum uric acid (76.96 [95% CI 57.44–96.49] μmol/L, P < 0.001), in serum creatinine (9.49 [95% CI 6.54–12.44] μmol/L, P < 0.001), and in estimated glomerular filtration rate (−6.72 [95% CI −9.46 to −3.98] ml∙min−1∙1.73 m−2, P < 0.001) were statistically significant, whereas they were not statistically significant on changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and weight (P > 0.05). Telmisartan combined with clopidogrel had no statistical effect on any outcome, and there was no interaction between the interventions. No obvious adverse reactions were observed. Conclusions: Telmisartan combined with leflunomide, not clopidogrel, is safe and effective for decreasing proteinuria in certain

  4. Na/K citrate versus sodium bicarbonate in prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abouzeid, Sameh Mohamed; ElHossary, Hossam E

    2016-05-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is one of the important complications of radiographic procedures, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is also one of the common causes of acute kidney injury. The pathogenesis is postulated to be the effect of oxygen- free radicals and hyperosmolar stress on the renal medulla. It is reported that the production of superoxide is most active at acid environment. K/Na citrate is well known as a urine alkalinization medium, and this has been evaluated earlier with standard hydration for reduction of CIN and was stated to be efficient. We aimed to determine the efficacy of Na/K citrate in reducing the frequency of CIN in comparison to sodium bicarbonate in patients after coronary angiography. Two hundred and ten patients with renal dysfunction [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or less] who underwent elective or emergency coronary angiography (CAG) with/without percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at our institution were enrolled into the study. The patients were randomized into two groups, Group 1-Taking Na/K citrate and Group 2-Taking sodium bicarbonate. Radiographic contrast agent iohexol was used. Change in creatinine, percent change in creatinine, percent change in eGFR, change in serum potassium, and urine pH were all compared between the two groups. There was no significant difference for prevention of CIN when comparing the Na/K citrate with sodium bicarbonate solution in patients exposed to CAG with or without PCI. Mean absolute change in eGFR after 48 h after administration of contrast between sodium bicarbonate group and Na/K citrate group was -0.60 ± 1.58 versus -0.71 ± 1.38. Serum potassium decreased postprocedure in the sodium bicarbonate group than in the citrate group (3.90 ± 0.33 vs. 4.14 ± 0.39). Both agents are equally effective in reducing the incidence of CIN, but the citrate would possibly be a safer option for patients at risk of hypokalemia.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of Febuxostat Therapy on Adipokines and Markers of Kidney Fibrosis in Asymptomatic Hyperuricemic Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Filipowicz, Rebecca; Wang, Bin; Wei, Guo; Chen, Xiaorui; Roy, Abinash C.; DuVall, Scott L.; Farrukh, Hanadi; Habib, Arsalan N.; Bjordahl, Terrence; Simmons, Debra L.; Munger, Mark; Stoddard, Greg; Kohan, Donald E.; Greene, Tom; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: In observational studies, higher uric acid levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and kidney disease. Objective: The objective of this study is to examine whether reduction of plasma uric acid with febuxostat, a xanthine oxido reductase inhibitor, impacts adipose tissue oxidative stress, adipokines, and markers of systemic inflammation or kidney fibrosis. Design: This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Setting: Academic university setting was used. Patients: Overweight or obese adults with hyperuricemia and type 2 diabetic nephropathy were included. Measurements: Adipose tissue thiobarbituric acid reducing substances (TBARS) and adiponectin concentrations and urinary transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β) were primary endpoints. Plasma C-reactive protein, high molecular weight–adiponectin, interleukin–6, tumor necrosis factor–α, and TBARS and albuminuria were among predefined secondary endpoints. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to febuxostat (n = 40) or matching placebo (n = 40) and followed for 24 weeks. Results: Baseline plasma uric acid levels were 426 ± 83 µmol/L; 95% completed the study. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) declined from 54 ± 17 mL/min/1.73 m2 at baseline to 51 ± 17 mL/min/1.73 m2 at 24 weeks (P = .05). In separate mixed-effects models, compared with placebo, febuxostat reduced uric acid by 50% (P < .001) but had no significant effects on subcutaneous adipose tissue TBARS (−7.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 57.4%-101.4%) or adiponectin (6.7%, 95% CI, 26.0%-53.8%) levels or urinary TGF-β/creatinine ratio (18.0%, 95% CI, 10.0%-54.8%) or secondary endpoints. Limitations: Relatively modest sample size and short duration of follow-up. Conclusions: In this population with progressive diabetic nephropathy, febuxostat effectively reduced plasma uric acid. However, no detectable effects were observed for the prespecified primary or secondary endpoints. Trial Registration

  6. UMOD polymorphism rs12917707 is not associated with severe or stable IgA nephropathy in a large Caucasian cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, as well as in the course of IgA nephropathy progression towards end stage renal failure. UMOD polymorphism rs12917707 is known to associate with end stage renal failure of mixed aetiologies. Methods We tested a large cohort of Caucasian patients for association of rs12917707 with IgA nephropathy showing a benign, stable course and with IgA nephropathy that progressed toward end stage renal failure. Results No association was observed between either groups, and a non-significant trend was observed for more severe IgA nephropathy with the allele reported to protect against end stage renal failure of mixed aetiologies. Conclusion We conclude that UMOD is unlikely to play a role in IgA nephropathy pathogenesis nor progression to end stage renal failure, and suggest that UMOD effects are restricted to some causes of renal disease, e.g. diabetes or hypertension. PMID:25163389

  7. Urinary C3dg and C5b-9 indicate active immune disease in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Brenchley, P E; Coupes, B; Short, C D; O'Donoghue, D J; Ballardie, F W; Mallick, N P

    1992-04-01

    We have measured complement activation markers, C3dg and C5b-9 in plasma and urine from patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy and IgA nephropathy. There was no significant difference in levels of plasma C5b-9 between the patient groups. However, high plasma concentrations of C3dg were associated significantly with IgA nephropathy with 45% of patients having levels over 25 U/ml (P less than 0.001). High concentrations of urinary C3dg and C5b-9 were associated significantly with membranous nephropathy (43% and 43% of the patient group, respectively) compared to patients with IgA nephropathy (10% and 0%, respectively, P less than 0.001). In a retrospective analysis of 31 patients with membranous nephropathy, 66% of patients with high initial urinary C5b-9 showed an unstable clinical course compared to 18% of patients with initially absent or low C5b-9 (P less than 0.001). We suggest that high urinary C5b-9 identifies those patients with a membranous lesion which retains an active immunological component contributing to the pathology of progressive glomerular damage.

  8. The role of non-coding RNAs in diabetic nephropathy: potential applications as biomarkers for disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Distefano, Johanna K

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, a progressive kidney disease that develops secondary to diabetes, is the major cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries, and contributes significantly to increased morbidity and mortality among individuals with diabetes. Although the causes of diabetic nephropathy are not fully understood, recent studies demonstrate a role for epigenetic factors in the development of the disease. For example, non-coding RNA (ncRNA) molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs), have been shown to be functionally important in modulating renal response to hyperglycemia and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Characterization of miRNA expression in diabetic nephropathy from studies of animal models of diabetes, and in vitro investigations using different types of kidney cells also support this role. The goal of this review, therefore, is to summarize the current state of knowledge of specific ncRNAs involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy, with a focus on the potential role of miRNAs to serve as sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers of kidney disease and progression. Non-coding RNAs are currently recognized as potentially important regulators of genes involved in processes related to the development of diabetic nephropathy, and as such, represent viable targets for both clinical diagnostic strategies and therapeutic intervention.

  9. Severe Cholestasis and Bile Acid Nephropathy From Anabolic Steroids Successfully Treated With Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Avegail; Nustas, Rosemary; Nguyen, Hoang-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Severe cholestasis with anabolic androgenic steroids is well-known to cause acute liver injury. Treatment is usually supportive after withdrawal of the offending agent. Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs in acute liver injury and may complicate management and prognosis. We highlight the use of plasmapheresis resulting in rapid improvement in cholestatic jaundice with resolution of AKI. Plasmapheresis should be considered in special cases in which there is progressive clinical decline despite supportive care. PMID:26958570

  10. Kidney Transplant in a 26-Year-Old Nigerian Patient with Sickle Cell Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, U. H.; Wachukwu, C.; Emem-Chioma, P.; Wokoma, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It has variable presentation, ranging from hyposthenuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Management of ESRD in SCD patients is froth with multiple challenges which has potential to impact negatively the outcome of the patient. Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy in these patients. The objective of this case study is to report kidney transplant in a Nigerian young man with sickle cell nephropathy and to highlight the outcome and the challenges to kidney transplant in this patient. The index case is a 26-years-old sickle cell disease patient with ESRD complicated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, immunological, and infective challenges. These conditions were controlled, and the patient had a successful live-related kidney transplant. Kidney transplant is a viable option for sickle cell disease patients with ESRD. PMID:24555134

  11. Non-nephronal hematuria misdiagnosed as C1q nephropathy: Look before you leap.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S N; Jha, R; Fatima, R; Swarnalata, G

    2012-05-01

    A 19-year-old male presented with persistent macroscopic hematuria for last 3 months. On initial evaluation, he was found to have minimal proteinuria, normal renal function, and normal complement with negative lupus serology. Light microscopy, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy of renal tissue confirmed the presence of C1q nephropathy. Because of poor response to immunosuppressive agent (prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil), passage of urinary clot once and vexing persistent macroscopic hematuria, alternative diagnosis was considered. Cystourethroscopy showed urethritis of prostatic urethra. Immunosuppressives were stopped and doxycycline started to which hematuria responded dramatically. This case report illustrates that hematuria in this patient was because of undiagnosed urethritis rather than incidental C1q nephropathy.

  12. Emerging role of podocyte autophagy in the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Tagawa, Atsuko; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular podocytes are pivotal in maintaining glomerular filtration barrier function. As severe podocyte injury results in proteinuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy, determining the pathogenesis of podocyte injury may contribute to the development of new treatments. We recently showed that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes-related podocyte injury. Insufficient podocyte autophagy and podocyte loss are observed in diabetic patients with massive proteinuria. Podocyte loss and massive proteinuria occur in high-fat diet-induced diabetic mice with podocyte-specific autophagy deficiency, with podocytes of these mice and of diabetic rats having huge damaged lysosomes. Sera from diabetic patients and from rodents with massive proteinuria cause autophagy insufficiency, resulting in lysosome dysfunction and apoptosis of cultured podocytes. These findings suggest the importance of autophagy in maintaining lysosome homeostasis in podocytes under diabetic conditions. Impaired autophagy may be involved in the pathogenesis of podocyte loss, leading to massive proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy.

  13. [Possibilities of therapy GLP1 RA for diabetics with nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Adamíková, Alena

    2015-04-01

    The incretin hormone GLP1 (glucagon-like peptide 1) has also systemic effects besides its effects on the pancreas. The renal expression for the receptors GLP1 and DPP4 has been described in a whole line of experimental stu-dies. Activation of the receptors for GLP1 in the kidneys has diuretic and natriuretic effects apparently through the renal tubular cells and sodium transporters. Pre-clinical incretin therapy decreased albuminuria, affected glomerulosclerosis, oxidative stress and fibrosis in the kidneys. Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of kidney failure. In the course of renal insufficiency the functional possibilities and simultaneous safe compensation of diabetes are limited. The treatment GLP1 RA of patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy appear to be effective from the aspect of effectiveness and safety.

  14. Microalbuminuria--a marker of the risk of developing nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dryáková, M; Englis, M; Bartos, V; Rozprimová, L; Sidlová, A; Malý, J

    1989-01-01

    The authors present partial results of a prospective study conducted in 65 insulin-dependent diabetics with varying duration of disease in whom development of micro-angiopathic organ alterations is followed in relation to diabetes compensation and development of clinically manifest proteinuria or to albumin excretion (microalbuminuria). The results suggest that the increase in albumin excretion in recent-onset and non-recent-onset patients is in most cases only an expression of changes in renal function due to metabolism and therapy and apparently of little value in predicting the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. The situation is not so unambiguous in patients with long duration of diabetes and, in case increased albumin excretion remains unchanged or further increases despite intensive insulin therapy, it may serve most likely as a marker of high risk of developing diabetic nephropathy.

  15. [Microalbuminuria--a risk indicator for the development of nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetics].

    PubMed

    Dryáková, M; Englis, M; Bartos, V; Rozprimová, L; Sidlová, A; Malý, J

    1989-10-27

    The authors submit preliminary results of a prospective study in 65 insulin-dependent diabetics with a varying duration of the disease where they followed up the development of microangiopathic organ changes in relation to the compensation of diabetes and the development of clinically manifest proteinuria or albumin excretion (microalbuminuria). From the results ensues that in recent and postrecent patients the increased albumin excretion is as a rule only a manifestation of metabolically conditioned and treatable changes of renal function and is of minor importance for the prediction of the risk of development of diabetic nephropathy. In patients with prolonged duration of diabetes the position is not unequivocal and if the albumin excretion persists or increases despite intensive insulin treatment it is most probably an indicator of a high risk of development of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Study of microRNA in diabetic nephropathy: isolation, quantification and biological function.

    PubMed

    Kantharidis, Phillip; Hagiwara, Shinji; Brennan, Eoin; McClelland, Aaron D

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported dysregulation of microRNA expression in disease with a growing interest focussed on targeting microRNAs as a novel therapy for human disease. This is especially true in diabetic nephropathy where the expression of several microRNAs is dysregulated, contributing to the increased expression and accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins and increased pro-fibrotic signalling, ultimately resulting in renal fibrosis. The development of various techniques and microRNA reagents has enabled work to progress very rapidly in this area. In the present article, the authors describe the methods they have used that have enabled them to contribute to our current understanding of the role of microRNAs in diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Hemizygous Fabry disease associated with IgA nephropathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Homare; Yoh, Keigyou; Takada, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Usui, Joichi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2009-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male patient who showed both classical Fabry disease and IgA nephropathy. He had proteinuria (1.5 g/day), hypohidrosis and neuralgia with fever. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were 0.9 mg/dL and 11.4 mg/dL, respectively. Renal biopsy showed strikingly vacuolated podocytes and tubular epithelium cells. Myelin-like bodies were detected in podocytes, mesangial cells, endothelial cells and tubular epithelium cells by electron microscopy. On immunofluorescence microscopy, IgA and C3 deposits were detected in mesangial areas. From these results and a markedly low level of alpha-galactosidase A activity, this patient was diagnosed as having classical Fabry disease and IgA nephropathy.

  18. Kidney retransplantation for BK virus nephropathy with active viremia without allograft nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Danovitch, Gabriel; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund

    2015-12-01

    BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney allograft failure. Retransplantation has been successfully performed for patients with previous allograft loss due to BK virus nephropathy; however, whether allograft nephrectomy and viral clearance are required prior to retransplantation is controversial. Some recent studies have suggested that retransplantion can be successfully achieved without allograft nephrectomy if viremia is cleared prior to retransplant. The only published experience of successful retransplantation in the presence of active viremia occurred in the presence of concomitant allograft nephrectomy of the failing kidney. In this report, we describe a case of successful repeat kidney transplant in a patient with high-grade BK viremia and fulminant hepatic failure without concomitant allograft nephrectomy performed under the setting of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  19. Clinicopathological and immunohistological features in childhood IgA nephropathy: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Topaloglu, Rezan; Orhan, Dicle; Bilginer, Yelda; Karabulut, Erdem; Ozaltin, Fatih; Duzova, Ali; Kale, Gulsev; Besbas, Nesrin

    2013-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy is a glomerular disease diagnosed by renal biopsy and is characterized by a highly variable course ranging from a completely benign condition to rapidly progressive renal failure. We aimed to evaluate the clinical, histopathological and inflammatory characteristics of children with IgA nephropathy. Methods Data of 37 patients with IgA nephropathy diagnosed between the years 1980 and 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 24 patients. Expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, TGF-β, TNF-α and the newly proposed tubulointerstitial fibrosis marker nestin were evaluated. Results The median age at diagnosis was 10 years. Recurrent macroscopic haematuria (66%) was the most common clinical manifestation, and 35% of the patients had synpharyngitic presentation. A significant correlation was found between proteinuria and increase in mesangial matrix (r = 0.406, P = 0.013). The presence of CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD68+ macrophages were also significantly associated with proteinuria >1 g/day. While cytokines IL-1β, IL-10 and TNF-α were mainly expressed in tubular epithelial cells, TGF-β was evident in glomeruli but they had no correlation to clinical features and severity of the disease. Nestin was detected at the tubules in almost half of the patients with no correlation to proteinuria and tubulointersititial fibrosis. Conclusions We found a correlation between proteinuria and mesangial matrix expansion. The presence of CD4+ T-lymphocytes and CD68+ macrophages were also significantly associated with proteinuria >1 g/day. Although there are many evidences, for immunological basis of IgA nephropathy, the immunological markers were not fully expressed in children to evaluate glomerular and tubulointerstitial inflammation, and progression of the disease. Further studies with the extended number of children are needed to shed light on the immunological basis of the disease. PMID:24175085

  20. Combined effects of streptozotocin-diabetes and ionizing radiation on nephropathy in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Claycamp, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The individual effects of radiation and diabetes on nephropathy in the rat are well-documented; however, the combined effects of these factors on nephropathy have not been adequately studied. The combined effect of radiation and diabetes on nephropathy is a significant problem in view of human populations at risk; diabetic radiation workers and diabetic radiotherapy patients. Streptozotocin-diabetic and control rats were irradiated using 137-Cs to whole body doses of 0, 0.29, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 Gy. Glomerulopathy in the rats was measured using standard histological grading techniques on left kidney biopsy samples taken at times of one month prior to and three, six and nine months after irradiation. Twelve months after irradiation, both right and left kidneys were graded for the degree of glomerulopathy. A pilot tubular attributes study of the histologic samples was added in which eight attributes of tubular histopathology were scored for the degree of severity. The acute effects of radiation on hemopoiesis were studied in the 0, 0.29, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 Gy rats, and dose levels of 7.0 and 8.5 Gy were added to extend the dose range of the hemopoiesis study only. The factors of diabetes, irradiation, time after irradiation and the interactions of these factors did not significantly affect glomerulopathy in the rats. Radiation also was not a significant factor in the tubular attribute study. The results of this study imply that diabetic radiation workers are not at a significantly increased risk of nephropathy as a result of ionizing radiation exposure.

  1. Renal cortical complement C3 gene expression in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Montinaro, V; Gesualdo, L; Ranieri, E; Monno, R; Grandaliano, G; Schena, F P

    1997-03-01

    Glomerular C3 deposits are commonly found in immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy. Renal gene expression and protein synthesis of complement components have been shown in settings of tissue inflammation. In this study, the pathogenetic involvement of locally produced C3 in IgA nephropathy was analyzed. C3 gene expression was analyzed by reverse transcription, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization techniques. C3 mRNA was detected in 56% of cases, with a significantly higher percentage in patients with moderate-to-severe lesions than in those with mild lesions (P < 0.01). By in situ hybridization, C3 transcript was predominantly expressed by tubular cells and some interstitial cells. C3 mRNA was also observed on glomerular parietal epithelial cells. Immunoreactive native C3 was detected on cortical tubuli by an anti-C3c immunoalkaline-phosphatase technique. A significant correlation was found between renal C3 transcription and glomerulosclerosis, intracapillary proliferation (both P < 0.005) and markers of interstitial damage, including tubular atrophy (P < 0.05), interstitial infiltration (P < 0.05), and fibrosis (P < 0.005). Proteinuria (P < 0.05), but not serum creatinine, at the time of renal biopsy correlated with C3 mRNA. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the C3 gene was expressed primarily in proximal tubular cells and occasionally in glomerular crescents, and that its expression correlated with clinical and histologic markers of severity and poor outcome of IgA nephropathy. Thus, a pathogenetic involvement of the local transcription and translation of the C3 gene in IgA nephropathy was suggested.

  2. Sodium bicarbonate versus isotonic saline solution to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Chica, Carlos Andres; Bello Marquez, Diana; Nieto-Ríos, John Fredy; Casas-Arroyave, Fabian David; Donado-Gómez, Jorge Hernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy is one of the main causes of acute kidney injury and increased hospital-acquired morbidity and mortality. The use of sodium bicarbonate for nephroprotection has emerged as a preventative strategy; however, its efficacy is controversial compared to other strategies, such as hydration using 0.9% saline solution. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate vs. hydration using 0.9% saline solution to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Methods: A systematic review of studies registered in the COCHRANE, PUBMED, MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO and EMBASE databases was conducted. Randomized controlled studies that evaluated the use of 0.9% saline solution vs. sodium bicarbonate to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy were included. Results: A total of 22 studies (5,686 patients) were included. Sodium bicarbonate did not decrease the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (RD= 0.00; 95% CI= -0.02 to 0.03; p= 0.83; I2= 0%). No significant differences were found in the demand for renal replacement therapy (RD= 0.00; 95% CI= -0.01 to 0-01; I2= 0%; p= 0.99) or in mortality (RD= -0.00; 95% CI= -0.001 to 0.001; I2= 0%; p= 0.51). Conclusions: Sodium bicarbonate administration is not superior to the use of 0.9% saline solution for preventing contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with risk factors, nor is it better at reducing mortality or the need for renal replacement therapy. PMID:26600623

  3. Pioglitazone attenuates cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy in a rat model of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Elrashidy, Rania A; Asker, Mervat E; Mohamed, Hoda E

    2012-09-01

    Pioglitazone has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular outcomes. However, little is known about its effect on cardiac remodeling associated with diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, this study was designed to study the effects of pioglitazone on cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy in a rat model of diabetic nephropathy. For this purpose, male Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n = 10 per group): normal (N) group, diabetic (D) group, diabetic nephropathic (DN) group received an equal amount of vehicle (0.5% carboxy methyl cellulose), and diabetic nephropathic group treated by oral administration of pioglitazone (10 mg/kg per d) for 4 weeks. Diabetic nephropathy was induced by subtotal nephrectomy plus streptozotocin (STZ) injection. The results revealed that DN rats showed excessive deposition of collagen fibers in their cardiac tissue, along with a marked myocyte hypertrophy. This was associated with a dramatic upregulation of cardiac transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) gene. Furthermore, the gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) decreased, while the gene expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) increased in the hearts of DN rats. In addition, enhanced lipid peroxidation and myocardial injury, evidenced by a significant increase in their serum creatine kinase-MB level were observed in DN rats. All these abnormalities were ameliorated by pioglitazone administration. Our findings suggest that upregulation of cardiac TGF-β1 gene along with the imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 expressions is critically involved in cardiac fibrosis associated with diabetic nephropathy. Pioglitazone can ameliorate cardiac remodeling by suppressing the gene expression of TGF-β1 and regulating the MMP-2/TIMP-2 system.

  4. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology should be renamed chronic agrochemical nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Saroj

    2014-04-01

    Epidemics of chronic kidney disease not attributable to common causes have recently been observed in Central America and Asia. Since the etiology is unclear, the disease is often known by terms such as chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology. There is growing evidence that risk factors include rural agricultural work and agrochemical exposure. The disease should be renamed chronic agrochemical nephropathy to highlight the most likely etiology and draw attention to the condition.

  5. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Rituximab in IgA Nephropathy with Proteinuria and Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Richard A; Canetta, Pietro A; Rovin, Brad H; Appel, Gerald B; Novak, Jan; Nath, Karl A; Sethi, Sanjeev; Tumlin, James A; Mehta, Kshama; Hogan, Marie; Erickson, Stephen; Julian, Bruce A; Leung, Nelson; Enders, Felicity T; Brown, Rhubell; Knoppova, Barbora; Hall, Stacy; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2017-04-01

    IgA nephropathy frequently leads to progressive CKD. Although interest surrounds use of immunosuppressive agents added to standard therapy, several recent studies have questioned efficacy of these agents. Depleting antibody-producing B cells potentially offers a new therapy. In this open label, multicenter study conducted over 1-year follow-up, we randomized 34 adult patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy and proteinuria >1 g/d, maintained on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers with well controlled BP and eGFR<90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), to receive standard therapy or rituximab with standard therapy. Primary outcome measures included change in proteinuria and change in eGFR. Median baseline serum creatinine level (range) was 1.4 (0.8-2.4) mg/dl, and proteinuria was 2.1 (0.6-5.3) g/d. Treatment with rituximab depleted B cells and was well tolerated. eGFR did not change in either group. Rituximab did not alter the level of proteinuria compared with that at baseline or in the control group; three patients in each group had ≥50% reduction in level of proteinuria. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 or antibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1 did not change. In this trial, rituximab therapy did not significantly improve renal function or proteinuria assessed over 1 year. Although rituximab effectively depleted B cells, it failed to reduce serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 and antigalactose-deficient IgA1 antibodies. Lack of efficacy of rituximab, at least at this stage and severity of IgA nephropathy, may reflect a failure of rituximab to reduce levels of specific antibodies assigned salient pathogenetic roles in IgA nephropathy.

  6. Low TGFβ1 expression prevents and high expression exacerbates diabetic nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Gasim, Adil M. H.; Grant, Ruriko; Chang, Albert S.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Jennette, J. Charles; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathy develops in many but not all patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Substantial efforts to identify genotypic differences explaining this differential susceptibility have been made, with limited success. Here, we show that the expression of the transforming growth factor β1 gene (Tgfb1) affects the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice. To do this we genetically varied Tgfb1 expression in five steps, 10%, 60%, 100%, 150%, and 300% of normal, in mice with type 1 diabetes caused by the Akita mutation in the insulin gene (Ins2Akita). Although plasma glucose levels were not affected by Tgfb1 genotype, many features of diabetic nephropathy (mesangial expansion, elevated plasma creatinine and urea, decreased creatinine clearance and albuminuria) were progressively ameliorated as Tgfb1 expression decreased and were progressively exacerbated when expression was increased. The diabetic 10% hypomorphs had comparable creatinine clearance and albumin excretion to wild-type mice and no harmful changes in renal morphology. The diabetic 300% hypermorphs had ∼1/3 the creatinine clearance of wild-type mice, >20× their albumin excretion, ∼3× thicker glomerular basement membranes and severe podocyte effacement, matching human diabetic nephropathy. Switching Tgfb1 expression from low to high in the tubules of the hypomorphs increased their albumin excretion more than 10-fold but creatinine clearance remained high. Switching Tgfb1 expression from low to high in the podocytes markedly decreased creatinine clearance, but minimally increased albumin excretion. Decreasing expression of Tgfb1 could be a promising option for preventing loss of renal function in diabetes. PMID:25902541

  7. URINE miRNAs: POTENTIAL BIOMARKERS FOR MONITORING PROGRESION OF EARLY STAGES OF DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeyi; Xiao, Li; Li, Jun; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Liu, Fuyou; Sun, Lin

    2013-01-01

    With a steep increase in the incidence of type 1 and 2 diabetes globally, diabetic nephropathy (DN) has now become the leading cause of renal failure in the world. There are no suitable biomarkers for the diagnosis of early stages of DN. In recent years, tremendous efforts are being made worldwide to delineate the role of micro RNAs in the pathogenesis of DN. Circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma, urine and other body fluids, which reflect a response to various pathophysiological stresses, are being investigated in the context of diabetic nephropathy. Delineation of the changes in miRNA levels in patients with DN may lead to a better understanding of the progression of the disease. We present here an exhaustive survey of the miRNA literature, highlighting various studies performed over the last decade. The aim is to assess if changes in various miRNAs could correlate with the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Based on the survey, we found that miRNA-377, miRNA-192, miRNA-216/217 and miRNA-144 are increased in body fluids of patients with DN, while miRNA-21 and miRNA-375 are decreased. Overall, there are a very few miRNAs that are kidney specific, and although significant differences were observed in the urinary excretion of certain miRNAs, they were not correlative to their levels in the blood or plasma. Thus, it is completely plausible that urine-specific miRNAs could serve as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of early stages of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23683774

  8. [Incidence of diabetic nephropathy in the province of Badajoz along the period from 1990 to 1994].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Cid, M C; Roncero, F; Pizarro, J L; Sánchez-Casado, E; Pérez Miranda, M

    1996-12-01

    Current registries provide information only on the number of diabetic patients with end-stage renal failure, more detailed information on the incidence of diabetic nephropathy with incipient renal failure is currently not available. The Nephrology Service of Hospital Infanta Cristina in Badajoz serves a population of approximately 650,000. In the time span between 1.1.90 and 31.12.94 the outpatient clinic and the renal ward had 1,717 admissions for evaluation of renal illness, 166 due to diabetic nephropathy (9.7% of total. Twelve (7.2%) were type I diabetics (mean age, 29.9 +/- 6.2 years), and 154 were type II diabetics (mean age 63.4 +/- 9.8 years). The annual incidence increased from 41.5/mio in 1990 to 61.5/mio in 1994. In parallel, 286 patients were admitted for renal replacement therapy, i.e. 88/mio/year. Of this group 60 patients had diabetes: type I, 8 patients (13.3%, mean age 3.7 +/- 6.4); type II, 52 patients (86.7%, mean age 66.0 +/- 6.6 years). This corresponds to an admission rate for dialysis of 18.5/mio/year (19.6% of all patients), with a increasing incidence rate from 13.8/mio in 1990 to 23.1/mio in 1994. This incidence of diabetic nephropathy is more than two-fold greater than the previously reported incidence by the EDTA registry for Spain, it is six-fold greater that the figure recorded for our region. Although the rates of incidence and prevalence of renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy founded in this study seems still to be lower than those of other developed european countries, it is detected a trend toward an increase of these figures in the latter years.

  9. Endothelin receptor a blockade is an ineffective treatment for adriamycin nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Roderick J; Zhou, Lili; Zhou, Dong; Lin, Lin; Liu, Youhua

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin is a vasoconstricting peptide that plays a key role in vascular homeostasis, exerting its biologic effects via two receptors, the endothelin receptor A (ETA) and endothelin receptor B (ETB). Activation of ETA and ETB has opposing actions, in which hyperactive ETA is generally vasoconstrictive and pathologic. Selective ETA blockade has been shown to be beneficial in renal injuries such as diabetic nephropathy and can improve proteinuria. Atrasentan is a selective pharmacologic ETA blocker that preferentially inhibits ETA activation. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of ETA blockade by atrasentan in ameliorating proteinuria and kidney injury in murine adriamycin nephropathy, a model of human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We found that ETA expression was unaltered during the course of adriamycin nephropathy. Whether initiated prior to injury in a prevention protocol (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or after injury onset in a therapeutic protocol (7 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg three times a week, i.p.), atrasentan did not significantly affect the initiation and progression of adriamycin-induced albuminuria (as measured by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios). Indices of glomerular damage were also not improved in atrasentan-treated groups, in either the prevention or therapeutic protocols. Atrasentan also failed to improve kidney function as determined by serum creatinine, histologic damage, and mRNA expression of numerous fibrosis-related genes such as collagen-I and TGF-β1. Therefore, we conclude that selective blockade of ETA by atrasentan has no effect on preventing or ameliorating proteinuria and kidney injury in adriamycin nephropathy.

  10. Association of dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs in human blood with nephropathy among US teens and young adults.

    PubMed

    Everett, Charles J; Thompson, Olivia M

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the association of three chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, a chlorinated dibenzofuran, and four dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in human blood with nephropathy (microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria) among teens and young adults (12-30 years old) having normal glycohemoglobin (A1c <5.7%). The data were derived from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (unweighted n=1504, population estimate=38,806,338). In this paper, nephropathy refers to normal A1c with nephropathy. In an all-adult sample (Everett CJ, Thompson OM. Dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs in human blood: causes or consequences of diabetic nephropathy? Environ Res 2014;132:126-31), the cut-offs for these chemicals being considered elevated, were defined as the 75th percentile. Using these same cut-offs again, the proportion of those with one or more of the eight dioxin-like compounds elevated was 9.9%. The four chemicals associated with nephropathy were 1,2,3,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, PCB 126, PCB 169, and PCB 156. The proportion with one or more of these four