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  1. In the NICU: Your Family and Friends

    MedlinePlus

    ... care unit (NICU) > Your family and friends Your family and friends E-mail to a friend Please ... to your dashboard . After your baby's arrival, some family members and friends will rally to support you. ...

  2. Care of the Family of an Infant With a Congenital Heart Defect During the NICU Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Milford, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    The family of an infant born with a congenital heart defect is challenged by both the short- and long-term implications of the diagnosis and the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization. Nurses are in a key position to support these families as they deal with the psychological, emotional, and financial impact of the NICU experience. Understanding how families perceive the NICU environment and their grief in losing the desired healthy baby provides the NICU nurse with the knowledge to engage in self-reflection on her or his interpersonal style and caregiving attitudes. Utilizing the concepts and principles of family-centered care and relationship-based practice, nurses can work together with the families to determine how to best meet the families' needs and to find the resources to support them. Families and colleagues appreciate nurses who demonstrate expertise in this approach to family-centered care. This appreciation leads to greater job satisfaction and decreased job-related stress.

  3. Implementing family-integrated care in the NICU: engaging veteran parents in program design and delivery.

    PubMed

    Macdonell, Kristy; Christie, Kristen; Robson, Kate; Pytlik, Kasia; Lee, Shoo K; OʼBrien, Karel

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate how "veteran" parents were engaged as experts in the design and implementation of a family-integrated care program in a Canadian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Three parents of preterm infants previously discharged from the NICU participated in the design and implementation of a family-integrated care pilot program. The steering committee for the program included 5 staff members (a physician, a NICU nurse, a parent education nurse, a lactation consultant, and a social worker) and the parent volunteers. This article includes a total of 42 mothers of infants born at 35-week gestation or less were enrolled in the pilot program. A detailed description and qualitative evaluation of the engagement of veteran parents in the design and implementation of the family-integrated care program. The effectiveness of engaging veteran parents in developing this model of care was evaluated by written feedback from the veteran parents and the other steering committee members. In addition, a structured interview at discharge with the 42 mothers enrolled in the pilot study was used to assess their experiences of the peer-to-peer support provided by veteran parents. Veteran NICU parents brought a wealth of wisdom and expertise developed through personal experience to the design and implementation of the family-integrated care program. The veteran parents played a significant role in both the initial development of the program and in the provision of peer-to-peer support during program implementation. Engagement of parents with prior experience of the NICU care environment is a critical step in the design and implementation of a program of family-integrated care.

  4. Discharge of infants from NICU to Latino families with limited English proficiency.

    PubMed

    Miquel-Verges, Franscesca; Donohue, Pamela K; Boss, Renee D

    2011-04-01

    Assess the needs of Latino families with limited English proficiency (LEP) whose infant is discharged from the NICU. Parent interviews at discharge and 1 month later. Thirty-six mothers were interviewed. Thirty nine percentage had <8th grade education; half earned <$10,000 annually. Twenty-eight percentage had no primary support person inside the US. Only half felt very prepared for their infants' discharge. Many expressed general worry about their infant's medical condition (53%) and development (81%), but few (15%) could identify specific risk factors. One-third of families sought emergency medical care for their infant within 1 month of discharge. Less than half were aware of early intervention programs. Safe infant discharge from the NICU must address families' needs. Latino parents with LEP have deficits in knowledge about their infant's medical condition and available resources that place these vulnerable infants at further risk.

  5. Use of translation cards to increase communication with non-English-speaking families in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Dye, E

    2001-10-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit report that communication with staff helps to relieve the many stresses they face. Particularly challenging for NICU nurses, however, is communication with non-English-speaking families. To improve this communication at Vanderbilt Children's Hospital in Nashville, illustrated cards have been developed to translate phrases commonly used in the nursery into foreign languages. Three different sets of cards provide translations in Spanish, Kurdish, and Serbo-Croatian (the languages most commonly encountered at this hospital), and a fourth set, in English, is used for individuals with hearing impairments. These cards aid the bedside nurse in giving a basic report and in encouraging parental participation in the infant's care. Nurses who have used the cards report that parents respond to the questions and seem to appreciate the attempt to communicate.

  6. Randomized controlled trial of Family Nurture Intervention in the NICU: assessments of length of stay, feasibility and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While survival rates for preterm infants have increased, the risk for adverse long-term neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes remains very high. In response to the need for novel, evidence-based interventions that prevent such outcomes, we have assessed Family Nurture Intervention (FNI), a novel dual mother-infant intervention implemented while the infant is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Here, we report the first trial results, including the primary outcome measure, length of stay in the NICU and, the feasibility and safety of its implementation in a high acuity level IV NICU. Methods The FNI trial is a single center, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital for mothers and their singleton or twin infants of 26–34 weeks gestation. Families were randomized to standard care (SC) or (FNI). FNI was implemented by nurture specialists trained to facilitate affective communication between mother and infant during specified calming interactions. These interactions included scent cloth exchange, sustained touch, vocal soothing and eye contact, wrapped or skin-to-skin holding, plus family-based support interactions. Results A total of 826 infants born between 26 and 34 weeks during the 3.5 year study period were admitted to the NICU. After infant and mother screening plus exclusion due to circumstances that prevented the family from participating, 373 infants were eligible for the study. Of these, we were unable to schedule a consent meeting with 56, and consent was withheld by 165. Consent was obtained for 150 infants from 115 families. The infants were block randomized to groups of N = 78, FNI and N = 72, SC. Sixteen (9.6%) of the randomized infants did not complete the study to home discharge, 7% of those randomized to SC and 12% of FNI infants. Mothers in the intervention group engaged in 3 to 4 facilitated one- to two-hour sessions/week. Intent to treat analyses revealed no significant

  7. Communicating with Chinese American families in the NICU using the Giger and Davidhizar transcultural model.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Having an infant admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be a frightening experience for parents. However, it can be even more frightening for them when they are from a different culture and speak a different language than the health care team. Hence, a nurse needs to be culturally competent in order to provide proper care to a multicultural society. The purpose of this article is to describe how NICU nurses can communicate with one such culture, the Chinese American, the largest Asian group in the United States. A transcultural nursing model will be described to use as a guide to help the nurse. The culture, Chinese Americans, will be described to help nurses provide culturally competent care. Research studies will be presented so the reader can develop an understanding of how parents of Chinese descent perceive the care they receive. Interventions and recommendations will be presented on how to enhance communication between the nurses and this cultural group.

  8. Medications After the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... intensive care unit (NICU) > Medications after the NICU Medications after the NICU E-mail to a friend ... from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on medication for apnea, reflux or respiratory problems. Apnea is ...

  9. Common NICU Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... care unit (NICU) > Common NICU equipment Common NICU equipment E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... understand how they can help your baby. What equipment is commonly used in the NICU? Providers use ...

  10. Recommendations for palliative and bereavement care in the NICU: a family-centered integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Kenner, C; Press, J; Ryan, D

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances have increased our ability to detect a life-threatening, life-limiting or lethal problem early in pregnancy, leaving parents months to anticipate a death or a prematurely born infant. Babies can also be born with unanticipated problems that could lead to death. In either scenario, perinatal palliative care should be offered as a strategy for family support. Since the preponderance of professional training focuses on saving lives, many health professionals are uncomfortable with palliative care. This article's purpose is to define best practices for the provision of family-centered perinatal and neonatal palliative care and provision of support to bereaved families experiencing anticipated and unanticipated life-limiting conditions or death of their infant. An overview of core concepts and values is presented, followed by intervention strategies to promote an integrated family-centered approach to palliative and bereavement care. The concluding section presents evidence-based recommendations. PMID:26597801

  11. Psychosocial program standards for NICU parents

    PubMed Central

    Hynan, M T; Hall, S L

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for and brief description of the process of developing recommendations for program standards for psychosocial support of parents with babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A multidisciplinary workgroup of professional organizations and NICU parents was convened by the National Perinatal Association. Six interdisciplinary committees (family-centered developmental care, peer-to-peer support, mental health professionals in the NICU, palliative and bereavement care, follow-up support and staff education and support) worked to produce the recommendations found in this supplemental issue. NICU parents contributed to the work of each committee. PMID:26597799

  12. Recommendations for mental health professionals in the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Hynan, M T; Steinberg, Z; Baker, L; Cicco, R; Geller, P A; Lassen, S; Milford, C; Mounts, K O; Patterson, C; Saxton, S; Segre, L; Stuebe, A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes recommended activities of social workers, psychologists and psychiatric staff within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). NICU mental health professionals (NMHPs) should interact with all NICU parents in providing emotional support, screening, education, psychotherapy and teleservices for families. NMHPs should also offer educational and emotional support for the NICU health-care staff. NMHPs should function at all levels of layered care delivered to NICU parents. Methods of screening for emotional distress are described, as well as evidence for the benefits of peer-to-peer support and psychotherapy delivered in the NICU. In the ideal NICU, care for the emotional and educational needs of NICU parents are outcomes equal in importance to the health and development of their babies. Whenever possible, NMHPs should be involved with parents from the antepartum period through after discharge. PMID:26597800

  13. Recommendations for peer-to-peer support for NICU parents

    PubMed Central

    Hall, S L; Ryan, D J; Beatty, J; Grubbs, L

    2015-01-01

    Peer-to-peer support provided by ‘veteran' neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) parents to those with current NICU babies is a legitimate and unique form of support that can complement or supplement, but not replace, services provided by professional NICU staff. Peer support can be delivered through hospital- or community-based programs that offer one-to-one in-person or telephone matches, or support groups that meet in-person or via the Internet. Issues in program development, volunteer training and program operation are discussed. Recommendations for offering peer support to all NICU parents as an integral component of family-centered care and comprehensive family support are presented. PMID:26597805

  14. Medical Equipment at Home After the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical equipment at home after the NICU Medical equipment at home after the NICU E-mail to ... care unit (NICU) don’t need special medical equipment, like monitors or feeding tubes, when they leave ...

  15. Common Parent Reactions to the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Common Parent Reactions to the NICU Page Content Article Body The ... stress that you may not yet understand. In addition, other NICU parents may be watching you to ...

  16. Supporting parental bonding in the NICU: a care plan for nurses.

    PubMed

    Haut, C; Peddicord, K; O'Brien, E

    1994-12-01

    New and improved technology in the NICU has assisted in supporting critically ill neonates, especially those born at very low birth weights. These small patients require the dedicated hand of the NICU staff, but also the love and support of their parents. Family bonding in the NICU is often a very difficult process, which is interrupted by separation of parent and child at birth and continued by the physical constraints of this highly complex critical care environment. Neonatal nurses are most often the front line managers and coordinators of family care in the NICU. They are charged with the challenge of understanding and providing "state of the art" technological care in an environment that must also adapt to the ever changing needs of parents and families who cannot be considered visitors, but an integral part of their infants' care and survival. Each infant and family in the NICU requires individualized assessment and nursing care. This article reviews the process of parental bonding as it relates to the premature or ill infant and provides for nurses a plan of care written to foster and support family bonding in the NICU. Stages of bonding with a sick or premature infant are explored in the context of a theoretical framework of adaptation provided by Sister Callista Roy.

  17. Effect of NICU Department Orientation Program on Mother’s Anxiety: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Heydarpoor Damanabad, Zhilla; Rahkar Farshi, Mahni; Asgari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ranjbar Kochaksaraie, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neonatal intensive care unit induces the high level of anxiety for mothers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of NICU orientation program on the anxiety of mothers who had preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial (three parallel groups). Participants included 99 mothers with preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU of Al- Zahra hospital, affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Mothers were randomly assigned to one of three groups (film, booklet, and control). Mothers completed the State- Trait Anxiety Inventory before entering to the NICU, and then mothers in the experiment groups became familiar with the NICU environment through watching a film or reading booklet. After the first NICU visit, all mothers completed the STAI and Cattell's Anxiety Questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 13 software. Results: There was no significant difference between three groups regarding state- trait anxiety before the intervention. After the first NICU visit, a significant reduction in maternal state anxiety was seen in the both experiment groups. There was no statistical significant difference regarding trait anxiety. Data obtained from Cattell's anxiety questionnaire after intervention, showed significant difference in state anxiety between groups. Conclusion: Employing film and booklet orientation strategy after preterm delivery can reduce the mother’s anxiety and beneficent for the mother, baby, family and health care system. PMID:27752486

  18. Narratives and embodied knowing in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Ringham, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The author draws on narratives as an illustration of embodied knowledge and argues for the importance of using embodied knowing to inform ethical decisions in the neonatal setting. Nurses have a unique perspective of the complex care associated with neonatal intensive care (NIC). NIC nurses listen to parent's stories and share their own practice stories, leading to an intimate appreciation of a family's particular response to their health care experience. These narratives can deepen understanding of how nurses go about doing their everyday work, describe experiences in everyday practice, and help the writer come to terms with traumatic events. Moreover, nurses' narratives provide a voice, an expression of their embodied knowledge. By telling and listening to nurses' stories, we can better understand how embodied knowledge supports families in crisis. The narratives in this article are examples of the challenges neonatal nurses face in using embodied knowing to enhance relationships with families. These narratives may help nurses to reflect on their practice and cultivate relationships with families in the NICU.

  19. Creative caring in the NICU: parent-to-parent support.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, J K; Roman, L; DeWys, M; Eager, M; Levick, J; Quinn, M

    1993-06-01

    When infants are admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, the parents are immediately confronted with the crisis surrounding a critically ill newborn and often require additional support. Parents experience feelings of anxiety, fear, anger, and guilt over this unanticipated event. In addition, parents often describe the withdrawal of friends and the denial responses of well-meaning family members during their infant's illness. In an effort to address the NICU parents' need for support, Butterworth Hospital in collaboration with Michigan State University initiated a demonstration and research project focused on parent-to-parent support. The primary goal of the program is to improve parenting outcomes by providing emotional, informational, and role modeling support to parents of high-risk infants utilizing experienced volunteer parents. The program model includes professional program coordinators who recruit and train volunteer parents with past NICU experience. Volunteers are then matched to new NICU families based on infant's diagnosis, similar geographic location, and other characteristics. Volunteers provide support through hospital visits, phone contact, and home visits during the infant's hospitalization and throughout the infant's first year of life. The program was evaluated by analyzing the differences between a treatment group and a comparison group of parents. Significant differences between groups were found on measures of maternal mood states, maternal-infant relationships, and home environment. Services to over 900 families by 110 volunteer parents have convinced staff that the volunteer parents are a valuable and indispensable component of the services at Butterworth Hospital and that families of high-risk infants benefit from past experiences and ongoing support of volunteer parents.

  20. Recommendations for enhancing psychosocial support of NICU parents through staff education and support

    PubMed Central

    Hall, S L; Cross, J; Selix, N W; Patterson, C; Segre, L; Chuffo-Siewert, R; Geller, P A; Martin, M L

    2015-01-01

    Providing psychosocial support to parents whose infants are hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can improve parents' functioning as well as their relationships with their babies. Yet, few NICUs offer staff education that teaches optimal methods of communication with parents in distress. Limited staff education in how to best provide psychosocial support to families is one factor that may render those who work in the NICU at risk for burnout, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress syndrome. Staff who develop burnout may have further reduced ability to provide effective support to parents and babies. Recommendations for providing NICU staff with education and support are discussed. The goal is to deliver care that exemplifies the belief that providing psychosocial care and support to the family is equal in importance to providing medical care and developmental support to the baby. PMID:26597803

  1. Engaging fathers in the NICU: taking down the barriers to the baby.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy Nagorski

    2008-01-01

    The technological intensive care environment of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) presents a challenge for nurses to integrate care that supports the development of premature infants while facilitating and supporting parents as collaborators in the care of their infant. Engaging mothers in talking to and providing care for their infants is, for the most part, the focus of family nursing interventions in this intense environment. Engaging fathers at the bedside in the NICU is a much more difficult task. The purpose of this article is to identify potential barriers in the NICU perceived by fathers and intervene so that fathers are more likely to engage in being present for their infant and significant other. This is a part of the ongoing nursing assessment that identifies family care needs and weaves interventions into the developmental plan of care.

  2. Individual rooms in the NICU - an evolving concept.

    PubMed

    White, Robert D

    2003-01-01

    The provision of individual rooms for NICU patients has several attractive benefits, including the ability to provide the appropriate environmental stimuli for each child, and increased privacy and accessibility for families. This concept can put serious strain on caregivers, however, by isolating them from one another and from the multiple infants for whom they may have responsibility, and places additional financial and space demands on the institution. These problems are not insurmountable, however, and use of individual rooms for at least some patients is feasible and probably desirable if certain considerations are addressed in the planning and design process.

  3. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  4. Influence of Clinical and Sociodemographic Characteristics on Early Intervention Enrollment after NICU Discharge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Perrin, James M.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to characterize participation of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates in early intervention (EI). We used data from the National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study. We fit models of days from referral to Individualized Family Service Plan creation (plan time), days from referral to initiation of services (service time),…

  5. The Effect of Spiritual Care on Stress Levels of Mothers in NICU.

    PubMed

    Küçük Alemdar, Dilek; Kardaş Özdemir, Funda; Güdücü Tüfekci, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    Hospitalization of an infant is a difficult situation for the family, and parents require support from the health care team during this difficult time. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of spiritual care on levels of stress in mothers with infants in a neonatal intensive care unit. This spiritual care study was performed by comparing control and spiritual care pre- and posttest groups. The study population included 62 mothers. The Mother-Baby Introductory Information Form and the Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (PSS:NICU) were used for data collection. Prior to spiritual care, no significant difference was found between the mothers' PSS:NICU scores, whereas following spiritual care, there was a significant difference between PSS:NICU scores of the mothers, in favor of the spiritual care group ( p < .05). Findings indicate that nurses should be aware and consider the spiritual needs of mothers and must identify and meet these needs.

  6. Isolation and Identification Enterobacter asburiae from Consumed Powdered Infant Formula Milk (PIF) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

    PubMed

    Mardaneh, Jalal; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a facultative anaerobic, non-spore-forming gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. It is an opportunistic pathogen that its strains are isolated from a variety of clinical and environmental specimens. Since powdered infant formula milk (PIF) is not a sterile product, it is an excellent medium for bacterial growth. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify E. asburiae from PIF in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of this bacterium. A total 125 PIF samples were purchased from drug stores between June 2011 to March 2012. E. asburiae was isolated according to FDA method. For final confirmation, biochemical tests embedded in the API-20E system were used. The drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. Out of the 125 PIF samples investigated, 2 (1.6%) samples were positive for E. asburiae. All isolated strains were uniformly susceptible to aztreonam, cefotaxim, amikacin, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, meropenem, tetracycline, ceftazidime, and colistin. Variable susceptibility was seen to the some antimicrobial agents tested. Each country should categorize its own designed guidelines for the preparation and handling of PIF adapted to the local environment. Moreover, the pathogenesis of the E. asburiae in infants hospitalized in NICU and other groups such as immunosuppressed patients and HIV infected individuals is uncertain and requires further study.

  7. Paternal and maternal concerns for their very low-birth-weight infants transitioning from the NICU to home.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Craig F; Lee, Young; Kim, Hyung Nam

    2014-01-01

    This study examines qualitatively the concerns and coping mechanisms of fathers and mothers of very low-birth-weight (VLBW; <1500 g) neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants as they transition to home from the NICU. In-depth, semistructured phone interviews were conducted with a sample of fathers and mothers of VLBW NICU infants in the Chicago area who had transitioned home, and parental concerns were examined during the transition to home. Phone interviews lasting 30 to 60 minutes were transcribed verbatim, and all interviews were coded using content and narrative analysis. Twenty-five parents (10 fathers, 15 mothers) of 16 VLBW infants who had an average gestational age of 29.5 weeks and an average NICU stay of 58.38 days completed the interview. Overriding concerns included pervasive uncertainty, lingering medical concerns, and partner-related adjustment concerns that differed by gender. A variety of resilient coping methods during this stressful transition are also described. Fathers and mothers of VLBW NICU graduates have evolving but often differing concerns as they transition from the NICU to home. Many of these concerns can be addressed with improved discharge information exchanges and anticipatory guidance. Supporting parents during this stressful and often difficult transition may lead to decreased family stress, improved care, and better infant outcomes.

  8. Common Diagnoses in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... and the whites of the eyes a yellowish color. Babies with jaundice are sometimes more sleepy than ...

  9. Parental needs in infant's end-of-life and bereavement in NICU: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour, Marzieh; Sadeghi, Narges; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Newborn death is an unexpected outcome for parents. Parents face with several needs in infant end-of-life. The health care team is responsible for meet these needs. This qualitative study aim was to explore of parental needs in infant end-of-life and bereavement. Materials and Methods: For this qualitative study, 24 single semi-structure interviews were done. A qualitative content analysis method was used. Sampling conducted on purposeful with maximum variation in five Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) environments in Isfahan city. Inclusion criteria for nurses and doctors were having at least one experience of caring for an infant and their family at end-of-life. Inclusion criteria for parents and their families were having at least one infant at end-of-life or had lost their infant for 6 months before in NICU. Results: Data analysis uncovered two main themes. Family's support needs with two subthemes (family's support needs before infant's death and family's support needs after infant's death) and family's preparatory needs upon infant's death with two subthemes (management of the bad news of infant's death by treatment team and management of the bad news of infant's death by family). Discussion: Mourning mother's need for her husband's presence by her side, getting hospitalized in a separate room, and management of infant's death news by father and family were among items rarely pointed out in other studies. Exploration of these needs cab be helpful for the health care team for providing care. PMID:27500172

  10. Cue-Based Feeding in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Whetten, Cynthia H

    In NICU settings, caring for neonates born as early as 23 weeks gestation presents unique challenges for caregivers. Traditionally, preterm infants who are learning to orally feed take a predetermined volume of breast milk or formula at scheduled intervals, regardless of their individual ability to coordinate each feeding. Evidence suggests that this volume-driven feeding model should be replaced with a more individualized, developmentally appropriate practice. Evidence from the literature suggests that preterm infants fed via cue-based feeding reach full oral feeding status faster than their volume-feeding counterparts and have shorter lengths of stay in the hospital. Changing practice to infant-driven or cue-based feedings in the hospital setting requires staff education, documentation, and team-based communication.

  11. Stress Management among Parents of Neonates Hospitalized in NICU: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Haydeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh; Fooladi, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infant hospitalization is stressful event for parent in NICU. Parents think that they have lost control because of unfamiliar environment. Therefore, stress management is very important in this period. The family as the main factor of strength and protection for infant is required as the bases of standard care in NICU. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate stress management in Iranian NICU Parents. Methods: Using qualitative content analysis approach helped to collect and analysis data for open coding, classification, and theme abstraction. Twenty one parents with hospitalized neonates, physicians and nurses in the city of Isfahan were purposely recruited and selected for in-depth interviews. Results: The analyzed content revealed unique stress management approaches among the parents. The main themes were: 1) spirituality, 2) seeking information, 3) Seeking hope, 4) maintaining calm, 5) attachment to infant, and 6) communicating with the medical team Conclusion: Findings of this study highlights the importance of medical team’s attention to stressed parents who are trying to make adjustment or adapt to the hospitalization of their infant. A revised management approach to address the emotional needs of parents of neonates in Iran seems essential for improving communication with physicians and nurses. PMID:28299295

  12. When Your Baby's in the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my baby's treatment and daily care? What medicines will my baby have to take? What types ... of NICU care — your child may take antibiotics, medicine to stimulate breathing, or something to help his ...

  13. A New Member of the Graphene Family: Graphene Acid.

    PubMed

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Nováček, Michal; Luxa, Jan; Sedmidubský, David; Fila, Vlastimil; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2016-11-21

    A new member of the family of graphene derivatives, namely, graphene acid with a composition close to C1 (COOH)1 , was prepared by oxidation of graphene oxide. The synthetic procedure is based on repeated oxidation of graphite with potassium permanganate in an acidic environment. The oxidation process was studied in detail after each step. The multiple oxidations led to oxidative removal of other oxygen functional groups formed in the first oxidation step. Detailed chemical analysis showed only a minor amount of other oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl and the dominant presence of carboxyl groups in a concentration of about 30 wt %. Further oxidation led to complete decomposition of graphene acid. The obtained material exhibits unique sorption capacity towards metal ions and carbon dioxide. The highly hydrophilic nature of graphene acid allowed the assembly of ultrathin free-standing membranes with high transparency.

  14. Transitioning Newborns from NICU to Home: Family Information Packet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for emergencies. Return to Appendix Contents Tips About Health Insurance Your baby will need to visit the doctor ... newborn to your insurance plan. Call your current insurance company as soon as ... Home, and other low-cost health care benefits if you do not qualify for ...

  15. Feeding in the NICU: A Perspective from a Craniosacral Therapist.

    PubMed

    Quraishy, Karyn

    2016-01-01

    Completing full feedings is a requirement for discharge for babies in the NICU. interaction between the nerves and the muscles of the jaw, tongue, and the soft palate is required for functional sucking and swallowing. Jaw misalignment, compressed nerves, and misshapen heads can interfere with these interactions and create feeding difficulties. craniosacral therapy (CST) is a noninvasive manual therapy that is perfect for the fragile population in the NICU. CST can be used as a treatment modality to release fascial restrictions that are affecting the structures involved in feeding, thereby improving feeding outcomes.

  16. Characteristics of the NICU Work Environment Associated With Breastfeeding Support

    PubMed Central

    Hallowell, Sunny G.; Spatz, Diane L.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Rogowski, Jeannette A.; Lake, Eileen T.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The provision of breastfeeding support in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may assist a mother to develop a milk supply for the NICU infant. Human milk offers unique benefits and its provision unique challenges in this highly vulnerable population. The provision of breastfeeding support in this setting has not been studied in a large, multihospital study. We describe the frequency of breastfeeding support provided by nurses and examined relationships between NICU nursing characteristics, the availability of a lactation consultant (LC), and breastfeeding support. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN This was a secondary analysis of 2008 survey data from 6060 registered nurses in 104 NICUs nationally. Nurse managers provided data on LCs. These NICUs were members of the Vermont Oxford Network, a voluntary quality and safety collaborative. METHODS Nurses reported on the infants (n = 15,233) they cared for on their last shift, including whether breastfeeding support was provided to parents. Breastfeeding support was measured as a percentage of infants on the unit. The denominator was all infants assigned to all nurse respondents on that NICU. The numerator was the number of infants that nurses reported providing breastfeeding support. Nurses also completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), a nationally endorsed nursing care performance measure. The NICU nursing characteristics include the percentages of nurses with a BSN or higher degree and with 5 or more years of NICU experience, an acuity-adjusted staffing ratio, and PES-NWI subscale scores. Lactation consultant availability was measured as any/none and in full-time equivalent positions per 10 beds. RESULTS The parents of 14% of infants received breastfeeding support from the nurse. Half of the NICUs had an LC. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant relationship between 2 measures of nurse staffing and breastfeeding support. A 1 SD higher acuity-adjusted staffing ratio was

  17. The NICU Mom Who Rarely Visits and What You Can Do About It.

    PubMed

    Discenza, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    NICU nurses often worry about NICU moms who are not able to visit their babies regularly and rightfully so. The mother is key to not only the baby's ability to survive but also thrive, and spare visits do little to help with the bonding process. This article provides solid tips on increasing the NICU mom's visits using strengths and positives instead of guilt.

  18. Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Family for Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lokeshwar, Vinata B.; Mirza, Summan; Jordan, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid or hyaluronan (HA) is perhaps one of the most uncomplicated large polymers that regulates several normal physiological processes and, at the same time, contributes to the manifestation of a variety of chronic and acute diseases, including cancer. Members of the HA signaling pathway (HA synthases, HA receptors, and HYAL-1 hyaluronidase) have been experimentally shown to promote tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and hence each of them is a potential target for cancer therapy. Furthermore, as these members are also overexpressed in a variety of carcinomas, targeting of the HA family is clinically relevant. A variety of targeted approaches have been developed to target various HA family members, including small-molecule inhibitors and antibody and vaccine therapies. These treatment approaches inhibit HA-mediated intracellular signaling that promotes tumor cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of endothelial cell functions. Being nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and versatile for modifications, HA has been used in nanoparticle preparations for the targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs and other anticancer compounds to tumor cells through interaction with cell-surface HA receptors. This review discusses basic and clinical translational aspects of targeting each HA family member and respective treatment approaches that have been described in the literature. PMID:25081525

  19. When Your Baby's in the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NICU, those most responsible for day-to-day care are nurses. You might come to know them ... the nurses. The nurses see your baby every day, so they can give you frequent updates on your little one. The plan of care for your infant is discussed on "rounds" every ...

  20. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) gene family revisited.

    PubMed

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding.

  1. Transition to an individual-room NICU design: process and outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Milford, Cheryl A; Zapalo, Barbara J; Davis, Glenda

    2008-01-01

    Redesign of a neonatal intensive care unit is a major budget undertaking, demanding accountability for its equipment and feasibility of design. It must be philosophically based and driven by research supporting best practice. The NJCU at the Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, a Level III, 74-bed unit, has made the change from a ward design to an individual-room design suitable for family-centered, developmentally supportive care. This article presents the design process as it occurred. Unique to this process are the involvement of NJCU-graduate families and the use of transition teams. Guidelines and recommendations are offered to others interested in designing and practicing in an individual-room NJCU. Outcome data demonstrate staff adjustment to the new design and practice model. A comparison of this NICU design is made with the Recommended Standards for Newborn ICU Design.

  2. Feeding Your Baby in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... League International, 1999). GotMom . Created by the American College of Nurse-Midwives to provide breastfeeding information and resources for mothers and families International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners . Provides referrals to breastfeeding ...

  3. Family Perspectives on Prematurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero to Three (J), 2003

    2003-01-01

    In this article, seven families describe their experiences giving birth to and raising a premature baby. Their perspectives vary, one from another, and shift over time, depending on each family's circumstances and the baby's developmental course. Experiences discussed include premature labor, medical interventions and the NICU, bringing the baby…

  4. NICU music therapy: song of kin as critical lullaby in research and practice.

    PubMed

    Loewy, Joanne

    2015-03-01

    Music therapy can improve neonatal function and reduce anxiety in parents during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stays. Live music entrained to an infant's observed vital signs, provided by a certified music therapist with First Sounds RBL (rhythm, breath, and lullaby) training, enhanced bonding for infant-parent dyads and triads. The author's song of kin intervention, which employs parent-selected songs, is compared to the presentation of a well-known folk theme ("Twinkle") in 272 neonates. Culturally based, parent-selected, personalized musical tunes provided in song, as a noninvasive intervention, foster optimal, continuous quality of care. Music psychotherapy sessions for parents before working with their infants can instill a potent means of nonconfrontational support, allowing for expression of fear or anxiety related to the premature birth. Although most attention is typically directed to their infant, using music can support the parents' grief and assist in the expression of hope that can instill a sense of security and containment. From the NICU to home, a familiar thread-line theme can be resourced directly from the family and/or parent and applied effortlessly throughout the growing baby's transitional moments.

  5. Parents' experiences of their premature infants' transportation from a university hospital NICU to the NICU at two local hospitals.

    PubMed

    Granrud, Marie Dahlen; Ludvigsen, Elin; Andershed, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how the parents of premature infants experience the transportation of their baby from the neonatal intensive care unit at a university hospital (NICU-U) to such a unit at a local hospital (NICU-L). This descriptive qualitative study comprises interviews with nine sets of parents and two mothers. The qualitative content analysis resulted in one theme: living in uncertainty about whether the baby will survive, and three categories: being distanced from the baby; fearing that something would happen to the baby during transportation; and experiencing closeness to the baby. The results also revealed that the parents experienced developmental, situational and health-illness transitions.

  6. Trichophyton tonsurans-Ringworm in an NICU.

    PubMed

    Sproul, Ann Vivian; Whitehall, John; Engler, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Ringworm is very rarely found in the neonate, especially infants who have been confined from birth to an intensive care unit. We report an infection with the dermatophyte Trichophyton tonsurans, the most common cause of tinea capitis in children but not yet described in a premature baby who has never left the nursery. Our case illustrates the need to consider this diagnosis among the causes of dermatitis in the newborn, especially in at-risk populations such as indigenous Australians. Though our infant's presentation was the classic "ring" shape, a literature review revealed varied presentations. In contrast to the usual need for long-term antifungal medication, our case responded rapidly to a topical azole preparation. Although we did not screen visiting family members, screening would have been appropriate, and those found positive might have benefited from at least antifungal shampoo.

  7. Understanding neurodevelopmental outcomes of prematurity: education priorities for NICU parents.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne

    2010-08-01

    NICU nurses have an important role to play in many aspects of parent education. This article stresses the need for an increased focus on teaching parents about the central role that self-regulation will play in their infant's neurobehavioral development not only during the early infancy period but throughout all of childhood and adolescence. Suggestions are made about how to conceptualize the relation between cognition and emotions in humans and how to help parents understand that continued vigilance concerning potential problems in attention and self-regulation will be necessary.

  8. Family Conferences in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Observation of Communication Dynamics and Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Renee D.; Donohue, Pamela K.; Larson, Susan M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Roter, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinicians in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) must engage in clear and compassionate communication with families. Empirical, observational studies of NICU family conferences are needed to develop counseling best practices and to train clinicians in key communication skills. We devised a pilot study to record and analyze how interdisciplinary NICU clinicians and parents navigate difficult conversations during NICU family conferences. Design We prospectively identified and audiotaped a convenience sample of NICU family conferences about “difficult news.” Conversations were analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), a quantitative tool for assessing content and quality of patient-provider communication. Setting An urban academic children’s medical center with a 45-bed level IV NICU. Participants NICU parents and clinicians. Measurements and Main Results We analyzed 19 family conferences that included 31 family members and 23 clinicians. The child’s mother was included in all conferences and a second parent, usually the father, was present in 13. All but one conference included multiple medical team members. On average, physicians contributed 65% of all dialogue, regardless of who else was present. Over half (56%) of this dialogue involved giving medical information; under 5% of clinician dialogue involved asked questions of the family, and families rarely (5% of dialogue) asked questions. Conversations were longer with the presence of non-physician clinicians, but this did not increase the amount of dialogue about psychosocial information or increase parent dialogue. Conclusions We collected a novel repository of audiorecorded NICU family meetings that offers insights into discussion content and process. These meetings were heavily focused on biomedical information even when interdisciplinary clinicians were present. Clinicians always talked more than parents, and no one asked many questions. Maximizing the participation of

  9. Collaborative Decision Making in the NICU: When Life Is Uncertain, Satisfice [sic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Brian S.; Maroney, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    Collaborative decision making in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) involves negotiation among the parents and medical professionals involved with a premature baby. The authors introduce economist Herbert Simon's concept of "satisficing" as a model for collaborative decision making in the NICU. Satisficing (a hybrid of "satisfy" and…

  10. Decreasing NICU Costs in the managed care arena: the positive impact of collaborative high-risk OB and NICU disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Diehl-Svrjcek, Beth C; Richardson, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Costs for preterm and critically ill neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be astronomical related to the number of inpatient day's accrued and professional ancillary fees. NICU births are often associated with maternal risk factors such as previous preterm or low birth weight delivery, maternal infections, chronic disease states, substance abuse and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Accordingly, Johns Hopkins HealthCare provides a disease management approach for the prevention of NICU births through "Partners With Mom." This maternity disease management program identifies pregnant women that could potentially generate high-dollar claims. The mission of the program is to reduce hospital/NICU admissions related to pregnancy complications and improve maternal/neonatal outcomes. If an NICU birth does occur, multiple avenues are pursued to control costs. By working in concert with Partners With Mom, the NICU Disease Management Program utilizes a multifaceted approach by tracking maternal risk factors, optimizing levels of required inpatient neonatal care and pursuing other avenues of revenue enhancement.

  11. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria: extending the family.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceous antimicrobial molecules with a diverse genetic origin, posttranslationally modified or not, that can help the producer organism to outcompete other bacterial species. In this review, we focus on the various types of bacteriocins that can be found in LAB and the organization and regulation of the gene clusters responsible for their production and biosynthesis, and consider the food applications of the prototype bacteriocins from LAB. Furthermore, we propose a revised classification of bacteriocins that can accommodate the increasing number of classes reported over the last years.

  12. Bicyclic alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acid derivatives from a colonial tunicate of the family Polyclinidae.

    PubMed

    Bao, Baoquan; Dang, Hung The; Zhang, Ping; Hong, Jongki; Lee, Chong-O; Cho, Hee Young; Jung, Jee H

    2009-11-01

    In the course of our search for bioactive metabolites from a colonial tunicate of the family Polyclinidae, six new (1-6) cyclic fatty acid derivatives were isolated. Their planar structures were established on the basis of NMR and MS spectroscopic analyses. The relative configuration was determined by NOESY experiment. Compounds 1-6 represent a fused bicyclic skeleton possibly derived from alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids such as eicosanedioic acid or docosanedioic acid via a Diels-Alder type of cyclization. Compounds 1-4 and 6 showed mild cytotoxicity against a panel of five human solid tumor cell lines.

  13. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  14. Monitoring bacterial community shifts in bioleaching of Ni-Cu sulfide.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiguo; Zhao, Jiancun; Gao, Fengling; Hu, Yuehua; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2010-11-01

    The microbial ecology of the bioleaching of Ni-Cu sulfide is poorly understood and little effort has been made to handle the microbiological components of these processes. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes fragments from bacteria was used to evaluate the changes of the bacterial community in the process of Ni-Cu sulfide bioleaching in a shaken flask system. The results revealed that the bacterial community was disturbed after the addition of Ni-Cu sulfide. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA fragments revealed that the retrieved sequences clustered together with the genera Acidithiobacillus and Leptospirillum. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) and cluster analysis of DGGE-banding patterns revealed that the process of Ni-Cu sulfide bioleaching in 46days was divided into three stages. During the bioleaching process of Ni-Cu sulfide, Leptospirillum was always dominant. The genera Acidithiobacillus was only detected at early and later stages of the bioleaching process. These results extend our knowledge on microbial dynamics in Ni-Cu sulfide bioleaching, a key issue required to improve commercial applications.

  15. Characterization of glucosylceramides in leaves of the grass family (Poaceae): Pooideae has unsaturated hydroxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Imai, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The glucosylceramide components were characterized in the 33 species of the grass family (Poaceae). Pooideae contained 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenines [i.e., t18:1(8Z) plus t18:1(8E)] as major components, the relative levels of t18:1(8Z) being higher than those of the 8-E isomers. 2-Hydroxy arachidic acid was a major component in all species other than Pooideae, whereas Pooideae had a high content of 2-hydroxytetracosenoic acid.

  16. A new family of extraterrestrial amino acids in the Murchison meteorite.

    PubMed

    Koga, Toshiki; Naraoka, Hiroshi

    2017-04-04

    The occurrence of extraterrestrial organic compounds is a key for understanding prebiotic organic synthesis in the universe. In particular, amino acids have been studied in carbonaceous meteorites for almost 50 years. Here we report ten new amino acids identified in the Murchison meteorite, including a new family of nine hydroxy amino acids. The discovery of mostly C3 and C4 structural isomers of hydroxy amino acids provides insight into the mechanisms of extraterrestrial synthesis of organic compounds. A complementary experiment suggests that these compounds could be produced from aldehydes and ammonia on the meteorite parent body. This study indicates that the meteoritic amino acids could be synthesized by mechanisms in addition to the Strecker reaction, which has been proposed to be the main synthetic pathway to produce amino acids.

  17. A 3D porous Ni-Cu alloy film for high-performance hydrazine electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming; Lu, Zhiyi; Luo, Liang; Chang, Zheng; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Structural design and catalyst screening are two most important factors for achieving exceptional electrocatalytic performance. Herein we demonstrate that constructing a three-dimensional (3D) porous Ni-Cu alloy film is greatly beneficial for improving the hydrazine oxidation reaction (HzOR) performance. A facile electrodeposition process is employed to synthesize a Ni-Cu alloy film with a 3D hierarchical porous structure. As an integrated electrode for HzOR, the Ni-Cu alloy film exhibits superior catalytic activity and stability to the Ni or Cu counterparts. The synthesis parameters are also systematically tuned for optimizing the HzOR performance. The excellent HzOR performance of the Ni-Cu alloy film is attributed to its high intrinsic activity, large electrochemical specific surface area, and 3D porous architecture which offers a ``superaerophobic'' surface to effectively remove the gas product in a small volume. It is believed that the Ni-Cu alloy film electrode has potential application in direct hydrazine fuel cells as well as other catalytic fields.Structural design and catalyst screening are two most important factors for achieving exceptional electrocatalytic performance. Herein we demonstrate that constructing a three-dimensional (3D) porous Ni-Cu alloy film is greatly beneficial for improving the hydrazine oxidation reaction (HzOR) performance. A facile electrodeposition process is employed to synthesize a Ni-Cu alloy film with a 3D hierarchical porous structure. As an integrated electrode for HzOR, the Ni-Cu alloy film exhibits superior catalytic activity and stability to the Ni or Cu counterparts. The synthesis parameters are also systematically tuned for optimizing the HzOR performance. The excellent HzOR performance of the Ni-Cu alloy film is attributed to its high intrinsic activity, large electrochemical specific surface area, and 3D porous architecture which offers a ``superaerophobic'' surface to effectively remove the gas product in a small

  18. Expanding the Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase Protein Family to the Fungal Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Anthony G.; Preiner, Chelsea S.

    2013-01-01

    The known enzymes that open the s-triazine ring, the cyanuric acid hydrolases, have been confined almost exclusively to the kingdom Bacteria and are all homologous members of the rare cyanuric acid hydrolase/barbiturase protein family. In the present study, a filamentous fungus, Sarocladium sp. strain CA, was isolated from soil by enrichment culturing using cyanuric acid as the sole source of nitrogen. A reverse-genetic approach identified a fungal cyanuric acid hydrolase gene composed of two exons and one intron. The translated spliced sequence was 39 to 53% identical to previously characterized bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases. The sequence was used to generate a gene optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and encoding an N-terminally histidine-tagged protein. The protein was purified by nickel affinity and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protein was shown by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) to produce carboxybiuret as the product, which spontaneously decarboxylated to yield biuret and carbon dioxide. The protein was very narrow in substrate specificity, showing activity only with cyanuric acid and N-methyl cyanuric acid. Barbituric acid was an inhibitor of enzyme activity. Sequence analysis identified genes with introns in other fungi from the Ascomycota that, if spliced, are predicted to encode proteins with cyanuric acid hydrolase activity. The Ascomycota cyanuric acid hydrolase homologs are most closely related to cyanuric acid hydrolases from Actinobacteria. PMID:24039269

  19. Modified Ni-Cu catalysts for ethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, M.; Mihet, M.; Almasan, V.; Borodi, G.; Katona, G.; Muresan, L.; Lazar, M. D.

    2013-11-13

    Three Ni-Cu catalysts, having different Cu content, supported on γ-alumina were synthesized by wet co-impregnation method, characterized and tested in the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. The catalysts were characterized for determination of: total surface area and porosity (N{sub 2} adsorption - desorption using BET and Dollimer Heal methods), Ni surface area (hydrogen chemisorption), crystallinity and Ni crystallites size (X-Ray Diffraction), type of catalytic active centers (Hydrogen Temperature Programmed Reduction). Total surface area and Ni crystallites size are not significantly influenced by the addition of Cu, while Ni surface area is drastically diminished by increasing of Cu concentration. Steam reforming experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure, temperature range 150-350°C, and ethanol - water molar ration of 1 at 30, using Ar as carrier gas. Ethanol conversion and hydrogen production increase by the addition of Cu. At 350°C there is a direct connection between hydrogen production and Cu concentration. Catalysts deactivation in 24h time on stream was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) on used catalysts. Coke deposition was observed at all studied temperatures; at 150°C amorphous carbon was evidenced, while at 350°C crystalline, filamentous carbon is formed.

  20. Increased urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid in a Danish family.

    PubMed

    Sjølin, K E

    1988-08-01

    During collection of a control material for determination of urinary excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIB), female high excretors were found in four generations in a Danish family. The heredity seemed to be sex related and dominant, unlike previous communications about genetically conditioned high excretors of beta-AIB.

  1. The solute carrier family 10 (SLC10): beyond bile acid transport

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Polli, James E.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier (SLC) family 10 (SLC10) comprises influx transporters of bile acids, steroidal hormones, various drugs, and several other substrates. Because the seminal transporters of this family, namely, sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2), were primarily bile acid transporters, the term “sodium bile salt cotransporting family” was used for the SLC10 family. However, this notion became obsolete with the finding of other SLC10 members that do not transport bile acids. For example, the sodium-dependent organic anion transporter (SOAT; SLC10A6) transports primarily sulfated steroids. Moreover, NTCP was shown to also transport steroids and xenobiotics, including HMG-CoA inhibitors (statins). The SLC10 family contains four additional members, namely, P3 (SLC10A3; SLC10A3), P4 (SLC10A4; SLC10A4), P5 (SLC10A5; SLC10A5) and SLC10A7 (SLC10A7), several of which were unknown or considered hypothetical until approximately a decade ago. While their substrate specificity remains undetermined, great progress has been made towards their characterization in recent years. SLC10A4 may participate in vesicular storage or exocytosis of neurotransmitters or mastocyte mediators, whereas SLC10A5 and SLC10A7 may be involved in solute transport and SLC10A3 may have a role as a housekeeping protein. Finally, the newly found role of bile acids in glucose and energy homeostasis, via the TGR5 receptor, sheds new light on the clinical relevance of ASBT and NTCP. The present mini-review provides a brief summary of recent progress on members of the SLC10 family. PMID:23506869

  2. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and inborn errors of bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Irena; Socha, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), types 1, 2 and 3, are due to defects in genes involved in bile secretion (FIC1, BSEP, MDR3). PFIC and inborn errors of bile acid synthesis (IEBAS) often present in infancy with cholestasis. The distinctive feature of PFIC 1 and 2 and IEBAS is a normal level of GGT, while IEBAS are suspected in patients with low plasma bile acids concentration. Molecular testing, urinary bile acid analysis (IEBAS), liver biopsy and immuno-staining are used for the diagnosis. Some patients with PFIC can be successfully treated with ursodeoxycholic acid or partial external biliary diversion. IEBAS is treated with cholic acid. Liver transplantation is required for cirrhosis with liver failure. Hepatocarcinoma has been reported in PFIC2.

  3. Perioperative hypothermia in NICU infants: its occurrence and impact on infant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morehouse, Deborah; Williams, Lisa; Lloyd, Christina; McCoy, Dena S; Miller Walters, Elizabeth; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Baumgart, Stephen; Sill, Anne; Mueller-Burke, Dawn; Short, Billie Lou

    2014-06-01

    Infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require surgical intervention and maintaining normothermia perioperatively is a major concern. In our preliminary study of 31 normothermic infants undergoing operative procedures in the operating room (OR), 58% (N = 18) returned hypothermic while all 5 undergoing procedures in the NICU remained normothermic (P = .001). To describe perioperative thermal instability (temperatures lower than 36.0°C) and frequency of associated adverse events, support interventions, and diagnostic tests in infants undergoing operative procedures in the OR and the NICU. This prospective, case-control study included 108 infants admitted to the NICU who were sequentially scheduled for an operative procedure in the OR (50.93%; N = 55) or the NICU (49.07%; N = 53). Existing data from the medical record were collected about temperatures and frequency of adverse cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic events, associated support interventions, and diagnostic tests during the perioperative period. Analyses examined the relative risks and proportional differences in rates of hypothermia between the OR group and the NICU group and associated adverse events, support interventions, and diagnostic tests between hypothermic and normothermic infants. Hypothermia developed in 40% (N = 43) of infants during the perioperative period. The OR group had a higher rate of perioperative hypothermia (65.45%, N = 36; P < .001) and were 7 times more likely to develop perioperative hypothermia (P = .008) than the NICU group (13.21%, N = 7). Likewise, infants in the OR group were 10 times more likely to develop hypothermia during the intra- and postoperative periods than those in the NICU group (P = .001). The hypothermic group had significantly more respiratory adverse events (P = .025), were 6 times more likely to require thermoregulatory interventions (P < .001), 5 times more likely to require cardiac support interventions (P < .006), and 3

  4. Strengths and weaknesses of parent–staff communication in the NICU: a survey assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parents of infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) find themselves in a situation of emotional strain. Communication in the NICU presents special challenges due to parental stress and the complexity of the highly technologized environment. Parents’ need for communication may not always be met by the NICU staff. This study aimed to describe strengths and weaknesses of parent–nurse and parent–doctor communication in a large level III NICU in Sweden in order to improve our understanding of parents’ communication needs. Methods Parents were asked to complete a survey consisting of sixteen questions about their experiences of communication with nurses and doctors in the NICU. In each question the parents evaluated some aspect of communication on a five- or six-point Likert scale. They also had the opportunity on each question to comment on their experiences in their own words. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics 20.0 and qualitative manifest content analysis. Results 270 parents (71.4%) completed the survey. Parents generally rated communication with the staff in the NICU positively and appreciated having received emotional support and regular information about their child´s care. Although a large majority of the parents were satisfied with their communication with doctors and nurses, only about half of the parents felt the nurses and doctors understood their emotional situation very well. Some parents would have desired easier access to conversations with doctors and wanted medical information to be given directly by doctors rather than by nurses. Parents’ communication with the staff was hampered when many different nurses were involved in caring for the infant or when the transfer of information in connection with shift changes or between the maternity ward and NICU was poor. Parents also desired to be present during doctors’ rounds on their infant. Conclusions Training both doctors and nurses in communication

  5. Antibiotic Therapy for Very Low Birth Weigh Newborns in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Fahimzad, Seyyed-Ali-Reza; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged empiric antibiotics therapy in neonates results in several adverse consequences including widespread antibiotic resistance, late onset sepsis (LOS), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prolonged hospital course (HC) and increase in mortality rates. Objectives To assess the risk factors and the outcome of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns. Materials and Methods Prospective study in VLBW neonates admitted to NICU and survived > 2 W, from July 2011 - June 2012. All relevant perinatal and postnatal data including duration of antibiotics therapy (Group I < 2W vs Group II > 2W) and outcome up to the time of discharge or death were documented and compared. Results Out of 145 newborns included in the study, 62 were in group I, and 83 in Group II. Average duration of antibiotic therapy was 14 days (range 3 - 62 days); duration in Group I and Group II was 10 ± 2.3 vs 25.5 ± 10.5 days. Hospital stay was 22.3 ± 11.5 vs 44.3 ± 14.7 days, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed following risk factors as significant for prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy: VLBW especially < 1000 g, (P < 0.001), maternal Illness (P = 0.003), chorioamnionitis (P = 0.048), multiple pregnancy (P = 0.03), non-invasive ventilation (P < 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (P < 0.001). Seventy (48.3%) infants developed LOS; 5 with NEC > stage II, 12 (8.3%) newborns died. Infant mortality alone and with LOS/NEC was higher in group II as compared to group I (P < 0.002 and < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy caused increasing rates of LOS, NEC, HC and infant mortality. PMID:27307961

  6. Mothers and Fathers in NICU: The Impact of Preterm Birth on Parental Distress

    PubMed Central

    Ionio, Chiara; Colombo, Caterina; Brazzoduro, Valeria; Mascheroni, Eleonora; Confalonieri, Emanuela; Castoldi, Francesca; Lista, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a stressful event for families. In particular, the unexpectedly early delivery may cause negative feelings in mothers and fathers. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between preterm birth, parental stress and negative feelings, and the environmental setting of NICU. 21 mothers (age = 36.00 ± 6.85) and 19 fathers (age = 34.92 ± 4.58) of preterm infants (GA = 30.96 ± 2.97) and 20 mothers (age = 40.08 ± 4.76) and 20 fathers (age = 40.32 ± 6.77) of full-term infants (GA = 39.19 ± 1.42) were involved. All parents filled out the Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, the Impact of Event Scale Revised, Profile of Mood States, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Post-Partum Bonding Questionnaire. Our data showed differences in emotional reactions between preterm and full-term parents. Results also revealed significant differences between mothers and fathers’ responses to preterm birth in terms of stress, negative feelings, and perceptions of social support. A correlation between negative conditions at birth (e.g., birth weight and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit stay) and higher scores in some scales of Impact of Event Scale Revised, Profile of Mood States and Post-Partum Bonding Questionnaire were found. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit may be a stressful place both for mothers and fathers. It might be useful to plan, as soon as possible, interventions to help parents through the experience of the premature birth of their child and to begin an immediately adaptive mode of care. PMID:27872669

  7. Human milk is the only milk for premies in the NICU!

    PubMed

    Ahrabi, Ali Faraghi; Schanler, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    Numerous short and long-term benefits of breastfeeding the full-term infant have been acknowledged. The use of human milk in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is emerging as the beneficial effects are being realized. Challenges facing the practitioners today include providing optimal storage and processing strategies for mother's own milk (MOM), as well as offering an alternative when MOM is unavailable or supply is insufficient. We review the health benefits of human milk for the ELBW infant and the strategies for optimal use of the milk in the NICU.

  8. Interaction of dietary fatty acids with tumour necrosis factor family cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Safaříková, Barbora; Skender, Belma; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF- α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NF κ B activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  9. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Šafaříková, Barbora; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF-α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NFκB activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined. PMID:24876678

  10. Interleukin-1 family members are enhanced in psoriasis and suppressed by vitamin D and retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Balato, Anna; Schiattarella, Maria; Lembo, Serena; Mattii, Martina; Prevete, Nella; Balato, Nicola; Ayala, Fabio

    2013-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1 family comprise 11 members that play an important role in immune regulation and inflammatory process. Retinoids exert complex effects on the immune system, having anti-inflammatory effects in chronic dermatological diseases. Vitamin D (vitD) and analogs have been shown to suppress TNF-α-induced IL-1α in human keratinocytes (KCs). In the present study, we investigated IL-1 family members in psoriasis and the effects of vitD and retinoic acid (RA) on these members. We analyzed IL-1 family members gene expression in psoriatic skin and in ex vivo skin organ culture exposed to TNF-α, IL-17 or broadband UVB; afterwards, treatment with vitD or RA was performed and IL-1 family members mRNA was evaluated. Similarly, KCs were stimulated with IL-17 and subsequently treated with vitD. IL-1 family members were enhanced in psoriatic skin and in ex vivo skin organ cultures after pro-inflammatory stimuli (TNF-α, IL-17 and UVB). RA and vitD were able to suppress this enhancement.

  11. Clustering of protein families into functional subtypes using Relative Complexity Measure with reduced amino acid alphabets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis can be used to divide a protein family into subfamilies in the absence of experimental information. Most phylogenetic analysis methods utilize multiple alignment of sequences and are based on an evolutionary model. However, multiple alignment is not an automated procedure and requires human intervention to maintain alignment integrity and to produce phylogenies consistent with the functional splits in underlying sequences. To address this problem, we propose to use the alignment-free Relative Complexity Measure (RCM) combined with reduced amino acid alphabets to cluster protein families into functional subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with an alignment-based approach was also carried out to test the quality of the clustering. Results We demonstrate the robustness of RCM with reduced alphabets in clustering of protein sequences into families in a simulated dataset and seven well-characterized protein datasets. On protein datasets, crotonases, mandelate racemases, nucleotidyl cyclases and glycoside hydrolase family 2 were clustered into subfamilies with 100% accuracy whereas acyl transferase domains, haloacid dehalogenases, and vicinal oxygen chelates could be assigned to subfamilies with 97.2%, 96.9% and 92.2% accuracies, respectively. Conclusions The overall combination of methods in this paper is useful for clustering protein families into subtypes based on solely protein sequence information. The method is also flexible and computationally fast because it does not require multiple alignment of sequences. PMID:20718947

  12. Cultivating a Culture of Awareness: Nurturing Reflective Practices in the NICU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Zina; Kraemer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the challenges to nurturing reflective practices in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)--an environment in which life and death hang in fragile balance and where the need to defend against unbearable realities is natural, even an adaptive response. Working as consultants to this acute setting, the authors describe how they…

  13. Global trophic position comparison of two dominant mesopelagic fish families (Myctophidae, Stomiidae) using amino acid nitrogen isotopicanalyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the biogeochemical and ecological mechanisms responsible for variability in bulk tissue and amino acid (AA) stable nitrogen isotope compositions in two groups of important mesopelagic fish families, Myctophidae (lanternfishes) and Stomiidae (dragonfishes), from five d...

  14. Novel Enzyme Family Found in Filamentous Fungi Catalyzing trans-4-Hydroxylation of l-Pipecolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Makoto; Mori, Ryosuke; Miyake, Ryoma; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kozono, Shoko; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxypipecolic acids are bioactive compounds widely distributed in nature and are valuable building blocks for the organic synthesis of pharmaceuticals. We have found a novel hydroxylating enzyme with activity toward l-pipecolic acid (l-Pip) in a filamentous fungus, Fusarium oxysporum c8D. The enzyme l-Pip trans-4-hydroxylase (Pip4H) of F. oxysporum (FoPip4H) belongs to the Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, catalyzes the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation of l-Pip, and produces optically pure trans-4-hydroxy-l-pipecolic acid (trans-4-l-HyPip). Amino acid sequence analysis revealed several fungal enzymes homologous with FoPip4H, and five of these also had l-Pip trans-4-hydroxylation activity. In particular, the homologous Pip4H enzyme derived from Aspergillus nidulans FGSC A4 (AnPip4H) had a broader substrate specificity spectrum than other homologues and reacted with the l and d forms of various cyclic and aliphatic amino acids. Using FoPip4H as a biocatalyst, a system for the preparative-scale production of chiral trans-4-l-HyPip was successfully developed. Thus, we report a fungal family of l-Pip hydroxylases and the enzymatic preparation of trans-4-l-HyPip, a bioactive compound and a constituent of secondary metabolites with useful physiological activities. PMID:26801577

  15. Heteroresistant Vancomycin Intermediate Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus in the NICU: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jasmine; Caya, Chelsea; Lévesque, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Context NICUs in the province of Québec have seen an increase in hVICoNS, detected in the clinical laboratory. Objective To investigate the clinical relevance of hVICoNS on the course of infection, and to determine the prevalence of hVICoNS sepsis in the NICU. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed from 1 January 1980 to 1 July 2016. Both observational and interventional studies were considered eligible if they provided data on hVICoNS in the NICU population. Two investigators independently reviewed studies for data extraction. Data extracted included: number of CoNS cultures, prevalence of hVICoNS, and clonality of strains. Results Of the 613 studies identified, 19 studies were reviewed, and 5 studies included in the final review. No studies addressed the clinical significance of hVICoNS in the NICU. The prevalence of hVICoNS in the NICU varied greatly, ranging from 2.3% to 100%. Limitations Publication bias could not be assessed, and risk of bias in some of the included studies due to small sample size and poor methods reporting. The quality of all included studies was low according to GRADE criteria, and the inclusion criteria restricted to either English or French studies. Conclusions Our review suggests that heteroresistance to vancomycin is much more common than previously believed. Our search however did not identify any studies that explicitly assessed any clinical implications of hVICoNS infections, thereby highlighting the need for research to assess the true impact of hVICoNS infection and to determine its significance on patient mortality and morbidity in the NICU. PMID:27716838

  16. Defining sequence space and reaction products within the cyanuric acid hydrolase (AtzD)/barbiturase protein family.

    PubMed

    Seffernick, Jennifer L; Erickson, Jasmine S; Cameron, Stephan M; Cho, Seunghee; Dodge, Anthony G; Richman, Jack E; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2012-09-01

    Cyanuric acid hydrolases (AtzD) and barbiturases are homologous, found almost exclusively in bacteria, and comprise a rare protein family with no discernible linkage to other protein families or an X-ray structural class. There has been confusion in the literature and in genome projects regarding the reaction products, the assignment of individual sequences as either cyanuric acid hydrolases or barbiturases, and spurious connection of this family to another protein family. The present study has addressed those issues. First, the published enzyme reaction products of cyanuric acid hydrolase are incorrectly identified as biuret and carbon dioxide. The current study employed (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to show that cyanuric acid hydrolase releases carboxybiuret, which spontaneously decarboxylates to biuret. This is significant because it revealed that homologous cyanuric acid hydrolases and barbiturases catalyze completely analogous reactions. Second, enzymes that had been annotated incorrectly in genome projects have been reassigned here by bioinformatics, gene cloning, and protein characterization studies. Third, the AtzD/barbiturase family has previously been suggested to consist of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily, a large class of metallohydrolases. Bioinformatics and the lack of bound metals both argue against a connection to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Lastly, steady-state kinetic measurements and observations of protein stability suggested that the AtzD/barbiturase family might be an undistinguished protein family that has undergone some resurgence with the recent introduction of industrial s-triazine compounds such as atrazine and melamine into the environment.

  17. Amino acid and DNA analyses in a family with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hou, J W; Wang, T R

    1996-02-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) is a hepatic mitochondrial enzyme involved in the detoxification of ammonia by the urea cycle. OTC deficiency is an X-linked genetic disorder, usually causing neonatal or infantile hyperammonemia, coma and death. We attended a male newborn who had poor feeding since 30 hours of age, at which time, he then rapidly progressed to a comatose state. Hyperammonemia and liver dysfunction were noted. Analysis of plasma amino acids showed elevated levels of glutamine and alanine, but a decreased level of arginine and no citrulline. OTC deficiency was diagnosed by family history of early death of newborn males on the maternal side and characteristic biochemical findings. In addition, it was proved by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Although OTC deficiency has been described as the most common inborn error of ureagenesis in humans, to our knowledge, this is the first report in a Chinese family confirmed by biochemical and DNA analyses.

  18. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family*

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Miller, Darcie J.; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    DOE PAGES

    Yurchenko, Olga P.; Park, Sunjung; Ilut, Daniel C.; ...

    2014-11-18

    The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, and thus perform well in these geographical areas, cotton seedlings are sensitive to cold temperature, which can significantly reduce crop yields. One of the common biochemical responses of plants to cold temperatures is an increase in omega-3 fatty acids, which protects cellular function by maintaining membrane integrity. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterizemore » the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) gene family in G. hirsutum, with an emphasis on identifying omega-3 FADs involved in cold temperature adaptation. Results: Eleven omega-3 FAD genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and characterization of the gene family in extant A and D diploid species (G. herbaceum and G. raimondii, respectively) allowed for unambiguous genome assignment of all homoeologs in tetraploid G. hirsutum. The omega-3 FAD family of cotton includes five distinct genes, two of which encode endoplasmic reticulum-type enzymes (FAD3-1 and FAD3-2) and three that encode chloroplast-type enzymes (FAD7/8-1, FAD7/8-2, and FAD7/8-3). The FAD3-2 gene was duplicated in the A genome progenitor species after the evolutionary split from the D progenitor, but before the interspecific hybridization event that gave rise to modern tetraploid cotton. RNA-seq analysis revealed conserved, gene-specific expression patterns in various organs and cell types and semi-quantitative RT-PCR further revealed that FAD7/8-1 was specifically induced during cold temperature treatment of G. hirsutum seedlings. Conclusions: The omega-3 FAD gene family in cotton was characterized at the genome-wide level in three species, showing relatively ancient establishment of the gene family prior

  20. The Role of Sleep in the Modulation of Gastroesophageal reflux and Symptoms in NICU Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Aslam; Malkar, Manish; Splaingard, Mark; Khuhro, Abdul; Jadcherla, Sudarshan

    2015-01-01

    Background Newborns sleep about 80% of the time. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is prevalent in about 10% of NICU infants. Concurrent polysomnography and pH-impedance studies clarify relationship of GER with sleep. Aims To characterize spatio-temporal and chemical characteristics of impedance-positive GER and define symptom associations in sleep and wake states in symptomatic neonates. We hypothesized that frequency of impedance-positive GER events and their association with cardiorespiratory symptoms is greater during sleep. Methods Eighteen neonates underwent concurrent polysomnography with pH-impedance study. Impedance-positive GER events (weakly acidic or acidic) were categorized between sleep vs. wake states: Symptom Index = # of symptoms with GER/total symptoms*100, Symptom Sensitivity Index = # of GER with symptoms/Total GER*100 and Symptom Association Probability = [(1-Probability of observed association between reflux and symptoms)*100]). Results We analyzed 317 GER events during 116 hours of polysomnography. During wake vs. sleep respectively, the median (interquartile range) frequency of impedance-positive GER was 4.9(3.1–5.8) vs. 1.4(0.7–1.7)events/hour (P<0.001), proximal migration was 2.6(0.8–3.3) vs. 0.2(0.0–0.9)events/hour (P<0.001); Symptom Index for cardiorespiratory symptoms for impedance-positive events was 22.5 (0–55.3) vs. 6.1(0–13), P=0.04 while Symptom Sensitivity Index was 9.1(0–23.1) vs. 18.4 (0–50), P=0.04 though Symptom Association Probability was similar, (P=0.68). Conclusions Contrary to our hypothesis, frequency of GER in sleep is lesser; however, spatio-temporal and chemical characteristics of GER and symptom generation mechanisms are distinct. For cardiorespiratory symptoms during sleep, lower Symptom Index entails evaluation for etiologies other than GER disease, higher Symptom Sensitivity Index implies heightened esophageal sensitivity and similar Symptom Association Probability indicates other mechanistic

  1. NICU discharge planning and beyond: recommendations for parent psychosocial support

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, I B; Craig, J W; Zeanah, P

    2015-01-01

    Parents will interact with a multitude of teams from various disciplines during their child's admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Recognition of the emotional stressors experienced by these parents is a first step in working to provide the crucial support and parenting skills needed for bonding and caring for their infant from admission through discharge and beyond. Family-centered care involves time-sensitive two-way communication between parents and the multidisciplinary team members who coordinate care transition by providing emotional, educational, medical and home visitor support for these families. To do this well, a thoughtful exchange of information between team members and parents is essential to identify psychosocial stress and ameliorate family concerns. Parents will need emotional and educational support and follow-up resources. Establishing individualized, flexible but realistic, pre- and post-discharge plans with parents is needed to start their healthy transition to home and community. PMID:26597802

  2. Multiple origins of crassulacean acid metabolism and the epiphytic habit in the Neotropical family Bromeliaceae

    PubMed Central

    Crayn, Darren M.; Winter, Klaus; Smith, J. Andrew C.

    2004-01-01

    The large Neotropical family Bromeliaceae presents an outstanding example of adaptive radiation in plants, containing a wide range of terrestrial and epiphytic life-forms occupying many distinct habitats. Diversification in bromeliads has been linked to several key innovations, including water- and nutrient-impounding phytotelmata, absorptive epidermal trichomes, and the water-conserving mode of photosynthesis known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). To clarify the origins of CAM and the epiphytic habit, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for 51 bromeliad taxa by using the plastid loci matK and the rps16 intron, combined with a survey of photosynthetic pathway determined by carbon-isotope ratios for 1,873 species representing 65% of the family. Optimization of character-states onto the strict consensus tree indicated that the last common ancestor of Bromeliaceae was a terrestrial C3 mesophyte, probably adapted to moist, exposed, nutrient-poor habitats. Both CAM photosynthesis and the epiphytic habit evolved a minimum of three times in the family, most likely in response to geological and climatic changes in the late Tertiary. The great majority of epiphytic forms are now found in two lineages: in subfamily Tillandsioideae, in which C3 photosynthesis was the ancestral state and CAM developed later in the most extreme epiphytes, and in subfamily Bromelioideae, in which CAM photosynthesis predated the appearance of epiphytism. Subsequent radiation of the bromelioid line into less xeric habitats has led to reversion to C3 photosynthesis in some taxa, showing that both gain and loss of CAM have occurred in the complex evolutionary history of this family. PMID:14982989

  3. Multiple origins of crassulacean acid metabolism and the epiphytic habit in the Neotropical family Bromeliaceae.

    PubMed

    Crayn, Darren M; Winter, Klaus; Smith, J Andrew C

    2004-03-09

    The large Neotropical family Bromeliaceae presents an outstanding example of adaptive radiation in plants, containing a wide range of terrestrial and epiphytic life-forms occupying many distinct habitats. Diversification in bromeliads has been linked to several key innovations, including water- and nutrient-impounding phytotelmata, absorptive epidermal trichomes, and the water-conserving mode of photosynthesis known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). To clarify the origins of CAM and the epiphytic habit, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for 51 bromeliad taxa by using the plastid loci matK and the rps16 intron, combined with a survey of photosynthetic pathway determined by carbon-isotope ratios for 1,873 species representing 65% of the family. Optimization of character-states onto the strict consensus tree indicated that the last common ancestor of Bromeliaceae was a terrestrial C(3) mesophyte, probably adapted to moist, exposed, nutrient-poor habitats. Both CAM photosynthesis and the epiphytic habit evolved a minimum of three times in the family, most likely in response to geological and climatic changes in the late Tertiary. The great majority of epiphytic forms are now found in two lineages: in subfamily Tillandsioideae, in which C(3) photosynthesis was the ancestral state and CAM developed later in the most extreme epiphytes, and in subfamily Bromelioideae, in which CAM photosynthesis predated the appearance of epiphytism. Subsequent radiation of the bromelioid line into less xeric habitats has led to reversion to C(3) photosynthesis in some taxa, showing that both gain and loss of CAM have occurred in the complex evolutionary history of this family.

  4. Metabolic pathways and fermentative production of L-aspartate family amino acids.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-06-01

    The L-aspartate family amino acids (AFAAs), L-threonine, L-lysine, L-methionine and L-isoleucine have recently been of much interest due to their wide spectrum of applications including food additives, components of cosmetics and therapeutic agents, and animal feed additives. Among them, L-threonine, L-lysine and L-methionine are three major amino acids produced currently throughout the world. Recent advances in systems metabolic engineering, which combine various high-throughput omics technologies and computational analysis, are now facilitating development of microbial strains efficiently producing AFAAs. Thus, a thorough understanding of the metabolic and regulatory mechanisms of the biosynthesis of these amino acids is urgently needed for designing system-wide metabolic engineering strategies. Here we review the details of AFAA biosynthetic pathways, regulations involved, and export and transport systems, and provide general strategies for successful metabolic engineering along with relevant examples. Finally, perspectives of systems metabolic engineering for developing AFAA overproducers are suggested with selected exemplary studies.

  5. Caring for Premature Life and Death: The Relational Dynamics of Detachment in a NICU.

    PubMed

    Seo, Bo Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Chiang Mai during 2010 and 2012, I examine neonatal care as a contingent entanglement of technological and ethical relationships with vulnerable others. Along the continuum of universal antenatal and delivery care, neonatal medicine becomes a normative part of reproductive health care in Chiang Mai. As the NICU opens its door to sick newborns whose belonging to kinship and the nation-state is uncertain, neonatal care requires deliberate practices to incorporate them into life-sustaining connections. By tracing medical staff's effort to be accountable to their fragile patients, I show that withdrawing of intensive care is relational work that requires affective involvement and distancing through commensality, prosthetic extensions, and karmic network. This specific mode of care, which is premised on the combination of unconditional openness and careful detachment, offers insight into a possible enactment of hospitality within biomedical institutions.

  6. Bile Acid Pool Dynamics in Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis with Partial External Bile Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Jericho, Hilary Smith; Kaurs, Elizabeth; Boverhof, Renze; Knisely, Alex; Shneider, Benjamin L; Verkade, Henkjan J; Whitington, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Partial external bile diversion (PEBD) is an established therapy for low-GGT Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis (PFIC). This study sought to determine if the dynamics of the cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) pools in low-GGT-PFIC subjects with successful PEBD were equivalent to those achieved with successful liver transplantation (LTX). Methods The kinetics of CA and CDCA metabolism were measured by stable isotope dilution in plasma samples in 5 PEBD subjects all with intact canalicular BSEP expression and compared to low-GGT-PFIC subjects with successful LTX. Stomal loss of bile acids was measured in PEBD subjects. Results The fractional turnover rate for CA in the PEBD group ranged from 0.5 to 4.2 d−1 (LTX group, range 0.2 – 0.9 d−1, p = 0.076) and for CDCA from 0.7 to 4.5 d−1 (LTX group 0.3 – 0.4 d−1, p = 0.009). The CA and CDCA pool sizes were equivalent between groups; however pool composition in PEBD was somewhat more hydrophilic. The CA/CDCA ratio in PEBD ranged from 0.9 to 19.5, whereas in LTX it ranged from 0.5 to 2.6. Synthesis rates computed from isotope dilution correlated well with timed output for both CA: r2 = 0.760, p = 0.024 and CDCA: r2 = 0.690, p = 0.021. Conclusions PEBD results in bile acid fractional turnover rates greater than LTX, pool sizes equivalent to LTX and pool composition that is at least as hydrophilic as produced by LTX. PMID:25383786

  7. An Amino Acid Deletion in SZT2 in a Family with Non-Syndromic Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Michelle; Yariz, Kemal O.; Ross, David B.; Foster, Joseph; Menendez, Ibis; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, three mutations in SZT2 were reported in two unrelated children with unexplained infantile epileptic encephalopathy with severe ID. Here we report a European American family with three children having non-syndromic mild or moderate ID without seizures. Whole-exome sequencing of three affected siblings revealed a three base pair deletion (c.4202_4204delTTC) located in a 19 mb autozygous region on chromosome 1, leading to an amino acid deletion (p.Phe1401del) in SZT2. All three children were homozygous for the deletion and their parents were heterozygous as expected in autosomal recessive inheritance. SZT2 is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and regulates seizure threshold and neuronal excitation in mice. We conclude that the disruption of SZT2 with some residual function might lead to mild or moderate ID without seizures. PMID:24324832

  8. Understanding neonatal ventilation: strategies for decision making in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Petty, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal ventilation is an integral component of care delivered in the neonatal unit. The aim of any ventilation strategy is to support the neonate's respiratory system during compromise while limiting any long-term damage to the lungs. Understanding the principles behind neonatal ventilation is essential so that health professionals caring for sick neonates and families have the necessary knowledge to understand best practice. Given the range of existing ventilation modes and parameters available, these require explanation and clarification in the context of current evidence. Many factors can influence clinical decision making on both an individual level and within the wider perspective of neonatal care.

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid therapy in pediatric patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, E; Hermans, D; Myara, A; Habes, D; Debray, D; Hadchouel, M; Sokal, E M; Bernard, O

    1997-03-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a lethal inherited childhood cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Different subtypes of PFIC have been described according to serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity. There is currently no effective medical therapy available for children with PFIC. We report on 39 patients with PFIC who received ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) orally (20-30 mg/kg b.w./day) for a period of 2 to 4 years. Group 1 (n = 26) consisted of children with normal GGT activity, and group 2 (n = 13) of children with high GGT activity. Within group 1, liver tests normalized in 11 children, improved in 5, and stabilized or worsened in 10. Within group 2, liver tests normalized in six children, improved in four, and stabilized or worsened in three. Improvement of parameters was associated with an enrichment of the circulating pool of bile acids with UDCA. Hepatosplenomegaly and pruritus disappeared or diminished in children in whom liver tests normalized. In nine of these children, liver tests worsened and normalized again after stopping and restarting UDCA. Liver histology assessed in four children after normalization of liver tests and 2 years of treatment showed a decrease in fibrosis. We conclude that UDCA should be considered in the initial therapeutic management of children with PFIC, because it appears effective in resolving or improving the liver function and the clinical status of a fair proportion of children. Chronic UDCA therapy might thus avoid the need for liver transplantation in some children with PFIC.

  10. Phylogenetic, Molecular, and Biochemical Characterization of Caffeic Acid o-Methyltransferase Gene Family in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xianting; Wu, Jiajie; Luo, Yangfan; Bragg, Jennifer; Anderson, Olin; Vogel, John; Gu, Yong Q.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid o-methyltransferase (COMT) is one of the important enzymes controlling lignin monomer production in plant cell wall synthesis. Analysis of the genome sequence of the new grass model Brachypodium distachyon identified four COMT gene homologs, designated as BdCOMT1, BdCOMT2, BdCOMT3, and BdCOMT4. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that they belong to the COMT gene family, whereas syntenic analysis through comparisons with rice and sorghum revealed that BdCOMT4 on Chromosome 3 is the orthologous copy of the COMT genes well characterized in other grass species. The other three COMT genes are unique to Brachypodium since orthologous copies are not found in the collinear regions of rice and sorghum genomes. Expression studies indicated that all four Brachypodium COMT genes are transcribed but with distinct patterns of tissue specificity. Full-length cDNAs were cloned in frame into the pQE-T7 expression vector for the purification of recombinant Brachypodium COMT proteins. Biochemical characterization of enzyme activity and substrate specificity showed that BdCOMT4 has significant effect on a broad range of substrates with the highest preference for caffeic acid. The other three COMTs had low or no effect on these substrates, suggesting that a diversified evolution occurred on these duplicate genes that not only impacted their pattern of expression, but also altered their biochemical properties. PMID:23431288

  11. Biomonitoring of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Exposure and Dose in Farm Families

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Bruce H.; Mandel, Jack S.; Baker, Beth A.; Burns, Carol J.; Bartels, Michael J.; Acquavella, John F.; Gustin, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Objective We estimated 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) exposure and systemic dose in farm family members following an application of 2,4-D on their farm. Methods Farm families were recruited from licensed applicators in Minnesota and South Carolina. Eligible family members collected all urine during five 24-hr intervals, 1 day before through 3 days after an application of 2,4-D. Exposure profiles were characterized with 24-hr urine 2,4-D concentrations, which then were related to potential predictors of exposure. Systemic dose was estimated using the urine collections from the application day through the third day after application. Results Median urine 2,4-D concentrations at baseline and day after application were 2.1 and 73.1 μ g/L for applicators, below the limit of detection, and 1.2 μ g/L for spouses, and 1.5 and 2.9 μ g/L for children. The younger children (4–11 years of age) had higher median post-application concentrations than the older children (≥ 12 years of age) (6.5 vs. 1.9 μ g/L). The geometric mean systemic doses (micrograms per kilogram body weight) were 2.46 (applicators), 0.8 (spouses), 0.22 (all children), 0.32 (children 4–11 years of age), and 0.12 (children ≥ 12 years of age). Exposure to the spouses and children was primarily determined by direct contact with the application process and the number of acres treated. Multivariate models identified glove use, repairing equipment, and number of acres treated as predictors of exposure in the applicators. Conclusions We observed considerable heterogeneity of 2,4-D exposure among farm family members, primarily attributable to level of contact with the application process. Awareness of this variability and the actual magnitude of exposures are important for developing exposure and risk characterizations in 2,4-D–exposed agricultural populations. PMID:17431485

  12. Comparative Studies of Mammalian Acid Lipases: Evidence for a New Gene Family in Mouse and Rat (Lipo)

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S; Cox, Laura A; VandeBerg, John L

    2010-01-01

    At least six families of mammalian acid lipases (E.C. 3.1.1.-) catalyse the hydrolysis of triglycerides in the body, designated as LIPA (lysosomal), LIPF (gastric), LIPJ (testis) and LIPK, LIPM and LIPN (epidermal), which belong to the AB hydrolase superfamily. In this study, in silico methods were used to predict the amino acid sequences, secondary and tertiary structures, and gene locations for acid lipase genes and encoded proteins using data from several mammalian genome projects. Mammalian acid lipase genes were located within a gene cluster for each of the 8 mammalian genomes examined, including human (Homo sapiens), chimpanzee (Pons troglodytes), rhesus monkey (Macacca mulatta), mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), cow (Bos taurus), horse (Equus caballus) and dog (Canis familaris), with each containing 9 coding exons. Human and mouse acid lipases shared 44-87% sequence identity and exhibited sequence alignments and identities for key amino acid residues and conservation of predicted secondary and tertiary structures with those previously reported for human gastric lipase (LIPF) (Roussel et al., 1999). Evidence for a new family of acid lipase genes is reported for mouse and rat genomes, designated as Lipo. Mouse acid lipase genes are subject to differential mRNA tissue expression, with Lipa showing wide tissue expression, while others have a more restricted tissue expression in the digestive tract (Lipf), salivary gland (Lipo) and epidermal tissues (Lipk, Lipm and Lipn). Phylogenetic analyses of the mammalian acid lipase gene families suggested that these genes are products of gene duplication events prior to eutherian mammalian evolution and derived from an ancestral vertebrate LIPA gene, which is present in the frog, Xenopus tropicalis. PMID:20598663

  13. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-02-23

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111) through an η2(C,O) configuration which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). Lastly, the ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).

  14. Electrodeposition mechanism and characterization of Ni-Cu alloy coatings from a eutectic-based ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaohua; Guo, Xingwu; Yang, Haiyan; Dai, JiChun; Zhu, Rongyu; Gong, Jia; Peng, Liming; Ding, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    The electrodeposition mechanism, microstructures and corrosion resistances of Ni-Cu alloy coatings on Cu substrate were investigated in a choline chloride-urea (1:2 molar ratio) eutectic-based ionic liquid (1:2 ChCl-urea IL) containing nickel and copper chlorides. Cyclic voltammetry showed that the onset reduction potentials for Cu (∼-0.32 V) and for Ni (∼-0.47 V) were close to each other, indicating that Ni-Cu co-deposition could be easily achieved in the absence of complexing agent which was indispensable in aqueous plating electrolyte. Chronoamperometric investigations revealed that Ni-Cu deposits followed the three-dimensional instantaneous nucleation/growth mechanism, thus producing a solid solution. The compositions, microstructures and corrosion resistances of Ni-Cu alloy coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition current densities. Ni-Cu alloy coatings were α-Ni(Cu) solid solutions, and the coating containing ∼17.6 at.% Cu exhibited the best corrosion resistance because of its dense and crack-free structure.

  15. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111) through an η2(C,O) configuration, which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). The ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).

  16. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-02-23

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111)more » through an η2(C,O) configuration which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). Lastly, the ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).« less

  17. Tuning the magnetic properties of multisegmented Ni/Cu electrodeposited nanowires with controllable Ni lengths.

    PubMed

    Susano, M; Proenca, M P; Moraes, S; Sousa, C T; Araújo, J P

    2016-08-19

    The fabrication of segmented Ni/Cu nanowires (NWs), with tunable structural and magnetic properties, is reported. A potentiostatic electrodeposition method with a single electrolytic bath has been used to fabricate multisegmented Ni/Cu NWs inside a highly hexagonally ordered anodic nanoporous alumina membrane, with diameters of 50 nm and Ni segment lengths (L Ni) tuned from 10 nm up to 140 nm. The x-ray diffraction results evidenced a strong dependence of the Ni NWs crystallographic face-centered-cubic (fcc) texture along the [220] direction on the aspect ratio of the NWs. The magnetic behavior of the multisegmented Ni/Cu NW arrays, as a function of the magnetic field and temperature, is also studied and correlated with their structural and morphological properties. Micromagnetic simulations, together with the experimental results, showed a dominant antiferromagnetic coupling between Ni segments along the wire length for small low aspect-ratio magnetic segments. When increasing the Ni segments' length, the magnetic interactions between these along the wire became stronger, favouring a ferromagnetic coupling. The Curie temperature of the NWs was also found to strongly depend on the Ni magnetic segment length. Particularly the Curie temperature was found to be reduced 75 K for the 20 nm Ni segments, following the finite-size scaling relation with ξ 0 = 8.1 Å and γ = 0.48. These results emphasize the advantages of using a template assisted method to electrodeposit multilayer NWs, as it allows an easy tailor of the respective morphological, chemical, structural and magnetic properties.

  18. Level of NICU Quality of Developmental Care and Neurobehavioral Performance in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Alberto; Bellù, Roberto; Tronick, Ed; Borgatti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between the neurobehavior of very preterm infants and the level of NICU quality of developmental care. METHODS: The neurobehavior of 178 very preterm infants (gestational age ≤29 weeks and/or birth weight ≤1500 g) from 25 NICUs participating in a large multicenter, longitudinal study (Neonatal Adequate Care for Quality of Life, NEO-ACQUA) was examined with a standardized neurobehavioral assessment, the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS). A questionnaire, the NEO-ACQUA Quality of Care Checklist was used to evaluate the level of developmental care in each of the NICUs. A factor analyses applied to NEO-ACQUA Quality of Care Checklist produced 2 main factors: (1) the infant-centered care (ICC) index, which measures parents’ involvement in the care of their infant and other developmentally oriented care interventions, and (2) the infant pain management (IPM) index, which measures the NICU approach to and the procedures used for reducing infant pain. The relations between NNNS neurobehavioral scores and the 2 indexes were evaluated. RESULTS: Infants from NICUs with high scores on the ICC evidenced higher attention and regulation, less excitability and hypotonicity, and lower stress/abstinence NNNS scores than infants from low-care units. Infants from NICUs with high scores on the IPM evidenced higher attention and arousal, lower lethargy and nonoptimal reflexes NNNS scores than preterm infants from low-scoring NICUs. CONCLUSIONS: Very preterm infant neurobehavior was associated with higher levels of developmental care both in ICC and in IPM, suggesting that these practices support better neurobehavioral stability. PMID:22492762

  19. GH1-family 6-P-β-glucosidases from human microbiome lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Karolina; Tan, Kemin; Li, Hui; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    In lactic acid bacteria and other bacteria, carbohydrate uptake is mostly governed by phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs). PTS-dependent translocation through the cell membrane is coupled with phosphorylation of the incoming sugar. After translocation through the bacterial membrane, the β-glycosidic bond in 6′-­P-­β-glucoside is cleaved, releasing 6-P-β-glucose and the respective aglycon. This reaction is catalyzed by 6-P-β-glucosidases, which belong to two glycoside hydrolase (GH) families: GH1 and GH4. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of GH1 6-P-β-glucosidases from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPbg1) and Streptococcus mutans (SmBgl) and their complexes with ligands are reported. Both enzymes show hydrolytic activity towards 6′-P-β-glucosides. The LpPbg1 structure has been determined in an apo form as well as in a complex with phosphate and a glucose molecule corresponding to the aglycon molecule. The S. mutans homolog contains a sulfate ion in the phosphate-dedicated subcavity. SmBgl was also crystallized in the presence of the reaction product 6-P-β-glucose. For a mutated variant of the S. mutans enzyme (E375Q), the structure of a 6′-P-salicin complex has also been determined. The presence of natural ligands enabled the definition of the structural elements that are responsible for substrate recognition during catalysis. PMID:23519420

  20. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Enrique; Crehuet, Ramon; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-09-01

    Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions) favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  1. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase family

    PubMed Central

    González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida-Odette; Montes, Ricardo A. Chávez; de Folter, Stefan; Andrés-Hernández, Liliana; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Sawers, Ruairidh J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members. PMID:26042133

  2. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase family.

    PubMed

    González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida-Odette; Montes, Ricardo A Chávez; de Folter, Stefan; Andrés-Hernández, Liliana; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Sawers, Ruairidh J H

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members.

  3. Global trophic position comparison of two dominant mesopelagic fish families (Myctophidae, Stomiidae) using amino acid nitrogen isotopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Choy, C Anela; Davison, Peter C; Drazen, Jeffrey C; Flynn, Adrian; Gier, Elizabeth J; Hoffman, Joel C; McClain-Counts, Jennifer P; Miller, Todd W; Popp, Brian N; Ross, Steve W; Sutton, Tracey T

    2012-01-01

    The δ(15)N values of organisms are commonly used across diverse ecosystems to estimate trophic position and infer trophic connectivity. We undertook a novel cross-basin comparison of trophic position in two ecologically well-characterized and different groups of dominant mid-water fish consumers using amino acid nitrogen isotope compositions. We found that trophic positions estimated from the δ(15)N values of individual amino acids are nearly uniform within both families of these fishes across five global regions despite great variability in bulk tissue δ(15)N values. Regional differences in the δ(15)N values of phenylalanine confirmed that bulk tissue δ(15)N values reflect region-specific water mass biogeochemistry controlling δ(15)N values at the base of the food web. Trophic positions calculated from amino acid isotopic analyses (AA-TP) for lanternfishes (family Myctophidae) (AA-TP ∼2.9) largely align with expectations from stomach content studies (TP ∼3.2), while AA-TPs for dragonfishes (family Stomiidae) (AA-TP ∼3.2) were lower than TPs derived from stomach content studies (TP∼4.1). We demonstrate that amino acid nitrogen isotope analysis can overcome shortcomings of bulk tissue isotope analysis across biogeochemically distinct systems to provide globally comparative information regarding marine food web structure.

  4. Global trophic position comparison of two dominant mesopelagic fish families (Myctophidae, Stomiidae) using amino acid nitrogen isotopic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, C. Anela; Davison, Peter C.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Flynn, Adrian; Gier, Elizabeth J.; Hoffman, Joel C.; McClain-Counts, Jennifer P.; Miller, Todd W.; Popp, Brian N.; Ross, Steve W.; Sutton, Tracey T.

    2012-01-01

    The δ15N values of organisms are commonly used across diverse ecosystems to estimate trophic position and infer trophic connectivity. We undertook a novel cross-basin comparison of trophic position in two ecologically well-characterized and different groups of dominant mid-water fish consumers using amino acid nitrogen isotope compositions. We found that trophic positions estimated from the δ15N values of individual amino acids are nearly uniform within both families of these fishes across five global regions despite great variability in bulk tissue δ15N values. Regional differences in the δ15N values of phenylalanine confirmed that bulk tissue δ15N values reflect region-specific water mass biogeochemistry controlling δ15N values at the base of the food web. Trophic positions calculated from amino acid isotopic analyses (AA-TP) for lanternfishes (family Myctophidae) (AA-TP ~2.9) largely align with expectations from stomach content studies (TP ~3.2), while AA-TPs for dragonfishes (family Stomiidae) (AA-TP ~3.2) were lower than TPs derived from stomach content studies (TP~4.1). We demonstrate that amino acid nitrogen isotope analysis can overcome shortcomings of bulk tissue isotope analysis across biogeochemically distinct systems to provide globally comparative information regarding marine food web structure.

  5. An evidence-based approach to nipple feeding in a level III NICU: nurse autonomy, developmental care, and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Catherine S; Woida, Amy Marie Werner

    2007-01-01

    Historically, nipple feeding in the NICU has been initiated and advanced by physician order based on nursing observation and suggestions. The growing evidence base regarding nipple feeding readiness and progression, contingent caregiving, and nurse autonomy in decision making prompted our Level III NICU to reconsider our process. A literature review and discussions resulted in new protocols for initiating and advancing nipple feedings for three distinct groups: healthy preterm infants, preterm infants with complicated medical courses, and sick term or posttcrm infants. Through incorporating contingent earegiving, greater autonomy for the bedside nurse, developmental support, and collaboration, we expect to improve outcomes, comnuinication, and problem solving.

  6. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  7. General health status of residents of the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Ekosse, Georges

    2005-10-01

    Residents of the Selebi Phikwe area, Botswana where nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) is being exploited often exhibit symptoms of varied degrees of ailments, sicknesses and diseases. A need to investigate their general health status was therefore eminent. Primary data was obtained by means of a questionnaire and structured interviews conducted with individuals, health service providers, business enterprises and educational Institutions. The generated data revealed common ailments, sicknesses and diseases in the area with the four most frequent health complaints being frequent coughing headaches, influenza/common colds and rampant chest pains. Research findings indicated that residents had respiratory tract-related problems, suspected to be linked to the effects of air pollution caused by the emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from mining and smelting activities. Residents were frequently in contact with SO2 and related gases and fumes, mineral and silica dust generated from the mining processes. No clearly demarcating differences were noticed in the health status of residents living in the control site from those in the main study area. However, sites most affected were those close to where Ni-Cu is exploited. Environmental factors resulting from mining and smelting activities, among others, could be contributory to the negative health effects occurring at Selebi Phikwe.

  8. Performance Evaluation of New-Generation Pulse Oximeters in the NICU: Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Nizami, Shermeen; Greenwood, Kim; Barrowman, Nick; Harrold, JoAnn

    2015-09-01

    This crossover observational study compares the data characteristics and performance of new-generation Nellcor OXIMAX and Masimo SET SmartPod pulse oximeter technologies. The study was conducted independent of either original equipment manufacturer (OEM) across eleven preterm infants in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The SmartPods were integrated with Dräger Infinity Delta monitors. The Delta monitor measured the heart rate (HR) using an independent electrocardiogram sensor, and the two SmartPods collected arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and pulse rate (PR). All patient data were non-Gaussian. Nellcor PR showed a higher correlation with the HR as compared to Masimo PR. The statistically significant difference found in their median values (1% for SpO2, 1 bpm for PR) was deemed clinically insignificant. SpO2 alarms generated by both SmartPods were observed and categorized for performance evaluation. Results for sensitivity, positive predictive value, accuracy and false alarm rates were Nellcor (80.3, 50, 44.5, 50%) and Masimo (72.2, 48.2, 40.6, 51.8%) respectively. These metrics were not statistically significantly different between the two pulse oximeters. Despite claims by OEMs, both pulse oximeters exhibited high false alarm rates, with no statistically or clinically significant difference in performance. These findings have a direct impact on alarm fatigue in the NICU. Performance evaluation studies can also impact medical device purchase decisions made by hospital administrators.

  9. Light Reduction Capabilities of Homemade and Commercial Incubator Covers in NICU.

    PubMed

    Ludington-Hoe, Susan M; Abouelfettoh, Amel

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of high-risk neonates' exposure to aversive light stimulation is an important component of developmentally supportive care. In neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), usually light is reduced by reducing the room's light level or by using incubator covers. Many types of incubator covers are in use, including homemade and commercial covers. A comparative study was used to determine the light reducing capabilities of 19 homemade incubator covers, 2 commercial covers, and 1 receiving blanket. The covers were tested by covering and uncovering an incubator and an oxygen hood in the NICU during daytime and nighttime lightings. The light reducing capabilities value was determined for each cover using an Extech light dosimeter when the cover was placed over and removed from an oxyhood, and an incubator. The study showed that the light reducing capability of the commercial covers was 91.2%, the homemade covers capability was 72.1%, and the receiving blankets capability was 55.1%. A significant difference between the commercial and homemade covers was found (F = 452.50, P < 0.00). Commercial incubator covers are the most effective covers to achieve light reduction; homemade covers can be effective if made large enough so that they completely cover all sides of the incubator.

  10. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, K. W.; Berumen, M. L.; Mateo, I.; Elsdon, T. S.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas.

  11. NICU staff

    MedlinePlus

    ... The attending doctor has completed fellowship training in neonatology and residency training in pediatrics. Each fellowship most ... other specialists to help with your baby's care. NEONATOLOGY FELLOW A neonatology fellow is a doctor who ...

  12. The aspartate-family pathway of plants: linking production of essential amino acids with energy and stress regulation.

    PubMed

    Galili, Gad

    2011-02-01

    The Asp family pathway of plants is highly important from a nutritional standpoint because it leads to the synthesis of the four essential amino acids Lys, Thr, Met and Ile. These amino acids are not synthesized by human and its monogastric livestock and should be supplemented in their diets. Among the Asp-family amino acids, Lys is considered as the nutritionally most important essential amino acid because its level is most limiting in cereal grains, representing the largest source of plant foods and feeds worldwide. Metabolic engineering approaches led to significant increase in Lys level in seeds by enhancing its synthesis and reducing its catabolism. However, results from the model plant Arabidopsis showed that this approach may retard seed germination due to a major negative effect on the levels of a number of TCA cycle metabolites that associate with cellular energy. In the present review, we discuss the regulatory metabolic link of the Asp-family pathway with the TCA cycle and its biological significance upon exposure to stress conditions that cause energy deprivation. In addition, we also discuss how deep understanding of the regulatory metabolic link of the Asp-family pathway with energy and stress regulation can be used to improve Lys level in seeds of important crop species, minimizing the interference with the cellular energy status and plant-stress interaction. This review thus provides an example showing how deep understanding the inter-regulation of metabolism with plant stress physiology can lead to successful nutritional improvements with minimal negative effect on plant growth and response to stressful environments.

  13. The Human Gene SLC25A29, of Solute Carrier Family 25, Encodes a Mitochondrial Transporter of Basic Amino Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation. PMID:24652292

  14. The human gene SLC25A29, of solute carrier family 25, encodes a mitochondrial transporter of basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-05-09

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation.

  15. Cloning and characterization of the NapA acid phosphatase/phosphotransferase of Morganella morganii: identification of a new family of bacterial acid-phosphatase-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Thaller, M C; Lombardi, G; Berlutti, F; Schippa, S; Rossolini, G M

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding a minor phosphate-irrepressible acid phosphatase (named NapA) of Morganella morganii was cloned and sequenced, and its product characterized. NapA is a secreted acid phosphatase composed of four 27 kDa polypeptide subunits. The enzyme is active on several organic phosphate monoesters but not on diesters, and is also endowed with transphosphorylating activity from organic phosphoric acid esters to nucleosides and other compounds with free hydroxyl groups. Its activity is inhibited by EDTA, inorganic phosphate, nucleosides and Ca2+, but not by fluoride or tartrate, and is enhanced by Mg2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. At the sequence level, the NapA enzyme did not show similarities to any other sequenced bacterial phosphatases. However, a search for homologous genes in sequence databases allowed identification of two open reading frames located within sequenced regions of the Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis genomes respectively, encoding proteins of unknown function which are highly homologous to the Morganella enzyme. Moreover, the properties of the NapA enzyme are very similar to those reported for the periplasmic nonspecific acid phosphatase II of Salmonella typhimurium (for which no sequence data are available). These data point to the existence of a new family of bacterial acid phosphatases, which we propose designating class B bacterial acid phosphatases.

  16. Principal transcriptional regulation and genome-wide system interactions of the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid networks of amino acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Less, Hadar; Angelovici, Ruthie; Tzin, Vered; Galili, Gad

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid metabolism is among the most important and best recognized networks within biological systems. In plants, amino acids serve multiple functions associated with growth. Besides their function in protein synthesis, the amino acids are also catabolized into energy-associated metabolites as well we into numerous secondary metabolites, which are essential for plant growth and response to various stresses. Despite the central importance of amino acids in plants growth, elucidation of the regulation of amino acid metabolism within the context of the entire system, particularly transcriptional regulation, is still in its infancy. The different amino acids are synthesized by a number of distinct metabolic networks, which are expected to possess regulatory cross interactions between them for proper coordination of their interactive functions, such as incorporation into proteins. Yet, individual amino acid metabolic networks are also expected to differentially cross interact with various genome-wide gene expression programs and metabolic networks, in respect to their functions as precursors for various metabolites with distinct functions. In the present review, we discuss our recent genomics, metabolic and bioinformatics studies, which were aimed at addressing these questions, focusing mainly on the Asp-family metabolic network as the main example and also comparing it to the aromatic amino acids metabolic network as a second example (Angelovici et al. in Plant Physiol 151:2058-2072, 2009; Less and Galili in BMC Syst Biol 3:14, 2009; Tzin et al. in Plant J 60:156-167, 2009). Our focus on these two networks is because of the followings: (i) both networks are central to plant metabolism and growth and are also precursors for a wide range of primary and secondary metabolites that are indispensable to plant growth; (ii) the amino acids produced by these two networks are also essential to the nutrition and health of human and farm animals; and (iii) both networks contain

  17. Elevated cholesterol and bile acid synthesis in an adult patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Reduction by a high glucose diet.

    PubMed

    Stacpoole, P W; Grundy, S M; Swift, L L; Greene, H L; Slonim, A E; Burr, I M

    1981-11-01

    Elevated levels of cholesterol synthesis are reported for several young children with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HFH) and are considered to contribute directly to their hypercholesterolemia. In contrast, increased cholesterol production has not previously been found in adult patients with HFH. Using the fecal steroid balance technique, we studied rates of cholesterol and bile acid synthesis in a 24-yr-old man who had severe hypercholesterolemia typical of HFH and who lacked skin fibroblast low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity. On an average diet (45% carbohydrate, 40% fat, 15% protein) mean +/- SEM cholesterol (24.8 +/- 1.4 mg/kg per d) and bile acid (11.1 +/- 1.6 mg/kg per d) excretion were approximately threefold higher than normal. When an isocaloric high carbohydrate, low fat diet (90.5% glucose oligosaccharides, 1.3% safflower oil, 8.2% crystalline amino acids was substituted, mean cholesterol (13.0 +/- 0.5 mg/kg per d) and bile acid (8.6 +/- 0.4 mg/kg per d) fell markedly. The decline in fecal steroid excretion was accompanied by modest reductions in plasma total and LDL cholesterol concentrations and by a softening of cutaneous xanthomata. Although the patient phenotypically and biochemically resembled the HFH state, his family pedigree was not noteable for hypercholesterolemia. While the patient's father had premature cardiovascular disease, his mother had no evidence of heart disease, had normal plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels, and had normal fibroblast LDL receptor activity. Likewise, the plasma cholesterol levels of three other members of the patient's family were normal. Despite the unusual genotypic background of this individual, however, the fecal balance data shows that elevated cholesterol and bile acid synthesis may occur in adult, as well as juvenile, patients with HFH and may be responsive to dietary control.

  18. [Effects of treating with concentrated sulfuric acid on the seed germination of ten Hibiscus hamabo provenance families].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Xue; Sun, Hai-Jing; Liu, Yun; Chen, Yi-Tai; Feng, Da-Lan; Li, Sha

    2012-11-01

    The seeds from ten Hibiscus hamabo provenance families were treated with concentrated sulfuric acid for different durations (0, 10, 15, and 20 min) , and the seed germination rate, germination energy, and germination index, as well as the seed relative water adsorption rate, soluble sugar and starch contents, and alpha-amylase activity during the germination, were determined, aimed to study the effects of treating with concentrated sulfuric acid on the seed germination of H. hamabo and the differences of the seed germination among different H. hamabo provenance families. After treated with concentrated sulfuric acid, the seed germination rate, germination energy, and germination index increased significantly, and the germination time shortened remarkably. Treating with concentrated sulfuric acid for 15 minutes had the best effect, i. e., the germination rate, germination energy, and germination index were up to 95.7%, 91.3%, and 13.28, respectively, and the germination time was the shortest. The seed germination rate, germination energy, and germination index differed significantly with different provenance families, the highest germination index (15.13) being 2.12 times of the lowest germination index (7.15), and the highest germination energy (98.0%) being 1.77 times of the lowest one (55.5%). Treating with concentrated sulfuric acid accelerated the physiological and biochemical processes of seed germination, and the relative water absorption rate, soluble sugar content, and a-amylase activity were decreased after an initial increase, with the maximum at the early stage of germination. There was a significant negative relationship between the seed starch content and the seed germination index.

  19. Neurobehavioral Assessment from Fetus to Infant: The NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale and the Fetal Neurobehavior Coding Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Amy L.; Fallone, Melissa Duncan; Lester, Barry

    2005-01-01

    This review provides an overview and definition of the concept of neurobehavior in human development. Two neurobehavioral assessments used by the authors in current fetal and infant research are discussed: the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Assessment Scale and the Fetal Neurobehavior Coding System. This review will present how the two assessments…

  20. Characterization and analysis of the cotton cyclopropane fatty acid synthase family and their contribution to cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu X. H.; Shanklin J.; Rawat, R.

    2011-05-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA) have been found in certain gymnosperms, Malvales, Litchi and other Sapindales. The presence of their unique strained ring structures confers physical and chemical properties characteristic of unsaturated fatty acids with the oxidative stability displayed by saturated fatty acids making them of considerable industrial interest. While cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPE) are well-known inhibitors of fatty acid desaturation in animals, CPE can also inhibit the stearoyl-CoA desaturase and interfere with the maturation and reproduction of some insect species suggesting that in addition to their traditional role as storage lipids, CPE can contribute to the protection of plants from herbivory. Three genes encoding cyclopropane synthase homologues GhCPS1, GhCPS2 and GhCPS3 were identified in cotton. Determination of gene transcript abundance revealed differences among the expression of GhCPS1, 2 and 3 showing high, intermediate and low levels, respectively, of transcripts in roots and stems; whereas GhCPS1 and 2 are both expressed at low levels in seeds. Analyses of fatty acid composition in different tissues indicate that the expression patterns of GhCPS1 and 2 correlate with cyclic fatty acid (CFA) distribution. Deletion of the N-terminal oxidase domain lowered GhCPS's ability to produce cyclopropane fatty acid by approximately 70%. GhCPS1 and 2, but not 3 resulted in the production of cyclopropane fatty acids upon heterologous expression in yeast, tobacco BY2 cell and Arabidopsis seed. In cotton GhCPS1 and 2 gene expression correlates with the total CFA content in roots, stems and seeds. That GhCPS1 and 2 are expressed at a similar level in seed suggests both of them can be considered potential targets for gene silencing to reduce undesirable seed CPE accumulation. Because GhCPS1 is more active in yeast than the published Sterculia CPS and shows similar activity when expressed in model plant systems, it represents a strong candidate gene for

  1. Inhibition of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 by unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yashiro, Koji

    2016-11-01

    A human member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, AKR1B10, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase toward various carbonyl compounds including reactive aldehydes, and is normally expressed in intestines. The enzyme is overexpressed in several extraintestinal cancers, and suggested as a potential target for cancer treatment. We found that saturated and cis-unsaturated fatty acids inhibit AKR1B10. Among the saturated fatty acids, myristic acid was the most potent, showing the IC50 value of 4.2 μM cis-Unsaturated fatty acids inhibited AKR1B10 more potently, and linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids showed the lowest IC50 values of 1.1 μM. The inhibition by these fatty acids was reversible and kinetically competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the Ki values of 0.24-1.1 μM. These fatty acids, except for α-linoleic acid, were much less inhibitory to structurally similar aldose reductase. Site-directed mutagenesis study suggested that the fatty acids interact with several active site residues of AKR1B10, of which Gln114, Val301 and Gln303 are responsible for the inhibitory selectivity. Linoleic and arachidonic acids also effectively inhibited AKR1B10-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in HCT-15 cells. Thus, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids may be used as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of cancers that up-regulate AKR1B10.

  2. Informed consent in the NICU setting: an ethically optimal model for research solicitation.

    PubMed

    Golec, Lisa; Gibbins, Sharyn; Dunn, Michael S; Hebert, Philip

    2004-12-01

    Recruiting patients for studies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is a complex endeavour. Much discussion has occurred regarding the optimal recruitment "model" for this environment. This paper discusses current and suggested recruitment models for the NICU setting and presents a systematic approach to the consent process that focuses on the protection and promotion of parental autonomy. The proposed model incorporates several key considerations for an ethically optimal approach to the inclusion of neonates in research: informing parents about research and their rights prior to any solicitation, asking parents if they wish to be approached for research, approaching for one study at a time, assuring the study is relevant to the infants' current clinical status, minimising information overload, allowing parents appropriate time (which will vary from study to study) to consider their choice, and providing a waiting period between subsequent approaches. It is argued that parental ability to make a truly informed choice may be improved when following the proposed model.

  3. NICU procedures are getting sweeter: development of a sucrose protocol for neonatal procedural pain.

    PubMed

    Mokhnach, Larisa; Anderson, Marilyn; Glorioso, Rachelle; Loeffler, Katie; Shinabarger, Kelly; Thorngate, Lauren; Yates, Marna; Diercks, Kristi; Berkan, Maureen; Hou, Shwu-Shin; Millar, April; Thomas, Karen A; Walker, Wendy; Zbirun, Ilona

    2010-01-01

    Neonates in the neonatal intensive care nursery experience multiple, painful, tissue-damaging procedures daily. Pain among neonates is often underestimated and untreated, producing untoward consequences. A literature review established strong evidence supporting the use of sucrose as an analgesic for minor procedural pain among neonates. A review of unit practices and nurses' experiential evidence initiated the production of a standardized protocol in our unit at the University of Washington Medical Center NICU in Seattle.Nursing practices surrounding sucrose use differed widely in dose, timing, and patient application. We carefully evaluated evidence documenting the effectiveness as well as the safety of sucrose administration and wrote a protocol and practice standards for our primarily premature patient population. This article describes the development and execution of a standardized, nurse-implemented, sucrose protocol to reduce procedural pain.

  4. Neonatal procedural pain exposure predicts lower cortisol and behavioral reactivity in preterm infants in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth E; Holsti, Liisa; Haley, David W; Oberlander, Tim; Weinberg, Joanne; Solimano, Alfonso; Whitfield, Michael F; Fitzgerald, Colleen; Yu, Wayne

    2005-02-01

    Data from animal models indicate that neonatal stress or pain can permanently alter subsequent behavioral and/or physiological reactivity to stressors. However, cumulative effects of pain related to acute procedures in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on later stress and/or pain reactivity has received limited attention. The objective of this study is to examine relationships between prior neonatal pain exposure (number of skin breaking procedures), and subsequent stress and pain reactivity in preterm infants in the NICU. Eighty-seven preterm infants were studied at 32 (+/-1 week) postconceptional age (PCA). Infants who received analgesia or sedation in the 72 h prior to each study, or any postnatal dexamethasone, were excluded. Outcomes were infant responses to two different stressors studied on separate days in a repeated measures randomized crossover design: (1) plasma cortisol to stress of a fixed series of nursing procedures; (2) behavioral (Neonatal Facial Coding System; NFCS) and cardiac reactivity to pain of blood collection. Among infants born

  5. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  6. The ETS family member ERM contains an alpha-helical acidic activation domain that contacts TAFII60.

    PubMed Central

    Defossez, P A; Baert, J L; Monnot, M; de Launoit, Y

    1997-01-01

    Transcription factors are modular entities built up of discrete domains, some devoted to DNA binding and others permitting transcriptional modulation. The structure of DNA binding domains has been thoroughly investigated and structural classes clearly defined. In sharp contrast, the structural constraints put on transactivating regions, if any, are mostly unknown. Our investigations focus on ERM, a eukaryotic transcription factor of the ETS family. We have previously shown that ERM harbours two transactivating domains (TADs) with distinct functional features: AD1 lies in the first 72 amino acids of ERM, while AD2 sits in the last 62. Here we show that AD1 is a bona fide acidic TAD, for it activated transcription in yeast cells, while AD2 did not. AD1 contains a 20 amino acid stretch predicted to form an alpha-helix that is found unchanged in the related PEA3 and ER81 transcription factors. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that a 32 amino acid peptide encompassing this region is unstructured in water but folds into a helix when the hydrophobic solvent trifluoroethanol is added. The isolated helix was sufficient to activate transcription and mutations predicted to disrupt it dramatically affected AD1-driven transactivation, whereas mutations decreasing its acidity had more gentle effects. A phenylalanine residue within the helix was particularly sensitive to mutations. Finally, we observed that ERM bound TAFII60 via AD1 and bound TBP and TAFII40, presumably via other activation domains. PMID:9358152

  7. Plasma Amino Acid Levels in Children with Autism and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldred, Sarah; Moore, Kieran M.; Fitzgerald, Michael; Waring, Rosemary H.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma amino acid levels were measured in autistic (n=12), Asperger syndrome (n=11) patients, their parents and siblings. Patients with autism or Asperger syndrome and their siblings and parents all had raised glutamic acid, phenyalanine, asparagine, tyrosine, alanine, and lysine levels than age-matched controls. Results suggest dysregulated amino…

  8. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L.

    2010-01-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  9. The fatty acid compositions of several plant seed oils belong to Leguminosae and Umbelliferae families.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Meryem; Geçgel, Umit; Duran, Ahmet; Uslu, Nurhan; Özcan, Mehmet Musa

    2014-05-01

    In samples with 1,009, 7,723, 7,618, 7,618, 1,004 and 1,009 number, oleic acid were found as 62.0, 77.0, 74.84, 71.55, 54.52 and 62.30 %, respectively. In other samples, oleic acid content was determined between 17.43 % (1,589) and 34.86 % (1,298). Linoleic acid content of seed oils ranged from 6.52 % (7,727) to 57.29 % (1,501). In addition, linolenic acid content was found between 0.22 % (7,618) and 46.91 % (1,589). Palmitic acid content of samples changed between 2.03 % (7,727) and 19.81 % (1,298). Capric acid was found at high level in 1,009 (8.53 %), 7,727 (37.31 %) and 1,004 (8.28 %) samples. Caproic acid was found in only 7,727 (3.38 %).

  10. The role of the acidity of N-heteroaryl sulfonamides as inhibitors of bcl-2 family protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Touré, B Barry; Miller-Moslin, Karen; Yusuff, Naeem; Perez, Lawrence; Doré, Michael; Joud, Carol; Michael, Walter; DiPietro, Lucian; van der Plas, Simon; McEwan, Michael; Lenoir, Francois; Hoe, Madelene; Karki, Rajesh; Springer, Clayton; Sullivan, John; Levine, Kymberly; Fiorilla, Catherine; Xie, Xiaoling; Kulathila, Raviraj; Herlihy, Kara; Porter, Dale; Visser, Michael

    2013-02-14

    Overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins is commonly associated with cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics. Here, we describe the structure-based optimization of a series of N-heteroaryl sulfonamides that demonstrate potent mechanism-based cell death. The role of the acidic nature of the sulfonamide moiety as it relates to potency, solubility, and clearance is examined. This has led to the discovery of novel heterocyclic replacements for the acylsulfonamide core of ABT-737 and ABT-263.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, Olga P.; Park, Sunjung; Ilut, Daniel C.; Inmon, Jay J.; Millhollon, Jon C.; Liechty, Zach; Page, Justin T.; Jenks, Matthew A.; Chapman, Kent D.; Udall, Joshua A.; Gore, Michael A.; Dyer, John M.

    2014-11-18

    The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, and thus perform well in these geographical areas, cotton seedlings are sensitive to cold temperature, which can significantly reduce crop yields. One of the common biochemical responses of plants to cold temperatures is an increase in omega-3 fatty acids, which protects cellular function by maintaining membrane integrity. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterize the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) gene family in G. hirsutum, with an emphasis on identifying omega-3 FADs involved in cold temperature adaptation. Results: Eleven omega-3 FAD genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and characterization of the gene family in extant A and D diploid species (G. herbaceum and G. raimondii, respectively) allowed for unambiguous genome assignment of all homoeologs in tetraploid G. hirsutum. The omega-3 FAD family of cotton includes five distinct genes, two of which encode endoplasmic reticulum-type enzymes (FAD3-1 and FAD3-2) and three that encode chloroplast-type enzymes (FAD7/8-1, FAD7/8-2, and FAD7/8-3). The FAD3-2 gene was duplicated in the A genome progenitor species after the evolutionary split from the D progenitor, but before the interspecific hybridization event that gave rise to modern tetraploid cotton. RNA-seq analysis revealed conserved, gene-specific expression patterns in various organs and cell types and semi-quantitative RT-PCR further revealed that FAD7/8-1 was specifically induced during cold temperature treatment of G. hirsutum seedlings. Conclusions: The omega-3 FAD gene family in cotton was characterized at the genome-wide level

  12. Molecular basis of fatty acid selectivity in the zDHHC family of S-acyltransferases revealed by click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Jennifer; Munro, Kevin R.; Davidson, Stuart C.; Riviere, Matthieu; Wojno, Justyna; Smith, Terry K.; Tomkinson, Nicholas C. O.; Chamberlain, Luke H.

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation is a major posttranslational modification, catalyzed by the zinc finger DHHC domain containing (zDHHC) enzyme family. S-acylated proteins can be modified by different fatty acids; however, very little is known about how zDHHC enzymes contribute to acyl chain heterogeneity. Here, we used fatty acid-azide/alkyne labeling of mammalian cells, showing their transformation into acyl-CoAs and subsequent click chemistry-based detection, to demonstrate that zDHHC enzymes have marked differences in their fatty acid selectivity. This difference in selectivity was apparent even for highly related enzymes, such as zDHHC3 and zDHHC7, which displayed a marked difference in their ability to use C18:0 acyl-CoA as a substrate. Furthermore, we identified isoleucine-182 in transmembrane domain 3 of zDHHC3 as a key determinant in limiting the use of longer chain acyl-CoAs by this enzyme. This study uncovered differences in the fatty acid selectivity profiles of cellular zDHHC enzymes and mapped molecular determinants governing this selectivity. PMID:28167757

  13. Density functional theory fragment descriptors to quantify the reactivity of a molecular family: application to amino acids.

    PubMed

    Senet, P; Aparicio, F

    2007-04-14

    By using the exact density functional theory, one demonstrates that the value of the local electronic softness of a molecular fragment is directly related to the polarization charge (Coulomb hole) induced by a test electron removed (or added) from (at) the fragment. Our finding generalizes to a chemical group a formal relation between these molecular descriptors recently obtained for an atom in a molecule using an approximate atomistic model [P. Senet and M. Yang, J. Chem. Sci. 117, 411 (2005)]. In addition, a practical ab initio computational scheme of the Coulomb hole and related local descriptors of reactivity of a molecular family having in common a similar fragment is presented. As a blind test, the method is applied to the lateral chains of the 20 isolated amino acids. One demonstrates that the local softness of the lateral chain is a quantitative measure of the similarity of the amino acids. It predicts the separation of amino acids in different biochemical groups (aliphatic, basic, acidic, sulfur contained, and aromatic). The present approach may find applications in quantitative structure activity relationship methodology.

  14. Carbon tolerance of Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu/YSZ sub-μm sized SOFC thin film model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götsch, Thomas; Schachinger, Thomas; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Kaindl, Reinhard; Penner, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Thin films of YSZ, unsupported Ni-Cu 1:1 alloy phases and YSZ-supported Ni-Cu 1:1 alloy solutions have been reproducibly prepared by magnetron sputter deposition on Si wafers and NaCl(001) single crystal facets at two selected substrate temperatures of 298 K and 873 K. Subsequently, the layer properties of the resulting sub-μm thick thin films as well as the tendency towards carbon deposition following treatment in pure methane at 1073 K has been tested comparatively. Well-crystallized structures of cubic YSZ, cubic NiCu and cubic NiCu/YSZ have been obtained following deposition at 873 K on both substrates. Carbon is deposited on all samples following the trend Ni-Cu (1:1) = Ni-Cu (1:1)/YSZ > pure YSZ, indicating that at least the 1:1 composition of layered Ni-Cu alloy phases is not able to suppress the carbon deposition completely, rendering it unfavorable for usage as anode component in sub-μm sized fuel cells. It is shown that surfaces with a high Cu/Ni ratio nevertheless prohibit any carbon deposition.

  15. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study.

    PubMed

    Trunnelle, Kelly J; Bennett, Deborah H; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B; Tancredi, Daniel J; Gee, Shirley J; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure.

  16. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfuric acid on placental PRL-family hormone production and fetal growth retardation in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Kwan; Kang, Sung Goo; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Soo-Woong; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Dae Hwan; Son, Byung Chul; Kim, Kun Hyung; Suh, Chun Hui; Kim, Se Yeong; Park, Yeong Beom

    2015-02-05

    Perfluorooctane sulfuric acid (PFOS) is a persistent organic pollutant, causes fetal growth retardation but the mechanism is still unclear. This study focused on PFOS-induced toxicity such as placental trophoblast cell histopathological changes, endocrine function (i.e., prolactin (PRL)-family hormone production) and subsequent fetal growth retardation in mice. Maternal body weight gain, placental and fetal weights were significantly decreased in proportion to PFOS dosage. Placental efficiency (fetal weight/placental weight) was significantly reduced dose-dependently. Necrotic changes were observed in PFOS-treated placental tissues, and the area of injury increased dose-dependently. Finally, mRNA levels and maternal serum concentrations of the PRL-family hormones (mPL-II, mPLP-Cα, mPLP-K) were significantly reduced dose-dependently. In addition, the changing pattern between PRL-family hormone concentrations and fetal body weight was positively correlated. These results suggest that gestational PFOS treatment induces placental histopathological changes and disruption of endocrine function, finally may lead to fetal growth retardation in mice.

  17. On the conservation of the slow conformational dynamics within the amino acid kinase family: NAGK the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Enrique; Crehuet, Ramon; Bahar, Ivet

    2010-04-08

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) is the structural paradigm for examining the catalytic mechanisms and dynamics of amino acid kinase family members. Given that the slow conformational dynamics of the NAGK (at the microseconds time scale or slower) may be rate-limiting, it is of importance to assess the mechanisms of the most cooperative modes of motion intrinsically accessible to this enzyme. Here, we present the results from normal mode analysis using an elastic network model representation, which shows that the conformational mechanisms for substrate binding by NAGK strongly correlate with the intrinsic dynamics of the enzyme in the unbound form. We further analyzed the potential mechanisms of allosteric signalling within NAGK using a Markov model for network communication. Comparative analysis of the dynamics of family members strongly suggests that the low-frequency modes of motion and the associated intramolecular couplings that establish signal transduction are highly conserved among family members, in support of the paradigm sequence-->structure-->dynamics-->function.

  18. Molecular analysis of the acid sphingomyelinase deficiency in a family with an intermediate form of Niemann-Pick disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ferlinz, K; Hurwitz, R; Weiler, M; Suzuki, K; Sandhoff, K; Vanier, M T

    1995-01-01

    A novel point mutation in the lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase gene has been identified in the recently reported Serbian family with a clinically and biochemically atypical intermediate form of Niemann-Pick disease. The mutation was a T1171-->G transversion resulting in substitution of glycine for normal tryptophan at amino acid residue 391. The coding sequence was otherwise normal. All of the five affected individuals were almost certainly homoallelic, and both of the two obligate heterozygotes studied also carried the same mutation. This mutation is therefore likely to be directly associated with the atypical phenotype of these patients. Expression in COS-1 cells suggested a higher residual activity than that in cultured fibroblasts. A recently developed high-affinity rabbit antihuman sphingomyelinase antibody allowed us to study for the first time the biosynthesis, processing, and targeting of a mutant sphingomyelinase by metabolic labeling of cultured fibroblasts. The mutant enzyme protein was normally synthesized, processed, and routed to the lysosome but was apparently unstable and degraded rapidly once it reached the lysosome. Together with the finding of the relatively high residual activity in COS-1 cells, we interpret our observations to mean that instability and rapid breakdown of the mature mutant enzyme protein, due to the mutation rather than direct inactivation of the catalytic activity, is the primary mechanism for the deficiency of sphingomyelinase activity in these patients. A high prevalence of this mutation in the Serbian population is likely, since the family pedigree indicates that members from four reportedly unrelated families must have contributed the same mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7762557

  19. Association of Nursing Overtime, Nurse Staffing, and Unit Occupancy with Health Care-Associated Infections in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Beltempo, Marc; Blais, Régis; Lacroix, Guy; Cabot, Michèle; Piedboeuf, Bruno

    2017-04-04

    Objective This study aims to assess the association of nursing overtime, nurse staffing, and unit occupancy with health care-associated infections (HCAIs) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design A 2-year retrospective cohort study was conducted for 2,236 infants admitted in a Canadian tertiary care, 51-bed NICU. Daily administrative data were obtained from the database "Logibec" and combined to the patient outcomes database. Median values for the nursing overtime hours/total hours worked ratio, the available to recommended nurse staffing ratio, and the unit occupancy rate over 3-day periods before HCAI were compared with days that did not precede infections. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) that control for the latter factors and unit risk factors were also computed. Results A total of 122 (5%) infants developed a HCAI. The odds of having HCAI were higher on days that were preceded by a high nursing overtime ratio (aOR, 1.70; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.05-2.75, quartile [Q]4 vs. Q1). High unit occupancy rates were not associated with increased odds of infection (aOR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.47-1.51, Q4 vs. Q1) nor were higher available/recommended nurse ratios (aOR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.67-1.99, Q4 vs. Q1). Conclusion Nursing overtime is associated with higher odds of HCAI in the NICU.

  20. Long-Term Persistency of Abnormal Heart Rate Variability following Long NICU Stay and Surgery at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Mélanie; Lafrenaye, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with painful procedures during the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay. Full-term newborns can also experience pain, following surgery. These procedures can have long-lasting consequences. It has been shown that children born preterm show pain responses and cardiac alterations. This study aimed to explore the heart rate reactivity to pain in 107 subjects born either preterm or full-term who were between 7 and 25 years old at testing. We also evaluated the effect of pain experienced at birth, as represented by a longer NICU stay, time under ventilation, and surgery at birth. Participants were asked to immerse their right forearm in 10°C water for 2 minutes. Electrocardiograms were recorded at baseline and during the immersion procedure. Full-term subjects showed a stable increase in heart rate throughout the procedure, whereas preterm ones showed a strong increase at the beginning, which decreased over time. Also, preterm and full-term subjects who experienced pain at birth showed higher resting heart rate, stronger sympathetic activity, and lower cardiac vagal activity. Our study demonstrated a long-term impact of a long NICU stay and surgery at birth on cardiac autonomic activity. This could lead to impaired reactions to pain or stress in later life. PMID:24724021

  1. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    SciTech Connect

    Trunnelle, Kelly J.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Gee, Shirley J.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: • We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. • We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. • 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. • Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure.

  2. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  3. The EZ:Faast family of amino acid analysis kits: application of the GC-FID kit for rapid determination of plasma tryptophan and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2012-01-01

    Plasma tryptophan (Trp) and other amino acids (AA) can be determined rapidly by gas (GC) or liquid (LC) chromatography using the Phenomenex EZ:Faast(™) family of kits. Three kits are available: (1) GC-FID or -NPD, (2) GC-MS, (3) LC-MS. The two GC kits can determine 32 AA, whereas the LC-MS can determine five additional AA. All three kits, however, share the same experimental procedure up to and including the preparation of derivatised AA. The method is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE), thus saving time on prior removal of plasma or other proteins and interfering substances, and can be applied to other body fluids and experimental media and to supernatants of extracts of solid material. Briefly, SPE is performed using a proprietary cation-exchange mechanism. The acid solution of the internal standard ensures that the free amino acids are in an anionic form suitable for cationic binding. The alkaline nature of the elution medium ensures that the AA cations are released prior to derivatisation. The latter involves production of chloroformate derivatives of both the amino and carboxylic acid groups. With experience, six plasma samples can be so processed within 12 min. The shortest analytical run is <7 min per sample using the GC-FID/NPD kit. Despite its many steps, the procedure becomes second nature and an enjoyable task. I have now used the GC-FID kit with manual injection to process >1,600 plasma and other samples. Limit of detection of AA is 1 μM or less. The procedure has been validated and optimised for Trp and its main five brain uptake competitors.

  4. Elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl acids in family members of occupationally exposed workers: the importance of dust transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jianjie; Gao, Yan; Wang, Thanh; Liang, Yong; Zhang, Aiqian; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-01-01

    The exposure pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to humans are still not clear because of the complex living environment, and few studies have simultaneously investigated the bioaccumulative behaviour of different PFAAs in humans. In this study, serum, dust, duplicate diet, and other matrices were collected around a manufacturing plant in China, and homologous series of PFAAs were analysed. PFAA levels in dust and serum of local residents in this area were considerably higher than those in non-polluted area. Although dietary intake was the major exposure pathway in the present study, dust ingestion played an important role in this case. Serum PFAAs in local residents was significantly correlated with dust PFAAs levels in their living or working microenvironment. Serum PFAAs and dust PFAAs were significantly higher in family members of occupational workers (FM) than in ordinary residents (OR) (p < 0.01). After a careful analysis of the PFAAs exposure pathway, a potential pathway in addition to direct dust ingestion was suggested: PFAAs might transferred from occupational worker's clothes to dinners via cooking processes. The bioaccumulative potential of PFHxS and PFOS were higher than other PFAAs, which suggested a substantial difference between the bioaccumulative ability of perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorinated carboxylic acids. PMID:25791573

  5. New mono- and dimeric members of the secalonic acid family: blennolides A-G isolated from the fungus Blennoria sp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Krohn, Karsten; Flörke, Ulrich; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Antus, Sándor; Kurtán, Tibor; Rheinheimer, Joachim; Draeger, Siegfried; Schulz, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Blennolides A-G (2-8), seven unusual chromanones, were isolated together with secalonic acid B (1) from Blennoria sp., an endophytic fungus from Carpobrotus edulis. This is the first reported isolation of the blennolides 2 and 3 (hemisecalonic acids B and E), the existence of which as the monomeric units of the dimeric secalonic acids had long been postulated. A compound of the proposed structure 4 (beta-diversonolic ester) will need to be revised, as its reported data do not fit those of the established structure of blennolide C (4). Other monomers, the blennolides D-F (5-7) seem to be derived from blennolides A (2) and B (3) by rearrangement of the hydroaromatic ring. The heterodimer 8, composed of the monomeric blennolide A (2) and the rearranged 11-dehydroxy derivative of blennolide E (6), extends the ergochrome family with an ergoxanthin type of skeleton. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis and further confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study of a single crystal of 2. The absolute configurations were determined by TDDFT calculations of CD spectra, including the solid-state CD/TDDFT approach. Preliminary studies showed strong antifungal and antibacterial activities of these compounds against Microbotryum violaceum and Bacillus megaterium, respectively. They were also active against the alga Chlorella fusca and the bacterium Escherichia coli.

  6. Elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl acids in family members of occupationally exposed workers: the importance of dust transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianjie; Gao, Yan; Wang, Thanh; Liang, Yong; Zhang, Aiqian; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-03-01

    The exposure pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to humans are still not clear because of the complex living environment, and few studies have simultaneously investigated the bioaccumulative behaviour of different PFAAs in humans. In this study, serum, dust, duplicate diet, and other matrices were collected around a manufacturing plant in China, and homologous series of PFAAs were analysed. PFAA levels in dust and serum of local residents in this area were considerably higher than those in non-polluted area. Although dietary intake was the major exposure pathway in the present study, dust ingestion played an important role in this case. Serum PFAAs in local residents was significantly correlated with dust PFAAs levels in their living or working microenvironment. Serum PFAAs and dust PFAAs were significantly higher in family members of occupational workers (FM) than in ordinary residents (OR) (p < 0.01). After a careful analysis of the PFAAs exposure pathway, a potential pathway in addition to direct dust ingestion was suggested: PFAAs might transferred from occupational worker's clothes to dinners via cooking processes. The bioaccumulative potential of PFHxS and PFOS were higher than other PFAAs, which suggested a substantial difference between the bioaccumulative ability of perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorinated carboxylic acids.

  7. Influence of Gestational Age and Postnatal Age on Speech Sound Processing in NICU infants

    PubMed Central

    Key, Alexandra P.F.; Lambert, E. Warren; Aschner, Judy L.; Maitre, Nathalie L.

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the effect of gestational (GA) and postnatal (PNA) age on speech sound perception in infants. Auditory ERPs were recorded in response to speech sounds (CV syllables) in 50 infant NICU patients (born at 24–40 weeks gestation) prior to discharge. Efficiency of speech perception was quantified as absolute difference in mean amplitudes of ERPs in response to vowel (/a/–/u/) and consonant (/b/–/g/, /d/–/g/) contrasts within 150–250, 250–400, 400–700 ms after stimulus onset. Results indicated that both GA and PNA affected speech sound processing. These effects were more pronounced for consonant than vowel contrasts. Increasing PNA was associated with greater sound discrimination in infants born at or after 30 weeks GA, while minimal PNA-related changes were observed for infants with GA less than 30 weeks. Our findings suggest that a certain level of brain maturity at birth is necessary to benefit from postnatal experience in the first 4 months of life, and both gestational and postnatal ages need to be considered when evaluating infant brain responses. PMID:22332725

  8. Axially adjustable magnetic properties in arrays of multilayered Ni/Cu nanowires with variable segment sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi Tehrani, A.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Montazer, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    Arrays of multilayered Ni/Cu nanowires (NWs) with variable segment sizes were fabricated into anodic aluminum oxide templates using a pulsed electrodeposition method in a single bath for designated potential pulse times. Increasing the pulse time between 0.125 and 2 s in the electrodeposition of Ni enabled the formation of segments with thicknesses ranging from 25 to 280 nm and 10-110 nm in 42 and 65 nm diameter NWs, respectively, leading to disk-shaped, rod-shaped and/or near wire-shaped geometries. Using hysteresis loop measurements at room temperature, the axial and perpendicular magnetic properties were investigated. Regardless of the segment geometry, the axial coercivity and squareness significantly increased with increasing Ni segment thickness, in agreement with a decrease in calculated demagnetizing factors along the NW length. On the contrary, the perpendicular magnetic properties were found to be independent of the pulse times, indicating a competition between the intrawire interactions and the shape demagnetizing field.

  9. Magnetic behavior of NiCu nanowire arrays: Compositional, geometry and temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Palmero, E. M. Bran, C.; Real, R. P. del; Vázquez, M.; Magén, C.

    2014-07-21

    Arrays of Ni{sub 100−x}Cu{sub x} nanowires ranging in composition 0 ≤ x ≤ 75, diameter from 35 to 80 nm, and length from 150 nm to 28 μm have been fabricated by electrochemical co-deposition of Ni and Cu into self-ordered anodic aluminum oxide membranes. As determined by X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy, the crystalline structure shows fcc cubic symmetry with [111] preferred texture and preferential Ni or Cu lattice depending on the composition. Their magnetic properties such as coercivity and squareness have been determined as a function of composition and geometry in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer in the temperature range from 10 to 290 K for applied magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the nanowires axis. Addition of Cu into the NiCu alloy up to 50% enhances both parallel coercivity and squareness. For the higher Cu content, these properties decrease and the magnetization easy axis becomes oriented perpendicular to the wires. In addition, coercivity and squareness increase by decreasing the diameter of nanowires which is ascribed to the increase of shape anisotropy. The temperature dependent measurements reflect a complex behavior of the magnetic anisotropy as a result of energy contributions with different evolution with temperature.

  10. Nickel silicide for Ni/Cu contact mono-silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Seon Kyu; Kim, Dong Ho; Lee, Soo Hong

    2013-07-01

    A solar cell contact needs to be as thin as possible and have high conductivity since a thick contact causes shading loss and reduced current. Plating is a very suitable method for making a metal contact, and nickel is a high conductivity metal which is easy to form into a contact using electroless plating. After the nickel is plated on the silicon substrate, the nickel contact should be fired in order to form nickel silicide. Nickel silicide is used for the seed layer of the Cu contact for silicon solar cells. In this study, we replaced the screen-printed contact of the Passivated Emitter Solar Cell (PESC) with a Ni/Cu contact that has a selective emitter. The nickel layer was used as the seed layer, adhesion layer, and Cu diffusion barrier. The main contact was formed by plating the copper. The firing conditions of a conventional furnace were varied in order to form nickel silicide. Consequently, we achieved the best solar cell efficiency of 18.15%.

  11. NiCu Alloy Nanoparticle-Loaded Carbon Nanofibers for Phenolic Biosensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Lv, Pengfei; Zhu, Jiadeng; Lu, Yao; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiangwu; Wei, Qufu

    2015-11-20

    NiCu alloy nanoparticle-loaded carbon nanofibers (NiCuCNFs) were fabricated by a combination of electrospinning and carbonization methods. A series of characterizations, including SEM, TEM and XRD, were employed to study the NiCuCNFs. The as-prepared NiCuCNFs were then mixed with laccase (Lac) and Nafion to form a novel biosensor. NiCuCNFs successfully achieved the direct electron transfer of Lac. Cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry were used to study the electrochemical properties of the biosensor. The finally prepared biosensor showed favorable electrocatalytic effects toward hydroquinone. The detection limit was 90 nM (S/N = 3), the sensitivity was 1.5 µA µM(-1), the detection linear range was 4 × 10(-7)-2.37 × 10(-6) M. In addition, this biosensor exhibited satisfactory repeatability, reproducibility, anti-interference properties and stability. Besides, the sensor achieved the detection of hydroquinone in lake water.

  12. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of iron (III) complex with a quinolone family member (pipemidic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, D.; Szymanska, B.; Kovala-Demertzi, Dimitra; Wiecek, Joanna; Talik, E.; Demertzis, Mavroudis A.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction of iron (III) with pipemidic acid, Hpipem, afforded the complex [Fe (pipem) (HO)2 (H2O)]2. The new complex has been characterised by elemental analyses, infra-red, EPR and XPS spectroscopies. The monoanion, pipem, exhibits O, O ligation through the carbonyl and carboxylato oxygen atoms. Six coordinate dimer distorted octahedral configuration has been proposed for [Fe (pipem) (HO)2 (H2O)]2.

  13. A New Structural Family of Gas-Sorbing Coordination Polymers Derived from Phenolic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    White, Keith F; Abrahams, Brendan F; Babarao, Ravichandar; Dharma, A David; Hudson, Timothy A; Maynard-Casely, Helen E; Robson, Richard

    2015-12-07

    The structure of Li(inox)⋅2/3 DMF (inox(-) =the N-oxide of the isonicotinate anion) consists of a 3D framework with solvent-filled, square cross-section channels of approximate dimensions 5.5×5.5 Å. Unfortunately, the Li(inox) framework is unstable upon removal of DMF from the channels. When the structurally related 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (H2 hba) was used in place of Hinox, and Zn(2+) in place of the Li(+) , a structurally similar but more robust network, Zn(hba), was obtained; the isostructural compound, Co(hba), may also be prepared. Longer ligands with phenolate and carboxylate functional groups at opposite ends, such as the dianions of 4-coumaric acid (H2 cma) and 4'-hydroxy-4-biphenylcarboxylic acid (H2 hbpc), in combination with Zn(2+) yield Zn(cma) and Zn(hbpc) frameworks, respectively, with the same PtS topology but with larger channels. The coordination polymers remain intact after desolvation and exhibit microporosity, showing the ability to sorb significant quantities of CO2 , CH4 , and H2 .

  14. Conserved amino acid motifs from the novel Piv/MooV family of transposases and site-specific recombinases are required for catalysis of DNA inversion by Piv.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Buchner, J M; Thiel, W H; Gernert, K M; Karls, A C

    2001-02-01

    Piv, a site-specific invertase from Moraxella lacunata, exhibits amino acid homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements. The functions of conserved amino acid motifs that define this novel family of both transposases and site-specific recombinases (Piv/MooV family) were examined by mutagenesis of fully conserved amino acids within each motif in Piv. All Piv mutants altered in conserved residues were defective for in vivo inversion of the M. lacunata invertible DNA segment, but competent for in vivo binding to Piv DNA recognition sequences. Although the primary amino acid sequences of the Piv/MooV recombinases do not contain a conserved DDE motif, which defines the retroviral integrase/transposase (IN/Tnps) family, the predicted secondary structural elements of Piv align well with those of the IN/Tnps for which crystal structures have been determined. Molecular modelling of Piv based on these alignments predicts that E59, conserved as either E or D in the Piv/MooV family, forms a catalytic pocket with the conserved D9 and D101 residues. Analysis of Piv E59G confirms a role for E59 in catalysis of inversion. These results suggest that Piv and the related IS110/IS492 transposases mediate DNA recombination by a common mechanism involving a catalytic DED or DDD motif.

  15. Morphology-Control Synthesis of a Core-Shell Structured NiCu Alloy with Tunable Electromagnetic-Wave Absorption Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Zhao, Wanyu; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Zhang, Rui

    2015-06-17

    In this work, dendritelike and rodlike NiCu alloys were prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal process at various reaction temperatures (120, 140, and 160 °C). The structure and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, which that demonstrate NiCu alloys have core-shell heterostructures with Ni as the shell and Cu as the core. The formation mechanism of the core-shell structures was also discussed. The uniform and perfect dendritelike NiCu alloy obtained at 140 °C shows outstanding electromagnetic-wave absorption properties. The lowest reflection loss (RL) of -31.13 dB was observed at 14.3 GHz, and the effective absorption (below -10 dB, 90% attenuation) bandwidth can be adjusted between 4.4 and 18 GHz with a thin absorber thickness in the range of 1.2-4.0 mm. The outstanding electromagnetic-wave-absorbing properties are ascribed to space-charge polarization arising from the heterogeneous structure of the NiCu alloy, interfacial polarization between the alloy and paraffin, and continuous micronetworks and vibrating microcurrent dissipation originating from the uniform and perfect dendritelike shape of NiCu prepared at 140 °C.

  16. Effect of Depth and Duration of Cooling on Deaths in the NICU Among Neonates With Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Pappas, Athina; McDonald, Scott. A.; Das, Abhik; Tyson, Jon E.; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Schibler, Kurt; Bell, Edward F.; Heyne, Roy J.; Pedroza, Claudia; Bara, Rebecca; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Grisby, Cathy; Petrie Huitema, Carolyn M.; Garg, Meena; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Shepherd, Edward G.; Chalak, Lina F.; Hamrick, Shannon E. G.; Khan, Amir M.; Reynolds, Anne Marie; Laughon, Matthew M.; Truog, William E.; Dysart, Kevin C.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Walsh, Michele C.; Watterberg, Kristi L.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Hypothermia at 33.5°C for 72 hours for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy reduces death or disability to 44% to 55%; longer cooling and deeper cooling are neuroprotective in animal models. OBJECTIVE To determine if longer duration cooling (120 hours), deeper cooling (32.0°C), or both are superior to cooling at 33.5°C for 72 hours in neonates who are full-term with moderate or severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Arandomized, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial performed in 18 US centers in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Neonatal Research Network between October 2010 and November 2013. INTERVENTIONS Neonates were assigned to 4 hypothermia groups; 33.5°C for 72 hours, 32.0°C for 72 hours, 33.5°C for 120 hours, and 32.0°C for 120 hours. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome of death or disability at 18 to 22 months is ongoing. The independent data and safety monitoring committee paused the trial to evaluate safety (cardiac arrhythmia, persistent acidosis, major vessel thrombosis and bleeding, and death in the neonatal intensive care unit [NICU]) after the first 50 neonates were enrolled, then after every subsequent 25 neonates. The trial was closed for emerging safety profile and futility analysis after the eighth review with 364 neonates enrolled (of 726 planned). This report focuses on safety and NICU deaths by marginal comparisons of 72 hours’ vs 120 hours’ duration and 33.5°C depth vs 32.0°C depth (predefined secondary outcomes). RESULTS The NICU death rates were 7 of 95 neonates (7%) for the 33.5°C for 72 hours group, 13 of 90 neonates (14%) for the 32.0°C for 72 hours group, 15 of 96 neonates (16%) for the 33.5°C for 120 hours group, and 14 of 83 neonates (17%) for the 32.0°C for 120 hours group. The adjusted risk ratio (RR) for NICU deaths for the 120 hours group vs 72 hours group was 1.37 (95% CI, 0.92–2.04) and for

  17. Crystal Chemistry of the Potassium and Rubidium Uranyl Borate Families Derived from Boric Acid Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-07-19

    The reaction of uranyl nitrate with a large excess of molten boric acid in the presence of potassium or rubidium nitrate results in the formation of three new potassium uranyl borates, K{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 12}O{sub 19}(OH){sub 4}]·0.3H{sub 2}O (KUBO-1), K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}] (KUBO-2), and K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (KUBO-3) and two new rubidium uranyl borates Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 13}O{sub 20}(OH){sub 5}] (RbUBO-1) and Rb[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (RbUBO-2). The latter is isotypic with KUBO-3. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create an UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. All of these compounds adopt layered structures. With the exception of KUBO-1, the structures are all centrosymmetric. All of these compounds fluoresce when irradiated with long-wavelength UV light. The fluorescence spectrum yields well-defined vibronically coupled charge-transfer features.

  18. A study of nickel silicide in a conventional furnace for Ni/Cu contact monocrystalline-silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Seon Kyu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2013-01-01

    High-conductivity contacts in place of screen-printed contacts are in demand for commercial solar cells. Also, simplifying the process steps is required for commercial solar cells. In addition, very expensive metals are necessary improved efficiency without using scarce. In this research, we replaced screen-printed contacts with Ni/Cu contacts in passivated emitter solar cells. A layer of nickel was used as the seed and the adhesion layer. The main contact was formed by plating with copper. Firing conditions in a conventional furnace were varied so as to form nickel silicide. The best cell showed a solar cell efficiency of 18.76%.

  19. Transition From Hospital to Home in Preterm Infants and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    When the day of discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) comes for the parents of newborn infants, they are filled with long-awaited joy and happiness. They go home feeling as parents, away from scheduled routines of the hospital, monitor alarms, clinical rounds, numerous tests, and so on. What do we know about what happens after these little patients and their families leave the NICU? What happens from the point of leaving the hospital until when things get settled and life becomes perceived as normal? This article presents a short summary of research conducted with the vulnerable population of high-risk and preterm infants and their families postdischarge. Available evidence suggests that transition to home after hospital discharge, a phenomenon that many families experience, is challenging and requires attention from clinicians and researchers if we are to provide effective, efficient, and high-quality care.

  20. The identification of the acid-base catalyst of alpha-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6, a family 51 glycoside hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Shallom, Dalia; Belakhov, Valery; Solomon, Dmitry; Gilead-Gropper, Sara; Baasov, Timor; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2002-03-13

    The alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (AbfA T-6) belongs to the retaining family 51 glycoside hydrolases. The conserved Glu175 was proposed to be the acid-base catalytic residue. AbfA T-6 exhibits residual activity towards aryl beta-D-xylopyranosides. This phenomenon was used to examine the catalytic properties of the putative acid-base mutant E175A. Data from kinetic experiments, pH profiles, azide rescue, and the identification of the xylopyranosyl azide product provide firm support to the assignment of Glu175 as the acid-base catalyst of AbfA T-6.

  1. Media Stories on NICU Outbreaks Lead to an Increased Prescription Rate of Third-Line Antibiotics in the Community of Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Härtel, Christoph; Hartz, Annika; Bahr, Lina; Gille, Christian; Gortner, Ludwig; Simon, Arne; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Müller, Andreas; Körner, Thorsten; Henneke, Philipp; Haase, Roland; Zemlin, Michael; Viemann, Dorothee; Gebauer, Corinna; Thome, Ulrich; Ziegler, Andreas; Rupp, Jan; Herting, Egbert; Göpel, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND Between 2010 and 2012, 3 outbreaks of nosocomial infections in German neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) attracted considerable public interest. Headlines on national television channels and in newspapers had important consequences for the involved institutions and a negative impact on the relationship between families and staff in many German NICUs. OBJECTIVE To determine whether NICU outbreaks reported in the media influenced provider behavior in the community of neonatal care and led to more third-line antibiotic prescribing. DESIGN Observational cohort study. METHODS To investigate secular trends, we evaluated data for very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs, birth weight <1,500 g) enrolled in the German Neonatal Network (GNN) between 2009 and 2014 (N=10,253). For outbreak effects, we specifically analyzed data for VLBWIs discharged 6 months before (n=2,428) and 6 months after outbreaks (n=2,508). RESULTS The exposure of all VLBWIs to third-line antibiotics increased after outbreaks (19.4% before vs 22.5% after; P=.007). This trend particularly affected male infants (4.6% increase; P=.005) and infants with a birth weight between 1,000 and 1,499 g (3.5% increase; P=.001) In a logistic regression analysis, month of discharge as linear variable of time was associated with increased exposure to third-line antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.014; P<.001), and discharge within the 6-month period after outbreak reports independently contributed to this long-term trend (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.017-1.270; P=.024). CONCLUSIONS Media reports directly affect medical practice, eg, overuse of third-line antibiotics. Future communication and management strategies must be based on objective dialogues between the scientific community and investigative journalists. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:924-930.

  2. [Identification of new conserved and variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene of acetic acid bacteria and acetobacteraceae family].

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, S; Sarkar, S; Gachhui, R

    2015-01-01

    The Acetobacteraceae family of the class Alpha Proteobacteria is comprised of high sugar and acid tolerant bacteria. The Acetic Acid Bacteria are the economically most significant group of this family because of its association with food products like vinegar, wine etc. Acetobacteraceae are often hard to culture in laboratory conditions and they also maintain very low abundances in their natural habitats. Thus identification of the organisms in such environments is greatly dependent on modern tools of molecular biology which require a thorough knowledge of specific conserved gene sequences that may act as primers and or probes. Moreover unconserved domains in genes also become markers for differentiating closely related genera. In bacteria, the 16S rRNA gene is an ideal candidate for such conserved and variable domains. In order to study the conserved and variable domains of the 16S rRNA gene of Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Acetobacteraceae family, sequences from publicly available databases were aligned and compared. Near complete sequences of the gene were also obtained from Kombucha tea biofilm, a known Acetobacteraceae family habitat, in order to corroborate the domains obtained from the alignment studies. The study indicated that the degree of conservation in the gene is significantly higher among the Acetic Acid Bacteria than the whole Acetobacteraceae family. Moreover it was also observed that the previously described hypervariable regions V1, V3, V5, V6 and V7 were more or less conserved in the family and the spans of the variable regions are quite distinct as well.

  3. A Family of Negative Regulators Targets the Committed Step of de Novo Fatty Acid Biosynthesis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Salie, Matthew J.; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) catalyzes the committed step of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis. In prokaryotes, green algae, and most plants, this enzyme is a heteromeric complex requiring four different subunits for activity. The plant complex is recalcitrant to conventional purification schemes and hence the structure and composition of the full assembly have been unclear. In vivo coimmunoprecipitation using subunit-specific antibodies identified a novel family of proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana annotated as biotin/lipoyl attachment domain containing (BADC) proteins. Results from yeast two-hybrid and coexpression in Escherichia coli confirmed that all three BADC isoforms interact with the two biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) isoforms of Arabidopsis ACCase. These proteins resemble BCCP subunits but are not biotinylated due to a mutated biotinylation motif. We demonstrate that BADC proteins significantly inhibit ACCase activity in both E. coli and Arabidopsis. Targeted gene silencing of BADC isoform 1 in Arabidopsis significantly increased seed oil content when normalized to either mass or individual seed. We conclude the BADC proteins are ancestral BCCPs that gained a new function as negative regulators of ACCase after initial loss of the biotinylation motif. A functional model is proposed. PMID:27559025

  4. Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Carotid Plaques: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    NEOGI, TUHINA; ELLISON, R. CURTIS; HUNT, STEVEN; TERKELTAUB, ROBERT; FELSON, DAVID T.; ZHANG, YUQING

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of serum uric acid (SUA) with a marker of preclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD), carotid atherosclerotic plaques (PLQ), where early evidence of risk may be evident, focusing on individuals without CV risk factors. Methods The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. PLQ were assessed with carotid ultrasound. We conducted sex-specific logistic regression to assess the association of SUA with presence of PLQ, including analyses among persons without risk factors related to both CVD and hyperuricemia. Results In total, 4866 participants had both SUA and carotid ultrasound assessed (54% women, mean age 52 yrs, mean body mass index 27.6). The association of SUA with PLQ increased with increasing SUA levels, demonstrating a dose-response relation for men [OR 1.0, 1.29, 1.61, 1.75, for SUA categories < 5 (reference), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, ≥ 6.8 mg/dl, respectively; p = 0.002]. Similar associations were found in men without CV risk factors. We found no relation of SUA with PLQ in women. Conclusion In this large study, SUA was associated with carotid atherosclerotic plaques in men. Results were similar in the absence of CV risk factors. These results suggest that SUA may have a pathophysiologic role in atherosclerosis in men. (J Rheumatol First Release Nov 15 2008; doi:10.3899/jrheum.080646) PMID:19012359

  5. Aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ beta chain protects against type I diabetes: a family study.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, P A; Dorman, J S; Todd, J A; McDevitt, H O; Trucco, M

    1988-01-01

    One hundred seventy-two members from 27 randomly selected multiple case Caucasian families of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were studied at the DNA level to ascertain the reliability of codon 57 of the HLA-DQ beta-chain gene as a disease protection/susceptibility marker. The analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA encoding the first domain of the DQ beta chain and by dot blot analysis of the amplified material with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. One hundred twenty-three randomly selected healthy Caucasian donors were also tested. The results demonstrated that haplotypes carrying an aspartic acid in position 57 (Asp-57) of their DQ beta chain were significantly increased in frequency among nondiabetic haplotypes (23/38), while non-Asp-57 haplotypes were significantly increased in frequency among diabetic haplotypes (65/69). Ninety-six percent of the diabetic probands in our study were homozygous non-Asp/non-Asp as compared to 19.5% of healthy unrelated controls. This conferred a relative risk of 107 (chi 2 = 54.97; P = 0.00003) for non-Asp-57 homozygous individuals. Even though the inheritance and genetic features of IDDM are complex and are not necessarily fully explained by DQ beta chain polymorphism, this approach is much more sensitive than HLA serolog in assessing risk for IDDM. PMID:3186714

  6. Effects of tactile stimulation by fathers on physiological responses and paternal attachment in infants in the NICU: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min A; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Cho, Haeryun

    2016-09-22

    The aims of our pilot study were to test (1) the effectiveness of tactile stimulation by fathers on their infants' physiological responses such as oxygen saturation levels, heart rates (HRs), and respiration rates (RRs) and (2) fathers' perceived levels of attachment to infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This was a quasi-experimental design using a control group, which assessed pre- and post-intervention differences via t tests. Twenty neonate-father dyads participated in the intervention and 20 neonate-father dyads populated a control group from one general hospital located in South Korea. Infants in the experimental group received tactile stimulation for one 10-minute period per day, for five consecutive days. Overall, we found that tactile stimulation by fathers significantly stabilized infants' physiological status, including oxygen saturation levels, HRs, and RRs (t = 2.138, p = .039; t = -2.348, p = .024; t = -3.461, p = .001, respectively) with effect size ranged 0.67-1.10 and increased paternal attachment levels (t = 3.982, p = .001) with large effect size (1.29). This pilot study suggests that tactile stimulation by the father may be regarded as an important and potentially useful intervention for the care of infants in the NICU.

  7. Anomalous dielectric and AC conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrite synthesized via combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, B. J.; Rashmi, B. N.; Banu, Arshiya; Seema, G. A.; Shruthi, B.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2013-02-05

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrites (Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were prepared using solution combustion method. The structure of the samples were studied with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric and a.c. conductivity studies have been undertaken on the Ni-Cu nanoferrites in the frequency region 100Hz-5MHz. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} Prime ) is found to decrease initially with the frequency and finally reaching a constant value at higher frequencies. Observed trends in the dielectric constant are ascribed to the Maxwell-Wagner type interfacial polarization, which is in agreement with the Koop'fs phenomenological theory. The a.c. conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) is found to increase with an increase in the frequency from room temperature up to 300 Degree-Sign C. However, at a temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C, the a.c. conductivity is found to decrease with an increase in the frequency exhibiting an abnormal behavior. The electrical conduction mechanism in the present nano nickel-copper ferrite is found to be in accordance with the electron hopping model.

  8. Anomalous dielectric and AC conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrite synthesized via combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, B. J.; Rashmi, B. N.; Banu, Arshiya; Seema, G. A.; Shruthi, B.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2013-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu ferrites (Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4) were prepared using solution combustion method. The structure of the samples were studied with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Cu-Kα radiation. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric and a.c. conductivity studies have been undertaken on the Ni-Cu nanoferrites in the frequency region 100Hz-5MHz. The dielectric constant (ɛ') is found to decrease initially with the frequency and finally reaching a constant value at higher frequencies. Observed trends in the dielectric constant are ascribed to the Maxwell-Wagner type interfacial polarization, which is in agreement with the Koop'fs phenomenological theory. The a.c. conductivity (σac) is found to increase with an increase in the frequency from room temperature up to 300 °C. However, at a temperature of 400 °C, the a.c. conductivity is found to decrease with an increase in the frequency exhibiting an abnormal behavior. The electrical conduction mechanism in the present nano nickel-copper ferrite is found to be in accordance with the electron hopping model.

  9. Structure of LP2179, the first representative of Pfam family PF08866, suggests a new fold with a role in amino-acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Tien, Henry J.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of LP2179, a member of the PF08866 (DUF1831) family, suggests a novel α+β fold comprising two β-sheets packed against a single helix. A remote structural similarity to two other uncharacterized protein families specific to the Bacillus genus (PF08868 and PF08968), as well as to prokaryotic S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases, is consistent with a role in amino-acid metabolism. Genomic neighborhood analysis of LP2179 supports this functional assignment, which might also then be extended to PF08868 and PF08968. PMID:20944212

  10. Rhizocola hellebori gen. nov., sp. nov., an actinomycete of the family Micromonosporaceae containing 3,4-dihydroxydiaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Atsuko; Kawaguchi, Yoko; Nakashima, Takuji; Iwatsuki, Masato; Ōmura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yōko

    2014-08-01

    An actinomycete strain, K12-0602(T), was isolated from the root of a Helleborus orientalis plant in Japan. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain K12-0602(T) showed that it had a close relationship with members of the family Micromonosporaceae and the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values between strain K12-0602(T) and type strains of type species of 27 genera belonging to the family Micromonosporaceae were below 96.2%. MK-9 (H4) and MK-9 (H6) were detected as major menaquinones, and galactose, xylose, mannose and ribose were present in the whole-cell hydrolysate. The acyl type of the peptidoglycan was glycolyl. Major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0), C(17 : 1)ω9c and anteiso-C(17 : 0). Phosphatidylethanolamine was detected as the phospholipid corresponding to phospholipid type II. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 67 mol%. Analyses of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by TLC and LC/MS showed that it was composed of alanine, glycine, hydroxylglutamic acid and an unknown amino acid, which was subsequently determined to be 3,4-dihydroxydiaminopimelic acid using instrumental analyses, including NMR and mass spectrometry. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain K12-0602(T) represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Micromonosporaceae, for which the name Rhizocola hellebori gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is K12-0602(T) ( = NBRC 109834(T) = DSM 45988(T)). This is the first report, to our knowledge, of 3,4-dihydroxydiaminopimelic acid being found as a diamino acid in bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan.

  11. Systemic Concentrations of Short Chain Fatty Acids Are Elevated in Salmonellosis and Exacerbation of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna A.; Mkrtchyan, Mkhitar S.; Zakharyan, Magdalina K.; Mnatsakanyan, Armine A.; Arakelova, Karine A.; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi U.; Sedrakyan, Anahit M.; Hovhannisyan, Alvard I.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Aminov, Rustam I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota-produced short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play an important role in the normal human metabolism and physiology. Although the gradients of SCFAs from the large intestine, where they are largely produced, to the peripheral blood as well as the main routes of SCFA metabolism by different organs are known well for the healthy state, there is a paucity of information regarding how these are affected in disease. In particular, how the inflammation caused by infection or autoinflammatory disease affect the concentration of SCFAs in the peripheral venous blood. In this work, we revealed that diseases caused either by infectious agents (two Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium) or by the exacerbation of an autoinflammatory disease, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), both result in a significantly elevated systemic concentration of SCFAs. In the case of salmonellosis the concentration of SCFAs in peripheral blood was significantly and consistently higher, from 5- to 20-fold, compared to control. In the case of FMF, however, a significant increase of SCFAs in the peripheral venous blood was detected only in the acute phase of the disease, with a lesser impact in remission. It seems counterintuitive that the dysbiotic conditions, with a reduced number of gut microorganisms, produce such an effect. This phenomenon, however, must be appraised within the context of how the inflammatory diseases affect the normal physiology. We discuss a number of factors that may contribute to the “leak” and persistence of gut-produced SCFAs into the systemic circulation in infectious and autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:27252692

  12. Specific glycosylation of α1-acid glycoprotein characterises patients with familial Mediterranean fever and obligatory carriers of MEFV

    PubMed Central

    Poland, D; Drenth, J; Rabinovitz, E; Livneh, A; Bijzet, J; van het, Hof B; van Dijk, W

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic febrile disorder, characterised by fever and serositis. The acute phase response during attacks of FMF results from the release of cytokines, which in turn induce increased expression and changed glycosylation of acute phase proteins. A recent study indicated that attacks in FMF are accompanied by a rise of plasma concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) and C reactive protein (CRP), which remain significantly raised during remission relative to healthy controls. Another study suggested that obligatory heterozygotes also display an inflammatory acute phase response.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the state of inflammation in homozygotic and heterozygotic MEFV genotypes.
METHODS—CRP and SAA were studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The glycosylation of the acute phase protein, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), was visualised with crossed affinoimmunoelectrophoresis with concanavalin A as diantennary glycan-specific component and Aleuria aurantia lectin as fucose-specific affinity component.
RESULTS—FMF attacks were associated with an increase (p<0.05) in the serum inflammation parameters CRP, SAA, and AGP. The glycosylation of AGP showed an increase (p<0.05) in fucosylated AGP glycoforms, whereas the branching of the glycans remained unaffected. The glycosylation of AGP in the MEFV carrier group, compared with that in a healthy control group, was characterised by a significant increase (p<0.05) in branching of the glycans, whereas the fucosylation remained unaffected.
CONCLUSION—The findings suggest an FMF-specific release of cytokines, resulting in a different glycosylation of AGP between a homozygotic and heterozygotic MEFV genotype.

 PMID:11454642

  13. The AAP gene family for amino acid permeases contributes to development of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in roots of Arabidopsis☆

    PubMed Central

    Elashry, Abdelnaser; Okumoto, Sakiko; Siddique, Shahid; Koch, Wolfgang; Kreil, David P.; Bohlmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii is able to infect Arabidopsis plants and induce feeding sites in the root. These syncytia are the only source of nutrients for the nematodes throughout their life and are a nutrient sink for the host plant. We have studied here the role of amino acid transporters for nematode development. Arabidopsis contains a large number of different amino acid transporters in several gene families but those of the AAP family were found to be especially expressed in syncytia. Arabidopsis contains 8 AAP genes and they were all strongly expressed in syncytia with the exception of AAP5 and AAP7, which were slightly downregulated. We used promoter::GUS lines and in situ RT-PCR to confirm the expression of several AAP genes and LHT1, a lysine- and histidine-specific amino acid transporter, in syncytia. The strong expression of AAP genes in syncytia indicated that these transporters are important for the transport of amino acids into syncytia and we used T-DNA mutants for several AAP genes to test for their influence on nematode development. We found that mutants of AAP1, AAP2, and AAP8 significantly reduced the number of female nematodes developing on these plants. Our study showed that amino acid transport into syncytia is important for the development of the nematodes. PMID:23831821

  14. Effects of combined oral sucrose and nonnutritive sucking (NNS) on procedural pain of NICU newborns, 2001 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Huang, Xinchun; Luo, Biru; Peng, Wentao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Both oral sucrose (OS) and nonnutritive sucking (NNS) are effective nonpharmacological methods to alleviate procedures pain in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) newborns when they were used alone, but the combined effect of OS+NNS remains controversial. So, we conducted this study to evaluate the efficiency of NNS combined with oral sucrose on pain relief in NICU newborns undergoing painful procedures. Methods: We searched PubMed, Ovid (Medline), Embase (Medline), Cochrane Central Library, and other resources such as Google Scholar, bibliographies of included literatures for all available articles. Two reviewers screened literatures and extracted data independently. The fixed effects model was used to pool the results using Reviewer Manager (RevMan) 5.3. As each study included in our meta-analysis had been approved by Ethics Committee or institutional review board, thus our study did not need ethical approval. Results: Seven randomized controlled trials, including 599 participants, were contained in our meta-analysis. The combination of oral sucrose and NNS is associated with reduced pain scores (mean difference [MD], −0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.68 to −0.36); shortened crying time (MD,−0.92; 95% CI, −1.39 to −0.44); but the 2 groups did not differ significantly in reducing bradycardia (MD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.32–1.68), tachycardia (MD, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.38–1.10), or desaturations (MD, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.32–1.68). Conclusion: The pooled evidence indicates that the combination measures may serve as an evidence-based guideline for pain relief among patients having minor pain. Besides, it also indicates that OS combined with NNS can be an alternative for better prevention and management of procedure pain in NICU newborns. Nevertheless, the results may be limited due to incomplete data, and thus, more randomized controlled trials or well-designed studies are required to determine the effects of OS+NNS in the future. PMID

  15. Identification and characterization of the abscisic acid (ABA) receptor gene family and its expression in response to hormones in the rubber tree

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Zhou, Ying; Li, Hui-Liang; Zhu, Jia-Hong; Wang, Ying; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential phytohormone involved in diverse physiological processes. Although genome-wide analyses of the ABA receptor PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYL) protein/gene family have been performed in certain plant species, little is known about the ABA receptor protein/gene family in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In this study, we identified 14 ABA receptor PYL proteins/genes (designated HbPYL1 through HbPYL14) in the most recent rubber tree genome. A phylogenetic tree was constructed, which demonstrated that HbPYLs can be divided into three subfamilies that correlate well with the corresponding Arabidopsis subfamilies. Eight HbPYLs are highly expressed in laticifers. Five of the eight genes are simultaneously regulated by ABA, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET). The identification and characterization of HbPYLs should enable us to further understand the role of ABA signal in the rubber tree. PMID:28332623

  16. Evolution of structure and function in the o-succinylbenzoate synthase/N-acylamino acid racemase family of the enolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Margaret E; Fayazmanesh, Nima; Chiang, Ranyee A; Sakai, Ayano; Jacobson, Matthew P; Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2006-06-30

    Understanding how proteins evolve to provide both exquisite specificity and proficient activity is a fundamental problem in biology that has implications for protein function prediction and protein engineering. To study this problem, we analyzed the evolution of structure and function in the o-succinylbenzoate synthase/N-acylamino acid racemase (OSBS/NAAAR) family, part of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily. Although all characterized members of the family catalyze the OSBS reaction, this family is extraordinarily divergent, with some members sharing <15% identity. In addition, a member of this family, Amycolatopsis OSBS/NAAAR, is promiscuous, catalyzing both dehydration and racemization. Although the OSBS/NAAAR family appears to have a single evolutionary origin, no sequence or structural motifs unique to this family could be identified; all residues conserved in the family are also found in enolase superfamily members that have different functions. Based on their species distribution, several uncharacterized proteins similar to Amycolatopsis OSBS/NAAAR appear to have been transmitted by lateral gene transfer. Like Amycolatopsis OSBS/NAAAR, these might have additional or alternative functions to OSBS because many are from organisms lacking the pathway in which OSBS is an intermediate. In addition to functional differences, the OSBS/NAAAR family exhibits surprising structural variations, including large differences in orientation between the two domains. These results offer several insights into protein evolution. First, orthologous proteins can exhibit significant structural variation, and specificity can be maintained with little conservation of ligand-contacting residues. Second, the discovery of a set of proteins similar to Amycolatopsis OSBS/NAAAR supports the hypothesis that new protein functions evolve through promiscuous intermediates. Finally, a combination of evolutionary, structural, and sequence analyses identified characteristics that

  17. New zwitterionic butanesulfonic acids that extend the alkaline range of four families of Good buffers: evaluation for use in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Thiel, T; Liczkowski, L; Bissen, S T

    1998-11-18

    Four new zwitterionic butanesulfonic acid buffers that are structurally related to four families of Good buffers were evaluated for use in biological systems. These buffers, with pKa values from 7.6 to 10.7, were compared with a variety of other buffers from the same family and with unrelated buffers to determine their effect on enzyme activity and on microbial growth. The activity of four enzymes with optimum pH values in the alkaline range were tested: beta-galactosidase, esterase, phosphodiesterase and alkaline phosphatase. In general, all the Good buffers, including the new butanesulfonic acid buffers, gave good activity; however, there was variation in activity of certain enzymes with certain buffers. Tris, glycine, and phosphate buffers typically showed variation in activity compared to the family of Good buffers. beta-Galactosidase, in particular, showed greater activity with Good buffers than with phosphate or Tris buffers. Similarly, growth of seven bacterial strains was consistent, with a few exceptions, for all the Good family of buffers with Tris often inhibiting growth. Quantitation of alkaline phosphatase conjugated to antibodies is an important tool in many applications in molecular biology. Several Good buffers gave good signals when compared with Tris at pH 9.5 for detection of proteins using alkaline phosphatase-conjugated antibodies.

  18. Comparative Analysis of P450 Signature Motifs EXXR and CXG in the Large and Diverse Kingdom of Fungi: Identification of Evolutionarily Conserved Amino Acid Patterns Characteristic of P450 Family

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Mashele, Samson Sitheni

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins distributed across the biological kingdoms. P450s are catalytically versatile and play key roles in organisms primary and secondary metabolism. Identification of P450s across the biological kingdoms depends largely on the identification of two P450 signature motifs, EXXR and CXG, in the protein sequence. Once a putative protein has been identified as P450, it will be assigned to a family and subfamily based on the criteria that P450s within a family share more than 40% homology and members of subfamilies share more than 55% homology. However, to date, no evidence has been presented that can distinguish members of a P450 family. Here, for the first time we report the identification of EXXR- and CXG-motifs-based amino acid patterns that are characteristic of the P450 family. Analysis of P450 signature motifs in the under-explored fungal P450s from four different phyla, ascomycota, basidiomycota, zygomycota and chytridiomycota, indicated that the EXXR motif is highly variable and the CXG motif is somewhat variable. The amino acids threonine and leucine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the EXXR motif and proline and glycine are preferred as second and third amino acids in the CXG motif in fungal P450s. Analysis of 67 P450 families from biological kingdoms such as plants, animals, bacteria and fungi showed conservation of a set of amino acid patterns characteristic of a particular P450 family in EXXR and CXG motifs. This suggests that during the divergence of P450 families from a common ancestor these amino acids patterns evolve and are retained in each P450 family as a signature of that family. The role of amino acid patterns characteristic of a P450 family in the structural and/or functional aspects of members of the P450 family is a topic for future research. PMID:24743800

  19. Use of the six sigma methodology to reduce incidence of breast milk administration errors in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Drenckpohl, Douglas; Bowers, Laura; Cooper, Hoa

    2007-01-01

    Breast milk is the optimal source of nutrition for infants. According to research, neonates fed breast milk have a reduced risk of sepsis, increased feeding tolerance, a decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis, and better neurodevelopmental outcomes. Unfortunately, researchers have not identified practices to reduce or eliminate the risk for errors in breast milk administration. This article discusses the potential hazards of incorrect administration of breast milk. It then describes how the tertiary care center at Children's Hospital of Illinois implemented a policy utilizing six sigma quality improvement methodologies to improve breast milk administration. Since implementation of this policy, the NICU at our hospital has reduced the risk of breast milk administration errors to less than 3.4 mistakes per million opportunities.

  20. Safe sleep practices and sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction: NICU and well-baby nursery graduates.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Aja J; Evans, Patricia W; Etchegaray, Jason M; Ottenbacher, Allison; Arnold, Cody

    2013-11-01

    Our primary objective was to compare parents of infants cared for in newborn intensive care units (NICUs) and infants cared for in well-baby ("general") nurseries with regard to knowledge and practice of safe sleep practices/sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction measures and guidelines. Our secondary objective was to obtain qualitative data regarding reasons for noncompliance in both populations. Sixty participants (30 from each population) completed our survey measuring safe sleep knowledge and practice. Parents of NICU infants reported using 2 safe sleep practices-(a) always placing baby in crib to sleep and (b) always placing baby on back to sleep-significantly more frequently than parents of well infants. Additional findings and implications for future studies are discussed.

  1. The Effect of Education and Implementation of Evidence-Based Nursing Guidelines on Infants’ Weight Gaining in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zahra; Nouri, Jamileh Mokhtari; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohammad; Ebadi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educating evidence-based guidelines influences increased quality of nursing cares effectively. Infant’s weight gaining is one of the most important indicators for measuring quality of nursing care in NICU. The research is conducted with the aim of surveying the effect of education and implementation of educating evidence-based guidelines on infants’ weight gaining in NICU. Methods: This two-group clinical trial study was conducted in 2013 on one hundred infants in Baqiyatallah (AJ) hospital of Tehran. It was performed by using non-probable and convenient sampling. Data collection tools included; infants’ demographic questionnaire and a researcher-made checklist to record infants’ weight by using a weighing scale. Infants’ weight was recorded before intervention and two months after implementation of the guidelines, then data were analyzed by using SPSS19 statistical software. Findings: Mean weight of the infants in the control group on admission and on discharge was respectively; 1771(41.71) and 1712(42.68), and mean weight of the infants in intervention group on admission and on discharge was respectively; 1697(37.63) and 1793(40.71). After two months, infants’ weight gaining in intervention group was more than control group and it was statistically significant (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Results of the present study showed that implementation of evidence-based instruction an effective and economical method regarding infants’ weight gaining. Therefore it is recommended to the authorities and managers of the hospitals and educational centers of the healthcare services to put education and implementation of educating evidence-based instruction the priority of their work plans. PMID:25716388

  2. Breastfeeding Evaluation Indicators System is a Promising Evaluation Tool for Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiurong; Sun, Hongying; Lin, Xiangyun; Liu, Xiuxiang

    2016-10-26

    BACKGROUND Breast feeding can enhance preterm infants' neurodevelopmental outcome, regulate immune function development. This study aims to develop breastfeeding evaluation indicators system in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and to provide theoretical basis for all-round evaluation of breast feeding quality for hospitalized preterm infants. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was performed based on Avedis Donabedian's theory of medical care quality. Preterm infant breast feeding evaluation indicators system frame was initially formed by using literature review, clinical on-spot observation and expert consultation methods. By using specialists meeting method and Delphi method, evaluation indicators system for preterm infants breastfeeding was verified and established. Breastfeeding evaluation indicators system were performed in NICU of hospitals in Binzhou and Shanghai. Feasibility and usability of indicators system were examined. RESULTS Breastfeeding evaluation indicators system for preterm infants comprise 3 levels, including level 1 (3 indicators), level 2 (7 indicators), and level 3 (18 indicators). Recognition rates of importance for level 2 and 3 range from 94.4% to 100.0% and 80.6% to 100.0%, respectively. Mean of Likert rating for level 2 and 3 range from 3.31 to 3.89 and 3.03 to 3.97, which are all higher than the average value of 2.50. Kendall's coefficient and its significance test showed that consistency of experts' opinion for indicators' importance is high (P<0.001). This strategy of combining qualitative and quantitative methods could be used in overall evaluation of the breastfeeding quality in NICUs. CONCLUSIONS Indicators system is feasible and is a promising evaluation tool for continuously improving breastfeeding quality for preterm infants in NICUs.

  3. In vitro assessment of potential intestinal absorption of some phenolic families and carboxylic acids from commercial instant coffee samples.

    PubMed

    López-Froilán, R; Ramírez-Moreno, E; Podio, N S; Pérez-Rodríguez, M L; Cámara, M; Baroni, M V; Wunderlin, D A; Sánchez-Mata, M C

    2016-06-15

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, being a source of bioactive compounds as well as flavors. Hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols, and carboxylic acids have been studied in the samples of instant coffee commercialized in Spain. The studies about contents of food components should be complemented with either in vitro or in vivo bioaccessibility studies to know the amount of food components effectively available for functions in the human body. In this sense, a widely used in vitro model has been applied to assess the potential intestinal absorption of phenolic compounds and organic acids. The contents of hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonols were higher in instant regular coffee samples than in the decaffeinated ones. Bioaccessible phenolic compounds in most analyzed samples account for 20-25% of hydroxycinnamic acids and 17-26% of flavonols. This could mean that a great part of them can remain in the gut, acting as potential in situ antioxidants. Quinic, acetic, pyroglutamic, citric and fumaric acids were identified in commercial instant coffee samples. Succinic acid was found in the coffee blend containing chicory. All carboxylic acids showed a very high bioaccessibility. Particularly, acetic acid and quinic acid were found in higher contents in the samples treated with the in vitro simulation of gastrointestinal processes, compared to the original ones, which can be explained by their cleavage from chlorogenic acid during digestion. This is considered as a positive effect, since quinic acid is considered as an antioxidant inducer.

  4. Unravelling the diversity of the cyclopiazonic acid family of mycotoxins in Aspergillus flavus by UHPLC Triple-TOF HRMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (a-cyclopiazonic acid, a-CPA) is an indole-hydrindane-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by various fungal species, including the notorious food and feed contaminant Aspergillus flavus. Despite its discovery in A. flavus cultures, approximately 40 years ago, its contribution to the...

  5. Family Nurture Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Improves Social-Relatedness, Attention, and Neurodevelopment of Preterm Infants at 18 Months in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Martha G.; Firestein, Morgan R.; Austin, Judy; Hane, Amie A.; Stark, Raymond I.; Hofer, Myron A.; Garland, Marianne; Glickstein, Sara B.; Brunelli, Susan A.; Ludwig, Robert J.; Myers, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preterm infants are at high risk for adverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes. Family Nurture Intervention (FNI) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is designed to counteract adverse effects of separation of mothers and their preterm infants. Here, we evaluate effects of FNI on neurobehavioral outcomes. Methods: Data…

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Individual Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy and Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Youth with Subsyndromal Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrea S.; Vesco, Anthony T.; Nader, Elias S.; Healy, K. Zachary; Gardner, William; Wolfson, Hannah L.; Arnold, L. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This pilot study evaluates efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (Ω3), individual family psychoeducational psychotherapy (IF-PEP), and their combination in youth with subsyndromal bipolar disorders (bipolar disorder not otherwise specified [BP-NOS], cyclothymic disorder [CYC]). Methods: This study was a 12 week, randomized trial of Ω3 versus placebo and IF-PEP versus active monitoring (AM) using a 2 × 2 design (Ω3 + PEP: n = 5; Ω3 + AM: n = 5; placebo + PEP: n = 7; placebo + AM: n = 6). Twenty-three youth ages 7–14 with BP-NOS or CYC were recruited via community advertisements and clinician referrals. Participants could be taking stable medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and sleep aids, but no other psychotropics. Independent evaluators assessed participants at screen, baseline, and 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders (K-SADS) Depression (KDRS) and Mania (KMRS) Rating Scales, Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R), and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Ω3/placebo conditions were double-blind; independent evaluators were blind to psychotherapy condition. Results: Most participants (83%) completed the 12 week trial. Side effects were uncommon and mild. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated significant improvement in depressive symptoms (KDRS) for combined treatment relative to placebo and AM (p = 0.01, d = 1.70). Across groups, manic symptoms improved over time without significant treatment effects. Effect of IF-PEP on child depression compared with AM was medium (d = 0.63, CDRS-R) to large (d = 1.24, KDRS). Effect of Ω3 on depression was medium (d = 0.48, KDRS). Conclusion: IF-PEP and Ω3 are well tolerated and associated with improved mood symptoms among youth with BP-NOS and CYC. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01507753 PMID:26682997

  7. Identification of amino acid residues critical for catalysis and stability in Aspergillus niger family 1 pectin lyase A.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Torres, Paloma; Visser, Jaap; Benen, Jacques A E

    2003-01-01

    Site-directed-mutagenesis studies were performed on family 1 pectin lyase A (PL1A) from Aspergillus niger to gain insight into the reaction mechanism for the pectin lyase-catalysed beta-elimination cleavage of methylesterified polygalacturonic acid and to stabilize the enzyme at slightly basic pH. On the basis of the three-dimensional structures of PL1A [Mayans, Scott, Connerton, Gravesen, Benen, Visser, Pickersgill and Jenkins (1997) Structure 5, 677-689] and the modelled enzyme-substrate complex of PL1B [Herron, Benen, Scavetta, Visser and Jurnak (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 8762-8769], Asp154, Arg176, Arg236 and Lys239 were mutagenized. Substituting Arg236 with alanine or lysine rendered the enzyme completely inactive, and mutagenesis of Arg176 and Lys239 severely affected catalysis. The Asp154-->Arg and Asp154-->Glu mutant enzymes were only moderately impaired in respect of catalysis. The results strongly indicate that Arg236, which is sandwiched between Arg176 and Lys239, would initiate the reaction upon enzyme-substrate interaction, through the abstraction of the proton at C5 of the galacturonopyranose ring. The positively charged residues Arg176 and Lys239 are responsible for lowering the p K a of Arg236. Arg176 and Lys239 are maintained in a charged state by interacting with Asp154 or bulk solvent respectively. The deprotonation of the Asp186-Asp221 pair was proposed to be responsible for a pH-driven conformational change of PL1A [Mayans, Scott, Connerton, Gravesen, Benen, Visser, Pickersgill and Jenkins (1997) Structure 5, 677-689]. Substitution of Asp186 and Asp221 by Asn186 and Asn221 was expected to stabilize the enzyme. However, the Asp186-->Asn/Asp221-->Asn enzyme appeared less stable than the wild-type enzyme, even at pH 6.0, as evidenced by fluorescence studies. This demonstrates that the pH-dependent conformational change is not driven by deprotonation of the Asp186-Asp221 pair. PMID:12418964

  8. Assignment of function to a domain of unknown function: DUF1537 is a new kinase family in catabolic pathways for acid sugars

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinshuai; Carter, Michael S.; Vetting, Matthew W.; San Francisco, Brian; Zhao, Suwen; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F.; Solbiati, Jose O.; Thiaville, Jennifer J.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Using a large-scale “genomic enzymology” approach, we (i) assigned novel ATP-dependent four-carbon acid sugar kinase functions to members of the DUF1537 protein family (domain of unknown function; Pfam families PF07005 and PF17042) and (ii) discovered novel catabolic pathways for d-threonate, l-threonate, and d-erythronate. The experimentally determined ligand specificities of several solute binding proteins (SBPs) for TRAP (tripartite ATP-independent permease) transporters for four-carbon acids, including d-erythronate and l-erythronate, were used to constrain the substrates for the catabolic pathways that degrade the SBP ligands to intermediates in central carbon metabolism. Sequence similarity networks and genome neighborhood networks were used to identify the enzyme components of the pathways. Conserved genome neighborhoods encoded SBPs as well as permease components of the TRAP transporters, members of the DUF1537 family, and a member of the 4-hydroxy-l-threonine 4-phosphate dehydrogenase (PdxA) oxidative decarboxylase, class II aldolase, or ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, large subunit (RuBisCO) superfamily. Because the characterized substrates of members of the PdxA, class II aldolase, and RuBisCO superfamilies are phosphorylated, we postulated that the members of the DUF1537 family are novel ATP-dependent kinases that participate in catabolic pathways for four-carbon acid sugars. We determined that (i) the DUF1537/PdxA pair participates in a pathway for the conversion of d-threonate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and CO2 and (ii) the DUF1537/class II aldolase pair participates in pathways for the conversion of d-erythronate and l-threonate (epimers at carbon-3) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and CO2. The physiological importance of these pathways was demonstrated in vivo by phenotypic and genetic analyses. PMID:27402745

  9. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    PubMed

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  10. Amino Acid Bound Surfactants: A New Synthetic Family of Polymeric Monoliths Open Up Possibilities for Chiral Separations in Capillary Electrochromatography

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun; Wang, Xiaochun; Morrill, Mike; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2012-01-01

    By combining a novel chiral amino-acid surfactant containing acryloyl amide tail, carbamate linker and leucine head group of different chain lengths with a conventional cross linker and a polymerization technique, a new “one-pot”, synthesis for the generation of amino-acid based polymeric monolith is realized. The method promises to open up the discovery of amino-acid based polymeric monolith for chiral separations in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Possibility of enhanced chemoselectivity for simultaneous separation of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine containing multiple chiral centers, and the potential use of this amino-acid surfactant bound column for CEC and CEC coupled to mass spectrometric detection is demonstrated. PMID:22607448

  11. InReach: Connecting NICU Infants and Their Parents with Community Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akers, Adrienne L.; Boyce, Glenna; Mabey, Vanya; Boyce, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Infants who are born prematurely may experience developmental delays and impairments during infancy and beyond. Those who are born at extremely low birthweight face the greatest challenges. Many families could benefit from early intervention services through their local Part C of Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) programs, but…

  12. In Vivo Evidence that S-Adenosylmethionine and Fatty Acid Synthesis Intermediates Are the Substrates for the LuxI Family of Autoinducer Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Val, Dale L.; Cronan, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria synthesize N-acyl homoserine lactone autoinducer molecules as quorum-sensing signals which act as cell density-dependent regulators of gene expression. We have investigated the in vivo source of the acyl chain and homoserine lactone components of the autoinducer synthesized by the LuxI homolog, TraI. In Escherichia coli, synthesis of N-(3-oxooctanoyl)homoserine lactone by TraI was unaffected in a fadD mutant blocked in β-oxidative fatty acid degradation. Also, conditions known to induce the fad regulon did not increase autoinducer synthesis. In contrast, cerulenin and diazoborine, specific inhibitors of fatty acid synthesis, both blocked autoinducer synthesis even in a strain dependent on β-oxidative fatty acid degradation for growth. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that the acyl chains in autoinducers synthesized by LuxI-family synthases are derived from acyl-acyl carrier protein substrates rather than acyl coenzyme A substrates. Also, we show that decreased levels of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine caused by expression of bacteriophage T3 S-adenosylmethionine hydrolase result in a marked reduction in autoinducer synthesis, thus providing direct in vivo evidence that the homoserine lactone ring of LuxI-family autoinducers is derived from S-adenosylmethionine. PMID:9573148

  13. The Clinical Spectrum of Missense Mutations of the First Aspartic Acid of cbEGF-like Domains in Fibrillin-1 Including a Recessive Family

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Rijlaarsdam, Marry EB; Scholte, Arthur JHA; Swart-van den Berg, Marietta; Versteegh, Michel IM; van der Schoot-van Velzen, Iris; Schäbitz, Hans-Joachim; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Baars, Marieke J; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; Giltay, Jacques C; Hamel, Ben C; Breuning, Martijn H; Pals, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominant disorder with a recognizable phenotype. In most patients with the classical phenotype mutations are found in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1) on chromosome 15q21. It is thought that most mutations act in a dominant negative way or through haploinsufficiency. In 9 index cases referred for MFS we detected heterozygous missense mutations in FBN1 predicted to substitute the first aspartic acid of different calcium-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like (cbEGF) fibrillin-1 domains. A similar mutation was found in homozygous state in 3 cases in a large consanguineous family. Heterozygous carriers of this mutation had no major skeletal, cardiovascular or ophthalmological features of MFS. In the literature 14 other heterozygous missense mutations are described leading to the substitution of the first aspartic acid of a cbEGF domain and resulting in a Marfan phenotype. Our data show that the phenotypic effect of aspartic acid substitutions in the first position of a cbEGF domain can range from asymptomatic to a severe neonatal phenotype. The recessive nature with reduced expression of FBN1 in one of the families suggests a threshold model combined with a mild functional defect of this specific mutation. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20886638

  14. Occurrence of lipid A variants with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in lipopolysaccharides from members of the family Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, U.R.; Carlson, R.W. ); Mayer, H. ); Yokota, A. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from several strains of Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Agrobacterium, and Azorhizobium were screened for the presence of 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid. The LPSs from all strains, with the exception of Azorhizobium caulinodans, contained various amounts of this long-chain hydroxy fatty acid in the lipid A fractions. Analysis of the lipid A sugars revealed three types of backbones: those containing glucosamine (as found in Rhizobium meliloti and Thizobium fredii), those containing glucosamine and galacturonic acid (as found in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, trifolii, and viciae), and those containing clucosamine and galacturonic acid (as found in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, trifolii, and viciae), and those containing 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxyglucose either alone or in combination with glucosamine (as found in Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) strain DSM 30140). The distribution of 27-hydroxyoctacosamoic acid as well as analysis of lipid A backbone sugars revealed the taxonomic relatedness of various strains of the Rhizobiaceae.

  15. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  16. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-12-02

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF₃) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  17. Mutational Insights into the Roles of Amino Acid Residues in Ligand Binding for Two Closely Related Family 16 Carbohydrate Binding Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xiaoyun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K.O.

    2010-11-22

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) are specialized proteins that bind to polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5ACBM16-1/CBM16-2 bind to glucose-, mannose-, and glucose/mannose-configured substrates. The crystal structures of the two proteins represent the only examples in CBM family 16, and studies that evaluate the roles of amino acid residues in ligand binding in this family are lacking. In this study, we probed the roles of amino acids (selected based on CBM16-1/ligand co-crystal structures) on substrate binding. Two tryptophan (Trp-20 and Trp-125) and two glutamine (Gln-81 and Gln-93) residues are shown to be critical in ligand binding. Additionally, several polar residues that flank the critical residues also contribute to ligand binding. The CBM16-1 Q121E mutation increased affinity for all substrates tested, whereas the Q21G and N97R mutants exhibited decreased substrate affinity. We solved CBM/substrate co-crystal structures to elucidate the molecular basis of the increased substrate binding by CBM16-1 Q121E. The Gln-121, Gln-21, and Asn-97 residues can be manipulated to fine-tune ligand binding by the Man5A CBMs. Surprisingly, none of the eight residues investigated was absolutely conserved in CBM family 16. Thus, the critical residues in the Man5A CBMs are either not essential for substrate binding in the other members of this family or the two CBMs are evolutionarily distinct from the members available in the current protein database. Man5A is dependent on its CBMs for robust activity, and insights from this study should serve to enhance our understanding of the interdependence of its catalytic and substrate binding modules.

  18. The ALMT Family of Organic Acid Transporters in Plants and Their Involvement in Detoxification and Nutrient Security.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo; Kochian, Leon; Piñeros, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    About a decade ago, members of a new protein family of anion channels were discovered on the basis of their ability to confer on plants the tolerance toward toxic aluminum ions in the soil. The efflux of Al(3+)-chelating malate anions through these channels is stimulated by external Al(3+) ions. This feature of a few proteins determined the name of the entire protein family as Aluminum-activated Malate Transporters (ALMT). Meanwhile, after several years of research, it is known that the physiological roles of ALMTs go far beyond Al-detoxification. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on this transporter family and assess their involvement in diverse physiological processes.

  19. The ALMT Family of Organic Acid Transporters in Plants and Their Involvement in Detoxification and Nutrient Security

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo; Kochian, Leon; Piñeros, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    About a decade ago, members of a new protein family of anion channels were discovered on the basis of their ability to confer on plants the tolerance toward toxic aluminum ions in the soil. The efflux of Al3+-chelating malate anions through these channels is stimulated by external Al3+ ions. This feature of a few proteins determined the name of the entire protein family as Aluminum-activated Malate Transporters (ALMT). Meanwhile, after several years of research, it is known that the physiological roles of ALMTs go far beyond Al-detoxification. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on this transporter family and assess their involvement in diverse physiological processes. PMID:27757118

  20. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-21

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli "adaptive response" protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1-8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins.

  1. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond*

    PubMed Central

    Fedeles, Bogdan I.; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C.; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli “adaptive response” protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1–8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins. PMID:26152727

  2. Influence of Immediate Skin-to-Skin Contact During Cesarean Surgery on Rate of Transfer of Newborns to NICU for Observation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lindsay W; Crenshaw, Jeannette T; Gilder, Richard E

    We conducted an evidence-based practice project to determine if skin-to-skin contact immediately after cesarean birth influenced the rate of transfer of newborns to the NICU for observation. We analyzed data for 5 years (2011 through 2015) and compared the rates for the period before implementation of skin-to-skin contact with rates for the period after. The proportion of newborns transferred to the NICU for observation was significantly different and lower after implementing skin-to-skin contact immediately after cesarean birth (Pearson's χ(2) = 32.004, df = 1, p < .001). These results add to the growing body of literature supporting immediate, uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact for all mother-newborn pairs, regardless of birth mode.

  3. Association between SLC2A9 transporter gene variants and uric acid phenotypes in African American and white families

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Matsumoto, Martha; Mosley, Tom H.; Kardia, Sharon; Turner, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. SLC2A9 gene variants associate with serum uric acid in white populations, but little is known about African American populations. Since SLC2A9 is a transporter, gene variants may be expected to associate more closely with the fractional excretion of urate, a measure of renal tubular transport, than with serum uric acid, which is influenced by production and extrarenal clearance. Methods. Genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the SLC2A9 gene were obtained in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy cohorts. The associations of SNPs with serum uric acid, fractional excretion of urate and urine urate-to-creatinine ratio were assessed with adjustments for age, sex, diuretic use, BMI, homocysteine and triglycerides. Results. We identified SLC2A9 gene variants that were associated with serum uric acid in 1155 African American subjects (53 SNPs) and 1132 white subjects (63 SNPs). The most statistically significant SNPs in African American subjects (rs13113918) and white subjects (rs11723439) were in the latter half of the gene and explained 2.7 and 2.8% of the variation in serum uric acid, respectively. After adjustment for this SNP in African Americans, 0.9% of the variation in serum uric acid was explained by an SNP (rs1568318) in the first half of the gene. Unexpectedly, SLC2A9 gene variants had stronger associations with serum uric acid than with fractional excretion of urate. Conclusions. These findings support two different loci by which SLC2A9 variants affect uric acid levels in African Americans and suggest SLC2A9 variants affect serum uric acid level via renal and extrarenal clearance. PMID:21186168

  4. Schore's regulation theory: maternal-infant interaction in the NICU as a mechanism for reducing the effects of allostatic load on neurodevelopment in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ashley M; Harrison, Tondi M; Steward, Deborah K

    2012-10-01

    Premature infants confront numerous physiologic and environmental stressors in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) that have the potential to permanently alter their neurodevelopment. Schore's regulation theory postulates that positive maternal-infant interactions can shape the infant's developmental outcomes through inducing mechanistic changes in brain structure and function. The purposes of this article are to explain the regulation of infant neurobiological processes during interactions between mothers and healthy infants in the context of Schore's theory, to identify threats to these processes for premature infants, and to propose principles of clinical practice and areas of research necessary to establish a supportive environment and prevent or reduce maladaptive consequences for these vulnerable infants. A premature birth results in the disruption of neurodevelopment at a critical time. Chronic exposure to stressors related to the NICU environment overwhelms immature physiologic and stress systems, resulting in significant allostatic load, as measured by long-term neurodevelopmental impairments in the premature infant. Positive maternal-infant interactions during NICU hospitalization and beyond have the potential to reduce neurologic deficits and maximize positive neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants. The quality of the maternal-infant interaction is affected not only by the infant's developing neurobiology but also by the mother's responses to the stressors surrounding a premature birth and mothering an infant in the NICU environment. Nurses can empower mothers to overcome these stressors, promote sensitive interactions with their infants, and facilitate neurodevelopment. Research is critically needed to develop and test nursing interventions directed at assisting mothers in supporting optimal neurodevelopment for their infants.

  5. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P < .05). They also reported a higher level of empowerment (P < .05). Three months after discharge, the mothers in the FC group had a higher self-reported skill level for interpretation of the infant's signals and knowledge about breast-feeding (P < .05). Despite similar rate of breast-feeding at discharge, more infants in the FC group were breastfed 3 months after discharge (P < .05). An FC program in the NICU promoted better maternal confidence during the hospital stay and 3 months after discharge compared with traditional care.

  6. Lithological and geochemical constraints on the magma conduit systems of the Huangshan Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Feng; Song, Xie-Yan; Hollings, Pete; Chen, Lie-Meng; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Xie, Wei; Zhang, Dayu; Zhao, Bingbing

    2016-12-01

    Magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposits in northern Xinjiang, China, are associated with small mafic-ultramafic complexes, with the sulfide ores generally occurring in ultramafic rocks. The Huangshan deposit (up to 65 Mt of ore at 0.49% Ni and 0.31% Cu), one of the largest magmatic Ni-Cu deposits in northern Xinjiang, is composed of a layered sequence of lower websterite, lower lherzolite, websterite, norite-gabbro, gabbro, diorite, and gabbronorite, with sulfide mineralization mainly found in the lower lherzolite, lower websterite, and websterite. Systematic variations of the major oxides and trace elements suggest that the rocks of the Huangshan deposit are fractionated from the same parental magma, with the sharp contact and discontinuous trends of major oxide contents between different lithologies implying intrusion of four distinct stages of magma from a single deep-seated staging chamber. The reversals in olivine Fo contents and major oxides in the lower lherzolite were the result of inhomogeneity in olivine within the lower chamber. The Se/S ratios (63.1˜150 × 10-6) and the negative correlation between Se/S and δ34S (0.63˜2.42‰) of the sulfide ores suggest that a large contribution of crustal S caused the sulfide segregation. The sulfides in the lower lherzolite have lower Cu contents (1386-2200 ppm) and Cu/Pd ratios (2.31 × 105-1.36 × 106) relative to those in the mineralized lower websterite (Cu = 2300 to 18,700 ppm, and Cu/Pd = 6.65 × 105 to 2.73 × 106). A positive correlation between Pd/Ir and Ni/Ir for the vein-textured sulfides in the lower websterite likely reflects fractionated sulfides picked up by a new pulse of magma. In contrast, the restricted range of Pd/Ir ratios indicates that the PGE contents of the disseminated sulfides in the lower lherzolite resulted from reaction between the sulfides and new pulses of S-undersaturated magma.

  7. Furthering our understanding of the needs of mothers who are pumping breast milk for infants in the NICU: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ruth; Paquette, Rebecca; Briere, Carrie-Ellen; McGrath, Jacqueline G

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this integrative review was to uncover information regarding emotional and other types of support required by mothers providing breast milk for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). These high-risk infants are often unable to directly breastfeed and, thus, mothers need to pump their breast milk for weeks to months, which can be both a pleasing experience that increases satisfaction and infant involvement, while at the same time being an uncomfortable and tiring endeavor. Understanding this notion is important because pumping at least 8 times each day is central to increasing or maintaining breast milk production. Articles were gathered using PubMed and CINAHL databases. Forty-four sources were chosen for inclusion in this review. Search terms included "breastfeeding," "pumping," "neonatal intensive care unit," "emotional support," and "breast milk." We identified that the emotional and practical support for NICU mothers is different from those of other breastfeeding mothers, especially around the development of early bonding behaviors. These mothers require significant ongoing emotional support from healthcare professionals and their partners and peers. Healthcare providers need to monitor breast milk production and provide educated encouragement that anticipates breastfeeding challenges, especially when the mother is pumping for an extended period of time while their infant is maturing in the NICU. Effective providers' support may be best provided by selectively bundling interventions to support pumping initiation and transition to direct breastfeeding.

  8. An acoustic gap between the NICU and womb: a potential risk for compromised neuroplasticity of the auditory system in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Lahav, Amir; Skoe, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The intrauterine environment allows the fetus to begin hearing low-frequency sounds in a protected fashion, ensuring initial optimal development of the peripheral and central auditory system. However, the auditory nursery provided by the womb vanishes once the preterm newborn enters the high-frequency (HF) noisy environment of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The present article draws a concerning line between auditory system development and HF noise in the NICU, which we argue is not necessarily conducive to fostering this development. Overexposure to HF noise during critical periods disrupts the functional organization of auditory cortical circuits. As a result, we theorize that the ability to tune out noise and extract acoustic information in a noisy environment may be impaired, leading to increased risks for a variety of auditory, language, and attention disorders. Additionally, HF noise in the NICU often masks human speech sounds, further limiting quality exposure to linguistic stimuli. Understanding the impact of the sound environment on the developing auditory system is an important first step in meeting the developmental demands of preterm newborns undergoing intensive care.

  9. A genome-wide analysis of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid gene family in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Linyi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Han, Xiao; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xin; Zhan, Haixian; Ma, Jian; Luo, Peigao; Zhang, Wenping; Cui, Lei; Li, Xiaoyan; Chang, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    The Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) gene family plays key roles in the primary auxin-response process and controls a number of important traits in plants. However, the characteristics of the Aux/IAA gene family in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have long been unknown. In this study, a comprehensive identification of the Aux/IAA gene family was performed using the latest draft genome sequence of the bread wheat "Chinese Spring." Thirty-four Aux/IAA genes were identified, 30 of which have duplicated genes on the A, B or D sub-genome, with a total of 84 Aux/IAA sequences. These predicted Aux/IAA genes were non-randomly distributed in all the wheat chromosomes except for chromosome 2D. The information of wheat Aux/IAA proteins is also described. Based on an analysis of phylogeny, expression and adaptive evolution, we prove that the Aux/IAA family in wheat has been replicated twice in the two allopolyploidization events of bread wheat, when the tandem duplication also occurred. The duplicated genes have undergone an evolutionary process of purifying selection, resulting in the high conservation of copy genes among sub-genomes and functional redundancy among several members of the TaIAA family. However, functional divergence probably existed in most TaIAA members due to the diversity of the functional domain and expression pattern. Our research provides useful information for further research into the function of Aux/IAA genes in wheat.

  10. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS.

  11. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS. PMID:25873685

  12. The ALMT family of organic acid transporters in plants and their involvement in detoxification and nutrient security

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About a decade ago, members of a new protein family of anion channels were discovered on the basis of their ability to confer on plants the tolerance towards toxic aluminum ions in the soil. The efflux of Al3+ chelating malate anions through these channels is stimulated by external Al3+ ions. This f...

  13. Effective communication in difficult situations: preventing stress and burnout in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Dessy, Elisa

    2009-10-01

    Stress and burnout, the human side of the health service and the quality of care, are touchy subjects experienced on an everyday basis. Caregivers in the health systems are constantly called upon to handle feelings and "strong emotions", both their own and those of others: rage, impatience, frustration, helplessness, fear and so on. Frustration and conflicts between oneself and others are a frequent event, and may undermine the professional skills of each health professional. This article summarises problems, skills and situations where caregivers, patients, family face the difficulty to communicate. The aim is to provide an overview in this area and to suggest possible tools to overcome the daily difficulties.

  14. Silencing of BnTT1 family genes affects seed flavonoid biosynthesis and alters seed fatty acid composition in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jianping; Lu, Xiaochun; Yin, Nengwen; Ma, Lijuan; Lu, Jing; Liu, Xue; Li, Jiana; Lu, Jun; Lei, Bo; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong

    2017-01-01

    TRANSPARENT TESTA1 (TT1) is a zinc finger protein that contains a WIP domain. It plays important roles in controlling differentiation and pigmentation of the seed coat endothelium, and can affect the expression of early biosynthetic genes and late biosynthetic genes of flavonoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Brassica napus (AACC, 2n=38), the functions of BnTT1 genes remain unknown and few studies have focused on their roles in fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis. In this study, BnTT1 family genes were silenced by RNA interference, which resulted in yellow rapeseed, abnormal testa development (a much thinner testa), decreased seed weight, and altered seed FA composition in B. napus. High-throughput sequencing of genes differentially expressed between developing transgenic B. napus and wild-type seeds revealed altered expression of numerous genes involved in flavonoid and FA biosynthesis. As a consequence of this altered expression, we detected a marked decrease of oleic acid (C18:1) and notable increases of linoleic acid (C18:2) and α-linolenic acid (C18:3) in mature transgenic B. napus seeds by gas chromatography and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Meanwhile, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed reduced accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic seeds. Therefore, we propose that BnTT1s are involved in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis, and may also play a role in FA biosynthesis in B. napus.

  15. The role of trefoil factor family in apparently healthy subjects administrated gastroprotective agents for the primary prevention of gastrointestinal injuries from low-dose acetylsalicylic acid: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takashi; Takagi, Yu; Fukuzawa, Mari; Yamagishi, Tetsuya; Goto, Shinya

    2011-09-01

    It is well-known that acetylsalicylic acid induces gastrointestinal complication. Recently, trefoil factor family has been reported as a mucosal protective factor. We focused on trefoil factor family as one of defensive system for gastrointestinal injuries. The aim of this trial was to evaluate trefoil factor family levels in the serum of healthy subjects with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid with placebo or proton pump inhibitor or rebamipide were administered in 30 healthy subjects. Transnasal endoscopy was performed at 0, 24 h, 3 and 7 day. Changing of trefoil factor family (1,2,3) and numbers of gastric injuries were evaluated. The numbers of gastric injuries were significantly increased in the placebo group at 3 and 7 days. Injuries in the proton pump inhibitor group were not induced, in the rebamipide group were slightly induced. Trefoil factor family level in the placebo group were decreased in 3 and 7 days compared with prior to starting the trial. Trefoil factor family may have an important association with acetylsalicylic acid-induced gastrointestinal damage. Proton pump inhibitor and rebamipide prevented low-dose acetylsalicylic acid-induced gastrointestinal complications compared with the placebo group.

  16. Living in hope and desperate for a miracle: NICU nurses perceptions of parental anguish.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet

    2015-04-01

    The birth of an extremely premature baby is a tragedy, and it is only natural that the parents will rely on the spiritual and religious beliefs that guide the rest of their lives. At this difficult time, parents with strong religious beliefs will hope for divine intervention and pray for a miracle. This paper outlines the difficulties experienced by neonatal nurses when caring for an extremely premature baby whose parents hold on to hope and their belief in divine intervention and a miracle. Data were collected via a questionnaire to Australian neonatal nurses and semi-structured interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in NSW, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme of "hoping for a miracle" was captured by two sub-themes "praying for a miracle" and "oscillating between hope and despair". For some families, the hope of divine intervention seemed all consuming, and the nurses were witness to the desperation and disappointment of families when a miracle was not forthcoming.

  17. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of the fatty acid desaturase gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q M; Cheng, D J; Liu, S P; Ma, Z G; Tan, X; Zhao, P

    2014-05-13

    Fatty acid desaturases exist in all living organisms and play important roles in many different biologic processes, such as fatty acid metabolism, lipid biosynthetic processes, and pheromone biosynthetic processes. Using the available silkworm genome sequence, we identified 14 candidate fatty acid desaturase genes. Eleven genes contain 3 conserved histidine cluster motifs and 4 transmembrane domains, but their N-terminal residues exhibit obvious diversity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that there are 6 groups; Bmdesat1 and Bmdesat5-8 were clustered into group 2, which is involved in Δ11 desaturation activity, and Bmdesat3-4 were grouped in group 1, which is involved in Δ9 desaturation activity. Twelve of the 14 genes have expressed sequence tag evidence. Microarray data and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that Bmdesat3-4 and Bmdesat10 were expressed from the larval to moth stages and in multiple tissues on day 3 of 5th instar larvae. Bmdesat9, Bmdesat11, and Bmdesat14 were expressed during the pupal and late-embryonic stage, suggesting that they may take part in fatty acid metabolism to provide energy. These results provide some insights into the functions of individual fatty acid desaturases in silkworm.

  18. Motor Responses and Weight Gaining in Neonates through Use of Two Methods of Earmuff and Receiving Silence in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Abdeyazdan, Z.; Ghasemi, S.; Marofi, M.; Berjis, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. With technological advances in NICUs the survival rate of preterm infants has been increased. Because NICU environment is a potent source of stress for infants, its modification is an essential measure to decrease infants' morbidity. The purposes of this study were to compare the effects of wearing earmuff and provision silence for infants on their motor responses and gaining weight. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 96 preterm infants were enrolled. Their motor responses were evaluated for two consecutive days in the morning and afternoon shifts, in the groups of earmuff and silence, and at similar time points in the control group. Also their weight was measured at days 1 and 10. Results. In the two intervention groups, means of motor responses in infants were significantly less than in the control group, and weight gain of infants was more than the control group. However weight gain was more pronounced in the earmuff group. Conclusion. Both interventions led to decreasing number of motor responses and improvement of weight gain pattern, but these effects were more pronounced in earmuff group; thus because implementation of silence in NICUs has many barriers, it is suggested to use earmuff for preterm infants in these units. This trial obtained IRCT registration number IRCT2012092010812N2. PMID:25614898

  19. Corrosion aspects of Ni-Cr-Fe based and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. S.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews corrosion related issues of Ni-Cr-Fe based (in a general sense) and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials for nuclear power plants those have been dealt with for last more than four decades along with some updated information on corrosion research. The materials include austenitic stainless steels (SSs), Alloy 600, Monel 400, Alloy 800 and Alloy 690. Compatibility related issues of these alloys are briefly discussed along with the alloy chemistry and microstructure. For austenitic SSs, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in high temperature aqueous environments is discussed. For Alloy 600, intergranular cracking in high temperature water including hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking is highlighted along with the interactions of material in various environments. In case of Monel 400, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion at ambient temperature and SCC behaviour at elevated temperature are briefly described. For Alloy 800, the discussion covers SCC behaviour, surface characterization and microstructural aspects of pitting, whereas hydrogen-related issues are also highlighted for Alloy 690.

  20. Oxidation-induced spin reorientation in Co adatoms and CoPd dimers on Ni/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Beeck, T.; Fiedler, S.; Baev, I.; Wurth, W.; Martins, M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasmall magnetic clusters and adatoms are of strong current interest because of their possible use in future technological applications. Here, we demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between the adsorbates and the substrate can be significantly changed through oxidation. The magnetic properties of Co adatoms and CoPd dimers deposited on a remanently magnetized Ni/Cu(100) substrate have been investigated by x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at the Co L2 ,3 edges. Using spectral differences, pure and oxidized components are distinguished, and their respective magnetic moments are determined. The Co adatoms and the CoPd dimers are coupled ferromagnetically to the substrate, while their oxides, Co-O and CoPd-O, are coupled antiferromagnetically to the substrate. Along with the spin reorientation from the pure to the oxidized state, the magnetic moment of the adatom is highly reduced from Co to Co-O. In contrast, the magnetic moment of the dimer is of similar order for CoPd and CoPd-O.

  1. The Crystal Structure of Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a New Family of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Proteins in Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, William; Haouz, Ahmed; Graña, Martin; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Betton, Jean-Michel; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    The gene Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is conserved within the order Actinomycetales but absent elsewhere. The crystal structure of Rv0813c reveals a new family of proteins that resemble the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) found in eukaryotes. Rv0813c adopts the 10-stranded β-barrel fold typical of FABPs but lacks the double-helix insert that covers the entry to the binding site in the eukaryotic proteins. The barrel encloses a deep cavity, at the bottom of which a small cyclic ligand was found to bind to the hydroxyl group of Tyr192. This residue is part of a conserved Arg-X-Tyr motif much like the triad that binds the carboxylate group of fatty acids in FABPs. Most of the residues forming the internal surface of the cavity are conserved in homologous protein sequences found in CG-rich prokaryotes, strongly suggesting that Rv0813c is a member of a new family of bacterial FABP-like proteins that may have roles in the recognition, transport, and/or storage of small molecules in the bacterial cytosol. PMID:17172346

  2. The maize (Zea mays L.) AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID gene family: phylogeny, synteny, and unique root-type and tissue-specific expression patterns during development.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Yvonne; Zhang, Yanxiang; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin plays a key role in the coordination of many aspects of growth and development. AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) genes encode instable primary auxin responsive regulators of plant development that display a protein structure with four characteristic domains. In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of the 34 members of the maize Aux/IAA gene family was performed. Phylogenetic reconstructions revealed two classes of Aux/IAA proteins that can be distinguished by alterations in their domain III. Seven pairs of paralogous maize Aux/IAA proteins were discovered. Comprehensive root-type and tissue-specific expression profiling revealed unique expression patterns of the diverse members of the gene family. Remarkably, five of seven pairs of paralogous genes displayed highly correlated expression patterns in roots. All but one (ZmIAA23) tested maize Aux/IAA genes were auxin inducible, displaying two types of auxin induction within three hours of treatment. Moreover, 51 of 55 (93%) differential Aux/IAA expression patterns between different root-types followed the expression tendency: crown roots > seminal roots > primary roots > lateral roots. This pattern might imply root-type-specific regulation of Aux/IAA transcript abundance. In summary, the detailed analysis of the maize Aux/IAA gene family provides novel insights in the evolution and developmental regulation and thus the function of these genes in different root-types and tissues.

  3. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  4. Structural, Biochemical, and Phylogenetic Analyses Suggest That Indole-3-Acetic Acid Methyltransferase Is an Evolutionarily Ancient Member of the SABATH Family

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao,N.; Ferrer, J.; Ross, J.; Guan, J.; Yang, Y.; Pichersky, E.; Noel, J.; Chen, F.

    2008-01-01

    The plant SABATH protein family encompasses a group of related small-molecule methyltransferases (MTs) that catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methylation of natural chemicals encompassing widely divergent structures. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) methyltransferase (IAMT) is a member of the SABATH family that modulates IAA homeostasis in plant tissues through methylation of IAA's free carboxyl group. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) IAMT (AtIAMT1) was determined and refined to 2.75 Angstroms resolution. The overall tertiary and quaternary structures closely resemble the two-domain bilobed monomer and the dimeric arrangement, respectively, previously observed for the related salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase from Clarkia breweri (CbSAMT). To further our understanding of the biological function and evolution of SABATHs, especially of IAMT, we analyzed the SABATH gene family in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. Forty-one OsSABATH genes were identified. Expression analysis showed that more than one-half of the OsSABATH genes were transcribed in one or multiple organs. The OsSABATH gene most similar to AtIAMT1 is OsSABATH4. Escherichia coli-expressed OsSABATH4 protein displayed the highest level of catalytic activity toward IAA and was therefore named OsIAMT1. OsIAMT1 exhibited kinetic properties similar to AtIAMT1 and poplar IAMT (PtIAMT1). Structural modeling of OsIAMT1 and PtIAMT1 using the experimentally determined structure of AtIAMT1 reported here as a template revealed conserved structural features of IAMTs within the active-site cavity that are divergent from functionally distinct members of the SABATH family, such as CbSAMT. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that IAMTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and poplar (Populus spp.) form a monophyletic group. Thus, structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic evidence supports the hypothesis that IAMT is an evolutionarily ancient member of the SABATH family likely to play a critical role in

  5. Acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member B (ANP32B) contributes to retinoic acid-induced differentiation of leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yun; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Wu, Zhao-Xia; Han, Bin; Wang, Li-Shun

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANP32B was down-regulated during ATRA-induced leukemic cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of ANP32B enhanced ATRA-induced leukemic cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of ANP32B inhibited ATRA-induced leukemic cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANP32B inhibited ATRA activated transcriptional activity of RAR{alpha}. -- Abstract: The acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32B (ANP32B) is a member of a conserved superfamily of nuclear proteins whose functions are largely unknown. In our previous work, ANP32B was identified as a novel direct substrate for caspase-3 and acted as a negative regulator for leukemic cell apoptosis. In this work, we provided the first demonstration that ANP32B expression was down-regulated during differentiation induction of leukemic cells by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Knockdown of ANP32B expression by specific shRNA enhanced ATRA-induced leukemic cell differentiation, while ectopic expression of ANP32B attenuated it, indicating an inhibitory role of ANP32B against leukemic cell differentiation. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assay revealed that ANP32B might exert this role through inhibiting the ATRA dependent transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptor (RAR{alpha}). These data will shed new insights into understanding the biological functions of ANP32B protein.

  6. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  7. Characterization of the Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase Enzyme Family in Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Gregory S.; Kochevenko, Andrej; Tieman, Denise M.; Tohge, Takayuki; Krieger, Uri; Zamir, Dani; Taylor, Mark G.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Klee, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are synthesized in plants from branched-chain keto acids, but their metabolism is not completely understood. The interface of BCAA metabolism lies with branched-chain aminotransferases (BCAT) that catalyze both the last anabolic step and the first catabolic step. In this study, six BCAT genes from the cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were identified and characterized. SlBCAT1, -2, -3, and -4 are expressed in multiple plant tissues, while SlBCAT5 and -6 were undetectable. SlBCAT1 and -2 are located in the mitochondria, SlBCAT3 and -4 are located in chloroplasts, while SlBCAT5 and -6 are located in the cytosol and vacuole, respectively. SlBCAT1, -2, -3, and -4 were able to restore growth of Escherichia coli BCAA auxotrophic cells, but SlBCAT1 and -2 were less effective than SlBCAT3 and -4 in growth restoration. All enzymes were active in the forward (BCAA synthesis) and reverse (branched-chain keto acid synthesis) reactions. SlBCAT3 and -4 exhibited a preference for the forward reaction, while SlBCAT1 and -2 were more active in the reverse reaction. While overexpression of SlBCAT1 or -3 in tomato fruit did not significantly alter amino acid levels, an expression quantitative trait locus on chromosome 3, associated with substantially higher expression of Solanum pennellii BCAT4, did significantly increase BCAA levels. Conversely, antisense-mediated reduction of SlBCAT1 resulted in higher levels of BCAAs. Together, these results support a model in which the mitochondrial SlBCAT1 and -2 function in BCAA catabolism while the chloroplastic SlBCAT3 and -4 function in BCAA synthesis. PMID:20435740

  8. Unravelling the Diversity of the Cyclopiazonic Acid Family of Mycotoxins in Aspergillus flavus by UHPLC Triple-TOF HRMS

    PubMed Central

    Uka, Valdet; Moore, Geromy G.; Arroyo-Manzanares, Natalia; Nebija, Dashnor; De Saeger, Sarah; Diana Di Mavungu, José

    2017-01-01

    Cyclopiazonic acid (α-cyclopiazonic acid, α-CPA) is an indole-hydrindane-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by various fungal species, including the notorious food and feed contaminant Aspergillus flavus. Despite its discovery in A. flavus cultures approximately 40 years ago, its contribution to the A. flavus mycotoxin burden is consistently minimized by our focus on the more potent carcinogenic aflatoxins also produced by this fungus. Here, we report the screening and identification of several CPA-type alkaloids not previously found in A. flavus cultures. Our identifications of these CPA-type alkaloids are based on a dereplication strategy involving accurate mass high resolution mass spectrometry data and a careful study of the α-CPA fragmentation pattern. In total, 22 CPA-type alkaloids were identified in extracts from the A. flavus strains examined. Of these metabolites, 13 have been previously reported in other fungi, though this is the first report of their existence in A. flavus. Two of our metabolite discoveries, 11,12-dehydro α-CPA and 3-hydroxy-2-oxo CPA, have never been reported for any organism. The conspicuous presence of CPA and its numerous derivatives in A. flavus cultures raises concerns about the long-term and cumulative toxicological effects of these fungal secondary metabolites and their contributions to the entire A. flavus mycotoxin problem. PMID:28098779

  9. Functional analysis of the omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (CaFAD2) gene family of the oil seed crop Crambe abyssinica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crambe abyssinica produces high erucic acid (C22:1, 55-60%) in the seed oil, which can be further increased by reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels. The omega-6 fatty acid desaturase enzyme (FAD2) is known to be involved in PUFA biosynthesis. In crambe, three CaFAD2 genes, CaFAD2-C1, CaFAD2-C2 and CaFAD2-C3 are expressed. Results The individual effect of each CaFAD2 gene on oil composition was investigated through studying transgenic lines (CaFAD2-RNAi) for differential expression levels in relation to the composition of seed-oil. Six first generation transgenic plants (T1) showed C18:1 increase (by 6% to 10.5%) and PUFA reduction (by 8.6% to 10.2%). The silencing effect in these T1-plants ranged from the moderate silencing (40% to 50% reduction) of all three CaFAD2 genes to strong silencing (95% reduction) of CaFAD2-C3 alone. The progeny of two T1-plants (WG4-4 and WG19-6) was further analysed. Four or five transgene insertions are characterized in the progeny (T2) of WG19-6 in contrast to a single insertion in the T2 progeny of WG4-4. For the individual T2-plants of both families (WG19-6 and WG4-4), seed-specific silencing of CaFAD2-C1 and CaFAD2-C2 was observed in several individual T2-plants but, on average in both families, the level of silencing of these genes was not significant. A significant reduction in expression level (P < 0.01) in both families was only observed for CaFAD2-C3 together with significantly different C18:1 and PUFA levels in oil. Conclusions CaFAD2-C3 expression is highly correlated to levels of C18:1 (r = -0.78) and PUFA (r = 0.75), which suggests that CaFAD2-C3 is the most important one for changing the oil composition of crambe. PMID:24083776

  10. Functional Characterization of a Novel Member of the Amidohydrolase 2 Protein Family, 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthoic Acid Nonoxidative Decarboxylase from Burkholderia sp. Strain BC1

    PubMed Central

    Pal Chowdhury, Piyali; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene encoding a nonoxidative decarboxylase capable of catalyzing the transformation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) to 2-naphthol was identified, recombinantly expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The putative gene sequence of the decarboxylase (hndA) encodes a 316-amino-acid protein (HndA) with a predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa. HndA exhibited high identity with uncharacterized amidohydrolase 2 proteins of various Burkholderia species, whereas it showed a modest 27% identity with γ-resorcylate decarboxylase, a well-characterized nonoxidative decarboxylase belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Biochemically characterized HndA demonstrated strict substrate specificity toward 2H1NA, whereas inhibition studies with HndA indicated the presence of zinc as the transition metal center, as confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A three-dimensional structural model of HndA, followed by docking analysis, identified the conserved metal-coordinating and substrate-binding residues, while their importance in catalysis was validated by site-directed mutagenesis. IMPORTANCE Microbial nonoxidative decarboxylases play a crucial role in the metabolism of a large array of carboxy aromatic chemicals released into the environment from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these, hydroxynaphthoic acids are usually encountered as pathway intermediates in the bacterial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present study reveals biochemical and molecular characterization of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid nonoxidative decarboxylase involved in an alternative metabolic pathway which can be classified as a member of the small repertoire of nonoxidative decarboxylases belonging to the amidohydrolase 2 family of proteins. The strict substrate specificity and sequence uniqueness make it a novel member of the metallo-dependent hydrolase superfamily. PMID:27068590

  11. Celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid co-treatment inhibits cell growth in familial adenomatous polyposis derived LT97 colon adenoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heumen, Bjorn W.H. van; Roelofs, Hennie M.J.; Morsche, Rene H.M. te; Marian, Brigitte; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Peters, Wilbert H.M.

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention would be a desirable strategy to avoid duodenectomy in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suffering from duodenal adenomatosis. We investigated the in vitro effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COX-2 expression of the potential chemopreventives celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). HT-29 colon cancer cells and LT97 colorectal micro-adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, were exposed to low dose celecoxib and UDCA alone or in combination with tauro-cholic acid (CA) and tauro-chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), mimicking bile of FAP patients treated with UDCA. In HT-29 cells, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA resulted in a decreased cell growth (14-17%, p < 0.01). A more pronounced decrease (23-27%, p < 0.01) was observed in LT97 cells. Cell growth of HT-29 cells exposed to 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, was decreased (p < 0.001), either in the absence or presence of celecoxib. In LT97 cells incubated with 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, cell growth was decreased only in the presence of celecoxib (p < 0.05). No clear evidence was found for involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, caspase-3, or COX-2 in the cellular processes leading to the observed changes in cell growth. In conclusion, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA has growth inhibitory effects on colorectal adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, and further research on this combination as promising chemopreventive strategy is desired. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Celecoxib and UDCA acid co-treatment decreases cell growth in colon tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDCA enriched 'artificial bile' decreases LT-97 cell growth only in presence of celecoxib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCNA, caspase-3, nor COX-2 seem to be involved in the observed changes in cell growth.

  12. Brief parenting intervention for parents of NICU graduates: a randomized, clinical trial of Primary Care Triple P

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preterm-born or asphyxiated term-born children who received neonatal intensive care show more emotional and behavioral problems than term-born children without a medical condition. It is uncertain whether regular parenting intervention programs to which the parents of these children are usually referred, are effective in reducing child problem behavior in this specific population. Our objective was to investigate whether a regular, brief parenting intervention, Primary Care Triple P, is effective in decreasing emotional and behavioral problems in preterm-born or asphyxiated term-born preschoolers. Methods For this pragmatic, open randomized clinical trial, participants were recruited from a cohort of infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) of two Dutch hospitals. Children born with a gestational age <32 weeks or birth weight <1500 g and children born at a gestational age 37–42 weeks with perinatal asphyxia were included. After screening for a t-score ≥60 on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), children were randomly assigned to Primary Care Triple P (n = 34) or a wait-list control group (n = 33). The primary outcome was child emotional and behavioral problems reported by parents on the CBCL, 6 months after the start of the trial. Results There was no effect of the intervention on the CBCL at the trial endpoint (t64 = 0.54, P = .30). On secondary measurements of child problem behavior, parenting style, parenting stress, and parent perceived child vulnerability, groups either did not differ significantly or the intervention group showed more problems. In both the intervention and control group there was a significant decrease in emotional and behavioral problems during the trial. Conclusions Primary Care Triple P, a brief parenting intervention, is not effective in reducing child emotional and behavioral problems in preterm-born children or term-born children with perinatal asphyxia. Trial registration Netherlands National Trial

  13. Influence of maternal and socioeconomic factors on breast milk fatty acid composition in urban, low-income families.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Uma; Kanungo, Suman; Zhang, Dadong; Ross Colgate, E; Carmolli, Marya P; Dey, Ayan; Alam, Masud; Manna, Byomkesh; Nandy, Ranjan Kumar; Kim, Deok Ryun; Paul, Dilip Kumar; Choudhury, Saugato; Sahoo, Sushama; Harris, William S; Wierzba, Thomas F; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C

    2017-02-15

    The lipid composition of breast milk may have a significant impact on early infant growth and cognitive development. Comprehensive breast milk data is lacking from low-income populations in the Indian subcontinent impeding assessment of deficiencies and limiting development of maternal nutritional interventions. A single breast milk specimen was collected within 6 weeks postpartum from two low-income maternal cohorts of exclusively breastfed infants, from Dhaka, Bangladesh (n = 683) and Kolkata, India (n = 372) and assayed for percentage composition of 26 fatty acids. Mature milk (>15 days) in Dhaka (n = 99) compared to Kolkata (n = 372) was higher in total saturated fatty acid (SFA; mean 48% vs. 44%) and disproportionately lower in ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), hence the ω6- and ω3-PUFA ratio in Dhaka were almost double the value in Kolkata. In both sites, after adjusting for days of lactation, increased maternal education was associated with decreased SFA and PUFA, and increasing birth order or total pregnancies was associated with decreasing ω6-PUFA or ω3-PUFA by a factor of 0.95 for each birth and pregnancy. In Dhaka, household prosperity was associated with decreased SFA and PUFA and increased ω6- and ω3-PUFA. Maternal height was associated with increased SFA and PUFA in Kolkata (1% increase per 1 cm), but body mass index showed no independent association with either ratio in either cohort. In summary, the socioeconomic factors of maternal education and household prosperity were associated with breast milk composition, although prosperity may only be important in higher cost of living communities. Associated maternal biological factors were height and infant birth order, but not adiposity. Further study is needed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of these effects.

  14. The effect of intermetallic compound morphology on Cu diffusion in Sn-Ag and Sn-Pb solder bump on the Ni/Cu Under-bump metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Guh-Yaw; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2005-01-01

    The eutectic Sn-Ag solder alloy is one of the candidates for the Pb-free solder, and Sn-Pb solder alloys are still widely used in today’s electronic packages. In this tudy, the interfacial reaction in the eutectic Sn-Ag and Sn-Pb solder joints was investigated with an assembly of a solder/Ni/Cu/Ti/Si3N4/Si multilayer structures. In the Sn-3.5Ag solder joints reflowed at 260°C, only the (Ni1-x,Cux)3Sn4 intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the solder/Ni interface. For the Sn-37Pb solder reflowed at 225°C for one to ten cycles, only the (Ni1-x,Cux)3Sn4 IMC formed between the solder and the Ni/Cu under-bump metallization (UBM). Nevertheless, the (Cu1-y,Niy)6Sn5 IMC was observed in joints reflowed at 245°C after five cycles and at 265°C after three cycles. With the aid of microstructure evolution, quantitative analysis, and elemental distribution between the solder and Ni/Cu UBM, it was revealed that Cu content in the solder near the solder/IMC interface played an important role in the formation of the (Cu1-y,Niy)6Sn5 IMC. In addition, the diffusion behavior of Cu in eutectic Sn-Ag and Sn-Pb solders with the Ni/Cu UBM were probed and discussed. The atomic flux of Cu diffused through Ni was evaluated by detailed quantitative analysis in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). During reflow, the atomic flux of Cu was on the order of 1016-1017 atoms/cm2sec in both the eutectic Sn-Ag and Sn-Pb systems.

  15. Biliary bile acids in birds of the Cotingidae family: taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid.

    PubMed

    Hagey, Lee R; Iida, Takashi; Ogawa, Shoujiro; Adachi, Yuuki; Une, Mizuho; Mushiake, Kumiko; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Shimada, Miki; Mano, Nariyasu; Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Three C(27) bile acids were found to be major biliary bile acids in the capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor) and bare-throated bellbird (Procnias nudicollis), both members of the Cotingidae family of the order Passeriformes. The individual bile acids were isolated by preparative RP-HPLC, and their structures were established by RP-HPLC, LC/ESI-MS/MS and NMR as well as by a comparison of their chromatographic properties with those of authentic reference standards of their 12α-hydroxy derivatives. The most abundant bile acid present in the capuchinbird bile was the taurine conjugate of C(27) (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid, a diastereomer not previously identified as a natural bile acid. The four diastereomers of taurine-conjugated (24ξ,25ξ)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid could be distinguished by NMR and were resolved by RP-HPLC. The RRT of the diastereomers (with taurocholic acid as 1.0) were found to be increased in the following order: (24R,25R)<(24S,25R)<(24S,25S)<(24R,25S). Two epimers (25R and 25S) of C(27) 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid were also present (as the taurine conjugates) in both bird species. Epimers of the two compounds could be distinguished by their NMR spectra and resolved by RP-HPLC with the (25S)-epimer eluting before the (25R)-epimer. Characterization of the taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid should facilitate their detection in peroxisomal disease and inborn errors of bile acid biosynthesis.

  16. AaCAT1 of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti: a novel histidine-specific amino acid transporter from the SLC7 family.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Immo A; Boudko, Dmitri Y; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Voronov, Dmitri A; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Drake, Lisa L; Aguirre, Sarah E; Fox, Jeffrey M; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2011-03-25

    Insect yolk protein precursor gene expression is regulated by nutritional and endocrine signals. A surge of amino acids in the hemolymph of blood-fed female mosquitoes activates a nutrient signaling system in the fat bodies, which subsequently derepresses yolk protein precursor genes and makes them responsive to activation by steroid hormones. Orphan transporters of the SLC7 family were identified as essential upstream components of the nutrient signaling system in the fat body of fruit flies and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. However, the transport function of these proteins was unknown. We report expression and functional characterization of AaCAT1, cloned from the fat body of A. aegypti. Expression of AaCAT1 transcript and protein undergoes dynamic changes during postembryonic development of the mosquito. Transcript expression was especially high in the third and fourth larval stages; however, the AaCAT1 protein was detected only in pupa and adult stages. Functional expression and analysis of AaCAT1 in Xenopus oocytes revealed that it acts as a sodium-independent cationic amino acid transporter, with unique selectivity to L-histidine at neutral pH (K(0.5)(L-His) = 0.34 ± 0.07 mM, pH 7.2). Acidification to pH 6.2 dramatically increases AaCAT1-specific His(+)-induced current. RNAi-mediated silencing of AaCAT1 reduces egg yield of subsequent ovipositions. Our data show that AaCAT1 has notable differences in its transport mechanism when compared with related mammalian cationic amino acid transporters. It may execute histidine-specific transport and signaling in mosquito tissues.

  17. Variable mineralization processes during the formation of the Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yongqiang; Ke, Junjun; Zu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit is located at the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) in Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China. The host intrusion of the Hulu deposit is composed of a layered mafic-ultramafic sequence and a dike-like unit. The layered sequence is composed of harzburgite, lherzolite, pyroxenite, gabbro, gabbrodiorite and diorite. The dike-like body comprises lherzolite and gabbro. Sulfide orebodies occur mainly within the harzburgite, pyroxenite and lherzolite at the base of the layered sequence and within the lherzolite in the dike-like body. Sulfide mineralization from the Hulu deposit shows significant depletion of PGE relative to Cu and Ni. These elements show good positive correlations with S in the sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit but relatively weak correlations in the sulfide mineralization from the layered sequence. The sulfide mineralization from the layered unit shows excellent positive correlations between Ir and Os, Ru or Rh, and poor relationships between Ir and Pt or Pd. On the contrary, sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit shows good correlations in the diagrams of Os, Ru, Rh, Pt and Pd against Ir. Both high Cu/Pd ratios (8855-481,398) and our modeling indicate that PGE depletion resulted from sulfide removal in a deep staging magma chamber. The evolved PGE-depleted magmas then ascended to the shallower magma chamber and became sulfide saturation due to crustal contamination. Both low Se/S ratios (33.5 × 10-6-487.5 × 10-6) and a negative correlation between Se/S and Cu/Pd ratios are consistent with the addition of crustal S. A large number of sulfide liquids segregated with minor crystallization of monosulfide solid solution (MSS) in the shallower magma chamber. When new magma pulses with unfractionated sulfide droplets entered the shallower magma chamber, the sulfide slurry containing crystallized MSS may be disrupted and mixed with the unfractionated sulfide droplets. The

  18. Crustal contamination and sulfide immiscibility history of the Permian Huangshannan magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, East Tianshan, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Tang, Dong-Mei; Feng, Hong-Ye; Xue, Sheng-Chao

    2016-11-01

    The Huangshannan mafic-ultramafic intrusion is a Permian Ni-Cu sulfide-bearing intrusion in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The intrusion consists of an ultramafic unit, which is composed of lherzolite and olivine websterite, and a mafic unit, which is composed of olivine gabbronorite, gabbronorite and leuco-gabbronorite. This intrusion was formed by two separate pulses of magma: a more primitive magma for the early ultramafic unit and a more evolved magma for the late mafic unit. U-Pb isotope geochronology of zircon from the mafic unit yields an age of 278 ± 2 Ma. According to its olivine and Cr-rich spinel compositions, the estimated parental magma of lherzolite for the Huangshannan intrusion has 12.4 wt.% MgO, indicating picritic affinity. Fractional crystallization modeling results and the presence of rounded sulfide inclusions in an olivine crystal (Fo 86.7) indicate that sulfide immiscibility was achieved at the beginning of olivine fractionation. Co-magmatic zircon crystals from gabbronorite have a δ18O value close to 6.5‰, which is 1.2‰ higher than the typical mantle value and suggests significant crustal contamination (∼20%). The positive εHf(t) values of co-magmatic zircon (which vary from +9.2 to +15.3) and positive whole rock εNd(t) values (which vary from +4.7 to +7.8) also indicate that the parental magma was derived from a depleted mantle source and contaminated by 5-20% juvenile arc crust and then by ∼5% upper crustal materials. However, modeling results of sulfur content at sulfide saturation reveal that such a large amount of crustal contamination is not sufficient to trigger sulfide saturation in the parental magma, which strongly suggests that external sulfur addition, probably during contamination, has played a critical role in causing sulfide immiscibility. Furthermore, the arc magmatism geochemical signatures of the Huangshannan intrusion, such as significant Nb and Ta depletion relative to La and low Ca

  19. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Influence of a Combined Inpatient/Outpatient Methadone Treatment Regimen on the Average Length of Stay of a Medicaid NICU Population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jerry; Hulman, Sonia; Musci, Michael; Stang, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Prescription opioid and heroin abuse have been increasing steadily year after year, and continue to be a serious national problem. A sequela of the increase in opioid abuse has been an increase in the number of infants born with opioid dependence. These infants often require costly, prolonged stays in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for drug withdrawal treatment. The authors studied a population of infants from a large Medicaid health plan who were born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in utero opioid exposure to assess the average length of stay in the NICU, and to determine the variables that may account for differences in interinstitutional lengths of stay. The overall average length of stay for NAS was 21.1 days for the 139 infants included in the study. Analysis of the medication used for treatment revealed that infants who were treated with a combined inpatient/outpatient regimen with methadone had an average length of stay of 11.4 days versus 25.1 days for infants who were treated entirely as inpatients (P<0.001), a 55% reduction in average length of stay. In 2009 there were an estimated 13,600 cases of NAS in the United States at a cost of $53,000 per case. A 55% reduction in length of stay corresponds to $396 million in annual savings for the treatment of NAS. Development of successful combined inpatient/outpatient management programs for NAS warrants further consideration.

  20. Amino acid sequence diversity within the family of antibodies bearing the major antiarsonate cross-reactive idiotype of the A strain mouse

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    VH region amino acid sequences are described for five A/J anti-p- azophenylarsonate (anti-Ars) hybridoma antibodies for which the VL region sequences have previously been determined, thus completing the V domain sequences of these molecules. These antibodies all belong to the family designated Ars-A which bears the major anti-arsonate cross- reactive idiotype (CRI) of the A strain mouse. However, they differ in the degree to which they express the CRI in standard competition radioimmunoassays. Although the sequences are closely related, all are different from each other. Replacements are distributed throughout the VH region and occur in positions of the chain encoded by all three gene segments, VH, DH, and JH. It is likely that somatic diversification processes play a dominant role in producing the sequence variability in each of these segments. The number of differences from the sequence encoded by the germline is smallest for antibodies that express the CRI most strongly, suggesting that somatic diversification is responsible for loss of the CRI in members of the Ars-A antibody family. There is an unusual degree of clustering of differences in both CDR2 and CDR3 and many of the substitutions are located in "hot spots" of variation. The large number of differences between the chains prohibits the unambiguous identification of positions at which alterations play a major role in reducing the expression of the CRI. However, the data suggest that the loss of the CRI is associated with a definable repertoire of somatic changes at a restricted number of highly variable sites. PMID:6415209

  1. Members of a Novel Protein Family Containing Microneme Adhesive Repeat Domains Act as Sialic Acid-binding Lectins during Host Cell Invasion by Apicomplexan Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M.; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J.; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for α2–3- over α2–6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to α2–9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6′sulfo-sialyl Lewisx might have implications for tissue tropism. PMID:19901027

  2. Mucilaginibacter paludis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Mucilaginibacter gracilis sp. nov., pectin-, xylan- and laminarin-degrading members of the family Sphingobacteriaceae from acidic Sphagnum peat bog.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Timofei A; Tindall, Brian J; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2007-10-01

    Two facultatively aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria capable of degrading pectin, xylan, laminarin and some other polysaccharides were obtained from the acidic Sphagnum peat bog Bakchar, in western Siberia, Russia, and were designated strains TPT18(T) and TPT56(T). Cells of these isolates are Gram-negative, non-motile, long rods that are covered by large capsules. On ageing, they transform into spherical L-forms. Strains TPT18(T) and TPT56(T) are acido- and psychrotolerant organisms capable of growth at pH 4.2-8.2 (with an optimum at pH 6.0-6.5) and at 2-33 degrees C (with an optimum at 20 degrees C). The major fatty acids are iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c); the quinones are MK-7 and MK-6. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the novel strains share 97 % sequence similarity and belong to the family Sphingobacteriaceae; however, they are related only distantly to members of the genera Pedobacter (91.8-93.3 % similarity) and Sphingobacterium (89.6-91.2 % similarity). The DNA G+C content of strains TPT18(T) and TPT56(T) is 42.4 and 46.1 mol%, respectively. The low DNA-DNA hybridization value (42 %) and a number of phenotypic differences between strains TPT18(T) and TPT56(T) indicated that they represent two separate species. Since the two isolates are clearly distinct from all currently described members of the family Sphingobacteriaceae, we propose a novel genus, Mucilaginibacter gen. nov., containing two novel species, Mucilaginibacter gracilis sp. nov. and Mucilaginibacter paludis sp. nov. The type strains of Mucilaginibacter gracilis and Mucilaginibacter paludis are respectively TPT18(T) (=ATCC BAA-1391(T) =VKM B-2447(T)) and TPT56(T) (=ATCC BAA-1394(T) =VKM B-2446(T)).

  3. Fatty acid binding protein 3 (fabp3) is associated with insulin, lipids and cardiovascular phenotypes of the metabolic syndrome through epigenetic modifications in a northern european family population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) play regulatory roles at the nexus of lipid metabolism and signaling. Dyslipidemia in clinical manifestation frequently co-occurs with obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension in the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Animal studies have suggested FABPs play regulatory roles in expressing MetS phenotypes. In our family cohort of Northern European descent, transcript levels in peripheral white blood cells (PWBCs) of a key FABPs, FABP3, is correlated with the MetS leading components. However, evidence supporting the functions of FABPs in humans using genetic approaches has been scarce, suggesting FABPs may be under epigenetic regulation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CpG methylation status of a key regulator of lipid homeostasis, FABP3, is a quantitative trait associated with status of MetS phenotypes in humans. Methods We used a mass-spec based quantitative method, EpiTYPER®, to profile a CpG island that extends from the promoter to the first exon of the FABP3 gene in our family-based cohort of Northern European descent (n=517). We then conducted statistical analysis of the quantitative relationship of CpG methylation and MetS measures following the variance-component association model. Heritability of each methylation and the effect of age and sex on CpG methylation were also assessed in our families. Results We find that methylation levels of individual CpG units and the regional average are heritable and significantly influenced by age and sex. Regional methylation was strongly associated with plasma total cholesterol (p=0.00028) and suggestively associated with LDL-cholesterol (p=0.00495). Methylation at individual units was significantly associated with insulin sensitivity, lipid particle sizing and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.0028, corrected for multiple testing for each trait). Peripheral white blood cell (PWBC) expression of FABP3 in a separate group of subjects (n=128) negatively

  4. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Family therapy By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  5. Family Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... your outlook on the future. Friends and adult family members The effects of cancer on your relationships ...

  6. Biosynthesis of UDP-xylose. Cloning and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene family, UXS, encoding soluble and putative membrane-bound UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harper, April D; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2002-12-01

    UDP-xylose (Xyl) is an important sugar donor for the synthesis of glycoproteins, polysaccharides, various metabolites, and oligosaccharides in animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. UDP-Xyl also feedback inhibits upstream enzymes (UDP-glucose [Glc] dehydrogenase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, and UDP-GlcA decarboxylase) and is involved in its own synthesis and the synthesis of UDP-arabinose. In plants, biosynthesis of UDP-Xyl is catalyzed by different membrane-bound and soluble UDP-GlcA decarboxylase (UDP-GlcA-DC) isozymes, all of which convert UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Because synthesis of UDP-Xyl occurs both in the cytosol and in membranes, it is not known which source of UDP-Xyl the different Golgi-localized xylosyltransferases are utilizing. Here, we describe the identification of several distinct Arabidopsis genes (named AtUXS for UDP-Xyl synthase) that encode functional UDP-GlcA-DC isoforms. The Arabidopsis genome contains five UXS genes and their protein products can be subdivided into three isozyme classes (A-C), one soluble and two distinct putative membrane bound. AtUxs from each class, when expressed in Escherichia coli, generate active UDP-GlcA-DC that converts UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Members of this gene family have a large conserved C-terminal catalytic domain (approximately 300 amino acids long) and an N-terminal variable domain differing in sequence and size (30-120 amino acids long). Isoforms of class A and B appear to encode putative type II membrane proteins with their catalytic domains facing the lumen (like Golgi-glycosyltransferases) and their N-terminal variable domain facing the cytosol. Uxs class C is likely a cytosolic isoform. The characteristics of the plant Uxs support the hypothesis that unique UDP-GlcA-DCs with distinct subcellular localizations are required for specific xylosylation events.

  7. The family of ferrocene-stabilized silylium ions: synthesis, 29Si NMR characterization, Lewis acidity, substituent scrambling, and quantum-chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Müther, Kristine; Hrobárik, Peter; Hrobáriková, Veronika; Kaupp, Martin; Oestreich, Martin

    2013-12-02

    The purpose of this systematic experimental and theoretical study is to deeply understand the unique bonding situation in ferrocene-stabilized silylium ions as a function of the substituents at the silicon atom and to learn about the structure parameters that determine the (29)Si NMR chemical shift and electrophilicity of these strong Lewis acids. For this, ten new members of the family of ferrocene-stabilized silicon cations were prepared by a hydride abstraction reaction from silanes with the trityl cation and characterized by multinuclear (1)H and (29)Si NMR spectroscopy. A closer look at the NMR spectra revealed that additional minor sets of signals were not impurities but silylium ions with substitution patterns different from that of the initially formed cation. Careful assignment of these signals furnished experimental proof that sterically less hindered silylium ions are capable of exchanging substituents with unreacted silane precursors. Density functional theory calculations provided mechanistic insight into that substituent transfer in which the migrating group is exchanged between two silicon fragments in a concerted process involving a ferrocene-bridged intermediate. Moreover, the quantum-chemical analysis of the (29)Si NMR chemical shifts revealed a linear relationship between δ((29)Si) values and the Fe···Si distance for subsets of silicon cations. An electron localization function and electron localizability indicator analysis shows a three-center two-electron bonding attractor between the iron, silicon, and C'(ipso) atoms, clearly distinguishing the silicon cations from the corresponding carbenium ions and boranes. Correlations between (29)Si NMR chemical shifts and Lewis acidity, evaluated in terms of fluoride ion affinities, are seen only for subsets of silylium ions, sometimes with non-intuitive trends, indicating a complicated interplay of steric and electronic effects on the degree of the Fe···Si interaction.

  8. Grandparents and the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... Too Soon Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & ... donation Giving opportunities Our corporate partners Tools & Resources Careers Events in your area Frequently asked questions Email ...

  9. Lived Experience of Caregivers of Family-Centered Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: “Evocation of Being at Home”

    PubMed Central

    Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Pishva, Narjes; Jahanpour, Faezeh

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, family-centered care (FCC) has come to be known, accepted, and reported as the best care strategy for admitted children and their families. However, in spite of the increasing application of this approach, the experiences of the caregivers have not yet been studied. Objectives The present study aimed at the description and interpretation of the FCC experience in two neonatal intensive care units (NICU) at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods This study was conducted through the hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 professional and familial caregivers, and their interactions were observed in three work shifts. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. After observations, field notes were also written. Finally, the data were analyzed through van Manen’s methodology. Results One of the essential themes that emerged in this study was the “evocation of being at home” among familial and even professional caregivers. This theme had three subthemes: i.e., “meta-family interaction,” “comprehensive support,” and “reconstruction of a normal family.” Accordingly, FCC eliminated borders between professional and non-professional caregivers and built close relationships among them in the NICU. It also provided for the needs of neonates, their families, and even professional caregivers through perceived and received support. Conclusions Parents of the neonates admitted to the NICU experience hard moments. They not only play the role of primary caregivers, but they also receive the care. Focusing on the different meanings of this care from the caregivers’ points of view and having managers provide certain requirements can guarantee the establishment of comprehensive care for clients and proper support for the staff in this unit. PMID:28203324

  10. Structure and magnetism of S = 1/2 kagome antiferromagnets NiCu3(OH)6Cl2 and CoCu3(OH)6Cl2.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-sheng; Zhang, Qing-ming

    2013-01-16

    We have successfully synthesized S = 1/2 kagome antiferromagnets MCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2) (M = Ni and Co) by a hydrothermal method with a rotating pressure vessel. Structural characterization shows that both compounds have similar crystal structure to ZnCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2) with R3m symmetry. As with ZnCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2), the compounds show no obvious hysteresis at 2 K. A spin-glass transition is found in both NiCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2) and CoCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2) at low temperatures (6.0 and 3.5 K respectively) by AC susceptibility measurements. This indicates no long-range magnetic order and a strong spin frustration. The substitution of Zn(2+) by magnetic ions Ni(2+) or Co(2+) effectively enhances the interlayer exchange coupling and changes the ground state of the kagome spin system.

  11. Treating Parents to Reduce NICU Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus (TREAT PARENTS) trial: protocol of a multisite randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M; Koontz, Danielle W; Voskertchian, Annie; Popoola, Victor O; Harrelson, Kathleen; Ross, Tracy; Aucott, Susan W; Gilmore, Maureen M; Carroll, Karen C; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction More than 33 000 healthcare-associated infections occur in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) each year in the USA. Parents, rather than healthcare workers, may be a reservoir from which neonates acquire Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonisation in the NICU. This study looks to measure the effect of treating parents with short course intranasal mupirocin and topical chlorhexidine antisepsis on acquisition of S. aureus colonisation and infection in neonates. Methods and analysis The TREAT PARENTS trial (Treating Parents to Reduce Neonatal Transmission of S. aureus) is a multicentre randomised, masked, placebo-controlled trial. Shortly after a neonate is admitted to the NICU, parents will be tested for S. aureus colonisation. If either parent screens positive for S. aureus, then both parents as a pair will be enrolled and randomised to one of the two possible masked treatment arms. Arm 1 will include assignment to intranasal 2% mupirocin plus topical antisepsis with chlorhexidine gluconate impregnated cloths for 5 days. Arm 2 will include assignment to placebo ointment and placebo cloths for skin antisepsis for 5 days. The primary outcome will be neonatal acquisition of an S. aureus strain that is concordant to the parental baseline S. aureus strain as determined by periodic surveillance cultures or a culture collected during routine clinical care that grows S. aureus. Secondary outcomes will include neonatal acquisition of S. aureus, neonatal S. aureus infection, eradication of S. aureus colonisation in parents, natural history of S. aureus colonisation in parents receiving placebo, adverse reactions to treatment, feasibility of intervention, and attitudes and behaviour in consented parents. Four hundred neonate-parent pairs will be enrolled. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by Johns Hopkins University IRB in June 2014 (IRB number 00092982). Protocol V.7 was approved in November 2014. Findings will be published in peer

  12. Goals for Human Milk Feeding in Mothers of Very Low Birth Weight Infants: How Do Goals Change and Are They Achieved During the NICU Hospitalization?

    PubMed Central

    Bigger, Harold; Patel, Aloka L.; Rossman, Beverly; Fogg, Louis F.; Meier, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about human milk (HM) feeding goals for mothers of very low birth weight (VLBW) (<1,500 g birth weight) infants, especially for black mothers, for whom rates of VLBW birth are higher and lactation rates lower. This study examined the establishment, modification, and achievement of HM feeding goals during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization for mothers of VLBW infants and the influence of maternal race and income. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study measured maternal HM feeding goals (exclusive [EHM], partial, none) predelivery and during three time intervals: day of life (DOL) 1–14, 15–28, and 29–72. Goal achievement compared the goal for the time interval with the proportion of HM feedings received by the infant. Goal establishment, modification, and achievement were examined using chi-squared and contingency tables. Results: Three hundred fifty-two mother–infant dyads (53% black; 70% low-income; mean birth weight, 1,048 g) were studied. Predelivery, 55% of mothers planned to provide EHM; fewer black and low-income mothers chose EHM. During DOL 1–14, 63% of mothers chose EHM, and predelivery racial differences disappeared. Only 10% of mothers chose exclusive at-breast EHM feedings. EHM feeding goals decreased during NICU hospitalization, especially for black mothers. Whereas most mothers met their HM feeding goals initially, achievement rates declined during hospitalization. Mothers' EHM goal achievement was not influenced by race or income. Conclusions: Mothers changed their predelivery HM feeding goals after birth of a VLBW infant. Longitudinally, HM feeding goals and achievement reflected less HM use, highlighting the need to target lactation maintenance in this population. PMID:26110439

  13. Positive effect of human milk feeding during NICU hospitalization on 24 month neurodevelopment of very low birth weight infants: an Italian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gibertoni, Dino; Corvaglia, Luigi; Vandini, Silvia; Rucci, Paola; Savini, Silvia; Alessandroni, Rosina; Sansavini, Alessandra; Fantini, Maria Pia; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human milk feeding during NICU hospitalization on neurodevelopment at 24 months of corrected age in very low birth weight infants. A cohort of 316 very low birth weight newborns (weight ≤ 1500 g) was prospectively enrolled in a follow-up program on admission to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of S. Orsola Hospital, Bologna, Italy, from January 2005 to June 2011. Neurodevelopment was evaluated at 24 months corrected age using the Griffiths Mental Development Scale. The effect of human milk nutrition on neurodevelopment was first investigated using a multiple linear regression model, to adjust for the effects of gestational age, small for gestational age, complications at birth and during hospitalization, growth restriction at discharge and socio-economic status. Path analysis was then used to refine the multiple regression model, taking into account the relationships among predictors and their temporal sequence. Human milk feeding during NICU hospitalization and higher socio-economic status were associated with better neurodevelopment at 24 months in both models. In the path analysis model intraventricular hemorrhage-periventricular leukomalacia and growth restriction at discharge proved to be directly and independently associated with poorer neurodevelopment. Gestational age and growth restriction at birth had indirect significant effects on neurodevelopment, which were mediated by complications that occurred at birth and during hospitalization, growth restriction at discharge and type of feeding. In conclusion, our findings suggest that mother's human milk feeding during hospitalization can be encouraged because it may improve neurodevelopment at 24 months corrected age.

  14. Glutathione transferase supergene family in tomato: Salt stress-regulated expression of representative genes from distinct GST classes in plants primed with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Horváth, Edit; Váry, Zsolt; Gallé, Ágnes; Bela, Krisztina; Brunner, Szilvia; Tari, Irma

    2014-05-01

    A family tree of the multifunctional proteins, glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) was created in Solanum lycopersicum based on homology to known Arabidopsis GSTs. The involvement of selected SlGSTs was studied in salt stress response of tomato primed with salicylic acid (SA) or in un-primed plants by real-time qPCR. Selected tau GSTs (SlGSTU23, SlGSTU26) were up-regulated in the leaves, while GSTs from lambda, theta, dehydroascorbate reductase and zeta classes (SlGSTL3, SlGSTT2, SlDHAR5, SlGSTZ2) in the root tissues under salt stress. Priming with SA exhibited a concentration dependency; SA mitigated the salt stress injury and caused characteristic changes in the expression pattern of SlGSTs only at 10(-4) M concentration. SlGSTF4 displayed a significant up-regulation in the leaves, while the abundance of SlGSTL3, SlGSTT2 and SlGSTZ2 transcripts were enhanced in the roots of plants primed with high SA concentration. Unexpectedly, under high salinity the SlDHAR2 expression decreased in primed roots as compared to the salt-stressed plants, however, the up-regulation of SlDHAR5 isoenzyme contributed to the maintenance of DHAR activity in roots primed with high SA. The members of lambda, theta and zeta class GSTs have a specific role in salt stress acclimation of tomato, while SlGSTU26 and SlGSTF4, the enzymes with high glutathione conjugating activity, characterize a successful priming in both roots and leaves. In contrast to low concentration, high SA concentration induced those GSTs in primed roots, which were up-regulated under salt stress. Our data indicate that induction of GSTs provide a flexible tool in maintaining redox homeostasis during unfavourable conditions.

  15. Structure, localization and transcriptional properties of two classes of retinoic acid receptor alpha fusion proteins in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL): structural similarities with a new family of oncoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, P; Perez, A; Lutz, Y; Rochette-Egly, C; Gaub, M P; Durand, B; Lanotte, M; Berger, R; Chambon, P

    1992-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is due to a chromosomal t(15;17) translocation which involves a novel human gene, Myl, (also named PML) and the retinoic acid (RA) receptor alpha (RAR-alpha) gene. We report here the characterization of Myl and of the reciprocal MylRAR (PMLRAR) and RARMyl (RARPML) fusion transcripts which are found in two classes of APL patients. Myl displays similarities with a new family of proteins of which some members are fused to protooncogenes in the transforming proteins RFP-ret and T18. The speckled nuclear localization of Myl, as well as its sequence homology with the 52 kDa component of the RO/SSA ribonucleoprotein particle, suggest that Myl may be present in a ribonucleoprotein complex. In contrast to both Myl and RAR-alpha whose localization is essentially nuclear in the presence or absence of RA, MylRAR which is largely cytoplasmic in the absence of RA appears to be translocated to the nucleus in the presence of RA. Myl and MylRAR can associate in vitro and this association is mediated by a coiled coil in the Myl sequence. In vivo this association results in a colocalization of Myl and MylRAR which is identical to that of MylRAR alone. Studies of activation of transcription from the promoters of several RA target genes indicate that MylRARs have altered transcription activation properties when compared with RAR-alpha. Most notably, MylRAR represses markedly the activity of some RA target promoters in the absence of RA. Western blot analyses of patient samples show that MylRAR is expressed to a much higher level than wild type RAR-alpha originating from the normal allele. Taken together, these results suggest that MylRAR may interfere in a dominant manner with both Myl and RAR functions. Images PMID:1311253

  16. Structural comparison of AP endonucleases from the exonuclease III family reveals new amino acid residues in human AP endonuclease 1 that are involved in incision of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mursalimov, Aibek; Grin, Inga; Alili, Doria; Koshenov, Zhanat; Akishev, Zhiger; Maksimenko, Andrei; Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Saparbaev, Murat; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Moréra, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: DNA glycosylase-initiated base excision repair (BER) and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease-initiated nucleotide incision repair (NIR). In the BER pathway, an AP endonuclease cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3'-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases, whereas in the NIR pathway, the same AP endonuclease incises DNA 5' to an oxidized base. The majority of characterized AP endonucleases possess classic BER activities, and approximately a half of them can also have a NIR activity. At present, the molecular mechanism underlying DNA substrate specificity of AP endonucleases remains unclear mainly due to the absence of a published structure of the enzyme in complex with a damaged base. To identify critical residues involved in the NIR function, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of Bacillus subtilis AP endonuclease ExoA and compared its crystal structure with the structures of other AP endonucleases: Escherichia coli exonuclease III (Xth), human APE1, and archaeal Mth212. We found conserved amino acid residues in the NIR-specific enzymes APE1, Mth212, and ExoA. Four of these positions were studied by means of point mutations in APE1: we applied substitution with the corresponding residue found in NIR-deficient E. coli Xth (Y128H, N174Q, G231S, and T268D). The APE1-T268D mutant showed a drastically decreased NIR activity and an inverted Mg(2+) dependence of the AP site cleavage activity, which is in line with the presence of an aspartic residue at the equivalent position among other known NIR-deficient AP endonucleases. Taken together, these data show that NIR is an evolutionarily conserved function in the Xth family of AP endonucleases.

  17. A pilot cohort analytic study of Family Integrated Care in a Canadian neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have developed a Family Integrated Care (FIC) model for use in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where parents provide most of the care for their infant, while nurses teach and counsel parents. The objective of this pilot prospective cohort analytic study was to explore the feasibility, safety, and potential outcomes of implementing this model in a Canadian NICU. Methods Infants born ≤35 weeks gestation, receiving continuous positive airway pressure or less respiratory support, with a primary caregiver willing and able to spend ≥8 hours a day with their infant were eligible. Families attended daily education sessions and were mentored at the bedside by nurses. The primary outcome was weight gain, as measured by change in z-score for weight 21 days after enrolment. For each enrolled infant, we identified two matched controls from the previous year’s clinical database. Differences in weight gain between the two groups were analyzed using a linear mixed effects multivariable regression model. We also measured parental stress levels using the Parental Stress Survey: NICU, and interviewed parents and nurses regarding their experiences with FIC. Results This study included 42 mothers and their infants. Of the enrolled infants, matched control data were available for 31 who completed the study. The rate of change in weight gain was significantly higher in FIC infants compared with control infants (p < 0.05). There was also a significant increase in the incidence of breastfeeding at discharge (82.1 vs. 45.5%, p < 0.05). The mean Parental Stress Survey: NICU score for FIC mothers was 3.06 ± 0.12 at enrolment, which decreased significantly to 2.30 ± 0.13 at discharge (p < 0.05). Feedback from the parents and nurses indicated that FIC was feasible and appropriately implemented. Conclusions This study suggests that the FIC model is feasible and safe in a Canadian healthcare setting and results in improved weight gain among preterm infants. In addition

  18. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  19. Familial hypertriglyceridemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000397.htm Familial hypertriglyceridemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families. ...

  20. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  1. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  2. Family Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that family literacy programs can provide opportunities for educational success for parents and children. The benefits reaped by the children in family literacy workshops are presented.

  3. Muslim families and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Daneshpour, M

    1998-07-01

    Muslim immigrant families living in the United States may well come to the attention of mental health professionals. This article examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The most significant differences in value systems between the Muslim and Anglo-American cultures is Muslim families' preference for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Systemic thinking, which deals with the pattern of relationships, is valid for all families regardless of cultural differences. However, the preferred directions of change for Muslim families need to be integrated into the assessment and goals for family therapy.

  4. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  5. Association of polymorphisms in solute carrier family 27, isoform A6 (SLC27A6) and fatty acid-binding protein-3 and fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP3 and FABP4) with fatty acid composition of bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Nafikov, R A; Schoonmaker, J P; Korn, K T; Noack, K; Garrick, D J; Koehler, K J; Minick-Bormann, J; Reecy, J M; Spurlock, D E; Beitz, D C

    2013-09-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop tools for genetic selection of animals producing milk with a lower concentration of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and a higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). The reasons for changing milk fatty acid (FA) composition were to improve milk technological properties, such as for production of more spreadable butter, and milk nutritional value with respect to the potentially adverse effects of SFA on human health. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in solute carrier family 27, isoform A6 (SLC27A6) fatty acid transport protein gene and fatty acid binding protein (FABP)-3 and FABP-4 (FABP3 and FABP4) would affect the selectivity of FA uptake into, and FA redistribution inside, mammary epithelial cells, resulting in altered FA composition of bovine milk. The objectives of our study were to discover genetic polymorphisms in SLC27A6, FABP3, and FABP4, and to test those polymorphisms for associations with milk FA composition. The results showed that after pairwise comparisons between SLC27A6 haplotypes for significantly associated traits, haplotype H3 was significantly associated with 1.37 weight percentage (wt%) lower SFA concentration, 0.091 lower SFA:UFA ratio, and 0.17 wt% lower lauric acid (12:0) concentration, but 1.37 wt% higher UFA and 1.24 wt% higher monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) concentrations compared with haplotype H1 during the first 3 mo of lactation. Pairwise comparisons between FABP4 haplotypes for significantly associated traits showed that haplotype H3 was significantly associated with 1.04 wt% lower SFA concentration, 0.079 lower SFA:UFA ratio, 0.15 wt% lower lauric acid (12:0), and 0.27 wt% lower myristic acid (14:0) concentrations, but 1.04 wt% higher UFA and 0.91 wt% higher MUFA concentrations compared with haplotype H1 during the first 3 mo of lactation. Percentages of genetic variance explained by H3 versus H1 haplotype substitutions for SLC27A6 and FABP4 ranged from 2.50 to 4.86% and

  6. The use of TLC-DPPH* test with image processing to study direct antioxidant activity of phenolic acid fractions of selected Lamiaceae family species.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Łukasz; Staszek, Dorota; Kowalska, Teresa; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    TLC coupled with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl staining was used to analyze phenolic acid fractions of selected Salvia and Thymus species. Documented videoscans were processed by means of an image processing program. This is the first time that free phenolic acids fractions, as well as fractions containing phenolic acids derived from basic and acidic hydrolysis, have been analyzed and compared for selected sage and thyme species. The analyzed samples along with caffeic acid (CA; standard) were chromatographed on silica gel plates with toluene-ethyl acetate-formic acid (60 + 40 + 1, v/v/v) mobile phase. The extracts were investigated with respect to the activity of CA. It was found that CA was most abundant in the fractions derived from basic hydrolysis. This compound was not detected in any of the fractions obtained after acidic hydrolysis. S. officinalis and S. triloba have similar free radical scavenging activity fingerprints obtained for all the analyzed fractions.

  7. Muslim Families and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshpour, Manijeh

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The differences in value systems are the Muslim families' preferences for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Suggests that directions for change for Muslims need to…

  8. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  9. Familial hyperargininaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Terheggen, H G; Lowenthal, A; Lavinha, F; Colombo, J P

    1975-01-01

    A third case of hyperargininaemia occurring in one family was studied from birth. In cord blood serum arginine concentration was only slightly raised, but arginase activity in red blood cell haemolysates was very low. In the urine on day 2 a typical cystinuria pattern was present. Arginine concentration in serum increased to 158 mumol/100 ml on the 41st day of life. Later determinations of the arginase activity in peripheral blood showed values below the sensitivity of the method. Blood ammonia was consistently high, and cystinuria was present. The enzymatic defect was further displayed by intravenous loading tests with arginine. Serum urea values were predominantly normal or near the lower limit of normal, suggesting the presence of other metabolic pathways of urea synthesis. In urine there was no excretion of guanidinosuccinic acid, while the excretion of other monosubstituted guanidine derivatives was increased, pointing to a connexion with hyperargininaemia. Owing to parental attitude, a low protein diet (1-5 g/kg) was introduced only late. The infant developed severe mental retardation, athetosis, and spasticity. PMID:1124944

  10. Family Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Deployment & Transition Home » Health & Wellness » Family Violence Family Violence Recognize the warning signs . Know how to report. ... Love Every Day Making Relationships Work National Domestic Violence Hotline Signs of Child Abuse INSTALLATION PROGRAM DIRECTORY ...

  11. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  12. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the…

  13. Solidification Behavior and Weldability of Dissimilar Welds Between a Cr-Free, Ni-Cu Welding Consumable and Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Liang, Dong; Alexandrov, Boian T.; Frankel, Gerald S.; Lippold, John C.

    2012-04-01

    The solidification behavior of a Cr-free welding consumable based on the Ni-Cu system was evaluated in conjunction with Type 304L stainless steel. The weld metal microstructure evolution was evaluated with optical and secondary electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, button melting, and thermodynamic (CALPHAD-based) modeling. Solidification partitioning patterns showed that higher dilutions of the filler metal by Type 304L increased segregation of Ti, Cu, and Si to interdendritic regions. Button melting experiments showed a widening of the solidification temperature range with increasing dilution because of the expansion of the austenite solidification range and formation of Ti(C,N) via a eutectic reaction. The model predictions showed good correlation with button melting experiments and were used to evaluate the nature of the Ti(C,N) precipitation reaction. Solidification cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was shown to increase with dilution of 304L stainless steel based on testing conducted with the cast pin tear test. The increase in cracking susceptibility is associated with expansion of the solidification temperature range and the presence of eutectic liquid at the end of solidification that wets solidification grain boundaries.

  14. Nursing staff fluctuation and pathogenic burden in the NICU - effective outbreak management and the underestimated relevance of non-resistant strains

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Kai O.; van den Bruck, Rhea; Klare, Ingo; Heldmann, Michael; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Jenke, Andreas C.

    2017-01-01

    In the course of a hospital management takeover, a microbial outbreak took place in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Here, we characterize the outbreak and its management. About 4 months prior to takeover, there was a sharp increase in positive isolates for MSSA and multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). Simultaneously, the nursing staff sick leave rate increased dramatically which directly correlated with the number of infection/colonization per week (r2 = 0.95, p = 0.02). During the following months we observed several peaks in positive isolates of methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), MDROs and subsequently a vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) outbreak. Interventional outbreak management measures were only successful after substantial recruitment of additional nursing staff. None of the VRE, but 44% (n = 4) of MDRO and 32% (n = 23) of MSSA colonized infants developed symptomatic infections (p = 0.02). Among the latter, 35% suffered from serious consequences such as osteomyelitis. The most important risk factors for colonization-to-infection progression were low gestational age and birth weight. Nursing staff fluctuation poses a substantial risk for both bacterial colonization and infection in neonates. Comprehensive outbreak management measures are only successful if adequate nursing staff is available. Non resistant strains account for most neonatal infections – possibly due to their limited perception as being harmful. PMID:28322345

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Welded Ti3Al/Ni-Based Superalloy Joint Using a Ni-Cu Filler Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Qing; Xiong, Hua-Ping; Guo, Shao-Qing; Sun, Bing-Bing; Chen, Bo; Tang, Si-Yi

    2015-02-01

    Dissimilar welding of a Ti3Al-based alloy and a Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 718) was successfully carried out using gas tungsten arc welding technology in this study. With a Ni-Cu alloy as filler material, sound joints have been obtained. The microstructure evolution along the cross section of the dissimilar joint has been revealed based on the results of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffractometer. It is found that the weld/Ti3Al interface is composed of Ti2AlNb matrix dissolved with Ni and Cu, Al(Cu, Ni)2Ti, (Cu, Ni)2Ti, (Nb, Ti) solid solution, and so on. The weld and In718/weld interface mainly consist of (Cu, Ni) solid solutions. The weld exhibits higher microhardness than the two base materials. The average room-temperature tensile strength of the joints reaches 242 MPa and up to 73.6 pct of the value can be maintained at 873 K (600 °C). The brittle intermetallic phase of Ti2AlNb matrix dissolved with Ni and Cu at the weld/Ti3Al interface is the weak link of the joint.

  16. Italian families and family interventions.

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2014-06-01

    In Italy, as in many countries, relatives are closely involved in caring for persons with physical and mental disorders. The Italian scenario lends itself to routine involvement of family members in psychiatric treatment because, despite becoming smaller and smaller, Italian families keep close ties, and men and women do not leave the parental home until relatively late. The authors describe the impact of international family psychosocial research on the Italian mental health services (MHSs) and the main psychosocial interventions currently in use, including family psychoeducational interventions and the "Milan family therapy approach." They also highlight the contribution Italian researchers have given to the study of important variables in integrated mental disorder care, such as family burden of care, relatives' attitudes, family functioning, and satisfaction with the MHSs. Finally, they discuss the difficulties of implementing and disseminating family interventions within the Italian MHS, despite the growing evidence of their effectiveness.

  17. Neonatal intensive care unit discharge preparation, family readiness and infant outcomes: connecting the dots.

    PubMed

    Smith, V C; Hwang, S S; Dukhovny, D; Young, S; Pursley, D M

    2013-06-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) discharge readiness is defined as the masterful attainment of technical skills and knowledge, emotional comfort, and confidence with infant care by the primary caregivers at the time of discharge. NICU discharge preparation is the process of facilitating comfort and confidence as well as the acquisition of knowledge and skills to successfully make the transition from the NICU to home. In this paper, we first review the literature about discharge readiness as it relates to the NICU population. Understanding that discharge readiness is achieved, in part, through successful discharge preparation, we then outline an approach to NICU discharge preparation.

  18. From unexpected reactions to a new family of ionic co-crystals: the case of barbituric acid with alkali bromides and caesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Braga, Dario; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Prosperi, Susanna; Gobetto, Roberto; Chierotti, Michele R

    2010-11-07

    Pressing solid barbituric acid with KBr to prepare samples for IR spectroscopy leads to the formation of an ionic co-crystal, in which the co-former is a classical ionic salt; co-crystal formation is also obtained with the other alkali bromides (LiBr, NaBr, RbBr and CsBr) and with caesium iodide. The simultaneous presence of alkali and halide ions affects the dissolution properties of barbituric acid in water.

  19. Associations of Whole Blood n-3 and n-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids with Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents – Results from the IDEFICS/I.Family Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Valeria; Russo, Paola; Risé, Patrizia; Moreno, Luis A.; De Henauw, Stefaan; Mehlig, Kirsten; Veidebaum, Toomas; Molnár, Denés; Tornaritis, Michael; Galli, Claudio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Börnhorst, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Polyunsaturated n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are precursors of biologically active metabolites that affect blood pressure (BP) regulation. This study investigated the association of n-3 and n-6 PUFA and BP in children and adolescents. Methods In a subsample of 1267 children aged 2–9 years at baseline of the European IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) cohort whole blood fatty acids were measured by a validated gas chromatographic method. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured at baseline and after two and six years. Mixed-effects models were used to assess the associations between fatty acids at baseline and BP z-scores over time adjusting for relevant covariables. Models were further estimated stratified by sex and weight status. Results The baseline level of arachidonic acid was positively associated with subsequent systolic BP (β = 0.08, P = 0.002) and diastolic BP (β = 0.07, P<0.001). In thin/normal weight children, baseline alpha-linolenic (β = -1.13, P = 0.003) and eicosapentaenoic acid (β = -0.85, P = 0.003) levels were inversely related to baseline and also to subsequent systolic BP and alpha-linolenic acid to subsequent diastolic BP. In overweight/obese children, baseline eicosapentaenoic acid level was positively associated with baseline diastolic BP (β = 0.54, P = 0.005). Conclusions Low blood arachidonic acid levels in the whole sample and high n-3 PUFA levels in thin/normal weight children are associated with lower and therefore healthier BP. The beneficial effects of high n-3 PUFA on BP were not observed in overweight/obese children, suggesting that they may have been overlaid by the unfavorable effects of excess weight. PMID:27806134

  20. Xanthomonas campestris FabH is required for branched-chain fatty acid and DSF-family quorum sensing signal biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Hong; Hu, Zhe; Dong, Hui-Juan; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium, causes black rot disease of cruciferous vegetables. Although Xcc has a complex fatty acid profile comprised of straight-chain fatty acids and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs), and encodes a complete set of genes required for fatty acid synthesis, there is still little known about the mechanism of BCFA synthesis. We reported that expression of Xcc fabH restores the growth of Ralstonia solanacearum fabH mutant, and this allows the R. solanacearum fabH mutant to produce BCFAs. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that Xcc FabH is able to condense branched-chain acyl-CoAs with malonyl-ACP to initiate BCFA synthesis. Moreover, although the fabH gene is essential for growth of Xcc, it can be replaced with Escherichia coli fabH, and Xcc mutants failed to produce BCFAs. These results suggest that Xcc does not have an obligatory requirement for BCFAs. Furthermore, Xcc mutants lost the ability to produce cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid, a diffusible signal factor (DSF) required for quorum sensing of Xcc, which confirms that the fatty acid synthetic pathway supplies the intermediates for DSF signal biosynthesis. Our study also showed that replacing Xcc fabH with E. coli fabH affected Xcc pathogenesis in host plants. PMID:27595587

  1. Cytochrome P450 family member CYP704B2 catalyzes the {omega}-hydroxylation of fatty acids and is required for anther cutin biosynthesis and pollen exine formation in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Pinot, Franck; Sauveplane, Vincent; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Diehl, Patrik; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Liang; Gao, Yawei; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-01-01

    The anther cuticle and microspore exine act as protective barriers for the male gametophyte and pollen grain, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of the monomers of which they are composed. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male sterile mutant, cyp704B2, which exhibits a swollen sporophytic tapetal layer, aborted pollen grains without detectable exine, and undeveloped anther cuticle. In addition, chemical composition analysis indicated that cutin monomers were hardly detectable in the cyp704B2 anthers. These defects are caused by a mutation in a cytochrome P450 family gene, CYP704B2. The CYP704B2 transcript is specifically detected in the tapetum and the microspore from stage 8 of anther development to stage 10. Heterologous expression of CYP704B2 in yeast demonstrated that CYP704B2 catalyzes the production of omega -hydroxylated fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon chains. Our results provide insights into the biosynthesis of the two biopolymers sporopollenin and cutin. Specifically, our study indicates that the omega -hydroxylation pathway of fatty acids relying on this ancient CYP704B family, conserved from moss to angiosperms, is essential for the formation of both cuticle and exine during plant male reproductive and spore development.

  2. A third MRX family (MRX68) is the result of mutation in the long chain fatty acid-CoA ligase 4 (FACL4) gene: proposal of a rapid enzymatic assay for screening mentally retarded patients

    PubMed Central

    Longo, I; Frints, S; Fryns, J; Meloni, I; Pescucci, C; Ariani, F; Borghgraef, M; Raynaud, M; Marynen, P; Schwartz, C; Renieri, A; Froyen, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The gene encoding fatty acid CoA ligase 4 (FACL4) is mutated in families with non-specific X linked mental retardation (MRX) and is responsible for cognitive impairment in the contiguous gene syndrome ATS-MR (Alport syndrome and mental retardation), mapped to Xq22.3. This finding makes this gene a good candidate for other mental retardation disorders mapping in this region. Methods: We have screened the FACL4 gene in eight families, two MRX and six syndromic X linked mental retardation (MRXS), mapping in a large interval encompassing Xq22.3. Results: We have found a missense mutation in MRX68. The mutation (c.1001C>T in the brain isoform) cosegregates with the disease and changes a highly conserved proline into a leucine (p.P375L) in the first luciferase domain, which markedly reduces the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, all heterozygous females showed completely skewed X inactivation in blood leucocytes, as happens in all reported females with other FACL4 point mutations or deletions. Conclusions: Since the FACL4 gene is highly expressed in brain, where it encodes a brain specific isoform, and is located in hippocampal and cerebellar neurones, a role for this gene in cognitive processes can be expected. Here we report the third MRX family with a FACL4 mutation and describe the development of a rapid enzymatic assay on peripheral blood that we propose as a sensitive, robust, and efficient diagnostic tool in mentally retarded males. PMID:12525535

  3. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  4. Improving Family Communications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  5. Intestinal carriage of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in preterm-infants during hospitalization in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    PubMed

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Ahmad Kamar, Azanna; Chong, Chun Wie; Yap, Ivan Kok Seng; Thong, Kwai Lin; Choo, Yao Mun; Md Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of intestinal carriage of Gram-negative bacteria among preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia were determined. A total of 34 stool specimens were obtained from preterm infants upon admission and once weekly up to two weeks during hospitalization. The presumptive colonies of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were selected for identification, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and subtyping by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Out of 76 Gram-negative isolates, highest resistance was detected for amoxicillin/clavulanate (30.8%, n = 16), ceftriaxone (42.3%, n = 22), ceftazidime (28.8%, n = 15), cefoxitin (28.8%, n = 15), aztreonam (36.5%, n = 19), and polymyxin B (23.1%, n = 12). Three colistin resistant K. pneumoniae have also been detected based on E-test analysis. Thirty-nine isolates of K. pneumoniae and 20 isolates of E. coli were resistant to more than three antimicrobial classes and were categorized as multidrug resistant (MDR). PFGE analysis revealed a higher diversity in pulsotypes for K. pneumoniae (18 pulsotypes) in comparison to E. coli (four pulsotypes). In addition, a total of fifteen pulsotypes was observed from 39 MDR K. pneumoniae. The risk factors for antibiotic resistance were assessed using random forest analysis. Gender was found to be the most important predictor for colistin resistant while length, OFC, and delivery mode were showing greater predictive power in the polymyxin B resistance. This study revealed worrying prevalence rates of intestinal carriage of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae and E. coli of hospitalized preterm infants in Malaysia, particularly high resistance to polymyxins.

  6. The effect of decibel level of music stimuli and gender on head circumference and physiological responses of premature infants in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Jane W

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine different protocols with regard to the presentation of music stimuli and compare gender differential reactions to those stimuli. Subjects for this study (N = 63) were premature infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between the gestational ages of 28 and 33 weeks. Half of the experimental infants listened to 20 mins of lullaby music (female voice with orchestral background) on 2 days followed by 20 mins of classical music (Mozart string music) on 2 days. The other half listened to the same music in the reverse order. One quarter of the males and one quarter of the females listened to music presented at an average of 65 dB, one quarter at an average of 70 dB, one quarter at an average of 75 dB, and one quarter did not listen to any music and served as control subjects. Head circumference data were collected four times by the researcher: (a) upon receipt of parental consent, (b) on the first day of music presentation (1 week after consent), (c) on the last day of music presentation, and (d) 1 week after music presentation. Physiological data (heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation) were recorded by the researcher at 2-minute intervals starting 4 minutes prior to and ending 4 minutes after music presentation. There was a significant difference (p < .0001) in average daily head growth across time, but this seems unrelated to the music condition as the same curvilinear trend (larger gain during days of treatment, smaller gain during baseline before and after treatment) was noted for control infants who did not listen to music. Results indicate a significant (p = .002), but biologically unimportant, decrease in heart rate over the course of data collection. No differences due to gender were noted.

  7. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  8. Family Reunification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Reunifying children placed in foster care with their birth parents is a primary goal of the child welfare system. Yet, relatively little is known about the reunification process. This article analyzes new data on trends in family reunification and discovers: (1) Although most children still exit foster care through family reunification, exit…

  9. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of…

  10. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  11. Family, Extended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jessica Rae

    2006-01-01

    Parents are a child's first and most influential teacher. People hear this truism often, yet nowhere has the author seen it more taken to heart than at Tower Street Elementary School. The school's efforts to form a true partnership with students' families--from involving families in the first day of school, to the principal making home visits, to…

  12. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  13. [The effect of diet ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids of omega-3 and omega-6 families on activity of aminotransferases and gamma-glutamyltransferase in rat blood serum].

    PubMed

    Ketsa, O V; Marchenko, M M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of diet fat compositions with various ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activities in blood serum of 45 white mongrel rats weighing 90-110 g (9 animals in group) has been investigated. Fat components in the semi-synthetic diet, compiled on the basis of AIN-93 diet, and sources of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA were presented by sunflower oil, soybean oil and fish oil. It has been shown that four-week inclusion of linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LNA) in a ratio of 7:1 into the diet (soybean oil) as well as use of only omega-6 PUFA (sunflower oil) has lead to an increase in the activity of ALT and GGT in rat blood serum compared to control animals treated with the complex of linolenic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid through the mixture of sunflower oil and fish oil (9:1) with the ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA 7:1. Along with this, the AST:ALT ratio (de Ritis ratio) was lower (p < 0.05) as compared with the control group of rat, amounting respectively 0.92 +/- 0.08 and 0.79 +/- 0.12 vs 1.26 +/- 0.10. The use of high doses of omega-3 fatty acids (600 mg EPA and 400 mg DHA per kg of animal weight per day coming through fish oil) did not affect the activity of ALT and GGT, but increased AST serum activity (0.47 +/- 0.04 micromoles/min per mg protein) and the de Ritis ratio (2.53 +/- 0.23). The diet deprived with fat increased enzyme activity of ALT, AST and GGT in rat blood serum.

  14. Development of potential manufacturing routes for substituted thiophenes – Preparation of halogenated 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid derivatives as building blocks for a new family of 2,6-dihaloaryl 1,2,4-triazole insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hull, John W; Romer, Duane R; Podhorez, David E; Ash, Mezzie L; Brady, Christine H

    2007-01-01

    Background Dow AgroSciences has been investigating a new family of functionalized 2,6-dihaloaryl 1,2,4-triazole insecticides featuring specifically targeted insecticidal activities coupled with low mammalian toxicity. With broad spectrum control of both chewing and sap-feeding pests in mind, this family of compounds has been under investigation for aphid, mite, and whitefly control in food crop protection as well as ornamental applications. Two specific targets for development have been the 2,6-dihalo 1,2,4-triazoles XR-693 and XR-906, which require a supply of the halogenated 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid derivatives 1, 2, and 3 for assembly of the C-ring portion of the triazole products. Results Potential manufacturing routes to three halogenated 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid derivatives 4-bromo-3-methyl-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 1, 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 2, and 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonitrile 3 from commercially available thiophene raw materials have been developed and demonstrated on a laboratory scale. A one-pot bromination/debromination procedure developed for 3-methylthiophene gave 2,4-dibromo-3-methylthiophene. Carboxylic acid functionality was then introduced either by a Grignard metallation followed by carbonation with CO2, or by a palladium catalyzed carbonylation procedure under CO pressure. The vapor phase chlorination of 2-thiophenecarbonitrile with chlorine gas at 500°C with an average residence time of 6 seconds gave 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenenitrile 3 in a 69% distilled yield, a process that was carried out on a multi-kilogram scale in the laboratory. Finally, a route for the preparation of 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 2 was developed from tetrachlorothiophene via either a lithiation reaction with n-butyllithium in MTBE solvent, or by a previously reported Grignard method using 1,2-dibromoethane as activator, followed by carbonation of the anion with CO2 to give the trichloro-2-thiophenecarboxylic acid

  15. Characterization of the Candida albicans Amino Acid Permease Family: Gap2 Is the Only General Amino Acid Permease and Gap4 Is an S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Transporter Required for SAM-Induced Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kraidlova, Lucie; Schrevens, Sanne; Tournu, Hélène; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Sychrova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amino acids are key sources of nitrogen for growth of Candida albicans. In order to detect and take up these amino acids from a broad range of different and changing nitrogen sources inside the host, this fungus must be able to adapt via its expression of genes for amino acid uptake and further metabolism. We analyzed six C. albicans putative general amino acid permeases based on their homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gap1 general amino acid permease. We generated single- and multiple-deletion strains and found that, based on growth assays and transcriptional or posttranscriptional regulation, Gap2 is the functional orthologue to ScGap1, with broad substrate specificity. Expression analysis showed that expression of all GAP genes is under control of the Csy1 amino acid sensor, which is different from the situation in S. cerevisiae, where the expression of ScGAP1 is not regulated by Ssy1. We show that Gap4 is the functional orthologue of ScSam3, the only S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) transporter in S. cerevisiae, and we report that Gap4 is required for SAM-induced morphogenesis. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans is a commensal organism that can thrive in many niches in its human host. The environmental conditions at these different niches differ quite a bit, and this fungus must be able to sense these changes and adapt its metabolism to them. Apart from glucose and other sugars, the uptake of amino acids is very important. This is underscored by the fact that the C. albicans genome encodes 6 orthologues of the Saccharomyces. cerevisiae general amino acid permease Gap1 and many other amino acid transporters. In this work, we characterize these six permeases and we show that C. albicans Gap2 is the functional orthologue of ScGap1 and that C. albicans Gap4 is an orthologue of ScSam3, an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) transporter. Furthermore, we show that Gap4 is required for SAM-induced morphogenesis, an important virulence factor of C. albicans. PMID

  16. Use of antireflection layers to avoid ghost plating on Ni/Cu plated crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong Sang; Choi, Sung Jin; Chang, Hyo Sik; In Lee, Jeong; Kang, Min Gu; Kim, Donghwan; Song, Hee-eun

    2016-03-01

    Screen printing is a method commonly used for making electrodes for crystalline silicon solar cells. Although the screen-printing method is fast and easy, screen-printed electrodes have a porous structure, high contact resistance, and low aspect ratio. On the other hand, plated electrodes have low contact resistance and narrow electrode width. Therefore, the plating method could be substituted for the screen-printing method in crystalline silicon solar cells. During the plating process, ghost plating can appear at the surface when the quality of the passivation layer is poor, causing an increase in the recombination rate. In this paper, light-induced plating was applied to the fabrication of electrodes, and various passivation layers were investigated to remove ghost plating in crystalline silicon solar cells. These included, (1) SiNx deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), (2) a double SiNx layer formed by PECVD, (3) a double layer with thermal silicon oxide and SiNx deposited by PECVD, and (4) a double layer comprising SiNx and SiOx formed by PECVD. For the plated solar cells, a laser was used to remove various antireflection coating (ARC) layers and phosphoric acid was spin-coated onto the doped silicon wafer prior to laser ablation. Also, a screen-printed solar cell was fabricated to compare plated solar cells with screen-printed solar cells. As a result, we found that a thermal SiO2/PECVD SiNx layer showed the lowest pinhole density and its wet vapor transmission rate was characterized. The solar cell with the thermal SiO2/PECVD SiNx layer showed the lowest J02 value, as well as improved Voc and Jsc.

  17. Natural and synthetic poly(malic acid)-based derivates: a family of versatile biopolymers for the design of drug nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Loyer, Pascal; Cammas-Marion, Sandrine

    2014-08-01

    The field of specific drug delivery is an expanding research domain. Besides the use of liposomes formed from various lipids, natural and synthetic polymers have been developed to prepare more efficient drug delivery systems either under macromolecular prodrugs or under particulate nanovectors. To ameliorate the biocompatibility of such nanocarriers, degradable natural or synthetic polymers have attracted the interest of many researchers. In this context, poly(malic acid) (PMLA) extracted from microorganisms or synthesized from malic or aspartic acid was used to prepare water-soluble drug carriers or nanoparticles. Within this review, both the preparation and the applications of PMLA derivatives are described emphasizing the in vitro and in vivo assays. The results obtained by several groups highlight the interest of such polyesters in the field of drug delivery.

  18. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  19. Asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Bottke, William F.; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert

    An asteroid family is a group of asteroids with similar orbits and spectra that was produced by a collisional breakup of a large parent body. To identify asteroid families, researchers look for clusters of asteroid positions in the space of proper orbital elements. These elements, being more constant over time than osculating orbital elements, provide a dynamical criterion of whether a group of bodies has a common ancestor. More than fifty asteroid families have been identified to date. Their analysis produced several important insights into the physics of large scale collisions, dynamical processes affecting small bodies in the Solar System, and surface and interior properties of asteroids.

  20. Familial dysautonomia

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome; FD; Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy - type III (HSAN III); Autonomic crises - familial dysautonomia ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Sarnat HB. Autonomic neuropathies. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  1. Unusual families.

    PubMed

    Golombok, Susan

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of assisted reproduction has led to unusual forms of procreation. This article describes the social consequences of lesbian motherhood and of families headed by single heterosexual mothers.

  2. Family dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hayaki, Chie; Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown differences in the psychosocial factors related to chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). However, no studies have done an evaluation of differences between CLP and CWP from the viewpoint of family functioning. We did a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care setting to investigate possible differences in the relation of CWP and CLP to family functioning. Patients with CLP (N = 126) or CWP (N = 75) were assessed for family functioning by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and a comparison was done. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of family functioning subscales with pain status (CWP vs CLP), controlling for demographic variables, pain variables; pain duration, pain ratings, pain disability, and psychological factors; depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. The odds ratios (ORs) for the presence of CWP were calculated. Compared to patients with CLP, patients with CWP showed a lower functional status for Roles and Affective Involvement. The ORs for CWP were significantly higher in lower functioning Roles (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.21–4.65) and Affective Involvement (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.56–5.24) after adjusting for demographic variables. The significant association of CWP to Roles and Affective Involvement remained after controlling for the pain variables and psychological factors. This study shows that the families of patients with CWP have poorer family functioning than those with CLP. Our findings suggest that early identification and interventions for the family dysfunction of chronic pain patients are important to the treatment and prevention of CWP. PMID:27930535

  3. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S Sri; Miller, Mitchell D; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T; Murphy, Kevin D; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; Trout, Christina V; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc Andre; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis.

  4. ATP-Dependent Binding Cassette Transporter G Family Member 16 Increases Plant Tolerance to Abscisic Acid and Assists in Basal Resistance against Pseudomonas syringae DC30001[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hao; Peng, Yanhui; Meckes, Nicole; Allen, Sara; Stewart, C. Neal; Traw, M. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Plants have been shown previously to perceive bacteria on the leaf surface and respond by closing their stomata. The virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (PstDC3000) responds by secreting a virulence factor, coronatine, which blocks the functioning of guard cells and forces stomata to reopen. After it is inside the leaf, PstDC3000 has been shown to up-regulate abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and thereby suppress salicylic acid-dependent resistance. Some wild plants exhibit resistance to PstDC3000, but the mechanisms by which they achieve this resistance remain unknown. Here, we used genome-wide association mapping to identify an ATP-dependent binding cassette transporter gene (ATP-dependent binding cassette transporter G family member16) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that contributes to wild plant resistance to PstDC3000. Through microarray analysis and β-glucuronidase reporter lines, we showed that the gene is up-regulated by ABA, bacterial infection, and coronatine. We also used a green fluorescent protein fusion protein and found that transporter is more likely to localize on plasma membranes than in cell walls. Transferred DNA insertion lines exhibited consistent defective tolerance of exogenous ABA and reduced resistance to infection by PstDC3000. Our conclusion is that ATP-dependent binding cassette transporter G family member16 is involved in ABA tolerance and contributes to plant resistance against PstDC3000. This is one of the first examples, to our knowledge, of ATP-dependent binding cassette transporter involvement in plant resistance to infection by a bacterial pathogen. It also suggests a possible mechanism by which plants reduce the deleterious effects of ABA hijacking during pathogen attack. Collectively, these results improve our understanding of basal resistance in Arabidopsis and offer unique ABA-related targets for improving the innate resistance of plants to bacterial infection. PMID:25146567

  5. The AP-3 adaptor complex mediates sorting of yeast and mammalian PQ-loop-family basic amino acid transporters to the vacuolar/lysosomal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Llinares, Elisa; Barry, Abdoulaye Oury; André, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The limiting membrane of lysosomes in animal cells and that of the vacuole in yeast include a wide variety of transporters, but little is known about how these proteins reach their destination membrane. The mammalian PQLC2 protein catalyzes efflux of basic amino acids from the lysosome, and the similar Ypq1, −2, and −3 proteins of yeast perform an equivalent function at the vacuole. We here show that the Ypq proteins are delivered to the vacuolar membrane via the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) trafficking pathway, which requires the AP-3 adaptor complex. When traffic via this pathway is deficient, the Ypq proteins pass through endosomes from where Ypq1 and Ypq2 properly reach the vacuolar membrane whereas Ypq3 is missorted to the vacuolar lumen via the multivesicular body pathway. When produced in yeast, PQLC2 also reaches the vacuolar membrane via the ALP pathway, but tends to sort to the vacuolar lumen if AP-3 is defective. Finally, in HeLa cells, inhibiting the synthesis of an AP-3 subunit also impairs sorting of PQLC2 to lysosomes. Our results suggest the existence of a conserved AP-3-dependent trafficking pathway for proper delivery of basic amino acid exporters to the yeast vacuole and to lysosomes of human cells. PMID:26577948

  6. GmCYP82A3, a Soybean Cytochrome P450 Family Gene Involved in the Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene Signaling Pathway, Enhances Plant Resistance to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lin, Shuai; Gan, Shuping; Xing, Han; Dou, Daolong

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) represent a large and important enzyme superfamily in plants. They catalyze numerous monooxygenation/hydroxylation reactions in biochemical pathways, P450s are involved in a variety of metabolic pathways and participate in the homeostasis of phytohormones. The CYP82 family genes specifically reside in dicots and are usually induced by distinct environmental stresses. However, their functions are largely unknown, especially in soybean (Glycine max L.). Here, we report the function of GmCYP82A3, a gene from soybean CYP82 family. Its expression was induced by Phytophthora sojae infection, salinity and drought stresses, and treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or ethephon (ETH). Its expression levels were consistently high in resistant cultivars. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpressing GmCYP82A3 exhibited strong resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora parasitica, and enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought stresses. Furthermore, transgenic plants were less sensitive to jasmonic acid (JA), and the enhanced resistance was accompanied with increased expression of the JA/ET signaling pathway-related genes. PMID:27588421

  7. Family welfare.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  8. In vitro evaluation of the genotoxicity of a family of novel MeO-PEG-poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-PEG-OMe triblock copolymer and PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lili; Yang, Likai; Zhang, Zhi-rong; Gong, Tao; Deng, Li; Gu, Zhongwei; Sun, Xun

    2009-11-01

    Despite the booming development of nanoparticle materials for pharmaceutical applications, studies on their genotoxicity are few. In our previous efforts to develop an intravenous nanoparticle material, a family of novel monomethoxy(polyethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-monomethoxy (PELGE) polymers was synthesized. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nine kinds of selected blank PELGE and PLGA (poly(D,L-lactic and glycolic acid)) nanoparticles were evaluated using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles exhibited a dose-dependent response, with a concentration of 5 mg ml-1 being the turning point. The frequencies of MN observed in samples treated with various nanoparticles were not statistically different from those seen in the negative controls in the presence or absence of the S9 mix. Also, no cell cycle delay was observed. The numbers of SCE per cell observed in samples treated with five kinds of PELGE nanoparticles were significantly greater than those found in the negative controls with or without the S9 mix. The discrepancies found in the two assays suggest that the five kinds of nanoparticles may produce only a weakly clastogenic response.

  9. Perfluorooctanoic acid and environmental risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) family of chemicals, which consist of a carbon backbone typically four to fourteen carbons in length and a charged functional moiety.

  10. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 505.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J M; Yañez, R J; Pan, R; Rodriguez, J F; Salas, M L; Viñuela, E

    1994-01-01

    Sequencing of restriction fragment EcoRI A-SalI C of African swine fever virus has revealed the existence of a multigene family, designated family 505 because of the average number of amino acids in the proteins, composed of seven homologous and tandemly arranged genes. All the genes of family 505 are expressed during infection. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription is initiated a short distance (3 to 62 nucleotides) from the start codon of the corresponding open reading frame. The proteins of family 505 showed similarity to those of family 360 from African swine fever virus. In particular, a striking conservation of three regions at the amino terminus of the polypeptides was observed. Images PMID:8139051

  11. Lead discovery for mammalian elongation of long chain fatty acids family 6 using a combination of high-throughput fluorescent-based assay and RapidFire mass spectrometry assay.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Mari; Sakurai, Masaaki; Teranishi, Fumie; Ikeda, Tomoko; Kamiyama, Tsutomu; Asai, Akira

    2016-11-25

    A high-throughput RapidFire mass spectrometry assay is described for elongation of very long-chain fatty acids family 6 (Elovl6). Elovl6 is a microsomal enzyme that regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 may be a new therapeutic target for fat metabolism disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify new Elovl6 inhibitors, we developed a high-throughput fluorescence screening assay in 1536-well format. However, a number of false positives caused by fluorescent interference have been identified. To pick up the real active compounds among the primary hits from the fluorescence assay, we developed a RapidFire mass spectrometry assay and a conventional radioisotope assay. These assays have the advantage of detecting the main products directly without using fluorescent-labeled substrates. As a result, 276 compounds (30%) of the primary hits (921 compounds) in a fluorescence ultra-high-throughput screening method were identified as common active compounds in these two assays. It is concluded that both methods are very effective to eliminate false positives. Compared with the radioisotope method using an expensive (14)C-labeled substrate, the RapidFire mass spectrometry method using unlabeled substrates is a high-accuracy, high-throughput method. In addition, some of the hit compounds selected from the screening inhibited cellular fatty acid elongation in HEK293 cells expressing Elovl6 transiently. This result suggests that these compounds may be promising lead candidates for therapeutic drugs. Ultra-high-throughput fluorescence screening followed by a RapidFire mass spectrometry assay was a suitable strategy for lead discovery against Elovl6.

  12. Conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase belonged to motif B′ methyltransferase family in Coffea arabica

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Matsuzaki, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Shiho; Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Kato, Misako

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: Trigonelline synthase catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline. We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene(s) from Coffea arabica. - Highlights: • Trigonelline is a major compound in coffee been same as caffeine is. • We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene. • Coffee trigonelline synthases are highly homologous with coffee caffeine synthases. • This study contributes the fully understanding of pyridine alkaloid metabolism. - Abstract: Trigonelline (N-methylnicotinate), a member of the pyridine alkaloids, accumulates in coffee beans along with caffeine. The biosynthetic pathway of trigonelline is not fully elucidated. While it is quite likely that the production of trigonelline from nicotinate is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase, as is caffeine synthase (CS), the enzyme(s) and gene(s) involved in N-methylation have not yet been characterized. It should be noted that, similar to caffeine, trigonelline accumulation is initiated during the development of coffee fruits. Interestingly, the expression profiles for two genes homologous to caffeine synthases were similar to the accumulation profile of trigonelline. We presumed that these two CS-homologous genes encoded trigonelline synthases. These genes were then expressed in Escherichiacoli, and the resulting recombinant enzymes that were obtained were characterized. Consequently, using the N-methyltransferase assay with S-adenosyl[methyl-{sup 14}C]methionine, it was confirmed that these recombinant enzymes catalyzed the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline, coffee trigonelline synthases (termed CTgS1 and CTgS2) were highly identical (over 95% identity) to each other. The sequence homology between the CTgSs and coffee CCS1 was 82%. The pH-dependent activity curve of CTgS1 and CTgS2 revealed optimum activity at pH 7.5. Nicotinate was the specific methyl acceptor for CTgSs, and no activity was detected with any other nicotinate derivatives, or

  13. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  14. Variation of S/G Ratio and Lignin Content in a Populus Family Influences the Release of Xylose by Dilute Acid Hydrolysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H; Drescher, Sadie R; Tuskan, Gerald A; Davis, Dr. Mark F.; Nghiem, Nhuan Phu

    2006-01-01

    Wood samples from second generation Populus cross were shown to have different lignin contents and S/G ratios (S: syringyl-like lignin structures; G: guaiacyl-like lignin structures). The lignin contents varied from 22.7% to 25.8% and the S/G ratio from 1.8 to 2.3. Selected samples spanning these ranges were hydrolyzed with dilute (1%) sulfuric acid to release fermentable sugars. The conditions were chosen for partial hydrolysis of the hemicellulosic fraction to maximize the expression of variation among samples. The results indicated that both lignin contents and S/G ratio significantly affected the yield of xylose. For example, the xylose yield of the 25.8% lignin and 2.3 S/G (hihg lignin, high S/G) sample produced 30% of the theoretical yield, whereas the xylose yield of the 22.7% lignin and 1.8 S/G (low lignin, low S/G) was 55% of the theoretical value. These results indicate that lignin content and composition among genetic variants within a single species can influence the hydrolyzability of the biomass.

  15. Common Diagnoses in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn pale, purplish, or blue from lack of oxygen What causes it? Apnea is usually caused by ... Bradycardia often arises from other problems like low oxygen levels in the blood or apnea. How is ...

  16. NICU consultants and support staff

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses with extra experience in the care of newborn infants in addition to completing master's or doctoral level ... doctor with special training in the care of infants and children. This type ... for a healthy newborn. A pediatrician also provides primary care for most ...

  17. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  18. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... more emphasis on careers for women, more effective methods of contraception, and the rising cost of rearing and educating children. There are some very clear benefits to having a small family; Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self- ...

  19. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  20. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  1. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  2. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  3. FAMILY LAUXANIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera Cristina

    2016-06-14

    An updated Catalogue of the Lauxaniidae of Colombia is presented. This acalyptratae family is poorly known in Colombia, with only 36 described species in 33 genera. This paper expands the distribution of 24 species to Colombia. At total, 63 species are reported here for Colombia.

  4. Cloning and Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica napus L. Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase 1 Gene Family and Its Expression Pattern under Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Yuan, Jianglian; Huang, Jieheng; Du, Hai; Li, Jiana

    2016-01-01

    For many plants, regulating lignin content and composition to improve lodging resistance is a crucial issue. Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a lignin monomer-specific enzyme that controls S subunit synthesis in plant vascular cell walls. Here, we identified 12 BnCOMT1 gene homologues, namely BnCOMT1-1 to BnCOMT1-12. Ten of 12 genes were composed of four highly conserved exons and three weakly conserved introns. The length of intron I, in particular, showed enormous diversification. Intron I of homologous BnCOMT1 genes showed high identity with counterpart genes in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and intron I from positional close genes in the same chromosome were relatively highly conserved. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that COMT genes experience considerable diversification and conservation in Brassicaceae species, and some COMT1 genes are unique in the Brassica genus. Our expression studies indicated that BnCOMT1 genes were differentially expressed in different tissues, with BnCOMT1-4, BnCOMT1-5, BnCOMT1-8, and BnCOMT1-10 exhibiting stem specificity. These four BnCOMT1 genes were expressed at all developmental periods (the bud, early flowering, late flowering and mature stages) and their expression level peaked in the early flowering stage in the stem. Drought stress augmented and accelerated lignin accumulation in high-lignin plants but delayed it in low-lignin plants. The expression levels of BnCOMT1s were generally reduced in water deficit condition. The desynchrony of the accumulation processes of total lignin and BnCOMT1s transcripts in most growth stages indicated that BnCOMT1s could be responsible for the synthesis of a specific subunit of lignin or that they participate in other pathways such as the melatonin biosynthesis pathway. PMID:27832102

  5. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, E

    1999-06-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), also known as Byler disease, is an inherited disorder of childhood in which cholestasis of hepatocellular origin often presents in the neonatal period and leads to death from liver failure before adolescence. The pattern of appearance of affected children within families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Several studies have provided support for the heterogeneity of this clinical entity suggesting the existence of different types due to different disorders affecting the hepatocyte and related to defects of bile acid secretion or bile acid metabolism. Recent molecular and genetic studies have identified genes responsible for three types of PFIC and have shown that PFIC was related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. These findings now provide specific diagnostic tools for the investigation of children with PFIC and should allow prenatal diagnosis in the future. Genotype-phenotype correlations performed in patients treated with ursodeoxycholic acid or biliary diversion should allow those PFIC patients who could benefit from these therapies to be precisely identified. In the future, other therapies, such as cell and gene therapies, might be considered and could also represent an alternative to liver transplantation.

  6. [Correction of polyhypovitaminosis in rats, having standard and enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids family omega-3 diets with different doses of vitamins].

    PubMed

    Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Kosheleva, O V; Preverzeva, O G; Sokol'nikov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of the correction of combined alimentary vitamin deficit in male Wistar rats (body weight 90-121 g) fed standard diet or enriched with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids diet (by replacing sunflower oil (4.5% of the diet) with linseed oil) with different doses (physiological and enhanced) of vitamins has been investigated. The control group of animals (n = 12) received a complete semisynthetic diet during all experimental period (42 d). The animals of the test groups (each of 20 rats) received vitamin-deficient diet containing sunflower or linseed oil and 20% per cent of vitamin mixture amount in control diet from which vitamin E had been excluded. After 28 days of such feeding each of test groups was divided into two subgroups (6-8 rats in each), and the next 14 days the animals of subgroups received the diet with different degree of vitamin compensation (50 or 180% percent of vitamin content in the diet of the control group). The addition of both low and high vitamin dose in deficient diet based on standard fat component did not compensate the reduced liver vitamin A content, which amounted to 47.4% of the level in the liver of the control group. The lack of vitamin E in animals was eliminated only after adding of the enhanced dose of vitamin E to the ration. Recovering of decreased plasma and liver B2 level, plasma 25(OH)D and liver vitamin B1 content have been occurred after addition of the low dose of these vitamins to rat diet. Increasing of omega-3 PUFA diet level improved vitamins A and D sufficiency to some extent, but was accompanied by the significant reduction of rat liver alfa-tocopherol content both under combined vitamin deficiency (by 14%) and increased vitamins consumption (by 43%). PUFA enrichment of the diet of rats with vitamin deficiency had no impact on vitamin B1 and B2 liver level. The use of high doses of vitamins for a long time to eliminate a combined deficiency of vitamins has been proved.

  7. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    PubMed Central

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct, CD/ODD and MDD symptoms, and greater parent-child conflict than their counterparts in two parent families. Single parent mothers reported greater economic hardship, depression and family stress. Family stress and parent-child conflict emerged as significant mediators of the association between family structure and early adolescent outcomes, suggesting important processes linking MA single parent families and adolescent adjustment. PMID:21361925

  8. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  9. Family Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-30

    quality service delivery to meet the needs of the DoD personnel and their families, in accordance with DoD Directive 1342.17 (reference (a)). 4...facility, and program standards. f. Develop and forward to ASD(FM&P), for review and approval, a comprehensive evaluation system to measure the...of future services and the continuation, expansion, or termination of others. (3) Service-wide measurement criteria for monitoring and evaluating the

  10. Characterization of the fatty acyl elongase (elovl) gene family, and hepatic elovl and delta-6 fatty acyl desaturase transcript expression and fatty acid responses to diets containing camelina oil in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Xue, Xi; Feng, Charles Y; Hixson, Stefanie M; Johnstone, Kim; Anderson, Derek M; Parrish, Christopher C; Rise, Matthew L

    2014-09-01

    For aquaculture to become sustainable, there is a need to substitute fish oil [FO, rich in ω3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) such as 20:5ω3 (EPA) and 22:6ω3 (DHA)] in aquafeed with plant oils such as camelina oil [CO, rich in C18 PUFA such as 18:3ω3 (ALA) and 18:2ω6 (LNA)]. The LC-PUFA are essential components in fish diets for maintaining optimal health, physiology and growth. However, most marine fish including Atlantic cod are inefficient at producing LC-PUFA from shorter chain precursors. Since elovl genes encode enzymes that play key roles in fatty acid biosynthesis, we hypothesized that they may be involved in Atlantic cod responses to diets rich in 18:3ω3 and 18:2ω6. Ten members of the cod elovl gene family were characterized at the mRNA level. RT-PCR was used to study constitutive expression of elovl transcripts in fifteen tissues. Some transcripts (e.g. elovl5) were ubiquitously expressed, while others had tissue-specific expression (e.g. elovl4a in brain and eye). Cod fed a CO-containing diet (100% CO replacement of FO and including solvent-extracted fish meal) had significantly lower weight gain, with significant up-regulation of elovl5 and fadsd6 transcripts in the liver as shown by QPCR analysis, compared with cod on a FO control diet after a 13-week trial. Multivariate statistical analyses (SIMPER and PCA) indicated that high 18:3ω3 and/or low ω3 LC-PUFA levels in the liver were associated with the up-regulation of elovl5 and fadsd6, which are involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in cod.

  11. The "putative" role of transcription factors from HlWRKY family in the regulation of the final steps of prenylflavonid and bitter acids biosynthesis in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Kocábek, Tomáš; Patzak, Josef; Bříza, Jindřich; Siglová, Kristýna; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj; Týcová, Anna; Ono, Eiichiro; Krofta, Karel

    2016-10-01

    Lupulin glands localized in female hop (Humulus lupulus L.) cones are valuable source of bitter acids, essential oils and polyphenols. These compounds are used in brewing industry and are important for biomedical applications. In this study we describe the potential effect of transcription factors from WRKY family in the activation of the final steps of lupulin biosynthesis. In particular, lupulin gland-specific transcription factor HlWRKY1 that shows significant similarity to AtWRKY75, has ability to activate the set of promoters driving key genes of xanthohumol and bitter acids biosynthesis such as chalcone synthase H1, valerophenone synthase, prenyltransferase 1, 1L and 2 and O-methyltransferase-1. When combined with co-factor HlWDR1 and silencing suppressor p19, HlWRKY1 is able to enhance transient expression of gus gene driven by Omt1 and Chs_H1 promoters to significant level as compared to 35S promoter of CaMV in Nicotiana. benthamiana. Transformation of hop with dual Agrobacterium vector bearing HlWRKY1/HlWDR1 led to ectopic overexpression of these transgenes and further activation of lupulin-specific genes expression in hop leaves. It was further showed that (1) HlWRKY1 is endowed with promoter autoactivation; (2) It is regulated by post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanism; (3) It is stimulated by kinase co-expression. Since HlWRKY1 promotes expression of lupulin-specific HlMyb3 gene therefore it can constitute a significant component in hop lupulin regulation network. Putative involvement of HlWRKY1 in the regulation of lupulin biosynthesis may suggest the original physiological function of lupulin components in hop as flower and seed protective compounds.

  12. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K.; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis. PMID:20944209

  13. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  14. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  15. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  16. The Family Hero in Black Alcoholism Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Francis L.

    1989-01-01

    Uses data from 20 case studies of Black adult female children of alcoholic parents to discuss Family Hero role often assumed by oldest or only female child in Black alcoholism families. Explains how female-dominated survival role of Family Hero in Black families is significantly more related to racial and cultural factors than numbers alone may…

  17. Positive Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Marvin B.

    The persistence of the nuclear family as the primary social unit in the United States and most all other societies, especially complex ones, is a fact. Values shape the definition of family, especially the "good family," and the "great debate" of this period on family failure, family corruption and the family's near demise originates in…

  18. Apoptosis of HL-60 human leukemia cells induced by Asiatic acid through modulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuling; Lv, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Wen, Lu; Zhang, Junli; Jiang, Xudong; Liu, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The toxicities of conventional chemotherapeutic agents to normal cells restrict their dosage and clinical efficacy in acute leukemia; therefore, it is important to develop novel chemotherapeutics, including natural products, which selectively target cancer-specific pathways. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the chemopreventive agent asiatic acid (AA) on the proliferation and apoptotic rate of the leukemia cell line HL-60 and investigated the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor activity. The effect of AA on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis as well as Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. Furthermore, changes of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 expressions were detected by western blot analysis. AA blocked the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50-value of AA on HL-60 cells was 46.67 ± 5.08 µmol/l for 24 h. AA induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited in the presence of Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase. The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and survivin were downregulated by AA in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, AA inhibited ERK and p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the p38 and ERK pathways, as well as modulation of Bcl-2 family and survivin proteins were key regulators of apoptosis induced in HL-60 cells in response to AA.

  19. Family Orientation in Family Medicine Training

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves R.; Tannenbaum, David

    1990-01-01

    Teaching about the family has become an important part of the family medicine curriculum. The family orientation index, a 39-item questionnaire, was designed to evaluate the family orientation of services and care provided as well as the teaching and research. The questionnaire was distributed to 55 program directors at 16 Canadian universities. The response rate was 84%. The results indicate that the family orientation of services is less than optimal. PMID:21233938

  20. Family ties: constructing family time in low-income families.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Carolyn Y; Roy, Kevin M; Burton, Linda M

    2005-03-01

    "Family time" is reflected in the process of building and fortifying family relationships. Whereas such time, free of obligatory work, school, and family maintenance activities, is purchased by many families using discretionary income, we explore how low-income mothers make time for and give meaning to focused engagement and relationship development with their children within time constraints idiosyncratic to being poor and relying on welfare. Longitudinal ethnographic data from 61 low-income African American, European American, and Latina American mothers were analyzed to understand how mothers construct family time during daily activities such as talking, play, and meals. We also identify unique cultural factors that shape family time for low-income families, such as changing temporal orientations, centrality of television time, and emotional burdens due to poverty. Implications for family therapy are also discussed.

  1. Protein family classification using sparse Markov transducers.

    PubMed

    Eskin, E; Grundy, W N; Singer, Y

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for classifying proteins into families using sparse Markov transducers (SMTs). Sparse Markov transducers, similar to probabilistic suffix trees, estimate a probability distribution conditioned on an input sequence. SMTs generalize probabilistic suffix trees by allowing for wild-cards in the conditioning sequences. Because substitutions of amino acids are common in protein families, incorporating wildcards into the model significantly improves classification performance. We present two models for building protein family classifiers using SMTs. We also present efficient data structures to improve the memory usage of the models. We evaluate SMTs by building protein family classifiers using the Pfam database and compare our results to previously published results.

  2. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  3. Family Therapy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Ysern, Eduardo

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the family and the enterprise of family therapy are social systems and under the influence of the ideology particular to a given society. The strategic family therapy treatment of a family with a drug-addicted member serves as an example to clarify the ideological themes of contemporary family therapy. (Author/BL)

  4. Familial hypercholesterolaemia in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, M; Alves, A C; Medeiros, A M; Silva, S; Soutar, A K

    2008-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is characterised clinically by an increased level of circulating LDL cholesterol that leads to lipid accumulation in tendons and arteries, premature atherosclerosis and increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Although Portugal should have about 20,000 cases, this disease is severely under-diagnosed in our country, this being the first presentation of Portuguese data on FH. A total of 602 blood samples were collected from 184 index patients and 418 relatives from several centres throughout Portugal. Fifty-three different mutations were found in 83 index patients, 79 heterozygous and 4 with two defective LDLR alleles. Additionally, 4 putative alterations were found in 8 patients but were not considered mutations causing disease, mainly because they did not co-segregate with hypercholesterolaemia in the families. Three unrelated patients were found to be heterozygous for the APOB(3500) mutation and two unrelated patients were found to be heterozygous for a novel mutation in PCSK9, predicted to cause a single amino acid substitution, D374H. Cascade screening increased the number of FH patients identified genetically to 204. The newly identified FH patients are now receiving counselling and treatment based on the genetic diagnosis. The early identification of FH patients can increase their life expectancy and quality of life by preventing the development of premature CHD if patients receive appropriate pharmacological treatment.

  5. Effects of family connection and family individuation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Linda G; Bell, David C

    2009-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study explores the differential effects of family connection and family individuation measured during adolescence on later midlife well-being. Home interviews were held in the 1970s with 99 families of 245 adolescents. Connection and individuation in the family system were measured by self-report, a projective exercise, and coding of taped family interactions. Twenty-five years later, telephone interviews were conducted with 54 men and 120 women (representing 82 families) who had been adolescents in the 1970s interviews. Family connection (measured during adolescence) was associated with self-acceptance and positive relationships at midlife partially mediated by marriage. Family individuation (measured during adolescence) was associated with personal autonomy at midlife.

  6. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  7. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  8. Choosing a Family Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the whole family. Family doctors create caring relationships with patients and their families. They really get ... questions.Remember, it takes time to build a relationship with your doctor. Last Updated: May 2014 This ...

  9. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  10. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  11. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  12. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  13. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Mixtures in CD-1 Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) belong to a family of fluoro-organic compounds known as perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). PFAAs have been widely used in industrial and commercial applications, and have been found to be...

  14. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Frulloni, Luca; Cerati, Elena; Ribeiro, Luciana Andrea; Corrente, Vincenzo; Sianesi, Mario; Franzè, Angelo; Di Mario, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive childhood cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. PFIC 1, also known as Byler disease, was first described in Amish kindred. It is characterized by cholestasis often arising in the neonatal period and it leads to death due to liver failure. PFIC 1, like Benign Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholestasis (BRIC) which is the benign form of the same disease, recognizes mutations in the ATP8B1 gene. PFIC 2 disease is clinically similar to PFIC 1 but it has a different gene mutation causing a defect in the Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP), exclusively expressed in the liver and involved in the canalicular secretion of bile acids. PFIC 3 usually appears later in life and it has a higher risk of portal hypertension, gastrointestinal bleeding and liver failure. This particular form of disease (the only one with high serum values of g-glutamil transpeptidase), is associated to a genetic defect in the class III multidrug resistance protein (MDR). External biliary diversion and ursodeoxycholic acid therapy, should be considered as the initial therapy in these patients, even if liver transplantation still seems to be the only solution for most patients.

  15. Familial mesothelioma: a report of two families

    SciTech Connect

    Hammar, S.P.; Bockus, D.; Remington, F.; Freidman, S.; LaZerte, G.

    1989-02-01

    Five reports of familial mesothelioma in which mesotheliomas occurred in two or more family members have been recorded in the medical literature. In this report, we describe two examples of familial mesothelioma. In one family, three brothers who worked in the asbestos insulation industry developed mesothelioma. In the second family, the father, who was occupationally exposed to asbestos, died from a tubulopapillary peritoneal mesothelioma 11 years before his son died from an identical histologic type of peritoneal mesothelioma. Our report, as with those previously recorded, suggests that genetic factors may be important in the genesis of some mesotheliomas.

  16. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Familial Mediterranean fever By Mayo Clinic Staff Familial Mediterranean fever is an inflammatory disorder that causes recurrent fevers and painful inflammation of your abdomen, ...

  17. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  18. Frequency and Causes of Hypotonia in Neonatal Period with the Gestational Age of More Than 36 Weeks in NICU of Mofid Children Hospital, Tehran, Iran During 2012-2014

    PubMed Central

    SHAHABI, Nosratollah Seyed; FAKHRAEE, Hossain; KAZEMIAN, Mohammad; AFJEH, Abolfazl; FALLAHI, Minoo; SHARIATI, Maryam; GORJI, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hypotonia is a serious neurologic problem in neonatal period. Although hypotonia is a nonspecific clinical finding but it is the most common motor disorder in the newborn. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of neonatal hypotonia then to ascertain of the most common causes. Materials & Methods This cross –sectional prospective study was carried out on the 3281 term infants hospitalized in conventional and NICU of Mofid Children Hospital, Tehran, Iran during 2012-2014. Diagnosis was made by history, physical & neurological examination and accessible diagnostic tests. Results Fifty nine hypotonic neonates were identified, forty seven (79.66%) had central hypotonia (Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (n= 2), other causes of encephalopathy (n=2), intracranial hemorrhage (n=4), CNS abnormalities (n= 7), chromosomal disorders (n=4), syndromic–nonsyndromic (n=8), and metabolic diseases (n=8). Peripheral hypotonic recognized in 6 infants (10.17%); spinal muscular atrophy (n= 1), and myopathy (n= 5). Six cases (10.17%) remained unclassified. Twelve infants had transient hypotonia. In final study, 18 of 59 infants (30%) died, nearly 90% before one year of age. Twenty-eight (47%) infants found developmental disorders and only 13 (22%) infants achieved normal development in their follow up. Conclusion Neonatal hypotonia is a common event in neonatal period. A majority of diagnosis is obtained by history and physical examination. Neuroimaging, genetic and metabolic tests were also important in diagnosis. Genetic, syndromic–nonsyndromic, and metabolic disorders were the most causes of neonatal hypotonia. PMID:28277555

  19. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand:…

  20. The Family in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Jean D.

    This paper describes Laurelhurst Manor's family treatment program to help families affected by chemical dependency, a 7-month program which treats family members from the perspective of developmental stages and family roles. The center, located in Portland, Oregon, is a 40-bed, free-standing facility having a 20-bed adolescent unit and a 20-bed…

  1. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say…

  2. Family Participation in Policymaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Elizabeth, Ed.; Blankenship, Kelly, Ed.; McManus, Marilyn, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This bulletin focuses on family participation in mental health policymaking and highlights state efforts to increase family involvement. Articles include: (1) "Promoting Family Member Involvement in Children's Mental Health Policy Making Bodies," which describes how different states are promoting family member involvement in various statutory and…

  3. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  4. Plant ALDH10 Family

    PubMed Central

    Kopečný, David; Končitíková, Radka; Tylichová, Martina; Vigouroux, Armelle; Moskalíková, Hana; Soural, Miroslav; Šebela, Marek; Moréra, Solange

    2013-01-01

    Plant ALDH10 family members are aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases (AMADHs), which oxidize ω-aminoaldehydes to the corresponding acids. They have been linked to polyamine catabolism, osmoprotection, secondary metabolism (fragrance), and carnitine biosynthesis. Plants commonly contain two AMADH isoenzymes. We previously studied the substrate specificity of two AMADH isoforms from peas (PsAMADHs). Here, two isoenzymes from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), SlAMADHs, and three AMADHs from maize (Zea mays), ZmAMADHs, were kinetically investigated to obtain further clues to the catalytic mechanism and the substrate specificity. We also solved the high resolution crystal structures of SlAMADH1 and ZmAMADH1a because these enzymes stand out from the others regarding their activity. From the structural and kinetic analysis, we can state that five residues at positions 163, 288, 289, 444, and 454 (PsAMADHs numbering) can, directly or not, significantly modulate AMADH substrate specificity. In the SlAMADH1 structure, a PEG aldehyde derived from the precipitant forms a thiohemiacetal intermediate, never observed so far. Its absence in the SlAMADH1-E260A structure suggests that Glu-260 can activate the catalytic cysteine as a nucleophile. We show that the five AMADHs studied here are capable of oxidizing 3-dimethylsulfoniopropionaldehyde to the cryo- and osmoprotectant 3-dimethylsulfoniopropionate. For the first time, we also show that 3-acetamidopropionaldehyde, the third aminoaldehyde besides 3-aminopropionaldehyde and 4-aminobutyraldehyde, is generally oxidized by AMADHs, meaning that these enzymes are unique in metabolizing and detoxifying aldehyde products of polyamine degradation to nontoxic amino acids. Finally, gene expression profiles in maize indicate that AMADHs might be important for controlling ω-aminoaldehyde levels during early stages of the seed development. PMID:23408433

  5. Nontraditional family romance.

    PubMed

    Corbett, K

    2001-07-01

    Family stories lie at the heart of psychoanalytic developmental theory and psychoanalytic clinical technique, but whose family? Increasingly, lesbian and gay families, multiparent families, and single-parent families are relying on modern reproductive technologies to form families. The contemplation of these nontraditional families and the vicissitudes of contemporary reproduction lead to an unknowing of what families are, including the ways in which psychoanalysts configure the family within developmental theory. This article focuses on the stories that families tell in order to account for their formation--stories that include narratives about parental union, parental sexuality, and conception. The author addresses three constructs that inform family stories and that require rethinking in light of the category crises posed by and for the nontraditional family: (1) normative logic, (2) family reverie and the construction of a family romance, and (3) the primal scene. These constructs are examined in tandem with detailed clinical material taken from the psychotherapy of a seven-year-old boy and his two mothers.

  6. The Family Relationships Grid: Measuring Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Anne P.; And Others

    This study examined the Family Relationships Grid (FRG), a new measure of family structure that evaluates alliances, identification, isolation, and the relative strength of sibling and marital relationships. Subjects were 52 female and 35 male adolescents who were recruited through a university course and who each had at least one sibling.…

  7. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT.

  8. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  9. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  10. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration.

  11. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Creating a Family Health History Why Create a Family Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for ... Click for more information What a Family Health History May Reveal You can use a family health ...

  12. Multi-element variations in olivine as geochemical signatures of Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization in mafic magma systems—examples from Voisey's Bay and Pants Lake intrusions, Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulle, Florian; Layne, Graham D.

    2016-01-01

    Olivine from the olivine gabbro to troctolite intrusions at Voisey's Bay and at Pants Lake, Labrador, was analyzed for multiple elements (Ca, Sc, Mg, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, and Zr) with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both intrusions have similar lithologies and petrographic characteristics and are approximately coeval (1.34 and 1.32 Ga, respectively) members of the Mesoproterozoic Nain Plutonic Suite. The Voisey's Bay intrusion hosts a producing economic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, whereas the Pants Lake intrusion displays evidence of Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization, but, to date, a viable ore deposit has not been discovered. Olivine from both barren and mineralized lithologies was analyzed to assess the potential of the olivine composition for providing a record of silicate melt evolution and sulfide saturation related to formation of a massive sulfide deposit. Two detailed transects were sampled, using five diamond drill holes that laterally approach the basal massive sulfide in the Eastern Deeps portion of the Voisey's Bay intrusion from the barren central part. Olivine displays distinct trace element distributions that vary coherently with host lithology and proximity to sulfide mineralization. In particular, olivine shows an increase in Fe (˜Fo80 to ˜Fo60), Mn (˜2500 to 5000 ppm), and Zn (˜280 to 700 ppm), generally coupled with a decrease in Ni (˜1600 to ˜900 ppm), Co (˜270 to ˜190 ppm), and Cr (˜110 to 45 ppm), from barren troctolite (normal troctolite—NT) and weakly mineralized troctolite (variable-textured troctolite—VTT) towards the heavily mineralized, brecciated basal succession (basal breccia sequence—BBS). The enrichment in Fe-Mn-Zn is most pronounced in samples that laterally approach, but do not directly intersect, the massive sulfide deposit at the base of the intrusion, particularly in samples from the lower variable-textured troctolite and the basal breccia. Olivine from gabbro lithologies within the basal

  13. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  14. Assessing Postpartum Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana; Talbot, Yves

    1988-01-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals. PMID:21253238

  15. Unique Family Living Situations

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the family home changes for reasons of divorce, death, or economics? Factors, such as shifting between ... blending families when a parent remarries after a divorce or death of a spouse, or moving in ...

  16. Government and the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Walter F.

    1975-01-01

    In order to deal successfully with the changes and pressures placed upon families, article considered the extent government policies are helping or hurting families, and what kind of support services are available. (Author/RK)

  17. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... Group) Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Caregivers exhibit ...

  18. Chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brian; Giardiello, Francis M

    2011-08-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) predictably leads to adenomas and eventual adenocarcinomas in the lower gastrointestinal tract and less frequently, the upper gastrointestinal tract. Chemopreventive strategies have been studied in FAP patients to delay the development of adenomas in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, as well as to prevent recurrence of adenomas in the retained rectum of patients after prophylactic surgery with colectomy and ileorectal anastamosis (IRA). The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib reduce polyposis of the retained rectum after colectomy with IRA. Reports of cardiovascular risks of some NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors have led to promising studies of lower doses in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid, statin, and difluoromethylornithine. Curcumin and eicosapentaenoic acid show efficacy in small clinical trials of FAP chemoprevention. This article will review the concept of chemoprevention and the current clinical literature in FAP chemoprevention.

  19. Forcefield_NCAA: Ab Initio Charge Parameters to Aid in the Discovery and Design of Therapeutic Proteins and Peptides with Unnatural Amino Acids and Their Application to Complement Inhibitors of the Compstatin Family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development and testing of ab initio derived, AMBER ff03 compatible charge parameters for a large library of 147 noncanonical amino acids including β- and N-methylated amino acids for use in applications such as protein structure prediction and de novo protein design. The charge parameter derivation was performed using the RESP fitting approach. Studies were performed assessing the suitability of the derived charge parameters in discriminating the activity/inactivity between 63 analogs of the complement inhibitor Compstatin on the basis of previously published experimental IC50 data and a screening procedure involving short simulations and binding free energy calculations. We found that both the approximate binding affinity (K*) and the binding free energy calculated through MM-GBSA are capable of discriminating between active and inactive Compstatin analogs, with MM-GBSA performing significantly better. Key interactions between the most potent Compstatin analog that contains a noncanonical amino acid are presented and compared to the most potent analog containing only natural amino acids and native Compstatin. We make the derived parameters and an associated web interface that is capable of performing modifications on proteins using Forcefield_NCAA and outputting AMBER-ready topology and parameter files freely available for academic use at http://selene.princeton.edu/FFNCAA. The forcefield allows one to incorporate these customized amino acids into design applications with control over size, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. PMID:24932669

  20. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  1. Fatherhood and Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    On the assumption that fathers have been relatively absent from family support programs, this publication of the Family Resource Coalition addresses the role of fathers in family support programs, examines the impact of fathers on their children, and describes programs involving fathers successfully. Articles include: (1) "What's Behind the…

  2. Changing Family Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibert, M. Therese; Willetts, Marion C.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the definition of family. Considers three facets of the contemporary family measured by U.S. Census statistics: (1) marriage and divorce trends; (2) declining fertility; and (3) the rise in single-headed families. Addresses the societal changes (economic, cultural, legal, and technological) that have influenced the changes in family…

  3. Launching Family Message Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollman-Bonilla, Julie

    This lesson introduces Family Message Journals, a tool for encouraging family involvement and supporting writing to reflect and learn. First and second graders are led into composing through demonstration, guided writing, and finally independent writing of messages that they will bring home for family to read and write a reply. During the three…

  4. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  5. Families in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Patti O., Ed.; McGee, Michael, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This issue of "Emphasis" deals with families in transition, providing some model programs for the new family and some historical perspectives on how families have developed over time. Articles include: (1) "Nostalgia on the Right" (Nancy Theriot); (2) "Heart to Heart" (Nancy Harrington-MacLennan); (3) "The Media Get the Message" (Janet Alyn); (4)…

  6. Family Planning & Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This publication is an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) annotated bibliography of books and articles concerned with family planning and literacy. The subject is divided into four major listings: (1) Literacy; (2) Education; (3) Literacy and Family Planning; and (4) Functional Literacy/Family Planning Projects and Programs.…

  7. Books in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinger, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    Opportunities for parents to encourage reading in the family are noted and ways to enhance the reading experience are discussed, including writing letters to book characters, singing combined with reading aloud, supplementing school subjects with enjoyable reading, sharing books at family gatherings, and using family experiences for book…

  8. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  9. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... for anyone with a family history of this disease. Prevention There is no known prevention for this rare, inherited disorder. Awareness of risks may allow early detection. Following a very low-fat diet can improve the ... Type I hyperlipoproteinemia; Familial chylomicronemia; Familial ...

  10. Year of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Agriculture, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue focuses on problems and challenges confronting the California family and on research and extension efforts to provide at least partial answers. Research briefs by staff include "Challenges Confront the California Family" (state trends in poverty, divorce, single-parent families, child abuse, delinquency, teen births,…

  11. Individual and Family Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jean; Simpson, Elizabeth

    This curriculum guide, in working paper form, for a semester-long three-credit course in individual and family development is one of nine technical core courses in an associate degree consumer/family manager program. The course studies individual and family development through the life cycle. Emphasis is on the relationship of basic needs to the…

  12. Treatment of violent families.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C. C.; Chance-Hill, G.

    1991-01-01

    Family violence is responsible for a significant proportion of homicides, a major cause of premature deaths in African-Americans. This article reviews the prevalence of family violence and explores associated risk factors. Principles and tips of treatment, along with a cognitive framework to guide the actual therapy, are outlined. Finally, issues of preventing family violence are discussed. PMID:2038079

  13. Strengthening America's Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Rose; Kumpfer, Karol

    2000-01-01

    Improving parenting practices and the family environment is the most effective, enduring strategy for combating juvenile delinquency. Describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Strengthening America's Families Initiative. Highlights several family-focused prevention programs identified as exemplary, explaining how they…

  14. A story of family.

    PubMed

    Condon, Barbara Backer

    2010-07-01

    The author of this column gives a vivid description of Parse's humanbecoming family model as lived in community. The story of M'Barek (Mark), who was imprisoned for 18 years, draws readers to a new understanding of family and community. Through the process of storytelling, Parse's essences of family are discussed.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY S HARE W ITH W OMEN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY During pregnancy, your baby gets most ... eat and vitamins you take. Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) are an important family of building ...

  16. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal-recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and associated with mutations in hepatocellular transport-system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may arise later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. The main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump (BSEP) protein, respectively. Defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion, resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests to exclude other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates for whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis may be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion may also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of liver tumors

  17. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2009-01-08

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) refers to heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. The exact prevalence remains unknown, but the estimated incidence varies between 1/50,000 and 1/100,000 births. Three types of PFIC have been identified and related to mutations in hepatocellular transport system genes involved in bile formation. PFIC1 and PFIC2 usually appear in the first months of life, whereas onset of PFIC3 may also occur later in infancy, in childhood or even during young adulthood. Main clinical manifestations include cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. PFIC patients usually develop fibrosis and end-stage liver disease before adulthood. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity is normal in PFIC1 and PFIC2 patients, but is elevated in PFIC3 patients. Both PFIC1 and PFIC2 are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due respectively to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein, and in ABCB11 encoding the bile salt export pump protein (BSEP). Defects in ABCB4, encoding the multi-drug resistant 3 protein (MDR3), impair biliary phospholipid secretion resulting in PFIC3. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations, liver ultrasonography, cholangiography and liver histology, as well as on specific tests for excluding other causes of childhood cholestasis. MDR3 and BSEP liver immunostaining, and analysis of biliary lipid composition should help to select PFIC candidates in whom genotyping could be proposed to confirm the diagnosis. Antenatal diagnosis can be proposed for affected families in which a mutation has been identified. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) therapy should be initiated in all patients to prevent liver damage. In some PFIC1 or PFIC2 patients, biliary diversion can also relieve pruritus and slow disease progression. However, most PFIC patients are ultimately candidates for liver transplantation. Monitoring of

  18. Family practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozsahin, Akatli Kursad

    2014-03-01

    The national project 'Transformation in Health' was started in 2005 to provide expert primary care by family physicians, and decrease expenses in Turkey. The number of family physicians was far below the need, so public physicians were promoted to family physician status after a 10-day intensive course. The government declared some satisfactory results, but privately paid family physicians were not accepted into the system. Furthermore, the government stopped paying for their services from private settings. Some family physicians became unemployed as the major payer for all forms of medical care in Turkey denied their services. The process showed it's value in time. Nevertheless, family physicians should be the core of this transformation as family medicine is an academic and a scientific discipline and a primary care-oriented specialty with its own specific educational content, research and base of evidence, which cannot be achieved through standard medical education.

  19. The solute carrier 6 family of transporters

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, Stefan; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of the human genome comprises transporters for neurotransmitters, amino acids, osmolytes and energy metabolites. Members of this family play critical roles in neurotransmission, cellular and whole body homeostasis. Malfunction or altered expression of these transporters is associated with a variety of diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of the neurotransmitter transporters in this family is an important strategy in the management of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review provides an overview of the biochemical and pharmacological properties of the SLC6 family transporters. LINKED ARTICLES BJP published a themed section on Transporters in 2011. To view articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-7/issuetoc PMID:22519513

  20. Family II. Leptospiraceae Hovind-Hougen 1979, 245AL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria within the Family Leptospiraceae comprise a diverse group of three bacterial genera, Leptospira, Leptonema, and Turneriella. These bacteria are aerobes that consume long-chain fatty acids and alcohols as carbon and energy sources. Some members of this Family cause serious infections in ani...

  1. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  2. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  3. Cytochrome P450 1 family and cancers.

    PubMed

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor that dimerizes with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT). This complex binds to xenobiotics response element (XREs), and then starts the expressions of downstream genes including cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1 family members: CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1. Role of CYP1 family is involved in the metabolism of endogenous hormones, xenobiotics and drug. The expression of CYP1 family is regulated by estradiol (E2) or xenobiotics in diverse cancers. In breast cancers expressing estrogen receptors (ERs), level of CYP1B1 is increased by E2 and reversed by an estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780 or 4-hydrotamoxifen, which indicates that the expression of CYP1 family in downstream region of AhR is regulated by an activation of ERα. In metabolic pathways, E2 is converted into 4-hydroxyestradiol by CYP1B1, which can be converted into mainly estradiol-3,4-quinone, a potential carcinogen, by peroxidase. Increased expression of CYP1 family indicates the possibility of carcinogenesis by exposure of xenobiotics in endometrial and ovarian cancers. Apart from roles of CYP1 family in relation with ER pathway, CYP1 family is over-expressed in ER independent cancers. CYP1A1 exhibits hydroxylase activity in oxidation of arachidonic acid, which has been transformed to 12(R)-hydrxyeicosatetraenoic (HETEs), a potent activator of AhR activity. On the basis of results, phytoestrogens and dexamethasone are provided as cancer therapy regulating the expression of CYP1 family. Thus, this review focuses on the role(s) of CYP1 family in ER-dependent or ER-independent cancers and the potential for cancer therapy to target CYP1 family in these cancers.

  4. Opening Doors: Understanding School and Family Influences on Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Erin; Stanley, Lindsey; Kemple, Kristen Mary

    2005-01-01

    Family involvement in schooling can benefit young children, teachers, and families. Family involvement in schools can be influenced by both school-related and family-related factors. School-related factors include teachers' attitudes toward families, and school and teacher expectations. Family-related factors include ethnicity, prior school…

  5. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  6. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  7. Extended family medicine training

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  8. Family dynamics and family psychotherapy of psychosomatic.

    PubMed

    Wirsching, M; Stierlin, H

    1979-01-01

    Family therapy of psychosomatic disorders is oftern difficult and comparable to the therapy of psychotic patients. Nonetheless, the results published today by authors such as Minuchin and Selvini and our own experiences are promising indeed. We have found that what seemed to be a deep-rooted psychic structure changed rapidly and enduringly if the relationship field changed. Amelioration of symptoms is in many cases easily attained if they are understood in their function within a relational system. Also, we regard the system or family approach as a chance for medical practice. The general practioner who usually deals with family systems has, in our view, an ideal position to bring about change if he uses his authority and trust properly. He has to obtain a positive, not pathology-oriented view and should use family and social resources in spite of engaging in an often fruitless and endless contact with the designated patient, which only serves to maintain and even to increase the homeostatic lock of the family system.

  9. Creating a family health history

    MedlinePlus

    Family health history; Create a family health history; Family medical history ... Many factors affect your health. These include your: Genes Diet and exercise habits Environment Family members tend to share certain behaviors, genetic traits, and habits. ...

  10. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  11. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  12. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  13. The Arabidopsis thaliana At4g13040 gene, a unique member of the AP2/EREBP family, is a positive regulator for salicylic acid accumulation and basal defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Giri, Mrunmay Kumar; Swain, Swadhin; Gautam, Janesh Kumar; Singh, Subaran; Singh, Nidhi; Bhattacharjee, Lipika; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2014-06-15

    The Arabidopsis genome contains a large number of putative transcription factors, containing a DNA binding domain similar to APETALA2/ethylene response element binding protein (AP2/EREBP), for most of which a function is not known. Phylogenetic analysis divides the Apetala 2 (AP2) super-family into 5 major groups: AP2, RAV, ethylene response factor (ERF), dehydration response element binding protein (DREB) and At4g13040. Similar to ERF and DREB, the At4g13040 protein contains only one AP2 domain; however, its structural uniqueness places it into a distinct group. In this article, we report that At4g13040 (referred herein as Apetala 2 family protein involved in SA mediated disease defense 1 - APD1) is an important regulator for SA mediated plant defense. The APD1 gene is upregulated upon pathogen inoculation, exogenous SA application and in the mutant that constitutively activates SA signaling. The T-DNA insertion lines (inserted in the APD1 promoter), which fail to induce expression upon pathogen inoculation, are compromised for resistance against virulent bacterial pathogens and show reduced induction of pathogenesis related 1 gene. Our results suggest that APD1 functions downstream of PAD4 in Arabidopsis and promotes pathogen-induced SA accumulation. Exogenous SA application completely restores the loss-of-resistance phenotype of the apd1 mutant. Thus, APD1 is a positive regulator of disease defense that functions upstream of SA accumulation.

  14. Folded and unfolded conformations of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid family: ch(3)ch(2)[ch=chch(2)](b)[ch(2)](m)cooh: first principles study.

    PubMed

    Law, Jacqueline M S; Szori, Milan; Izsak, Robert; Penke, Botond; Csizmadia, Imre G; Viskolcz, Bela

    2006-05-11

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) like stearidonic acid (SDA;18:4 n-3) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 n-3), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) and its chain fragment models were studied at B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels of theory. Significant conformations for the cis and trans isomers were selected to obtained the thermodynamic functions (DeltaH, DeltaS, DeltaG) for the cis-trans isomerization and for folding using the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The structural analysis shows that there are significant differences in thermodynamic function of the trans- and cis-PUFAs. The trans-cis isomerization energy values reinforce the consistency and the relative accuracy of theoretical model calculations. The observed flexibility of naturally cis PUFAs could be explained by a very special "smooth basin" PES of the motif of sp(2)-sp(3)-sp(2) hybrid states as reported previously (J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 520-533). We assumed that intrinsic thermodynamic functions may describe this flexible folding process. The folding enthalpy as well as the folding entropy suggests that there is a new role of the cis-PUFAs in membranes: these cis isomers may have a strong influence on membrane stability and permeability. The average length of the cis helix and beta PUFA was approximated. The difference between the lengths of these two structures is approximately 10 A.

  15. Sodium-coupled and electrogenic transport of B-complex vitamin nicotinic acid by slc5a8, a member of the Na/glucose co-transporter gene family

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Elangovan; Fei, You-Jun; Miyauchi, Seiji; Zhuang, Lina; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2005-01-01

    SMCT (sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter; slc5a8) is a Na+-coupled transporter for lactate, pyruvate and short-chain fatty acids. Similar to these already known substrates of SMCT, the water-soluble B-complex vitamin nicotinic acid also exists as a monocarboxylate anion (nicotinate) under physiological conditions. Therefore we evaluated the ability of SMCT to mediate the uptake of nicotinate. In mammalian cells, the cloned mouse SMCT (slc5a8) induced the uptake of nicotinate. The SMCT-induced uptake was Na+-dependent. The Michaelis constant for the uptake process was 296±88 μM. The Na+-activation kinetics indicated that at least two Na+ ions are involved in the process. Among the various structural analogues tested, nicotinate was the most effective substrate. Nicotinamide and methylnicotinate were not recognized by the transporter. 2-Pyrazine carboxylate and isonicotinate interacted with the transporter to a moderate extent. SMCT-mediated uptake of nicotinate was inhibited by lactate and pyruvate. In the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system, SMCT-mediated nicotinate transport was electrogenic, as evident from the nicotinate-induced inward currents under voltage-clamp conditions. Substrate-induced currents in this expression system corroborated the substrate specificity determined in the mammalian cell expression system. The kinetic parameters with regard to the affinity of the transporter for nicotinate and the Hill coefficient for Na+ activation, determined by using the oocyte expression system, were also similar to those obtained from the mammalian cell expression system. We conclude that SMCT functions not only as a Na+-coupled transporter for short-chain fatty acids and lactate but also as a Na+-coupled transporter for the water-soluble vitamin nicotinic acid. PMID:15651982

  16. Electrophilic nitro-fatty acids prevent astrocyte-mediated toxicity to motor neurons in a cell model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor activation.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Amarilla, Pablo; Miquel, Ernesto; Trostchansky, Andrés; Trias, Emiliano; Ferreira, Ana M; Freeman, Bruce A; Cassina, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis; Vargas, Marcelo R; Rubbo, Homero

    2016-06-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in tissues during inflammation, which are able to induce pleiotropic cytoprotective and antioxidant pathways including up regulation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) responsive genes. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons associated to an inflammatory process that usually aggravates the disease progression. In ALS animal models, the activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in astrocytes confers protection to neighboring neurons. It is currently unknown whether NO2-FA can exert protective activity in ALS through Nrf2 activation. Herein we demonstrate that nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) or nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA) administrated to astrocytes expressing the ALS-linked hSOD1(G93A) induce antioxidant phase II enzyme expression through Nrf2 activation concomitant with increasing intracellular glutathione levels. Furthermore, treatment of hSOD1(G93A)-expressing astrocytes with NO2-FA prevented their toxicity to motor neurons. Transfection of siRNA targeted to Nrf2 mRNA supported the involvement of Nrf2 activation in NO2-FA-mediated protective effects. Our results show for the first time that NO2-FA induce a potent Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in astrocytes capable of preventing motor neurons death in a culture model of ALS.

  17. Advancing family psychology.

    PubMed

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year.

  18. Protein family classification using sparse markov transducers.

    PubMed

    Eskin, Eleazar; Noble, William Stafford; Singer, Yoram

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for classifying proteins into families based on short subsequences of amino acids using a new probabilistic model called sparse Markov transducers (SMT). We classify a protein by estimating probability distributions over subsequences of amino acids from the protein. Sparse Markov transducers, similar to probabilistic suffix trees, estimate a probability distribution conditioned on an input sequence. SMTs generalize probabilistic suffix trees by allowing for wild-cards in the conditioning sequences. Since substitutions of amino acids are common in protein families, incorporating wild-cards into the model significantly improves classification performance. We present two models for building protein family classifiers using SMTs. As protein databases become larger, data driven learning algorithms for probabilistic models such as SMTs will require vast amounts of memory. We therefore describe and use efficient data structures to improve the memory usage of SMTs. We evaluate SMTs by building protein family classifiers using the Pfam and SCOP databases and compare our results to previously published results and state-of-the-art protein homology detection methods. SMTs outperform previous probabilistic suffix tree methods and under certain conditions perform comparably to state-of-the-art protein homology methods.

  19. State of family planning.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Courtney A; Traxler, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Family planning and reproductive health services are uniquely impacted by policy and politics in the United States. Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented number of abortion restrictions, and research funding has decreased in related areas. Despite this, both the science and the implementation of improved family planning and abortion methods have progressed in the past decade. This article reviews the current state of family planning, as well as technologies and patient care opportunities for the future.

  20. The Growth of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Biringer, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Caring for a family during pregnancy and birth is an ideal opportunity for family physicians to assess family functioning and help the family adjust to the birth of a new child. Stress and support systems can influence the course of pregnancy, including obstetric and perinatal outcomes. A family-centered approach can help patients during this critical stage of family development. PMID:21229107

  1. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluorinated Phosphonic Acids in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) are a third member of the perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) family, and are structurally similar to the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates. PFPAs are used primarily as a surfactant defoaming agent in pesticide production. Re...

  2. The Hoffmeister asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Novaković, B.; Aljbaae, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Hoffmeister family is a C-type group located in the central main belt. Dynamically, it is important because of its interaction with the ν1C nodal secular resonance with Ceres, which significantly increases the dispersion in inclination of family members at a lower semimajor axis. As an effect, the distribution of inclination values of the Hoffmeister family at a semimajor axis lower than its centre is significantly leptokurtic, and this can be used to set constraints on the terminal ejection velocity field of the family at the time it was produced. By performing an analysis of the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the vW component of the ejection velocity field [γ2(vW)], as obtained from Gauss' equations, for different fictitious Hoffmeister families with different values of the ejection velocity field, we were able to exclude that the Hoffmeister family should be older than 335 Myr. Constraints from the currently observed inclination distribution of the Hoffmeister family suggest that its terminal ejection velocity parameter VEJ should be lower than 25 m s-1. Results of a Yarko-YORP Monte Carlo method to family dating, combined with other constraints from inclinations and γ2(vW), indicate that the Hoffmeister family should be 220^{+60}_{-40} Myr old, with an ejection parameter VEJ = 20 ± 5 m s-1.

  3. [Nuclear families in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unalan, T

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the household or family types in Turkey in 1983, especially nuclear families. Nuclear families constitute 61.6% of all households in Turkey, and the majority of them are in the West and the Central regions. The highest % of nuclear families was found in the Mediterranean regions, and the lowest in the Black Sea region. Among all nuclear families, 87% of them consist of husband, wife and children, whereas 13% of them have only husband and wife. Nuclear families without children are common in urban areas and in the West while nuclear families with children are mostly found in rural areas and in the East and the Black Sea regions. Nuclear families with 3 or more children constitute 32% of all nuclear households in the West. On the other hand, the corresponding % is 73 for the Eastern region. As a result, it is concluded that nuclear families have significant regional and residential differentiations and households with the same formation in a developed and a less developed region should have different social, economic, and cultural characteristics.

  4. The FGF family: biology, pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Andrew; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    The family of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulates a plethora of developmental processes, including brain patterning, branching morphogenesis and limb development. Several mitogenic, cytoprotective and angiogenic therapeutic applications of FGFs are already being explored, and the recent discovery of the crucial roles of the endocrine-acting FGF19 subfamily in bile acid, glucose and phosphate homeostasis has sparked renewed interest in the pharmacological potential of this family. This Review discusses traditional applications of recombinant FGFs and small-molecule FGF receptor kinase inhibitors in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular disease and their emerging potential in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and hypophosphataemic diseases. PMID:19247306

  5. Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonovsky, Aaron; Sourani, Talma

    1988-01-01

    Administered family Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale to 60 married Israeli males who were disabled by injury or illness and to their spouses. Data provide strong support for hypothesis that strength of SOC would be associated with adaptation, and showed considerable degree of consensus among spouses. (Author/NB)

  6. The Rafita asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljbaae, S.; Carruba, V.; Masiero, J. R.; Domingos, R. C.; Huaman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Rafita asteroid family is an S-type group located in the middle main belt, on the right side of the 3J:-1A mean-motion resonance. The proximity of this resonance to the family left side in semi-major axis caused many former family members to be lost. As a consequence, the family shape in the (a, 1/D) domain is quite asymmetrical, with a preponderance of objects on the right side of the distribution. The Rafita family is also characterized by a leptokurtic distribution in inclination, which allows the use of methods of family age estimation recently introduced for other leptokurtic families such as Astrid, Hansa, Gallia, and Barcelona. In this work we propose a new method based on the behavior of an asymmetry coefficient function of the distribution in the (a, 1/D) plane to date incomplete asteroid families such as Rafita. By monitoring the time behavior of this coefficient for asteroids simulating the initial conditions at the time of the family formation, we were able to estimate that the Rafita family should have an age of 490 ± 200 Myr, in good agreement with results from independent methods such as Monte Carlo simulations of Yarkovsky and Yorp dynamical induced evolution and the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the sin (i) distribution. Asteroids from the Rafita family can reach orbits similar to 8% of the currently known near Earth objects. ≃1% of the simulated objects are present in NEO-space during the final 10 Myr of the simulation, and thus would be comparable to objects in the present-day NEO population.

  7. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  8. Strengthening Families: Exploring the Impacts of Family Camp Experiences on Family Functioning and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Baughman, Sarah; Franz, Nancy K.; Seidel, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods…

  9. Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  10. Narrative Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  11. Families, Risk, and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael, Ed.; Feiring, Candice, Ed.

    The problems of studying families arise from the difficulty in studying systems in which there are multiple elements interacting with each other and with the child. This book attests to the growing sophistication of the conceptualization and measurement techniques for understanding family processes. Chapters in the first part of the book,…

  12. Workshops on Family Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Kathleen M.

    Intended to help speech communication professionals become involved in developing, implementing, and evaluating marital or family enrichment programs, this booklet discusses the theory and practice of using marital enrichment programs to increase family harmony. The first section contains an overview of selected enrichment programs, as well as…

  13. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  14. Education and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leonard, Ed.

    This book is the report of the Family Ties Commission, which was established by the Association of Teacher Educators to study the relationship between home and school. Following the preface and two introductory essays, "Education and My Family" (K.B. O'Rourke as told to E. Johnson) and "Preparing for Successful Children" (B. Clawson), the book is…

  15. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  16. Employers, Families and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Family involvement in education is good for business, critical to children's school achievement, and important in creating strong and vibrant communities. This report discusses the role of businesses and employers in helping partners and family members be more involved in children's learning. Throughout the report, programs at specific companies…

  17. America's Family Time Famine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Jr., William R.

    1990-01-01

    Parents spend increasingly less time with their children because of the pressures of dual careers and single parenthood. Economic pressures and social values have affected sharing of family time. Studies show both parents and children consider spending time together the most important element in improving family life. (BC)

  18. Family Science Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Holly; Alderman, Helen Christine

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Family Science Night (FSN) described in this article was to involve culturally and linguistically diverse families in school life so that students would be more vocal, successful, and interactive in science class. The project would also demonstrate to the students that their teacher valued their input in the classroom. The setting…

  19. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  20. Patent Family Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Edlyn S.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on retrieval of patent information online and includes definition of patent family, basic and equivalent patents, "parents and children" applications, designated states, patent family databases--International Patent Documentation Center, World Patents Index, APIPAT (American Petroleum Institute), CLAIMS (IFI/Plenum). A table…

  1. Democratization of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ulrich

    1997-01-01

    Discusses several issues related to a modern approach in the interpretation of civil freedom and its relationship to the notion of family. First, presents some definitions and distinctions regarding the sociology of political freedom, which it suggests should become the sociology of citizenship. Then, applies those ideas to families, particularly…

  2. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  3. Measuring Family Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunce, Joseph T.; Priesmeyer, Marydeth L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated dimensions of family dynamics via test construction and cross validation, with a developmental sample (N=93) and a validity generalization sample (N=65). Developed two scales that correlated significantly with perceptions of family stability and quality in the developmental and validity generalization samples. (BH)

  4. Black Families. Interdisciplinary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E., Ed.; Stewart, James B., Ed.

    Since the early 1960s, the black family has been characterized as pathological. This six-part collection of 18 research studies presents alternative approaches to understanding the special characteristics of black families. Part I, "Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives," comprises a comparison of the pioneering work of W. E. B. Du…

  5. Family-Friendly Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patterson; Garcia, Maria

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the Denver Art Museum initiated efforts to make the museum a destination for families. From 1997 to 2001, with a generous grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, these efforts came to fruition. From the moment they walk through the doors, families' needs are anticipated. For example, they can pick up a welcoming brochure, Free…

  6. The Family Constellation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemire, David

    The Family Constellation Scale (FC Scale) is an instrument that assesses perceived birth order in families. It can be used in counseling to help initiate conversations about various traits and assumptions that tend to characterize first-born, middle-born children, youngest-born, and only children. It provides both counselors and clients insights…

  7. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  8. Marinating the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Karen A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the New York Aquarium's program specifically designed for family learning and teaching. The program's goal is to create an environment where child-parent roles are dropped and where the philosophy that no one of us is as smart as all of us prevails. Strategies for family involvement are outlined. (MH)

  9. Reaching Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter issue focuses on programming undertaken to address the health and educational needs of rural families in developing and developed nations. After examining the nature of rural families and rural poverty, the newsletter discusses: (1) the Mon Women's Organization in Thailand; (2) The "Contact With Kids" parent education…

  10. Latino Families Learning Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterling, Jorge P.; Violand-Sanchez, Emma; von Vacano, Marcela

    1999-01-01

    The push for the English-only literacy approach sends the wrong message to language-minority families. The Arlington (Virginia) Public Schools have established first-language pilot programs to accelerate Latino students' academic achievement and have welcomed community-based educational initiatives. A family-literacy program motivates parents to…

  11. Explaining Family Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Mary Anne, Ed.; Vangelisti, Anita L., Ed.

    A detailed review of current research and state-of-the-art ideas concerning both communication processes and family functioning is presented in this collection of articles. The volume is organized around three sections. Part 1, "The Development of Family Communication Patterns," contains: (1) "Communication in Infancy"…

  12. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia is a metabolic disorder that is passed down through families. Babies with ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Jaundice Metabolic Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  13. Intervention in Disintegrating Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wootton, Ray W.

    A special demonstration project attempted to find means of assisting hard-core multi-problem families in a predominantly rural Idaho county. A single agency was formed to coordinate community activities and provide a variety of services for the needs of the total family. Project personnel included a director, social worker, home economist, public…

  14. Families on the Grow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Irene K.; Phillips, Marjorie M.

    This correspondence course was designed to help parents better understand their growing children and themselves as parents. The introduction briefly sketches the importance of the family in child development. Each of the five illustrated lessons contains 7 to 12 pages on one aspect of family life. Each lesson contains a set of objectives, a…

  15. Golden Matrix Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontaine, Anne; Hurley, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This student research project explores the properties of a family of matrices of zeros and ones that arises from the study of the diagonal lengths in a regular polygon. There is one family for each n greater than 2. A series of exercises guides the student to discover the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrices, which leads in turn to…

  16. Helping Friends and Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... chapter Join our online community Helping Friends and Family Part of living well with Alzheimer’s is adjusting to your “new normal” and helping family and friends do the same. Knowing what to ...

  17. [Focus: Family Communication].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Richard E., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the "Journal of the Wisconsin Communication Association" focuses on family communication and contains the following articles: "Marital Typologies: An Alternative Approach to the Study of Communication in Enduring Relations" by Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, "Intimate Communication and the Family" by Marilyn D. LaCourt, and "A Study in…

  18. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  19. Anesthesia and analgesia in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Hall, R Whit

    2012-03-01

    Painful procedures in the neonatal intensive care unit are common, undertreated, and lead to adverse consequences. A stepwise approach to treatment should include pain recognition, assessment, and treatment, starting with nonpharmacologic and progressing to pharmacologic methods for increasing pain. The most common nonpharmacologic techniques include nonnutritive sucking with and without sucrose, kangaroo care, swaddling, and massage therapy. Drugs used to treat neonatal pain include the opiates, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, ketamine, propofol, acetaminophen, and local and topical anesthetics. The indications, advantages, and disadvantages of the commonly used analgesic drugs are discussed. Guidance and references for drugs and dosing for specific neonatal procedures are provided.

  20. Visiting your baby in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  1. Becoming a Parent in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... mail address. Your information: Your recipient's information: Your personal message: Thank you! Your e-mail was sent. ... for you to reflect and lean on your personal spiritual perspective. You may find comfort speaking with ...

  2. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Prine, Kelli Beckvermit; Goracke, Kimberly; Rubarth, Lori Baas

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was developed for adults but has been used in neonates as a life-saving rescue therapy for infants with respiratory failure and/or cardiac collapse as a result of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, meconium aspiration syndrome, persistent pulmonary hypertension, or systemic sepsis. ECMO has been proven to increase the survival rate for these diseases. This article provides an overview of neonatal ECMO: the history and development of neonatal ECMO, patient selection criteria, clinical management, the ECMO circuit, weaning from ECMO, and possible complications of ECMO.

  3. Short Bowel Syndrome in the Nicu

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sachin C.; Pappas, Cleo; Iyengar, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is the most common cause of intestinal failure in infants. In neonates and young infants, necrotizing enterocolitis, gastroschisis, intestinal atresia and intestinal malrotation/volvulus are the leading causes of SBS. Following an acute post-surgical phase, the residual gastrointestinal tract adapts with reorganization of the crypt-villus histoarchitecture and functional changes in nutrient absorption and motility. A cohesive, multidisciplinary approach can allow most neonates with SBS to transition to full enteral feeds and achieve normal growth and development. In this article, we review the clinical features, management, complications, and prognostic factors in SBS. PMID:23415263

  4. Intermittent kangaroo mother care: a NICU protocol.

    PubMed

    Davanzo, Riccardo; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Travan, Laura; Kennedy, Jacqueline; Crocetta, Anna; Sanesi, Cecilia; Strajn, Tamara; De Cunto, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The practice of kangaroo mother care (KMC) is steadily increasing in high-tech settings due to its proven benefits for both infants and parents. In spite of that, clear guidelines about how to implement this method of care are lacking, and as a consequence, some restrictions are applied in many neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), preventing its practice. Based on recommendations from the Expert Group of the International Network on Kangaroo Mother Care, we developed a hospital protocol in the neonatal unit of the Institute for Maternal and Child Health in Trieste, Italy, a level 3 unit, aimed to facilitate and promote KMC implementation in high-tech settings. Our guideline is therefore proposed, based both on current scientific literature and on practical considerations and experience. Future adjustments and improvements would be considered based on increasing clinical KMC use and further knowledge.

  5. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  6. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy with Severe Elevation of Bile Acids in the Setting of Acute Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, Agatha S.

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a complication of pregnancy resulting in elevation of serum bile acid levels. ICP is often associated with underlying liver disease, including hepatitis C. Bile acids in relationship to the acute infection of hepatitis C virus have not yet been delineated in the literature. A 26-year-old gravida 4 para 2103 with dichorionic, diamniotic twin gestation and history of intravenous drug abuse developed ICP in the setting of acute hepatitis C infection. In addition to clinical symptoms of pruritus and right upper quadrant pain, she developed severe elevation in bile acids, 239 micromol/L, and transaminitis aspartate aminotransferase 1033 U/L, and alanine aminotransferase 448 U/L. She received ursodeoxycholic acid and antenatal testing was performed. Patient delivered vaginally at 33-week gestation following preterm rupture of membranes. Neonates were admitted to NICU and had uncomplicated neonatal courses. In the setting of ICP with significant transaminitis and severe elevation of bile acids, consideration of acute viral hepatitis is important, especially considering the worsening opioid epidemic and concurrent increase in intravenous drug use in the United States. Further study is needed regarding the acute form of HCV infection and its effect on ICP and associated bile acids. PMID:27891271

  7. Family Reconstruction: The Family within-a Group Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satir, Virginia; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents Virginia Satir's Family Reconstruction, a group therapy experience that blends and extends her 1982 process therapy and 1983 conjoint family therapy approaches. Describes the family reconstruction process, the review of family reconstruction data in the pregroup interview, the family reconstruction process in the counseling group, and the…

  8. 75 FR 17946 - Family Report, MTW Family Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Family Report, MTW Family Report AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... understand demographic, family profile, income, and housing information for participants in the Public... Following Information Title of Proposal: Family Report, MTW Family Report. OMB Approval Number:...

  9. Family intervention for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Fiona; Mari, Jair; Rathbone, John; Wong, Winson

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia from families that express high levels of criticism, hostility, or over involvement, have more frequent relapses than people with similar problems from families that tend to be less expressive of emotions. Forms of psychosocial intervention, designed to reduce these levels of expressed emotions within families, are now widely used. Objectives To estimate the effects of family psychosocial interventions in community settings for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like conditions compared with standard care. Search strategy We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (September 2008). Selection criteria We selected randomised or quasi-randomised studies focusing primarily on families of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder that compared community-orientated family-based psychosocial intervention with standard care. Data collection and analysis We independently extracted data and calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for binary data, and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). Main results This 2009-10 update adds 21 additional studies, with a total of 53 randomised controlled trials included. Family intervention may decrease the frequency of relapse (n = 2981, 32 RCTs, RR 0.55 CI 0.5 to 0.6, NNT 7 CI 6 to 8), although some small but negative studies might not have been identified by the search. Family intervention may also reduce hospital admission (n = 481, 8 RCTs, RR 0.78 CI 0.6 to 1.0, NNT 8 CI 6 to 13) and encourage compliance with medication (n = 695, 10 RCTs, RR 0.60 CI 0.5 to 0.7, NNT 6 CI 5 to 9) but it does not obviously affect the tendency of individuals/families to leave care (n = 733, 10 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.0). Family intervention also seems to improve general social impairment and the levels of

  10. [Aristolochic acid nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy is a chronic, fibrosing, interstitial nephritis caused by aristolochic acid (AA), which is a component of the plants of Aristolochiacae family. It was first reported in 1993, in Belgium as a Chinese herb nephropathy, in patients who received a slimming regimen containing AA. The term aristolochic acid nephropathy also includes Balcan endemic nephropathy and other endemic tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Moreover, AA is a human carcinogen which induces urothelial cancer. The AA-containing herbs are banned in many countries and FDA published the warnings concerning the safety of AA-containing botanical remedies in 2000. Regarding the increasing interest in herbal medicines, uncontrolled access to botanical remedies and replacement of one herb by another AA-containing compounds makes thousands of people all around the world at risk of this grave disease.

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of trinuclear chromium(III) basic carboxylate assembly: [Cr3O(salH)7(H2O)2] (salH2=salicylic acid), a new member of [Cr3O] family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jinlong; Liu, Bin; Yang, Binsheng

    2016-07-01

    Synthesizing a novel trinuclear chromium(III) basic carboxylate complex could give rise to new materials with interesting properties. Complex [Cr3O(salH)7(H2O)2] is formed in a one-pot, self-assembly reaction when the inert reaction mixture is exposed to dioxygen. The structural property of the complex has been acquired by single-crystal X-ray crystallography and further characterized by elemental analysis (EA), infrared (IR), UV-Visible (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). X-ray structural analysis shows a slightly distorted equilateral of the Cr triangle. The most important feature of the title complex is the unusual framework of the [Cr3O] family due to a terminal Ph(OH)CO2- ion of Cr(2) center, which is unique among the structurally characterized (μ3-oxo)-trichromium(III) complexes. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility studies indicate that the total spin value of the ground state is 1/2.

  12. Neurotransmitter transporter family including SLC6A6 and SLC6A13 contributes to the 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced accumulation of protoporphyrin IX and photodamage, through uptake of ALA by cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tai Tien; Mu, Anfeng; Adachi, Yuka; Adachi, Yasushi; Taketani, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    δ-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin accumulation is widely used in the treatment of cancer, as photodynamic therapy (PDT). To clarify the mechanisms of ALA uptake by tumor cells, we have examined the ALA-induced accumulation of protoporphyrin by the treatment of colon cancer DLD-1 and epithelial cancer HeLa cells with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related compounds. When the cells were treated with GABA, taurine and β-alanine, the level of protoporphyrin was decreased, suggesting that plasma membrane transporters involved in the transport of neurotransmitters contribute to the uptake of ALA. By transfection with neurotransmitter transporters SLC6A6, SLC6A8 and SLC6A13 cDNA, the ALA- and ALA methylester-dependent accumulation of protoporphyrin markedly increased in HEK293T cells, dependent on an increase in the uptake of ALA. When ALA-treated cells were exposed to white light, the extent of photodamage increased in SLC6A6- and SLC6A13-expressing cells. Conversely, knockdown of SLC6A6 or SLC6A13 with siRNAs in DLD-1 and HeLa cells decreased the ALA-induced accumulation. The expression of SLC6A6 and SLC6A13 was found in some cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the presence of these transporters was elevated in colon cancerous cells. These results indicated that neurotransmitter transporters including SLC6A6 and SLC6A13 mediate the uptake of ALA and can play roles in the enhancement of ALA-induced accumulation of protoporphyrin in cancerous cells.

  13. A family quarrel? "Developmentalism" or family planning.

    PubMed

    Carder, M

    1974-01-01

    The switch in emphasis in population policies from family planning to the development of socioeconomic policies that would encourage smaller families--summed up in the word "developmentalism"--is charted from a 1967 paper by Kinsley Davis to its culmination at the 1974 World Population Conference, when even as staunch a supporter of family planning as John D. Rockefeller came out in support of placing population policy in the context of economic and social development. The real question is, however: To what extent does developmentalism represent a true shift in policy and how much is simply a more sophisticated rhetoric designed to deflect the growing opposition to population control? On the one hand, the endorsement by a man of Rockefeller's stature indicates a significant change. On the other, the changes which the implementation of developmentalism would entail seem irreconcilable with the present political and economic structures of underdeveloped nations and of relations between them and the more developed countries. Further, developmentalism is neither as progressive as its advocates suggest, nor as threatening as its opponents cry. It is, in fact, a prescription for enhancing the effectiveness of family planning through a form of social engineering from the top; its details--more aid, investment, and trade--would involve an expanded Western role in the Third World. It is even suggested that developmentalism might be a cover for the creation of a more stratified society, where marginal members are restricted to their own quarters in an effort to secure political stability and economic growth. In the end, developmentalism might be shortlived, as pressure to step up birth control programs is felt from many quarters.

  14. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family.

  15. Families Get Involved! Learning Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Media and Information Services.

    Noting that families who are involved in their children's education make a difference in their child's performance, this two-page information sheet encourages families to get involved by listing the benefits of family involvement on one side and the ways adult family members can help in the school on the other. As a result of family participation:…

  16. Family Centered Maternity Care

    PubMed Central

    Enkin, Murray W.

    1973-01-01

    Current practices of obstetrical care tend to hinder rather than facilitate family development and maturation. A program of family centred maternity care is described. Husbands are invited to prenatal visits, and are involved in intensive preparation for labor and delivery. Their presence and active participation in labor, delivery, and postpartum course are encouraged. This, along with a rooming-in policy for the baby, and the utilization of the postpartum period for an intensive training in parenthood, appears to produce a safe and satisfying obstetrical experience for the family. PMID:20468914

  17. Medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of family Sterculiaceae: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Muqarrabun, L M R; Ahmat, N

    2015-03-06

    The family Sterculiaceae is one of the most important families among flowering plants. Many of its members demonstrate medicinal properties and have been used for the treatment of various ailments and wounds. A wide range of compounds including alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and other types of compounds including hydrocarbons, sugars, quinones, phenolic acids, lactones, lignans, amine and amides have been isolated from several species in this family. Few studies have reported that some extracts and single compounds isolated from this family exhibited several biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The present review is an effort to provide information about the traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of species from family Sterculiaceae, and to uncover the gaps and potentials requiring further research opportunities regarding the chemistry and pharmacy of this family.

  18. Family Treatment for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FALLOON, IAN R. H.; MCGILL, CHARISTINE W.; MATTHEWS, SUSAN M.; KEITH, SAMUEL J.; SCHOOLER, NINA R.

    1996-01-01

    The NIMH Treatment Strategies in Schizophrenia (TSS) collaborative study group investigated the efficacy of antisychotic drug maintenance strategies involving reduced medication exposure in interaction with applied and supportive family management for the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. Therapy was provided at five centers by 25 clinicians who did not participate in the development of the therapies. They were trained by two of the authors, I.R.H.F and C.W.M, in applied family management, a homebased treatment derived from the behavioral family therapy developed by them. Clinicians’ characteristics, selection, and training methods, as well as patient rehospitalization rates, are reported for the two family management conditions. The TSS study represents a bridge between the development of a novel therapy and its dissemination in general clinical practice. PMID:22700264

  19. The Family Training Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Gwendolyn H.

    1974-01-01

    The author describes a program in which the families of migrant workers were educated, trained, and placed in permanent jobs. This program also provided health, counseling, and child care services. (RWP)

  20. General Dynamics Atlas family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, James

    Developments concerning the Atlas family of launch vehicles over the last three or four years are summarized. Attention is given to the center of gravity, load factors, acoustics, pyroshock, low-frequency sinusoidal vibration, and high-frequency random vibration.

  1. Balancing Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chris

    1991-01-01

    Describes the responses of some companies to increasing demands for family-work balance in terms of flexibility in working hours and leave policies, child care, and fringe benefits. Identifies some of the effects on the "bottom line." (SK)

  2. Familial calcific periarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hajiroussou, V J; Webley, M

    1983-01-01

    A family of 4 is described in which both children had calcific periarthritis affecting the shoulders, and the mother had radiological evidence of periarticular calcification near the left greater trochanter. PMID:6882045

  3. Children and Families: 1984?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1981-01-01

    In order to develop normally, children need emotional involvement and shared activities with one or more adult(s). Public policy in the United States, unlike that of most industrialized societies, is not supportive of family life. (Author/GC)

  4. Family troubles - resources

    MedlinePlus

    The following organizations are good resources for information on child abuse , incest, domestic violence, and family troubles: National Domestic Violence Hotline -- www.thehotline.org Prevent Child Abuse America -- ...

  5. Asbestos: Protect Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Protect Your Family How to Identify Materials That May Contain Asbestos ... Improper removal may actually increase your and your family’s exposure to asbestos fibers. Top of Page Asbestos ...

  6. The changing American family.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A; Freedman, D

    1983-10-01

    This Bulletin documents recent changes in American family patterns resulting both from longterm trends in urbanization, industrialization, and economic growth and the disruption of the Great Depression and World War 2, as well as changed attitudes toward marriage, parenthood, divorce, and the roles of women. Following a postwar boom in the 1950s and 1960s, marriage rates have now fallen to levels observed in the early 20th century. Since 1970, the number of unmarried couples living together has more than tripled to 1.9 million in 1983. The divorce rate has now stabilized after more than doubling since 1960, but at the current level, 1/2 of all recent marriages will end in divorce. Most divorced persons remarry fairly quickly, often creating complex families of "step-relatives." With 19% of households with minor children now headed by a women with no husband present, up to 1/2 of all children will live for sometime in a fatherless family before age 18. Over 1/2 of all married women, including 49% of married mothers of preschool children, now hold a paid job outside the home. Working wives boost a family's income by an average 40% but still are expected to shoulder most responsiblility for home and childcare. White women now in their 20s say they expect to have an average of 2 children, but are delaying childbearing to such an extent that 29% could end up childless. Most of the elderly live on their own but usually near children whom they see frequently. Despite changes in traditional family patterns, Americans consistently report that a happy marriage and good family are the most important aspects of life. And though most Americans now live with few or no family members, they maintain active contact with a large network of family.

  7. Familiality in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Familiality in brain tumors is not definitively substantiated. Methods: We used the Utah Population Data Base (UPDB), a genealogy representing the Utah pioneers and their descendants, record-linked to statewide cancer records, to describe the familial nature of primary brain cancer. We examined the familial clustering of primary brain tumors, including subgroups defined by histologic type and age at diagnosis. The UPDB includes 1,401 primary brain tumor cases defined as astrocytoma or glioblastoma, all with at least three generations of genealogy data. We tested the hypothesis of excess relatedness of brain tumor cases using the Genealogical Index of Familiality method. We estimated relative risks for brain tumors in relatives using rates of brain tumors estimated internally. Results: Significant excess relatedness was observed for astrocytomas and glioblastomas considered as a group (n = 1,401), for astrocytomas considered separately (n = 744), but not for glioblastomas considered separately (n = 658). Significantly increased risks to first- and second-degree relatives for astrocytomas were identified for relatives of astrocytomas considered separately. Significantly increased risks to first-degree relatives, but not second degree, were observed for astrocytoma and glioblastoma cases considered together, and for glioblastoma cases considered separately. Conclusions: This study provides strong evidence for a familial contribution to primary brain cancer risk. There is evidence that this familial aspect includes not only shared environment, but also a heritable component. Extended high-risk brain tumor pedigrees identified in the UPDB may provide the opportunity to identify predisposition genes responsible for familial brain tumors. GLOSSARY GBM = glioblastoma; GIF = Genealogical Index of Familiality; HGG = high-grade gliomas; ICD-O = International Classification of Disease–Oncology; LGG = low-grade gliomas; RR = relative risks; SEER = Surveillance

  8. Swedish Family Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrstrom, Staffan

    1986-01-01

    Family policy remains one of the leading issues of Swedish domestic politics. All parties are agreed that families with children must be given a better deal in the wake of the economic crisis. But how is this to be done and how quickly can it be achieved? Is the expansion of day nursery facilities to be speeded up, or are parents to be given a…

  9. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  10. Welfare Policies and Black Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trader, Harriet Peat

    1979-01-01

    The family is an important resource for minority persons, and many minority families depend on public welfare for their survival. This article offers a compact analysis of how welfare policies often work to the disadvantage of poor Black families. (Author)

  11. Administration for Children and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speeches Videos What is the Administration for Children & Families? The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is ... Visit the Office of Community Services Website The Family Room Blog RSS Feed Building Community, Building Hope: ...

  12. Mandolin Family Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David J.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    The mandolin family of instruments consists of plucked chordophones, each having eight strings in four double courses. With the exception of the mandobass, the courses are tuned in intervals of fifths, as are the strings in violin family instruments. The soprano member of the family is the mandolin, tuned G3-D4-A4-E5. The alto member of the family is the mandola, tuned C3-G3-D4-A4. The mandola is usually referred to simply as the mandola in the USA, but is called the tenor mandola in Europe. The tenor member of the family is the octave mandolin, tuned G2-D3-A3-E4. It is referred to as the octave mandolin in the USA, and as the octave mandola in Europe. The baritone member of the family is the mandocello, or mandoloncello, tuned C2-G2-D3-A3. A variant of the mandocello not common in the USA is the five-course liuto moderno, or simply liuto, designed for solo repertoire. Its courses are tuned C2-G2-D3-A3-E4. A mandobass was also made by more than one manufacturer during the early twentieth century, though none are manufactured today. They were fretted instruments with single string courses tuned E1-A1-D2-G2. There are currently a few luthiers making piccolo mandolins, tuned C4-G4-D5-A5.

  13. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  14. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  15. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  16. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  17. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  18. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  19. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  20. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...