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Sample records for acid o-methyl transferase

  1. Farnesoic acid O-methyl transferase (FAMeT) isoforms: conserved traits and gene expression patterns related to caste differentiation in the stingless bee, Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Carlos U; Bonetti, Ana M; Simões, Zilá L P; Maranhão, Andréa Q; Costa, Christiane S; Costa, Maria Cristina R; Siquieroli, Ana Carolina S; Nunes, Francis M F

    2008-02-01

    Farnesoic acid O-methyl transferase (FAMeT) is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of methyl farnesoate (MF) from farnesoic acid (FA) in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone (JH). This work reports the cloning, sequencing, and expression of FAMeT gene from the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris (MsFAMeT). The MsFAMeT in silico analysis showed that greatest sequence similarity is found in Apis mellifera and other insects, while relatively less similarity is shown in crustaceans. Evidence of alternative splicing of a 27 nucleotide (nt) microexon explains the presence of the detected isoforms, 1 and 2. The expression analysis of the two isoforms showed a marked difference when castes were compared, suggesting that they could be involved differently in the JH metabolism in M. scutellaris, providing new insights for the comprehension of female plasticity.

  2. Catechol-O-methyl Transferase and Expression of Schizophrenia in 73 Adults with 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Anne S.; Caluseriu, Oana; Weksberg, Rosanna; Young, Donald A.; Chow, Eva W.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) is a candidate gene for schizophrenia with a role in dopamine metabolism, particularly in frontal cortex. COMT is within the region commonly deleted in 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a syndrome with high prevalence of schizophrenia. We examined the role of COMT in schizophrenia-related expression in 22q11DS. Methods We genotyped the COMT functional Val158/108Met allele in 73 Caucasian adults with 22q11DS (36 men, 37 women; aged 33.8, SD 10.1 years; 37 Met, 36 Val hemizygosity) blind to clinical data and assessed effects on symptoms and frontal functioning. Results The lower activity Met allele was not significantly more prevalent than the Val allele in 33 subjects with schizophrenia. Excitement symptoms were more severe, however, and three frontal cognitive tests (theory of mind, Trails B, and olfactory identification), communication, and social functioning measures showed significantly worse performance with Met allele hemizygosity, even after accounting for effects of schizophrenia. Conclusions The results suggest that hemizygosity of the COMT functional allele exerts an effect on some measures of frontal functioning in 22q11DS. Elevated levels of tonic dopamine activation associated with the COMT Met allele may underlie these aspects of expression. We must look elsewhere for causes of the high prevalence of schizophrenia in 22q11DS, however. PMID:17217925

  3. 4-O-methylation of glucuronic acid in Arabidopsis glucuronoxylan is catalyzed by a domain of unknown function family 579 protein

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Breeanna R.; Peña, Maria J.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Avci, Utku; Backe, Jason; Steet, Heather F.; Foston, Marcus; Li, Hongjia; O’Neill, Malcolm A.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Darvill, Alan G.; Wyman, Charles; Gilbert, Harry J.; York, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The hemicellulose 4-O-methyl glucuronoxylan is one of the principle components present in the secondary cell walls of eudicotyledonous plants. However, the biochemical mechanisms leading to the formation of this polysaccharide and the effects of modulating its structure on the physical properties of the cell wall are poorly understood. We have identified and functionally characterized an Arabidopsis glucuronoxylan methyltransferase (GXMT) that catalyzes 4-O-methylation of the glucuronic acid substituents of this polysaccharide. AtGXMT1, which was previously classified as a domain of unknown function (DUF) 579 protein, specifically transfers the methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to O-4 of α-d-glucopyranosyluronic acid residues that are linked to O-2 of the xylan backbone. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme indicates that GXMT1 is localized in the Golgi apparatus and requires Co2+ for optimal activity in vitro. Plants lacking GXMT1 synthesize glucuronoxylan in which the degree of 4-O-methylation is reduced by 75%. This result is correlated to a change in lignin monomer composition and an increase in glucuronoxylan release during hydrothermal treatment of secondary cell walls. We propose that the DUF579 proteins constitute a previously undescribed family of cation-dependent, polysaccharide-specific O-methyl-transferases. This knowledge provides new opportunities to selectively manipulate polysaccharide O-methylation and extends the portfolio of structural targets that can be modified either alone or in combination to modulate biopolymer interactions in the plant cell wall. PMID:22893684

  4. Aerobic Copper-Catalyzed O-Methylation with Methylboronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Clare E; Martinez-Muñoz, Noelia; Gorin, David J

    2015-07-17

    The oxidative coupling of alkylboronic acids with oxygen nucleophiles offers a strategy for replacing toxic, electrophilic alkylating reagents. Although the Chan-Lam reaction has been widely applied in the arylation of heteroatom nucleophiles, O-alkylation with boronic acids is rare. We report a Cu-catalyzed nondecarboxylative methylation of carboxylic acids with methylboronic acid that proceeds in air with no additional oxidant. An isotope-labeling study supports an oxidative cross-coupling mechanism, in analogy to that proposed for Chan-Lam arylation. PMID:26111825

  5. Studies in vitro on the involvement of O-sulphate esters in the formation of O-methylated 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid by rat liver.

    PubMed

    Pennings, E J; Van Kempen, G M

    1981-03-01

    The involvement of O-sulphate esters in the directed O-methylation was investigated in vitro with a dialysed "high-speed' supernatant from rat liver as the enzyme preparation and the catechol compound 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the substrate. The enzyme reactions involved were studied separately with the O-methylated and O-sulphated derivatives. The rate of hydrolysis by arylsulphatase was 14.5 nmol/min per mg of protein for 3-methoxy-4-sulphonyloxybenzoic acid and 10.1 nmol/min per mg of protein for 4-methoxy-3-sulphonyloxybenzoic acid. The sulphotransferase activity towards the guaiacols 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid and 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid was 570pmol of 4-O-sulphated and 350pmol of 3-O-sulphated product formed/min per mg of protein. The 3-O- and 4-O-sulphate esters of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid could not serve as substrates for the catechol O-methyltransferase reaction. When either ester was incubated in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine, but without the arylsulphatase inhibitor KH2PO4, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid was formed, which was subsequently O-methylated in a meta/para ratio of 4.6. It is concluded that O-methylation can precede O-sulphation but that O-sulphation prevents further metabolism by O-methylation. Also O-sulphate esters do not have a directing effect on O-methylation. From the study of the simultaneous action of sulphotransferase and catechol O-methyltransferase on 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid we conclude that O-sulphation and O-methylation proceed independently of each other under the assay conditions used, both directed preferentially to the 3-hydroxy group.

  6. Inhibition of catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) by tolcapone restores reductions in microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) following exposure of neuronal cells to neurotropic HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting Ting; Chana, Gursharan; Gorry, Paul R; Ellett, Anne; Bousman, Chad A; Churchill, Melissa J; Gray, Lachlan R; Everall, Ian P

    2015-10-01

    This investigation aimed to assess whether inhibition of cathecol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) by tolcapone could provide neuroprotection against HIV-associated neurodegenerative effects. This study was conducted based on a previous work, which showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 158 (val158met) in COMT, resulted in 40 % lower COMT activity. Importantly, this reduction confers a protective effect against HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which have been linked to HIV-associated brain changes. SH-SY5Y-differentiated neurons were exposed to macrophage-propagated HIV (neurotropic MACS2-Br strain) in the presence or absence of tolcapone for 6 days. RNA was extracted, and qPCR was performed using Qiagen RT2 custom array consisting of genes for neuronal and synaptic integrity, COMT and pro-inflammatory markers. Immunofluorescence was conducted to validate the gene expression changes at the protein level. Our findings demonstrated that HIV significantly increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of COMT while reducing the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) (p = 0.0015) and synaptophysin (SYP) (p = 0.012) compared to control. A concomitant exposure of tolcapone ameliorated the perturbed expression of MAP2 (p = 0.009) and COMT (p = 0.024) associated with HIV. Immunofluorescence revealed a trend reduction of SYP and MAP2 with exposure to HIV and that concomitant exposure of tolcapone increased SYP (p = 0.016) compared to HIV alone. Our findings demonstrated in vitro that inhibition of COMT can ameliorate HIV-associated neurodegenerative changes that resulted in the decreased expression of the structural and synaptic components MAP2 and SYP. As HIV-associated dendritic and synaptic damage are contributors to HAND, inhibition of COMT may represent a potential strategy for attenuating or preventing some of the symptoms of HAND.

  7. Methyl-3-O-methyl gallate and gallic acid from the leaves of Peltiphyllum peltatum: isolation and comparative antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic effects in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, Solomon

    2011-11-01

    Methyl-3-O-methyl gallate (M3MG) is a rare natural product with close structural similarity to gallic acid. In the present report, the isolation of M3MG from Peltiphyllum peltatum leaves and its comparative antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxicity to neuronal SH-SY5Y cells are discussed. When tested in concentrations up to 1 mM, M3MG consistently showed antioxidant activity without prooxidant effect both in cell and cell-free assay models. In contrast to M3MG, gallic acid showed a copper-dependent prooxidant effect that resulted in DNA damage, increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. The identification of M3MG in P. peltatum leaves is furtherz evidence of the great antioxidant potential and nutritional value of the plant.

  8. Experimental and theoretical studies on the inclusion complexation of syringic acid with alpha-, beta-, gamma- and heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Song, Le Xin; Wang, Hai Ming; Xu, Peng; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Zi Qiang

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) with syringic acid (Syr) in aqueous solution are investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence intensity of Syr gradually increases with the addition of the CDs. The formation constants (K) of the host-guest inclusion complexes are determined using a nonlinear analysis. The association abilities of Syr with the CDs decrease in the order gamma->beta->alpha- approximately DMbeta-CD. Both the intrinsic binding abilities of the CDs and the structural effect of Syr are taken into consideration when comparing the K values. Based on the results of NMR experimental and theoretical PM3 calculations both in vacuo and in water, it is found that Syr stays near the wider rim of alpha-CD cavity. Both the number of substituted groups (NSG) in a guest and the molar volume ratio of the guest to host cavity (MVR) play an important role in forming the CD supramolecular complexes of a homologous series of phenol derivatives, such as 2-methoxylphenol (2-Mop), eugenol (Eug) and Syr, i.e., an appropriate NSG or MVR in an inclusion system, such as in 2-Mop-alpha-CD, Eug-beta-CD and Syr-gamma-CD systems, can maximize the intermolecular interaction between host and guest.

  9. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  10. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  11. Rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivatives as inhibitors of fungal protein mannosyl transferase 1 (PMT1).

    PubMed

    Orchard, Michael G; Neuss, Judi C; Galley, Carl M S; Carr, Andrew; Porter, David W; Smith, Phillip; Scopes, David I C; Haydon, David; Vousden, Katherine; Stubberfield, Colin R; Young, Kate; Page, Martin

    2004-08-01

    The first inhibitors of fungal protein: mannosyl transferase 1 (PMT1) are described. They are based upon rhodanine-3-acetic acid and several compounds have been identified, for example, 5-[[3-(1-phenylethoxy)-4-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]methylene]-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-thiazolidineacetic acid (5a), which inhibit Candida albicans PMT1 with IC(50)s in the range 0.2-0.5 microM. Members of the series are effective in inducing changes in morphology of C. albicans in vitro that have previously been associated with loss of the transferase activity. These compounds could serve as useful tools for studying the effects of protein O-mannosylation and its relevance in the search for novel antifungal agents. PMID:15225710

  12. Potent and sustained cellular inhibition of miR-122 by lysine-derivatized peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorothioate locked nucleic acid (LNA)/2'-O-methyl (OMe) mixmer anti-miRs in the absence of transfection agents

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adrian G.; Threlfall, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient cell delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) is a key issue for their potential therapeutic use. It has been shown recently that some ONs can be delivered into cells without the use of transfection agents (gymnosis), but this generally requires cell incubation over several days and high amounts of ONs (micromolar concentrations). Here we have targeted microRNA 122 (miR-122), a small non-coding RNA involved in regulation of lipid metabolism and in the replication of hepatitis C virus, with ONs of different chemistries (anti-miRs) by gymnotic delivery in cell culture. Using a sensitive dual-luciferase reporter assay, anti-miRs were screened for their ability to enter liver cells gymnotically and inhibit miR-122 activity. Efficient miR-122 inhibition was obtained with cationic PNAs and 2'-O-methyl (OMe) and Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA)/OMe mixmers containing either phosphodiester (PO) or phosphorothioate (PS) linkages at sub-micromolar concentrations when incubated with cells for just 4 hours. Furthermore, PNA and PS-containing anti-miRs were able to sustain miR-122 inhibitory effects for at least 4 days. LNA/OMe PS anti-miRs were the most potent anti-miR chemistry tested in this study, an ON chemistry that has been little exploited so far as anti-miR agents towards therapeutics. PMID:22567190

  13. Properties of a Maize Glutathione S-Transferase That Conjugates Coumaric Acid and Other Phenylpropanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, J. V.; Devarenne, T. P.; Lee, I. S.; Orlofsky, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    A glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme from corn (Zea mays L. Pioneer hybrid 3906) that is active with p-coumaric acid and other unsaturated phenylpropanoids was purified approximately 97-fold and characterized. The native enzyme appeared to be a monomer with a molecular mass of approximately 30 kD and an apparent isoelectric point at pH 5.2. The enzyme had a pH optimum between 7.5 and 8.0 and apparent Km values of 4.4 and 1.9 mM for reduced glutathione (GSH) and p-coumaric acid, respectively. In addition to p-coumaric acid, the enzyme was also active with o-coumaric acid, m-coumaric acid, trans-cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, and coniferyl alcohol. In addition to GSH, the enzyme could also utilize cysteine as a sulfhydryl source. The enzyme activity measured when GSH and trans-cinnamic acid were used as substrates was enhanced 2.6- and 5.2-fold by the addition of 50 [mu]M p-coumaric acid and 7-hydroxycoumarin, respectively. 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of the conjugate revealed that the enzyme catalyzed the addition of GSH to the olefinic double bond of p-coumaric acid. Based on the high activity and the substrate specificity of this enzyme, it is possible that this enzyme may be involved in the in vivo conjugation of a number of unsaturated phenylpropanoids. PMID:12228522

  14. Identification and characterization of two bile acid coenzyme A transferases from Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    The human bile acid pool composition is composed of both primary bile acids (cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid). Secondary bile acids are formed by the 7α-dehydroxylation of primary bile acids carried out by intestinal anaerobic bacteria. We have previously described a multistep biochemical pathway in Clostridium scindens that is responsible for bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. We have identified a large (12 kb) bile acid inducible (bai) operon in this bacterium that encodes eight genes involved in bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. However, the function of the baiF gene product in this operon has not been elucidated. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the baiF gene in E. coli and discovered it has bile acid CoA transferase activity. In addition, we discovered a second bai operon encoding three genes. The baiK gene in this operon was expressed in E. coli and found to encode a second bile acid CoA transferase. Both bile acid CoA transferases were determined to be members of the type III family by amino acid sequence comparisons. Both bile acid CoA transferases had broad substrate specificity, except the baiK gene product, which failed to use lithocholyl-CoA as a CoA donor. Primary bile acids are ligated to CoA via an ATP-dependent mechanism during the initial steps of 7α-dehydroxylation. The bile acid CoA transferases conserve the thioester bond energy, saving the cell ATP molecules during bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. ATP-dependent CoA ligation is likely quickly supplanted by ATP-independent CoA transfer. PMID:22021638

  15. Coenzyme A transferase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and its role in the uptake of acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenborn, D.P.; Rudolph, F.B.; Papoutsakis, E.T. )

    1989-02-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) transferase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified 81-fold to homogeneity. This enzyme was stable in the presence of 0.5 M ammonium sulfate and 20% (vol/vol) glycerol, whereas activity was rapidly lost in the absence of these stabilizers. The kinetic binding mechanism was Ping Pong Bi Bi, and the K{sub m} values at pH 7.5 and 30{degree}C for acetate, propionate, and butyrate were, respectively, 1,200, 1,000, and 660 mM, while the K{sub m} value for acetoacetyl-CoA ranged from about 7 to 56{mu}M, depending on the acid substrate. The K{sub m} values for butyrate and acetate were high relative to the intracellular concentrations of these species; consequently, in vivo enzyme activity is expected to be sensitive to changes in those concentrations. In addition to the carboxylic acids listed above, this CoA transferase was able to convert valerate, isobutyrate, and crotonate; however, the conversion of formate, n-caproate, and isovalerate was not detected. The acetate and butyrate conversion reactions in vitro were inhibited by physiological levels of acetone and butanol, and this may be another factor in the in vivo regulation of enzyme activity. The optimum pH of acetate conversion was broad, with at least 80% of maximal activity from pH 5.9 to greater than 7.8. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer with subunit molecular weights of about 23,000 and 25,000.

  16. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  17. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  18. Inhibitory effects of catechin gallates on o-methyltranslation of protocatechuic acid in rat liver cytosolic preparations and cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Masaaki; Ootani, Emi; Sugihara, Narumi; Furuno, Koji

    2005-08-01

    Flavonoids including tea catechins and gallic acid esters were characterized for their ability to inhibit o-methyltranslation of protocatechuic acid (PCA) to form vanillic acid (VA) in rat liver cytosolic preparations and cultured hepatocytes. Flavonols and flavones exhibited different behaviors in inhibiting the formation of VA between the cell-free enzymatic preparations and the intact cells. The underlying mechanism of the inhibitory effects of flavonols and flavones on PCA o-methylation in cultured hepatocytes may not be due to the inhibition of the enzyme activity of catechol o-methyl transferase (COMT). Catechin gallates inhibited PCA o-methylation in liver cytosolic preparations with markedly higher potency than other flavonoids. As compared with catechin gallates, ungallated catechins had two to three orders of magnitude lower efficiency in inhibiting cytosolic PCA o-methylation. Gallic acid esters inhibited cytosolic PCA o-methylation with strong potency almost equal to that of catechin gallates. These results suggest that the COMT-inhibitory activity of catechin gallates is derived from the presence of the galloyl moiety at the C3 position in the C-ring. Catechin gallates and gallic acid esters inhibited PCA o-methylation in cultured hepatocytes with two orders of magnitude lower efficacy than that in cytosolic preparations. The inhibitory effects of catechin gallates and gallic acid esters on cellular PCA o-methylation appear to be due to the direct inhibition of COMT activity.

  19. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  20. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells.

  1. Induction of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and fatty acid oxidation by retinoic acid in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Amengual, Jaume; Petrov, Petar; Bonet, M Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2012-11-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) is an important regulator of mammalian adiposity and lipid metabolism, primarily acting at the gene expression level through nuclear receptors of the RA receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamilies. Here, we studied cell-autonomous effects of RA on fatty acid metabolism, particularly fatty acid oxidation, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Exposure to all-trans RA (ATRA) up-regulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT1-L) in HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and increased cellular oxidation rate of exogenously added radiolabeled palmitate. The effect of ATRA on gene expression of CPT1-L was: dependent on ongoing transcription, reproduced by both 9-cis RA and a pan-RXR agonist (but not a pan-RAR agonist) and abolished following RXRα partial siRNA-mediated silencing. CPT1-L gene expression was synergistically induced in HepG2 cells simultaneously exposed to ATRA and a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist. We conclude that ATRA treatment enhances fatty acid catabolism in hepatocytes through RXR-mediated mechanisms that likely involve the transactivation of the PPARα:RXR heterodimer. Knowledge of agents and nutrient-derivatives capable of enhancing substrate oxidation systemically and specifically in liver, and their mechanisms of action, may contribute to new avenues of prevention and treatment of fatty liver, obesity and other metabolic syndrome-related disorders. PMID:22871568

  2. A phosphopantetheinyl transferase that is essential for mitochondrial fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Chen, Hui; Abramson, Alex; Man, Huimin; Wu, Jinxia; Yu, Oliver; Nikolau, Basil J

    2015-11-01

    In this study we report the molecular genetic characterization of the Arabidopsis mitochondrial phosphopantetheinyl transferase (mtPPT), which catalyzes the phosphopantetheinylation and thus activation of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (mtACP) of mitochondrial fatty acid synthase (mtFAS). This catalytic capability of the purified mtPPT protein (encoded by AT3G11470) was directly demonstrated in an in vitro assay that phosphopantetheinylated mature Arabidopsis apo-mtACP isoforms. The mitochondrial localization of the AT3G11470-encoded proteins was validated by the ability of their N-terminal 80-residue leader sequence to guide a chimeric GFP protein to this organelle. A T-DNA-tagged null mutant mtppt-1 allele shows an embryo-lethal phenotype, illustrating a crucial role of mtPPT for embryogenesis. Arabidopsis RNAi transgenic lines with reduced mtPPT expression display typical phenotypes associated with a deficiency in the mtFAS system, namely miniaturized plant morphology, slow growth, reduced lipoylation of mitochondrial proteins, and the hyperaccumulation of photorespiratory intermediates, glycine and glycolate. These morphological and metabolic alterations are reversed when these plants are grown in a non-photorespiratory condition (i.e. 1% CO2 atmosphere), demonstrating that they are a consequence of a deficiency in photorespiration due to the reduced lipoylation of the photorespiratory glycine decarboxylase. PMID:26402847

  3. Inclusion compounds of plant growth regulators in cyclodextrins. V. 4-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid encapsulated in beta-cyclodextrin and heptakis(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Tsorteki, Frantzeska; Bethanis, Kostas; Pinotsis, Nikos; Giastas, Petros; Mentzafos, Dimitris

    2005-04-01

    The crystal structures of 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4CPA) included in beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and heptakis(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (TMbetaCD) have been studied by X-ray diffraction. The 4CPA/beta-CD complex crystallizes as a head-to-head dimer in the space group C2 in the Tetrad packing mode. The packing modes of some beta-CD dimeric complexes, having unique stackings, are also discussed. The 4CPA/TMbetaCD inclusion complex crystallizes in the space group P2(1) and its asymmetric unit contains two crystallographically independent complexes, complex A and complex B, exhibiting different conformations. The host molecule of complex A is significantly distorted, as a glucosidic residue rotated about the O4'-C1 and C4-O4 bonds forms an aperture where the guest molecule is accommodated. The phenyl moiety of the guest molecule of complex B is nearly perpendicular to the mean plane of the O4n atoms. The conformations of the guest molecules of the two complexes are similar. The crystal packing consists of antiparallel columns as in the majority of the TMbetaCD complexes published so far.

  4. 2'-O-Methyl- and 2'-O-propargyl-5-methylisocytidine: synthesis, properties and impact on the isoCd-dG and the isoCd-isoGd base pairing in nucleic acids with parallel and antiparallel strand orientation.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sunit K; Leonard, Peter; Ingale, Sachin A; Seela, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-methylated 5-methylisocytidine (3) and 2'-O-propargyl-5-methylisocytidine (4) as well as the non-functionalized 5-methyl-2'-deoxyisocytidine (1b) were synthesized. MALDI-TOF mass spectra of oligonucleotides containing 1b are susceptible to a stepwise depyrimidination. In contrast, oligonucleotides incorporating 2'-O-alkylated nucleosides 3 and 4 are stable. This is supported by acid catalyzed hydrolysis experiments performed on nucleosides in solution. 2'-O-Alkylated nucleoside 3 was synthesized from 2'-O-5-dimethyluridine via tosylation, anhydro nucleoside formation and ring opening. The corresponding 4 was obtained by direct regioselective alkylation of 5-methylisocytidine (1d) with propargyl bromide under phase-transfer conditions. Both compounds were converted to phosphoramidites and employed in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Hybridization experiments resulted in duplexes with antiparallel or parallel chains. In parallel duplexes, methylation or propargylation of the 2'-hydroxyl group of isocytidine leads to destabilization while in antiparallel DNA this effect is less pronounced. 2'-O-Propargylated 4 was used to cross-link nucleosides and oligonucleotides to homodimers by a stepwise click ligation with a bifunctional azide. PMID:27221215

  5. Participation of analogues of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA): oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (L-alpha-LPA) and 1-oleoyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerophosphothionate (OMPT) in uterine smooth muscle contractility of the pregnant pigs.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, W; Kamińska, K; Bogacki, M; Maślanka, T; Jaroszewski, J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies show that a representative of phospholipids, namely lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPA1.3) play a significant role in the reproductive processes, i. a, in the modulation of the uterine contractility. The participation of LPA3 in the reproductive processes has been revealed in mice and has not been studied in gilts. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the role/action of LPA and its receptors LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 on the contraction activity in the porcine uterus. The study was conducted on an experimental model in which the pig uterus consisted of the one whole uterine horn and a part of the second horn, both connected with the uterine corpus. Uterine strips consisting of the endometrium with the myometrium (ENDO/MYO) and myometrium (MYO) alone were collected on days 12-14 of the estrous cycle (control group; n = 5) or pregnancy (experimental group; n = 5). Two analogues of LPA at increasing doses were used: oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (L-alpha-LPA, a selective agonist of LPA1 and LPA2 receptors; 10(-7) M; 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M) and 1-oleoyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerophosphothionate (OMPT, a selective agonist of LPA3 receptor; 68 nM; 136 nM and 680 nM). L-alpha-LPA caused an increase in the contraction tension, amplitude and frequency of ENDO/MYO from the uterine horn with the developing embryos. This effect was not observed in MYO in both groups examined. In the ENDO/MYO strips of the uterine horn with developing embryos, OMPT significantly increased the contraction tension at the highest dose (680 nM) and amplitude at all doses examined, while frequency of contractions was decreased at doses of 136 nM and 680 nM. In the MYO strips of the uterine horn with embryos a significant increase in the contraction tension and amplitude after the highest dose of OMPT was observed. The results obtained imply the important role of receptors LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 in the contraction activity of the porcine uterus during early pregnancy. PMID

  6. Participation of analogues of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA): oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (L-alpha-LPA) and 1-oleoyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerophosphothionate (OMPT) in uterine smooth muscle contractility of the pregnant pigs.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, W; Kamińska, K; Bogacki, M; Maślanka, T; Jaroszewski, J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies show that a representative of phospholipids, namely lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPA1.3) play a significant role in the reproductive processes, i. a, in the modulation of the uterine contractility. The participation of LPA3 in the reproductive processes has been revealed in mice and has not been studied in gilts. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the role/action of LPA and its receptors LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 on the contraction activity in the porcine uterus. The study was conducted on an experimental model in which the pig uterus consisted of the one whole uterine horn and a part of the second horn, both connected with the uterine corpus. Uterine strips consisting of the endometrium with the myometrium (ENDO/MYO) and myometrium (MYO) alone were collected on days 12-14 of the estrous cycle (control group; n = 5) or pregnancy (experimental group; n = 5). Two analogues of LPA at increasing doses were used: oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (L-alpha-LPA, a selective agonist of LPA1 and LPA2 receptors; 10(-7) M; 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M) and 1-oleoyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerophosphothionate (OMPT, a selective agonist of LPA3 receptor; 68 nM; 136 nM and 680 nM). L-alpha-LPA caused an increase in the contraction tension, amplitude and frequency of ENDO/MYO from the uterine horn with the developing embryos. This effect was not observed in MYO in both groups examined. In the ENDO/MYO strips of the uterine horn with developing embryos, OMPT significantly increased the contraction tension at the highest dose (680 nM) and amplitude at all doses examined, while frequency of contractions was decreased at doses of 136 nM and 680 nM. In the MYO strips of the uterine horn with embryos a significant increase in the contraction tension and amplitude after the highest dose of OMPT was observed. The results obtained imply the important role of receptors LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 in the contraction activity of the porcine uterus during early pregnancy.

  7. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  8. The molecular basis for the post-translational addition of amino acids by L/F transferase in the N-end rule pathway.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai S; Fahlman, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a conserved targeted proteolytic process observed in organisms ranging from eubacteria to mammals. The N-end rule relates the metabolic stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid residue. The identity of the N-terminal amino acid residue is a primary degradation signal, often referred to as an N-degron, which is recognized by the components of the N-end rule when it is a destabilizing N-terminus. N-degrons may be exposed by non-processive proteolytic cleavages or by post-translational modifications. One modification is the post-translational addition of amino acids to the N-termini of proteins, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases. The aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase in eubacteria like Escherichia coli is L/F transferase. Recent investigations have reported unexpected observations regarding the L/F transferase catalytic mechanism and its mechanisms of substrate recognition. Additionally, recent proteome-wide identification of putative in vivo substrates facilitates hypothesis into the yet elusive biological functions of the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. Here we summarize the recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of catalysis and substrate recognition by the E. coli L/F transferase in the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway.

  9. Enzymatic aryl-O-methyl-/sup 14/C labeling of model lignin monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, A.C.; Bossert, I.; Young, L.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Aryl-O-methyl ethers are abundant in aerobic and anaerobic environments. In particular, lignin is composed of units of this type. Lignin monomers specifically radiolabeled in methoxy, side chain, and ring carbons have been synthesized by chemical procedures and are important in studies of lignin synthesis and degradation, humus formation, and microbial O-demethylation. In this paper attention is drawn to an enzymatic procedure for preparing O-methyl-/sup 14/C-labeled aromatic lignin monomers which has not previously been exploited in microbial ecology and physiology studies and which has several advantages compared with chemical synthesis procedures. O-(methyl-/sup 14/C)vanillic and O-(methyl-/sup 14/C)ferulic acids were prepared with S-(methyl-/sup 14/C)adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor, using commercially obtained porcine liver catechol-O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.6). The specific activity of the methylated products was the same as that of the methyl donor, a maximum of about 58 ..mu..Ci/..mu..mol, and the yields were 42% (vanillate) and 35% (ferulate). Thus lignin monomers are readily prepared as O-methylated products of the catechol-O-methyltransferase reaction and, with this enzyme method of preparation, would be more widely available than labeled compounds which require chemical synthesis.

  10. Regiocomplementary O-Methylation of Catechols by Using Three-Enzyme Cascades.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Jutta; Aschwanden, Simon; Mordhorst, Silja; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael; Andexer, Jennifer N

    2015-12-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent enzymes have great potential for selective alkylation processes. In this study we investigated the regiocomplementary O-methylation of catechols. Enzymatic methylation is often hampered by the need for a stoichiometric supply of SAM and the inhibitory effect of the SAM-derived byproduct on most methyltransferases. To counteract these issues we set up an enzyme cascade. Firstly, SAM was generated from l-methionine and ATP by use of an archaeal methionine adenosyltransferase. Secondly, 4-O-methylation of the substrates dopamine and dihydrocaffeic acid was achieved by use of SafC from the saframycin biosynthesis pathway in 40-70 % yield and high selectivity. The regiocomplementary 3-O-methylation was catalysed by catechol O-methyltransferase from rat. Thirdly, the beneficial influence of a nucleosidase on the overall conversion was demonstrated. The results of this study are important milestones on the pathway to catalytic SAM-dependent alkylation processes.

  11. Regiocomplementary O-Methylation of Catechols by Using Three-Enzyme Cascades.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Jutta; Aschwanden, Simon; Mordhorst, Silja; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael; Andexer, Jennifer N

    2015-12-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent enzymes have great potential for selective alkylation processes. In this study we investigated the regiocomplementary O-methylation of catechols. Enzymatic methylation is often hampered by the need for a stoichiometric supply of SAM and the inhibitory effect of the SAM-derived byproduct on most methyltransferases. To counteract these issues we set up an enzyme cascade. Firstly, SAM was generated from l-methionine and ATP by use of an archaeal methionine adenosyltransferase. Secondly, 4-O-methylation of the substrates dopamine and dihydrocaffeic acid was achieved by use of SafC from the saframycin biosynthesis pathway in 40-70 % yield and high selectivity. The regiocomplementary 3-O-methylation was catalysed by catechol O-methyltransferase from rat. Thirdly, the beneficial influence of a nucleosidase on the overall conversion was demonstrated. The results of this study are important milestones on the pathway to catalytic SAM-dependent alkylation processes. PMID:26437744

  12. Separation of catechins and O-methylated (-)-epigallocatechin gallate using polyamide thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunbo; Chen, Qincao; Lin, Yong; Yu, Shuangshang; Lin, Haiyan; Huang, Jianan; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-04-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) method for the separation and quantitative determination of seven related compounds: (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl) gallate (EGCG3″Me) and (-)-epigallocatechin- 3-O-(4-O-methyl) gallate (EGCG4″Me) has been developed. The above-mentioned seven compounds have been resolved using polyamide TLC plates using a double-development with methanol followed by acetone/acetic acid (2:1, v/v). In addition, separation of the phenolic acids namely gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid was achieved using the same solvent system. The applicability of the method was checked by screening of extracts of green, black, oolong, white tea and tea cultivars leaves. PMID:26990737

  13. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with RNA interference against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Powell, Charles A; Shatters, Robert G; Borovsky, Dov

    2014-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pivotal role in the control of reproduction in adults and metamorphism in larval mosquitoes. This report describes an approach to control Aedes aegypti using RNAi against JH acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of JH III that converts JH acid III (JHA III) into JH III. In female A. aegypti that were injected or fed jmtA dsRNA targeting the AeaJHAMT gene (jmtA) transcript, egg development was inhibited in 50% of the treated females. In mosquito larvae that were fed transgenic Pichia pastoris cells expressing long hair pin (LHP) RNA, adult eclosion was delayed by 3 weeks causing high mortality. Northern blot analyses and qPCR studies show that jmtA dsRNA causes inhibition of jmtA transcript in adults and larvae, which is consistent with the observed inhibition of egg maturation and larval development. Taken together, these results suggest that jmtA LHP RNA expressed in heat inactivated genetically modified P. pastoris cells could be used to control mosquito populations in the marsh.

  14. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with RNA interference against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Powell, Charles A; Shatters, Robert G; Borovsky, Dov

    2014-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pivotal role in the control of reproduction in adults and metamorphism in larval mosquitoes. This report describes an approach to control Aedes aegypti using RNAi against JH acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of JH III that converts JH acid III (JHA III) into JH III. In female A. aegypti that were injected or fed jmtA dsRNA targeting the AeaJHAMT gene (jmtA) transcript, egg development was inhibited in 50% of the treated females. In mosquito larvae that were fed transgenic Pichia pastoris cells expressing long hair pin (LHP) RNA, adult eclosion was delayed by 3 weeks causing high mortality. Northern blot analyses and qPCR studies show that jmtA dsRNA causes inhibition of jmtA transcript in adults and larvae, which is consistent with the observed inhibition of egg maturation and larval development. Taken together, these results suggest that jmtA LHP RNA expressed in heat inactivated genetically modified P. pastoris cells could be used to control mosquito populations in the marsh. PMID:25111689

  15. A selective de-O-methylation of guaiacyl lignans to corresponding catechol derivatives by 2-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX). The role of the catechol moiety on the toxicity of lignans.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Roberta; Barontini, Maurizio; Mosesso, Pasquale; Pepe, Gaetano; Willför, Stefan M; Sjöholm, Rainer E; Eklund, Patrik C; Saladino, Raffaele

    2009-06-01

    We report here the first selective de-O-methylation of a large panel of guaiacyl lignans to the corresponding catechol derivatives by using IBX as primary oxidant under green conditions (dimethyl carbonate-H(2)O solvent) through an in situ reduction procedure. The influence of the catechol moiety on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of new lignan derivatives has been investigated. The results obtained indicated that the presence of the catechol moiety sharply enhances the clastogenic potential (e.g. induction of chromosomal aberrations), the cytotoxicity and the modulation of cell cycle progression with respect to the parent compounds. Thus, despite the in vitro antioxidant activity usually described for catechol derivatives, our results show for the first time the generation of a clastogenic potential, highly indicative of a long-term genetic and cancer risk.

  16. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase activity and accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Many plants accumulate hydroxycinnamoyl esters to protect against abiotic and biotic stresses. Caffeoyl esters in particular can be substrates for endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Recently, we showed that perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) leaves contain PPO and identified one PPO substrate, caftaric acid (trans-caffeoyl-tartaric acid). Additional compounds were believed to be cis- and trans-p-coumaroyl tartaric acid and cis- and trans-feruloyl-tartaric acid, but lack of standards prevented definitive identifications. Here we characterize enzymatic activities in peanut leaves to understand how caftaric acid and related hydroxycinnamoyl esters are made in this species. We show that peanut leaves contain a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tartaric acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HTT) activity capable of transferring p-coumaroyl, caffeoyl, and feruloyl moieties from CoA to tartaric acid (specific activities of 11 ± 2.8, 8 ± 1.8, 4 ± 0.8 pkat mg(-1) crude protein, respectively). The HTT activity was used to make cis- and trans-p-coumaroyl- and -feruloyl-tartaric acid in vitro. These products allowed definitive identification of the corresponding cis- and trans-hydroxycinnamoyl esters extracted from leaves. We tentatively identified sinapoyl-tartaric acid as another major phenolic compound in peanut leaves that likely participates in secondary reactions with PPO-generated quinones. These results suggest hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters are made by an acyltransferase, possibly a BAHD family member, in perennial peanut. Identification of a gene encoding HTT and further characterization of the enzyme will aid in identifying determinants of donor and acceptor substrate specificity for this important class of biosynthetic enzymes. An HTT gene could also provide a means by genetic engineering for producing caffeoyl- and other hydroxycinnamoyl-tartaric acid esters in forage crops that lack them.

  17. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces gene promoter hypermethylation of glutathione-S-transferase Pi in human liver L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meiping; Peng, Siyuan; Martin, Francis L; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Wang, Zhanlin; Dong, Sijun; Shen, Heqing

    2012-06-14

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is one of the most commonly used perfluorinated compounds. Being a persistent environmental pollutant, it can accumulate in human tissues via various exposure routes. PFOA may interfere in a toxic fashion on the immune system, liver, development, and endocrine systems. In utero human exposure had been associated with cord serum global DNA hypomethylation. In light of this, we investigated possible PFOA-induced DNA methylation alterations in L02 cells in order to shed light into its epigenetic-mediated mechanisms of toxicity in human liver. L02 cells were exposed to 5, 10, 25, 50 or 100 mg/L PFOA for 72h. Global DNA methylation levels were determined by LC/ESI-MS, glutathione-S-transferase Pi (GSTP) gene promoter DNA methylation was investigated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with bisulfite sequencing, and consequent mRNA expression levels were measured with quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. A dose-related increase of GSTP promoter methylation at the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding site was observed. However, PFOA did not significantly influence global DNA methylation; nor did it markedly alter the promoter gene methylation of p16 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A), ERα (estrogen receptor α) or PRB (progesterone receptor B). In addition, PFOA significantly elevated mRNA transcript levels of DNMT3A (which mediates de novo DNA methylation), Acox (lipid metabolism) and p16 (cell apoptosis). Considering the role of GSTP in detoxification, aberrant methylation may be pivotal in PFOA-mediated toxicity response via the inhibition of SP1 binding to GSTP promoter. PMID:22425687

  18. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pi...

  19. WaaA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is a monofunctional 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid transferase involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mamat, Uwe; Schmidt, Helgo; Munoz, Eva; Lindner, Buko; Fukase, Koichi; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Wu, Jing; Meredith, Timothy C; Woodard, Ronald W; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Mesters, Jeroen R; Holst, Otto

    2009-08-14

    The hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus belongs to the deepest branch in the bacterial genealogy. Although it has long been recognized that this unique Gram-negative bacterium carries genes for different steps of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation, data on the LPS itself or detailed knowledge of the LPS pathway beyond the first committed steps of lipid A and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) synthesis are still lacking. We now report the functional characterization of the thermostable Kdo transferase WaaA from A. aeolicus and provide evidence that the enzyme is monofunctional. Compositional analysis and mass spectrometry of purified A. aeolicus LPS, showing the incorporation of a single Kdo residue as an integral component of the LPS, implicated a monofunctional Kdo transferase in LPS biosynthesis of A. aeolicus. Further, heterologous expression of the A. aeolicus waaA gene in a newly constructed Escherichia coli DeltawaaA suppressor strain resulted in synthesis of lipid IVA precursors substituted with one Kdo sugar. When highly purified WaaA of A. aeolicus was subjected to in vitro assays using mass spectrometry for detection of the reaction products, the enzyme was found to catalyze the transfer of only a single Kdo residue from CMP-Kdo to differently modified lipid A acceptors. The Kdo transferase was capable of utilizing a broad spectrum of acceptor substrates, whereas surface plasmon resonance studies indicated a high selectivity for the donor substrate. PMID:19546212

  20. WaaA of the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Aquifex aeolicus Is a Monofunctional 3-Deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic Acid Transferase Involved in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mamat, Uwe; Schmidt, Helgo; Munoz, Eva; Lindner, Buko; Fukase, Koichi; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Wu, Jing; Meredith, Timothy C.; Woodard, Ronald W.; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Mesters, Jeroen R.; Holst, Otto

    2009-01-01

    The hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus belongs to the deepest branch in the bacterial genealogy. Although it has long been recognized that this unique Gram-negative bacterium carries genes for different steps of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation, data on the LPS itself or detailed knowledge of the LPS pathway beyond the first committed steps of lipid A and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) synthesis are still lacking. We now report the functional characterization of the thermostable Kdo transferase WaaA from A. aeolicus and provide evidence that the enzyme is monofunctional. Compositional analysis and mass spectrometry of purified A. aeolicus LPS, showing the incorporation of a single Kdo residue as an integral component of the LPS, implicated a monofunctional Kdo transferase in LPS biosynthesis of A. aeolicus. Further, heterologous expression of the A. aeolicus waaA gene in a newly constructed Escherichia coli ΔwaaA suppressor strain resulted in synthesis of lipid IVA precursors substituted with one Kdo sugar. When highly purified WaaA of A. aeolicus was subjected to in vitro assays using mass spectrometry for detection of the reaction products, the enzyme was found to catalyze the transfer of only a single Kdo residue from CMP-Kdo to differently modified lipid A acceptors. The Kdo transferase was capable of utilizing a broad spectrum of acceptor substrates, whereas surface plasmon resonance studies indicated a high selectivity for the donor substrate. PMID:19546212

  1. Dual catalytic activity of hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A quinate transferase from tomato allows it to moonlight in the synthesis of both mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Andrea; Lanteri, Sergio; Comino, Cinzia; Hill, Lionel; Knevitt, Daniel; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bornemann, Stephen; Martin, Cathie

    2014-12-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), like other Solanaceous species, accumulates high levels of antioxidant caffeoylquinic acids, which are strong bioactive molecules and protect plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. Among these compounds, the monocaffeoylquinic acids (e.g. chlorogenic acid [CGA]) and the dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs) have been found to possess marked antioxidative properties. Thus, they are of therapeutic interest both as phytonutrients in foods and as pharmaceuticals. Strategies to increase diCQA content in plants have been hampered by the modest understanding of their biosynthesis and whether the same pathway exists in different plant species. Incubation of CGA with crude extracts of tomato fruits led to the formation of two new products, which were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as diCQAs. This chlorogenate:chlorogenate transferase activity was partially purified from ripe fruit. The final protein fraction resulted in 388-fold enrichment of activity and was subjected to trypsin digestion and mass spectrometric sequencing: a hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was selected as a candidate protein. Assay of recombinant HQT protein expressed in Escherichia coli confirmed its ability to synthesize diCQAs in vitro. This second activity (chlorogenate:chlorogenate transferase) of HQT had a low pH optimum and a high Km for its substrate, CGA. High concentrations of CGA and relatively low pH occur in the vacuoles of plant cells. Transient assays demonstrated that tomato HQT localizes to the vacuole as well as to the cytoplasm of plant cells, supporting the idea that in this species, the enzyme catalyzes different reactions in two subcellular compartments.

  2. Driving carbon flux through exogenous butyryl-CoA: Acetate CoA-transferase to produce butyric acid at high titer in Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yin; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-12-20

    Butyric acid, a 4-carbon short chain fatty acid, is widely used in chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The low activity of butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase in Thermobifida fusca muS, a thermophilic actinobacterium whose optimal temperature was 55°C, was found to hinder the accumulation of high yield of butyric acid. In order to solve this problem, an exogenous butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene (actA) from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM571 was integrated into the chromosome of T. fusca muS by replacing celR gene, forming T. fusca muS-1. We demonstrated that on 5g/L cellulose, the yield of butyric acid by the engineered muS-1 strain was increased by 42.9 % compared to the muS strain. On 100g/L of cellulose, the muS-1 strain could consume 90.5% of total cellulose in 144h, with 33.2g/L butyric acid produced. Furthermore, on the mix substrates including the major components of biomass: cellulose, xylose, mannose and galactose, 70.4g/L butyric acid was produced in 168h by fed-batch fermentation. To validate the ability of fermenting biomass, the muS-1 strain was grown on the milled corn stover ranging from 200 to 250μm. The muS-1 strain had the highest butyrate titer 17.1g/L on 90g/L corn stover. PMID:26535965

  3. Feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase

    DOEpatents

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-09-13

    The invention relates to nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and the feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme that enables incorporation of monolignol ferulates, for example, including p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and sinapyl ferulate, into the lignin of plants.

  4. Precocious leaf senescence by functional loss of PROTEIN S-ACYL TRANSFERASE14 involves the NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin-Ying; Wang, Jia-Gang; Song, Shi-Jian; Wang, Qun; Kang, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha

    2016-01-01

    We report here that Arabidopsis PROTEIN S-ACYL TRANSFERASE14 (PAT14), through its palmitate transferase activity, acts at the vacuolar trafficking route to repress salicylic acid (SA) signaling, thus mediating age-dependent but not carbon starvation-induced leaf senescence. Functional loss of PAT14 resulted in precocious leaf senescence and its transcriptomic analysis revealed that senescence was dependent on salicylic acid. Overexpressing PAT14 suppressed the expression of SA responsive genes. Introducing the SA deficient mutants, npr1-5 and NahG, but not other hormonal mutants, completely suppressed the precocious leaf senescence of PAT14 loss-of-function, further supporting the epistatic relation between PAT14 and the SA pathway. By confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that PAT14 is localized at the Golgi, the trans-Golg network/early endosome, and prevacuolar compartments, indicating its roles through vacuolar trafficking. By reporter analysis and real time PCRs, we showed that the expression PAT14, unlike most of the senescence associated genes, is not developmentally regulated, suggesting post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms on its functionality. We further showed that the maize and wheat homologs of PAT14 fully rescued the precocious leaf senescence of pat14-2, demonstrating that the role of PAT14 in suppressing SA signaling during age-dependent leaf senescence is evolutionarily conserved between dicots and monocots. PMID:26842807

  5. Inhibition of human catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated O-methylation of catechol estrogens by major polyphenolic components present in coffee.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao Ting; Wang, Pan; Nagai, Mime; Wen, Yujing; Bai, Hyoung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of three catechol-containing coffee polyphenols, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), on the O-methylation of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol (2-OH-E(2) and 4-OH-E(2), respectively) catalyzed by the cytosolic catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) isolated from human liver and placenta. When human liver COMT was used as the enzyme, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid each inhibited the O-methylation of 2-OH-E(2) in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC(50) values of 1.3-1.4 and 6.3-12.5 microM, respectively, and they also inhibited the O-methylation of 4-OH-E(2), with IC(50) values of 0.7-0.8 and 1.3-3.1 microM, respectively. Similar inhibition pattern was seen with human placental COMT preparation. CAPE had a comparable effect as caffeic acid for inhibiting the O-methylation of 2-OH-E(2), but it exerted a weaker inhibition of the O-methylation of 4-OH-E(2). Enzyme kinetic analyses showed that chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid inhibited the human liver and placental COMT-mediated O-methylation of catechol estrogens with a mixed mechanism of inhibition (competitive plus noncompetitive). Computational molecular modeling analysis showed that chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid can bind to human soluble COMT at the active site in a similar manner as the catechol estrogen substrates. Moreover, the binding energy values of these two coffee polyphenols are lower than that of catechol estrogens, which means that coffee polyphenols have higher binding affinity for the enzyme than the natural substrates. This computational finding agreed perfectly with our biochemical data.

  6. Biological Roles of the O-Methyl Phosphoramidate Capsule Modification in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michele R.; Fodor, Christopher; Ashmus, Roger A.; Stahl, Martin; Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Wren, Brendan W.; Stintzi, Alain; Miller, William G.; Lowary, Todd L.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of this organism is required for persistence and disease. C. jejuni produces over 47 different capsular structures, including a unique O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modification present on most C. jejuni isolates. Although the MeOPN structure is rare in nature it has structural similarity to some synthetic pesticides. In this study, we have demonstrated, by whole genome comparisons and high resolution magic angle spinning NMR, that MeOPN modifications are common to several Campylobacter species. Using MeOPN biosynthesis and transferase mutants generated in C. jejuni strain 81–176, we observed that loss of MeOPN from the cell surface correlated with increased invasion of Caco-2 epithelial cells and reduced resistance to killing by human serum. In C. jejuni, the observed serum mediated killing was determined to result primarily from activation of the classical complement pathway. The C. jejuni MeOPN transferase mutant showed similar levels of colonization relative to the wild-type in chickens, but showed a five-fold drop in colonization when co-infected with the wild-type in piglets. In Galleria mellonella waxmoth larvae, the MeOPN transferase mutant was able to kill the insects at wild-type levels. Furthermore, injection of the larvae with MeOPN-linked monosaccharides or CPS purified from the wild-type strain did not result in larval killing, indicating that MeOPN does not have inherent insecticidal activity. PMID:24498018

  7. KpsC and KpsS are retaining 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) transferases involved in synthesis of bacterial capsules.

    PubMed

    Willis, Lisa M; Whitfield, Chris

    2013-12-17

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are high-molecular-mass cell-surface polysaccharides, that act as important virulence factors for many pathogenic bacteria. Several clinically important Gram-negative pathogens share similar systems for CPS biosynthesis and export; examples include Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Pasteurella multocida. Each CPS contains a serotype-specific repeat-unit structure, but the glycans all possess a lipid moiety at their reducing termini. In E. coli and N. meningitidis, the predominant lipid is a lysophosphatidylglycerol moiety that is attached to the repeat-unit domain of the CPS via multiple residues of 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo), referred to as a poly-Kdo linker. The Kdo residues are β-linked, suggesting that they are synthesized by retaining glycosyltransferases. To date, the only characterized Kdo transferases are the inverting enzymes that catalyze the α-linkages found in lipopolysaccharide. Here, we identify two conserved proteins from CPS assembly systems, KpsC and KpsS, as the β-Kdo-transferases and demonstrate in vitro reconstitution of poly-Kdo linker assembly on a fluorescent phosphatidylglycerol acceptor. KpsS adds the first Kdo residue, and this reaction product is then extended by KpsC. Cross-complementation experiments demonstrate that the E. coli and N. meningitidis protein homologs are functionally conserved.

  8. Formyl-coenzyme A (CoA):oxalate CoA-transferase from the acidophile Acetobacter aceti has a distinctive electrostatic surface and inherent acid stability

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Elwood A; Starks, Courtney M; Francois, Julie A; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke; Kappock, T Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial formyl-CoA:oxalate CoA-transferase (FCOCT) and oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase work in tandem to perform a proton-consuming decarboxylation that has been suggested to have a role in generalized acid resistance. FCOCT is the product of uctB in the acidophilic acetic acid bacterium Acetobacter aceti. As expected for an acid-resistance factor, UctB remains folded at the low pH values encountered in the A. aceti cytoplasm. A comparison of crystal structures of FCOCTs and related proteins revealed few features in UctB that would distinguish it from nonacidophilic proteins and thereby account for its acid stability properties, other than a strikingly featureless electrostatic surface. The apparently neutral surface is a result of a “speckled” charge decoration, in which charged surface residues are surrounded by compensating charges but do not form salt bridges. A quantitative comparison among orthologs identified a pattern of residue substitution in UctB that may be a consequence of selection for protein stability by constant exposure to acetic acid. We suggest that this surface charge pattern, which is a distinctive feature of A. aceti proteins, creates a stabilizing electrostatic network without stiffening the protein or compromising protein–solvent interactions. PMID:22374910

  9. Formyl-coenzyme A (CoA):oxalate CoA-transferase from the acidophile Acetobacter aceti has a distinctive electrostatic surface and inherent acid stability.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Starks, Courtney M; Francois, Julie A; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke; Kappock, T Joseph

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial formyl-CoA:oxalate CoA-transferase (FCOCT) and oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase work in tandem to perform a proton-consuming decarboxylation that has been suggested to have a role in generalized acid resistance. FCOCT is the product of uctB in the acidophilic acetic acid bacterium Acetobacter aceti. As expected for an acid-resistance factor, UctB remains folded at the low pH values encountered in the A. aceti cytoplasm. A comparison of crystal structures of FCOCTs and related proteins revealed few features in UctB that would distinguish it from nonacidophilic proteins and thereby account for its acid stability properties, other than a strikingly featureless electrostatic surface. The apparently neutral surface is a result of a "speckled" charge decoration, in which charged surface residues are surrounded by compensating charges but do not form salt bridges. A quantitative comparison among orthologs identified a pattern of residue substitution in UctB that may be a consequence of selection for protein stability by constant exposure to acetic acid. We suggest that this surface charge pattern, which is a distinctive feature of A. aceti proteins, creates a stabilizing electrostatic network without stiffening the protein or compromising protein-solvent interactions.

  10. Structures of Nahuoic Acids B-E Produced in Culture by a Streptomyces sp. Isolated from a Marine Sediment and Evidence for the Inhibition of the Histone Methyl Transferase SETD8 in Human Cancer Cells by Nahuoic Acid A.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Izard, Fanny; Arnould, Stéphanie; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Tantapakul, Cholpisut; Maneerat, Wisanu; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Julien, Eric; Andersen, Raymond J

    2016-02-19

    Nahuoic acids A-E (1-5) have been isolated from laboratory cultures of a Streptomyces sp. obtained from a tropical marine sediment. The structures of the new polyketides 2-5 were elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data of the natural products and the chemical derivatives 6 and 7. Nahuoic acids 1-5 are in vitro inhibitors of the histone methyltransferase SETD8, and nahuoic acid A (1) and its pentaacetate derivative 8 inhibit the proliferation of several cancer cells lines in vitro with modest potency. At the IC50 for cancer cell proliferation, nahuoic acid A (1) showed selective inhibition of SETD8 in U2OS osteosarcoma cells that reflect its selectivity against a panel of pure histone methyl transferases. A cell cycle analysis revealed that the cellular toxicity of nahuoic acid A (1) is likely linked to its ability to inhibit SETD8 activity.

  11. Structure of a triphosphonopentaosylceramide containing 4-O-methyl-N-acetylglucosamine from the skin of the sea hare, Aplysia kurodai.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Abe, S; Odani, S; Ando, S; Fujii, N; Satake, M

    1987-10-15

    A novel phosphonoglycosphingolipid named SGL-I containing 3 mol of 2-aminoethylphosphonate residues was isolated from the skin of a sea gastropod, Aplysia kurodai. The saccharide moiety of the glycolipid was characterized as 4-O-methyl-GlcNAc alpha 1----4GalNAc alpha-1----3 [6'-O-(2-aminoethylphosphonyl)Gal alpha 1----2] (2-aminoethylphosphonyl----6)Gal beta 1----4(2-aminoethylphosphonyl----6) Glc beta 1----1-ceramide. The major aliphatic components of the ceramide portion were palmitic acid, stearic acid, octadeca-4-sphingenine, and anteisononadeca-4-sphingenine. This glycolipid is unique in containing 4-O-methyl-N-acetylglucosamine and 3 mol of 2-aminoethylphosphonate residues, one of which is attached to C-6 of glucose.

  12. Deduced amino acid sequence, gene structure and chromosomal location of a novel human class Mu glutathione S-transferase, GSTM4.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, S; Spurr, N K; Hayes, J D; Wolf, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Mu-Class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are subject to marked inter-individual variation in man, owing to the fact that 40-50% of the population fail to express M1 subunits. Mu-Class GST from two lymphoblastoid cell lines (expressing M1 subunits and the other 'nulled' for M1) have been studied. Both cell lines were found to express a Mu-Class GST that has not been described previously. The cDNA encoding this novel transferase, designated 'GSTM4' has been isolated and the enzyme shown to be comprised of 218 amino acids (including the initiator methionine residue) with an M(r) of approx. 25.5 kDa. Molecular cloning demonstrated that the lymphoblastoid cell line which expressed GSTM1 possessed the b allelic variant (i.e. that with an asparagine residue at position 173). The genes for GSTM4 and GSTM1b have been cloned and found to contain seven introns and eight exons. The coding region of the GSTM4 gene, including the seven introns, encompasses 5.0 kb, whereas the same region of GSTM1b is 5.5 kb; the difference in the size of the two genes is due to the length of intron 7. DNA sequencing allowed a GSTM4-gene-specific oligo-primer to be designed which has been utilized in a PCR-based assay to determine that the GSTM4 gene is located on chromosome 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8471052

  13. Drought and salt stress tolerance of an Arabidopsis glutathione S-transferase U17 knockout mutant are attributed to the combined effect of glutathione and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Hung; Jiang, Han-Wei; Hsieh, En-Jung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chien, Ching-Te; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2012-01-01

    Although glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are thought to play major roles in oxidative stress metabolism, little is known about the regulatory functions of GSTs. We have reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE U17 (AtGSTU17; At1g10370) participates in light signaling and might modulate various aspects of development by affecting glutathione (GSH) pools via a coordinated regulation with phytochrome A. Here, we provide further evidence to support a negative role of AtGSTU17 in drought and salt stress tolerance. When AtGSTU17 was mutated, plants were more tolerant to drought and salt stresses compared with wild-type plants. In addition, atgstu17 accumulated higher levels of GSH and abscisic acid (ABA) and exhibited hyposensitivity to ABA during seed germination, smaller stomatal apertures, a lower transpiration rate, better development of primary and lateral root systems, and longer vegetative growth. To explore how atgstu17 accumulated higher ABA content, we grew wild-type plants in the solution containing GSH and found that they accumulated ABA to a higher extent than plants grown in the absence of GSH, and they also exhibited the atgstu17 phenotypes. Wild-type plants treated with GSH also demonstrated more tolerance to drought and salt stresses. Furthermore, the effect of GSH on root patterning and drought tolerance was confirmed by growing the atgstu17 in solution containing l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis. In conclusion, the atgstu17 phenotype can be explained by the combined effect of GSH and ABA. We propose a role of AtGSTU17 in adaptive responses to drought and salt stresses by functioning as a negative component of stress-mediated signal transduction pathways.

  14. Engineering alfalfa to accumulate useful caffeic acid derivatives and characterization of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferases from legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some forages crops, such as red clover, accumulate high levels of caffeic acid derivatives. Oxidation of these o-diphenols to quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and the subsequent reactions of these quinones (probably with endogenous plant proteases) result in a significant reduction ...

  15. Functional analysis of a tomato salicylic acid methyl transferase and its role in synthesis of the flavor volatile methyl salicylate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl salicylate (MeSA) is a volatile plant secondary metabolite that is an important contributor to taste and scent of many fruits and flowers. It is synthesized from salicylic acid (SA), a phytohormone that contributes to plant pathogen defense. MeSA is synthesized by members of a family of O-met...

  16. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  17. Induction of the pi class of glutathione S-transferase by carnosic acid in rat Clone 9 cells via the p38/Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yuan; Wu, Chi-Rei; Chang, Shu-Wei; Wang, Yu-Jung; Wu, Jia-Jiuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Induction of phase II enzymes is important in cancer chemoprevention. We compared the effect of rosemary diterpenes on the expression of the pi class of glutathione S-transferase (GSTP) in rat liver Clone 9 cells and the signaling pathways involved. Culturing cells with 1, 5, 10, or 20 μM carnosic acid (CA) or carnosol (CS) for 24 h in a dose-dependent manner increased the GSTP expression. CA was more potent than CS. The RNA level and the enzyme activity of GSTP were also enhanced by CA treatment. Treatment with 10 μM CA highly induced the reporter activity of the enhancer element GPEI. Furthermore, CA markedly increased the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from the cytosol to the nucleus after 30 to 60 min. CA the stimulated the protein induction of p38, nuclear Nrf2, and GSTP was diminished in the presence of SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). In addition, SB203580 pretreatment or silencing of Nrf2 by siRNA suppressed the CA-induced GPEI-DNA binding activity and GSTP protein expression. Knockdown of p38 or Nrf2 by siRNA abolished the activation of p38 and Nrf2 as well as the protein induction and enzyme activity of GSTP by CA. These results suggest that CA up-regulates the expression and enzyme activity of GSTP via the p38/Nrf2/GPEI pathway.

  18. A Second Galacturonic Acid Transferase Is Required for Core Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis and Complete Capsule Association with the Cell Surface in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fresno, Sandra; Jiménez, Natalia; Canals, Rocío; Merino, Susana; Corsaro, Maria Michela; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2007-01-01

    The core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Klebsiella pneumoniae contains two galacturonic acid (GalA) residues, but only one GalA transferase (WabG) has been identified. Data from chemical and structural analysis of LPS isolated from a wabO mutant show the absence of the inner core β-GalA residue linked to l-glycero-d-manno-heptose III (l,d-Hep III). An in vitro assay demonstrates that the purified WabO is able to catalyze the transfer of GalA from UDP-GalA to the acceptor LPS isolated from the wabO mutant, but not to LPS isolated from waaQ mutant (deficient in l,d-Hep III). The absence of this inner core β-GalA residue results in a decrease in virulence in a capsule-dependent experimental mouse pneumonia model. In addition, this mutation leads to a strong reduction in cell-bound capsule. Interestingly, a K66 Klebsiella strain (natural isolate) without a functional wabO gene shows reduced levels of cell-bound capsule in comparison to those of other K66 strains. Thus, the WabO enzyme plays an important role in core LPS biosynthesis and determines the level of cell-bound capsule in Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:17142396

  19. Interplay of LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA in the structure and thermodynamics of RNA hybrid systems: a molecular dynamics study using the revised AMBER force field and comparison with experimental results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Schatz, George C

    2014-12-11

    When used in nucleic acid duplexes, locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues enhance the duplex stabilities, and this makes it possible to create much better RNA aptamers to target specific molecules in cells. Thus, LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues are finding increasingly widespread use in RNA-based therapeutics. Herein, we utilize molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and UV melting experiments to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of 13 nucleic acid duplexes, including full DNA, RNA, LNA, and 2'-O-methyl RNA duplexes as well as hybrid systems such as LNA:RNA, 2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA, LNA/2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA, and RNA/2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA duplexes. The MD simulations are based on a version of the Amber force field revised specifically for RNA and LNA residues. Our results indicate that LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues have two different hybridization mechanisms when included in hybrid duplexes with RNA wherein the former underwinds while the latter overwinds the duplexes. These computational predictions are supported by X-ray structures of LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA duplexes that were recently presented by different groups, and there is also good agreement with the measured thermal stabilities of the duplexes. We find out that the "underwinding" phenomenon seen in LNA and LNA:RNA hybrid duplexes happens due to expansion of the major groove widths (Mgw) of the duplexes that is associated with decrease in the slide and twist values in base-pair steps. In contrast, 2'-O-methyl RNA residues in RNA duplexes slightly overwind the duplexes while the backbone is forced to stay in C3'-endo. Moreover, base-pair stacking in the LNA and LNA:RNA hybrid systems is gradually reduced with the inclusion of LNA residues in the duplexes while no such effect is seen in the 2'-O-methyl RNA systems. Our results show how competition between base stacking and structural rigidity in these RNA hybrid systems influences structures and stabilities. Even though both

  20. Protonated sugars: vibrational spectroscopy and conformational structure of protonated O-methyl α-D-galactopyranoside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudić, Svemir; Xie, Hong-bin; Gerber, R. Benny; Simons, John P.

    2012-08-01

    'Bridging' protons provide a common structural motif in biological assemblies such as proton wires and proton-bound dimers. Here we present a 'proof-of-principle' computational and vibrational spectroscopic investigation of an 'intra-molecular proton-bound dimer,' O-methyl α-D-galactopyranoside (αMeGal-H+), generated in the gas phase through photo-ionisation of its complex with phenol in a molecular beam. Its vibrational spectrum corresponds well with a classical molecular dynamics simulation conducted 'on-the-fly' and also with the lowest-energy structures predicted by DFT and ab initio calculations. They reveal proton-bound structures that bridge neighbouring pairs of oxygen atoms, preferentially O6 and O4, linked together within the carbohydrate scaffold. Motivated by the possibility of an entry into the microscopic mechanism of its acid (or enzyme)-catalysed hydrolysis, we also report the corresponding predictions for its singly hydrated complex.

  1. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A.; Patel, Yesha M.; Stram, Daniel O.; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2–31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  2. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Patel, Yesha M; Stram, Daniel O; Carmella, Steven G; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2-31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  3. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  4. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Patel, Yesha M; Stram, Daniel O; Carmella, Steven G; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2-31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke.

  5. Effects of cadmium alone and in combination with low molecular weight chitosan on metallothionein, glutathione-S-transferase, acid phosphatase, and ATPase of freshwater crab Sinopotamon yangtsekiense.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijin; Zhou, Yanying; Wang, Lan; Ren, Guorui; Zou, Enmin

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental contaminant showing a variety of deleterious effects, including the potential threat for the ecological environment and human health via food chains. Low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) has been demonstrated to be an effective antioxidant. Metallothionein (MT) mRNA levels and activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), acid phosphatase (ACP), Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, and Ca(2+)-ATPase as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in the gills of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon yangtsekiense were analyzed in vivo in order to determine the injury of Cd exposure on the gill tissues as well as the protective effect of LMWC against this injury. The results showed that there was an apparent accumulation of Cd in the gills, which was lessened by the presence of LMWC. Moreover, Cd(2+) significantly increased the gill MT mRNA levels, ACP activity and MDA content while decreasing the activities of SOD, GST, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, and Ca(2+)-ATPase in the crabs relative to the control. Cotreatment with LMWC reduced the levels of MT mRNA and ACP but raised the activities of GST, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, and Ca(2+)-ATPase in gill tissues compared with the crabs exposed to Cd(2+) alone. These results suggest that LMWC may exert its protective effect through chelating Cd(2+) to form LMWC-Cd(2+) complex, elevating the antioxidative activities of GST, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, and Ca(2+)-ATPase as well as alleviating the stress pressure on MT and ACP, consequently protecting the cell from the adverse effects of Cd.

  6. Glutathione transferase supergene family in tomato: Salt stress-regulated expression of representative genes from distinct GST classes in plants primed with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Horváth, Edit; Váry, Zsolt; Gallé, Ágnes; Bela, Krisztina; Brunner, Szilvia; Tari, Irma

    2014-05-01

    A family tree of the multifunctional proteins, glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) was created in Solanum lycopersicum based on homology to known Arabidopsis GSTs. The involvement of selected SlGSTs was studied in salt stress response of tomato primed with salicylic acid (SA) or in un-primed plants by real-time qPCR. Selected tau GSTs (SlGSTU23, SlGSTU26) were up-regulated in the leaves, while GSTs from lambda, theta, dehydroascorbate reductase and zeta classes (SlGSTL3, SlGSTT2, SlDHAR5, SlGSTZ2) in the root tissues under salt stress. Priming with SA exhibited a concentration dependency; SA mitigated the salt stress injury and caused characteristic changes in the expression pattern of SlGSTs only at 10(-4) M concentration. SlGSTF4 displayed a significant up-regulation in the leaves, while the abundance of SlGSTL3, SlGSTT2 and SlGSTZ2 transcripts were enhanced in the roots of plants primed with high SA concentration. Unexpectedly, under high salinity the SlDHAR2 expression decreased in primed roots as compared to the salt-stressed plants, however, the up-regulation of SlDHAR5 isoenzyme contributed to the maintenance of DHAR activity in roots primed with high SA. The members of lambda, theta and zeta class GSTs have a specific role in salt stress acclimation of tomato, while SlGSTU26 and SlGSTF4, the enzymes with high glutathione conjugating activity, characterize a successful priming in both roots and leaves. In contrast to low concentration, high SA concentration induced those GSTs in primed roots, which were up-regulated under salt stress. Our data indicate that induction of GSTs provide a flexible tool in maintaining redox homeostasis during unfavourable conditions.

  7. Commonality and biosynthesis of the O-methyl phosphoramidate capsule modification in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    McNally, David J; Lamoureux, Marc P; Karlyshev, Andrey V; Fiori, Laura M; Li, Jianjun; Thacker, Gillian; Coleman, Russell A; Khieu, Nam H; Wren, Brendan W; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Jarrell, Harold C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2007-09-28

    In this study we investigated the commonality and biosynthesis of the O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) group found on the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Campylobacter jejuni. High resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy was used as a rapid, high throughput means to examine multiple isolates, analyze the cecal contents of colonized chickens, and screen a library of CPS mutants for the presence of MeOPN. Sixty eight percent of C. jejuni strains were found to express the MeOPN with a high prevalence among isolates from enteritis, Guillain Barré, and Miller-Fisher syndrome patients. In contrast, MeOPN was not observed for any of the Campylobacter coli strains examined. The MeOPN was detected on C. jejuni retrieved from cecal contents of colonized chickens demonstrating that the modification is expressed by bacteria inhabiting the avian gastrointestinal tract. In C. jejuni 11168H, the cj1415-cj1418 cluster was shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of MeOPN. Genetic complementation studies and NMR/mass spectrometric analyses of CPS from this strain also revealed that cj1421 and cj1422 encode MeOPN transferases. Cj1421 adds the MeOPN to C-3 of the beta-d-GalfNAc residue, whereas Cj1422 transfers the MeOPN to C-4 of D-glycero-alpha-L-gluco-heptopyranose. CPS produced by the 11168H strain was found to be extensively modified with variable MeOPN, methyl, ethanolamine, and N-glycerol groups. These findings establish the importance of the MeOPN as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for C. jejuni and set the groundwork for future studies aimed at the detailed elucidation of the MeOPN biosynthetic pathway.

  8. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  9. Dual Catalytic Activity of Hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A Quinate Transferase from Tomato Allows It to Moonlight in the Synthesis of Both Mono- and Dicaffeoylquinic Acids1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Moglia, Andrea; Lanteri, Sergio; Comino, Cinzia; Hill, Lionel; Knevitt, Daniel; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bornemann, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), like other Solanaceous species, accumulates high levels of antioxidant caffeoylquinic acids, which are strong bioactive molecules and protect plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. Among these compounds, the monocaffeoylquinic acids (e.g. chlorogenic acid [CGA]) and the dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs) have been found to possess marked antioxidative properties. Thus, they are of therapeutic interest both as phytonutrients in foods and as pharmaceuticals. Strategies to increase diCQA content in plants have been hampered by the modest understanding of their biosynthesis and whether the same pathway exists in different plant species. Incubation of CGA with crude extracts of tomato fruits led to the formation of two new products, which were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as diCQAs. This chlorogenate:chlorogenate transferase activity was partially purified from ripe fruit. The final protein fraction resulted in 388-fold enrichment of activity and was subjected to trypsin digestion and mass spectrometric sequencing: a hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was selected as a candidate protein. Assay of recombinant HQT protein expressed in Escherichia coli confirmed its ability to synthesize diCQAs in vitro. This second activity (chlorogenate:chlorogenate transferase) of HQT had a low pH optimum and a high Km for its substrate, CGA. High concentrations of CGA and relatively low pH occur in the vacuoles of plant cells. Transient assays demonstrated that tomato HQT localizes to the vacuole as well as to the cytoplasm of plant cells, supporting the idea that in this species, the enzyme catalyzes different reactions in two subcellular compartments. PMID:25301886

  10. Cathecol-O-methyl transferase Val158Met genotype is not a risk factor for conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Armagan, E; Almacıoglu, M L; Yakut, T; Köse, A; Karkucak, M; Köksal, O; Görükmez, O

    2013-03-19

    Alterations in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity are involved in various types of neurological disorders. We examined a possible association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and conversion disorder in a study of 48 patients with conversion disorder and 48 control patients. In the conversion disorder group, 31 patients were Val/Met heterozygotes, 15 patients were Val/Val homozygotes and 2 patients were Met/Met homozygotes. In the control group, 32 patients were Val/Met heterozygotes and 16 patients were Val/Val homozygotes. There was no significant difference between the groups. We conclude that the COMT Val158Met genotype is quite common in Turkey and that it is not a risk factor for conversion disorder in the Turkish population.

  11. Hybridization of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons to RNA and DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Bao, Gang

    2002-12-01

    Molecular beacons are stem-loop hairpin oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorescent dye at one end and a fluorescence quencher at the other end; they can differentiate between bound and unbound probes in homogeneous hybridization assays with a high signal-to-background ratio and enhanced specificity compared with linear oligonucleotide probes. However, in performing cellular imaging and quantification of gene expression, degradation of unmodified molecular beacons by endogenous nucleases can significantly limit the detection sensitivity, and results in fluorescence signals unrelated to probe/target hybridization. To substantially reduce nuclease degradation of molecular beacons, it is possible to protect the probe by substituting 2'-O-methyl RNA for DNA. Here we report the analysis of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons in the presence of RNA and DNA targets. We found that in terms of molecular beacon/target duplex stability, 2'-O-methyl/RNA > 2'-deoxy/RNA > 2'-deoxy/DNA > 2'-O-methyl/DNA. The improved stability of the 2'-O-methyl/RNA duplex was accompanied by a slightly reduced specificity compared with the duplex of 2'-deoxy molecular beacons and RNA targets. However, the 2'-O-methyl molecular beacons hybridized to RNA more quickly than 2'-deoxy molecular beacons. For the pairs tested, the 2'-deoxy-beacon/DNA-target duplex showed the fastest hybridization kinetics. These findings have significant implications for the design and application of molecular beacons.

  12. Hybridization of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons to RNA and DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Tsourkas, Andrew; Behlke, Mark A; Bao, Gang

    2003-03-15

    Molecular beacons are stem-loop hairpin oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorescent dye at one end and a fluorescence quencher at the other end; they can differentiate between bound and unbound probes in homogeneous hybridization assays with a high signal-to-background ratio and enhanced specificity compared with linear oligonucleotide probes. However, in performing cellular imaging and quantification of gene expression, degradation of unmodified molecular beacons by endogenous nucleases can significantly limit the detection sensitivity, and results in fluorescence signals unrelated to probe/target hybridization. To substantially reduce nuclease degradation of molecular beacons, it is possible to protect the probe by substituting 2'-O-methyl RNA for DNA. Here we report the analysis of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of 2'-O-methyl and 2'-deoxy molecular beacons in the presence of RNA and DNA targets. We found that in terms of molecular beacon/target duplex stability, 2'-O-methyl/RNA > 2'-deoxy/RNA > 2'-deoxy/DNA > 2'-O-methyl/DNA. The improved stability of the 2'-O-methyl/RNA duplex was accompanied by a slightly reduced specificity compared with the duplex of 2'-deoxy molecular beacons and RNA targets. However, the 2'-O-methyl molecular beacons hybridized to RNA more quickly than 2'-deoxy molecular beacons. For the pairs tested, the 2'-deoxy-beacon/DNA-target duplex showed the fastest hybridization kinetics. These findings have significant implications for the design and application of molecular beacons.

  13. Hybridization potential of oligonucleotides comprising 3'-O-methylated altritol nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, G; Schepers, G; Rozenski, J; Van Aerschot, Arthur

    2012-11-01

    A series of 3'-O-methylated-d-altrohexitol nucleoside analogs (MANA) was synthesized comprising all four base moieties, adenine, cytosine, uracil, and guanine. These monomers were incorporated into oligonucleotides (ONs) by automated solid phase synthesis and the thermal and thermodynamic stability of all new modified constructs were evaluated. Data were compared with results obtained for both anhydrohexitol (HNAs) and 3'-O-altrohexitol-modified ONs (ANAs). We hereby demonstrate that ONs modified with MANA monomers have an improved thermal and thermodynamic stability compared to RNA, ANA, or HNA containing ONs of which the extent depends on the number of incorporated moieties and their position in the sequence. Thermodynamic analysis afforded comparable or even improved results in comparison with the incorporation of locked nucleic acids. While the specificity of these new synthons is slightly lower compared to mismatches within RNA double strands, it is similar to the discrimination potential of other hexitol modifications (HNA and ANA) which already proved their biologic interest, highlighting the potential of MANA constructs in antisense and in siRNA applications.

  14. Nonintracellular, cell-associated O-methylation of isoproterenol in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Head, R.J.; Irvine, R.J.; Barone, S.; Stitzel, R.E.; de la Lande, I.S.

    1985-07-01

    The present study examines the subcellular site of catecholamine O-methylation in extraneuronal tissue. S-Adenosyl-l-methionine, a methyl donor that does not diffuse across biological membranes, was used to assess the participation of plasma membrane bound catechol-O-methyltransferase vs. cytoplasmic catechol-O-methyltransferase in the catecholamine O-methylating process. Segments of rabbit thoracic aorta incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-l-methionine and isoproterenol generate (/sup 3/H)methoxy-isoproterenol. The formation of (/sup 3/H)methoxy-isoproterenol from (methyl-/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-l-methionine was proportional to the isoproterenol concentrations in the range of 0.1 to 1.0 microM. There was a marked preference for the O-methylation of the (+)- rather than the (-)-isomer of isoproterenol. The O-methylation of isoproterenol in the presence of (methyl-/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-l-methionine was stimulated as much as 8-fold by the removal of calcium ions from the incubation solutions. In contrast, the O-methylation of (+)-(/sup 3/H)isoproterenol by endogenous, intracellular S-adenosyl-l-methionine was only slightly inhibited by the removal of calcium ions from incubation solutions. The formation of (/sup 3/H)methoxy-isoproterenol from (methyl-/sup 3/H)-S-adenosyl-l-methionine and isoproterenol was not inhibited by pretreatment of tissues with phenoxybenzamine (32 microM) or treatment with metanephrine (27 mumol 1(-1) or deoxycorticosterone acetate (27 microM), i.e., drug treatments that inhibit the extraneuronal uptake and O-methylation of (/sup 3/H)-isoproterenol by endogenous intracellular S-adenosyl-l-methionine. The results of this study provide evidence for a nonintracellular, cell-associated site of O-methylation of isoproterenol in the rabbit aorta.

  15. 2'-O-Methylation within Bacterial RNA Acts as Suppressor of TLR7/TLR8 Activation in Human Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimbach, Katharina; Kaiser, Steffen; Helm, Mark; Dalpke, Alexander H; Eigenbrod, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Microbial RNA is an important stimulator of innate immune responses. Differences in posttranscriptional RNA modification profiles enable the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self nucleic acids. This principle may be exploited by certain bacteria to circumvent immune cell activation. In this regard, 2'-O-methylation of Escherichia coli tRNATyr at position 18 (Gm18) has recently been described to inhibit TLR7-mediated IFN-α production in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Extending these findings, we now demonstrate that Gm18 also potently inhibits TLR7-independent human monocyte activation by RNA derived from a variety of bacterial strains. The half minimal inhibitory concentration values were similar to those found for IFN-α inhibition in pDCs. Mechanistically, 2'-O-methylated RNA impaired upstream signalling events, including MAP kinase and NFx03BA;B activation. Our results suggest that antagonizing effects of Gm18-modified RNA are due to competition with stimulatory RNA for receptor binding. The antagonistic effect was specific for RNA because the small molecule TLR7/8 agonist R848 was not inhibited. Despite the striking phenotype in human cells, 2'-O-methylated RNA did not interfere with TLR13 activation by bacterial 23S rRNA in murine DC and BMDM. Thus, we identify here Gm18 in E. coli tRNA(Tyr) as a universal suppressor of innate immune activation in the human but not the murine system. PMID:25823462

  16. Synthesis, chiral high performance liquid chromatographic resolution and enantiospecific activity of a potent new geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor, 2-hydroxy-3-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl-2-phosphonopropionic acid.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Charles E; Kashemirov, Boris A; Błazewska, Katarzyna M; Mallard-Favier, Isabelle; Stewart, Charlotte A; Rojas, Javier; Lundy, Mark W; Ebetino, Frank H; Baron, Rudi A; Dunford, James E; Kirsten, Marie L; Seabra, Miguel C; Bala, Joy L; Marma, Mong S; Rogers, Michael J; Coxon, Fraser P

    2010-05-13

    3-(3-Pyridyl)-2-hydroxy-2-phosphonopropanoic acid (3-PEHPC, 1) is a phosphonocarboxylate (PC) analogue of 2-(3-pyridyl)-1-hydroxyethylidenebis(phosphonic acid) (risedronic acid, 2), an osteoporosis drug that decreases bone resorption by inhibiting farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS) in osteoclasts, preventing protein prenylation. 1 has lower bone affinity than 2 and weakly inhibits Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RGGT), selectively preventing prenylation of Rab GTPases. We report here the synthesis and biological studies of 2-hydroxy-3-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl-2-phosphonopropionic acid (3-IPEHPC, 3), the PC analogue of minodronic acid 4. Like 1, 3 selectively inhibited Rab11 vs. Rap 1A prenylation in J774 cells, and decreased cell viability, but was 33-60x more active in these assays. After resolving 3 by chiral HPLC (>98% ee), we found that (+)-3-E1 was much more potent than (-)-3-E2 in an isolated RGGT inhibition assay, approximately 17x more potent (LED 3 microM) than (-)-3-E2 in inhibiting Rab prenylation in J774 cells and >26x more active in the cell viability assay. The enantiomers of 1 exhibited a 4-fold or smaller potency difference in the RGGT and prenylation inhibition assays.

  17. Structural basis for m7G recognition and 2'-O-methyl discrimination in capped RNAs by the innate immune receptor RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Devarkar, Swapnil C; Wang, Chen; Miller, Matthew T; Ramanathan, Anand; Jiang, Fuguo; Khan, Abdul G; Patel, Smita S; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-19

    RNAs with 5'-triphosphate (ppp) are detected in the cytoplasm principally by the innate immune receptor Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I), whose activation triggers a Type I IFN response. It is thought that self RNAs like mRNAs are not recognized by RIG-I because 5'ppp is capped by the addition of a 7-methyl guanosine (m7G) (Cap-0) and a 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) group to the 5'-end nucleotide ribose (Cap-1). Here we provide structural and mechanistic basis for exact roles of capping and 2'-O-methylation in evading RIG-I recognition. Surprisingly, Cap-0 and 5'ppp double-stranded (ds) RNAs bind to RIG-I with nearly identical Kd values and activate RIG-I's ATPase and cellular signaling response to similar extents. On the other hand, Cap-0 and 5'ppp single-stranded RNAs did not bind RIG-I and are signaling inactive. Three crystal structures of RIG-I complexes with dsRNAs bearing 5'OH, 5'ppp, and Cap-0 show that RIG-I can accommodate the m7G cap in a cavity created through conformational changes in the helicase-motif IVa without perturbing the ppp interactions. In contrast, Cap-1 modifications abrogate RIG-I signaling through a mechanism involving the H830 residue, which we show is crucial for discriminating between Cap-0 and Cap-1 RNAs. Furthermore, m7G capping works synergistically with 2'-O-methylation to weaken RNA affinity by 200-fold and lower ATPase activity. Interestingly, a single H830A mutation restores both high-affinity binding and signaling activity with 2'-O-methylated dsRNAs. Our work provides new structural insights into the mechanisms of host and viral immune evasion from RIG-I, explaining the complexity of cap structures over evolution. PMID:26733676

  18. Epimerization of tea catechins and O-methylated derivatives of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate: relationship between epimerization and chemical structure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masazumi; Sano, Mitsuaki; Yoshida, Risa; Degawa, Masakuni; Miyase, Toshio; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari

    2003-01-15

    Epimerization at C-2 of O-methylated catechin derivatives and four major tea catechins were investigated. The epimeric isomers of (-)-epicatechin (I), (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate (II), (-)-epigallocatechin (III), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (IV), and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl)gallate (V) in green tea extracts increased time-dependently at 90 degrees C. The epimerization rates of authentic tea catechins in distilled water are much lower than those in tea infusion or in pH 6.0 buffer solution. The addition of tea infusion to the authentic catechin solution accelerated the epimerization, and the addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, disodium salt (Na(2)EDTA) decreased the epimerization in the pH 6.0 buffer solution. Therefore, the metal ions in tea infusion may affect the rate of epimerization. The proportions of the epimers to authentic tea catechins [III, IV, V, and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(4-O-methyl)gallate (VI)] in pH 6.0 buffer solution after heating at 90 degrees C for 30 min were 42.4%, 37.0%, 41.7%, and 30.4%, respectively. These values were higher than those of I and II (23.5% and 23.6%, respectively). The O-methylated derivatives at the 4'-position on the B ring of IV and VI were hardly epimerized. These results suggest that the hydroxyl moiety on the B ring of catechins plays an important role in the epimerization in the order 3',4',5'-triol type > 3',4'-diol type > 3',5'-diol type. PMID:12517118

  19. Glutathione transferase gene family from the housefly Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Syvanen, M; Zhou, Z H; Wang, J Y

    1994-10-17

    Three new glutathione transferase (GST) genes from the housefly Musca domestica are described. These genes, identified as MdGST-2, -3, and -4, were from cDNA clones obtained from a cDNA bank in phage lambda. The bank was prepared using poly(A)+ RNA from a housefly that is highly resistant to organophosphate insecticides because of enhanced expression of multiple members of the glutathione transferase gene family. The DNA sequence of each is reported and has a complete open reading frame that specified an amino acid sequence similar to other dipteran glutathione transferases. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we can conclude that the insect glutathione transferase gene family falls into two groups, each of which evolves at a different rate, presumably due to differences in functional constraints. We show that MdGST-1 (and their homologues from Drosophila and Lucilia) evolve at a significantly slower rate than the other members of the gene family. Each housefly GST cDNA was inserted into a bacterial plasmid expression system and a glutathione transferase activity was expressed in Escherichia coli. The transcription pattern of each of these glutathione transferases was examined in a variety of different housefly strains that are known to differ in their resistance to organophosphate insecticides due to different patterns of glutathione transferase expression. We found that the level of transcription for two of our clones was positively correlated with the level of organophosphate resistance.

  20. A phosphoethanolamine transferase specific for the outer 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid residue of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Identification of the eptB gene and Ca2+ hypersensitivity of an eptB deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C Michael; Kalb, Suzanne R; Cotter, Robert J; Raetz, Christian R H

    2005-06-01

    Addition of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) moiety to the outer 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in WBB06, a heptose-deficient Escherichia coli mutant, occurs when cells are grown in 5-50 mM CaCl2 (Kanipes, M. I., Lin, S., Cotter, R. J., and Raetz, C. R. H. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1156-1163). A Ca2+-induced, membrane-bound enzyme was responsible for the transfer of the pEtN unit to the Kdo domain. We now report the identification of the gene encoding the pEtN transferase. E. coli yhjW was cloned and overexpressed, because it is homologous to a putative pEtN transferase implicated in the modification of the beta-chain heptose residue of Neisseria meningitidis lipo-oligosaccharide (Mackinnon, F. G., Cox, A. D., Plested, J. S., Tang, C. M., Makepeace, K., Coull, P. A., Wright, J. C., Chalmers, R., Hood, D. W., Richards, J. C., and Moxon, E. R. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 43, 931-943). In vitro assays with Kdo2-4'-[32P]lipid A as the acceptor showed that YhjW (renamed EptB) utilizes phosphatidylethanolamine in the presence of Ca2+ to transfer the pEtN group. Stoichiometric amounts of diacylglycerol were generated during the EptB-catalyzed transfer of pEtN to Kdo2-lipid A. EptB is an inner membrane protein of 574 amino acid residues with five predicted trans-membrane segments within its N-terminal region. An in-frame replacement of eptB with a kanamycin resistance cassette rendered E. coli WBB06 (but not wild-type W3110) hypersensitive to CaCl2 at 5 mM or higher. Ca2+ hypersensitivity was suppressed by excess Mg2+ in the medium or by restoring the LPS core of WBB06. The latter was achieved by reintroducing the waaC and waaF genes, which encode LPS heptosyl transferases I and II, respectively. Our data demonstrate that pEtN modification of the outer Kdo protected cells containing heptose-deficient LPS from damage by high concentrations of Ca2+. Based on its sequence similarity to EptA(PmrC), we propose that the active site of Ept

  1. Detection and quantification of RNA 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Karijolich, John; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2016-07-01

    RNA-guided RNA modification is a naturally occurring process that introduces 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation into rRNA, spliceosomal snRNA and several other types of RNA. The Box C/D ribonucleoproteins (RNP) and Box H/ACA RNP, each containing one unique guide RNA (Box C/D RNA or Box H/ACA RNA) and a set of core proteins, are responsible for 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation respectively. Box C/D RNA and Box H/ACA RNA provide the modification specificity through base pairing with their RNA substrate. These post-transcriptional modifications could profoundly alter the properties and functions of substrate RNAs. Thus it is desirable to establish reliable and standardized modification methods to study biological functions of modified nucleotides in RNAs. Here, we present several sensitive and efficient methods and protocols for detecting and quantifying post-transcriptional 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation. PMID:26853326

  2. Cocaine inhibits extraneuronal O-methylation of exogenous norepinephrine in nasal and oral tissues of the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    de la Lande, I.S.; Parker, D.A.S.; Proctor, C.H.; Marino, V.; Mackay-Sim, A.

    1987-11-30

    Nasal mucosa (respirator and olfactory) and lingual gingiva of the rabbit were depleted of their sympathetic nerves by superior cervical ganglionectomy. In the innervated nasal mucosa, exogenous tritiated norepinephrine (/sup 3/H-NE) was metabolized mainly to tritiated 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol (/sup 3/HDOPEG) and 3,4-dihydroxy mandelic acid (/sup 3/HDOMA), whereas after denervation it was metabolized mainly to tritiated normetanephrine (/sup 3/HNMN). In the denervated mucosa, cocaine(30umol/l) inhibited /sup 3/HNMN formation by 50-60%. Cocaine also inhibited /sup 3/HNMN formation by 60% in the denervated lingual gingiva. It is concluded that the tissues metabolize /sup 3/H-NE via a cocaine-sensitive extraneuronal uptake and O-methylating system similar to that which has been shown to be present in dental pulp. 17 references, 1 table.

  3. Recognition of 2'-O-methylated 3'-end of piRNA by the PAZ domain of a Piwi protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bernd; Kirkpatrick, John P; Eckhardt, Stephanie; Reuter, Michael; Rocha, Elsa A; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Sehr, Peter; Pillai, Ramesh S; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2011-02-01

    Piwi proteins are germline-specific Argonautes that associate with small RNAs called Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and together with these RNAs are implicated in transposon silencing. The PAZ domain of Argonaute proteins recognizes the 3'-end of the RNA, which in the case of piRNAs is invariably modified with a 2'-O-methyl group. Here, we present the solution structure of the PAZ domain from the mouse Piwi protein, MIWI, in complex with an 8-mer piRNA mimic. The methyl group is positioned in a hydrophobic cavity made of conserved amino acids from strand β7 and helix α3, where it is contacted by the side chain of methionine-382. Our structure is similar to that of Ago-PAZ, but subtle differences illustrate how the PAZ domain has evolved to accommodate distinct 3' ends from a variety of RNA substrates.

  4. Stabilization and detection of hydrophylloquinone as di-O-methyl derivative.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, Rodrigo A C; de Moraes, Marcilio M; Cebrián-Torrejón, Gerardo; Porta, Exequiel O; Doménech-Carbó, Antonio; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Katzin, Alejandro M; Kato, Massuo J

    2016-10-15

    Phylloquinone is a redox active naphthoquinone involved in electron transport in plants. The function of this reduced form remains unclear due to its instability, which has precluded detection. Herein, a simple method that permits the stabilization of the reduced form of phylloquinone by di-O-methylation and HPLC detection is described.

  5. Biosynthesis of 8-O-methylated benzoxazinoid defense compounds in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benzoxazinoids are important defense compounds in grasses. Here, we investigated the biosynthesis and biological roles of the 8-O-methylated benzoxazinoids, DIM2BOA-Glc and HDM2BOA-Glc. Using quantitative trait locus mapping and heterologous expression, we identified a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxy...

  6. Structural analysis of the O-polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide from Azospirillum brasilense Jm6B2 containing 3-O-methyl-D-rhamnose (D-acofriose).

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alevtina S; Dmitrenok, Andrey S; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Knirel, Yuriy A; Ignatov, Vladimir V

    2012-07-01

    Two types of neutral O-polysaccharides were obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide isolated by phenol-water extraction from the asymbiotic diazotrophic rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Jm6B2. The following structure of the major O-polysaccharide was established by composition and methylation (ethylation) analyses, Smith degradation, and 1D and 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy: [structure: see text] where a non-stoichiometric (~60%) 3-O-methylation of D-rhamnose is indicated by italics.

  7. Genetic basis for Rhizobium etli CE3 O-antigen O-methylated residues that vary according to growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Kristylea J; Box, Jodie M; Noel, K Dale

    2010-02-01

    The Rhizobium etli CE3 O antigen is a fixed-length heteropolymer with O methylation being the predominant type of sugar modification. There are two O-methylated residues that occur, on average, once per complete O antigen: a multiply O-methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation of a fucose residue within a repeating unit. The amount of the methylated terminal fucose decreases and the amount of 2-O-methylfucose increases when bacteria are grown in the presence of the host plant, Phaseolus vulgaris, or its seed exudates. Insertion mutagenesis was used to identify open reading frames required for the presence of these O-methylated residues. The presence of the methylated terminal fucose required genes wreA, wreB, wreC, wreD, and wreF, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses required the methyltransferase domain of bifunctional gene wreM. Mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose, lacking only 2-O methylation, or lacking both the methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation exhibited no other lipopolysaccharide structural defects. Thus, neither of these decorations is required for normal O-antigen length, transport, or assembly into the final lipopolysaccharide. This is in contrast to certain enteric bacteria in which the absence of a terminal decoration severely affects O-antigen length and transport. R. etli mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose were not altered in symbiosis with host Phaseolus vulgaris, whereas mutants lacking only 2-O-methylfucose exhibited a delay in nodule development during symbiosis. These results support previous conclusions that the methylated terminal fucose is dispensable for symbiosis, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses somehow facilitates early events in symbiosis. PMID:19948805

  8. Genetic Basis for Rhizobium etli CE3 O-Antigen O-Methylated Residues That Vary According to Growth Conditions▿

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Kristylea J.; Box, Jodie M.; Noel, K. Dale

    2010-01-01

    The Rhizobium etli CE3 O antigen is a fixed-length heteropolymer with O methylation being the predominant type of sugar modification. There are two O-methylated residues that occur, on average, once per complete O antigen: a multiply O-methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation of a fucose residue within a repeating unit. The amount of the methylated terminal fucose decreases and the amount of 2-O-methylfucose increases when bacteria are grown in the presence of the host plant, Phaseolus vulgaris, or its seed exudates. Insertion mutagenesis was used to identify open reading frames required for the presence of these O-methylated residues. The presence of the methylated terminal fucose required genes wreA, wreB, wreC, wreD, and wreF, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses required the methyltransferase domain of bifunctional gene wreM. Mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose, lacking only 2-O methylation, or lacking both the methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation exhibited no other lipopolysaccharide structural defects. Thus, neither of these decorations is required for normal O-antigen length, transport, or assembly into the final lipopolysaccharide. This is in contrast to certain enteric bacteria in which the absence of a terminal decoration severely affects O-antigen length and transport. R. etli mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose were not altered in symbiosis with host Phaseolus vulgaris, whereas mutants lacking only 2-O-methylfucose exhibited a delay in nodule development during symbiosis. These results support previous conclusions that the methylated terminal fucose is dispensable for symbiosis, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses somehow facilitates early events in symbiosis. PMID:19948805

  9. Bordetella pertussis waaA Encodes a Monofunctional 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-d-manno-Octulosonic Acid Transferase That Can Complement an Escherichia coli waaA Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Tomoko; White, Kimberley A.; Allen, Andrew G.; Peacock, Michael; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contains a single 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue, whereas LPS from Escherichia coli contains at least two. Here we report that B. pertussis waaA encodes an enzyme capable of transferring only a single Kdo during the biosynthesis of LPS and that this activity is sufficient to complement an E. coli waaA mutation. PMID:10198035

  10. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Structural basis for m7G recognition and 2′-O-methyl discrimination in capped RNAs by the innate immune receptor RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Devarkar, Swapnil C.; Wang, Chen; Miller, Matthew T.; Ramanathan, Anand; Jiang, Fuguo; Khan, Abdul G.; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RNAs with 5′-triphosphate (ppp) are detected in the cytoplasm principally by the innate immune receptor Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I), whose activation triggers a Type I IFN response. It is thought that self RNAs like mRNAs are not recognized by RIG-I because 5′ppp is capped by the addition of a 7-methyl guanosine (m7G) (Cap-0) and a 2′-O-methyl (2′-OMe) group to the 5′-end nucleotide ribose (Cap-1). Here we provide structural and mechanistic basis for exact roles of capping and 2′-O-methylation in evading RIG-I recognition. Surprisingly, Cap-0 and 5′ppp double-stranded (ds) RNAs bind to RIG-I with nearly identical Kd values and activate RIG-I’s ATPase and cellular signaling response to similar extents. On the other hand, Cap-0 and 5′ppp single-stranded RNAs did not bind RIG-I and are signaling inactive. Three crystal structures of RIG-I complexes with dsRNAs bearing 5′OH, 5′ppp, and Cap-0 show that RIG-I can accommodate the m7G cap in a cavity created through conformational changes in the helicase-motif IVa without perturbing the ppp interactions. In contrast, Cap-1 modifications abrogate RIG-I signaling through a mechanism involving the H830 residue, which we show is crucial for discriminating between Cap-0 and Cap-1 RNAs. Furthermore, m7G capping works synergistically with 2′-O-methylation to weaken RNA affinity by 200-fold and lower ATPase activity. Interestingly, a single H830A mutation restores both high-affinity binding and signaling activity with 2′-O-methylated dsRNAs. Our work provides new structural insights into the mechanisms of host and viral immune evasion from RIG-I, explaining the complexity of cap structures over evolution. PMID:26733676

  12. Detection and quantification of flavivirus NS5 methyl-transferase activities.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Bodenreider, Christophe; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Flavivirus NS5 is the most conserved protein amongst the flavivirus proteins and is an essential enzyme for viral mRNA capping and replication. It encodes a methyl-transferase (MTase) domain at its N-terminal region which carries out sequential N7 and 2'-O methylation, resulting in the formation of the cap1 structure on its viral RNA genome. Two key methods have been established to measure these activities in vitro: thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and scintillation proximity assays (SPA). TLC offers the advantage of direct visualization of the amounts and types of cap structures formed whilst the SPA assay is more sensitive and quantitative. It is also amenable to high-throughput compound screening. The drawback of both assays is the need for radioisotope usage. We further describe the adaptation of a nonradioactive immune-competitive fluorescence polarization assay for detection of dengue virus MTase activity. PMID:23821274

  13. Investigation of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein metabolites in rats by ultra-flow liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Nian-Guang; Tang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Ze-Xi; Gu, Ting; Wu, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Peng-Xuan; Yu, Shao-Peng; Duan, Jin-Ao; Shi, Zhi-Hao

    2016-10-01

    Context Scutellarin (1) has been widely used in China to treat acute cerebral infarction and paralysis induced by cerebrovascular diseases. However, scutellarin (1) has unstable metabolic characteristics. Objective The metabolic profile of 6-O-scutellarein was studied to determine its metabolic stability in vivo. Materials and methods In this study, a method of UFLC/Q-TOF MS was used to study the 6-O-methyl-scutellarein metabolites in rat plasma, urine, bile and faeces after oral administration of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (3). One hour after oral administration of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (3) (34 mg/kg), approximately 1 mL blood samples were collected in EP tubes from all groups. Bile, urine and faeces samples were collected from eight SD rats during 0-24 h after oral administration. The mass defect filtering, dynamic background subtraction and information dependent acquisition techniques were also used to identify the 6-O-methyl-scutellarein metabolites. Results The parent compound 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (3) was found in rat urine, plasma, bile and faeces. The glucuronide conjugate of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (M1, M2), diglucuronide conjugate of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (M3), sulphate conjugate of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (M4), glucuronide and sulphate conjugate of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (M5), methylated conjugate of 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (M6) were detected in rat urine. M1, M2 and M3 were detected in rat bile. M1 was found in rat plasma and M7 was detected in faeces. Discussion and conclusion Because the parent compound 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (3) was found in rat urine, plasma, bile and faeces, we speculate that 6-O-methyl-scutellarein (3) had good metabolic stability in vivo. This warrants further study to develop it as a promising candidate for the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

  14. Synthesis, optical and electrochemical properties of substituted 2-cinnamoyl-1, 3-indandione O-methyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malina, Ilze; Kampars, Valdis; Turovska, Baiba

    2016-07-01

    Seven new 2-cinnamoyl-1,3-indandione (2CID) O-methyl ethers with different substituents (R = -H, -CH3, -OCH3, -N(C6H5)2, -N(CH2CH2CN)2, julolidyl, -N(CH3)2) in 4-position of the cinnamoyl moiety were synthesized. The methylation with dimethylsulfate occurred at the oxygen atom of the exocyclic enol group with high selectivity. The synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, IR, UV-Vis and luminescence spectroscopy, their electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained results indicates that introducing an electron donating substituents in the 4-position of cinnamoyl moiety facilitates electrochemical oxidation, remarkably shifts absorption and emission bands to longer wavelengths, simultaneously increases extinction coefficient (ε). O-methyl ethers with strong electron donating groups (R = -N(C6H5)2, -N(CH2CH2CN)2, julolidyl, -N(CH3)2) in molecule are characterized by luminescence with maximum in range from 547 to 647 nm and absolute photoluminescence quantum yields from 0.02 to 0.32. Quantum yield (QY) of chromophore containing julolidyl fragment is solvent dependent. It was 0.32 in chloroform and decreased in other polar (ethanol, acetone) solvents.

  15. Ochnaflavone and ochnaflavone 7-O-methyl ether two antibacterial biflavonoids from Ochna pretoriensis (Ochnaceae).

    PubMed

    Makhafola, Tshepiso J; Samuel, Babatunde B; Elgorashi, Esameldin E; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2012-12-01

    The acetone extract of Ochna pretoriensis was evaluated for antibacterial activity using bioautography and serial microplate dilution methods against four nosocomial bacterial pathogens namely: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extract led to the isolation of two antibacterial biflavonoids, ochnaflavone and ochnaflavone 7-O-methyl ether. Gram-negative bacteria were more sensitive to the isolated compounds than the Gram-positive bacteria (MIC values: 31.3 microg/mL for P. aeruginosa and 62.5 microg/mL for S. aureus). In addition, the isolated compounds were assessed for their potential toxic effects in the MTT toxicity assay using monkey kidney vero cells and Ames genotoxicity test using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. LC50 values were 125.9 microg/mL for ochnaflavone and 162.0/microg/mL for ochnaflavone 7-O-methyl ether. The isolated compounds have selectivity index values ranging from 1.29 to 4.03. Selectivity index values higher than one indicate that test samples are less toxic to the host cells than to the pathogens. The biflavonoids did not have any mutagenic effects in the Salmonella/microsome assay without metabolic activation.

  16. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2׳-O methylation.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jennifer L; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    N-7 and 2'-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m(7)GpppN; cap 1, m(7)GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2'-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5'-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease. PMID:25682435

  17. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Jennifer L.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-05-15

    N-7 and 2′-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m{sup 7}GpppN; cap 1, m{sup 7}GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2′-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2′-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5′-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease.

  18. Characterization of the genes encoding beta-ketoadipate: succinyl-coenzyme A transferase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Parales, R E; Harwood, C S

    1992-01-01

    beta-Ketoadipate:succinyl-coenzyme A transferase (beta-ketoadipate:succinyl-CoA transferase) (EC 2.8.3.6) carries out the penultimate step in the conversion of benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in bacteria utilizing the beta-ketoadipate pathway. This report describes the characterization of a DNA fragment from Pseudomonas putida that encodes this enzyme. The fragment complemented mutants defective in the synthesis of the CoA transferase, and two proteins of sizes appropriate to encode the two nonidentical subunits of the enzyme were produced in Escherichia coli when the fragment was placed under the control of a phage T7 promoter. DNA sequence analysis revealed two open reading frames, designated pcaI and pcaJ, that were separated by 8 bp, suggesting that they may comprise an operon. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the P. putida CoA transferase genes with the sequences of two other bacterial CoA transferases and that of succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase from pig heart suggests that the homodimeric structure of the mammalian enzyme may have resulted from a gene fusion of the bacterial alpha and beta subunit genes during evolution. Conserved functional groups important to the catalytic activity of CoA transferases were also identified. Images PMID:1624453

  19. Direct and site-specific quantification of RNA 2'-O-methylation by PCR with an engineered DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Joos; Marx, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Methylation of the 2'-hydroxyl-group of ribonucleotides is found in all major classes of RNA in eukaryotes and is one of the most abundant posttranscriptional modifications of stable RNAs. In spite of intense studies, the multiple functions of RNA 2'-O-methylation are still not understood. One major obstacle in the field are the technical demanding detection methods, which are typically laborious and do not always deliver unambiguous results. We present a thermostable KlenTaq DNA polymerase variant with significant reverse transcription activity that is able to discriminate 2'-O-methylated from unmethylated RNAs. The engineered enzyme catalyzes DNA synthesis from DNA as well as RNA templates and enables expeditious quantification of 2'-O-methylation of individual nucleotides directly from total RNA extracts by a simple qRT-PCR. PMID:27016740

  20. Direct and site-specific quantification of RNA 2′-O-methylation by PCR with an engineered DNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbrenner, Joos; Marx, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of the 2′-hydroxyl-group of ribonucleotides is found in all major classes of RNA in eukaryotes and is one of the most abundant posttranscriptional modifications of stable RNAs. In spite of intense studies, the multiple functions of RNA 2′-O-methylation are still not understood. One major obstacle in the field are the technical demanding detection methods, which are typically laborious and do not always deliver unambiguous results. We present a thermostable KlenTaq DNA polymerase variant with significant reverse transcription activity that is able to discriminate 2′-O-methylated from unmethylated RNAs. The engineered enzyme catalyzes DNA synthesis from DNA as well as RNA templates and enables expeditious quantification of 2′-O-methylation of individual nucleotides directly from total RNA extracts by a simple qRT-PCR. PMID:27016740

  1. Dichloromethane metabolism to formaldehyde and reaction of formaldehyde with nucleic acids in hepatocytes of rodents and humans with and without glutathione S-transferase T1 and M1 genes.

    PubMed

    Casanova, M; Bell, D A; Heck, H D

    1997-06-01

    Metabolism of dichloromethane (DCM) to formaldehyde (HCHO) via a glutathione S-transferase (GST) pathway is thought to be required for its carcinogenic effects in B6C3F1 mice. In humans, this reaction is catalyzed primarily by the protein product of the gene GSTT1, a member of the Theta class of GST, and perhaps to a small extent by the protein product of the gene GSTM1. Humans are polymorphic with respect to both genes. Since HCHO may bind to both DNA and RNA forming DNA-protein crosslinks (DPX) and RNA-formaldehyde adducts (RFA), respectively, these products were determined in isolated hepatocytes from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, Syrian golden hamsters, and humans to compare species with respect to the production of HCHO from DCM and its reaction with nucleic acids. Only mouse hepatocytes formed detectable amounts of DPX, the quantities of which corresponded well with quantities of DPX formed in the livers of mice exposed to DCM in vivo [Casanova, M., Conolly, R.B., and Heck, H. d'A. (1996). Fundam. Appl. Toxicol. 31, 103-116]. Hepatocytes from all rodent species and from humans with functional GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes formed RFA. No RFA were detected in human cells lacking these genes. Yields of RFA in hepatocytes of mice were 4-fold higher than in those of rats, 7-fold higher than in those of humans, and 14-fold higher than in those of hamsters. The RFA:DPX ratio in mouse hepatocytes incubated with DCM was approximately 9.0 +/- 1.4, but it was 1.1 +/- 0.3 when HCHO was added directly to the medium, indicating that HCHO generated internally from DCM is not equivalent to that added externally to cells and that it may occupy separate pools. DPX were not detected in human hepatocytes even at concentrations equivalent to an in vivo exposure of 10,000 ppm; however, the possibility that very small amounts of DPX were produced from DCM cannot be excluded, since HCHO was formed in human cells. Maximal amounts of DPXliver that might be formed in humans were predicted from the

  2. Apiose and mono-O-methyl sugars as minor constituents of the leaves of deciduous trees and various other species

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, J. S. D.; Cheshire, M. V.

    1971-01-01

    1. Leaves of a number of species were hydrolysed with aqueous sulphuric acid and the resulting mixtures of sugars were fractionated by chromatography on activated charcoal. Paper chromatography of the fractions showed the presence in all the hydrolysates of minor constituents with RF values similar to or greater than those of the common hexoses and pentoses. 2. Two of these were identified as 2-O-methylxylose and 2-O-methylfucose. Estimates of the amounts present in whole leaves, and in fractions prepared from them, showed that they were associated with the hemicelluloses. 3. A third constituent was identified, by the formation of its di-isopropylidene derivative, as apiose. It also was associated chiefly with the hemicellulose fraction; none could be found in aqueous extracts from leaves of Tilia vulgaris, nor in aqueous extracts of Zostera marina, in which apiose is a major constituent of the water-insoluble polysaccharide. 4. A further constituent, after further purification by preparative paper chromatography, was tentatively identified, by gas–liquid chromatography of derivatives, as 3-O-methylgalactose, and was probably accompanied by small amounts of 4-O-methylgalactose. 5. These observations confirm the widespread occurrence of 2-O-methylxylose, 2-O-methylfucose and apiose, but 3-O-methylgalactose was hitherto known only in slippery-elm mucilage, and 4-O-methylgalactose in soil polysaccharides. Some experiments on the digestion of leaf hemicellulose fractions by snail crop-juice suggested that the mono-O-methyl sugars might confer resistance to enzymic degradation. PMID:5135242

  3. Structure and conformational analysis of spiroketals from 6-O-methyl-9(E)-hydroxyiminoerythronolide A

    PubMed Central

    Ćaleta, Irena; Žiher, Dinko; Vine, Mark B; Elenkov, Ivaylo J; Dukši, Marko; Gembarovski, Dubravka; Ilijaš, Marina; Dragojević, Snježana; Malnar, Ivica; Alihodžić, Sulejman

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three novel spiroketals were prepared by a one-pot transformation of 6-O-methyl-9(E)-hydroxyiminoerythronolide A. We present the formation of a [4.5]spiroketal moiety within the macrolide lactone ring, but also the unexpected formation of a 10-C=11-C double bond and spontaneous change of stereochemistry at position 8-C. As a result, a thermodynamically stable structure was obtained. The structures of two new diastereomeric, unsaturated spiroketals, their configurations and conformations, were determined by means of NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The reaction kinetics and mechanistic aspects of this transformation are discussed. These rearrangements provide a facile synthesis of novel macrolide scaffolds. PMID:26425201

  4. Elimination of oxidative degradation during the per-O-methylation of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ciucanu, Ionel; Costello, Catherine E

    2003-12-31

    The possible oxidative degradation mechanism occurring during the per-O-methylation of carbohydrates in dimethyl sulfoxide with methyl iodide in the presence of base is described. Evidence is presented that this process occurs only under anhydrous conditions when there is a long reaction time between the carbohydrate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and methyl iodide, followed by reaction with the base. Under these specific conditions, the oxidative degradation of alditols, and cyclic carbohydrates, with and without a free hemiacetal group, is observed. The reaction between carbohydrate and methyl iodide in dimethyl sulfoxide can result in a complete oxidative degradation depending on the type of carbohydrate and the time of reaction. The oxidative degradation can be accelerated by replacing methyl iodide with dimethyl sulfate. Mass spectrometric identification of the degradation products of d-glucitol indicates simultaneous oxidation processes at all the hydroxyl groups, with site dependent rates of their reactivity. This oxidative process is not a characteristic of the methylation of carbohydrates in dimethyl sulfoxide with methyl iodide in the presence of solid sodium hydroxide and can be totally avoided by treating the carbohydrate with powdered sodium hydroxide before introduction of methyl iodide under nonanhydrous conditions, or by adding a trace of water in dimethyl sulfoxide before methyl iodide, or by using N,N-dimethylacetamide as the solvent. The degradation of the per-O-methylated carbohydrates in the liquid-liquid extraction process is also taken into account, and it is found that the degradation process can be avoid by neutralization of the base before extraction, by using benzene or tetrachloromethane as extraction solvent, and by drying the final organic extract.

  5. Glutathione transferases: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron

    2011-05-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are one of the most important families of detoxifying enzymes in nature. The classic activity of the GSTs is conjugation of compounds with electrophilic centers to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), but many other activities are now associated with GSTs, including steroid and leukotriene biosynthesis, peroxide degradation, double-bond cis-trans isomerization, dehydroascorbate reduction, Michael addition, and noncatalytic "ligandin" activity (ligand binding and transport). Since the first GST structure was determined in 1991, there has been an explosion in structural data across GSTs of all three families: the cytosolic GSTs, the mitochondrial GSTs, and the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG family). In this review, the major insights into GST structure and function will be discussed.

  6. Bioconversion of α-linolenic acid to n-3 LCPUFA and expression of PPAR-alpha, acyl Coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine acyl transferase I are incremented after feeding rats with α-linolenic acid-rich oils.

    PubMed

    González-Mañán, Daniel; Tapia, Gladys; Gormaz, Juan Guillermo; D'Espessailles, Amanda; Espinosa, Alejandra; Masson, Lilia; Varela, Patricia; Valenzuela, Alfonso; Valenzuela, Rodrigo

    2012-07-01

    High dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids in relation to n-3 fatty acids may generate health disorders, such as cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Fish consumption rich in n-3 fatty acids is low in Latin America, it being necessary to seek other alternatives to provide α-linolenic acid (ALA), precursor of n-3 LCPUFA (EPA and DHA). Two innovative oils were assayed, chia (Salvia hispanica) and rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa). This study evaluated hepatic bioconversion of ALA to EPA and DHA, expression of PPAR-α, acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and carnitine acyltransferase I (CAT-I), and accumulation of EPA and DHA in plasma and adipose tissue in Sprague-Dawley rats. Three experimental groups were fed 21 days: sunflower oil (SFO, control); chia oil (CO); rosa mosqueta oil (RMO). Fatty acid composition of total lipids and phospholipids from plasma, hepatic and adipose tissue was assessed by gas-liquid chromatography and TLC. Expression of PPAR-α (RT-PCR) and ACOX1 and CAT-I (Western blot). CO and RMO increased plasma, hepatic and adipose tissue levels of ALA, EPA and DHA and decreased n-6:n-3 ratio compared to SFO (p < 0.05, One-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls test). CO increased levels of ALA and EPA compared to RMO (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed for DHA levels. CO also increased the expression of PPAR-α, ACOX1 and CAT-I. Only CAT-I levels were increased by RO. CO and RMO may be a nutritional alternative to provide ALA for its bioconversion to EPA and DHA, and to increase the expression of PPAR-α, ACOX1 and CAT-I, especially CO-oil.

  7. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, C H

    1976-02-29

    In man congential lack of enzyme of the purine salvage system, hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HG-PRT E.C. 2.4.2.8), is mostly accompanied by a picture known as the Lesch-Nyhan snydrome. The degree of deficiency may vary from zero to a few percent of normal activity but a correlation between the severity of HG-PRT deficiency and the clinical picture has not been observed, no more than a correlation HG-PRT deficiency and neurological dysfunction. But individuals with undetectable HG-PRT activity but without the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome have been described. Patients with partial HG-PRT defiency have clinically distinctive findings. Sometimes mild neurological abnormalities are observed. Because of marked overproduction of ric acid severe gouty arthritis and renal dysfunction are often encountered in both complete and partial deficiency. There is considerable molecular heterogeneity in HG-PRT deficiency in man. Mutant ebnzymes may exhibit different kinetic and electrophoretic properties, indicating that hterwe might be a mutation on the structural gene coding for HG-PRT. Lack of HG-PRT disturbs purine interconversions profoundly. In addition to an important function of HG-PRT in the uptake of the purine hypoxantine and guanine into the cell, the effective uptake of inosine, guanosine and adenosine also seems to be dependent on HG-PRT...

  8. Preservation of mouse sperm by convective drying and storing in 3-O-methyl-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lee, Gloria Y; Lawitts, Joel A; Toner, Mehmet; Biggers, John D

    2012-01-01

    With the fast advancement in the genetics and bio-medical fields, the vast number of valuable transgenic and rare genetic mouse models need to be preserved. Preservation of mouse sperm by convective drying and subsequent storing at above freezing temperatures could dramatically reduce the cost and facilitate shipping. Mouse sperm were convectively dried under nitrogen gas in the Na-EGTA solution containing 100 mmol/L 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and stored in LiCl sorption jars (Relative Humidity, RH, 12%) at 4°C and 22°C for up to one year. The functionality of these sperm samples after storage was tested by intracytoplasmic injection into mouse oocytes. The percentages of blastocysts produced from sperm stored at 4°C for 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months were 62.6%, 53.4%, 39.6%, 33.3%, and 30.4%, respectively, while those stored at 22°C for 1, 2, and 3 months were 28.8%, 26.6%, and 12.2%, respectively. Transfer of 38 two- to four-cell embryos from sperm stored at 4°C for 1 year produced two live pups while 59 two- to four-cell embryos from sperm stored at 22°C for 3 months also produced two live pups. Although all the pups looked healthy at 3 weeks of age, normality of offspring produced using convectively dried sperm needs further investigation. The percentages of blastocyst from sperm stored in the higher relative humidity conditions of NaBr and MgCl(2) jars and driest condition of P(2)O(5) jars at 4°C and 22°C were all lower. A simple method of mouse sperm preservation is demonstrated. Three-O-methyl-D-glucose, a metabolically inactive derivative of glucose, offers significant protection for dried mouse sperm at above freezing temperatures without the need for poration of cell membrane.

  9. Metabolic stability and inhibitory effect of O-methylated theaflavins on H2O2-induced oxidative damage in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kirita, Masanobu; Abe, Yuko; Miyata, Satoshi; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Kanda, Tomomasa; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Seven new O-methylated theaflavins (TFs) were synthesized by using O-methyltransferase from an edible mushroom. Using TFs and O-methylated TFs, metabolic stability in pooled human liver S9 fractions and inhibitory effect on H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in human HepG2 cells were investigated. In O-methylation of theaflavin 3'-O-gallate (TF3'G), metabolic stability was potentiated by an increase in the number of introduced methyl groups. O-methylation of TF3,3'G did not affect metabolic stability, which was likely because of a remaining 3-O-galloyl group. The inhibitory effect on oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the viability of H(2)O(2)-damaged HepG2 cells treated with TFs and O-methylated TFs. TF3,3'G and O-methylated TFs increased cell viabilities significantly compared with DMSO, which was the compound vehicle (p < 0.05), and improved to approximately 100%. Only TF3'G did not significantly increase cell viability. It was suggested that the inhibitory effect on H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage was potentiated by O-methylation or O-galloylation of TFs. PMID:25229848

  10. (1) H NMR analysis of O-methyl-inositol isomers: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C; De Assis, João Vitor; Anconi, Cleber P A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (1) H NMR chemical shifts for l-quebrachitol isomers were performed using the B3LYP functional employing the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2d,p) basis sets. The effect of the solvent on the B3LYP-calculated NMR spectrum was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model. Comparison is made with experimental (1) H NMR spectroscopic data, which shed light on the average uncertainty present in DFT calculations of chemical shifts and showed that the best match between experimental and theoretical B3LYP (1) H NMR profiles is a good strategy to assign the molecular structure present in the sample handled in the experimental measurements. Among four plausible O-methyl-inositol isomers, the l-quebrachitol 2a structure was unambiguously assigned based only on the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical (1) H NMR chemical shift data. The B3LYP infrared (IR) spectrum was also calculated for the four isomers and compared with the experimental data, with analysis of the theoretical IR profiles corroborating assignment of the 2a structure. Therefore, it is confirmed in this study that a combined experimental/DFT spectroscopic investigation is a powerful tool in structural/conformational analysis studies. PMID:22865668

  11. (1) H NMR analysis of O-methyl-inositol isomers: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C; De Assis, João Vitor; Anconi, Cleber P A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (1) H NMR chemical shifts for l-quebrachitol isomers were performed using the B3LYP functional employing the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2d,p) basis sets. The effect of the solvent on the B3LYP-calculated NMR spectrum was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model. Comparison is made with experimental (1) H NMR spectroscopic data, which shed light on the average uncertainty present in DFT calculations of chemical shifts and showed that the best match between experimental and theoretical B3LYP (1) H NMR profiles is a good strategy to assign the molecular structure present in the sample handled in the experimental measurements. Among four plausible O-methyl-inositol isomers, the l-quebrachitol 2a structure was unambiguously assigned based only on the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical (1) H NMR chemical shift data. The B3LYP infrared (IR) spectrum was also calculated for the four isomers and compared with the experimental data, with analysis of the theoretical IR profiles corroborating assignment of the 2a structure. Therefore, it is confirmed in this study that a combined experimental/DFT spectroscopic investigation is a powerful tool in structural/conformational analysis studies.

  12. Distinct and cooperative activities of HESO1 and URT1 nucleotidyl transferases in microRNA turnover in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Liu, Li; Xu, Chi; Zhai, Jixian; Li, Shengben; Lopez, Miguel A; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yu, Yu; Ramachandran, Vanitharani; Ren, Guodong; Yu, Bin; Li, Shigui; Meyers, Blake C; Mo, Beixin; Chen, Xuemei

    2015-04-01

    3' uridylation is increasingly recognized as a conserved RNA modification process associated with RNA turnover in eukaryotes. 2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal ribose protects micro(mi)RNAs from 3' truncation and 3' uridylation in Arabidopsis. Previously, we identified HESO1 as the nucleotidyl transferase that uridylates most unmethylated miRNAs in vivo, but substantial 3' tailing of miRNAs still remains in heso1 loss-of-function mutants. In this study, we found that among nine other potential nucleotidyl transferases, UTP:RNA uridylyltransferase 1 (URT1) is the single most predominant nucleotidyl transferase that tails miRNAs. URT1 and HESO1 prefer substrates with different 3' end nucleotides in vitro and act cooperatively to tail different forms of the same miRNAs in vivo. Moreover, both HESO1 and URT1 exhibit nucleotidyl transferase activity on AGO1-bound miRNAs. Although these enzymes are able to add long tails to AGO1-bound miRNAs, the tailed miRNAs remain associated with AGO1. Moreover, tailing of AGO1-bound miRNA165/6 drastically reduces the slicing activity of AGO1-miR165/6, suggesting that tailing reduces miRNA activity. However, monouridylation of miR171a by URT1 endows the miRNA the ability to trigger the biogenesis of secondary siRNAs. Therefore, 3' tailing could affect the activities of miRNAs in addition to leading to miRNA degradation. PMID:25928405

  13. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-08-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3' aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNA(Leu) (anticodon 5'-CAG-3') isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNA(Leu) (CAG)-a G₃:C₇₀ base pair and a set of 4 nt (C₇₂, A₄:U₆₉, C₆₈)-that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed.

  14. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3′ aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNALeu (anticodon 5′-CAG-3′) isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNALeu (CAG)—a G3:C70 base pair and a set of 4 nt (C72, A4:U69, C68)—that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed. PMID:24935875

  15. Peptidyl transferase inhibition by the nascent leader peptide of an inducible cat gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z; Rogers, E J; Lovett, P S

    1993-01-01

    The site of ribosome stalling in the leader of cat transcripts is critical to induction of downstream translation. Site-specific stalling requires translation of the first five leader codons and the presence of chloramphenicol, a sequence-independent inhibitor of ribosome elongation. We demonstrate in this report that a synthetic peptide (the 5-mer) corresponding to the N-terminal five codons of the cat-86 leader inhibits peptidyl transferase in vitro. The N-terminal 2-, 3-, and 4-mers and the reverse 5-mer (reverse amino acid sequence of the 5-mer) are virtually without effect on peptidyl transferase. A missense mutation in the cat-86 leader that abolishes induction in vivo corresponds to an amino acid replacement in the 5-mer that completely relieves peptidyl transferase inhibition. In contrast, a missense mutation that does not interfere with in vivo induction corresponds to an amino acid replacement in the 5-mer that does not significantly alter peptidyl transferase inhibition. Our results suggest that peptidyl transferase inhibition by the nascent cat-86 5-mer peptide may be the primary determinant of the site of ribosome stalling in the leader. A model based on this concept can explain the site specificity of ribosome stalling as well as the response of induction to very low levels of the antibiotic inducer. Images PMID:7690023

  16. Effects of two venotropic drugs on inactivation and O-methylation of catecholamines in an isolated canine vein.

    PubMed

    Araújo, D; Gulati, O; Osswald, W

    1985-10-01

    Clobenoside (1-O-ethyl-3-O-propyl-5,6-di-O-chlorbenzyl-D-glucofuranose, CL) and Venoruton [O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides, HR] did not cause supersensitivity to either exogenous or endogenous (stimulation-released) noradrenaline, in strips of the saphenous vein of the dog. Both drugs caused a significant blockade of the inactivation of noradrenaline, in oil immersion experiments. In incubation experiments with 3H-isoprenaline, CL and HR (100 to 900 mumol/l) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of O-methylation; they had additive effects with the COMT inhibitor, U-0521 and their effects were abolished in the presence of hydrocortisone. In incubation experiments with 3H-adrenaline, formation of metanephrine was inhibited, neuronal uptake and oxidative deamination remaining unaffected. After intravenous administration of HR (100 mg/kg), the O-methylating capacity of blood vessels was similarly reduced. It is concluded that CL and HR affected exclusively the extraneuronal O-methylating system (probably both by inhibiting COMT and depressing uptake) and that this effect may contribute to their therapeutic actions.

  17. Theoretical spectroscopic characterization at low temperatures of S-methyl thioformate and O-methyl thioformate.

    PubMed

    Senent, M L; Puzzarini, C; Hochlaf, M; Domínguez-Gómez, R; Carvajal, M

    2014-09-14

    Highly correlated ab initio methods are employed to determine spectroscopic properties at low temperatures of two S-analogs of methyl formate: S-methyl thioformate CH3-S-CHO (MSCHO) and O-methyl thioformate CH3-O-CHS (MOCHS). Both species are detectable and they are expected to play an important role in Astrochemistry. Molecular properties are compared with those of the O-analog, methyl formate. Both isomers present two conformers cis and trans. cis-CH3-S-CHO represents the most stable structure lying 4372.2 cm(-1) below cis-CH3-O-CHS. The energy difference between the cis and trans forms is drastically lower for MSCHO (1134 cm(-1)) than for MOCHS (1963.6 cm(-1)). Harmonic and anharmonic fundamentals and the corresponding intensities, as well as the rotational constants for the ground vibrational and first excited torsional states and the centrifugal distortions constants, are provided. Low torsional energy levels have been obtained by solving variationally a two dimensional Hamiltonian expressed in terms of the two torsional degrees of freedom. The corresponding 2D potential energy surfaces have been computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The methyl torsional barriers V3(cis) are determined to be 139.7 cm(-1) (CH3-S-CHO) and 670.4 cm(-1) (CH3-O-CHS). The A/E splitting of ground torsional state has been estimated to be 0.438 cm(-1) for CH3-S-CHO and negligible for CH3-O-CHS.

  18. Theoretical spectroscopic characterization at low temperatures of S-methyl thioformate and O-methyl thioformate.

    PubMed

    Senent, M L; Puzzarini, C; Hochlaf, M; Domínguez-Gómez, R; Carvajal, M

    2014-09-14

    Highly correlated ab initio methods are employed to determine spectroscopic properties at low temperatures of two S-analogs of methyl formate: S-methyl thioformate CH3-S-CHO (MSCHO) and O-methyl thioformate CH3-O-CHS (MOCHS). Both species are detectable and they are expected to play an important role in Astrochemistry. Molecular properties are compared with those of the O-analog, methyl formate. Both isomers present two conformers cis and trans. cis-CH3-S-CHO represents the most stable structure lying 4372.2 cm(-1) below cis-CH3-O-CHS. The energy difference between the cis and trans forms is drastically lower for MSCHO (1134 cm(-1)) than for MOCHS (1963.6 cm(-1)). Harmonic and anharmonic fundamentals and the corresponding intensities, as well as the rotational constants for the ground vibrational and first excited torsional states and the centrifugal distortions constants, are provided. Low torsional energy levels have been obtained by solving variationally a two dimensional Hamiltonian expressed in terms of the two torsional degrees of freedom. The corresponding 2D potential energy surfaces have been computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The methyl torsional barriers V3(cis) are determined to be 139.7 cm(-1) (CH3-S-CHO) and 670.4 cm(-1) (CH3-O-CHS). The A/E splitting of ground torsional state has been estimated to be 0.438 cm(-1) for CH3-S-CHO and negligible for CH3-O-CHS. PMID:25217912

  19. Theoretical spectroscopic characterization at low temperatures of S-methyl thioformate and O-methyl thioformate

    SciTech Connect

    Senent, M. L.; Puzzarini, C.; Hochlaf, M.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.

    2014-09-14

    Highly correlated ab initio methods are employed to determine spectroscopic properties at low temperatures of two S-analogs of methyl formate: S-methyl thioformate CH{sub 3}-S-CHO (MSCHO) and O-methyl thioformate CH{sub 3}-O-CHS (MOCHS). Both species are detectable and they are expected to play an important role in Astrochemistry. Molecular properties are compared with those of the O-analog, methyl formate. Both isomers present two conformers cis and trans. cis-CH{sub 3}-S-CHO represents the most stable structure lying 4372.2 cm{sup −1} below cis-CH{sub 3}-O-CHS. The energy difference between the cis and trans forms is drastically lower for MSCHO (1134 cm{sup −1}) than for MOCHS (1963.6 cm{sup −1}). Harmonic and anharmonic fundamentals and the corresponding intensities, as well as the rotational constants for the ground vibrational and first excited torsional states and the centrifugal distortions constants, are provided. Low torsional energy levels have been obtained by solving variationally a two dimensional Hamiltonian expressed in terms of the two torsional degrees of freedom. The corresponding 2D potential energy surfaces have been computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The methyl torsional barriers V{sub 3}(cis) are determined to be 139.7 cm{sup −1} (CH{sub 3}-S-CHO) and 670.4 cm{sup −1} (CH{sub 3}-O-CHS). The A/E splitting of ground torsional state has been estimated to be 0.438 cm{sup −1} for CH{sub 3}-S-CHO and negligible for CH{sub 3}-O-CHS.

  20. Biosynthesis of 8-O-Methylated Benzoxazinoid Defense Compounds in Maize.

    PubMed

    Handrick, Vinzenz; Robert, Christelle A M; Ahern, Kevin R; Zhou, Shaoqun; Machado, Ricardo A R; Maag, Daniel; Glauser, Gaetan; Fernandez-Penny, Felix E; Chandran, Jima N; Rodgers-Melnik, Eli; Schneider, Bernd; Buckler, Edward S; Boland, Wilhelm; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Jander, Georg; Erb, Matthias; Köllner, Tobias G

    2016-07-01

    Benzoxazinoids are important defense compounds in grasses. Here, we investigated the biosynthesis and biological roles of the 8-O-methylated benzoxazinoids, DIM2BOA-Glc and HDM2BOA-Glc. Using quantitative trait locus mapping and heterologous expression, we identified a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (BX13) that catalyzes the conversion of DIMBOA-Glc into a new benzoxazinoid intermediate (TRIMBOA-Glc) by an uncommon reaction involving a hydroxylation and a likely ortho-rearrangement of a methoxy group. TRIMBOA-Glc is then converted to DIM2BOA-Glc by a previously described O-methyltransferase BX7. Furthermore, we identified an O-methyltransferase (BX14) that converts DIM2BOA-Glc to HDM2BOA-Glc. The role of these enzymes in vivo was demonstrated by characterizing recombinant inbred lines, including Oh43, which has a point mutation in the start codon of Bx13 and lacks both DIM2BOA-Glc and HDM2BOA-Glc, and Il14H, which has an inactive Bx14 allele and lacks HDM2BOA-Glc in leaves. Experiments with near-isogenic maize lines derived from crosses between B73 and Oh43 revealed that the absence of DIM2BOA-Glc and HDM2BOA-Glc does not alter the constitutive accumulation or deglucosylation of other benzoxazinoids. The growth of various chewing herbivores was not significantly affected by the absence of BX13-dependent metabolites, while aphid performance increased, suggesting that DIM2BOA-Glc and/or HDM2BOA-Glc provide specific protection against phloem feeding insects. PMID:27317675

  1. [Structure and functions of glutathione transferases].

    PubMed

    Fedets, O M

    2014-01-01

    Data about classification, nomenclature, structure, substrate specificity and role of many glutathione transferase's isoenzymes in cell functions have been summarised. The enzyme has been discovered more than 50 years ago. This family of proteins is updated continuously. It has very different composition and will have demand for system analysis for many years.

  2. Sugar composition of the pectic polysaccharides of charophytes, the closest algal relatives of land-plants: presence of 3-O-methyl-d-galactose residues

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Christina; Gregson, Timothy; Murray, Lorna; Sadler, Ian H.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims During evolution, plants have acquired and/or lost diverse sugar residues as cell-wall constituents. Of particular interest are primordial cell-wall features that existed, and in some cases abruptly changed, during the momentous step whereby land-plants arose from charophytic algal ancestors. Methods Polysaccharides were extracted from four charophyte orders [Chlorokybales (Chlorokybus atmophyticus), Klebsormidiales (Klebsormidium fluitans, K. subtile), Charales (Chara vulgaris, Nitella flexilis), Coleochaetales (Coleochaete scutata)] and an early-diverging land-plant (Anthoceros agrestis). ‘Pectins’ and ‘hemicelluloses’, operationally defined as extractable in oxalate (100 °C) and 6 m NaOH (37 °C), respectively, were acid- or Driselase-hydrolysed, and the monosaccharides analysed chromatographically. One unusual monosaccharide, ‘U’, was characterized by 1H/13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and also enzymically. Key Results ‘U’ was identified as 3-O-methyl-d-galactose (3-MeGal). All pectins, except in Klebsormidium, contained acid- and Driselase-releasable galacturonate, suggesting homogalacturonan. All pectins, without exception, released rhamnose and galactose on acid hydrolysis; however, only in ‘higher’ charophytes (Charales, Coleochaetales) and Anthoceros were these sugars also efficiently released by Driselase, suggesting rhamnogalacturonan-I. Pectins of ‘higher’ charophytes, especially Chara, contained little arabinose, instead possessing 3-MeGal. Anthoceros hemicelluloses were rich in glucose, xylose, galactose and arabinose (suggesting xyloglucan and arabinoxylan), none of which was consistently present in charophyte hemicelluloses. Conclusions Homogalacturonan is an ancient streptophyte feature, albeit secondarily lost in Klebsormidium. When conquering the land, the first embryophytes already possessed rhamnogalacturonan-I. In contrast, charophyte and land-plant hemicelluloses differ

  3. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of C8-modified sialic acids and related α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialosides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Cao, Hongzhi; Tiwari, Vinod Kumar; Li, Yanhong; Chen, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring 8-O-methylated sialic acids, including 8-O-methyl-N-acetylneuraminic acid and 8-O-methyl-N-glycolylneuraminic acid, along with 8-O-methyl-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nonulosonic acid (Kdn8Me) and 8-deoxy-Kdn were synthesized from corresponding 5-O-modified six-carbon monosaccharides and pyruvate using a sialic acid aldolase cloned from Pasteurella multocida strain P-1059 (PmNanA). In addition, α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialyltrisaccharides containing Neu5Ac8Me and Kdn8Deoxy were also synthesized using a one-pot multienzyme approach. The strategy reported here provides an efficient approach to produce glycans containing various C8-modified sialic acids for biological evaluations. PMID:21592790

  4. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of poly-O-methyl-[n]-polyurethane from a d-glucamine-based monomer.

    PubMed

    Kolender, Adriana A; Arce, Silvina M; Varela, Oscar

    2011-09-01

    Aminoalditol 1-amino-1-deoxy-D-sorbitol (1) was readily converted into 2,3,4,5-tetra-O-methyl derivative 5, a key precursor of a sugar-based [n]-polyurethane. For the polymerization, the free amino or primary hydroxyl groups of 5 were selectively activated and employed as starting monomers in two alternative procedures. Thus, the amino function of 5 was converted into the isocyanate derivative by treatment with di-tert-butyltricarbonate, and polymerized in situ in the presence of Zr(IV) acetylacetonate. The resulting poly(1-amino-1-deoxy-2,3,4,5-tetra-O-methyl-D-sorbitol)urethane (8) had a moderate molecular weight and showed the presence of urea units. The alternative synthesis of 8 involved the activation of the free hydroxyl group of 5 as the corresponding phenylcarbonate. The polymerization of this α-amino-ω-phenylcarbonate alditol monomer does not require a metal catalyst. The resulting material exhibited an improved molecular weight and higher purity than that obtained via the isocyanate. [n]-polyurethane 8 was highly soluble in water as well as in common organic solvents (chloroform, acetone, ethyl acetate, etc) and was obtained as an amorphous material which was characterized thermally and spectroscopically. PMID:21645884

  6. Prevention by 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate of the induction but not growth of putative preneoplastic, glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive, focal lesions in the livers of rats fed a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined diet.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Nakae, D; Akai, H; Kishida, H; Okajima, E; Kitayama, W; Denda, A; Tsujiuchi, T; Murakami, A; Koshimizu, K; Ohigashi, H; Konishi, Y

    1998-10-01

    The effects of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) on endogenous rat liver carcinogenesis because of chronic feeding of a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet were examined. Male Fischer 344 rats, 6 weeks old, received the CDAA diet containing ACA at doses of 0, 0.005, 0.010 and 0.050% for 12 weeks and were then killed. ACA decreased the numbers of putative preneoplastic, glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive, focal lesions developing in the livers of rats fed the CDAA diet but did not alter their sizes. At the same time, ACA reduced the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine, a parameter of oxidative DNA damage, but did not significantly affect generation of 2-thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, indicators of oxidative extra-DNA damage, or hepatocyte proliferation. Furthermore, ACA did not exert any significant effects on the numbers or sizes of GST-P-positive lesions in the livers of rats when administered between weeks 2 and 8 after initiation with a single i.p. dose of 200 mg/kg body wt of N-nitrosodiethylamine. These results indicate that ACA prevents the CDAA diet-associated induction of putative preneoplastic lesions by reduction of oxidative DNA damage but does not affect their subsequent growth.

  7. A single naturally occurring 2'-O-methylation converts a TLR7- and TLR8-activating RNA into a TLR8-specific ligand.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie; von Thülen, Tina; Laukemper, Viktoria; Pigisch, Stephanie; Hangel, Doris; Wagner, Hermann; Kaufmann, Andreas; Bauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    TLR7 and TLR8 recognize RNA from pathogens and lead to subsequent immune stimulation. Here we demonstrate that a single naturally occurring 2'-O-methylation within a synthetic 18s rRNA derived RNA sequence prevents IFN-α production, however secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 is not impaired. By analysing TLR-deficient plasmacytoid dendritic cells and performing HEK293 genetic complementation assays we could demonstrate that the single 2'-O-methylation containing RNA still activated TLR8 but not TLR7. Therefore this specific 2'-O-ribose methylation in rRNA converts a TLR7/TLR8 ligand to an exclusively TLR8-specific ligand. Interestingly, other modifications at this position such as 2'-O-deoxy or 2'-fluoro had no strong modulating effect on TLR7 or TLR8 activation suggesting an important role of 2'-O-methylation for shaping differential TLR7 or TLR8 activation. PMID:25785446

  8. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Red clover HCT2, a hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A:malate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, plays a crucial role in biosynthesis of phaselic acid and other hydroxycinnamoyl-malate esters in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves, phaselic acid (2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate) accumulates to several mmol kg-1 fresh weight and is a crucial component of a natural system that prevents protein breakdown during harvest and storage of this forage crop. Previously, we identified HCT2, a red clover g...

  10. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  11. Probing the leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase active site with tRNA substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Krishnakumar, Kollappillil S; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Strazewski, Peter; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases post-translationally conjugate an amino acid from an aminoacyl-tRNA onto the N-terminus of a target polypeptide. The eubacterial aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase, L/F transferase, utilizes both leucyl-tRNA(Leu) and phenylalanyl-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. X-ray crystal structures with substrate analogues, the minimal substrate phenylalanyl adenosine (rA-Phe) and inhibitor puromycin, have been used to characterize tRNA recognition by L/F transferase. However analyses of these two X-ray crystal structures reveal significant differences in binding. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and enzymatic activity assays, we rationalize and demonstrate that the substrate analogues bind to L/F transferase with similar binding affinities using a series of different interactions by the various chemical groups of the analogues. Our data also demonstrates that enlarging the hydrophobic pocket of L/F transferase selectively enhances puromycin inhibition and may aid in the development of improved inhibitors for this class of enzymes.

  12. Synthesis and immunodetection of 6-O-methyl-phosphoramidyl-α-D-galactose: a Campylobacter jejuni antigenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuening; Ma, Zuchao; Ewing, Cheryl P; Guerry, Patricia; Monteiro, Mario A

    2015-12-11

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea. Previously, we have shown that a C. jejuni capsule polysaccharide (CPS) conjugate vaccine can fully prevent C.jejuni diarrhea in non-human primates. C.jejuni CPSs are decorated with non-stoichiometric amounts of O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) units that are key serospecific markers. In the case of C.jejuni serotype complex HS23/36, the MeOPN are at positions 2 and 6 of the CPS galactose (Gal). We describe here the synthesis of the p-methoxyphenyl glycoside of MeOPN→6-α-D-Galp, and its immunodetection by antisera raised by C.jejuni CPS conjugates with MeOPN at primary positions. The synthetic approach in this work served as the foundation for a similar MeOPN→6-Gal construct used in a conjugate vaccine, whose synthesis, immunogenicity and efficacy will be described elsewhere.

  13. Live Cell Analysis and Mathematical Modeling Identify Determinants of Attenuation of Dengue Virus 2'-O-Methylation Mutant.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Bianca; Rinas, Melanie; Ruggieri, Alessia; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Bartenschlager, Marie; Reuter, Antje; Fischl, Wolfgang; Harder, Nathalie; Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Flossdorf, Michael; Rohr, Karl; Höfer, Thomas; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-transmitted virus infecting ~390 million people worldwide. In spite of this high medical relevance, neither a vaccine nor antiviral therapy is currently available. DENV elicits a strong interferon (IFN) response in infected cells, but at the same time actively counteracts IFN production and signaling. Although the kinetics of activation of this innate antiviral defense and the timing of viral counteraction critically determine the magnitude of infection and thus disease, quantitative and kinetic analyses are lacking and it remains poorly understood how DENV spreads in IFN-competent cell systems. To dissect the dynamics of replication versus antiviral defense at the single cell level, we generated a fully viable reporter DENV and host cells with authentic reporters for IFN-stimulated antiviral genes. We find that IFN controls DENV infection in a kinetically determined manner that at the single cell level is highly heterogeneous and stochastic. Even at high-dose, IFN does not fully protect all cells in the culture and, therefore, viral spread occurs even in the face of antiviral protection of naïve cells by IFN. By contrast, a vaccine candidate DENV mutant, which lacks 2'-O-methylation of viral RNA is profoundly attenuated in IFN-competent cells. Through mathematical modeling of time-resolved data and validation experiments we show that the primary determinant for attenuation is the accelerated kinetics of IFN production. This rapid induction triggered by mutant DENV precedes establishment of IFN-resistance in infected cells, thus causing a massive reduction of virus production rate. In contrast, accelerated protection of naïve cells by paracrine IFN action has negligible impact. In conclusion, these results show that attenuation of the 2'-O-methylation DENV mutant is primarily determined by kinetics of autocrine IFN action on infected cells. PMID:26720415

  14. Semisynthesis, cytotoxicity, antiviral activity, and drug interaction liability of 7-O-methylated analogues of flavonolignans from milk thistle.

    PubMed

    Althagafy, Hanan S; Graf, Tyler N; Sy-Cordero, Arlene A; Gufford, Brandon T; Paine, Mary F; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J; Croatt, Mitchell P; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2013-07-01

    Silymarin, an extract of the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), is used as an herbal remedy, particularly for hepatoprotection. The main chemical constituents in silymarin are seven flavonolignans. Recent studies explored the non-selective methylation of one flavonolignan, silybin B, and then tested those analogues for cytotoxicity and inhibition of both cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 activity in human liver microsomes and hepatitis C virus infection in a human hepatoma (Huh7.5.1) cell line. In general, enhanced bioactivity was observed with the analogues. To further probe the biological consequences of methylation of the seven major flavonolignans, a series of 7-O-methylflavonolignans were generated. Optimization of the reaction conditions permitted selective methylation at the phenol in the 7-position in the presence of each metabolite's 4-5 other phenolic and/or alcoholic positions without the use of protecting groups. These 7-O-methylated analogues, in parallel with the corresponding parent compounds, were evaluated for cytotoxicity against Huh7.5.1 cells; in all cases the monomethylated analogues were more cytotoxic than the parent compounds. Moreover, parent compounds that were relatively non-toxic and inactive or weak inhibitors of hepatitis C virus infection had enhanced cytotoxicity and anti-HCV activity upon 7-O-methylation. Also, the compounds were tested for inhibition of major drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP2C9, CYP3A4/5, UDP-glucuronsyltransferases) in pooled human liver or intestinal microsomes. Methylation of flavonolignans differentially modified inhibitory potency, with compounds demonstrating both increased and decreased potency depending upon the compound tested and the enzyme system investigated. In total, these data indicated that monomethylation modulates the cytotoxic, antiviral, and drug interaction potential of silymarin flavonolignans.

  15. Live Cell Analysis and Mathematical Modeling Identify Determinants of Attenuation of Dengue Virus 2’-O-Methylation Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Alessia; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Bartenschlager, Marie; Reuter, Antje; Fischl, Wolfgang; Harder, Nathalie; Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Flossdorf, Michael; Rohr, Karl; Höfer, Thomas; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-transmitted virus infecting ~390 million people worldwide. In spite of this high medical relevance, neither a vaccine nor antiviral therapy is currently available. DENV elicits a strong interferon (IFN) response in infected cells, but at the same time actively counteracts IFN production and signaling. Although the kinetics of activation of this innate antiviral defense and the timing of viral counteraction critically determine the magnitude of infection and thus disease, quantitative and kinetic analyses are lacking and it remains poorly understood how DENV spreads in IFN-competent cell systems. To dissect the dynamics of replication versus antiviral defense at the single cell level, we generated a fully viable reporter DENV and host cells with authentic reporters for IFN-stimulated antiviral genes. We find that IFN controls DENV infection in a kinetically determined manner that at the single cell level is highly heterogeneous and stochastic. Even at high-dose, IFN does not fully protect all cells in the culture and, therefore, viral spread occurs even in the face of antiviral protection of naïve cells by IFN. By contrast, a vaccine candidate DENV mutant, which lacks 2’-O-methylation of viral RNA is profoundly attenuated in IFN-competent cells. Through mathematical modeling of time-resolved data and validation experiments we show that the primary determinant for attenuation is the accelerated kinetics of IFN production. This rapid induction triggered by mutant DENV precedes establishment of IFN-resistance in infected cells, thus causing a massive reduction of virus production rate. In contrast, accelerated protection of naïve cells by paracrine IFN action has negligible impact. In conclusion, these results show that attenuation of the 2’-O-methylation DENV mutant is primarily determined by kinetics of autocrine IFN action on infected cells. PMID:26720415

  16. Determination of Neutral Monosaccharides as Per-O-methylated Derivatives Directly from a Drop of Whole Blood by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ciucanu, Ionel; Pilat, Luminiţa; Ciucanu, Cristian Ionuţ; Şişu, Eugen

    2015-11-01

    A new analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous quantification of neutral monosaccharides from a drop of whole blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS) of their per-O-methylated derivatives. The per-O-methylation reaction with methyl iodide and solid sodium hydroxide in methyl sulfoxide was used for the first time for analysis of blood monosaccharides. A blood drop volume of 0.6 μL was used without special purification. The elimination of the undesirable components was carried out during methylation in the presence of a strong base and by liquid extraction of the per-O-methylated monosaccharides. The neutral monosaccharides with an anomeric center gave four per-O-methylated isomers, which were well-separated using a capillary column. Identification was done by electron impact mass spectrometry fragmentation, retention times, and library searching. The limits of detection were determined for standards and varied from 2.0 to 2.3 ng mL(-1). Recoveries for human blood samples varied from 99.22% to 99.65%. The RSD values ranged from 1.92 to 2.37. The method is fast, sensitive, reproducible, and an alternative to current methods for quantitative analysis of blood monosaccharides. PMID:26444378

  17. GalNAc-transferase specificity prediction based on feature selection method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Niu, Bing; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Liang; Lu, Wen-Cong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Yi-Xue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2009-02-01

    GalNAc-transferase can catalyze the biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides. The specificity of GalNAc-transferase is composed of nine amino acid residues denoted by R4, R3, R2, R1, R0, R1', R2', R3', R4'. To predict whether the reducing monosaccharide will be covalently linked to the central residue R0(Ser or Thr), a new method based on feature selection has been proposed in our work. 277 nonapeptides from reference [Chou KC. A sequence-coupled vector-projection model for predicting the specificity of GalNAc-transferase. Protein Sci 1995;4:1365-83] are chosen for training set. Each nonapeptide is represented by hundreds of amino acid properties collected by Amino Acid Index database (http://www.genome.jp/aaindex) and transformed into a numeric vector with 4554 features. The Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) method combining with Incremental Feature Selection (IFS) and Feature Forward Selection (FFS) are then applied for feature selection. Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (NNA) is used to build prediction models. The optimal model contains 54 features and its correct rate tested by Jackknife cross-validation test reaches 91.34%. Final feature analysis indicates that amino acid residues at position R3' play the most important role in the recognition of GalNAc-transferase specificity, which were confirmed by the experiments [Elhammer AP, Poorman RA, Brown E, Maggiora LL, Hoogerheide JG, Kezdy FJ. The specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase as inferred from a database of in vivo substrates and from the in vitro glycosylation of proteins and peptides. J Biol Chem 1993;268:10029-38; O'Connell BC, Hagen FK, Tabak LA. The influence of flanking sequence on the O-glycosylation of threonine in vitro. J Biol Chem 1992;267:25010-8; Yoshida A, Suzuki M, Ikenaga H, Takeuchi M. Discovery of the shortest sequence motif for high level mucin-type O-glycosylation. J Biol Chem 1997;272:16884-8]. Our method can be used as a tool for predicting O

  18. Differentiation Between Intracellular and Cell Surface Glycosyl Transferases: Galactosyl Transferase Activity in Intact Cells and in Cell Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Deppert, Wolfgang; Werchau, Hermann; Walter, Gernot

    1974-01-01

    Intact BHK (baby hamster kidney) cells catalyze the hydrolysis of UDP-galactose to free galactose. The generation of galactose from UDP-galactose and its intracellular utilization impede the detection of possible galactosyl transferases on the cell surface of intact cells. Several independent procedures have been used to distinguish between intracellular and cell surface glycosyl transferases. With these procedures, no evidence was obtained for the presence of detectable amounts of galactosyl transferase activity on the surface of BHK cells. The data suggest that galactosyl transferases do not play a general role in the phenomena of cell adhesion and contact inhibition. PMID:4528509

  19. Synergistic and independent actions of multiple terminal nucleotidyl transferases in the 3' tailing of small RNAs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Shuxin; Dou, Yongchao; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Xuemei; Yu, Bin; Ren, Guodong

    2015-04-01

    All types of small RNAs in plants, piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals and a subset of siRNAs in Drosophila and C. elegans are subject to HEN1 mediated 3' terminal 2'-O-methylation. This modification plays a pivotal role in protecting small RNAs from 3' uridylation, trimming and degradation. In Arabidopsis, HESO1 is a major enzyme that uridylates small RNAs to trigger their degradation. However, U-tail is still present in null hen1 heso1 mutants, suggesting the existence of (an) enzymatic activities redundant with HESO1. Here, we report that UTP: RNA uridylyltransferase (URT1) is a functional paralog of HESO1. URT1 interacts with AGO1 and plays a predominant role in miRNA uridylation when HESO1 is absent. Uridylation of miRNA is globally abolished in a hen1 heso1 urt1 triple mutant, accompanied by an extensive increase of 3'-to-5' trimming. In contrast, disruption of URT1 appears not to affect the heterochromatic siRNA uridylation. This indicates the involvement of additional nucleotidyl transferases in the siRNA pathway. Analysis of miRNA tailings in the hen1 heso1 urt1 triple mutant also reveals the existence of previously unknown enzymatic activities that can add non-uridine nucleotides. Importantly, we show HESO1 may also act redundantly with URT1 in miRNA uridylation when HEN1 is fully competent. Taken together, our data not only reveal a synergistic action of HESO1 and URT1 in the 3' uridylation of miRNAs, but also independent activities of multiple terminal nucleotidyl transferases in the 3' tailing of small RNAs and an antagonistic relationship between uridylation and trimming. Our results may provide further insight into the mechanisms of small RNA 3' end modification and stability control. PMID:25928341

  20. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  1. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs.

  2. New members of the glutathione transferase family discovered in red and brown algae.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Cécile; de Franco, Pierre-Olivier; Groisillier, Agnès; Tonon, Thierry; Boyen, Catherine

    2008-06-15

    The GSTs (glutathione transferases) are involved in the detoxification of a wide variety of hydrophobic substrates. These enzymes have been found in virtually all types of organisms, including plants, animals, nematodes and bacteria. In the present study, we report the molecular and biochemical characterization of algal GSTs. Phylogenetic analysis showed that most of them were distinct from previously described GST classes, but were most closely related to the Sigma class. Profiling of GST genes from the red alga Chondrus crispus and brown alga Laminaria digitata was undertaken after different chemical treatments and showed that they displayed contrasting patterns of transcription. Recombinant algal GST from both species showed transferase activities against the common substrates aryl halides, but also on the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl 4-hydroxynonenal. Also, they exhibit significant peroxidation towards organic hydroperoxides, including oxygenated derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Among a range of compounds tested, Cibacron Blue was the most efficient inhibitor of algal GSTs identified.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of a Bombyx mori Omega-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major phase II detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here we report the crystal structure of an Omega-class glutathione transferase of Bombyx mori, bmGSTO, to gain insight into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of bmGSTO complexed with glutathione determined at a resolution of 2.5Å reveals that it exists as a dimer and is structurally similar to Omega-class GSTs with respect to its secondary and tertiary structures. Analysis of a complex between bmGSTO and glutathione showed that bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site (G-site). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTO mutants indicated that amino acid residues Leu62, Lys65, Lys77, Val78, Glu91 and Ser92 in the G-site contribute to catalytic activity.

  4. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  5. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  6. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  7. Inclusion phenomena of clove oil with alpha-, beta-, gamma- and heptakis (2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Song, L X; Xu, P; Wang, H M; Yang, Y

    2009-01-01

    Inclusion interactions of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and heptakis (2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (DMbeta-CD) as hosts with clove oil (an impure eugenol, I-Eug) as guest in aqueous solution were investigated by fluorescence emission spectra. The binding constants of different hosts to I-Eug in aqueous solution decreased in the order: gamma- > beta- > DMbeta- > alpha-CD. Two solid supramolecular inclusion complexes, I-Eug-beta-CD and I-Eug-gamma-CD, were prepared and characterised by nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. All the results proved the formation of I-Eug-CD. The inclusion differences between I-Eug and pure eugenol were discussed. The relative contents of the main component eugenol (Eug), second component (eugenol acetate, Eua) and others in I-Eug were found to be fairly different before and after being included by beta-CD, according to the data obtained from high performance liquid chromatography. This could be a practical method to extract the effective components (Eug and Eua) from I-Eug.

  8. Evaluation of a di-O-methylated glycan as a potential antigenic target for the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Elefant, G R; Roldán, W H; Seeböck, A; Kosma, P

    2016-04-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is based on the detection of specific IgG antibodies by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using Toxocara larvae excretory-secretory (TES) antigens, but its production is a laborious and time-consuming process being also limited by the availability of adult females of T. canis as source for ova to obtain larvae. Chemical synthesis of the di-O-methylated (DiM) glycan structure found in the TES antigens has provided material for studying the antibody reactivity in a range of mammalian hosts, showing reactivity with human IgM and IgG. In this study, we have evaluated the performance of the DiM glycan against a panel of sera including patients with toxocariasis (n = 60), patients with other helminth infections (n = 75) and healthy individuals (n = 94), showing that DiM is able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 91·7% and 94·7%, respectively, with a very good agreement with the TES antigens (kappa = 0·825). However, cross-reactivity was observed in some sera from patients with ascariasis, hymenolepiasis and fascioliasis. These results show that the DiM glycan could be a promising antigenic tool for the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  9. Evaluation of a di-O-methylated glycan as a potential antigenic target for the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Elefant, G R; Roldán, W H; Seeböck, A; Kosma, P

    2016-04-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is based on the detection of specific IgG antibodies by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using Toxocara larvae excretory-secretory (TES) antigens, but its production is a laborious and time-consuming process being also limited by the availability of adult females of T. canis as source for ova to obtain larvae. Chemical synthesis of the di-O-methylated (DiM) glycan structure found in the TES antigens has provided material for studying the antibody reactivity in a range of mammalian hosts, showing reactivity with human IgM and IgG. In this study, we have evaluated the performance of the DiM glycan against a panel of sera including patients with toxocariasis (n = 60), patients with other helminth infections (n = 75) and healthy individuals (n = 94), showing that DiM is able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 91·7% and 94·7%, respectively, with a very good agreement with the TES antigens (kappa = 0·825). However, cross-reactivity was observed in some sera from patients with ascariasis, hymenolepiasis and fascioliasis. These results show that the DiM glycan could be a promising antigenic tool for the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis. PMID:26896376

  10. Cloning and expression of clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetoacetyl-coenzyme A:acetate/butyrate:coenzyme A-transferase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.W.; Petersen, D.J.; Bennett, G.N. ); Papoutsakis, E.T. )

    1990-06-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase (acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase (butyrate-acetoacetate CoA-transferase) (EC 2.8.3.9)) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is an important enzyme in the metabolic shift between the acid-producing and solvent-forming states of this organism. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme have been cloned and subsequent subcloning experiments established the position of the structural genes for CoA-transferase. Complementation of Escherichia coli ato mutants with the recombinant plasmid pCoAT4 (pUC19 carrying a 1.8-kilobase insert of C. acetobutylicum DNA encoding CoA-transferase activity) enabled the transformants to grow on butyrate as a sole carbon source. Despite the ability of CoA-transferase to complement the ato defect in E. coli mutants, Southern blot and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses showed showed that neither the C. acetobutylicum genes encoding CoA-transferase nor the enzyme itself shared any apparent homology with its E. coli counterpart. Polypeptides of M{sub r} of the purified CoA-transferase subunits were observed by Western blot and maxicell analysis of whole-cell extracts of E.coli harboring pCoAT4. The proximity and orientation of the genes suggest that the genes encoding the two subunits of CoA-transferase may form an operon similar to that found in E. coli. In the plasmid, however, transcription appears to be primarily from the lac promoter of the vector.

  11. Characterization of chicken-liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-1 and A2-2 isoenzymes and their site-directed mutants heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli: identification of Lys-15 and Ser-208 on cGSTA1-1 as residues interacting with ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L F; Liaw, Y C; Tam, M F

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli-expressed chicken-liver glutathione S-transferase, cGSTA1-1, displays high ethacrynic acid (EA)-conjugating activity. Molecular modelling of cGSTA1-1 with EA in the substrate binding site reveals that the side chain of Phe-111 protrudes into the substrate binding site and possibly interacts with EA. Replacement of Phe-111 with alanine resulted in an enzyme (F111A mutant) with a 4.5-fold increase in EA-conjugating activity (9.2 mmol/min per mg), and an incremental Gibbs free energy (DeltaDeltaG) of 4.0 kJ/mol lower than that of the wild-type cGSTA1-1. Two other amino acid residues that possibly interact with EA are Ser-208 and Lys-15. Substitution of Ser-208 with methionine generated a cGSTA1-1(F111AS208M) double mutant that has low EA-conjugating activity (2.0 mmol/min per mg) and an incremental Gibbs free energy of +3.9 kJ/mol greater than the cGSTA1-1(F111A) single mutant. The cGSTA1-1(F111A) mutant, with an additional Lys-15-to-leucine substitution, lost 90% of the EA-conjugating activity (0.55 mmol/min per mg). The Km values of the cGSTA1-1(F111A) and cGSTA1-1(F111AK15L) mutants for EA are nearly identical. The wild-type cGSTA2-2 isoenzyme has a low EA-conjugating activity (0.56 mmol/min per mg). The kcat of this reaction can be increased 2. 5-fold by substituting Arg-15 and Glu-104 with lysine and glycine respectively. The KmEA of the cGSTA2-2(R15KE104G) double mutant is nearly identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. Another double mutant, cGSTA2-2(E104GL208S), has a KmEA that is 3.3-fold lower and a kcat that is 1.8-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results, taken together, illustrate the interactions of Lys-15 and Ser-208 on cGSTA1-1 with EA. PMID:9359434

  12. Systematic analysis of O-methyltransferase gene family and identification of potential members involved in the formation of O-methylated flavonoids in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Luo, Yan; Wu, Hongkun; Xi, Wanpeng; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-01-10

    The O-methylation of various secondary metabolites is mainly catalyzed by S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferase (OMT) proteins that are encoded by the O-methyltransferase gene family. Citrus fruits are a rich source of O-methylated flavonoids that have a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and antiatherogenic properties. However, little is known about this gene family and its members that are involved in the O-methylation of flavonoids and their regulation in Citrus. In this study, 58 OMT genes were identified from the entire Citrus sinensis genome and compared with those from 3 other representative dicot plants. A comprehensive analysis was performed, including functional/substrate predictions, identification of chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, and conserved motifs. Distribution mapping revealed that the 58 OMT genes were unevenly distributed on the 9 citrus chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of 164 OMT proteins from C.sinensis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Vitis vinifera showed that these proteins were categorized into group I (COMT subfamily) and group II (CCoAOMT subfamily), which were further divided into 10 and 2 subgroups, respectively. Finally, digital gene expression and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that citrus OMT genes had distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages. Interestingly, 18 and 11 of the 27 genes predicted to be involved in O-methylation of flavonoids had higher expression in the peel and pulp during fruit development, respectively. The citrus OMT gene family identified in this study might help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and facilitate functional studies in Citrus.

  13. Systematic analysis of O-methyltransferase gene family and identification of potential members involved in the formation of O-methylated flavonoids in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Luo, Yan; Wu, Hongkun; Xi, Wanpeng; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-01-10

    The O-methylation of various secondary metabolites is mainly catalyzed by S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferase (OMT) proteins that are encoded by the O-methyltransferase gene family. Citrus fruits are a rich source of O-methylated flavonoids that have a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and antiatherogenic properties. However, little is known about this gene family and its members that are involved in the O-methylation of flavonoids and their regulation in Citrus. In this study, 58 OMT genes were identified from the entire Citrus sinensis genome and compared with those from 3 other representative dicot plants. A comprehensive analysis was performed, including functional/substrate predictions, identification of chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, and conserved motifs. Distribution mapping revealed that the 58 OMT genes were unevenly distributed on the 9 citrus chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of 164 OMT proteins from C.sinensis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Vitis vinifera showed that these proteins were categorized into group I (COMT subfamily) and group II (CCoAOMT subfamily), which were further divided into 10 and 2 subgroups, respectively. Finally, digital gene expression and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that citrus OMT genes had distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages. Interestingly, 18 and 11 of the 27 genes predicted to be involved in O-methylation of flavonoids had higher expression in the peel and pulp during fruit development, respectively. The citrus OMT gene family identified in this study might help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and facilitate functional studies in Citrus. PMID:26407870

  14. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    PubMed Central

    Marimo, Patience; Hayeshi, Rose; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1) was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA) was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs. PMID:26925266

  15. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure–function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer. PMID:26729647

  16. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 μM and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 μM and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important.

  17. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  18. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively.

  19. An alternative mechanism for the catalysis of peptide bond formation by L/F transferase: substrate binding and orientation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela W; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Abeysundara, Heshani; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Fahlman, Richard P

    2011-06-17

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase (L/F transferase) catalyzes the transfer of a leucine or a phenylalanine from an aminoacyl-tRNA to the N-terminus of a protein substrate. This N-terminal addition of an amino acid is analogous to that of peptide synthesis by ribosomes. A previously proposed catalytic mechanism for Escherichia coli L/F transferase identified the conserved aspartate 186 (D186) and glutamine 188 (Q188) as key catalytic residues. We have reassessed the role of D186 and Q188 by investigating the enzymatic reactions and kinetics of enzymes possessing mutations to these active-site residues. Additionally three other amino acids proposed to be involved in aminoacyl-tRNA substrate binding are investigated for comparison. By quantitatively measuring product formation using a quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based assay, our results clearly demonstrate that, despite significant reduction in enzymatic activity as a result of different point mutations introduced into the active site of L/F transferase, the formation of product is still observed upon extended incubations. Our kinetic data and existing X-ray crystal structures result in a proposal that the critical roles of D186 and Q188, like the other amino acids in the active site, are for substrate binding and orientation and do not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Overall, we propose that L/F transferase does not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation but catalyzes the reaction by binding and orientating the substrates for reaction in an analogous mechanism that has been described for ribosomes.

  20. A novel method for the analysis of the substitution pattern of O-methyl-[alpha]- and [beta]-1,4-glucans by means of electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry/collision induced dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adden, Roland; Mischnick, Petra

    2005-03-01

    The substitution pattern of O-methyl amylose and O-methyl cellulose was analysed after per-O-methylation (Me-d3), and partial hydrolysis by subsequent ESI-MS/CID of the sodium (MS2) and the lithium adducts (MS3). Based on previous studies about the influence of regioselective O-methylation on the fragmentation pathways of malto- and cello-oligosaccharides, we could calculate the contribution of a certain methyl pattern to a distinct signal in the reproducible ESI-MS2 daughter spectrum. Signal intensities obtained from each O-methyl-O-methyl-d3 disaccharide were distributed on the corresponding methyl patterns and accumulated for all peaks of the mother mass spectrum. Data from ESI-MS2 were not sufficient for disaccharides bearing methyl and deuteromethyl groups in the combination 2 and 4, 3 and 3, or 4 and 2. Further independent information was obtained by ESI-MS3 of the lithium adducts. Monomer composition of methyl celluloses and methyl amyloses obtained by this novel approach were in very good agreement with reference data from GLC of the partially methylated glucitol acetates after complete hydrolysis, reduction and acetylation.

  1. Genetic Variation in the Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase Val108/158Met Is Linked to the Caudate and Posterior Cingulate Cortex Volume in Healthy Subjects: Voxel-Based Morphometry Analysis of Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keita; Kakeda, Shingo; Yoshimura, Reiji; Ide, Satoru; Hayashi, Kenji; Katsuki, Asuka; Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Watanabe, Rieko; Abe, Osamu; Korogi, Yukunori

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism on brain morphology has been investigated but remains controversial. We hypothesized that a comparison between Val/Val and Val/Met individuals, which may represent the most different combinations concerning the effects of the COMT genotype, may reveal new findings. We investigated the brain morphology using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in 27 Val/Val and 22 Val/Met individuals. Voxel-based morphometry revealed that the volumes of the bilateral caudate and posterior cingulate cortex were significantly smaller in Val/Val individuals than in Val/Met individuals [right caudate: false discovery rate (FDR)-corrected p = 0.048; left caudate: FDR-corrected p = 0.048; and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex: FDR-corrected p = 0.048]. This study demonstrates that interacting functional variants of COMT affect gray matter regional volumes in healthy subjects.

  2. Morphological changes in gray matter volume correlate with catechol-O-methyl transferase gene Val158Met polymorphism in first-episode treatment-naïve patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Li; Xiang, Bo; Li, Yin-Fei; Hu, Xun; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wan-Jun; Lei, Wei; Huang, Chao-Hua; Zhao, Lian-Sheng; Li, Na; Ren, Hong-Yan; Wang, Hui-Yao; Ma, Xiao-Hong; Deng, Wei; Li, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. A common functional polymorphism of this gene, Val158/158Met, has been proposed to influence gray matter volume (GMV). However, the effects of this polymorphism on cortical thickness/surface area in schizophrenic patients are less clear. In this study, we explored the relationship between the Val158Met polymorphism of the COMT gene and the GMV/cortical thickness/cortical surface area in 150 first-episode treatment-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 100 healthy controls. Main effects of diagnosis were found for GMV in the cerebellum and the visual, medial temporal, parietal, and middle frontal cortex. Patients with schizophrenia showed reduced GMVs in these regions. And main effects of genotype were detected for GMV in the left superior frontal gyrus. Moreover, a diagnosis × genotype interaction was found for the GMV of the left precuneus, and the effect of the COMT gene on GMV was due mainly to cortical thickness rather than cortical surface area. In addition, a pattern of increased GMV in the precuneus with increasing Met dose found in healthy controls was lost in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that the COMTMet variant is associated with the disruption of dopaminergic influence on gray matter in schizophrenia, and the effect of the COMT gene on GMV in schizophrenia is mainly due to changes in cortical thickness rather than in cortical surface area. PMID:25564193

  3. Genetic Variation in the Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase Val108/158Met Is Linked to the Caudate and Posterior Cingulate Cortex Volume in Healthy Subjects: Voxel-Based Morphometry Analysis of Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Keita; Kakeda, Shingo; Yoshimura, Reiji; Ide, Satoru; Hayashi, Kenji; Katsuki, Asuka; Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Watanabe, Rieko; Abe, Osamu; Korogi, Yukunori

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism on brain morphology has been investigated but remains controversial. We hypothesized that a comparison between Val/Val and Val/Met individuals, which may represent the most different combinations concerning the effects of the COMT genotype, may reveal new findings. We investigated the brain morphology using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in 27 Val/Val and 22 Val/Met individuals. Voxel-based morphometry revealed that the volumes of the bilateral caudate and posterior cingulate cortex were significantly smaller in Val/Val individuals than in Val/Met individuals [right caudate: false discovery rate (FDR)-corrected p = 0.048; left caudate: FDR-corrected p = 0.048; and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex: FDR-corrected p = 0.048]. This study demonstrates that interacting functional variants of COMT affect gray matter regional volumes in healthy subjects. PMID:26566126

  4. Glutathione transferases in the bioactivation of azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Modén, Olof; Mannervik, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    The prodrug azathioprine is primarily used for maintaining remission in inflammatory bowel disease, but approximately 30% of the patients suffer adverse side effects. The prodrug is activated by glutathione conjugation and release of 6-mercaptopurine, a reaction most efficiently catalyzed by glutathione transferase (GST) A2-2. Among five genotypes of GST A2-2, the variant A2*E has threefold-fourfold higher catalytic efficiency with azathioprine, suggesting that the expression of A2*E could boost 6-mercaptopurine release and adverse side effects in treated patients. Structure-activity studies of the GST A2-2 variants and homologous alpha class GSTs were made to delineate the determinants of high catalytic efficiency compared to other alpha class GSTs. Engineered chimeras identified GST peptide segments of importance, and replacing the corresponding regions in low-activity GSTs by these short segments produced chimeras with higher azathioprine activity. By contrast, H-site mutagenesis led to decreased azathioprine activity when active-site positions 208 and 213 in these favored segments were mutagenized. Alternative substitutions indicated that hydrophobic residues were favored. A pertinent question is whether variant A2*E represents the highest azathioprine activity achievable within the GST structural framework. This issue was addressed by mutagenesis of H-site residues assumed to interact with the substrate based on molecular modeling. The mutants with notably enhanced activities had small or polar residues in the mutated positions. The most active mutant L107G/L108D/F222H displayed a 70-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with azathioprine. The determination of its structure by X-ray crystallography showed an expanded H-site, suggesting improved accommodation of the transition state for catalysis.

  5. Crystal structures of Acetobacter aceti succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase reveal specificity determinants and illustrate the mechanism used by class I CoA-transferases.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2012-10-23

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze transthioesterification reactions involving acyl-CoA substrates, using an active-site carboxylate to form covalent acyl anhydride and CoA thioester adducts. Mechanistic studies of class I CoA-transferases suggested that acyl-CoA binding energy is used to accelerate rate-limiting acyl transfers by compressing the substrate thioester tightly against the catalytic glutamate [White, H., and Jencks, W. P. (1976) J. Biol. Chem. 251, 1688-1699]. The class I CoA-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase is an acetic acid resistance factor (AarC) with a role in a variant citric acid cycle in Acetobacter aceti. In an effort to identify residues involved in substrate recognition, X-ray crystal structures of a C-terminally His(6)-tagged form (AarCH6) were determined for several wild-type and mutant complexes, including freeze-trapped acetylglutamyl anhydride and glutamyl-CoA thioester adducts. The latter shows the acetate product bound to an auxiliary site that is required for efficient carboxylate substrate recognition. A mutant in which the catalytic glutamate was changed to an alanine crystallized in a closed complex containing dethiaacetyl-CoA, which adopts an unusual curled conformation. A model of the acetyl-CoA Michaelis complex demonstrates the compression anticipated four decades ago by Jencks and reveals that the nucleophilic glutamate is held at a near-ideal angle for attack as the thioester oxygen is forced into an oxyanion hole composed of Gly388 NH and CoA N2″. CoA is nearly immobile along its entire length during all stages of the enzyme reaction. Spatial and sequence conservation of key residues indicates that this mechanism is general among class I CoA-transferases.

  6. Effects of O-methylated metabolites of quercetin on oxidative stress, thermotolerance, lifespan and bioavailability on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Surco-Laos, Felipe; Cabello, Juan; Gómez-Orte, Eva; González-Manzano, Susana; González-Paramás, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Dueñas, Montserrat

    2011-08-01

    Quercetin is a major flavonoid in the human diet and the most commonly used in studies of biological activity. Most of the knowledge about its biological effects has originated from in vitro studies while in vivo data are scarce. Quercetin mostly occurs in foodstuffs as glycosides that are deglycosylated during absorption and further submitted to different conjugation reactions. Methylation to isorhamnetin (quercetin 3'-O-methylether) or tamarixetin (quercetin 4'-O-methylether) seems to be an important conjugation process in quercetin metabolism. In this work, the effects of quercetin and its 3'- and 4'-O-methylated metabolites on the phenotypic characteristics, stress oxidative resistance, thermotolerance and lifespan of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans have been assessed. The three assayed flavonols significantly prolonged the lifespan of this nematode with an increase from 11% to 16% in the mean lifespan with respect to controls. However, only quercetin significantly increased the reproductive capacity of the worm and enlarged the body size. Exposure to the assayed flavonols also increased significantly the resistance against thermal and juglone-induced oxidative stress, although differences were found depending on the stage of development of the worm. Thus, quercetin offered greater protection when thermal stress was applied in the 1st day of adulthood, whereas tamarixetin was more efficient in worms submitted to stress in the 6th day of adulthood. Similarly, significantly greater protection was provided by quercetin than by its methylated derivatives at the 1st day of adulthood, whilst quercetin and isorhamnetin were equally efficient when the oxidative stress was induced in the 6th of day of adulthood. Further evidence of antioxidant protection was obtained checking the oxidation status of proteins by the OxyBlot™ detection kit. Analyses by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS confirmed that the three flavonols were taken up by C. elegans leading to the formation of

  7. Cardiac electrophysiologic and antiarrhythmic actions of a pavine alkaloid derivative, O-methyl-neocaryachine, in rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Su, Ming-Jai; Hung, Li-Man; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2002-01-01

    O-methyl-neocaryachine (OMNC) suppressed the ischaemia/reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts (EC50=4.3 μM). Its electrophysiological effects on cardiac myocytes and the conduction system in isolated hearts as well as the electromechanical effects on the papillary muscles were examined.In rat papillary muscles, OMNC prolonged the action potential duration (APD) and decreased the maximal rate of depolarization (Vmax). As compared to quinidine, OMNC exerted less effects on both the Vmax and APD but a positive inotropic effect.In the voltage clamp study, OMNC decreased Na+ current (INa) (IC50=0.9 μM) with a negative-shift of the voltage-dependent inactivation and a slowed rate of recovery from inactivation. The voltage dependence of INa activation was, however, unaffected. With repetitive depolarizations, OMNC blocked INa frequency-dependently. OMNC blocked ICa with an IC50 of 6.6 μM and a maximum inhibition of 40.7%.OMNC inhibited the transient outward K+ current (Ito) (IC50=9.5 μM) with an acceleration of its rate of inactivation and a slowed rate of recovery from inactivation. However, it produced little change in the steady-state inactivation curve. The steady-state outward K+ current (ISS) was inhibited with an IC50 of 8.7 μM. The inward rectifier K+ current (IK1) was also reduced by OMNC.In the perfused heart model, OMNC (3 to 30 μM) prolonged the ventricular repolarization time, the spontaneous cycle length and the atrial and ventricular refractory period. The conduction through the AV node and His-Purkinje system, as well as the AV nodal refractory period and Wenckebach cycle length were also prolonged (30 μM).In conclusion, OMNC blocks Na+, Ito and ISS channels and in similar concentrations partly blocks Ca2+ channels. These effects lead to a modification of the electromechanical function and may likely contribute to the termination of ventricular arrhythmias. These results provide an opportunity to

  8. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1111, LB4823_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1111, LB4823_V)' providing data from direct low-pressure measurement of mass density at variable mole fraction and constant temperature, in the single-phase region(s).

  9. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1511, LB4833_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1511, LB4833_V)' providing data from direct measurement of low-pressure thermodynamic speed of sound at variable mole fraction and constant temperature, in the single-phase region(s).

  10. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1212, LB4828_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Cyclohexanone C6H10O + C7H8O Methyl phenyl ether (VMSD1212, LB4828_V)' providing data by calculation of molar excess volume from low-pressure density measurements at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  11. Urinary recovery of orally administered chromium 51-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in healthy adult male Beagles.

    PubMed

    Frias, Rafael; Steiner, Jörg M; Williams, David A; Sankari, Satu; Westermarck, Elias

    2012-05-01

    Objective-To provide values for gastrointestinal permeability and absorptive function tests (GIPFTs) with chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in Beagles and to evaluate potential correlations between markers. Animals-19 healthy adult male Beagles. Procedures-A test solution containing 3.7 MBq of (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 2 g of lactulose, 2 g of rhamnose, 2 g of d-xylose, 1 g of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and 8 g of sucrose was administered intragastrically to each dog. Urinary recovery of each probe was determined 6 hours after administration. Results-Mean ± SD (range) percentage urinary recovery was 6.3 ± 1.6% (4.3% to 9.7%) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 3.3 ± 1.1% (1.7% to 5.3%) for lactulose, 25.5 ± 5.0% (16.7% to 36.9%) for rhamnose, and 58.8% ± 11.0% (40.1% to 87.8%) for 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Mean (range) recovery ratio was 0.25 ± 0.06 (0.17 to 0.37) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA to rhamnose, 0.13 ± 0.04 (0.08 to 0.23) for lactulose to rhamnose, and 0.73 ± 0.09 (0.60 to 0.90) for d-xylose to 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Median (range) percentage urinary recovery was 40.3% (31.6% to 62.7%) for d-xylose and 0% (0% to 0.8%) for sucrose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Reference values in healthy adult male Beagles for 6 of the most commonly used GIPFT markers were determined. The correlation between results for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA and lactulose was not as prominent as that reported for humans and cats; thus, investigators should be cautious in the use and interpretation of GIPFTs performed with sugar probes in dogs with suspected intestinal dysbiosis.

  12. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  13. Characterization of glutathione-S-transferases in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Glisic, Branka; Mihaljevic, Ivan; Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Loncar, Jovica; Fent, Karl; Kovacevic, Radmila; Smital, Tvrtko

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are one of the key enzymes that mediate phase II of cellular detoxification. The aim of our study was a comprehensive characterization of GSTs in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an important vertebrate model species frequently used in environmental research. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of GST superfamily revealed 27 zebrafish gst genes. Further insights into the orthology relationships between human and zebrafish GSTs/Gsts were obtained by the conserved synteny analysis. Expression of gst genes in six tissues (liver, kidney, gills, intestine, brain and gonads) of adult male and female zebrafish was determined using qRT-PCR. Functional characterization was performed on 9 cytosolic Gst enzymes after overexpression in E. coli and subsequent protein purification. Enzyme kinetics was measured for GSH and a series of model substrates. Our data revealed ubiquitously high expression of gstp, gstm (except in liver), gstr1, mgst3a and mgst3b, high expression of gsto2 in gills and ovaries, gsta in intestine and testes, gstt1a in liver, and gstz1 in liver, kidney and brain. All zebrafish Gsts catalyzed the conjugation of GSH to model GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and monochlorobimane (MCB), apart from Gsto2 and Gstz1 that catalyzed GSH conjugation to dehydroascorbate (DHA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), respectively. Affinity toward CDNB varied from 0.28 mM (Gstp2) to 3.69 mM (Gstm3), while affinity toward MCB was in the range of 5 μM (Gstt1a) to 250 μM (Gstp1). Affinity toward GSH varied from 0.27 mM (Gstz1) to 4.45 mM (Gstt1a). Turnover number for CDNB varied from 5.25s(-1) (Gstt1a) to 112s(-1) (Gstp2). Only Gst Pi enzymes utilized ethacrynic acid (ETA). We suggest that Gstp1, Gstp2, Gstt1a, Gstz1, Gstr1, Mgst3a and Mgst3b have important role in the biotransformation of xenobiotics, while Gst Alpha, Mu, Pi, Zeta and Rho classes are involved in the crucial physiological processes. In summary, this study provides the

  14. Catalytic and structural diversity of the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Asimakopoulou, Basiliki; Platis, Dimitrios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2012-06-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of inducible enzymes that play important roles in stress tolerance and herbicide detoxification. Treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris leaves with the aryloxyphenoxypropionic herbicide fluazifop-p-butyl resulted in induction of GST activities. Three inducible GST isoenzymes were identified and separated by affinity chromatography. Their full-length cDNAs with complete open reading frame were isolated using RACE-RT and information from N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analysis of the cDNA clones showed that the deduced amino acid sequences share high homology with GSTs that belong to phi and tau classes. The three isoenzymes were expressed in E. coli and their substrate specificity was determined towards 20 different substrates. The results showed that the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from P. vulgaris (PvGSTs) catalyze a broad range of reactions and exhibit quite varied substrate specificity. Molecular modeling and structural analysis was used to identify key structural characteristics and to provide insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. These results provide new insights into catalytic and structural diversity of GSTs and the detoxifying mechanism used by P. vulgaris.

  15. Polyketide family of novel antibacterial 7-O-methyl-5'-hydroxy-3'-heptenoate-macrolactin from seaweed-associated Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Raola, Vamshi Krishna

    2014-12-17

    Seaweed-associated heterotrophic bacterial communities were screened to isolate potentially useful antimicrobial strains, which were characterized by phylogenetic analysis. The bacteria were screened for the presence of metabolite genes involved in natural product biosynthetic pathway, and the structural properties of secondary metabolites were correlated with the genes. Bioactivity-guided isolation of polyene antibiotic 7-O-methyl-5'-hydroxy-3'-heptenoate-macrolactin from Bacillus subtilis MTCC10403 associated with seaweed Anthophycus longifolius using mass spectrometry and extensive 2D-NMR studies was carried out. The newly isolated macrolactin compound is a bactericidal antibiotic with broad spectrum activity against human opportunistic clinical pathogens. The biosynthetic pathway of 7-O-methyl-5'-hydroxy-3'-heptenoate-macrolactin by means of a stepwise, decarboxylative condensation pathway established the PKS-assisted biosynthesis of the parent macrolactin and the side-chain 5-hydroxyhept-3-enoate moiety attached to the macrolactin ring system at C-7. Antimicrobial activity analysis combined with the results of amplifying genes encoding for polyketide synthetase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase showed that seaweed-associated bacteria had broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The present work may have an impact on the exploitation of macrolactins for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  16. BC1-FMRP interaction is modulated by 2′-O-methylation: RNA-binding activity of the tudor domain and translational regulation at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lacoux, Caroline; Di Marino, Daniele; Pilo Boyl, Pietro; Zalfa, Francesca; Yan, Bing; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Falconi, Mattia; Urlaub, Henning; Achsel, Tilmann; Mougin, Annie; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Bagni, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The brain cytoplasmic RNA, BC1, is a small non-coding RNA that is found in different RNP particles, some of which are involved in translational control. One component of BC1-containing RNP complexes is the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) that is implicated in translational repression. Peptide mapping and computational simulations show that the tudor domain of FMRP makes specific contacts to BC1 RNA. Endogenous BC1 RNA is 2′-O-methylated in nucleotides that contact the FMRP interface, and methylation can affect this interaction. In the cell body BC1 2′-O-methylations are present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, but they are virtually absent at synapses where the FMRP–BC1–mRNA complex exerts its function. These results strongly suggest that subcellular region-specific modifications of BC1 affect the binding to FMRP and the interaction with its mRNA targets. We finally show that BC1 RNA has an important role in translation of certain mRNAs associated to FMRP. All together these findings provide further insights into the translational regulation by the FMRP–BC1 complex at synapses. PMID:22238374

  17. Inhibitory impact of 3'-terminal 2'-O-methylated small silencing RNA on target-primed polymerization and unbiased amplified quantification of the RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yongxi

    2015-09-01

    3'-terminal 2'-O-methylation has been found in several kinds of small silencing RNA, regarded as a protective mechanism against enzymatic 3' → 5' degradation and 3'-end uridylation. The influence of this modification on enzymatic polymerization, however, remains unknown. Herein, a systematic investigation is performed to explore this issue. We found these methylated small RNAs exhibited a suppression behavior in target-primed polymerization, revealing biased result for the manipulation of these small RNAs by conventional polymerization-based methodology. The related potential mechanism is investigated and discussed, which is probably ascribed to the big size of modified group and its close location to 3'-OH. Furthermore, two novel solutions each utilizing base-stacking hybridization and three-way junction structure have been proposed to realize unbiased recognition of small RNAs. On the basis of phosphorothioate against nicking, a creative amplified strategy, phosphorothioate-protected polymerization/binicking amplification, has also been developed for the unbiased quantification of methylated small RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrating its promising potential for real sample analysis. Collectively, our studies uncover the polymerization inhibition by 3'-terminal 2'-O-methylated small RNAs with mechanistic discussion, and propose novel unbiased solutions for amplified quantification of small RNAs in real sample. PMID:26244621

  18. Inhibitory impact of 3'-terminal 2'-O-methylated small silencing RNA on target-primed polymerization and unbiased amplified quantification of the RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yongxi

    2015-09-01

    3'-terminal 2'-O-methylation has been found in several kinds of small silencing RNA, regarded as a protective mechanism against enzymatic 3' → 5' degradation and 3'-end uridylation. The influence of this modification on enzymatic polymerization, however, remains unknown. Herein, a systematic investigation is performed to explore this issue. We found these methylated small RNAs exhibited a suppression behavior in target-primed polymerization, revealing biased result for the manipulation of these small RNAs by conventional polymerization-based methodology. The related potential mechanism is investigated and discussed, which is probably ascribed to the big size of modified group and its close location to 3'-OH. Furthermore, two novel solutions each utilizing base-stacking hybridization and three-way junction structure have been proposed to realize unbiased recognition of small RNAs. On the basis of phosphorothioate against nicking, a creative amplified strategy, phosphorothioate-protected polymerization/binicking amplification, has also been developed for the unbiased quantification of methylated small RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrating its promising potential for real sample analysis. Collectively, our studies uncover the polymerization inhibition by 3'-terminal 2'-O-methylated small RNAs with mechanistic discussion, and propose novel unbiased solutions for amplified quantification of small RNAs in real sample.

  19. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  20. Homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST) cDNA’s in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This reaction ...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1535 - Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system. 862.1535 Section 862.1535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1535 Ornithine...

  2. Histamine N-methyl transferase: inhibition by drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, G M; Donatelli, P; Giuliani, L

    1992-01-01

    1. Histamine N-methyl transferase activity was measured in samples of human liver, brain, kidney, lung and intestinal mucosa. The mean (+/- s.d.) rate (nmol min-1 mg-1 protein) of histamine N-methylation was 1.78 +/- 0.59 (liver, n = 60), 1.15 +/- 0.38 (renal cortex, n = 8), 0.79 +/- 0.14 (renal medulla, n = 8), 0.35 +/- 0.08 (lung, n = 20), 0.47 +/- 0.18 (human intestine, n = 30) and 0.29 +/- 0.14 (brain, n = 13). 2. Inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase by 15 drugs was investigated in human liver. The IC50 for the various drugs ranged over three orders of magnitude; chloroquine was the most potent inhibitor. 3. The average IC50 values for chloroquine were 12.6, 22.0, 19.0, 21.6 microM in liver, renal cortex, brain and colon, respectively. These values are lower than the Michaelis-Menten constant for histamine N-methyltransferase in liver (43.8 microM) and kidney (45.5 microM). Chloroquine carried a mixed non-competitive inhibition of hepatic histamine N-methyl transferase. Some side-effects of chloroquine may be explained by inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase. PMID:1457266

  3. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  4. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  5. STT3, a highly conserved protein required for yeast oligosaccharyl transferase activity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, R; Knauer, R; Burda, P; Stagljar, I; te Heesen, S; Lehle, L; Aebi, M

    1995-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification, and is essential for viability in eukaryotic cells. A lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide is assembled at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and transferred to selected asparagine residues of nascent polypeptide chains by the oligosaccharyl transferase (OTase) complex. Based on the synthetic lethal phenotype of double mutations affecting the assembly of the lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide and the OTase activity, we have performed a novel screen for mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with altered N-linked glycosylation. Besides novel mutants deficient in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg mutants), we identified the STT3 locus as being required for OTase activity in vivo. The essential STT3 protein is approximately 60% identical in amino acid sequence to its human homologue. A mutation in the STT3 locus affects substrate specificity of the OTase complex in vivo and in vitro. In stt3-3 cells very little glycosyl transfer occurs from incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide, whereas the transfer of full-length Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 is hardly affected as compared with wild-type cells. Depletion of the STT3 protein results in loss of transferase activity in vivo and a deficiency in the assembly of OTase complex. Images PMID:7588624

  6. Selective inhibitors of glutathione transferase P1 with trioxane structure as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Maria; Teusch, Nicole; Schenk, Tobias; Sheikh, Miriam; Aricioglu, Rocky Z; Borowski, Swantje H; Neudörfl, Jörg-Martin; Baumann, Ulrich; Griesbeck, Axel G; Pietsch, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The response to chemotherapy in cancer patients is frequently compromised by drug resistance. Although chemoresistance is a multifactorial phenomenon, many studies have demonstrated that altered drug metabolism through the expression of phase II conjugating enzymes, including glutathione transferases (GSTs), in tumor cells can be directly correlated with resistance against a wide range of marketed anticancer drugs. In particular, overexpression of glutathione transferase P1 (GSTP1) appears to be a factor for poor prognosis during cancer therapy. Former and ongoing clinical trials have confirmed GSTP1 inhibition as a principle for antitumor therapy. A new series of 1,2,4-trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors were designed via a type II photooxygenation route of allylic alcohols followed by acid-catalyzed peroxyacetalization with aldehydes. A set of novel inhibitors exhibit low micromolar to high nanomolar inhibition of GSTP1, revealing preliminary SAR for further lead optimization. Importantly, high selectivity over another two human GST classes (GSTA1 and GSTM2) has been achieved. The trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors may therefore serve as a basis for the development of novel drug candidates in overcoming chemoresistance.

  7. Treatment of idiopathic parkinsonism with L-dopa in the absence and presence of decarboxylase inhibitors: effects on plasma levels of L-dopa, dopa decarboxylase, catecholamines and 3-O-methyl-dopa.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-05-01

    The effect of levodopa (L-dopa), alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor (PDI), on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD, = dopa decarboxylase), L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine beta-hydroxylase has been studied. In healthy subjects and in patients with parkinsonism plasma ALAAD level fell after administration of L-dopa + benserazide, but returned to previous levels within 90 min. In a cross-sectional study blood was obtained, 2 h after dosing, from 104 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism, divided into four groups: no L-dopa treatment (group 1), L-dopa alone (group 2), L-dopa + benserazide (Madopar) (group 3) and L-dopa + carbidopa (Sinemet) (group 4). Plasma ALAAD, which was normal in groups 1 and 2, was increased 3-fold in groups 3 and 4, indicating that there was induction of ALAAD by the co-administration of PDI. Despite this induction of ALAAD, in groups 3 and 4, with half the daily L-dopa dose compared with group 2, plasma L-dopa and 3-OMD levels were 5 times higher, while plasma DA levels were not different. The DA/L-dopa ratio was decreased 5-fold in group 2 and 16-fold in groups 3 and 4 as compared with group 1. Neither 3-OMD levels nor 3-OMD/L-dopa ratios correlated with the occurrence of on-off fluctuations. In a longitudinal study of three patients started on Madopar treatment the induction of plasma ALAAD was found to occur gradually over 3-4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required in order to elucidate whether the ALAAD induction by PDI may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena. PMID:2760634

  8. Treatment of idiopathic parkinsonism with L-dopa in the absence and presence of decarboxylase inhibitors: effects on plasma levels of L-dopa, dopa decarboxylase, catecholamines and 3-O-methyl-dopa.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-05-01

    The effect of levodopa (L-dopa), alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor (PDI), on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD, = dopa decarboxylase), L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine beta-hydroxylase has been studied. In healthy subjects and in patients with parkinsonism plasma ALAAD level fell after administration of L-dopa + benserazide, but returned to previous levels within 90 min. In a cross-sectional study blood was obtained, 2 h after dosing, from 104 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism, divided into four groups: no L-dopa treatment (group 1), L-dopa alone (group 2), L-dopa + benserazide (Madopar) (group 3) and L-dopa + carbidopa (Sinemet) (group 4). Plasma ALAAD, which was normal in groups 1 and 2, was increased 3-fold in groups 3 and 4, indicating that there was induction of ALAAD by the co-administration of PDI. Despite this induction of ALAAD, in groups 3 and 4, with half the daily L-dopa dose compared with group 2, plasma L-dopa and 3-OMD levels were 5 times higher, while plasma DA levels were not different. The DA/L-dopa ratio was decreased 5-fold in group 2 and 16-fold in groups 3 and 4 as compared with group 1. Neither 3-OMD levels nor 3-OMD/L-dopa ratios correlated with the occurrence of on-off fluctuations. In a longitudinal study of three patients started on Madopar treatment the induction of plasma ALAAD was found to occur gradually over 3-4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required in order to elucidate whether the ALAAD induction by PDI may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  9. Sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay for norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine based on the thin-layer chromatographic separation of their Dns-O-methyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Philips, S R; Robson, A M

    1983-01-01

    A radioenzymatic assay is described in which norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine are converted to their tritiated 3-O-methyl derivatives by reaction with S-[methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine in the presence of catechol-O-methyltransferase. The methylated compounds are then reacted with Dns chloride, and the Dns derivatives are extracted into ethyl acetate, isolated by thin-layer chromatography and quantified by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The assay displays a high degree of specificity for each compound, due in large part to the chromatographic properties of the Dns derivatives. It is capable of measuring 2 pg of each catecholamine, and is linear to at least 5 ng. Approximately 50 samples can be assayed in 1.5 days.

  10. Mice Deficient in Glutathione Transferase Zeta/Maleylacetoacetate Isomerase Exhibit a Range of Pathological Changes and Elevated Expression of Alpha, Mu, and Pi Class Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Cindy E.L.; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Davis, Richard P.; Dahlstrom, Jane E.; Koina, Mark E.; Anders, M.W.; Board, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Glutathione transferase zeta (GSTZ1-1) is the major enzyme that catalyzes the metabolism of α-halo acids such as dichloroacetic acid, a carcinogenic contaminant of chlorinated water. GSTZ1-1 is identical with maleylacetoacetate isomerase, which catalyzes the penultimate step in the catabolic pathways for phenylalanine and tyrosine. In this study we have deleted the Gstz1 gene in BALB/c mice and characterized their phenotype. Gstz1−/− mice do not have demonstrable activity with maleylacetone and α-halo acid substrates, and other GSTs do not compensate for the loss of this enzyme. When fed a standard diet, the GSTZ1-1-deficient mice showed enlarged liver and kidneys as well as splenic atrophy. Light and electron microscopic examination revealed multifocal hepatitis and ultrastructural changes in the kidney. The addition of 3% (w/v) phenylalanine to the drinking water was lethal for young mice (<28 days old) and caused liver necrosis, macrovesicular steatosis, splenic atrophy, and a significant loss of circulating leukocytes in older surviving mice. GSTZ1-1-deficient mice showed constitutive induction of alpha, mu, and pi class GSTs as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1. The overall response is consistent with the chronic accumulation of a toxic metabolite(s). We detected the accumulation of succinylacetone in the serum of deficient mice but cannot exclude the possibility that maleylacetoacetate and maleylacetone may also accumulate. PMID:15277241

  11. Benzyl esters of C2-C20 fatty acids and metabolically relevant carboxylic acids. Preparation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schatowitz, B; Gercken, G

    1987-11-13

    Short-, medium- and long-chain fatty acids, and other types of metabolically relevant carboxylic acids like hydroxy-, keto-, aromatic and dicarboxylic acids, were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography. For separation, benzyl ester derivatives were used, prepared by reaction of the potassium carboxylates with benzyl bromide in acetonitrile catalyzed by a crown ether. The reaction conditions for quantitative benzylation were studied. Keto groups of ketocarboxylic acids were stabilized prior to benzylation by formation of O-methyl oximes using methoxyamine hydrochloride in aqueous-ethanolic solution. The separation of more than 45 carboxylic acids was achieved on a CP-Sil 5 CB fused-silica capillary column in less than 70 min. The electron impact mass spectra of ketocarboxylic acid O-methyl oxime benzyl esters PMID:3693495

  12. New asymmetrical per-substituted cyclodextrins (2-O-methyl-3-O-ethyl- and 2-O-ethyl-3-O-methyl-6-O-t-butyldimethylsilyl-beta-derivatives) as chiral selectors for enantioselective gas chromatography in the flavour and fragrance field.

    PubMed

    Bicchi, Carlo; Cagliero, Cecilia; Liberto, Erica; Sgorbini, Barbara; Martina, Katia; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Rubiolo, Patrizia

    2010-02-12

    Asymmetrically substituted 6(I-VII)-O-t-butyldimethylsilyl(TBDMS)-3(I-VII)-O-ethyl-2(I-VII)-O-methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MeEt-CD) and 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-2(I-VII)-O-ethyl-3(I-VII)-O-methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (EtMe-CD) were synthesised to evaluate the role of the substitution pattern in positions 2 and 3 on the enantioselectivity, in particular in view of their application to routine analysis in fast enantioselective gas chromatography (Es-GC). The chromatographic properties and enantioselectivities of the new derivatives were tested by separating the enantiomers of a series of medium-to-high volatility racemates in the flavour and fragrance field, and compared to those of the corresponding symmetrically substituted 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-2(I-VII),3(I-VII)-O-methyl-beta-CD (MeMe-CD) and 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-2(I-VII),3(I-VII)-O-ethyl-beta-CD (EtEt-CD), and were then applied to analysis of real-world essential oil (e.o.) samples. A new synthetic process including the sonochemical approach to obtain synthetic reproducibility and significant yields of the per-substituted derivatives with acceptable reaction times was developed. The results show that asymmetrically substituted methyl/ethyl CDs compared to the methyl or ethyl symmetrical derivatives in general provide better enantioselectivity in terms of both enantiomer resolution and number of separated chiral compounds, and show how the substitution pattern in positions 2 and 3 of the CD ring can influence the separation. Moreover, these new CD derivatives with better enantioselectivity are also shown to be very useful in routine analysis for the exhaustive control of samples containing several chiral characterizing markers in a single run.

  13. Flavonoids and Methoxy-galloylquinic Acid Derivatives from the Leaf Extract of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Mauro S; Furtado, Ricardo A; Bastos, Jairo K

    2015-08-12

    Despite reports on the pharmacological potential of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Leguminosae-Caesalpinioideae) leaf extract, little is known about its chemical composition. In this work, a phytochemical study from the C. langsdorffii ethanol/H2O 7:3 (v/v) extract was undertaken. Separation was performed by high-speed counter-current (HSCCC) and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies, followed by preparative HPLC. The EtOAc- and H2O-soluble fractions of the extract furnished the flavonoids quercitrin (1) and afzelin (2) and 3-O-(3-O-methyl-galloyl)quinic acid (3), respectively. The H2O-soluble fraction furnished 3,4-di-O-(3-O-methyl-galloyl)quinic acid (4), 3,5-di-O-(galloyl)-4-O-(3-O-methyl-galloyl)quinic acid (5), and 3,5-di-O-(3-O-methyl-galloyl)-4-O-(galloyl)quinic acid (6). Their chemical structures were elucidated by NMR means.

  14. Defects in tRNA Anticodon Loop 2'-O-Methylation Are Implicated in Nonsyndromic X-Linked Intellectual Disability due to Mutations in FTSJ1.

    PubMed

    Guy, Michael P; Shaw, Marie; Weiner, Catherine L; Hobson, Lynne; Stark, Zornitza; Rose, Katherine; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Gecz, Jozef; Phizicky, Eric M

    2015-12-01

    tRNA modifications are crucial for efficient and accurate protein synthesis, and modification defects are frequently associated with disease. Yeast trm7Δ mutants grow poorly due to lack of 2'-O-methylated C32 (Cm32 ) and Gm34 on tRNA(Phe) , catalyzed by Trm7-Trm732 and Trm7-Trm734, respectively, which in turn results in loss of wybutosine at G37 . Mutations in human FTSJ1, the likely TRM7 homolog, cause nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual disability (NSXLID), but the role of FTSJ1 in tRNA modification is unknown. Here, we report that tRNA(Phe) from two genetically independent cell lines of NSXLID patients with loss-of-function FTSJ1 mutations nearly completely lacks Cm32 and Gm34 , and has reduced peroxywybutosine (o2yW37 ). Additionally, tRNA(Phe) from an NSXLID patient with a novel FTSJ1-p.A26P missense allele specifically lacks Gm34 , but has normal levels of Cm32 and o2yW37 . tRNA(Phe) from the corresponding Saccharomyces cerevisiae trm7-A26P mutant also specifically lacks Gm34 , and the reduced Gm34 is not due to weaker Trm734 binding. These results directly link defective 2'-O-methylation of the tRNA anticodon loop to FTSJ1 mutations, suggest that the modification defects cause NSXLID, and may implicate Gm34 of tRNA(Phe) as the critical modification. These results also underscore the widespread conservation of the circuitry for Trm7-dependent anticodon loop modification of eukaryotic tRNA(Phe) . PMID:26310293

  15. 2-O-methylation of fucosyl residues of a rhizobial lipopolysaccharide is increased in response to host exudate and is eliminated in a symbiotically defective mutant.

    PubMed

    Noel, K Dale; Box, Jodie M; Bonne, Valerie J

    2004-03-01

    When Rhizobium etli CE3 was grown in the presence of Phaseolus vulgaris seed extracts containing anthocyanins, its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sugar composition was changed in two ways: greatly decreased content of what is normally the terminal residue of the LPS, di-O-methylfucose, and a doubling of the 2-O-methylation of other fucose residues in the LPS O antigen. R. etli strain CE395 was isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis of strain CE3 by screening for mutant colonies that did not change antigenically in the presence of seed extract. The LPS of this strain completely lacked 2-O-methylfucose, regardless of whether anthocyanins were present during growth. The mutant gave only pseudonodules in association with P. vulgaris. Interpretation of this phenotype was complicated by a second LPS defect exhibited by the mutant: its LPS population had only about 50% of the normal amount of O-antigen-containing LPS (LPS I). The latter defect could be suppressed genetically such that the resulting strain (CE395 alpha 395) synthesized the normal amount of an LPS I that still lacked 2-O-methylfucose residues. Strain CE395 alpha 395 did not elicit pseudonodules but resulted in significantly slower nodule development, fewer nodules, and less nitrogenase activity than lps(+) strains. The relative symbiotic deficiency was more severe when seeds were planted and inoculated with bacteria before they germinated. These results support previous conclusions that the relative amount of LPS I on the bacterial surface is crucial in symbiosis, but LPS structural features, such as 2-O-methylation of fucose, also may facilitate symbiotic interactions. PMID:15006776

  16. 2-O-Methylation of Fucosyl Residues of a Rhizobial Lipopolysaccharide Is Increased in Response to Host Exudate and Is Eliminated in a Symbiotically Defective Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K. Dale; Box, Jodie M.; Bonne, Valerie J.

    2004-01-01

    When Rhizobium etli CE3 was grown in the presence of Phaseolus vulgaris seed extracts containing anthocyanins, its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sugar composition was changed in two ways: greatly decreased content of what is normally the terminal residue of the LPS, di-O-methylfucose, and a doubling of the 2-O-methylation of other fucose residues in the LPS O antigen. R. etli strain CE395 was isolated after Tn5 mutagenesis of strain CE3 by screening for mutant colonies that did not change antigenically in the presence of seed extract. The LPS of this strain completely lacked 2-O-methylfucose, regardless of whether anthocyanins were present during growth. The mutant gave only pseudonodules in association with P. vulgaris. Interpretation of this phenotype was complicated by a second LPS defect exhibited by the mutant: its LPS population had only about 50% of the normal amount of O-antigen-containing LPS (LPS I). The latter defect could be suppressed genetically such that the resulting strain (CE395α395) synthesized the normal amount of an LPS I that still lacked 2-O-methylfucose residues. Strain CE395α395 did not elicit pseudonodules but resulted in significantly slower nodule development, fewer nodules, and less nitrogenase activity than lps+ strains. The relative symbiotic deficiency was more severe when seeds were planted and inoculated with bacteria before they germinated. These results support previous conclusions that the relative amount of LPS I on the bacterial surface is crucial in symbiosis, but LPS structural features, such as 2-O-methylation of fucose, also may facilitate symbiotic interactions. PMID:15006776

  17. pH-dependent conformational flexibility within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center.

    PubMed Central

    Muth, G W; Chen, L; Kosek, A B; Strobel, S A

    2001-01-01

    A universally conserved adenosine, A2451, within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center has been proposed to act as a general acid-base catalyst during peptide bond formation. Evidence in support of this proposal came from pH-dependent dimethylsulfate (DMS) modification within Escherichia coli ribosomes. A2451 displayed reactivity consistent with an apparent acidity constant (pKa) near neutrality, though pH-dependent structural flexibility could not be rigorously excluded as an explanation for the enhanced reactivity at high pH. Here we present three independent lines of evidence in support of the alternative interpretation. First, A2451 in ribosomes from the archaebacteria Haloarcula marismortui displays an inverted pH profile that is inconsistent with proton-mediated base protection. Second, in ribosomes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, C2452 rather than A2451 is modified in a pH-dependent manner. Third, within E. coli ribosomes, the position of A2451 modification (N1 or N3 imino group) was analyzed by testing for a Dimroth rearrangement of the N1-methylated base. The data are more consistent with DMS modification of the A2451 N1, a functional group that, according to the 50S ribosomal crystal structure, is solvent inaccessible without structural rearrangement. It therefore appears that pH-dependent DMS modification of A2451 does not provide evidence either for or against a general acid-base mechanism of protein synthesis. Instead the data suggest that there is pH-dependent conformational flexibility within the peptidyl transferase center, the exact nature and physiological relevance of which is not known. PMID:11680845

  18. Characterization and isolation of oligosaccharyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H.A.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferases (OT), the enzyme catalyzing the transfer of oligosaccharride from dolichol-PP-GlcNAc/sub 2/Man/sub 9/Glc/sub 3/ to asparagine residues of -Asn-X-Thr/Ser-sequences within nascent polypeptides, was labeled with a new active site-directed photoaffinity probe, N/sup ..cap alpha../-(/sup 125/I)-3-(4-hydroxyphenylpropionyl)-Asn-Lys(N/sup epsilon/-p-azidobenzoyl)-Thr-NH/sub 2/. Using this sensitive selective labelling probe, the authors have characterized and isolated the enzyme from hen oviduct. Analysis by 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed that the major photoaffinity-labeled OT has a pI = 5.2; minor forms exist at pI = 6.0-6.2. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that the probe interacts with a 57 kDa Coomassie Blue stainable protein at short incubation times, with the radioactive signal appearing at 60 kDa after longer incubations. The 60 kDa /sup 125/I-photoaffinity labeled OT decreased in molecular mass to 57 kDa following endoglucosaminidase H digestion with no shift in pI. The 57 dKa Coomassie Blue stainable protein is not endoglucosaminidase H sensitive. When microsomal dolichol-P-P-oligosaccharide was depleted by preincubating with excess competing peptide, only the 57 kDa /sup 125/I-labeled OT formed. These data suggest that (1) OT is a 57 kDa protein that does not contain polymannose chains, and (2) the formation of the 60 kDa /sup 125/I-labeled OT is likely the result of the glycosylation of the covalently linked tripeptide probe. The enzyme has been isolated to homogeneity by preparative 2-D gel electrophoresis and amino acid sequence analysis and polyclonal antibody production is being performed.

  19. Proton mobilities in crambin and glutathione S-transferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Corsaro, C.; Hayward, R. L.; Bée, M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2003-08-01

    Using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements derived from window-integrated quasielastic spectra was measured for two D 2O-hydrated proteins: crambin and glutathione S-transferase. Analyses show that the anharmonic dynamics observed around and above 200 K is consistent with a description in terms of proton/deuteron jumps within asymmetric double-minimum potentials. Also determined were activation energies along with estimates of effective masses and average oscillator energies.

  20. Purification and kinetic mechanism of the major glutathione S-transferase from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Young, P R; Briedis, A V

    1989-01-01

    The major glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme from bovine brain was isolated and purified approx. 500-fold. The enzyme has a pI of 7.39 +/- 0.02 and consists of two non-identical subunits having apparent Mr values of 22,000 and 24,000. The enzyme is uniformly distributed in brain, and kinetic data at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate suggest a random rapid-equilibrium mechanism. The kinetics of inhibition by product, by GSH analogues and by NADH are consistent with the suggested mechanism and require inhibitor binding to several different enzyme forms. Long-chain fatty acids are excellent inhibitors of the enzyme, and values of 1nKi for hexanoic acid, octanoic acid, decanoic acid and lauric acid form a linear series when plotted as a function of alkyl chain length. A free-energy change of -1900 J/mol (-455 cal/mol) per CH2 unit is calculated for the contribution of hydrophobic binding energy to the inhibition constants. The turnover number of the purified enzyme dimer is approx. 3400/min. When compared with the second-order rate constant for the reaction between CDNB and GSH, the enzyme is providing a rate acceleration of about 1000-fold. The role of entropic contributions to this small rate acceleration is discussed. PMID:2930465

  1. Inhibition of the recombinant cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Guneidy, Rasha A; Shahein, Yasser E; Abouelella, Amira M K; Zaki, Eman R; Hamed, Ragaa R

    2014-09-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus is a bloodsucking ectoparasite that causes severe production losses in the cattle industry. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro effects of tannic acid, hematin (GST inhibitors) and different plant extracts (rich in tannic acid) on the activity of the recombinant glutathione S-transferase enzyme of the Egyptian cattle tick R. annulatus (rRaGST), in order to confirm their ability to inhibit the parasitic essential detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase. Extraction with 70% ethanol of Hibiscus cannabinus (kenaf flowers), Punica granatum (red and white pomegranate peel), Musa acuminata (banana peel) (Musaceae), Medicago sativa (alfalfa seeds), Tamarindus indicus (seed) and Cuminum cyminum (cumin seed) were used to assess: (i) inhibitory capacities of rRaGST and (ii) their phenolic and flavonoid contents. Ethanol extraction of red pomegranate peel contained the highest content of phenolic compounds (29.95mg gallic acid/g dry tissue) compared to the other studied plant extracts. The highest inhibition activities of rRaGST were obtained with kenaf and red pomegranate peel (P. granatum) extracts with IC50 values of 0.123 and 0.136mg dry tissue/ml, respectively. Tannic acid was the more effective inhibitor of rRaGST with an IC50 value equal to 4.57μM compared to delphinidine-HCl (IC50=14.9±3.1μM). Gossypol had a weak inhibitory effect (IC50=43.7μM), and caffeic acid had almost no effect on tick GST activity. The IC50 values qualify ethacrynic acid as a potent inhibitor of rRaGST activity (IC50=0.034μM). Cibacron blue and hematin showed a considerable inhibition effect on rRaGST activity, and their IC50 values were 0.13μM and 7.5μM, respectively. The activity of rRaGST was highest for CDNB (30.2μmol/min/mg protein). The enzyme had also a peroxidatic activity (the specific activity equals 26.5μmol/min/mg protein). Both tannic acid and hematin inhibited rRaGST activity non-competitively with respect to GSH and

  2. 23S rRNA nucleotides in the peptidyl transferase center are essential for tryptophanase operon induction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-06-01

    Distinct features of the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel are known to be essential for recognition of specific amino acids of a nascent peptidyl-tRNA. Thus, a tryptophan residue at position 12 of the peptidyl-tRNA TnaC-tRNA(Pro) leads to the creation of a free tryptophan binding site within the ribosome at which bound tryptophan inhibits normal ribosome functions. The ribosomal processes that are inhibited are hydrolysis of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) by release factor 2 and peptidyl transfer of TnaC of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) to puromycin. These events are normally performed in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center. In the present study, changes of 23S rRNA nucleotides in the 2585 region of the peptidyl transferase center, G2583A and U2584C, were observed to reduce maximum induction of tna operon expression by tryptophan in vivo without affecting the concentration of tryptophan necessary to obtain 50% induction. The growth rate of strains with ribosomes with either of these changes was not altered appreciably. In vitro analyses with mutant ribosomes with these changes showed that tryptophan was not as efficient in protecting TnaC-tRNA(Pro) from puromycin action as wild-type ribosomes. However, added tryptophan did prevent sparsomycin action as it normally does with wild-type ribosomes. These findings suggest that these two mutational changes act by reducing the ability of ribosome-bound tryptophan to inhibit peptidyl transferase activity rather than by reducing the ability of the ribosome to bind tryptophan. Thus, the present study identifies specific nucleotides within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center that appear to be essential for effective tryptophan induction of tna operon expression. PMID:19329641

  3. Quantification of butyryl CoA:acetate CoA-transferase genes reveals different butyrate production capacity in individuals according to diet and age.

    PubMed

    Hippe, Berit; Zwielehner, Jutta; Liszt, Kathrin; Lassl, Cornelia; Unger, Frank; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2011-03-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota produces short-chain fatty acids, especially butyrate, which affect colonic health, immune function and epigenetic regulation. To assess the effects of nutrition and aging on the production of butyrate, the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene and population shifts of Clostridium clusters lV and XlVa, the main butyrate producers, were analysed. Faecal samples of young healthy omnivores (24 ± 2.5 years), vegetarians (26 ± 5 years) and elderly (86 ± 8 years) omnivores were evaluated. Diet and lifestyle were assessed in questionnaire-based interviews. The elderly had significantly fewer copies of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene than young omnivores (P=0.014), while vegetarians showed the highest number of copies (P=0.048). The thermal denaturation of the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene variant melting curve related to Roseburia/Eubacterium rectale spp. was significantly more variable in the vegetarians than in the elderly. The Clostridium cluster XIVa was more abundant in vegetarians (P=0.049) and in omnivores (P<0.01) than in the elderly group. Gastrointestinal microbiota of the elderly is characterized by decreased butyrate production capacity, reflecting increased risk of degenerative diseases. These results suggest that the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene is a valuable marker for gastrointestinal microbiota function.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  7. Synthesis of isotopically labeled P-site substrates for the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Minghong

    2010-01-01

    Isotopomers of the ribosomal P-site substrate, the trinucleotide peptide conjugate CCA-pcb,1 have been designed and synthesized in 26–350020steps. These include individual isotopic substitution at the α-proton, carbonyl carbon, and carbonyl oxygen of the amino acid, the O2' and O3' of the adenosine, and a remote label in the N3 and N4 of both cytidines. These isotopomers were synthesized by coupling cytidylyl-(3'5')-cytidine phosphoramidite isotopomers, as the common synthetic intermediates, with isotopically substituted A-Phe-cap-biotin (A-pcb). The isotopic enrichment is higher than 99% for 1-13C (Phe), 2-2H (Phe), and 3,4-15N2 (cytidine), 93% for 2'/3'- 18O (adenosine), and 64% for 1-18O (Phe). A new synthesis of highly enriched [1-18O2] phenylalanine has been developed. The synthesis of [3'-18O] adenosine was improved by Lewis acid aided regioselective ring opening of the epoxide and by an economical SN2-SN2 method with high isotopic enrichment (93%). Such substrates are valuable for studies of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction by complete kinetic isotope effect analysis and of other biological processes catalyzed by nucleic acid related enzymes, including polymerases, reverse transcriptases, ligases, nucleases, and ribozymes. PMID:18081346

  8. Structural Basis for piRNA 2-O-methylated 3-end Recognition by Piwi PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Awille) Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Y Tian; D Simanshu; J Ma; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    Argonaute and Piwi proteins are key players in the RNA silencing pathway, with the former interacting with micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs, whereas the latter targets piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that are 2'-O-methylated (2'-OCH{sub 3}) at their 3' ends. Germline-specific piRNAs and Piwi proteins play a critical role in genome defense against transposable elements, thereby protecting the genome against transposon-induced defects in gametogenesis and fertility. Humans contain four Piwi family proteins designated Hiwi1, Hiwi2, Hiwi3, and Hili. We report on the structures of Hili-PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain in the free state and Hiwi1 PAZ domain bound to self-complementary 14-mer RNAs (12-bp + 2-nt overhang) containing 2'-OCH{sub 3} and 2'-OH at their 3' ends. These structures explain the molecular basis underlying accommodation of the 2'-OCH{sub 3} group within a preformed Hiwi1 PAZ domain binding pocket, whose hydrophobic characteristics account for the preferential binding of 2'-OCH{sub 3} over 2'-OH 3' ends. These results contrast with the more restricted binding pocket for the human Ago1 PAZ domain, which exhibits a reverse order, with preferential binding of 2'-OH over 2'-OCH{sub 3} 3' ends.

  9. Structural and biochemical insights into 2′-O-methylation at the 3′-terminal nucleotide of RNA by Hen1

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chio Mui; Zhou, Chun; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Huang, Raven H.

    2010-01-28

    Small RNAs of {approx}20-30 nt have diverse and important biological roles in eukaryotic organisms. After being generated by Dicer or Piwi proteins, all small RNAs in plants and a subset of small RNAs in animals are further modified at their 3'-terminal nucleotides via 2'-O-methylation, carried out by the S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase (MTase) Hen1. Methylation at the 3' terminus is vital for biological functions of these small RNAs. Here, we report four crystal structures of the MTase domain of a bacterial homolog of Hen1 from Clostridium thermocellum and Anabaena variabilis, which are enzymatically indistinguishable from the eukaryotic Hen1 in their ability to methylate small single-stranded RNAs. The structures reveal that, in addition to the core fold of the MTase domain shared by other RNA and DNA MTases, the MTase domain of Hen1 possesses a motif and a domain that are highly conserved and are unique to Hen1. The unique motif and domain are likely to be involved in RNA substrate recognition and catalysis. The structures allowed us to construct a docking model of an RNA substrate bound to the MTase domain of bacterial Hen1, which is likely similar to that of the eukaryotic counterpart. The model, supported by mutational studies, provides insight into RNA substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of Hen1.

  10. Distribution and kinetics of 3-O-methyl-6-(18F)fluoro-L-dopa in the rhesus monkey brain

    SciTech Connect

    Doudet, D.J.; McLellan, C.A.; Carson, R.; Adams, H.R.; Miyake, H.; Aigner, T.G.; Finn, R.T.; Cohen, R.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Most attempts to model accurately (18F)-DOPA imaging of the dopamine system are based on the assumptions that its main peripheral metabolite, 3-O-methyl-6-(18F)fluoro-L-DOPA ((18F)3-OM-DOPA), crosses the blood-brain barrier but is present as a homogenous distribution throughout the brain, in part because it is not converted into (18F)DOPA in significant quantities. These assumptions were based mainly on data in rodents. Little information is available in the primate. To verify the accuracy of the above assumptions, the authors administered 18F-labeled 3-OM-DOPA to normal rhesus monkeys and animals with lesions of the DA nigrostriatal system. No selective 18F regional accumulation in brain was apparent in normal or lesioned animals. The plasma metabolite analysis revealed that only the negatively charged metabolites (e.g., sulfated conjugates) that do not cross the blood-brain barrier were found in significant quantities in the plasma. A one-compartment, three-parameter model was adequate to describe the kinetics of (18F)3-OM-DOPA. In conclusion, assumptions concerning (18F)3-OM-DOPA's behavior in brain appear acceptable for (18F)DOPA modeling purposes.

  11. Structural basis for piRNA 2'-O-methylated 3'-end recognition by Piwi PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domains.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Ma, Jin-Biao; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2011-01-18

    Argonaute and Piwi proteins are key players in the RNA silencing pathway, with the former interacting with micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs, whereas the latter targets piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that are 2'-O-methylated (2(')-OCH(3)) at their 3' ends. Germline-specific piRNAs and Piwi proteins play a critical role in genome defense against transposable elements, thereby protecting the genome against transposon-induced defects in gametogenesis and fertility. Humans contain four Piwi family proteins designated Hiwi1, Hiwi2, Hiwi3, and Hili. We report on the structures of Hili-PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain in the free state and Hiwi1 PAZ domain bound to self-complementary 14-mer RNAs (12-bp + 2-nt overhang) containing 2(')-OCH(3) and 2'-OH at their 3' ends. These structures explain the molecular basis underlying accommodation of the 2(')-OCH(3) group within a preformed Hiwi1 PAZ domain binding pocket, whose hydrophobic characteristics account for the preferential binding of 2(')-OCH(3) over 2'-OH 3' ends. These results contrast with the more restricted binding pocket for the human Ago1 PAZ domain, which exhibits a reverse order, with preferential binding of 2'-OH over 2(')-OCH(3) 3' ends.

  12. Lysophosphatidylcholine attenuates the cytotoxic effects of the antineoplastic phospholipid 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3- phosphocholine.

    PubMed

    Boggs, K P; Rock, C O; Jackowski, S

    1995-05-12

    A colony-stimulating factor 1-dependent cell line was used to determine the relationship between the inhibition of phospholipid synthesis and the cytotoxic activity of the antineoplastic ether lipid, 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3). ET-18-OCH3 inhibited choline incorporation into phosphatidylcholine as well as total phospholipid synthesis. Exposure to ET-18-OCH3 at the G1/S boundary led to the accumulation of cells in G2, whereas the addition of ET-18-OCH3 in the G1 phase of the cell cycle prevented entry into the S phase. In both cases, ET-18-OCH3 treatment triggered DNA fragmentation and morphological changes associated with apoptosis within 10 h. The addition of lysophosphatidylcholine provided an exogenous source of cellular phospholipid and prevented ET-18-OCH3-dependent accumulation of cells in G2 and apoptosis. However, lysophosphatidylcholine did not overcome the ET-18-OCH3-dependent G1 block, although the growth-arrested cells remained viable. These data indicate that restoring phosphatidylcholine synthesis by supplementation with lysophosphatidylcholine overrides the cytotoxic but not the cytostatic activity of ET-18-OCH3.

  13. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mgU6-47 gene is required for 2′-O-methylation of U6 snRNA at A41

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Du, Yan-Ping; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2002-01-01

    Through a computer search of DNA databases, we have identified the homologs of the mgU6-47 snoRNA gene from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fly Drosophila melanogaster and human. The three box C/D-containing snoRNA genes showed no significant similarity in their sequences except for an 11 nt long complementarity to U6 snRNA, suggesting that the mechanism of snoRNA guided snRNA methylation is conserved from mammals to yeast. The corresponding snoRNAs have been positively detected by reverse transcription and northern blotting. Taking advantage of the fission yeast system, we have disrupted the yeast mgU6-47 gene and demonstrated that it is absolutely required for site-specific 2′-O-methylation of U6 at position A41. No growth differences between mgU6-47 gene-disrupted and wild-type cells were observed, suggesting that the mgU6-47 gene, as for most rRNA methylation guides, is dispensable in yeast. Nevertheless, it was revealed by temperature shift assay that abolition of A41 methylaion in yeast U6 snRNA might cause a small decrease in mRNA splicing efficiency. The timing of S.pombe U6 pre-RNA transport in the nucleus for splicing and methylation was also analyzed and is described. PMID:11842100

  14. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of latent alkylating agents activated by glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Satyam, A; Hocker, M D; Kane-Maguire, K A; Morgan, A S; Villar, H O; Lyttle, M H

    1996-04-12

    In search of compounds with improved specificity for targeting the important cancer-associated P1-1 glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozyme, new analogs 4 and 5 of the previously reported glutathione S-transferase (GST)-activated latent alkylating agent gamma-glutamyl-alpha-amino-beta-[[[2-[[bis[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]ph osp horyl]oxy]ethyl]sulfonyl]propionyl]-(R)-(-)-phenylglycine (3) have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated. One of the diastereomers of 4 exhibited good selectivity for GST P1-1. The tetrabromo analog 5 of the tetrachloro compound 3 maintained its specificity and was found to be more readily activated by GSTs than 3. The GST activation concept was further broadened through design, synthesis, and evaluation of a novel latent urethane mustard 8 and its diethyl ester 9. Interestingly, 8 showed very good specificity for P1-1 GST. Cell culture studies were carried out on 4, 5, 8, and 9 using cell lines engineered to have varying levels of GST P1-1 isozyme. New analogs 4 and 5 exhibited increased toxicity to cell lines with overexpressed GST P1-1 isozyme. The urethane mustard 8 and its diethyl ester 9 were found to be not as toxic. However, they too exhibited more toxicity to a cell line engineered to have elevated P1-1 levels, which was in agreement with the observed in vitro specificity of 8 for P1-1 GST isozyme. Mechanistic studies on alkaline as well as enzyme-catalyzed decomposition of latent mustard 3 provided experimental proof for the hypothesis that 3 breaks down into an active phosphoramidate mustard and a reactive vinyl sulfone. The alkylating nature of the decomposition products was further demonstrated by trapping those transient species as relatively stable diethyldithiocarbamic acid adducts. These results substantially extend previous efforts to develop drugs targeting GST and provide a paradigm for development of other latent drugs. PMID:8648613

  15. Electrochemical evaluation of glutathione S-transferase kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are a family of enzymes belonging to the phase II metabolism that catalyse the formation of thioether conjugates between the endogenous tripeptide glutathione and xenobiotic compounds. The voltammetric behaviour of glutathione (GSH), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the catalytic conjugation reaction of GSH to CDNB by GST was investigated at room temperature, T=298.15K (25°C), at pH6.5, for low concentration of substrates and enzyme, using differential pulse (DP) voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. Only GSH can be oxidized; a sensitivity of 0.14nA/μM and a LOD of 6.4μM were obtained. The GST kinetic parameter electrochemical evaluation, in relation to its substrates, GSH and CDNB, using reciprocal Michaelis-Menten and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots, was determined. A value of KM~100μM was obtained for either GSH or CDNB, and Vmax varied between 40 and 60μmol/min per mg of GST.

  16. Relative reactivities in the O-methylation of glucomannans: the influence of stereochemistry at C-2 and the solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujia; Li, Jiebing; Lindström, Mikael E; Mischnick, Petra

    2015-01-30

    The main hemicellulose in softwood, glucomannan (GM), structurally resembles cellulose but has quite different physical and chemical properties. In addition to branching and original acetylation, the only other difference between these two β-1,4-linked glycans is the configuration at C-2 in approximately 80% of the sugar residues. In contrast to glucose, the 2-OH in mannose has an axial orientation. The influence of this stereochemistry on the relative reactivities of glucosyl compared to mannosyl units in methylation reactions are studied in this work. Glucomannan isolated from spruce (SGM) and commercially available konjac glucomannan (KGM) was methylated in DMSO/Li-dimsyl/MeI and water/NaOH/MeI system, respectively. In the early stage of the reaction, the glucose part of the SGM achieved slightly higher DS values than the mannose residues, but the overall relative rate constants were close to 1:1. The order of reactivities in glucose was k2>k3>k6 and k3>k2>k6 for mannose (in DMSO/Li-dimsyl/MeI). The rate constants did not remain constant, but k3 decreased when k2 increased for both epimeric sugars. In water/NaOH/MeI, the methylation of the primary 6-OH was much more pronounced with an order of reactivity of O-6>O-2>O-3 for mannose and O-2>O-6>O-3 for glucose. The results are discussed with respect to the OH-acidity and the stereoelectronic, sterical, and solvent effects. PMID:25498017

  17. Relative reactivities in the O-methylation of glucomannans: the influence of stereochemistry at C-2 and the solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujia; Li, Jiebing; Lindström, Mikael E; Mischnick, Petra

    2015-01-30

    The main hemicellulose in softwood, glucomannan (GM), structurally resembles cellulose but has quite different physical and chemical properties. In addition to branching and original acetylation, the only other difference between these two β-1,4-linked glycans is the configuration at C-2 in approximately 80% of the sugar residues. In contrast to glucose, the 2-OH in mannose has an axial orientation. The influence of this stereochemistry on the relative reactivities of glucosyl compared to mannosyl units in methylation reactions are studied in this work. Glucomannan isolated from spruce (SGM) and commercially available konjac glucomannan (KGM) was methylated in DMSO/Li-dimsyl/MeI and water/NaOH/MeI system, respectively. In the early stage of the reaction, the glucose part of the SGM achieved slightly higher DS values than the mannose residues, but the overall relative rate constants were close to 1:1. The order of reactivities in glucose was k2>k3>k6 and k3>k2>k6 for mannose (in DMSO/Li-dimsyl/MeI). The rate constants did not remain constant, but k3 decreased when k2 increased for both epimeric sugars. In water/NaOH/MeI, the methylation of the primary 6-OH was much more pronounced with an order of reactivity of O-6>O-2>O-3 for mannose and O-2>O-6>O-3 for glucose. The results are discussed with respect to the OH-acidity and the stereoelectronic, sterical, and solvent effects.

  18. Cytotoxicity of the diterpene 14-O-methyl-ryanodanol from Erythroxylum passerinum in an astrocytic cells model.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Filho, Noélio de Jesus; Souza, Cleide dos Santos; Costa, Tereza Cristina Silva; Da Silva, Victor Diógenes Amaral; Ribeiro, Cátia Suse de Oliveira; Barreiros, Marizeth Liborio; Costa, Jose Fernando Oliveira; David, Jorge Mauricio; David, Juceni P L; Costa, Silvia Lima

    2014-09-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, such as, specifically, alkaloids and terpenes, may present psychoactive properties that modify the function of the central nervous system (CNS) and induce neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity involves the response of glial cells, mainly astrocytes, which play a fundamental role in the control of homeostasis of the CNS. Some Erythroxylum species are indigenous to the state of Bahia in Brazil. This study investigated the cytotoxic activity of the diterpene AEP-1, extracted from the fruit of E. passerinum in a GL-15 cell line, astrocytic, glial cells model. The effects on cell viability, analyzed by the MTT assay, demonstrated a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect, with maximum effect at 500 μg/mL of AEP-1, and with a reduction of about 40 and 47% on cellular viability after 24 h and 72 h treatment, respectively. Evidence for induction of apoptosis by AEP-1 was first obtained when GL-15 glial cells were incubated with 250 μg/mL AEP-1 causing reniform and/or pyknotic nuclei and apoptotic bodies revealed by chromatin staining with Hoechst 33258. Increase in DNA fragmentation was also observed by comet assays in cells incubated with 500 μg/mL of AEP-1. Moreover, cells exposed to a sub toxic dose of AEP-1 (250 μg/mL) showed significant changes in morphology--contraction of the cytoplasm and expansion of cellular projections--signifying the presence of astrocytic cytoskeletal protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These findings indicated astrocytic cells as the target for terpene AEP-1 and suggest the involvement of glial cells with psychoactive symptoms observed in humans and animals after consumption of fruits of plants of the genus Erythroxylum. PMID:25918783

  19. Combining in vitro and in silico approaches to evaluate the multifunctional profile of rosmarinic acid from Blechnum brasiliense on targets related to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Juliana Maria de Mello; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Kieling Rubio, Maria Angélica; Mendonça, Jacqueline Nakau; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha

    2016-07-25

    Natural products are important sources of chemical diversity leading to unique scaffolds that can be exploited in the discovery of new drug candidates or chemical probes. In this context, chemical and biological investigation of ferns and lycophytes occurring in Brazil is an approach adopted by our research group aiming at discovering bioactive molecules acting on neurodegeneration targets. In the present study, rosmarinic acid (RA) isolated from Blechnum brasiliense showed an in vitro multifunctional profile characterized by antioxidant effects, and monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and MAO-B) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibition. RA showed antioxidant effects against hydroxyl (HO(•)) and nitric oxide (NO) radicals (IC50 of 29.4 and 140 μM, respectively), and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (IC50 of 19.6 μM). In addition, RA inhibited MAO-A, MAO-B and COMT enzymes with IC50 values of 50.1, 184.6 and 26.7 μM, respectively. The MAO-A modulation showed a non-time-dependent profile, suggesting a reversible mechanism of inhibition. Structural insights on RA interactions with MAO-A and COMT were investigated by molecular docking. Finally, RA (up to 5 mM) demonstrated no cytotoxicity on polymorphonuclear rat cells. Taken together, our results suggest that RA may be exploited as a template for the development of new antioxidant molecules possessing additional MAO and COMT inhibition effects to be further investigated on in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27270453

  20. An ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical biosensor for microRNA-21 detection based on a 2'-O-methyl modified DNAzyme and duplex-specific nuclease assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wu, Dongzhi; Liu, Zhijing; Cai, Shuxian; Zhao, Yanping; Chen, Mei; Xia, Yaokun; Li, Chunyan; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Jinghua

    2014-10-21

    Based on a highly efficient 2'-O-methyl modified G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) assisted target recycling, a novel label-free electrochemical biosensor for microRNA-21 (miR-21) detection is developed here. By employing the strategy, this DNA biosensor can detect as low as 8 aM miR-21 and exhibits high discrimination ability even against a single-base mismatch.

  1. Elevation of alanine amino transferase and aspartate amino transferase produced by pyoverdin, a photolabile pigment of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Eraso, A J; Albesa, I

    1998-01-01

    The effect of three forms pyoverdin on mouse liver was studied. Significant increases of alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) were obtained in mice after ingestion of water with forms A and C. The effect on liver was more evident with A than with C. Pyoverdin was purified by means of salt saturation, solvent extractions and ion-exchange chromatography. Fluorescent peaks obtained in the presence of light were different from those eluted under dark conditions. The relative amounts of pyoverdin A, B and C varied when dark purification procedure was employed. Form A decreased while C increased in the absence of light. Optimum conditions for C were in the dark without iron. When C was exposed to light, it changed to form A. Fast Atom Bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry of pyoverdin form C gave a form at M+ = 1324 m.u., which is 9 m.u. less than pyoverdin purified in the presence of light. The results suggest that light can influence pyoverdin stability and toxicity. PMID:9888631

  2. Properties of Succinyl-Coenzyme A:l-Malate Coenzyme A Transferase and Its Role in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by l-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:l-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for l-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:l-malate CoA transferase forms a large (αβ)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + l-malate → succinate + l-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts l-citramalate instead of l-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. PMID:16547052

  3. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  4. Isolation and characterization of two mouse Pi-class glutathione S-transferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bammler, T K; Smith, C A; Wolf, C R

    1994-01-01

    Pi-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in the detoxification of chemical toxins and mutagens and are implicated in neoplastic development and drug resistance. In all species characterized to date, only one functional Pi-class GST gene has been described. In this report we have identified two actively transcribed murine Pi-class GST genes, Gst p-1 and Gst p-2. The coding regions of Gst p-1 and the mouse Pi-class GST cDNA (GST-II) reported by Hatayama, Satoh and Satoh (1990) (Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 4606) are identical, whereas Gst p-2 encodes a protein that has not been described previously. The two genes are approximately 3 kb long and contain seven exons interrupted by six introns. In addition to a TATA box and a sequence motif matching the phorbol-ester-responsive element, the promoters of Gst p-1 and Gst p-2 exhibit one and two G+C boxes (GGGCGG) respectively. The cDNAs of the two genes were isolated from total liver RNA using reverse PCR. The peptide sequence deduced from the cDNAs share 97% identity and differ in six amino acids. Both genes are transcribed at significantly higher levels in male mouse liver than in female, and Gst p-1 mRNA is more abundant in both sexes than Gst p-2. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8135745

  5. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase as a specific indicator of bile duct lesions in the rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, T. B.; Neptun, D. A.; Popp, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a marker of hepatic injury used extensively in humans, has been used rarely in rats because its specificity has not been previously defined. Studies were designed for investigation of the specificity of serum GGT activity with the use of cell type specific hepatotoxicants in Fischer 344 rats. Single necrogenic doses of CCl4, allyl alcohol (AA), and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) were used to produce cell specific injury in centrilobular hepatocytes, periportal hepatocytes, and bile duct cells, respectively. Administration of CCl4 markedly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and serum bile acid concentrations within 24 hours but had no effect on serum GGT activity. ANIT treatment increased serum GGT and AP activities and bile acid concentration 24 hours following administration. Allyl alcohol administration increased serum ALT activity but had no effect on GGT activity. Administration of ANIT in the diet at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% for 2, 4, and 6 weeks produced dose- and time-dependent increases in serum GGT activity which strongly correlated with quantitative increases in hepatic bile duct volume, which was determined morphometrically. These observations support the use of serum GGT activity in the rat as diagnostic of bile duct cell necrosis when increases are detected shortly after the insult and as an indicator of possible bile duct hyperplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:6147091

  6. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase as a specific indicator of bile duct lesions in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Leonard, T B; Neptun, D A; Popp, J A

    1984-08-01

    Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a marker of hepatic injury used extensively in humans, has been used rarely in rats because its specificity has not been previously defined. Studies were designed for investigation of the specificity of serum GGT activity with the use of cell type specific hepatotoxicants in Fischer 344 rats. Single necrogenic doses of CCl4, allyl alcohol (AA), and alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) were used to produce cell specific injury in centrilobular hepatocytes, periportal hepatocytes, and bile duct cells, respectively. Administration of CCl4 markedly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), and serum bile acid concentrations within 24 hours but had no effect on serum GGT activity. ANIT treatment increased serum GGT and AP activities and bile acid concentration 24 hours following administration. Allyl alcohol administration increased serum ALT activity but had no effect on GGT activity. Administration of ANIT in the diet at 0.01%, 0.022%, 0.047%, and 0.1% for 2, 4, and 6 weeks produced dose- and time-dependent increases in serum GGT activity which strongly correlated with quantitative increases in hepatic bile duct volume, which was determined morphometrically. These observations support the use of serum GGT activity in the rat as diagnostic of bile duct cell necrosis when increases are detected shortly after the insult and as an indicator of possible bile duct hyperplasia. PMID:6147091

  7. Glutathione transferase isoenzymes from Bufo bufo embryos at an early developmental stage.

    PubMed Central

    Di Ilio, C; Aceto, A; Bucciarelli, T; Dragani, B; Angelucci, S; Miranda, M; Poma, A; Amicarelli, F; Barra, D; Federici, G

    1992-01-01

    Six forms of glutathione transferase (GST) were resolved from the cytosolic fraction of Bufo bufo embryos at developmental stage 4 by GSH-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by f.p.l.c. chromatofocusing in the 9-6 pH range. They have apparent isoelectric points at pH 8.37 (GST I), 8.22 (GST II), 8.10 (GST III), 7.84 (GST IV), 7.37 (GST V) and 7.12 (GST VI), and each displayed an apparent subunit molecular mass of 23 kDa by SDS/PAGE. The Bufo bufo embryo enzymes showed very similar structural, catalytic and immunological properties, as indicated by their substrate-specificities, inhibition characteristics, c.d. spectra, h.p.l.c. elution profiles and immunological reactivities, as well as by their N-terminal amino acid sequences. Although Bufo bufo embryo GSTs do not correspond to any other known GSTs, the results of our experiments indicate that amphibian GSTs could be included in the Pi family of GSTs. This conclusion is supported by the analysis of c.d. spectra, and by the fact that mammalian Pi class GSTs and amphibian GSTs showed about 80% identity in their N-terminal amino acid sequences. Furthermore, antisera prepared against Bufo bufo GST III cross-reacted in immunoblotting analysis with Pi class GSTs, and vice versa. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1567369

  8. Effect of green tea powder (Camellia sinensis L. cv. Benifuuki) particle size on O-methylated EGCG absorption in rats; The Kakegawa Study.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Ema, Kaori; Tokuda, Yoshiko; Monobe, Manami; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Yoichi; Kuriyama, Shinichi

    2011-03-01

    Tea polyphenols, e.g., (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl gallate (EGCG3"Me), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate (ECG), and (-)-epicatechin (EC), are believed to be responsible for the beneficial effects of tea. 'Benifuuki', a tea (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivar grown in Japan, is rich in the anti-allergic molecule epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl) gallate (EGCG3"Me). Pulverized Benifuuki green tea powder (BGP) is more widely distributed than leaf tea in Japan. Japanese people mix their pulverized tea with water directly, whereas it is common to drink leaf tea after extraction. However, few studies of the effects of BGP particle size on polyphenol bioavailability have been performed. This study was conducted to investigate the absorption of catechins in rats after the intragastric administration of Benifuuki green tea. Therefore, we assessed the plasma concentrations of catechins following the ingestion of BGP with different mean particle sizes (2.86, 18.6, and 76.1 μm) or Benifuuki green tea infusion (BGI) as a control in rats. The bioavailabilities of EGCG3"Me, EGCG, ECG, EGC, and EC were analyzed after the oral administration of a single dose of Benifuuki green tea (125 mg/rat) to rats. The plasma concentrations of tea catechins were determined by HPLC analysis combined with of electrochemical detection (ECD) using a coulometric array. The AUC (area under the drug concentration versus time curve; min μg/mL) of ester-type catechins (EGCG3"Me, EGCG, and ECG) for the BGP 2.86 μm were significantly higher than those in the infusion and 18.6 and 76.1 μm BGP groups, but the AUC of free-type catechins (EGC and EC) showed no differences between these groups. Regarding the peak plasma level of EGCG3"Me adjusted for intake, BGP 2.86 μm and BGI showed higher values than the BGP 18.6 and 76.1 μm groups, and the peak plasma levels of the other catechins displayed the same tendency. The present study

  9. Geranylgeranyl transferase type II inhibition prevents myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michelle A; Coulton, Les; Ebetino, Frank H; Vanderkerken, Karin; Croucher, Peter I

    2008-12-12

    Geranylgeranyl transferase II (GGTase II) is an enzyme that plays a key role in the isoprenylation of proteins. 3-PEHPC, a novel GGTase II inhibitor, blocks bone resorption and induces myeloma cell apoptosis in vitro. Its effect on bone resorption and tumor growth in vivo is unknown. We investigated the effect of 3-PEHPC on tumor burden and bone disease in the 5T2MM model of multiple myeloma in vivo. 3-PEHPC significantly reduced osteoclast numbers and osteoclast surface. 3-PEHPC prevented the bone loss and the development of osteolytic bone lesions induced by 5T2MM myeloma cells. Treatment with 3-PEHPC also significantly reduced myeloma burden in bone. The magnitude of response was similar to that seen with the bisphosphonate, risedronate. These data show that targeting GGTase II with 3-PEHPC can prevent osteolytic bone disease and reduce tumor burden in vivo, and represents a novel approach to treating tumors that grow in bone.

  10. Pleiotropic Functions of Glutathione S-Transferase P

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform. PMID:24974181

  11. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  12. Pleiotropic functions of glutathione S-transferase P.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform.

  13. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of (-)-epigallocatechin 3-O-(3-O-methyl) gallate (EGCG3″Me) from Chinese oolong tea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wu, Zufang; Weng, Peifang

    2014-10-15

    (-)-Epigallocatechin 3-O-(3-O-methyl) gallate (EGCG3″Me) has exhibited various biological activities in oolong tea. However, little information about its hepatoprotective activity is available. The objectives of the present study, therefore, were to determine the hepatoprotective activity of EGCG3″Me. First, high-purity EGCG3″Me was prepared from Chinese oolong tea by column chromatography. In antioxidant assay in vitro, EGCG3″Me exhibited potential antioxidant activity. For hepatoprotective activity in vitro, it was observed that EGCG3″Me effectively alleviated the changes induced by alcohol in a concentration-dependent manner. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, the administration of EGCG3″Me at a dose of 100 mg/kg BW per day significantly decreased the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) from 64.6 ± 3.17 and 97.6 ± 3.78 to 39.6 ± 2.72 and 59.6 ± 3.02 U/L, decreased the liver level of malondialdehyde (MDA) from 1.14 ± 0.08 to 0.77 ± 0.03 nmol/mg protein, and remarkably restored the liver activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) from 247 ± 20.1 U/mg and 6.12 ± 0.17 nmol/mg protein to 261 ± 9.98 U/mg and 8.10 ± 0.03 nmol/mg protein, respectively, in alcohol-induced liver injury mice. This suggested that the protective effect of EGCG3″Me against alcohol-induced liver injury is possibly via its antioxidant activity to protect biological systems against oxidative stress.

  14. FK506 maturation involves a cytochrome p450 protein-catalyzed four-electron C-9 oxidation in parallel with a C-31 O-methylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Lihan; Pang, Bo; Chen, Jing; Xu, Zhinan; Abe, Ikuro; Liu, Wen

    2013-05-01

    FK506, structurally similar to FK520 and rapamycin, is an α-keto amide bonding-containing, macrolide natural product that exhibits potent immunosuppressive activity and moderate antifungal activity. FK506 biosynthesis requires a hybrid polyketide synthase (PKS)-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) system to construct the skeleton of the macrolide. The mechanism for tailoring this macrolide to furnish FK506 remains poorly understood. In this study, we report a maturation paradigm common for FK506, FK520, and rapamycin, by characterizing two conserved regiospecific, post-PKS-NRPS modifications in an FK506-producing Streptomyces tsukubaensis strain. A cytochrome P450 protein, FkbD, catalyzes a less common, four-electron oxidation at C-9 to give a rarely found α-keto amide group, whereas a methyltransferase, FkbM, is responsible for O-methylation at C-31 to afford a methoxy group. Both FkbD and FkbM are highly tolerant in their substrate choice; therefore, the order of FkbD- and FkbM-catalyzed reactions is interchangeable in the FK506 biosynthetic pathway. Inactivation of fkbD produced a new intermediate, 9-deoxo-FK506, which displayed antifungal activity lower than that of FK506. Taking previously reported bioassay results regarding the intermediates 9-deoxo-31-O-demethyl-FK506 and 31-O-demethyl-FK506 into account, it is clear that the modifications catalyzed by FkbD and FkbM are of importance to reach the full biological activity of FK506 by forming a key structure motif that is necessary for interaction of the molecule with the receptor and, subsequently, the downstream intracellular responses. PMID:23435975

  15. Thermotropic phase properties of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O-(3-O-methyl- beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Trouard, T P; Mannock, D A; Lindblom, G; Rilfors, L; Akiyama, M; McElhaney, R N

    1994-01-01

    The hydration properties and the phase structure of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O(3-O-methyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG) in water have been studied via differential scanning calorimetry, 1H-NMR and 2H-NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results indicate that this lipid forms a crystalline (Lc) phase up to temperatures of 60-70 degrees C, where a transition through a metastable reversed hexagonal (Hll) phase to a reversed micellar solution (L2) phase occurs. Experiments were carried out at water concentrations in a range from 0 to 35 wt%, which indicate that all phases are poorly hydrated, taking up < 5 mol water/mol lipid. The absence of a lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase and the low levels of hydration measured in the discernible phases suggest that the methylation of the saccharide moiety alters the hydrogen bonding properties of the headgroup in such a way that the 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG headgroup cannot achieve the same level of hydration as the unmethylated form. Thus, in spite of the small increase in steric bulk resulting from methylation, there is an increase in the tendency of 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG to form nonlamellar structures. A similar phase behavior has previously been observed for the Acholeplasma laidlawii A membrane lipid 1,2-diacyl-3-O-(6-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol in water (Lindblom et al. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:16198-16207). The phase behavior of the two lipids suggests that hydrophobic substitution of a hydroxyl group in the sugar ring of the glucopyranosylglycerols has a very strong effect on their physicochemical properties, i.e., headgroup hydration and the formation of different lipid aggregate structures. PMID:7811919

  16. The automated radiosynthesis and purification of the opioid receptor antagonist, [6-O-methyl-11C]diprenorphine on the GE TRACERlab FXFE radiochemistry module.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Michael; Prenant, Christian; Brown, Gavin; McMahon, Adam; Lowe, Jonathan; Jones, Anthony

    2014-05-15

    [6-O-Methyl-(11)C]diprenorphine ([(11)C]diprenorphine) is a positron emission tomography ligand used to probe the endogenous opioid system in vivo. Diprenorphine acts as an antagonist at all of the opioid receptor subtypes, that is, μ (mu), κ (kappa) and δ (delta). The radiosynthesis of [(11)C]diprenorphine using [(11)C]methyl iodide produced via the 'wet' method on a home-built automated radiosynthesis set-up has been described previously. Here, we describe a modified synthetic method to [(11)C]diprenorphine performed using [(11)C]methyl iodide produced via the gas phase method on a GE TRACERlab FXFE radiochemistry module. Also described is the use of [(11)C]methyl triflate as the carbon-11 methylating agent for the [(11)C]diprenorphine syntheses. [(11)C]Diprenorphine was produced to good manufacturing practice standards for use in a clinical setting. In comparison to previously reported [(11)C]diprenorphine radiosyntheisis, the method described herein gives a higher specific activity product which is advantageous for receptor occupancy studies. The radiochemical purity of [(11)C]diprenorphine is similar to what has been reported previously, although the radiochemical yield produced in the method described herein is reduced, an issue that is inherent in the gas phase radiosynthesis of [(11)C]methyl iodide. The yields of [(11)C]diprenorphine are nonetheless sufficient for clinical research applications. Other advantages of the method described herein are an improvement to both reproducibility and reliability of the production as well as simplification of the purification and formulation steps. We suggest that our automated radiochemistry route to [(11)C]diprenorphine should be the method of choice for routine [(11)C]diprenorphine productions for positron emission tomography studies, and the production process could easily be transferred to other radiochemistry modules such as the TRACERlab FX C pro.

  17. N-acetylcolchinol O-methyl ether and thiocolchicine, potent analogs of colchicine modified in the C ring. Evaluation of the mechanistic basis for their enhanced biological properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, G.J.; Getahun, Z.; Muzaffar, A.; Brossi, A.; Hamel, E. )

    1990-06-25

    Two colchicine analogs with modifications only in the C ring are better inhibitors than colchicine of cell growth and tubulin polymerization. Radiolabeled thiocolchicine (with a thiomethyl instead of a methoxy group at position C-10) and N-acetylcolchinol O-methyl ether (NCME) (with a methoxy-substituted benzenoid instead of the methoxy-substituted tropone C ring) were prepared for comparison with colchicine. Scatchard analysis indicated a single binding site with KD values of 1.0-2.3 microM. Thiocolchicine was bound 2-4 times as rapidly as colchicine, but the activation energies of the reactions were nearly identical (18 kcal/mol for colchicine, 20 kcal/mol for thiocolchicine). NCME bound to tubulin in a biphasic reaction. The faster phase was 60 times as fast as colchicine binding at 37 degrees C, and a substantial reaction occurred at 0 degrees C. The rate of the faster phase of NCME binding changed relatively little as a function of temperature, so the activation energy was only 7.0 kcal/mol. Dissociation reactions were also evaluated, and at 37 degrees C the half-lives of the tubulin-drug complexes were 11 min for NCME, 24 h for thiocolchicine, and 27 h for colchicine. Relative dissociation rates as a function of temperature varied little among the drug complexes. Activation energies for the dissociation reactions were 30 kcal/mol for thiocolchicine, 27 kcal/mol for NCME, and 24 kcal/mol for colchicine. Comparison of the activation energies of association and dissociation yielded free energies for the binding reactions of -20 kcal/mol for NCME, -10 kcal/mol for thiocolchicine, and -6 kcal/mol for colchicine. The greater effectiveness of NCME and thiocolchicine as compared with colchicine in biological assays probably derives from their more rapid binding to tubulin and the lower free energies of their binding reactions.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of p-coumaryl alcohol-γ-O-methyl ether is mediated through modulation of interferon-γ production in Th cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E-S; Min, H-J; Lee, K; Lee, M-S; Nam, J-W; Seo, E-K; Hong, J-H; Hwang, E-S

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: p-Coumaryl alcohol-γ-O-methyl ether (CAME) was isolated from Alpinia galanga and shown to contain a phenylpropanoid structure similar to p-coumaryl diacetate (CDA). CDA is known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, but the biochemical activities of CAME are unknown. Inflammation is mediated by inflammatory cytokine production, in particular, by CD4+ T helper cells (Th cells), but it is unclear whether phenylpropanoids affect cytokine production in Th cells. In this study, we decided to investigate the functions of CAME and CDA in CD4+ Th cells. Experimental approach: Mouse CD4+ Th cells were isolated from C57BL6 mice and stimulated with an antibody against T cell receptors in the presence of phenylpropanoids. Cytokine production was measured by elisa and intracellular cytokine staining. Gene knockout mice and tetracycline-inducible transgenic mice were used to examine the molecular mechanisms of phenylpropanoids on modulation of cytokine production. Key results: CAME potently reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species in Th cells, as does CDA. However, although CDA was cytotoxic, CAME selectively and potently suppresses interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in CD4+ Th cells, without toxicity. This effect was caused by attenuated expression of the transcription factor, T-box protein expressed in T cells (T-bet), and T-bet was essential for CAME to inhibit IFNγ production in CD4+ Th cells. Conclusions and implications: CAME selectively and substantially suppresses IFNγ production in CD4+ Th cells by decreasing T-bet expression. As increased IFNγ production by CD4+ Th cells can mediate inflammatory immune responses, a selective IFNγ suppressor, such as CAME may be an effective, naturally occurring, compound for modulating inflammatory immune disorders. PMID:19226286

  19. Heterologous expression and functional characterization of avian mu-class glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Bunderson, Brett R; Kim, Ji Eun; Croasdell, Amanda; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Reed, Kent M; Coulombe, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs: EC2.5.1.1.8) catalyze the detoxification of reactive electrophilic compounds, many of which are toxic and carcinogenic intermediates, via conjugation with the endogenous tripeptide glutathione (GSH). Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated detoxification is a critical determinant of species susceptibility to the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which in resistant animals efficiently detoxifies the toxic intermediate produced by hepatic cytochrome P450 bioactivation, the exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are one of the most sensitive animals known to AFB1, a condition associated with a deficiency of hepatic GST-mediated detoxification of AFBO. We have recently shown that unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris), which are relatively resistant, express hepatic GST-mediated detoxification activity toward AFBO. Because of the importance of GSTs in species susceptibility, and to explore possible GST classes involved in AFB1 detoxification, we amplified, cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the hepatic mu-class GSTs tGSTM3 (GenBank accession no. JF340152), tGSTM4 (JF340153) from domestic turkeys, and a GSTM4 variant (ewGSTM4, JF340154) from Eastern wild turkeys. Predicted molecular masses of tGSTM3 and two tGSTM4 variants were 25.6 and 25.8kDa, respectively. Multiple sequence comparisons revealed four GSTM motifs and the mu-loop in both proteins. tGSTM4 has 89% amino acid sequence identity to chicken GSTM2, while tGSTM3 has 73% sequence identity to human GSTM3 (hGSTM3). Specific activities of Escherichia coli-expressed tGSTM3 toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide were five-fold greater than tGSTM4 while tGSTM4 possessed more than three-fold greater activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The two enzymes displayed equal activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA

  20. Effect of municipal waste water effluent upon the expression of Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes of brine shrimp Artemia.

    PubMed

    Grammou, Athina; Papadimitriou, Chrisa; Samaras, Peter; Vasara, Eleni; Papadopoulos, Athanasios I

    2011-06-01

    Multiple isoenzymes of the detoxification enzyme family Glutathione S-transferase are expressed in the brine shrimp Artemia. The number of the major ones detected in crude extract by means of chromatofocusing varied between three and four, depending on the age. Two isoenzymes, one alkaline and one neutral (with corresponding isoelectric points of 8.5 and 7.2) appear to be dominant in all three developmental stages studied, (24, 48, and 72 h after hatching). Culturing Artemia for 48 h after hatching, in artificial sea water prepared by municipal wastewater effluent resulted to significant alterations of the isoenzyme profile. In comparison to organisms cultured for the same period of time in artificial sea water prepared by filtered tap water, the expression of the alkaline isoenzyme decreased by 62% while that of the neutral isoenzyme increased by 58%. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of the major isoenzyme of the acidic area increased by more than two folds. It is worth mentioning that although the specific activity of the total enzyme in the whole body homogenate was elevated, no statistically significant alteration of the Km value was observed. These findings suggest that study of the isoenzyme profile of Glutathione S-transferase may offer high sensitivity in detecting environmental pollution and needs to be further investigated. PMID:21429555

  1. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Sabina; Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Mazzarelli, Paola

    2016-04-12

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors.

  2. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26799588

  3. Pharmacological stimulation of brain carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-1 decreases food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Aja, Susan; Landree, Leslie E; Kleman, Amy M; Medghalchi, Susan M; Vadlamudi, Aravinda; McFadden, Jill M; Aplasca, Andrea; Hyun, Jayson; Plummer, Erica; Daniels, Khadija; Kemm, Matthew; Townsend, Craig A; Thupari, Jagan N; Kuhajda, Francis P; Moran, Timothy H; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2008-02-01

    Inhibition of brain carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-1 (CPT-1) is reported to decrease food intake and body weight in rats. Yet, the fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor and CPT-1 stimulator C75 produces hypophagia and weight loss when given to rodents intracerebroventricularly (icv). Thus roles and relative contributions of altered brain CPT-1 activity and fatty acid oxidation in these phenomena remain unclarified. We administered compounds that target FAS or CPT-1 to mice by single icv bolus and examined acute and prolonged effects on feeding and body weight. C75 decreased food intake rapidly and potently at all doses (1-56 nmol) and dose dependently inhibited intake on day 1. Dose-dependent weight loss on day 1 persisted through 4 days of postinjection monitoring. The FAS inhibitor cerulenin produced dose-dependent (560 nmol) hypophagia for 1 day, weight loss for 2 days, and weight regain to vehicle control by day 3. The CPT-1 inhibitor etomoxir (32, 320 nmol) did not alter overall day 1 feeding. However, etomoxir attenuated the hypophagia produced by C75, indicating that CPT-1 stimulation is important for C75's effect. A novel compound, C89b, was characterized in vitro as a selective stimulator of CPT-1 that does not affect fatty acid synthesis. C89b (100, 320 nmol) decreased feeding in mice for 3 days and produced persistent weight loss for 6 days without producing conditioned taste aversion. Similarly, intraperitoneal administration decreased feeding and body weight without producing conditioned taste aversion. These results suggest a role for brain CPT-1 in the regulation of energy balance and implicate CPT-1 stimulation as a pharmacological approach to weight loss.

  4. Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Estrogen-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis by Modulating Enzymes of Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Harini S.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine whether dietary berries and ellagic acid prevent 17β estradiol (E2) -induced mammary tumors by altering estrogen metabolism, we randomized ACI rats (n=6/group) into 5 groups − sham implant + control diet (SH-CD), E2 − implant + control diet (E2-CD), E2+2.5% black raspberry (E2-BRB); E2+2.5% blueberry (E2-BB) and E2+ 400ppm ellagic acid (E2-EA). Animals were euthanized at early (6wk), intermediate (18wk) and late (24wk) phases of E2-carcinogenesis and the mammary tissue analyzed for gene-expression changes using quantitative real-time PCR. At 6 weeks, E2-treatment caused 48-fold increase in cytochrome P4501A1(CYP1A1) (p<0.0001), which was attenuated by both BRB and BB diets to 12- and 21-fold, respectively (p<0.001). E2 did not alter CYP1B1 levels, but both berry and EA diets significantly suppressed it by 11- and 3.5-fold, respectively from baseline (p<0.05). There was a 5-fold increase in 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehyrdogenase(17βHSD7) and this was moderately abrogated to about 2-fold by all supplementation (p<0.05). At 18 weeks, CYP1A1 was elevated by 15-fold in E2-CD and only E2-BB reduced this increase to 7-fold (p<0.05). Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) expression was elevated 2-fold by E2-treatment (p<0.05) and all supplementation reversed this. At 24 weeks, CYP1A1 expression was less pronounced, but still high (8-fold) in E2-treated rats. This increase was reduced to 3.2 and 4.6-fold, by E2-BRB and E2-EA, respectively (p<0.05), but not by E2-BB. Supplementation did not alter the effect of E2 on steroid receptors. The diets also significantly suppressed mammary tumor incidence (10–30%), volume (41–67%) and multiplicity (38 to 51%) (p<0.05). Berries may prevent mammary tumors by suppressing the levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes during the early phase of E2-carcinogenesis. PMID:20501861

  5. Quercetin 3-O-methyl ether protects FL83B cells from copper induced oxidative stress through the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsiao-Ling; Li, Chia-Jung; Huang, Lin-Huang; Chen, Chun-Yao; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Lin, Chun-Nan; Hsu, Hsue-Yin

    2012-10-01

    Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that exhibits several biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Quercetin 3-O-methyl ether (Q3) is a natural product reported to have pharmaceutical activities, including antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, little is known about the mechanism by which it protects cells from oxidative stress. This study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which Q3 protects against Cu{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity. Exposure to Cu{sup 2+} resulted in the death of mouse liver FL83B cells, characterized by apparent apoptotic features, including DNA fragmentation and increased nuclear condensation. Q3 markedly suppressed Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and PARP cleavage, in Cu{sup 2+}-exposed cells. The involvement of PI3K, Akt, Erk, FOXO3A, and Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was shown to be critical to the survival of Q3-treated FL83B cells. The liver of both larval and adult zebrafish showed severe damage after exposure to Cu{sup 2+} at a concentration of 5 μM. Hepatic damage induced by Cu{sup 2+} was reduced by cotreatment with Q3. Survival of Cu{sup 2+}-exposed larval zebrafish was significantly increased by cotreatment with 15 μM Q3. Our results indicated that Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis in FL83B cells occurred via the generation of ROS, upregulation and phosphorylation of Erk, overexpression of 14-3-3, inactivation of Akt, and the downregulation of FOXO3A and MnSOD. Hence, these results also demonstrated that Q3 plays a protective role against oxidative damage in zebrafish liver and remarked the potential of Q3 to be used as an antioxidant for hepatocytes. Highlights: ► Protective effects of Q3 on Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. ► Cu{sup 2+} induced apoptosis in FL83B cells via ROS and the activation of Erk. ► Q3 abolishes Cu{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt and MAPK

  6. Development of pyrethroid-like fluorescent substrates for glutathione S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huazhang; Yao, Hongwei; Liu, Jun-Yan; Samra, Aman I.; Kamita, Shizuo G.; Cornel, Anthony J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive substrates is critical for the development of precise and rapid assays for detecting changes in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity that are associated with GST-mediated metabolism of insecticides. In this study, six pyrethroid-like compounds were synthesized and characterized as substrates for insect and mammalian GSTs. All of the substrates were esters composed of the same alcohol moiety, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and acid moieties that structurally mimic some commonly used pyrethroid insecticides including cypermethrin and cyhalothrin. CpGSTD1, a recombinant Delta class GST from the mosquito Culex pipiens, metabolized our pyrethroid-like substrates with both chemical and geometric (i.e., the cis-isomers were metabolized at 2- to 5-fold higher rates than the corresponding trans-isomers) preference. A GST preparation from mouse liver also metabolized most of our pyrethroid-like substrates with both chemical and geometric preference but at 10- to 170-fold lower rates. CpGSTD1 and mouse GSTs metabolized CDNB, a general GST substrate, at more than 200-fold higher rates than our novel pyrethroid-like substrates. There was a 10-fold difference in the specificity constant (kcat/KM ratio) of CpGSTD1 for CDNB and those of CpGSTD1 for cis-DCVC and cis-TFMCVC suggesting that cis-DCVC and cis-TFMCVC may be useful for the detection of GST-based metabolism of pyrethroids in mosquitoes. PMID:23000005

  7. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  8. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, JZ; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  9. Conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal by largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Pham, Robert T; Gardner, James L; Gallagher, Evan P

    2002-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GST) are a major group of conjugative enzymes involved in the detoxification of electrophilic compounds and products of oxidative stress. We have previously described the kinetics of hepatic GST conjugation in largemouth bass using a variety of synthetic GST reference substrates. In the present study, we investigated the ability of largemouth bass hepatic GSTs to conjugate 4-hydroxynon-2-enal (4HNE), a mutagenic and cytotoxic alpha-beta-unsaturated aldehyde produced during oxidative injury. Hepatic cytosolic fractions from largemouth bass rapidly catalyzed GSH-dependent 4HNE conjugation, with the rate of GST-4HNE conjugation in bass liver exceeding those of several other mammalian and aquatic species. No apparent sex-related differences in GST-4HNE activity were observed among adult bass. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis of GSH affinity-purified bass liver cytosolic GST revealed the presence of two major GST subunits of approximately 30 and 27 KDa that exhibited slight cross-reactivity when probed with a rat alpha class GST antibody, but not to rat mu, pi or theta class GST. The rapid conjugation of 4HNE by hepatic GST suggests an important role for GSTs in protecting against peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in bass liver.

  10. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts. PMID:26226634

  11. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts.

  12. A study of gender, strain and age differences in mouse liver glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Egaas, E; Falls, J G; Dauterman, W C

    1995-01-01

    The hepatic cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in four strains of the mouse and one strain of the rat was studied with the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), ethachrynic acid (ETHA), cumene hydroperoxide (CU) and atrazine as the in vitro substrates. In the mouse, significant gender, strain and age-related differences in the GST activity towards CDNB and atrazine were found between adolescent and sexually mature males and females of the CD-1, C57BL/6, DBA/2 and Swiss-Webster strains, and the differences were larger with atrazine as the substrate. With DCNB and CU a similar tendency was observed, however not significant for all strains. The GST activity towards ETHA was also gender and strain specific, but revealed no age-related differences. The herbicide atrazine seems to be a useful substrate in the study of strain and age-related differences in the mouse GST class Pi.

  13. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, J Z; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans. PMID:27551520

  14. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a general probe for chemical contaminations in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, A; Fabrini, R; Lai, O; Alfieri, L; Roncoroni, C; Noce, A; Pedersen, J Z; Ricci, G

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes devoted to the protection of cells against many different toxins. In erythrocytes, the isoenzyme (e-GST) mainly present is GSTP1-1, which is overexpressed in humans in case of increased blood toxicity, as it occurs in nephrophatic patients or in healthy subjects living in polluted areas. The present study explores the possibility that e-GST may be used as an innovative and highly sensitive biomarker of blood toxicity also for other mammals. All distinct e-GSTs from humans, Bos taurus (cow), Sus scrofa (pig), Capra hircus (goat), Equus caballus (horse), Equus asinus (donkey) and Ovis aries (sheep), show very similar amino acid sequences, identical kinetics and stability properties. Reference values for e-GST in all these mammals reared in controlled farms span from 3.5±0.2 U/gHb in the pig to 17.0±0.9 U/gHb in goat; such activity levels can easily be determined with high precision using only a few microliters of whole blood and a simple spectrophotometric assay. Possibly disturbing factors have been examined to avoid artifact determinations. This study provides the basis for future screening studies to verify if animals have been exposed to toxicologic insults. Preliminary data on cows reared in polluted areas show increased expression of e-GST, which parallels the results found for humans.

  15. Human Polymorphisms in the Glutathione Transferase Zeta 1/Maleylacetoacetate Isomerase Gene Influence the Toxicokinetics of Dichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Langaee, Taimour; Coats, Bonnie S.; Kurtz, Tracie L.; Bullock, John R.; Weithorn, David; Gong, Yan; Wagner, David A.; Ostrov, David A.; Johnson, Julie A.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a chemical relevant to environmental science and allopathic medicine, is dehalogenated by the bifunctional enzyme glutathione transferase zeta (GSTz1) maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), the penultimate enzyme in the phenylalanine/tyrosine catabolic pathway. The authors postulated that polymorphisms in GSTz1/MAAI modify the toxicokinetics of DCA. GSTz1/MAAI haplotype significantly affected the kinetics and biotransformation of 1,2-13C-DCA when it was administered at either environmentally (μg/kg/d) or clinically (mg/kg/d) relevant doses. GSTz1/MAAI haplotype also influenced the urinary accumulation of potentially toxic tyrosine metabolites. Atomic modeling revealed that GSTz1/MAAI variants associated with the slowest rates of DCA metabolism induced structural changes in the enzyme homodimer, predicting protein instability or abnormal protein-protein interactions. Knowledge of the GSTz1/MAAI haplotype can be used prospectively to identify individuals at potential risk of DCA’s adverse side effects from environmental or clinical exposure or who may exhibit aberrant amino acid metabolism in response to dietary protein. PMID:21642471

  16. Limonin Methoxylation Influences Induction of Glutathione S-Transferase and Quinone Reductase

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, JOSE LUIS; JAYAPRAKASHA, G. K.; VALDIVIA, VIOLETA; MUNOZ, DIANA; DANDEKAR, DEEPAK V.; AHMAD, HASSAN; PATIL, BHIMANAGOUDA S.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated the chemoprevention potential of citrus limonoids due to the induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes. In the present study, three citrus limonoids were purified and identified from sour orange seeds as limonin, limonin glucoside (LG), deacetylnomilinic acid glucoside (DNAG). In addition, limonin was modified to defuran limonin and limonin 7-methoxime. The structures of these compounds were confirmed by NMR studies. These five compounds were used to investigate the influence of Phase II enzymes in female A/J mice. Our results indicated that the highest induction of Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) activity against 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) by DNAG (67%) in lung homogenates followed by limonin-7-methoxime (32%) in treated liver homogenates. Interestingly, the limonin-7-methoxime showed the highest GST activity (270%) in liver against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), while the same compound in stomach induced GST by 51% compared to the control. DNAG treated group induced 55% in stomach homogenates. Another Phase II enzyme, quinone reductase (QR), was significantly induced by limonin-7-methoxime by 65 and 32% in liver and lung homogenates, respectively. Defuran limonin, induced QR in lung homogenates by 45%. Our results indicated that modification of the limonin have differential induction of phase II enzymes. These findings are indicative of a possible mechanism for the prevention of cancer by aiding in detoxification of xenobiotics. PMID:19480426

  17. Comprehensive X-Ray Structural Studies of the Quinolinate Phosphoribosyl Transferase (BNA6) From Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    di Luccio, E.; Wilson, D.K.

    2009-05-14

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a 32 kDa enzyme encoded by the BNA6 gene in yeast and catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). QAPRTase plays a key role in the tryptophan degradation pathway via kynurenine, leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and clearing the neurotoxin quinolinate. To improve our understanding of the specificity of the eukaryotic enzyme and the course of events associated with catalysis, we have determined the crystal structures of the apo and singly bound forms with the substrates quinolinate and PRPP. This reveals that the enzyme folds in a manner similar to that of various prokaryotic forms which are {approx}30% identical in sequence. In addition, the structure of the Michaelis complex is approximated by PRPP and the quinolinate analogue phthalate bound to the active site. These results allow insight into the kinetic mechanism of QAPRTase and provide an understanding of structural diversity in the active site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme when compared to prokaryotic homologues.

  18. Characterization of Discrete Phosphopantetheinyl Transferases in Streptomyces tsukubaensis L19 Unveils a Complicate Phosphopantetheinylation Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Luo, Hong-Dou; Ren, Ni-Ni; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) play essential roles in both primary metabolisms and secondary metabolisms via post-translational modification of acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) and peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs). In this study, an industrial FK506 producing strain Streptomyces tsukubaensis L19, together with Streptomyces avermitilis, was identified to contain the highest number (five) of discrete PPTases known among any species thus far examined. Characterization of the five PPTases in S. tsukubaensis L19 unveiled that stw ACP, an ACP in a type II PKS, was phosphopantetheinylated by three PPTases FKPPT1, FKPPT3, and FKACPS; sts FAS ACP, the ACP in fatty acid synthase (FAS), was phosphopantetheinylated by three PPTases FKPPT2, FKPPT3, and FKACPS; TcsA-ACP, an ACP involved in FK506 biosynthesis, was phosphopantetheinylated by two PPTases FKPPT3 and FKACPS; FkbP-PCP, an PCP involved in FK506 biosynthesis, was phosphopantetheinylated by all of these five PPTases FKPPT1-4 and FKACPS. Our results here indicate that the functions of these PPTases complement each other for ACPs/PCPs substrates, suggesting a complicate phosphopantetheinylation network in S. tsukubaensis L19. Engineering of these PPTases in S. tsukubaensis L19 resulted in a mutant strain that can improve FK506 production. PMID:27052100

  19. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  20. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Motohiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Satow, Yoshinori; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli have been obtained by use of polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant. The crystallization was performed in the presence of a glutathione sulfonate inhibitor under the acidic condition, with combination of the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion and the macro-seeding procedures. The crystals are of a thin-plate shape with typical sizes of 1.0 × 0.5 × 0.1 mm, and are stable against X-ray irradiation. They belong to the space group P2 12 12 1 with cell parameters of a = 90.47 Å, b = 93.87 Å and c = 51.10 Å, and diffract X-rays at least up to 2.3 Å resolution. The solvent content is 48% in volume, when a homodimeric molecule of the enzyme is assumed to occupy an asymmetric unit of the crystal. The crystals are suitable for three-dimensional structural studies. Diffraction data of the native crystal have been collected.

  1. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  2. Antenna-specific glutathione S-transferase in male silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Quan-Mei; Xia, Qing-You; Zhao, Ping

    2014-04-29

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are widely distributed in different species. GSTs detoxify exogenous and endogenous substances by conjugation to reduced glutathione. We characterized BmGSTD4, an antenna-specific GST, in male silkmoths. The full-length mRNA of Bmgstd4 was cloned by RACE-PCR and contained an open reading frame of 738 bp encoding a 245 amino acid protein. The antenna specificity of BmGSTD4 was validated at the mRNA and protein levels and BmGSTD4 was shown to localize in the sensillum of male silkmoth antennae. Homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that BmGSTD4 was a typical GST belonging to the δ class and had a canonical GST fold with a conserved N-terminus, including a glutathione-binding site and a C-terminal domain harboring a hydrophobic substrate-binding site. Restricted expression of BmGSTD4 in silkmoth antennae combined with GST activity suggested that BmGSTD4 was involved in the detoxification of harmful chemicals.

  3. Characterization of GDP-Fucose: Polysaccharide Fucosyl Transferase in Corn Roots (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    James, D W; Jones, R L

    1979-12-01

    The peripheral root cap cells of corn (cv. SX-17A) secrete a fucose-rich, high molecular weight, polysaccharide slime via the dictyosome pathway. To study the synthesis of this polysaccharide, a technique for isolating and assaying GDP-fucose:polysaccharide fucosyl transferase activity was developed. Corn roots were excised from germinated seeds, incubated 12 hours at 10 C in water, and ground in 100 millimolar Tris or Pipes buffer (pH 7.0) with or without 0.5 molar sucrose. The membrane-bound enzyme was solubilized by sonication in the presence of 2 molar urea and 1.5% (v/v) Triton X-100 and assayed by monitoring the incorporation of GDP-[(14)C]fucose into endogenous acceptors. Optimum enzyme activity is expressed at pH 7.0 and 30 C in the presence of 0.8% (v/v) Triton X-100. The enzyme does not require divalent cations for activation and is inhibited by concentrations of MnCl(2) or MgCl(2) greater than 1 millimolar. Corn root cap slime will serve as an exogenous acceptor for the enzyme if it is first hydrolyzed in 5 millimolar trifluoroacetic acid for 60 minutes at 18 pounds per square inch, 121 C. This procedure prepares the acceptor by removing terminal fucose residues from the slime molecule. Kinetics of fucose release during hydrolysis of native slime and in vitro synthesized product suggests that the two polymers possess similar linkages to fucose.

  4. Mannosyl transferase activity in homogenates of adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Rumjanek, F D; Smithers, S R

    1978-08-01

    Homogenates of adult Schistosoma mansoni contain enzymes which are capable of transferring [14C]mannose from GDP[U-14C]mannose to a lipid acceptor which migrates as a single peak on a silica gel thin-layer plate. This lipid may belong to the class of polyprenol monophosphates which are intermediate elements in the glycosylation of nascent proteins. The schistosome mannosyl transferase activity is associated with membranous particles and is dependent on the presence of Mn2+. However, other divalent metals such as Mg2+ or Ca2+ can, in decreasing order of efficiency, replace Mn2+. When UDP[U-14C]glucose was incubated with the homogenates in the same conditions, relatively little label was transferred to the lipid acceptor. Live worms incubated in a medium containing GDP[U-14C]mannose seem to incorporate the label preferentially on the tegument and on adjacent subtegumental structures. By adding foetal calf serum to the medium, incorporation of the label can be stimulated.

  5. Glutathione S-transferase, incense burning and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-J; Tsai, C-H; Chen, C-H; Tung, K-Y; Lee, Y L

    2011-06-01

    Incense burning is a popular practice in many family homes and temples. However, little is known about the effects of indoor incense burning and genetic polymorphisms on asthma. This study evaluated the effects of indoor incense burning and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genetic polymorphisms on asthma and wheeze. In 2007, 3,764 seventh-grade schoolchildren (mean±sd age 12.42±0.65 yrs) were evaluated using a standard questionnaire for information about respiratory symptoms and environmental exposures. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to assess the association between GST polymorphisms and incense burning frequency on asthma and wheeze, after adjusting for potential confounders. The frequency of incense burning at home was associated with increased risk of current asthma (p=0.05), medication use (p=0.03) and exercise wheeze (p=0.001). GST1 (GSTT1) null genotypes were associated with current asthma (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.00-2.04) and medication use (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.22). GSTT1 showed a significant interactive effect with incense burning on current asthma, current wheeze and nocturnal wheeze. The frequency of incense burning was associated with increased risk of current asthma, medication use, lifetime wheeze, nocturnal wheeze and exercise wheeze in an exposure-response manner among children with GSTT1 null genotype (p<0.05). Incense burning is a risk factor for asthma and wheezing, especially in GSTT1 genetically susceptible children.

  6. Glucuronyl transferase deficiency and mild hereditary spherocytosis: effect of splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Eber, S W; Ullrich, D; Speer, C P; Armbrust, R; Schröter, W

    1988-08-01

    In a 6-year-old girl an association of hereditary spherocytosis and a defect in hepatic bilirubin metabolism has been found. The patient suffered from mild compensated haemolytic anaemia and excessive hyperbilirubinaemia (maximum concentration 581 mumol/l), the serum activity of liver enzymes was slightly increased. Examination of the erythrocyte membrane proteins revealed a deficiency of the major membrane skeletal protein, spectrin (about 75% of normal) which is probably the basic genetic defect of hereditary spherocytosis. Examination of the patient's family revealed a recessive mode of inheritance. The concentration of bilirubin conjugates in the patient's serum was decreased due to a reduced UDP-glucuronyl transferase activity found in homogenates of liver tissue. Histological liver examination showed an intrahepatic cholestasis, which is a secondary and reversible alteration resulting from severe hyperbilirubinaemia. After splenectomy, normalization of the increased haemolysis and hepatic dysfunction was observed. The excessive hyperbilirubinaemia can be explained by the association of an increased bilirubin load due to haemolytic anaemia and the diminished hepatic conjugation of bilirubin.

  7. Cloning and expressing a highly functional and substrate specific farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama)

    PubMed Central

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Shatters, Robert G.; Rougé, Pierre; Powell, Charles A.; Smagghe, Guy; Borovsky, Dov

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, transmits a phloem-limited bacterium, Candidatus ‘Liberibacter’ asiaticus that causes citrus greening disease. Because juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in adult and nymphal development, we studied the final steps in JH biosynthesis in D. citri. A putative JH acid methyltransferase ortholog gene (jmtD) and its cognate cDNA were identified by searching D. citri genome database. Expression analysis shows expression in all life stages. In adults, it is expressed in the head-thorax, (containing the corpora allata), and the abdomen (containing ovaries and male accessory glands). A 3D protein model identified the catalytic groove with catalytically active amino acids and the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-binding loop. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and the purified enzyme showed high preference for farnesoic acid (FA) and homoFA (kcat of 0.752 × 10−3 and 0.217 × 10−3 s−1, respectively) as compared to JH acid I (JHA I) (cis/trans/cis; 2Z, 6E, 10cis), JHA III (2E, 6E, 10cis), and JHA I (trans/cis/cis; 2E, 2Z, 10cis) (kcat of 0.081 × 10−3, 0.013 × 10−3, and 0.003 × 10−3 s−1, respectively). This suggests that this ortholog is a DcFA-o-methyl transferase gene (fmtD), not a jmtD, and that JH biosynthesis in D. citri proceeds from FA to JH III through methyl farnesoate (MF). DcFA-o-MT does not require Ca2+, Mg2+ or Zn2+, however, Zn2+ (1 mM) completely inhibits the enzyme probably by binding H115 at the active groove. This represents the first purified FA-o-MT from Hemiptera with preferred biological activity for FA and not JHA. PMID:25893162

  8. Cloning and expressing a highly functional and substrate specific farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama).

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Shatters, Robert G; Rougé, Pierre; Powell, Charles A; Smagghe, Guy; Borovsky, Dov

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, transmits a phloem-limited bacterium, Candidatus 'Liberibacter' asiaticus that causes citrus greening disease. Because juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in adult and nymphal development, we studied the final steps in JH biosynthesis in D. citri. A putative JH acid methyltransferase ortholog gene (jmtD) and its cognate cDNA were identified by searching D. citri genome database. Expression analysis shows expression in all life stages. In adults, it is expressed in the head-thorax, (containing the corpora allata), and the abdomen (containing ovaries and male accessory glands). A 3D protein model identified the catalytic groove with catalytically active amino acids and the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-binding loop. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and the purified enzyme showed high preference for farnesoic acid (FA) and homoFA (kcat of 0.752 × 10(-3) and 0.217 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively) as compared to JH acid I (JHA I) (cis/trans/cis; 2Z, 6E, 10cis), JHA III (2E, 6E, 10cis), and JHA I (trans/cis/cis; 2E, 2Z, 10cis) (kcat of 0.081 × 10(-3), 0.013 × 10(-3), and 0.003 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively). This suggests that this ortholog is a DcFA-o-methyl transferase gene (fmtD), not a jmtD, and that JH biosynthesis in D. citri proceeds from FA to JH III through methyl farnesoate (MF). DcFA-o-MT does not require Ca(2+), Mg(2+) or Zn(2+), however, Zn(2+) (1 mM) completely inhibits the enzyme probably by binding H115 at the active groove. This represents the first purified FA-o-MT from Hemiptera with preferred biological activity for FA and not JHA.

  9. Cloning and expressing a highly functional and substrate specific farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama).

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Shatters, Robert G; Rougé, Pierre; Powell, Charles A; Smagghe, Guy; Borovsky, Dov

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, transmits a phloem-limited bacterium, Candidatus 'Liberibacter' asiaticus that causes citrus greening disease. Because juvenile hormone (JH) plays an important role in adult and nymphal development, we studied the final steps in JH biosynthesis in D. citri. A putative JH acid methyltransferase ortholog gene (jmtD) and its cognate cDNA were identified by searching D. citri genome database. Expression analysis shows expression in all life stages. In adults, it is expressed in the head-thorax, (containing the corpora allata), and the abdomen (containing ovaries and male accessory glands). A 3D protein model identified the catalytic groove with catalytically active amino acids and the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-binding loop. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and the purified enzyme showed high preference for farnesoic acid (FA) and homoFA (kcat of 0.752 × 10(-3) and 0.217 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively) as compared to JH acid I (JHA I) (cis/trans/cis; 2Z, 6E, 10cis), JHA III (2E, 6E, 10cis), and JHA I (trans/cis/cis; 2E, 2Z, 10cis) (kcat of 0.081 × 10(-3), 0.013 × 10(-3), and 0.003 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively). This suggests that this ortholog is a DcFA-o-methyl transferase gene (fmtD), not a jmtD, and that JH biosynthesis in D. citri proceeds from FA to JH III through methyl farnesoate (MF). DcFA-o-MT does not require Ca(2+), Mg(2+) or Zn(2+), however, Zn(2+) (1 mM) completely inhibits the enzyme probably by binding H115 at the active groove. This represents the first purified FA-o-MT from Hemiptera with preferred biological activity for FA and not JHA. PMID:25893162

  10. Characterization and Functional Analysis of Four Glutathione S-Transferases from the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guohua; Jia, Miao; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Xueyao; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In this study, four GSTs (LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1) representing different classes were identified from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. These four proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins, purified by Ni2+-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column and biochemically characterized. LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, and LmGSTu1 showed high activities with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), detectable activity with p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC) and 1, 2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), whereas LmGSTt1 showed high activity with p-NBC and detectable activity with CDNB. The optimal pH of the locust GSTs ranged between 7.0 to 9.0. Ethacrynic acid and reactive blue effectively inhibited all four GSTs. LmGSTs5 was most sensitive to heavy metals (Cu2+ and Cd2+). The maximum expression of the four GSTs was observed in Malpighian tubules and fat bodies as evaluated by western blot. The nymph mortalities after carbaryl treatment increased by 28 and 12% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. The nymph mortalities after malathion and chlorpyrifos treatments increased by 26 and 18% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. These results suggest that sigma GSTs in L. migratoria play a significant role in carbaryl detoxification, whereas some of other GSTs may also involve in the detoxification of carbaryl and chlorpyrifos. PMID:23505503

  11. Cloning, expression and analysis of the olfactory glutathione S-transferases in coho salmon

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Herbert M.; Shireman, Laura M.; McClain, Valerie; Atkins, William; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2013-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) provide cellular protection by detoxifying xenobiotics, maintaining redox status, and modulating secondary messengers, all of which are critical to maintaining olfaction in salmonids. Here, we characterized the major coho salmon olfactory GSTs (OlfGSTs), namely omega, pi, and rho subclasses. OlfGST omega contained an open reading frame of 720 bp and encoded a protein of 239 amino acids. OlfGST pi and OlfGST rho contained open reading frames of 727 and 681 bp, respectively, and encoded proteins of 208 and 226 amino acids. Whole-protein mass spectrometry yielded molecular weights of 29,950, 23,354, and 26,655 Da, respectively, for the GST omega, pi, and rho subunits. Homology modeling using four protein-structure prediction algorithms suggest that the active sites in all three OlfGST isoforms resembled counterparts in other species. The olfactory GSTs conjugated prototypical GST substrates, but only OlfGST rho catalyzed the demethylation of the pesticide methyl parathion. OlfGST pi and rho exhibited thiol oxidoreductase activity towards 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HEDS) and conjugated 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a toxic aldehyde with neurodegenerative properties. The kinetic parameters for OlfGST pi conjugation of HNE were KM = 0.16 ± 0.06 mM and Vmax = 0.5 ± 0.1 μmol min−1 mg−1 for OlfGST pi, whereas OlfGST rho was more efficient at catalyzing HNE conjugation (KM = 0.022 ± 0.008 mM and Vmax = 0.47 ± 0.05 μmol min−1 mg−1). Our findings indicate that the peripheral olfactory system of coho expresses GST isoforms that detoxify certain electrophiles and pesticides and that help maintain redox statusand signal transduction. PMID:23261526

  12. Functional characterization of alpha-class glutathione s-transferases from the Turkey (meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Bunderson, Brett R; Croasdell, Amanda; Coulombe, Roger A

    2011-11-01

    Six Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST) subunits were cloned from domestic turkey livers, which are one of the most susceptible animals known to the carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B₁. In most animals, GST dysfunction is a risk factor for susceptibility toward AFB₁, and we have shown that turkeys lack GSTs with affinity toward the carcinogenic intermediate exo-aflatoxin B(1)-8-9-epoxide (AFBO). Conversely, mice are resistant to AFB₁ carcinogenesis, due to high constitutive expression of mGSTA3 that has high affinity toward AFBO. When expressed in Escherichia coli, all six tGSTA subunits possessed conjugating activities toward substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), ethacrynic acid (ECA), and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) with tGSTA1.2 appearing most active. Interestingly, tGSTA1.1, which lacks one of the four Alpha-class signature motifs, possessed enzymatic activities toward all substrates. All had comparable activities toward AFBO conjugation, an activity absent in turkey liver cytosols. E. coli-expressed mGSTA3 conjugated AFBO with more than 3-fold greater activity than that of tGSTAs and had higher activity toward GST prototype substrates. Mouse hepatic cytosols had approximately 900-fold higher catalytic activity toward AFBO compared with those from turkey. There was no apparent amino acid profile in tGSTAs that might correspond to specificity toward AFBO, although tGSTA1.2, which had slightly higher AFBO-trapping ability, shared Tyr¹⁰⁸ with mGSTA3, a residue postulated to be critical for AFBO trapping activity in mammalian systems. The observation that recombinant tGSTAs detoxify AFBO, whereas their hepatic forms do not, implies that the hepatic forms of these enzymes are silenced by one or more regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Characterization and functional analysis of four glutathione S-transferases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guohua; Jia, Miao; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Xueyao; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In this study, four GSTs (LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1) representing different classes were identified from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. These four proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins, purified by Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column and biochemically characterized. LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, and LmGSTu1 showed high activities with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), detectable activity with p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC) and 1, 2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), whereas LmGSTt1 showed high activity with p-NBC and detectable activity with CDNB. The optimal pH of the locust GSTs ranged between 7.0 to 9.0. Ethacrynic acid and reactive blue effectively inhibited all four GSTs. LmGSTs5 was most sensitive to heavy metals (Cu(2+) and Cd(2+)). The maximum expression of the four GSTs was observed in Malpighian tubules and fat bodies as evaluated by western blot. The nymph mortalities after carbaryl treatment increased by 28 and 12% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. The nymph mortalities after malathion and chlorpyrifos treatments increased by 26 and 18% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. These results suggest that sigma GSTs in L. migratoria play a significant role in carbaryl detoxification, whereas some of other GSTs may also involve in the detoxification of carbaryl and chlorpyrifos.

  14. Identification of the nuclear localisation signal of O-GlcNAc transferase and its nuclear import regulation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon Gyu; Kim, Han Byeol; Kang, Min Jueng; Ryum, Joo Hwan; Yi, Eugene C.; Cho, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) attaches a single GlcNAc to hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues. Although the cellular localisation of OGT is important to regulate a variety of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear localisation of OGT is unclear. Here, we characterised three amino acids (DFP; residues 451–453) as the nuclear localisation signal of OGT and demonstrated that this motif mediated the nuclear import of non-diffusible β-galactosidase. OGT bound the importin α5 protein, and this association was abolished when the DFP motif of OGT was mutated or deleted. We also revealed that O-GlcNAcylation of Ser389, which resides in the tetratricopeptide repeats, plays an important role in the nuclear localisation of OGT. Our findings may explain how OGT, which possesses a NLS, exists in the nucleus and cytosol simultaneously. PMID:27713473

  15. The substrate promiscuity of a phosphopantetheinyl transferase SchPPT for coenzyme A derivatives and acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Luo, Hong-Dou; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Lin, Tao; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2016-03-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) catalyze the posttranslational modification of acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) in fatty acid synthases (FASs), ACPs in polyketide synthases, and peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs) in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in all organisms. Some bacterial PPTases have broad substrate specificities for ACPs/PCPs and/or coenzyme A (CoA)/CoA analogs, facilitating their application in metabolite production in hosts and/or labeling of ACPs/PCPs, respectively. Here, a group II PPTase SchPPT from Streptomyces chattanoogensis L10 was characterized to accept a heterologous ACP and acetyl-CoA. Thus, SchPPT is a promiscuous PPTase and may be used on polyketide production in heterologous bacterial host and labeling of ACPs.

  16. A structural mapping of mutations causing succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shafqat, Naeem; Kavanagh, Kate L; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Christensen, Ernst; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Lee, Wen Hwa; Oppermann, Udo; Yue, Wyatt W

    2013-11-01

    Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder of ketone metabolism, characterized by ketoacidotic episodes and often permanent ketosis. To date there are ~20 disease-associated alleles on the OXCT1 gene that encodes the mitochondrial enzyme SCOT. SCOT catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step of ketone body utilization in peripheral tissues, by transferring a CoA moiety from succinyl-CoA to form acetoacetyl-CoA, for entry into the tricarboxylic acid cycle for energy production. We have determined the crystal structure of human SCOT, providing a molecular understanding of the reported mutations based on their potential structural effects. An interactive version of this manuscript (which may contain additional mutations appended after acceptance of this manuscript) may be found on the web address: http://www.thesgc.org/jimd/SCOT . PMID:23420214

  17. Selection of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against glutathione S-transferase Mu.

    PubMed Central

    't Hoen, Peter A C; Out, Ruud; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; van Batenburg, F H D; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify functional antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against the rat glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM) isoforms, GSTM1 and GSTM2. These antisense ODNs would enable the study of the physiological consequences of GSTM deficiency. Because it has been suggested that the effectiveness of antisense ODNs is dependent on the secondary mRNA structures of their target sites, we made mRNA secondary structure predictions with two software packages, Mfold and STAR. The two programs produced only marginally similar structures, which can probably be attributed to differences in the algorithms used. The effectiveness of a set of 18 antisense ODNs was evaluated with a cell-free transcription/translation assay, and their activity was correlated with the predicted secondary RNA structures. Four phosphodiester ODNs specific for GSTM1, two ODNs specific for GSTM2, and four ODNs targeted at both GSTM isoforms were found to be potent, sequence-specific, and RNase H-dependent inhibitors of protein expression. The IC50 value of the most potent ODN was approximately 100 nM. Antisense ODNs targeted against regions that were predicted by STAR to be predominantly single stranded were more potent than antisense ODNs against double-stranded regions. Such a correlation was not found for the Mfold prediction. Our data suggest that simulation of the local folding of RNA facilitates the discovery of potent antisense sequences. In conclusion, we selected several promising antisense sequences, which, when synthesized as biologically stable oligonucleotides, can be applied for study of the physiological impact of reduced GSTM expression. PMID:12515389

  18. Glutathione transferase classes alpha, pi, and mu: GSH activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Daniel F A R; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2010-10-14

    Since the early 1960s, glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been described as detoxification enzymes. In fact, GSTs are the most important enzymes involved in the metabolism of electrophilic xenobiotic/endobiotic compounds. These enzymes are able to catalyze the nucleophilic addition of glutathione (GSH) sulfur thiolate to a wide range of electrophilic substrates, building up a less toxic and more soluble compound. Cytosolic classes alpha, pi, and mu are the most extensively studied GSTs. However, many of the catalytic events are still poorly understood. In the present work, we have resorted to density functional theory (DFT) and to potential of mean force (PMF) calculations to determine the GSH activation mechanism of GSTP1-1 and GSTM1-1 isoenzymes. For the GSTP1-1 enzyme, we have demonstrated that a water molecule, after an initial conformational rearrangement of GSH, can assist a proton transfer between the GSH cysteine thiol (GSH-SH) and the GSH glutamate alpha carboxylate (GSH-COO(-)) groups. The energy barrier associated with the proton transfer is 11.36 kcal·mol(-1). The GSTM1-1 enzyme shows a completely different behavior from the previous isoenzyme. In this case, two water molecules, positioned between the GSH-SH and the ξ N atom of His107, working like a bridge, are able to promote the proton transfer between these two active groups with an energy barrier of 7.98 kcal·mol(-1). All our results are consistent with all the enzymes kinetics and mutagenesis experimental studies.

  19. Differential substrate specificity and kinetic behavior of Escherichia coli YfdW and Oxalobacter formigenes formyl coenzyme A transferase.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Cory G; Berthold, Catrine L; Gruez, Arnaud; Jónsson, Stefán; Lindqvist, Ylva; Cambillau, Christian; Richards, Nigel G J

    2008-04-01

    The yfdXWUVE operon appears to encode proteins that enhance the ability of Escherichia coli MG1655 to survive under acidic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotypic behavior remain to be elucidated, findings from structural genomic studies have shown that the structure of YfdW, the protein encoded by the yfdW gene, is homologous to that of the enzyme that mediates oxalate catabolism in the obligate anaerobe Oxalobacter formigenes, O. formigenes formyl coenzyme A transferase (FRC). We now report the first detailed examination of the steady-state kinetic behavior and substrate specificity of recombinant, wild-type YfdW. Our studies confirm that YfdW is a formyl coenzyme A (formyl-CoA) transferase, and YfdW appears to be more stringent than the corresponding enzyme (FRC) in Oxalobacter in employing formyl-CoA and oxalate as substrates. We also report the effects of replacing Trp-48 in the FRC active site with the glutamine residue that occupies an equivalent position in the E. coli protein. The results of these experiments show that Trp-48 precludes oxalate binding to a site that mediates substrate inhibition for YfdW. In addition, the replacement of Trp-48 by Gln-48 yields an FRC variant for which oxalate-dependent substrate inhibition is modified to resemble that seen for YfdW. Our findings illustrate the utility of structural homology in assigning enzyme function and raise the question of whether oxalate catabolism takes place in E. coli upon the up-regulation of the yfdXWUVE operon under acidic conditions. PMID:18245280

  20. Evaluation of the non-catalytic binding function of Ts26GST a glutathione transferase isoform of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Plancarte, A; Romero, J R; Nava, G; Reyes, H; Hernández, M

    2014-03-01

    Taenia solium glutathione transferase isoform of 26.5 kDa (Ts26GST) was observed to bind non-catalytically to porphyrins, trans-trans-dienals, bile acids and fatty acids, as assessed by inhibition kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and competitive fluorescence assays with 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS). The quenching of Ts26GST intrinsic fluorescence allowed for the determination of the dissociation constants (KD) for all ligands. Obtained data indicate that Ts26GST binds to all ligands but with different affinity. Porphyrins and lipid peroxide products inhibited Ts26GST catalytic activity up to 100% in contrast with only 20-30% inhibition observed for bile acids and two saturated fatty acids. Non-competitive type inhibition was observed for all enzyme inhibitor ligands except for trans-trans-2,4-decadienal, which exhibited uncompetitive type inhibition. The dissociation constant value KD = 0.7 μM for the hematin ligand, determined by competitive fluorescence assays with ANS, was in good agreement with its inhibition kinetic value Ki = 0.3 μM and its intrinsic fluorescence quenching KD = 0.7 μM. The remaining ligands did not displace ANS from the enzyme suggesting the existence of different binding sites. In addition to the catalytic activity of Ts26GST the results obtained suggest that the enzyme exhibits a ligandin function with broad specificity towards nonsubstrate ligands.

  1. Synthetic mucin fragments: synthesis of O-sulfo and O-methyl derivatives of allyl O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D- galactopyranoside as potential compounds for sulfotransferases.

    PubMed

    Jain, R K; Piskorz, C F; Matta, K L

    1995-10-01

    Allyl 2-acetamido-4,6-O-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galact opy ranoside (1) was condensed with either 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl bromide (2) or 2,3,4-tri-O-benzoyl-6-O-bromoacetyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl bromide (14) in the presence of mercuric cyanide. Selective substitution with methyl, sulfo or both at desired positions, followed by the removal of protecting groups, afforded allyl O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-methyl-alpha -D- galactopyranoside (5), allyl O-(6-O-sulfo-beta-D-galactopyranosyl sodium salt)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6- O-methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside (10), allyl O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-sulfo-alpha- D- galactopyranoside sodium salt (13), allyl O-(6-O-sulfo-beta-D-galactopyranosyl sodium salt)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy- alpha-D-galactopyranoside (17) and allyl O-(3-O-sulfo-beta-D-galactopyranosyl sodium salt)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy- alpha-D-galactopyranoside (22). The structures of compounds 5, 10, 13, 17 and 22 were established by 13C NMR and FAB mass spectroscopy. PMID:8529223

  2. Synthetic mucin fragments: synthesis of O-sulfo and O-methyl derivatives of allyl O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D- galactopyranoside as potential compounds for sulfotransferases.

    PubMed

    Jain, R K; Piskorz, C F; Matta, K L

    1995-10-01

    Allyl 2-acetamido-4,6-O-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galact opy ranoside (1) was condensed with either 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl bromide (2) or 2,3,4-tri-O-benzoyl-6-O-bromoacetyl-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl bromide (14) in the presence of mercuric cyanide. Selective substitution with methyl, sulfo or both at desired positions, followed by the removal of protecting groups, afforded allyl O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-methyl-alpha -D- galactopyranoside (5), allyl O-(6-O-sulfo-beta-D-galactopyranosyl sodium salt)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6- O-methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside (10), allyl O-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-6-O-sulfo-alpha- D- galactopyranoside sodium salt (13), allyl O-(6-O-sulfo-beta-D-galactopyranosyl sodium salt)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy- alpha-D-galactopyranoside (17) and allyl O-(3-O-sulfo-beta-D-galactopyranosyl sodium salt)-(1-->3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy- alpha-D-galactopyranoside (22). The structures of compounds 5, 10, 13, 17 and 22 were established by 13C NMR and FAB mass spectroscopy.

  3. Acetate:succinate CoA-transferase in the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis: identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Koen W A; Rosnowsky, Silke; van Weelden, Susanne W H; Pütz, Simone; van der Giezen, Mark; Martin, William; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Henze, Katrin

    2008-01-18

    Acetate:succinate CoA-transferases (ASCT) are acetate-producing enzymes in hydrogenosomes, anaerobically functioning mitochondria and in the aerobically functioning mitochondria of trypanosomatids. Although acetate is produced in the hydrogenosomes of a number of anaerobic microbial eukaryotes such as Trichomonas vaginalis, no acetate producing enzyme has ever been identified in these organelles. Acetate production is the last unidentified enzymatic reaction of hydrogenosomal carbohydrate metabolism. We identified a gene encoding an enzyme for acetate production in the genome of the hydrogenosome-containing protozoan parasite T. vaginalis. This gene shows high similarity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae acetyl-CoA hydrolase and Clostridium kluyveri succinyl-CoA:CoA-transferase. Here we demonstrate that this protein is expressed and is present in the hydrogenosomes where it functions as the T. vaginalis acetate:succinate CoA-transferase (TvASCT). Heterologous expression of TvASCT in CHO cells resulted in the expression of an active ASCT. Furthermore, homologous overexpression of the TvASCT gene in T. vaginalis resulted in an equivalent increase in ASCT activity. It was shown that the CoA transferase activity is succinate-dependent. These results demonstrate that this acetyl-CoA hydrolase/transferase homolog functions as the hydrogenosomal ASCT of T. vaginalis. This is the first hydrogenosomal acetate-producing enzyme to be identified. Interestingly, TvASCT does not share any similarity with the mitochondrial ASCT from Trypanosoma brucei, the only other eukaryotic succinate-dependent acetyl-CoA-transferase identified so far. The trichomonad enzyme clearly belongs to a distinct class of acetate:succinate CoA-transferases. Apparently, two completely different enzymes for succinate-dependent acetate production have evolved independently in ATP-generating organelles. PMID:18024431

  4. Unusual metal ion catalysis in an acyl-transferase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Suga, H; Cowan, J A; Szostak, J W

    1998-07-14

    Most studies of the roles of catalytic metal ions in ribozymes have focused on inner-sphere coordination of the divalent metal ions to the substrate or ribozyme. However, divalent metal ions are strongly hydrated in water, and some proteinenzymes, such as Escherichia coli RNase H and exonuclease III, are known to use metal cofactors in their fully hydrated form [Duffy, T. H., and Nowak, T. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 1152-1160; Jou, R., and Cowan, J. A. (1991) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 6685-6686]. It is therefore important to consider the possibility of outer-sphere coordination of catalytic metal ions in ribozymes. We have used an exchange-inert metal complex, cobalt hexaammine, to show that the catalytic metal ion in an acyl-transferase ribozyme acts through outer-sphere coordination. Our studies provide an example of a fully hydrated Mg2+ ion that plays an essential role in ribozyme catalysis. Kinetic studies of wild-type and mutant ribozymes suggest that a pair of tandem G:U wobble base pairs adjacent to the reactive center constitute the metal-binding site. This result is consistent with recent crystallographic studies [Cate, J. H., and Doudna, J. A. (1996) Structure 4, 1221-1229; Cate, J. H., Gooding, A. R., Podell, E., Zhou, K., Golden, B. L., Kundrot, C. E., Cech, T. R., and Doudna, J. A. (1996) Science 273, 1678-1685; Cate, J. H., Hanna, R. L., and Doudna, J. A. (1997) Nat. Struct. Biol. 4, 553-558] showing that tandem wobble base pairs are good binding sites for metal hexaammines. We propose a model in which the catalytic metal ion is bound in the major groove of the tandem wobble base pairs, is precisely positioned by the ribozyme within the active site, and stabilizes the developing oxyanion in the transition state. Our results may have significant implications for understanding the mechanism of protein synthesis [Noller, H. F., Hoffarth, V., and Zimniak, L. (1992) Science 256, 1416-1419].

  5. Subcellular Compartmentation of the Diterpene Carnosic Acid and Its Derivatives in the Leaves of Rosemary1

    PubMed Central

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Alegre, Leonor

    2001-01-01

    The potent antioxidant properties of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extracts have been attributed to its major diterpene, carnosic acid. Carnosic acid has received considerable attention in food science and biomedicine, but little is known about its function in the plant in vivo. We recently found that highly oxidized diterpenes increase in rosemary plants exposed to drought and high light stress as a result of the antioxidant activity of carnosic acid (S. Munné-Bosch, K. Schwarz, L. Alegre [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1047–1052). To elucidate the significance of the antioxidant function of carnosic acid in vivo we measured the relative amounts of carnosic acid and its metabolites in different compartments of rosemary leaves. Subcellular localization studies show that carnosic acid protects chloroplasts from oxidative stress in vivo by following a highly regulated compartmentation of oxidation products. Carnosic acid scavenges free radicals within the chloroplasts, giving rise to diterpene alcohols, mainly isorosmanol. This oxidation product is O-methylated within the chloroplasts, and the resulting form, 11,12-di-O-methylisorosmanol, is transferred to the plasma membrane. This appears to represent a mechanism of a way out for free radicals from chloroplasts. Carnosic acid also undergoes direct O-methylation within the chloroplasts, and its derived product, 12-O-methylcarnosic acid, accumulates in the plasma membrane. O-methylated diterpenes do not display antioxidant activity, but they may influence the stability of the plasma membrane. This study shows the relevance of the compartmentation of carnosic acid metabolism to the protection of rosemary plants from oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:11161064

  6. Interchangeable Domains in the Kdo Transferases of Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hak Suk; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Kdo2-lipid A, a conserved substructure of lipopolysaccharide, plays critical roles in Gram-negative bacterial survival and interaction with host organisms. Inhibition of Kdo biosynthesis in Escherichia coli results in cell death and accumulation of the tetra-acylated precursor lipid IVA. E. coli KdtA (EcKdtA) is a bi-functional enzyme that transfers two Kdo units from two CMP-Kdo molecules to lipid IVA. In contrast, H. influenzae KdtA (HiKdtA) transfers only one Kdo unit. E. coli CMR300, which lacks Kdo-transferase because of a deletion in kdtA, can be rescued to grow in broth at 37 °C if multiple copies of msbA are provided in trans. MsbA, the inner membrane transporter for nascent lipopolysaccharide, prefers hexa-acylated to tetra-acylated lipid A, but with the excess MsbA present in CMR300, lipid IVA is efficiently exported to the outer membrane. CMR300 is hypersensitive to hydrophobic antibiotics and bile salts, and does not grow at 42 °C. Expressing HiKdtA in CMR300 results in the accumulation of Kdo-lipid IVA in place of lipid IVA without suppression of its growth phenotypes at 30 °C. EcKdtA restores intact lipopolysaccharide, together with normal antibiotic resistance, detergent resistance and growth at 42 °C. To determine which residues are important for the mono- or bi-functional character of KdtA, protein chimeras were constructed using EcKdtA and HiKdtA. These chimeras, which are catalytically active, were characterized by in vitro assays and in vivo complementation. The N-terminal half of KdtA, especially the first 30 amino acid residues, specifies whether one or two Kdo units are transferred to lipid IVA. PMID:20394418

  7. Interaction of glutathione transferase P1-1 with captan and captafol.

    PubMed

    di Ilio, C; Sacchetta, P; Angelucci, S; Bucciarelli, T; Pennelli, A; Mazzetti, A P; Lo Bello, M; Aceto, A

    1996-07-12

    Glutathione transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) P1-1 was strongly inhibited by captan and captafol in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 values for captan and captafol were 5.8 microM and 1.5 microM, respectively. Time-course inactivation of GSTP1-1 by two pesticides was prevented by 3 microM of hexyl-glutathione, but not by methylglutathione. The fact that the inactivated enzyme recovered all the 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) titrable thiol groups, with concomitant recovery of all its original activity after treatment with 100 microM dithiothreitol, suggested that captan and captafol were able to induce the formation of disulfide bonds. That the inactivation of GSTP1-1 by captan and captafol involves the formation of disulfide bonds between the four cysteinil groups of the enzymes was confirmed by the SDS-PAGE experiments on nondenaturant conditions. In fact, on SDS-PAGE, GSTP1-1 as well as the cys47ala, cys101ala, and cys47ala/cys101ala GSTP1-1 mutants treated with captan and captafol showed several extra bands, with apparent molecular masses higher and lower than the molecular mass of native GSTP1-1 (23.5 kDa), indicating that both intra- and inter-subunit disulfide bonds were formed. These extra bands returned to the native 23.5 kDa band with concomitant restoration of activity when treated with dithiothreitol.

  8. Localization of epidermal sphingolipid synthesis and serine palmitoyl transferase activity: alterations imposed by permeability barrier requirements.

    PubMed

    Holleran, W M; Gao, W N; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1995-01-01

    Sphingolipids, the predominant lipid species in mammalian stratum corneum play, a central role in permeability barrier homeostatis. Prior studies have shown that the epidermis synthesizes abundant sphingolipids, a process regulated by barrier requirements, and that inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis interferes with barrier homeostasis. To investigate further the relationship between epidermal sphingolipid metabolism and barrier function, we localized sphingolipid synthetic activity in murine epidermis under basal conditions, and following acute (acetone treatment) or chronic (essential fatty acid deficiency, EFAD) barrier perturbation, using dithiothreitol and/or the staphylococcal epidermolytic toxin to isolate the lower from the outer epidermis. Under basal conditions, both the activity of serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the rate-limiting enzyme of sphingolipid synthesis, and the rates of 3H-H2O incorporation into sphingolipids were nearly equivalent in the lower and the outer epidermis. Following acute barrier perturbation, SPT activity increased significantly in both the lower (35%; P < 0.05) and the outer epidermal layers (60%; P < 0.01). The rates of 3H-H2O incorporation into each major sphingolipid family, including ceramides, glucosylceramides and sphingomyelin, increased significantly in both the lower and the outer epidermis of treated flanks after acute barrier disruption. Finally, SPT activity was modestly elevated (20%; P < 0.01) in the lower but not in the outer epidermis of EFAD animals. These studies demonstrate the ability of both lower and outer epidermal cells to generate sphingolipids, and that permeability barrier homeostatic mechanisms appear to differentially regulate SPT activity and sphingolipid synthesis in the lower and the outer epidermis in response to acute and chronic barrier perturbation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7598529

  9. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  10. Glutathione transferase mu 2 protects glioblastoma cells against aminochrome toxicity by preventing autophagy and lysosome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Huenchuguala, Sandro; Muñoz, Patricia; Zavala, Patricio; Villa, Mónica; Cuevas, Carlos; Ahumada, Ulises; Graumann, Rebecca; Nore, Beston F; Couve, Eduardo; Mannervik, Bengt; Paris, Irmgard; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2014-01-01

    U373MG cells constitutively express glutathione S-transferase mu 2 (GSTM2) and exhibit 3H-dopamine uptake, which is inhibited by 2 µM of nomifensine and 15 µM of estradiol. We generated a stable cell line (U373MGsiGST6) expressing an siRNA against GSTM2 that resulted in low GSTM2 expression (26% of wild-type U373MG cells). A significant increase in cell death was observed when U373MGsiGST6 cells were incubated with 50 µM purified aminochrome (18-fold increase) compared with wild-type cells. The incubation of U373MGsiGST6 cells with 75 µM aminochrome resulted in the formation of autophagic vacuoles containing undigested cellular components, as determined using transmission electron microscopy. A significant increase in autophagosomes was determined by measuring endogenous LC3-II, a significant decrease in cell death was observed in the presence of bafilomycin A1, and a significant increase in cell death was observed in the presence of trehalose. A significant increase in LAMP2 immunostaining was observed, a significant decrease in bright red fluorescence of lysosomes with acridine orange was observed, and bafilomycin A1 pretreatment reduced the loss of lysosome acidity. A significant increase in cell death was observed in the presence of lysosomal protease inhibitors. Aggregation of TUBA/α-tubulin (tubulin, α) and SQSTM1 protein accumulation were also observed. Moreover, a significant increase in the number of lipids droplets was observed compared with U373MG cells with normal expression of GSTM2. These results support the notion that GSTM2 is a protective enzyme against aminochrome toxicity in astrocytes and that aminochrome cell death in U373MGsiGST6 cells involves autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:24434817

  11. The Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase (CPT) System and Possible Relevance for Neuropsychiatric and Neurological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Pinto, Luigi; Bauermann, Otto; Zerelli, Saf; Diedenhofen, Andreas; Binienda, Zbigniew K; Ali, Syed F; van der Leij, Feike R

    2015-10-01

    The carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system is a multiprotein complex with catalytic activity localized within a core represented by CPT1 and CPT2 in the outer and inner membrane of the mitochondria, respectively. Two proteins, the acyl-CoA synthase and a translocase also form part of this system. This system is crucial for the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. CPT1 has two well-known isoforms, CPT1a and CPT1b. CPT1a is the hepatic isoform and CPT1b is typically muscular; both are normally utilized by the organism for metabolic processes throughout the body. There is a strong evidence for their involvement in various disease states, e.g., metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and in diabetes mellitus type 2. Recently, a new, third isoform of CPT was described, CPT1c. This is a neuronal isoform and is prevalently localized in brain regions such as hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus. These brain regions play an important role in control of food intake and neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases. CPT activity has been implicated in several neurological and social diseases mainly related to the alteration of insulin equilibrium in the brain. These pathologies include Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Evolution of both Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease is in some way linked to brain insulin and related metabolic dysfunctions with putative links also with the diabetes type 2. Studies show that in the CNS, CPT1c affects ceramide levels, endocannabionoids, and oxidative processes and may play an important role in various brain functions such as learning. PMID:26041663

  12. Functional characterization of UDP-glucose:undecaprenyl-phosphate glucose-1-phosphate transferases of Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kinnari B; Toh, Evelyn; Fernandez, Ximena B; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V; Bernards, Mark A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-05-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WcaJ and the Caulobacter crescentus HfsE, PssY, and PssZ enzymes are predicted to initiate the synthesis of colanic acid (CA) capsule and holdfast polysaccharide, respectively. These proteins belong to a prokaryotic family of membrane enzymes that catalyze the formation of a phosphoanhydride bond joining a hexose-1-phosphate with undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P). In this study, in vivo complementation assays of an E. coli K-12 wcaJ mutant demonstrated that WcaJ and PssY can complement CA synthesis. Furthermore, WcaJ can restore holdfast production in C. crescentus. In vitro transferase assays demonstrated that both WcaJ and PssY utilize UDP-glucose but not UDP-galactose. However, in a strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium deficient in the WbaP O antigen initiating galactosyltransferase, complementation with WcaJ or PssY resulted in O-antigen production. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) revealed the attachment of both CA and O-antigen molecules to lipid A-core oligosaccharide (OS). Therefore, while UDP-glucose is the preferred substrate of WcaJ and PssY, these enzymes can also utilize UDP-galactose. This unexpected feature of WcaJ and PssY may help to map specific residues responsible for the nucleotide diphosphate specificity of these or similar enzymes. Also, the reconstitution of O-antigen synthesis in Salmonella, CA capsule synthesis in E. coli, and holdfast synthesis provide biological assays of high sensitivity to examine the sugar-1-phosphate transferase specificity of heterologous proteins.

  13. Structure of succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Xu, Han-Yang; Wang, Yi-Cui; Shi, Zhu-Bing; Zhang, Nan-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) plays a crucial role in ketone-body metabolism. SCOT from Drosophila melanogaster (DmSCOT) was purified and crystallized. The crystal structure of DmSCOT was determined at 2.64 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.638, b = 101.921, c = 122.457 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Sequence alignment and structural analysis identified DmSCOT as a class I CoA transferase. Compared with Acetobacter aceti succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, DmSCOT has a different substrate-binding pocket, which may explain the difference in their substrate specificities. PMID:24100554

  14. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  15. New lanostane-type triterpene acids from wolfiporia extensa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Backgroud Dried sclerotia of Wolfiporia extensa (Polyporaceae) is used to invigorate the spleen and to tranquilize the mind in Chinese herbal medicine. Lanostane-type triterpene acids were regard as major secondary metabolites from dried sclerotia of W. extensa. Results Three new lanostane-type triterpene acids, 3-epi-benzoyloxyl-dehydrotumulosic acid (1), 3-epi-(3′-O-methyl malonyloxy)-dehydrotumulosic acid (2) and 3-epi-(3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryloxyl)-dehydrotumulosic acid (3), were isolated from the sclerotia of W. extensa, together with 3 known lanostane derivatives (4–6). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D-NMR techniques. Conclusion Six lanostane derivatives including three new triterpene acids and three known compounds were reported from the sclerotia of W. extensa in this paper. PMID:22559059

  16. Activity Detection of GalNAc Transferases by Protein-Based Fluorescence Sensors In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation occurring in the Golgi apparatus is an important protein posttranslational modification initiated by up to 20 GalNAc-transferase isozymes with largely distinct substrate specificities. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and misregulation causes human diseases. Here we describe the use of protein-based fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity in living cells. The sensors can either be "pan" or isozyme specific.

  17. Activity Detection of GalNAc Transferases by Protein-Based Fluorescence Sensors In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation occurring in the Golgi apparatus is an important protein posttranslational modification initiated by up to 20 GalNAc-transferase isozymes with largely distinct substrate specificities. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and misregulation causes human diseases. Here we describe the use of protein-based fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity in living cells. The sensors can either be "pan" or isozyme specific. PMID:27632006

  18. Regulatory and functional interactions of plant growth regulators and plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs).

    PubMed

    Moons, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Plant glutathioneS-transferases (GSTs) are a heterogeneous superfamily of multifunctional proteins, grouped into six classes. The tau (GSTU) and phi (GSTF) class GSTs are the most represented ones and are plant-specific, whereas the smaller theta (GSTT) and zeta (GSTZ) classes are also found in animals. The lambda GSTs (GSTL) and the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) are more distantly related. Plant GSTs perform a variety of pivotal catalytic and non-enzymatic functions in normal plant development and plant stress responses, roles that are only emerging. Catalytic functions include glutathione (GSH)-conjugation in the metabolic detoxification of herbicides and natural products. GSTs can also catalyze GSH-dependent peroxidase reactions that scavenge toxic organic hydroperoxides and protect from oxidative damage. GSTs can furthermore catalyze GSH-dependent isomerizations in endogenous metabolism, exhibit GSH-dependent thioltransferase safeguarding protein function from oxidative damage and DHAR activity functioning in redox homeostasis. Plant GSTs can also function as ligandins or binding proteins for phytohormones (i.e., auxins and cytokinins) or anthocyanins, thereby facilitating their distribution and transport. Finally, GSTs are also indirectly involved in the regulation of apoptosis and possibly also in stress signaling. Plant GST genes exhibit a diversity of expression patterns during biotic and abiotic stresses. Stress-induced plant growth regulators (i.e., jasmonic acid [JA], salicylic acid [SA], ethylene [ETH], and nitric oxide [NO] differentially activate GST gene expression. It is becoming increasingly evident that unique combinations of multiple, often interactive signaling pathways from various phytohormones and reactive oxygen species or antioxidants render the distinct transcriptional activation patterns of individual GSTs during stress. Underestimated post-transcriptional regulations of individual GSTs are becoming increasingly evident and roles

  19. A Mannosyl Transferase Required for Lipopolysaccharide Inner Core Assembly in Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Kanipes, Margaret I.; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Lin, Shanhua; Cotter, Robert J.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core domain of Gram-negative bacteria plays an important role in outer membrane stability and host interactions. Little is known about the biochemical properties of the glycosyltransferases that assemble the LPS core. We now report the purification and characterization of the Rhizobium leguminosarum mannosyl transferase LpcC, which adds a mannose unit to the inner 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) moiety of the LPS precursor, Kdo2-lipid IVA. LpcC containing an N-terminal His6 tag was assayed using GDP-mannose as the donor and Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA as the acceptor and was purified to near homogeneity. Sequencing of the N terminus confirmed that the purified enzyme is the lpcC gene product. Mild acid hydrolysis of the glycolipid generated in vitro by pure LpcC showed that the mannosylation occurs on the inner Kdo residue of Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA. A lipid acceptor substrate containing two Kdo moieties is required by LpcC, since no activity is seen with lipid IVA or Kdo-lipid IVA. The purified enzyme can use GDP-mannose or, to a lesser extent, ADP-mannose (both of which have the α-anomeric configuration) for the glycosylation of Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA. Little or no activity is seen with ADP-glucose, UDP-glucose, UDP-GlcNAc, or UDP-galactose. A Salmonella typhimurium waaC mutant, which lacks the enzyme for incorporating the inner L-glycero-D-manno-heptose moiety of LPS, regains LPS with O-antigen when complemented with lpcC. An Escherichia coli heptose-less waaC-waaF deletion mutant expressing the R. leguminosarum lpcC gene likewise generates a hybrid LPS species consisting of Kdo2-lipid A plus a single mannose residue. Our results demonstrate that heterologous lpcC expression can be used to modify the structure of the Salmonella and E. coli LPS cores in living cells. PMID:12591937

  20. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  1. Characterization of glutathione S-transferases from Sus scrofa, Cydia pomonella and Triticum aestivum: their responses to cantharidin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a key role in detoxification of xenobiotics in organisms. However, their other functions, especially response to the natural toxin cantharidin produced by beetles in the Meloidae and Oedemeridae families, are less known. We obtained GST cDNAs from three sources: Cydia pomonella (CpGSTd1), Sus scrofa (SsGSTα1), and Triticum aestivum (TaGSTf3). The predicted molecular mass is 24.19, 25.28 and 24.49 kDa, respectively. These proteins contain typical N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Recombinant GSTs were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins. Their optimal activities are exhibited at pH 7.0-7.5 at 30 °C. Activity of CpGSTd1 is strongly inhibited by cantharidin and cantharidic acid, but is only slightly suppressed by the demethylated analog of cantharidin and cantharidic acid. Enzymatic assays revealed that cantharidin has no effect on SsGSTα1 activity, while it significantly stimulates TaGSTf3 activity, with an EC50 value of 0.3852 mM. Activities of these proteins are potently inhibited by the known GST competitive inhibitor: S-hexylglutathione (GTX). Our results suggest that these GSTs from different sources share similar structural and biochemical characteristics. Our results also suggest that CpGSTd1 might act as a binding protein with cantharidin and its analogs.

  2. Pigs fed camelina meal increase hepatic gene expression of cytochrome 8b1, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and thiosulfate transferase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight. PMID:24383433

  3. Role of the 4-phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Trichoderma virens in secondary metabolism and induction of plant defense responses.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Robledo, R; Contreras-Cornejo, H A; Macias-Rodriguez, L; Hernandez-Morales, A; Aguirre, J; Casas-Flores, S; Lopez-Bucio, J; Herrera-Estrella, A

    2011-12-01

    Trichoderma virens is a ubiquitous soil fungus successfully used in biological control due to its efficient colonization of plant roots. In fungi, 4-phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) activate enzymes involved in primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore, we cloned the PPTase gene ppt1 from T. virens and generated PPTase-deficient (?ppt1) and overexpressing strains to investigate the role of this enzyme in biocontrol and induction of plant defense responses. The ?ppt1 mutants were auxotrophic for lysine, produced nonpigmented conidia, and were unable to synthesize nonribosomal peptides. Although spore germination was severely compromised under both low and high iron availability, mycelial growth occurred faster than the wild type, and the mutants were able to efficiently colonize plant roots. The ?ppt1 mutants were unable of inhibiting growth of phytopathogenic fungi in vitro. Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings co-cultivated with wild-type T. virens showed increased expression of pPr1a:uidA and pLox2:uidA markers, which correlated with enhanced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid, camalexin, and resistance to Botrytis cinerea. Co-cultivation of A. thaliana seedlings with ?ppt1 mutants compromised the SA and camalexin responses, resulting in decreased protection against the pathogen. Our data reveal an important role of T. virens PPT1 in antibiosis and induction of SA and camalexin-dependent plant defense responses.

  4. Cloning, characterisation and bacterial expression of full length cDNA for the mouse liver microsomal glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Raza, H; Mullick, J; John, A; Bhagwat, S V; Avadhani, N G

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding full length microsomal glutathione S-transferase (MGST) from mouse liver. The cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using primers designed from published cDNA sequence of rat MGST with the addition of 5' Nde-1 and 3' HindIII sites, and cloned into bacterial expression vector pSP19T7LT. Deduced amino acid sequence (155 amino acids, calculated mol.mass 17512 Dalton) confirmed the identity of microsomal GST from mouse liver which has sequence homology with that of rat and human liver MGST1. Recombinant GST cDNA (Genbank accession # 159050) was expressed in BL21(DE3) in the presence of 1 mM IPTG at 30 degrees C. The expressed GST protein was found to be localised in the bacterial membrane as determined by measuring catalytic activity using CDNB and cumene hydroperoxide substrates, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We have demonstrated the cloning and expression of full length cDNA for MGST from mouse liver and have characterised the functionally active product as MGST protein. These results should facilitate studies on the role of MGST in the regulation of chemical carcinogenesis and in the prevention of oxidative stress caused by endogenous and exogenous chemicals.

  5. Characterization of glutathione S-transferases from Sus scrofa, Cydia pomonella and Triticum aestivum: their responses to cantharidin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a key role in detoxification of xenobiotics in organisms. However, their other functions, especially response to the natural toxin cantharidin produced by beetles in the Meloidae and Oedemeridae families, are less known. We obtained GST cDNAs from three sources: Cydia pomonella (CpGSTd1), Sus scrofa (SsGSTα1), and Triticum aestivum (TaGSTf3). The predicted molecular mass is 24.19, 25.28 and 24.49 kDa, respectively. These proteins contain typical N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Recombinant GSTs were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins. Their optimal activities are exhibited at pH 7.0-7.5 at 30 °C. Activity of CpGSTd1 is strongly inhibited by cantharidin and cantharidic acid, but is only slightly suppressed by the demethylated analog of cantharidin and cantharidic acid. Enzymatic assays revealed that cantharidin has no effect on SsGSTα1 activity, while it significantly stimulates TaGSTf3 activity, with an EC50 value of 0.3852 mM. Activities of these proteins are potently inhibited by the known GST competitive inhibitor: S-hexylglutathione (GTX). Our results suggest that these GSTs from different sources share similar structural and biochemical characteristics. Our results also suggest that CpGSTd1 might act as a binding protein with cantharidin and its analogs. PMID:25640718

  6. Simultaneous determination of C2-C22 non-esterified fatty acids and other metabolically relevant carboxylic acids in biological material by gas chromatography of their benzyl esters.

    PubMed

    Schatowitz, B; Gercken, G

    1988-03-18

    A method for the simultaneous determination of non-esterified short-, medium- and long-chain fatty acids and other types of metabolically relevant carboxylic acids such as hydroxy, keto, aromatic and dicarboxylic acids in biological material by capillary gas chromatography of benzyl ester derivatives is described. Sample preparation avoiding incomplete isolation of carboxylic acids consisted of deproteinization and extraction with ethanol, fixation of carboxylic acids as carboxylates, removal of interfering compounds such as neutral lipids by hexane extraction and amino acids, acyl carnitines and other cations by cation-exchange chromatography, derivatization of keto groups of ketocarboxylic acids into O-methyl oximes and benzyl ester formation by reaction of the potassium carboxylates with benzyl bromide via crown ether catalysis. The sample preparation conditions were investigated, showing the usefulness of this method for quantitative determinations. Chromatograms obtained from human serum, human urine and rat heart ventricle and concentrations of carboxylic acids in these specimens are presented. PMID:3372640

  7. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1a-1a)

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Christopher D.; Zhong, Guo; Smeltz, Marci; James, Margaret O. McKenna, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Crystals of glutathione transferase zeta 1 were grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.0, b = 49.6, c = 54.6 Å, α = 82.9, β = 69.9, γ = 73.4°.

  8. A tyrosine-reactive irreversible inhibitor for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1).

    PubMed

    Crawford, L A; Weerapana, E

    2016-05-24

    Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) mediates cellular defense against reactive electrophiles. Here, we report LAS17, a dichlorotriazine-containing compound that irreversibly inhibits GSTP1 and is selective for GSTP1 within cellular proteomes. Mass spectrometry and mutational studies identified Y108 as the site of modification, providing a unique mode of GSTP1 inhibition. PMID:27113843

  9. Maize white seedling 3 results from disruption of homogentisate solanesyl transferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show here that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This re...

  10. Glutathione S-transferase class mu in French alcoholic cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Groppi, A; Coutelle, C; Fleury, B; Iron, A; Begueret, J; Couzigou, P

    1991-09-01

    The lack of glutathione S-transferase mu (GST mu) was examined in 45 healthy French Caucasians and 45 alcoholic cirrhotic French Caucasians: microsamples of blood were taken and DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. We have concluded that there is no relationship between this genotype and the development of alcoholic cirrhosis in these heavy consumers of ethanol.

  11. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  12. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  13. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  14. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  15. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  16. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Clausen, Henrik; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-10-31

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms. Surprisingly, molecular probes to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity are lacking and there exist no effective global or isoform-specific inhibitors. Here we describe the development of T2- and T3-isoform specific fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway. Each sensor yielded little signal when glycosylated but was strongly activated in the absence of its glycosylation. Specificity of each sensor was assessed in HEK cells with either the T2 or T3 enzymes deleted. Although the sensors are based on specific substrates of the T2 and T3 enzymes, elements in or near the enzyme recognition sequence influenced their activity and required modification, which we carried out based on previous in vitro work. Significantly, the modified T2 and T3 sensors were activated only in cells lacking their corresponding isozymes. Thus, we have developed T2- and T3-specific sensors that will be valuable in both the study of GalNAc-transferase regulation and in high-throughput screening for potential therapeutic regulators of specific GalNAc-transferases.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  18. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315...

  20. A practical fluorogenic substrate for high-throughput screening of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Morisaki, Fumika; Ogura, Asami; Morohashi, Kana; Enya, Sora; Niwa, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinji; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Hideshi

    2015-07-21

    We report a new fluorogenic substrate for glutathione S-transferase (GST), 3,4-DNADCF, enabling the assay with a low level of nonenzymatic background reaction. Inhibitors against Noppera-bo/GSTe14 from Drosophila melanogaster were identified by high throughput screening using 3,4-DNADCF, demonstrating the utility of this substrate.

  1. A tyrosine-reactive irreversible inhibitor for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1).

    PubMed

    Crawford, L A; Weerapana, E

    2016-05-24

    Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) mediates cellular defense against reactive electrophiles. Here, we report LAS17, a dichlorotriazine-containing compound that irreversibly inhibits GSTP1 and is selective for GSTP1 within cellular proteomes. Mass spectrometry and mutational studies identified Y108 as the site of modification, providing a unique mode of GSTP1 inhibition.

  2. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1-DEPENDENT METABOLISM OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a prevalent drinking water disinfection by-product, was previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) theta 1-1 (GST T1-1). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to study the...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  13. Hint, Fhit and GalT: Function, Structure, Evolution and Mechanism of Three Branches of the Histidine Triad Superfamily of Nucleotide Hydrolases and Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    HIT (histidine triad)1 proteins, named for a motif related to the sequence HφHφHφφ, (φ a hydrophobic amino acid) are a superfamily of nucleotide hydrolases and transferases, which act on the α-phosphate of ribonucleotides, and contain a ∼30 kDa domain that is typically either a homodimer of ∼15 kDa polypeptides with two active-sites or an internally, imperfectly repeated polypeptide that retains a single HIT active site. On the basis of sequence, substrate specificity, structure, evolution and mechanism, HIT proteins can be classified into the Hint branch, which consists of adenosine 5′-monophosphoramide hydrolases, the Fhit branch, which consists of diadenosine polyphosphate hydrolases, and the GalT branch, which consists of specific nucleoside monophosphate transferases including galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, diadenosine tetraphosphate phosphorylase, and adenylylsulfate:phosphate adenylytransferase. At least one human representative of each branch is lost in human diseases. Aprataxin, a Hint branch hydrolase, is mutated in ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome. Fhit is lost early in development of many epithelially derived tumors. GalT is deficient in galactosemia. Additionally, ASW is an avian Hint family member that has evolved to have unusual gene expression properties and the complete loss of its nucleotide binding-site. The potential roles of ASW and Hint in avian sexual development are discussed in an accompanying manuscript. Here we review what is known about biological activities of HIT proteins, the structural and biochemical bases for their functions, and propose a new enzyme mechanism for Hint and Fhit that may account for the differences between HIT hydrolases and transferases. PMID:12119013

  14. Effect of glutathione S-transferase M1 polymorphisms on biomarkers of exposure and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J

    1998-01-01

    Genotypes responsible for interindividual differences in ability to activate or detoxify genotoxic agents are recognized as biomarkers of susceptibility. Among the most studied genotypes are human glutathione transferases. The relationship of genetic susceptibility to biomarkers of exposure and effects was studied especially in relation to the genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1). For this review papers reporting the effect of GSTM1 genotype on DNA adducts, protein adducts, urine mutagenicity, Comet assay parameters, chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), micronuclei, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase mutations were assessed. Subjects in groups occupationally exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzidine, pesticides, and 1,3-butadiene were included. As environmentally exposed populations, autopsy donors, coal tar-treated patients, smokers, nonsmokers, mothers, postal workers, and firefighters were followed. From all biomarkers the effect of GSTM1 and N-acetyl transferase 2 was seen in coke oven workers on mutagenicity of urine and of glutathione S-transferase T1 on the chromosomal aberrations in subjects from 1,3-butadiene monomer production units. Effects of genotypes on DNA adducts were found from lung tissue of autopsy donors and from placentas of mothers living in an air-polluted region. The GSTM1 genotype affected mutagenicity of urine in smokers and subjects from polluted regions, protein adducts in smokers, SCE in smokers and nonsmokers, and Comet assay parameters in postal workers. A review of all studies on GSTM1 polymorphisms suggests that research probably has not reached the stage where results can be interpreted to formulate preventive measures. The relationship between genotypes and biomarkers of exposure and effects may provide an important guide to the risk assessment of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:9539016

  15. Purification and Characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus Bacillithiol Transferase BstA

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Varahenage R.; Newton, Gerald L.; Parnell, Jonathan M.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-01-01

    Background Gram-positive bacteria in the phylum Firmicutes synthesize the low molecular weight thiol bacillithiol rather than glutathione or mycothiol. The bacillithiol transferase YfiT from Bacillus subtilis was identified as a new member of the recently discovered DinB/YfiT-like Superfamily. Based on structural similarity using the Superfamily program, we have determined 30 of 31 Staphylococcus aureus strains encode a single bacillithiol transferase from the DinB/YfiT-like Superfamily, while the remaining strain encodes two proteins. Methods We have cloned, purified, and confirmed the activity of a recombinant bacillithiol transferase (henceforth called BstA) encoded by the S. aureus Newman ORF NWMN_2591. Moreover, we have studied the saturation kinetics and substrate specificity of this enzyme using in vitro biochemical assays. Results BstA was found to be active with the co-substrate bacillithiol, but not with other low molecular weight thiols tested. BstA catalyzed bacillithiol conjugation to the model substrates monochlorobimane, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and the antibiotic cerulenin. Several other molecules, including the antibiotic rifamycin S, were found to react directly with bacillithiol, but the addition of BstA did not enhance the rate of reaction. Furthermore, cells growing in nutrient rich medium exhibited low BstA activity. Conclusions BstA is a bacillithiol transferase from Staphylococcus aureus that catalyzes the detoxification of cerulenin. Additionally, we have determined that bacillithiol itself might be capable of directly detoxifying electrophilic molecules. General Significance BstA is an active bacillithiol transferase from Staphylococcus aureus Newman and is the first DinB/YfiT-like Superfamily member identified from this organism. Interestingly, BstA is highly divergent from Bacillus subtilis YfiT. PMID:24821014

  16. In vitro kinetics of hepatic glutathione s-transferase conjugation in largemouth bass and brown bullheads

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, E.P.; Sheehy, K.M.; Lame, M.W.; Segall, H.J.

    2000-02-01

    The kinetics of glutathione 5-transferase (GST) catalysis were investigated in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and brown bullheads (Amerius nebulosus), two freshwater fish species found in a variety of polluted waterways in the eastern US. The initial rates of hepatic GST activity toward four GST substrates, including 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid, {Delta}5-androstene-17-dione, and nitrobutyl chloride, were significantly higher in brown bullheads than in largemouth bass. Hepatic GST activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, a {mu}-class GST substrate in rodents, was not detectable in either species. Liver cytosolic GSTs were more efficient in bullheads than in bass at catalyzing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene-reduced glutathione (CDNB-GSH) conjugation over a broad range of electrophile (CDNB) concentrations, including those representative of environmental exposure. In contrast, largemouth bass maintained higher ambient concentrations of GSH, the nucleophilic cofactor for GST-mediated conjugation, than brown bullheads. Biphasic kinetics for GST-CDNB conjugation under conditions of variable GSH concentration were apparent in Eadie-Hofstee plots of the kinetic data, suggesting the presence of at least two hepatic GST isozymes with markedly different K{sub m} values for GSH in both species. The GST-CDNB reaction rate data obtained under conditions of variable GSH were well fitted (R{sup 2} = 0.999) by the two-enzyme Michaelis-Menten equation. In addition, Western blotting experiments confirmed the presence of two different hepatic GST-like proteins in both largemouth bass and brown bullhead liver. Collectively, these findings indicate that largemouth bass and brown bullhead GSTs catalyze the conjugation of structurally diverse, class-specific GST substrates, and that brown bullheads exhibit higher initial rates of GST activity than largemouth bass. The relatively higher rates of in vitro liver GST activity at the low substrate concentrations

  17. Proteomic and immunochemical characterization of glutathione transferase as a new allergen of the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Mohr, Jens; Zakzuk, Josefina; Samonig, Martin; Briza, Peter; Erler, Anja; Pomés, Anna; Huber, Christian G; Ferreira, Fatima; Caraballo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Helminth infections and allergy have evolutionary and clinical links. Infection with the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides induces IgE against several molecules including invertebrate pan-allergens. These antibodies influence the pathogenesis and diagnosis of allergy; therefore, studying parasitic and non-parasitic allergens is essential to understand both helminth immunity and allergy. Glutathione transferases (GSTs) from cockroach and house dust mites are clinically relevant allergens and comparative studies between them and the GST from A. lumbricoides (GSTA) are necessary to evaluate their allergenicity. We sought to analyze the allergenic potential of GSTA in connection with the IgE response to non-parasitic GSTs. IgE to purified GSTs from Ascaris (nGSTA and rGSTA), house dust mites (rDer p 8, nBlo t 8 and rBlo t 8), and cockroach (rBla g 5) was measured by ELISA in subjects from Cartagena, Colombia. Also, multidimensional proteomic approaches were used to study the extract of A. lumbricoides and investigate the existence of GST isoforms. We found that among asthmatics, the strength of IgE levels to GSTA was significantly higher than to mite and cockroach GSTs, and there was a strong positive correlation between IgE levels to these molecules. Specific IgE to GSTA was found in 13.2% of controls and 19.5% of asthmatics. In addition nGSTA induced wheal and flare in skin of sensitized asthmatics indicating that it might be of clinical relevance for some patients. Frequency and IgE levels to GSTA were higher in childhood and declined with age. At least six GST isoforms in A. lumbricoides bind human IgE. Four isoforms were the most abundant and several amino acid substitutions were found, mainly on the N-terminal domain. In conclusion, a new allergenic component of Ascaris has been discovered; it could have clinical impact in allergic patients and influence the diagnosis of mite and cockroach allergy in tropical environments.

  18. Cloning and characterization of a biotic-stress-inducible glutathione transferase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous proteins in plants that play important roles in stress tolerance and in the detoxification of toxic chemicals and metabolites. In this study, we systematically examined the catalytic diversification of a GST isoenzyme from Phaseolus vulgaris (PvGST) which is induced under biotic stress treatment (Uromyces appendiculatus infection). The full-length cDNA of this GST isoenzyme (termed PvGSTU3-3) with complete open reading frame, was isolated using RACE-RT and showed that the deduced amino acid sequence shares high homology with the tau class plant GSTs. PvGSTU3-3 catalyzes several different reactions and exhibits wide substrate specificity. Of particular importance is the finding that the enzyme shows high antioxidant catalytic function and acts as hydroperoxidase, thioltransferase, and dehydroascorbate reductase. In addition, its K m for GSH is about five to ten times lower compared to other plant GSTs, suggesting that PvGSTU3-3 is able to perform efficient catalysis under conditions where the concentration of reduced glutathione is low (e.g., oxidative stress). Its ability to conjugate GSH with isothiocyanates may provide an additional role for this enzyme to act as a regulator of the released isothiocyanates from glucosinolates as a response of biotic stress. Molecular modeling showed that PvGSTU3-3 shares the same overall fold and structural organization with other plant cytosolic GSTs, with major differences at their hydrophobic binding sites (H-sites) and some differences at the level of C-terminal domain and the linker between the C- and N-terminal domains. PvGSTU3-3, in general, exhibits restricted ability to bind xenobiotics in a nonsubstrate manner, suggesting that the biological role of PvGSTU3-3, is restricted mainly to the catalytic function. Our findings highlight the functional and catalytic diversity of plant GSTs and demonstrate their pivotal role for addressing biotic stresses in Phaseolus

  19. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J.; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M.; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Ashford, Michael L. J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J.; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J.; Fuller, William

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme–substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump. PMID:25422474

  20. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J; Fuller, William

    2014-12-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼ 120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme-substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump.

  1. Functional Dissection of the Bipartite Active Site of the Class I Coenzyme A (CoA)-Transferase Succinyl-CoA:Acetate CoA-Transferase.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jesse R; Mullins, Elwood A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA.

  2. Functional dissection of the bipartite active site of the class I coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jesse; Mullins, Elwood; Kappock, T.

    2016-05-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates less than 3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analogue dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analogue of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA.

  3. Functional Dissection of the Bipartite Active Site of the Class I Coenzyme A (CoA)-Transferase Succinyl-CoA:Acetate CoA-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Mullins, Elwood A.; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA. PMID:27242998

  4. Effects of 2(3)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole pretreatment on cefpiramide binding to mouse glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, H; Haga, T; Nozue, N; Komatsu, T; Baba, M; Ueda, Y; Ono, Y; Kunii, O

    1989-01-01

    Binding of cefpiramide (CPM) and other beta-lactam antimicrobial agents to 2(3)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole (BHA)-induced liver glutathione (GSH) S-transferases (EC 2.5.1.18) from CD-1 mice was studied. A marked induction of hepatic GSH S-transferase from mice fed BHA was observed. Gel chromatography of liver cytosol from mice fed BHA showed an increased binding of CPM, cefotetan and cefazolin to BHA-induced GSH S-transferases. The extent of their binding to GSH S-transferase seemed to be correlated with the extent of their excretion into the bile. Binding of CPM to the GSH S-transferase fraction was inhibited by both indocyanine green, which is known to bind liver GSH S-transferases intensively, and by cefoperazon, which is mainly excreted into the bile. This study suggests that GSH S-transferases are the main binding proteins of CPM in the liver cytosol fraction and play an important role as carrier proteins of CPM and some antimicrobial agents in mouse liver.

  5. A Golgi and tonoplast localized S-acyl transferase is involved in cell expansion, cell division, vascular patterning and fertility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Baoxiu; Doughty, James; Hooley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation of eukaryotic proteins is the reversible attachment of palmitic or stearic acid to cysteine residues, catalysed by protein S-acyl transferases that share an Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif. Previous evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis S-acylation is involved in the control of cell size, polarity and the growth of pollen tubes and root hairs. Using a combination of yeast genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and loss of function genetics the roles of a member of the protein S-acyl transferase PAT family, AtPAT10 (At3g51390), have been explored. In keeping with its role as a PAT, AtPAT10 auto-S-acylates, and partially complements the yeast akr1 PAT mutant, and this requires Cys192 of the DHHC motif. In Arabidopsis AtPAT10 is localized in the Golgi stack, trans-Golgi network/early endosome and tonoplast. Loss-of-function mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype involving cell expansion and division, vascular patterning, and fertility that is rescued by wild-type AtPAT10 but not by catalytically inactive AtPAT10C192A. This supports the hypothesis that AtPAT10 is functionally independent of the other Arabidopsis PATs. Our findings demonstrate a growing importance of protein S-acylation in plants, and reveal a Golgi and tonoplast located S-acylation mechanism that affects a range of events during growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:23795888

  6. Expression and RNA splicing of the maize glutathione S-transferase Bronze2 gene is regulated by cadmium and other stresses.

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, K A; Walbot, V

    1997-01-01

    The Bronze2 (Bz2) gene in maize (Zea mays) encodes a glutathione S-transferase that performs the last genetically defined step in anthocyanin biosynthesis--tagging anthocyanin precursors with glutathione, allowing for recognition and entry of anthocyanins into the vacuole. Here we show that Bz2 gene expression is highly induced by heavy metals such as cadmium. Treatment of maize seedlings with cadmium results in a 20-fold increase in Bz2 message accumulation and a 50-fold increase in the presence of the unspliced, intron-containing transcript. The increase in message levels during cadmium stress appears to result, at least in part, from activation of an alternative mRNA start site approximately 200 nucleotides upstream of the normal start site; this site is not used in unstressed or heat-stressed tissues. The effect of cadmium on the RNA splicing of Bz2 seems to be specific: splicing of other intron-containing maize genes, including a maize actin gene under the control of the cadmium-inducible Bz2 promoter, is unaffected by cadmium stress. Conversely, Bz2 intron splicing is not affected by other stress conditions that induce Bz2 gene expression, such as abscisic acid, auxin, or cold stress. Surprisingly, the increase in Bz2 mRNA during cadmium stress does not result in an increase in Bz2 glutathione S-transferase activity. We propose that an alternative protein may be encoded by Bz2 that has a role during responses to heavy metals. PMID:9008391

  7. Molecular cloning and differential expression patterns of sigma and omega glutathione S-transferases from Venerupis philippinarum to heavy metals and benzo[a]pyrene exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linbao; Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Leilei; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; You, Liping

    2012-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a class of enzymes that facilitate the detoxification of xenobiotics, and also play important roles in antioxidant defense. We identified two glutathione S-transferase isoforms (VpGSTS, sigma GST; VpGSTO, omega GST) from Venerupis philippinarum by RACE approaches. The open reading frames of VpGSTS and VpGSTO were of 612 bp and 729 bp, encoding 203 and 242 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 22.88 and 27.94 kDa, respectively. The expression profiles of VpGSTS and VpGSTO responded to heavy metals and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure were investigated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The expression of VpGSTS and VpGSTO were both rapidly up-regulated, however, they showed differential expression patterns to different toxicants. Cd displayed stronger induction of VpGSTS expression with an approximately 12-fold increase than that of VpGSTO with a maximum 6.4-fold rise. Cu exposure resulted in similar expression patterns for both VpGSTS and VpGSTO. For B[a]P exposure, the maximum induction of VpGSTO was approximately two times higher than that of VpGSTS. Altogether, these findings implied the involvement of VpGSTS and VpGSTO in host antioxidant responses, and highlighted their potential as a biomarker to Cd and B[a]P exposure.

  8. A Golgi and tonoplast localized S-acyl transferase is involved in cell expansion, cell division, vascular patterning and fertility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Baoxiu; Doughty, James; Hooley, Richard

    2013-10-01

    S-acylation of eukaryotic proteins is the reversible attachment of palmitic or stearic acid to cysteine residues, catalysed by protein S-acyl transferases that share an Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif. Previous evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis S-acylation is involved in the control of cell size, polarity and the growth of pollen tubes and root hairs. Using a combination of yeast genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and loss of function genetics the roles of a member of the protein S-acyl transferase PAT family, AtPAT10 (At3g51390), have been explored. In keeping with its role as a PAT, AtPAT10 auto-S-acylates, and partially complements the yeast akr1 PAT mutant, and this requires Cys(192) of the DHHC motif. In Arabidopsis AtPAT10 is localized in the Golgi stack, trans-Golgi network/early endosome and tonoplast. Loss-of-function mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype involving cell expansion and division, vascular patterning, and fertility that is rescued by wild-type AtPAT10 but not by catalytically inactive AtPAT10C(192) A. This supports the hypothesis that AtPAT10 is functionally independent of the other Arabidopsis PATs. Our findings demonstrate a growing importance of protein S-acylation in plants, and reveal a Golgi and tonoplast located S-acylation mechanism that affects a range of events during growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:23795888

  9. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a novel class glutathione S-transferase from the fungus Cunninghamella elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chang-Jun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Kim, Yong-Hak; Stingley, Robin; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2002-01-01

    The structural gene for glutathione S-transferase (CeGST1-1) in the fungus Cunninghamella elegans was cloned by screening a cDNA library using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein. Open reading frame analysis indicated that the cegst1 gene encodes a protein of 210 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 25% sequence identity with the sequence of the Pi-class GST from Danio rerio (zebrafish). Similarity was also shown with the Alpha-class GST from Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke; 23% identity), the Mu class from Mus musculus (22%) and the Sigma class from Ommastrephes sloani (squid; 21%). Further screening of a cDNA library with the cegst1 gene probe revealed the presence of another GST isoenzyme (CeGST2-2) in this fungus, which shows 84% sequence identity with CeGST1-1 at the amino acid level. Reverse transcription PCR revealed that cegst2 was also expressed at the mRNA level in the fungus C. elegans. Both cegst genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli using the expression vector pQE51, displaying specific activities with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene of 2.04 and 0.75 micromol/min per mg of protein respectively. Both enzymes exhibited a similar substrate specificity and inhibition profile, indicating that CeGST1-1 and CeGST2-2 belong to the same GST class. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that Tyr(10) in the N-terminal region is essential for catalysis of CeGST1-1. We propose from these results that the CeGSTs are novel Gamma-class GSTs and designated as GSTG1-1 and GSTG2-2 respectively. PMID:12196209

  10. Characterization of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium glutathione transferase reveals a novel structural and functional class with ligandin properties.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Yann; Prosper, Pascalita; Buée, Marc; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Gérardin, Philippe; Harvengt, Luc; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Lamant, Tiphaine; Meux, Edgar; Mathiot, Sandrine; Didierjean, Claude; Morel, Mélanie

    2012-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes. A new fungal specific class of GST has been highlighted by genomic approaches. The biochemical and structural characterization of one isoform of this class in Phanerochaete chrysosporium revealed original properties. The three-dimensional structure showed a new dimerization mode and specific features by comparison with the canonical GST structure. An additional β-hairpin motif in the N-terminal domain prevents the formation of the regular GST dimer and acts as a lid, which closes upon glutathione binding. Moreover, this isoform is the first described GST that contains all secondary structural elements, including helix α4' in the C-terminal domain, of the presumed common ancestor of cytosolic GSTs (i.e. glutaredoxin 2). A sulfate binding site has been identified close to the glutathione binding site and allows the binding of 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid. Competition experiments between 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid, which has fluorescent properties, and various molecules showed that this GST binds glutathionylated and sulfated compounds but also wood extractive molecules, such as vanillin, chloronitrobenzoic acid, hydroxyacetophenone, catechins, and aldehydes, in the glutathione pocket. This enzyme could thus function as a classical GST through the addition of glutathione mainly to phenethyl isothiocyanate, but alternatively and in a competitive way, it could also act as a ligandin of wood extractive compounds. These new structural and functional properties lead us to propose that this GST belongs to a new class that we name GSTFuA, for fungal specific GST class A.

  11. Succinyl-CoA:3-Sulfinopropionate CoA-Transferase from Variovorax paradoxus Strain TBEA6, a Novel Member of the Class III Coenzyme A (CoA)-Transferase Family

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Hirsch, Beatrice; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Stöveken, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    The act gene of Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 encodes a succinyl-CoA:3-sulfinopropionate coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase, ActTBEA6 (2.8.3.x), which catalyzes the activation of 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), an intermediate during 3,3′-thiodipropionate (TDP) degradation. In a previous study, accumulation of 3SP was observed in a Tn5::mob-induced mutant defective in growth on TDP. In contrast to the wild type and all other obtained mutants, this mutant showed no growth when 3SP was applied as the sole source of carbon and energy. The transposon Tn5::mob was inserted in a gene showing high homology to class III CoA-transferases. In the present study, analyses of the translation product clearly allocated ActTBEA6 to this protein family. The predicted secondary structure indicates the lack of a C-terminal α-helix. ActTBEA6 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli Lemo21(DE3) and was then purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) affinity chromatography. Analytical size exclusion chromatography revealed a homodimeric structure with a molecular mass of 96 ± 3 kDa. Enzyme assays identified succinyl-CoA, itaconyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA as potential CoA donors and unequivocally verified the conversion of 3SP to 3SP-CoA. Kinetic studies revealed an apparent Vmax of 44.6 μmol min−1 mg−1 for succinyl-CoA, which corresponds to a turnover number of 36.0 s−1 per subunit of ActTBEA6. For 3SP, the apparent Vmax was determined as 46.8 μmol min−1 mg−1, which corresponds to a turnover number of 37.7 s−1 per subunit of ActTBEA6. The apparent Km values were 0.08 mM for succinyl-CoA and 5.9 mM for 3SP. Nonetheless, the V. paradoxus Δact mutant did not reproduce the phenotype of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant. This defined deletion mutant was able to utilize TDP or 3SP as the sole carbon source, like the wild type. Complementation of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant with pBBR1MCS5::acdDPN7 partially restored growth on 3SP, which indicated a polar effect of the Tn5::mob transposon

  12. Cork Taint of Wines: Role of the Filamentous Fungi Isolated from Cork in the Formation of 2,4,6-Trichloroanisole by O Methylation of 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, María Luisa; López-Ocaña, Laura; López-Coronado, José Miguel; Rodríguez, Enrique; Martínez, María Jesús; Larriba, Germán; Coque, Juan-José R.

    2002-01-01

    Cork taint is a musty or moldy off-odor in wine mainly caused by 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA). We examined the role of 14 fungal strains isolated from cork samples in the production of 2,4,6-TCA by O methylation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). The fungal strains isolated belong to the genera Penicillium (four isolates); Trichoderma (two isolates); and Acremonium, Chrysonilia, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Mortierella, Mucor, Paecilomyces, and Verticillium (one isolate each). Eleven of these strains could produce 2,4,6-TCA when they were grown directly on cork in the presence of 2,4,6-TCP. The highest levels of bioconversion were carried out by the Trichoderma and Fusarium strains. One strain of Trichoderma longibrachiatum could also efficiently produce 2,4,6-TCA in liquid medium. However, no detectable levels of 2,4,6-TCA production by this strain could be detected on cork when putative precursors other than 2,4,6-TCP, including several anisoles, dichlorophenols, trichlorophenols, or other highly chlorinated compounds, were tested. Time course expression studies with liquid cultures showed that the formation of 2,4,6-TCA was not affected by a high concentration of glucose (2% or 111 mM) or by ammonium salts at concentrations up to 60 mM. In T. longibrachiatum the O methylation of 2,4,6-TCP was catalyzed by a mycelium-associated S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase that was strongly induced by 2,4,6-TCP. The reaction was inhibited by S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, an inhibitor of SAM-dependent methylation, suggesting that SAM is the natural methyl donor. These findings increase our understanding of the mechanism underlying the origin of 2,4,6-TCA on cork, which is poorly understood despite its great economic importance for the wine industry, and they could also help us improve our knowledge about the biodegradation and detoxification processes associated with chlorinated phenols. PMID:12450804

  13. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA. PMID:15528046

  14. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  15. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements.

  16. A signal sequence domain essential for processing, but not import, of mitochondrial pre-ornithine carbamyl transferase

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Studies using deletion mutagenesis indicate that a processing recognition site lies proximal to the normal cleavage position between gln32 and ser33 of pre-ornithine carbamyl transferase (pOCT). pOCT cDNA was manipulated to delete codons specifying amino acids 22-30 of the signal sequence. The mutant precursor, designated pOCT delta 22-30, was imported to the matrix compartment by purified mitochondria, but remained largely unprocessed; the low level of processing that was observed did not involve the normal cleavage site. Several manipulations performed downstream of the normal pOCT processing site (deletion, substitution, and hybrid protein constructions) affected neither import nor correct processing. Our data suggest that domains specifying import and processing site recognition may be functionally segregated within the signal peptide; that processing is not requisite for import of pOCT; and that a proximal region, not involving the normal signal peptide cleavage site, is required for processing site recognition. PMID:3571328

  17. The Plasmodium palmitoyl-S-acyl-transferase DHHC2 is essential for ookinete morphogenesis and malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jorge M; Kehrer, Jessica; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Janse, Chris J; Mair, Gunnar R

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational addition of C-16 long chain fatty acids to protein cysteine residues is catalysed by palmitoyl-S-acyl-transferases (PAT) and affects the affinity of a modified protein for membranes and therefore its subcellular localisation. In apicomplexan parasites this reversible protein modification regulates numerous biological processes and specifically affects cell motility, and invasion of host cells by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Using inhibitor studies we show here that palmitoylation is key to transformation of zygotes into ookinetes during initial mosquito infection with P. berghei. We identify DHHC2 as a unique PAT mediating ookinete formation and morphogenesis. Essential for life cycle progression in asexual blood stage parasites and thus refractory to gene deletion analyses, we used promoter swap (ps) methodology to maintain dhhc2 expression in asexual blood stages but down regulate expression in sexual stage parasites and during post-fertilization development of the zygote. The ps mutant showed normal gamete formation, fertilisation and DNA replication to tetraploid cells, but was characterised by a complete block in post-fertilisation development and ookinete formation. Our report highlights the crucial nature of the DHHC2 palmitoyl-S-acyltransferase for transmission of the malaria parasite to the mosquito vector through its essential role for ookinete morphogenesis. PMID:26526684

  18. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA.

  19. The Plasmodium palmitoyl-S-acyl-transferase DHHC2 is essential for ookinete morphogenesis and malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jorge M; Kehrer, Jessica; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Janse, Chris J; Mair, Gunnar R

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational addition of C-16 long chain fatty acids to protein cysteine residues is catalysed by palmitoyl-S-acyl-transferases (PAT) and affects the affinity of a modified protein for membranes and therefore its subcellular localisation. In apicomplexan parasites this reversible protein modification regulates numerous biological processes and specifically affects cell motility, and invasion of host cells by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Using inhibitor studies we show here that palmitoylation is key to transformation of zygotes into ookinetes during initial mosquito infection with P. berghei. We identify DHHC2 as a unique PAT mediating ookinete formation and morphogenesis. Essential for life cycle progression in asexual blood stage parasites and thus refractory to gene deletion analyses, we used promoter swap (ps) methodology to maintain dhhc2 expression in asexual blood stages but down regulate expression in sexual stage parasites and during post-fertilization development of the zygote. The ps mutant showed normal gamete formation, fertilisation and DNA replication to tetraploid cells, but was characterised by a complete block in post-fertilisation development and ookinete formation. Our report highlights the crucial nature of the DHHC2 palmitoyl-S-acyltransferase for transmission of the malaria parasite to the mosquito vector through its essential role for ookinete morphogenesis.

  20. Identification of Targets and Interaction Partners of Arginyl-tRNA Protein Transferase in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Mueller, Stefanie J; Fiedler, Kathrin; Schuelke, Marc; Vanselow, Jens T; Schuessele, Christian; Lang, Daniel; Nitschke, Roland; Igloi, Gabor L; Schlosser, Andreas; Reski, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification of both N-terminal amino acids of proteins and sidechain carboxylates and can be crucial for viability and physiology in higher eukaryotes. The lack of arginylation causes severe developmental defects in moss, affects the low oxygen response in Arabidopsis thaliana and is embryo lethal in Drosophila and in mice. Although several studies investigated impact and function of the responsible enzyme, the arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE) in plants, identification of arginylated proteins by mass spectrometry was not hitherto achieved. In the present study, we report the identification of targets and interaction partners of ATE in the model plant Physcomitrella patens by mass spectrometry, employing two different immuno-affinity strategies and a recently established transgenic ATE:GUS reporter line (Schuessele et al., 2016 New Phytol. , DOI: 10.1111/nph.13656). Here we use a commercially available antibody against the fused reporter protein (β-glucuronidase) to pull down ATE and its interacting proteins and validate its in vivo interaction with a class I small heatshock protein via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Additionally, we apply and modify a method that already successfully identified arginylated proteins from mouse proteomes by using custom-made antibodies specific for N-terminal arginine. As a result, we identify four arginylated proteins from Physcomitrella patens with high confidence.Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003228 and PXD003232.

  1. Identification of Targets and Interaction Partners of Arginyl-tRNA Protein Transferase in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Mueller, Stefanie J; Fiedler, Kathrin; Schuelke, Marc; Vanselow, Jens T; Schuessele, Christian; Lang, Daniel; Nitschke, Roland; Igloi, Gabor L; Schlosser, Andreas; Reski, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification of both N-terminal amino acids of proteins and sidechain carboxylates and can be crucial for viability and physiology in higher eukaryotes. The lack of arginylation causes severe developmental defects in moss, affects the low oxygen response in Arabidopsis thaliana and is embryo lethal in Drosophila and in mice. Although several studies investigated impact and function of the responsible enzyme, the arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE) in plants, identification of arginylated proteins by mass spectrometry was not hitherto achieved. In the present study, we report the identification of targets and interaction partners of ATE in the model plant Physcomitrella patens by mass spectrometry, employing two different immuno-affinity strategies and a recently established transgenic ATE:GUS reporter line (Schuessele et al., 2016 New Phytol. , DOI: 10.1111/nph.13656). Here we use a commercially available antibody against the fused reporter protein (β-glucuronidase) to pull down ATE and its interacting proteins and validate its in vivo interaction with a class I small heatshock protein via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Additionally, we apply and modify a method that already successfully identified arginylated proteins from mouse proteomes by using custom-made antibodies specific for N-terminal arginine. As a result, we identify four arginylated proteins from Physcomitrella patens with high confidence.Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003228 and PXD003232. PMID:27067052

  2. Immunogenicity of genetically engineered glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing a T-cell epitope from diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, S; Dermody, K; Metcalf, B

    1995-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) has been shown to induce a marginal antibody response in experimental animals as well as partial protection against a number of parasitic worms, including Schistosoma and Fasciola species. The objective of our study was to increase the immunogenicity of GST by adding heterologous T-cell epitopes at the carboxy terminus of the protein. We generated recombinant GST proteins by attaching one or three tandem repeats of a T-cell epitope of CRM197, a nontoxic variant of diphtheria toxin. This T-cell epitope encoding the region of amino acids 366 to 383 of CRM197, when contained in a GST fusion protein and/or after purification as a recombinant peptide, retained the ability to induce a CRM197-specific T-cell response. The fusion protein containing a single T-cell epitope induced a strong T-cell proliferative response to GST and also enhanced anti-GST antibody production in mice. The addition of three repeats of the epitope did not augment the responses when compared with the responses of GST itself. The results suggest that the addition of a single T-cell epitope to a larger protein like GST increases the immunogenicity of the protein. PMID:7534277

  3. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  4. Some effects of the fungicide propiconazole on cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase in brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Egaas, E; Sandvik, M; Fjeld, E; Källqvist, T; Goksøyr, A; Svensen, A

    1999-03-01

    The fungicide propiconazole (1-(2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-ylmethyl) -1H-1,2,4-triazole) induced the hepatic cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) activity towards ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), the content of CYP1A protein as quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity towards the three commonly used substrates CDNB(1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene), cumene hydroperoxide (CU) and ethachrynic acid (EA) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) depending on dose and body weight. An exponential dose response relationship existed between propiconazole exposure and CYP1A activity. A 2. order polynomial regression of the propiconazole concentration (square root transformed) on the data for CDNB, EU and CU revealed a bell-shaped pattern of the GST induction. Reverse-phase HPLC of the GSH-affinity chromatography purified GST isozymes in trout exposed to respectively 8.3, 23, 93, 313 and 606 microg l(-1) propiconazole in the water indicated that the propiconazole treatment may lead to changes in the composition of the subunits compared to the controls. Thus, propiconazole exposure through the water changed the properties of the brown trout hepatic CYP1A and GST, and these changes may be used as a bioindicator on the molecular level of exposure and effect of propiconazole in controlled experiments. The use in monitoring of propiconazole exposure under natural field conditions is possible, however needs further investigation.

  5. Design, synthesis, and characterization of peptide-based rab geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kui-Thong; Guiu-Rozas, Ester; Bon, Robin S; Guo, Zhong; Delon, Christine; Wetzel, Stefan; Arndt, Sabine; Alexandrov, Kirill; Waldmann, Herbert; Goody, Roger S; Wu, Yao-Wen; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2009-12-24

    Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RabGGTase) catalyzes the attachment of geranylgeranyl isoprenoids to Rab guanine triphosphatases, which are key regulators in vesicular transport. Because geranylgeranylation is required for proper function and overexpression of Rabs has been observed in various cancers, RabGGTase may be a target for novel therapeutics. The development of selective inhibitors is, however, difficult because two related enzymes involved in other cellular processes exist in eukaryotes and because RabGGTase recognizes protein substrates indirectly, resulting in relaxed specificity. We report the synthesis of a peptidic library based on the farnesyl transferase inhibitor pepticinnamin E. Of 469 compounds investigated, several were identified as selective for RabGGTase with low micromolar IC(50) values. The compounds were not generally cytotoxic and inhibited Rab isoprenylation in COS-7 cells. Crystal structure analysis revealed that selective inhibitors interact with a tunnel unique to RabGGTase, implying that this structural motif is an attractive target for improved RabGGTase inhibitors.

  6. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  7. Anti-peptidyl transferase leader peptides of attenuation-regulated chloramphenicol-resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z; Harrod, R; Rogers, E J; Lovett, P S

    1994-01-01

    The chloramphenicol (Cm)-inducible cmlA gene of Tn1696 specifies nonenzymatic resistance to Cm and is regulated by attenuation. The first eight codons of the leader specify a peptide that inhibits peptidyl transferase in vitro. Functionally similar, but less inhibitory, peptides are encoded by the leaders of Cm-inducible cat genes. However, the cat and cmlA coding sequences are unrelated and specify proteins of unrelated function. The inhibition of peptidyl transferase by the leader peptides is additive with that of Cm. Erythromycin competes with the inhibitory action of the peptides, and erythromycin and the peptides footprint to overlapping sites at the peptidyl transferase center of 23S rRNA. It is proposed that translation of the cmlA and cat leaders transiently pauses upon synthesis of the inhibitor peptides. The predicted site of pausing is identical to the leader site where long-term occupancy by a ribosome (ribosome stalling) will activate downstream gene expression. We therefore propose the inducer, Cm, converts a peptide-paused ribosome to the stalled state. We discuss the idea that cooperativity between leader peptide and inducer is necessary for ribosome stalling and may link the activation of a specific drug-resistance gene with a particular antibiotic. Images PMID:7515506

  8. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  9. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Influence of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) inhibition on lung epithelial cell injury: role of oxidative stress and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Marianne E; Boshier, Piers R; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Keun, Hector C; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Kirkham, Paul A; Adcock, Ian M; Barton, Paul J; Takata, Masao; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-06-15

    Oxidant-mediated tissue injury is key to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with toxic oxidant compounds and are associated with acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that attenuation of cellular GST enzymes would augment intracellular oxidative and metabolic stress and induce lung cell injury. Treatment of murine lung epithelial cells with GST inhibitors, ethacrynic acid (EA), and caffeic acid compromised lung epithelial cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitors also potentiated cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl-hydroperoxide, and hypoxia and reoxygenation (HR). SiRNA-mediated attenuation of GST-π but not GST-μ expression reduced cell viability and significantly enhanced stress (H2O2/HR)-induced injury. GST inhibitors also induced intracellular oxidative stress (measured by dihydrorhodamine 123 and dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), caused alterations in overall intracellular redox status (as evidenced by NAD(+)/NADH ratios), and increased protein carbonyl formation. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely prevented EA-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Whereas EA had no effect on mitochondrial energetics, it significantly altered cellular metabolic profile. To explore the physiological impact of these cellular events, we used an ex vivo mouse-isolated perfused lung model. Supplementation of perfusate with EA markedly affected lung mechanics and significantly increased lung permeability. The results of our combined genetic, pharmacological, and metabolic studies on multiple platforms suggest the importance of GST enzymes, specifically GST-π, in the cellular and whole lung response to acute oxidative and metabolic stress. These may have important clinical implications.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase gene induced by light stimulation in the protozoan Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuichi; Uda, Kouji; Kawamura, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Tatsuomi

    2004-02-16

    A cDNA clone that is inducible by light stimulation was cloned by a differential screening method from a cDNA library of the protozoan Blepharisma japonicum, and the light-dependent expression was checked by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Sequence analysis showed that the cDNA encodes a glutathione S-transferase (GST) that has not been characterized in the protozoa. Multiple alignment of B. japonicum GST (BjGST1), known protozoan, and mammalian alpha-, micro-, pi-, sigma-, theta-, zeta-, kappa-, and omega-class GSTs suggested that the BjGST1 may be a novel class GST. Furthermore, highly conserved amino acid residues among the GSTs and the substrate specificity of recombinant BjGST1 showed that BjGST1 is related to alpha-, micro-, pi-, and sigma-class GSTs rather than the other class of GSTs.

  12. New nucleotide-competitive non-nucleoside inhibitors of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: discovery, characterization, and crystal structure in complex with the target.

    PubMed

    Costi, Roberta; Crucitti, Giuliana Cuzzucoli; Pescatori, Luca; Messore, Antonella; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Amoroso, Alessandra; Crespan, Emmanuele; Campiglia, Pietro; Maresca, Bruno; Porta, Amalia; Granata, Ilaria; Novellino, Ettore; Gouge, Jérôme; Delarue, Marc; Maga, Giovanni; Di Santo, Roberto

    2013-09-26

    Terminal deoxynucletidyl transferase (TdT) is overexpressed in some cancer types, where it might compete with pol μ during the mutagenic repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) through the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. Here we report the discovery and characterization of pyrrolyl and indolyl diketo acids that specifically target TdT and behave as nucleotide-competitive inhibitors. These compounds show a selective toxicity toward MOLT-4 compared to HeLa cells that correlate well with in vitro selectivity for TdT. The binding site of two of these inhibitors was determined by cocrystallization with TdT, explaining why these compounds are competitive inhibitors of the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP). In addition, because of the observed dual localization of the phenyl substituent, these studies open the possibility of rationally designing more potent compounds.

  13. Isolation and characterization of ellagic acid derivatives isolated from Casearia sylvestris SW aqueous extract with anti-PLA(2) activity.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Saulo L; Calgarotto, Andrana K; Chaar, Jamal S; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2008-11-01

    The Casearia sylvestris SW (Flacourtiaceae) is utilized in folk medicine (Brazil and all Latin American) to treat several pathologic processes as inflammation, cancer, microbial infection and snake bites. Studies showed that C. sylvestris aqueous extract can inhibit many toxic effects caused by snake venoms (or caused by phospholipase A(2) isolated) from different species, mainly of Bothrops genus. Inhibition of enzymatic and myotoxic activities, decrease of edema formation and increase of the survival rate of rats injected with lethal doses of bothropic venoms are some toxic effects inhibited by C. sylvestris. In this study, four ellagic acid derivatives from aqueous extracts of C. sylvestris were isolated, characterized, and tested against effects from both total venom and PLA(2) (Asp 49 BthTX-II) from the venom of Bothrops jararacussu. The isolated compounds were as follows: ellagic acid (A), 3'-O-methyl ellagic acid (B), 3,3'-di-O-methyl ellagic acid (C), 3-O-methyl-3',4'-methylenedioxy ellagic acid (D). The inhibition constant values (Ki) for enzymatic activity, as well the IC(50) values found in the edematogenic and myotoxic activities, indicate that the ellagic acid is the best inhibitor of these activities, while compounds C and D are the substances with lowest capacity on inhibiting these same effects. Our results show that the presence of hydroxyls at position 3 or 3' (compounds A and B) increases the capacity of these derivatives on inhibiting these toxic effects. However, the presence of methoxyl groups at position 3 or 3' reduced, but did not completely inhibit the capacity of compounds C and D on inhibiting all the toxic effects studied.

  14. Arylamine N-acetyl Transferase (NAT) in the blue secretion of Telescopium telescopium: xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme as a biomarker for detection of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Gorain, Bapi; Chakraborty, Sumon; Pal, Murari Mohan; Sarkar, Ratul; Samanta, Samir Kumar; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2014-01-01

    Telescopium telescopium, a marine mollusc collected from Sundarban mangrove, belongs to the largest mollusca phylum in the world and exudes a blue secretion when stimulated mechanically. The blue secretion was found to metabolize (preferentially) para-amino benzoic acid, a substrate for N-acetyl transferase (NAT), thereby indicating acetyl transferase like activity of the secretion. Attempts were also made to characterise bioactive fraction of the blue secretion and to further use this as a biomarker for monitoring of marine pollution. NAT like enzyme from marine mollusc is a potential candidate for detoxification of different harmful chemicals. A partially purified extract of blue secretion was obtained by fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. From different fractions obtained by precipitation, the 0-30% fraction (30S) displayed NAT like activity (using para amino benzoic acid as a substrate with para nitrophenyl phosphate or acetyl coenzyme A as acetyl group donors). Maximum NAT like enzyme activity was attained at 25°C and at a pH of 6. The enzyme activity was found to be inhibited by 5 mM phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride. The divalent metal ions reduced NAT like activity of 30S. Moreover, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (at concentration of 1 mM) completely inhibited NAT activity. The thermal stability and bench-top stability studies were performed and it was found that the enzyme was stable at room temperature for more than 24 hours. Results from the present study further indicate that heavy metal content in blue secretion gradually decreased from pre-monsoon to post-monsoon season, which also corresponded to the change in NAT like activity. Therefore, this article stresses the importance of biomarker research for monitoring pollution.

  15. Arylamine N-acetyl Transferase (NAT) in the blue secretion of Telescopium telescopium: xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme as a biomarker for detection of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Gorain, Bapi; Chakraborty, Sumon; Pal, Murari Mohan; Sarkar, Ratul; Samanta, Samir Kumar; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2014-01-01

    Telescopium telescopium, a marine mollusc collected from Sundarban mangrove, belongs to the largest mollusca phylum in the world and exudes a blue secretion when stimulated mechanically. The blue secretion was found to metabolize (preferentially) para-amino benzoic acid, a substrate for N-acetyl transferase (NAT), thereby indicating acetyl transferase like activity of the secretion. Attempts were also made to characterise bioactive fraction of the blue secretion and to further use this as a biomarker for monitoring of marine pollution. NAT like enzyme from marine mollusc is a potential candidate for detoxification of different harmful chemicals. A partially purified extract of blue secretion was obtained by fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. From different fractions obtained by precipitation, the 0-30% fraction (30S) displayed NAT like activity (using para amino benzoic acid as a substrate with para nitrophenyl phosphate or acetyl coenzyme A as acetyl group donors). Maximum NAT like enzyme activity was attained at 25°C and at a pH of 6. The enzyme activity was found to be inhibited by 5 mM phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride. The divalent metal ions reduced NAT like activity of 30S. Moreover, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (at concentration of 1 mM) completely inhibited NAT activity. The thermal stability and bench-top stability studies were performed and it was found that the enzyme was stable at room temperature for more than 24 hours. Results from the present study further indicate that heavy metal content in blue secretion gradually decreased from pre-monsoon to post-monsoon season, which also corresponded to the change in NAT like activity. Therefore, this article stresses the importance of biomarker research for monitoring pollution. PMID:26034680

  16. The O-Methyltransferase SrsB Catalyzes the Decarboxylative Methylation of Alkylresorcylic Acid during Phenolic Lipid Biosynthesis by Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Chiaki; Funa, Nobutaka; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces griseus contains the srs operon, which is required for phenolic lipid biosynthesis. The operon consists of srsA, srsB, and srsC, which encode a type III polyketide synthase, an O-methyltransferase, and a flavoprotein hydroxylase, respectively. We previously reported that the recombinant SrsA protein synthesized 3-(13′-methyltetradecyl)-4-methylresorcinol, using iso-C16 fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) as a starter substrate and malonyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA as extender substrates. An in vitro SrsA reaction using [13C3]malonyl-CoA confirmed that the order of extender substrate condensation was methylmalonyl-CoA, followed by two extensions with malonyl-CoA. Furthermore, SrsA was revealed to produce an alkylresorcylic acid as its direct product rather than an alkylresorcinol. The functional SrsB protein was produced in the membrane fraction in Streptomyces lividans and used for the in vitro SrsB reaction. When the SrsA reaction was coupled, SrsB produced alkylresorcinol methyl ether in the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). SrsB was incapable of catalyzing the O-methylation of alkylresorcinol, indicating that alkylresorcylic acid was the substrate of SrsB and that SrsB catalyzed the conversion of alkylresorcylic acid to alkylresorcinol methyl ether, namely, by both the O-methylation of the hydroxyl group (C-6) and the decarboxylation of the neighboring carboxyl group (C-1). O-methylated alkylresorcylic acid was not detected in the in vitro SrsAB reaction, although it was presumably stable, indicating that O-methylation did not precede decarboxylation. We therefore postulated that O-methylation was coupled with decarboxylation and proposed that SrsB catalyzed the feasible SAM-dependent decarboxylative methylation of alkylresorcylic acid. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a methyltransferase that catalyzes decarboxylative methylation. PMID:22247507

  17. Immunolabeling of Gamma-glutamyl transferase 5 in Normal Human Tissues Reveals Expression and Localization Differs from Gamma-glutamyl transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Marie H.; Gillies, Elizabeth M.; Wickham, Stephanie; Wakeham, Nancy; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT5) was discovered due to its ability to convert leukotriene C4 (LTC4, a glutathione S-conjugate) to LTD4 and may have an important role in the immune system. However, it was not known which cells express the enzyme in humans. We have developed a sensitive and specific antibody that can be used to detect human GGT5 on western blots and in fixed tissue sections. We localized GGT5 expression in normal human tissues. We observed GGT5 expressed by macrophages present in many tissues, including tissue-fixed macrophages such as Kupffer cells in the liver and dust cells in the lung. GGT5 was expressed in some of the same tissues that have been shown to express gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT1), the only other enzymatically active protein in this family. But, the two enzymes were often expressed by different cell types within the tissue. For example, GGT5 was expressed by the interstitial cells of the kidney; whereas, GGT1 is expressed on the apical surface of the renal proximal tubules. Other tissues with GGT5-positive cells included: adrenal gland, salivary gland, pituitary, thymus, spleen, liver, bone marrow, small intestine, stomach, testis, prostate and placenta. GGT5 and GGT1 are cell surface enzymes. The different pattern of expression results in their access to different extracellular fluids and therefore different substrates. GGT5 has access to substrates in blood and intercellular fluids, while GGT1 has access primarily to fluids in ducts and glands throughout the body. These data provide new insights into the different functions of these two related enzymes. PMID:25377544

  18. INX-08189, a Phosphoramidate Prodrug of 6-O-Methyl-2′-C-Methyl Guanosine, Is a Potent Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus Replication with Excellent Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties▿

    PubMed Central

    Vernachio, John H.; Bleiman, Blair; Bryant, K. Dawn; Chamberlain, Stanley; Hunley, Damound; Hutchins, Jeff; Ames, Brenda; Gorovits, Elena; Ganguly, Babita; Hall, Andrea; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Liu, Yule; Muhammad, Jerry; Raja, Nicholas; Walters, C. Robin; Wang, Jin; Williams, Karen; Patti, Joseph M.; Henson, Geoffrey; Madela, Karolina; Aljarah, Mohamed; Gilles, Arnaud; McGuigan, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    INX-08189 is an aryl-phosphoramidate of 6-O-methyl-2′-C-methyl guanosine. INX-08189 was highly potent in replicon assays, with a 50% effective concentration of 10 ± 6 nM against hepatitis C genotype 1b at 72 h. The inhibitory effect on viral replication was rapid, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 35 ± 8 nM at 24 h. An intracellular 2′-C-methyl guanosine triphosphate (2′-C-MeGTP) concentration of 2.43 ± 0.42 pmol/106 cells was sufficient to achieve 90% inhibition of viral replication. In vitro resistance studies confirmed that the S282T mutation in the NS5b gene conferred an approximately 10-fold reduction in sensitivity to INX-08189. However, the complete inhibition of S282T mutant replicons still could be achieved with an EC90 of 344 ± 170 nM. Drug combination studies of INX-08189 and ribavirin indicated significant synergy in antiviral potency both in wild-type and S282T-expressing replicons. Genotype 1b replicons could be cleared after 14 days of culture when exposed to as little as 20 nM INX-08189. No evidence of mitochondrial toxicity was observed after 14 days of INX-08189 exposure in both HepG2 and CEM human cell lines. In vivo studies of rats and cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated that 2′-C-MeGTP concentrations in liver equivalent to the EC90 could be attained after a single oral dose of INX-08189. Rat liver 2′-C-MeGTP concentrations were proportional to dose, sustained for greater than 24 h, and correlated with plasma concentrations of the nucleoside metabolite 2′-C-methyl guanosine. The characteristics displayed by INX-08189 support its continued development as a clinical candidate for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. PMID:21357300

  19. INX-08189, a phosphoramidate prodrug of 6-O-methyl-2'-C-methyl guanosine, is a potent inhibitor of hepatitis C virus replication with excellent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Vernachio, John H; Bleiman, Blair; Bryant, K Dawn; Chamberlain, Stanley; Hunley, Damound; Hutchins, Jeff; Ames, Brenda; Gorovits, Elena; Ganguly, Babita; Hall, Andrea; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Liu, Yule; Muhammad, Jerry; Raja, Nicholas; Walters, C Robin; Wang, Jin; Williams, Karen; Patti, Joseph M; Henson, Geoffrey; Madela, Karolina; Aljarah, Mohamed; Gilles, Arnaud; McGuigan, Christopher

    2011-05-01

    INX-08189 is an aryl-phosphoramidate of 6-O-methyl-2'-C-methyl guanosine. INX-08189 was highly potent in replicon assays, with a 50% effective concentration of 10±6 nM against hepatitis C genotype 1b at 72 h. The inhibitory effect on viral replication was rapid, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 35±8 nM at 24 h. An intracellular 2'-C-methyl guanosine triphosphate (2'-C-MeGTP) concentration of 2.43±0.42 pmol/10(6) cells was sufficient to achieve 90% inhibition of viral replication. In vitro resistance studies confirmed that the S282T mutation in the NS5b gene conferred an approximately 10-fold reduction in sensitivity to INX-08189. However, the complete inhibition of S282T mutant replicons still could be achieved with an EC90 of 344±170 nM. Drug combination studies of INX-08189 and ribavirin indicated significant synergy in antiviral potency both in wild-type and S282T-expressing replicons. Genotype 1b replicons could be cleared after 14 days of culture when exposed to as little as 20 nM INX-08189. No evidence of mitochondrial toxicity was observed after 14 days of INX-08189 exposure in both HepG2 and CEM human cell lines. In vivo studies of rats and cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated that 2'-C-MeGTP concentrations in liver equivalent to the EC90 could be attained after a single oral dose of INX-08189. Rat liver 2'-C-MeGTP concentrations were proportional to dose, sustained for greater than 24 h, and correlated with plasma concentrations of the nucleoside metabolite 2'-C-methyl guanosine. The characteristics displayed by INX-08189 support its continued development as a clinical candidate for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. PMID:21357300

  20. The DinB Superfamily Includes Novel Mycothiol, Bacillithiol and Glutathione S-transferases

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Gerald L.; Leung, Stephan S.; Wakabayashi, Judy I.; Rawat, Mamta; Fahey, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The superfamily of glutathione S-transferases has been the subject of extensive study but Actinobacteria produce mycothiol (MSH) in place of glutathione and no mycothiol S-transferase (MST) has been identified. Using mycothiol and monochlorobimane as substrates a MST activity was detected in extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis and purified sufficiently to allow identification of MSMEG_0887, a member the DUF664 family of the DinB superfamily, as the MST. The identity of the M. smegmatis and homologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv0443) enzymes was confirmed by cloning and the expressed proteins were found to be active with MSH but not bacillithiol (BSH) or glutathione (GSH). Bacillus subtilis YfiT is another member of the DinB superfamily but this bacterium produces BSH. The YfiT protein was shown to have S-transferase activity with monochlorobimane when assayed with BSH but not with MSH or GSH. Enterococcus faecalis EF_3021 shares some homology with MSMEG_0887 but this organism produces GSH but not MSH or BSH. Cloned and expressed EF_0321 was active with monochlorobimane and GSH but not with MSH or BSH. MDMPI_2 is another member of the DinB superfamily and has been previously shown to have mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase activity. Three of the eight families of the DinB superfamily include proteins shown to catalyze thiol-dependent metabolic or detoxification activities. Since more than two-thirds of the sequences assigned to the DinB superfamily are members of these families it seems likely that such activity is dominant in the DinB superfamily. PMID:22059487

  1. Inherited glutathione-S-transferase deficiency is a risk factor for pulmonary asbestosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, C M; Kelsey, K T; Wiencke, J K; Leyden, K; Levin, S; Christiani, D C

    1994-09-01

    Pulmonary diseases attributable to asbestos exposure constitute a significant public health burden, yet few studies have investigated potential genetic determinants of susceptibility to asbestos-related diseases. The glutathione-S-transferases are a family of conjugating enzymes that both catalyze the detoxification of a variety of potentially cytotoxic electrophilic agents and act in the generation of sulfadipeptide leukotriene inflammatory mediators. The gene encoding glutathione-S-transferase class mu (GSTM-1) is polymorphic; approximately 50% of Caucasian individuals have a homozygous deletion of this gene and do not produce functional enzyme. Glutathione-S-transferase mu (GST-mu) deficiency has been previously reported to be associated with smoking-induced lung cancer. We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the prevalence of the homozygous deletion for the GSTM-1 gene in members of the carpentry trade occupationally exposed to asbestos. Members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America attending their 1991 National Union conference were invited to participate. Each participant was offered a chest X-ray and was asked to complete a comprehensive questionnaire and have their blood drawn. All radiographs were assessed for the presence of pneumoconiosis in a blinded fashion by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified International Labor Office "B" reader. Individual GSTM-1 status was determined using polymerase chain reaction methods. Six hundred fifty-eight workers were studied. Of these, 80 (12.2%) had X-ray abnormalities associated with asbestos exposure. Individuals genetically deficient in GST-mu were significantly more likely to have radiographic evidence of nonmalignant asbestos-related disease than those who were not deficient (chi 2 = 5.0; P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Bisubstrate UDP-peptide conjugates as human O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Borodkin, Vladimir S; Schimpl, Marianne; Gundogdu, Mehmet; Rafie, Karim; Dorfmueller, Helge C; Robinson, David A; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2014-02-01

    Inhibitors of OGT (O-GlcNAc transferase) are valuable tools to study the cell biology of protein O-GlcNAcylation. We report OGT bisubstrate-linked inhibitors (goblins) in which the acceptor serine in the peptide VTPVSTA is covalently linked to UDP, eliminating the GlcNAc pyranoside ring. Goblin1 co-crystallizes with OGT, revealing an ordered C₃ linker and retained substrate-binding modes, and binds the enzyme with micromolar affinity, inhibiting glycosyltransfer on to protein and peptide substrates.

  3. Bisubstrate UDP–peptide conjugates as human O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Borodkin, Vladimir S.; Schimpl, Marianne; Gundogdu, Mehmet; Rafie, Karim; Dorfmueller, Helge C.; Robinson, David A.; vanAalten, Daan M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of OGT (O-GlcNAc transferase) are valuable tools to study the cell biology of protein O-GlcNAcylation. We report OGT bisubstrate-linked inhibitors (goblins) in which the acceptor serine in the peptide VTPVSTA is covalently linked to UDP, eliminating the GlcNAc pyranoside ring. Goblin1 co-crystallizes with OGT, revealing an ordered C3 linker and retained substrate-binding modes, and binds the enzyme with micromolar affinity, inhibiting glycosyltransfer on to protein and peptide substrates. PMID:24256146

  4. Genetic Variations in Human Glutathione Transferase Enzymes: Significance for Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Josephy, P. David

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione transferase enzymes (GSTs) catalyze reactions in which electrophiles are conjugated to the tripeptide thiol glutathione. While many GST-catalyzed transformations result in the detoxication of xenobiotics, a few substrates, such as dihaloalkanes, undergo bioactivation to reactive intermediates. Many molecular epidemiological studies have tested associations between polymorphisms (especially, deletions) of human GST genes and disease susceptibility or response to therapy. This review presents a discussion of the biochemistry of GSTs, the sources—both genetic and environmental—of interindividual variation in GST activities, and their implications for pharmaco- and toxicogenetics; particular attention is paid to the Theta class GSTs. PMID:20981235

  5. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  6. Fucosylation of xyloglucan: localization of the transferase in dictyosomes of pea stem cells. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Camirand, A.; Brummell, D.; MacLachlan, G.

    1987-07-01

    Microsomal membranes from elongating regions of etiolated Pisum sativum stems were separated by rate-zonal centrifugation on Renografin gradients. The transfer of labeled fucose and xylose from GDP-(/sup 14/C) fucose and UDP-(/sup 14/C)xylose to xyloglucan occurred mainly in dictyosome-enriched fractions. No transferase activity was detected in secretory vesicle fractions. Pulse-chase experiments using pea stem slices incubated with (/sup 3/H)fucose suggest that xyloglucan chains are fucosylated and their structure completed within the dictyosomes, before being transported to the cell wall by secretory vesicles.

  7. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M D Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT) catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  8. The Phosphopantetheinyl Transferases: Catalysis of a Posttranslational Modification Crucial for Life

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Vickery, Christopher R.; Noel, Joseph P.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Although holo-acyl carrier protein synthase, AcpS, a phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase), was characterized in the 1960s, it was not until the publication of the landmark paper by Lambalot et al. in 1996 that PPTases garnered wide-spread attention being classified as a distinct enzyme superfamily. In the past two decades an increasing number of papers has been published on PPTases ranging from identification, characterization, structure determination, mutagenesis, inhibition, and engineering in synthetic biology. In this review, we comprehensively discuss all current knowledge on this class of enzymes that post-translationally install a 4′-phosphopantetheine arm on various carrier proteins. PMID:24292120

  9. A novel biomarker for marine environmental pollution of pi-class glutathione S-transferase from Mytilus coruscus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; He, Jianyu; Zhao, Rongtao; Chi, Changfeng; Bao, Yongbo

    2015-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are the superfamily of phase II detoxification enzymes that play crucial roles in innate immunity. In this study, a pi-class GST homolog was identified from Mytilus coruscus (named as McGST1, KC525103). The full-length cDNA sequence of McGST1 was 621bp with a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 70bp and a 3'-UTR of 201bp. The deduced amino acid sequence was 206 residues in length with theoretical pI/MW of 5.60/23.72kDa, containing the conserved G-site and diversiform H-site. BLASTn analysis and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that this cDNA sequence was a member of pi class GST family. The prediction of secondary structure displayed a preserved N-terminal and a C-terminal comprised with α-helixes. Quantitative real time RT-PCR showed that constitutive expression of McGST1 was occurred, with increasing order in mantle, muscle, gill, hemocyte, gonad and hepatopancreas. The stimulation of bacterial infection, heavy metals and 180CST could up-regulate McGST1 mRNA expression in hepatopancreas with time-dependent manners. The maximum expression appeared at 6h after pathogenic bacteria injected, with 10-fold in Vibrio alginolyticus and 16-fold in Vibrio harveyi higher than that of the control. The highest point of McGST1 mRNA appeared at different time for exposure to copper (10-fold at day 15), cadmium (9-fold at day10) and 180 CST (10-fold at day 15). These results suggested that McGST1 played a significant role in antioxidation and might potentially be used as indicators and biomarkers for detection of marine environmental pollution.

  10. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Sunakawa, Hajime; Aniya, Yoko

    2008-10-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore.

  11. Cloning and identification of four Mu-type glutathione S-transferases from the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kai-Min; Hao, Fang-Yuan; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Chi-Yu; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2013-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are essential components of the cellular detoxification system because of their capability to protect organisms against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROSs). Four different GSTs (MrMuGST1-MrMuGST4) showing similarities with Mu-type GSTs were cloned from the hepatopancreas of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. These four GSTs have 219, 216, 218 and 219 amino acids in length, respectively. MrMuGST1-MrMuGST4 proteins all have a G-site in the N-terminus and an H-site in the C-terminus. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that four Mu-type GSTs are classified into two different clades (MrMuGST2 one clade; MrMuGST1, MrMuGST3 and MrMuGST4 other clades). Nonetheless, no site under positive selection was detected but rapid evolution was found in the few of MuGST genes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that MrMuGST1 and MrMuGST2 transcripts were expressed in all detected tissues, however, MrMuGST3 and MrMuGST4 were just mainly expressed in hepatopancreas and intestines. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that MrMuGST1 and MrMuGST2 were down-regulated upon Vibrio anguillarum challenge, whereas MrMuGST3 and MrMuGST4 were quickly up-regulated 2 h after the Vibrio challenge. Our results imply that different Mu-type GSTs may respond to Vibrio challenge with different manners.

  12. Control of mucin-type O-glycosylation: a classification of the polypeptide GalNAc-transferase gene family.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Gerken, Thomas A; Fritz, Timothy A; Tabak, Lawrence A

    2012-06-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is an essential process in all eukaryotes and a great diversity in types of protein glycosylation exists in animals, plants and microorganisms. Mucin-type O-glycosylation, consisting of glycans attached via O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to serine and threonine residues, is one of the most abundant forms of protein glycosylation in animals. Although most protein glycosylation is controlled by one or two genes encoding the enzymes responsible for the initiation of glycosylation, i.e. the step where the first glycan is attached to the relevant amino acid residue in the protein, mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of up to 20 homologous genes encoding UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) (EC 2.4.1.41). Therefore, mucin-type O-glycosylation has the greatest potential for differential regulation in cells and tissues. The GalNAc-T family is the largest glycosyltransferase enzyme family covering a single known glycosidic linkage and it is highly conserved throughout animal evolution, although absent in bacteria, yeast and plants. Emerging studies have shown that the large number of genes (GALNTs) in the GalNAc-T family do not provide full functional redundancy and single GalNAc-T genes have been shown to be important in both animals and human. Here, we present an overview of the GalNAc-T gene family in animals and propose a classification of the genes into subfamilies, which appear to be conserved in evolution structurally as well as functionally.

  13. Glucosylceramide Transferase Activity Is Critical for Encystation and Viable Cyst Production by an Intestinal Protozoan, Giardia lamblia*

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Tavis L.; De Chatterjee, Atasi; Duarte, Trevor T.; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Robles-Martinez, Leobarda; Roy, Debarshi; Sun, Jianjun; Maldonado, Rosa A.; Roychowdhury, Sukla; Almeida, Igor C.; Das, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    The production of viable cysts by Giardia is essential for its survival in the environment and for spreading the infection via contaminated food and water. The hallmark of cyst production (also known as encystation) is the biogenesis of encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs) that transport cyst wall proteins to the plasma membrane of the trophozoite before laying down the protective cyst wall. However, the molecules that regulate ESV biogenesis and maintain cyst viability have never before been identified. Here, we report that giardial glucosylceramide transferase-1 (gGlcT1), an enzyme of sphingolipid biosynthesis, plays a key role in ESV biogenesis and maintaining cyst viability. We find that overexpression of this enzyme induced the formation of aggregated/enlarged ESVs and generated clustered cysts with reduced viability. The silencing of gGlcT1 synthesis by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide abolished ESV production and generated mostly nonviable cysts. Interestingly, when gGlcT1-overexpressed Giardia was transfected with anti-gGlcT1 morpholino, the enzyme activity, vesicle biogenesis, and cyst viability returned to normal, suggesting that the regulated expression of gGlcT1 is important for encystation and viable cyst production. Furthermore, the overexpression of gGlcT1 increased the influx of membrane lipids and fatty acids without altering the fluidity of plasma membranes, indicating that the expression of gGlcT1 activity is linked to lipid internalization and maintaining the overall lipid balance in this parasite. Taken together, our results suggest that gGlcT1 is a key player of ESV biogenesis and cyst viability and therefore could be targeted for developing new anti-giardial therapies. PMID:23589290

  14. Increased Sensitivity of Glutathione S-Transferase P-Null Mice to Cyclophosphamide-Induced Urinary Bladder Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Haberzettl, Petra; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Prough, Russell A.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis and diffuse inflammation of the bladder, common side effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment, have been linked to the generation of acrolein derived from CY metabolism. Metabolic removal of acrolein involves multiple pathways, which include reduction, oxidation, and conjugation with glutathione. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), the GST isoform that displays high catalytic efficiency with acrolein, protects against CY-induced urotoxicity by detoxifying acrolein. Treatment of wild-type (WT) and mGstP1/P2 null (GSTP-null) mice with CY caused hemorrhagic cystitis, edema, albumin extravasation, and sloughing of bladder epithelium; however, CY-induced bladder ulcerations of the lamina propria were more numerous and more severe in GSTP-null mice. CY treatment also led to greater accumulation of myeloperoxidase-positive cells and specific protein-acrolein adducts in the bladder of GSTP-null than WT mice. There was no difference in hepatic microsomal production of acrolein from CY or urinary hydroxypropyl mercapturic acid output between WT and GSTP-null mice, but CY induced greater c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38, activation in GSTP-null than in WT mice. Pretreatment with mesna (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate sodium) abolished CY toxicity and JNK activation in GSTP-null mice. Taken together, these data support the view that GSTP prevents CY-induced bladder toxicity, in part by detoxifying acrolein. Because polymorphisms in human GSTP gene code for protein variants differing significantly in their catalytic efficiency toward acrolein, it is likely that GSTP polymorphisms influence CY urotoxicity. In addition, pretreatment with dietary or nutrient inducers of GSTP may be of use in minimizing bladder injury in patients undergoing CY therapy. PMID:19696094

  15. Directed evolution of Tau class glutathione transferases reveals a site that regulates catalytic efficiency and masks co-operativity.

    PubMed

    Axarli, Irine; Muleta, Abdi W; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Kotzia, Georgia; Maltezos, Anastasios; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2016-03-01

    A library of Tau class GSTs (glutathione transferases) was constructed by DNA shuffling using the DNA encoding the Glycine max GSTs GmGSTU2-2, GmGSTU4-4 and GmGSTU10-10. The parental GSTs are >88% identical at the sequence level; however, their specificity varies towards different substrates. The DNA library contained chimaeric structures of alternated segments of the parental sequences and point mutations. Chimaeric GST sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activities towards CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and the herbicide fluorodifen (4-nitrophenyl α,α,α-trifluoro-2-nitro-p-tolyl ether) were determined. A chimaeric clone (Sh14) with enhanced CDNB- and fluorodifen-detoxifying activities, and unusual co-operative kinetics towards CDNB and fluorodifen, but not towards GSH, was identified. The structure of Sh14 was determined at 1.75 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione. Analysis of the Sh14 structure showed that a W114C point mutation is responsible for the altered kinetic properties. This was confirmed by the kinetic properties of the Sh14 C114W mutant. It is suggested that the replacement of the bulky tryptophan residue by a smaller amino acid (cysteine) results in conformational changes of the active-site cavity, leading to enhanced catalytic activity of Sh14. Moreover, the structural changes allow the strengthening of the two salt bridges between Glu(66) and Lys(104) at the dimer interface that triggers an allosteric effect and the communication between the hydrophobic sites.

  16. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats

    PubMed Central

    Carnevali, L.C.; Eder, R.; Lira, F.S.; Lima, W.P.; Gonçalves, D.C.; Zanchi, N.E.; Nicastro, H.; Lavoie, J.M.; Seelaender, M.C.L.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the capacity of high-intensity intermittent training (HI-IT) to facilitate the delivery of lipids to enzymes responsible for oxidation, a task performed by the carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. Male adult Wistar rats (160-250 g) were randomly distributed into 3 groups: sedentary (Sed, N = 5), HI-IT (N = 10), and moderate-intensity continuous training (MI-CT, N = 10). The trained groups were exercised for 8 weeks with a 10% (HI-IT) and a 5% (MI-CT) overload. The HI-IT group presented 11.8% decreased weight gain compared to the Sed group. The maximal activities of CPT-I, CPT-II, and citrate synthase were all increased in the HI-IT group compared to the Sed group (P < 0.01), as also was gene expression, measured by RT-PCR, of fatty acid binding protein (FABP; P < 0.01) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL; P < 0.05). Lactate dehydrogenase also presented a higher maximal activity (nmol·min−1·mg protein−1) in HI-IT (around 83%). We suggest that 8 weeks of HI-IT enhance mitochondrial lipid transport capacity thus facilitating the oxidation process in the gastrocnemius muscle. This adaptation may also be associated with the decrease in weight gain observed in the animals and was concomitant to a higher gene expression of both FABP and LPL in HI-IT, suggesting that intermittent exercise is a “time-efficient” strategy inducing metabolic adaptation. PMID:22735180

  17. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevali Jr, L C; Eder, R; Lira, F S; Lima, W P; Gonçalves, D C; Zanchi, N E; Nicastro, H; Lavoie, J M; Seelaender, M C L

    2012-08-01

    We examined the capacity of high-intensity intermittent training (HI-IT) to facilitate the delivery of lipids to enzymes responsible for oxidation, a task performed by the carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. Male adult Wistar rats (160-250 g) were randomly distributed into 3 groups: sedentary (Sed, N = 5), HI-IT (N = 10), and moderate-intensity continuous training (MI-CT, N = 10). The trained groups were exercised for 8 weeks with a 10% (HI-IT) and a 5% (MI-CT) overload. The HI-IT group presented 11.8% decreased weight gain compared to the Sed group. The maximal activities of CPT-I, CPT-II, and citrate synthase were all increased in the HI-IT group compared to the Sed group (P < 0.01), as also was gene expression, measured by RT-PCR, of fatty acid binding protein (FABP; P < 0.01) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL; P < 0.05). Lactate dehydrogenase also presented a higher maximal activity (nmol·min(-1)·mg protein(-1)) in HI-IT (around 83%). We suggest that 8 weeks of HI-IT enhance mitochondrial lipid transport capacity thus facilitating the oxidation process in the gastrocnemius muscle. This adaptation may also be associated with the decrease in weight gain observed in the animals and was concomitant to a higher gene expression of both FABP and LPL in HI-IT, suggesting that intermittent exercise is a "time-efficient" strategy inducing metabolic adaptation.

  18. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevali Jr, L C; Eder, R; Lira, F S; Lima, W P; Gonçalves, D C; Zanchi, N E; Nicastro, H; Lavoie, J M; Seelaender, M C L

    2012-08-01

    We examined the capacity of high-intensity intermittent training (HI-IT) to facilitate the delivery of lipids to enzymes responsible for oxidation, a task performed by the carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. Male adult Wistar rats (160-250 g) were randomly distributed into 3 groups: sedentary (Sed, N = 5), HI-IT (N = 10), and moderate-intensity continuous training (MI-CT, N = 10). The trained groups were exercised for 8 weeks with a 10% (HI-IT) and a 5% (MI-CT) overload. The HI-IT group presented 11.8% decreased weight gain compared to the Sed group. The maximal activities of CPT-I, CPT-II, and citrate synthase were all increased in the HI-IT group compared to the Sed group (P < 0.01), as also was gene expression, measured by RT-PCR, of fatty acid binding protein (FABP; P < 0.01) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL; P < 0.05). Lactate dehydrogenase also presented a higher maximal activity (nmol·min(-1)·mg protein(-1)) in HI-IT (around 83%). We suggest that 8 weeks of HI-IT enhance mitochondrial lipid transport capacity thus facilitating the oxidation process in the gastrocnemius muscle. This adaptation may also be associated with the decrease in weight gain observed in the animals and was concomitant to a higher gene expression of both FABP and LPL in HI-IT, suggesting that intermittent exercise is a "time-efficient" strategy inducing metabolic adaptation. PMID:22735180

  19. Cloning, identification and functional characterization of a pi-class glutathione-S-transferase from the freshwater mussel Cristaria plicata.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baoqing; Deng, Lirong; Wen, Chungen; Yang, Xilan; Pei, Pengzu; Xie, Yanhai; Luo, Shaoqing

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional phase II detoxification enzymes that catalyze the attachment of electrophilic substrates to glutathione and play an important role in protecting organisms against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The piGST cDNA was cloned and sequenced after rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) from the freshwater mussel Cristaria plicata. The comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with GSTs from other species showed that the enzymes belonged to the pi-class and the amino acids defining the binding sites of glutathione (G-site) and for xenobiotic substrates (H-site) were highly conserved. The Cp-piGST cDNA is 816 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a 615 nt open reading frame (ORF) encoding 205 amino acid residues, and has 19 nt of 5' untranslated region (UTR) and a 3' UTR of 182 nt including a tailing signal (AATAAA) and a poly (A) tail. The molecular weight of the predicted piGST is 23.4 kDa, with the calculated PI being 5.2. The mRNA transcript of Cp-piGST could be detected in all the examined tissues with highest expression level in hepatopancreas. The expression level of Cp-piGST in hepatopancreas and gill showed similar trend that were significantly increased after bacterial challenge compared to the control group at 12 h. Furthermore, the recombinant Cp-piGST with high enzyme activity was induced to be expressed as a soluble form by IPTG at 20°C for 8 h, and then was purified by using the native Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. The specific activity of the purified soluble Cp-piGST enzyme into pET30 was 2.396 μmol/min/mg, and which into pET32 was 1.706 μmol/min/mg. The recombinant Cp-piGST had a maximum activity at approximately pH 8.0, and its optimum temperature was 37°C. The recombinant Cp-piGST enzyme activity became lower gradually with the denaturant concentration increasing.

  20. Mammalian class Sigma glutathione S-transferases: catalytic properties and tissue-specific expression of human and rat GSH-dependent prostaglandin D2 synthases.

    PubMed Central

    Jowsey, I R; Thomson, A M; Flanagan, J U; Murdock, P R; Moore, G B; Meyer, D J; Murphy, G J; Smith, S A; Hayes, J D

    2001-01-01

    GSH-dependent prostaglandin D(2) synthase (PGDS) enzymes represent the only vertebrate members of class Sigma glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) identified to date. Complementary DNA clones encoding the orthologous human and rat GSH-dependent PGDS (hPGDS and rPGDS, respectively) have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins isolated by affinity chromatography. The purified enzymes were both shown to catalyse specifically the isomerization of prostaglandin (PG) H(2) to PGD(2). Each transferase also exhibited GSH-conjugating and GSH-peroxidase activities. The ability of hPGDS to catalyse the conjugation of aryl halides and isothiocyanates with GSH was found to be less than that of the rat enzyme. Whilst there is no difference between the enzymes with respect to their K(m) values for 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, marked differences were found to exist with respect to their K(m) for GSH (8 mM versus 0.3 mM for hPGDS and rPGDS, respectively). Using molecular modelling techniques, amino acid substitutions have been identified in the N-terminal domain of these enzymes that lie outside the proposed GSH-binding site, which may explain these catalytic differences. The tissue-specific expression of PGDS also varies significantly between human and rat; amongst the tissues examined, variation in expression between the two species was most apparent in spleen and bone marrow. Differences in catalytic properties and tissue-specific expression of hPGDS and rPGDS appears to reflect distinct physiological roles for class Sigma GST between species. The evolution of divergent functions for the hPGDS and rPGDS is discussed in the context of the orthologous enzyme from chicken. PMID:11672424

  1. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  2. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST.

  3. Riboswitch control of induction of aminoglycoside resistance acetyl and adenyl-transferases

    PubMed Central

    He, Weizhi; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jun; Jia, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Wenxia; Jiang, Hengyi; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair IH

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by human pathogens poses a significant threat to public health. The mechanisms that control the proliferation and expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are a historically important class of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. Aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug or enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or through the overexpression of efflux pumps. In our recent paper, we reported that expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes encoding the aminoglycoside acetyl transferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (AAD) enzymes was controlled by an aminoglycoside-sensing riboswitch RNA. This riboswitch is embedded in the leader RNA of the aac/aad genes and is associated with the integron cassette system. The leader RNA can sense and bind specific aminoglycosides such that the binding causes a structural transition in the leader RNA, which leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. Specific aminoglycosides induce reporter gene expression mediated by the leader RNA. Aminoglycoside RNA binding was measured directly and, aminoglycoside-induced changes in RNA structure monitored by chemical probing. UV cross-linking and mutational analysis identified potential aminoglycoside binding sites on the RNA. PMID:23880830

  4. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Luke A; Durrant, Benjamin P; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2015-03-11

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3' ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164-N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes-for example by the binding of protein co-factors-may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3' termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  5. Identification of Glutathione S-Transferase Pi as a Protein Involved in Parkinson Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Bradner, Joshua; Bammler, Theo K.; Eaton, David L.; Zhang, JianPeng; Ye, ZuCheng; Wilson, Angela M.; Montine, Thomas J.; Pan, Catherine; Zhang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) typically affects the cortical regions during the later stages of disease, with neuronal loss, gliosis, and formation of diffuse cortical Lewy bodies in a significant portion of patients with dementia. To identify novel proteins involved in PD progression, we prepared synaptosomal fractions from the frontal cortices of pathologically verified PD patients at different stages along with age-matched controls. Protein expression profiles were compared using a robust quantitative proteomic technique. Approximately 100 proteins displayed significant differences in their relative abundances between PD patients at various stages and controls; three of these proteins were validated using independent techniques. One of the confirmed proteins, glutathione S-transferase Pi, was further investigated in cellular models of PD, demonstrating that its level was intimately associated with several critical cellular processes that are directly related to neurodegeneration in PD. These results have, for the first time, suggested that the levels of glutathione S-transferase Pi may play an important role in modulating the progression of PD. PMID:19498008

  6. Glucose-induced expression of MIP-1 genes requires O-GlcNAc transferase in monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chikanishi, Toshihiro; Fujiki, Ryoji; Hashiba, Waka; Sekine, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2010-04-16

    O-glycosylation has emerged as an important modification of nuclear proteins, and it appears to be involved in gene regulation. Recently, we have shown that one of the histone methyl transferases (MLL5) is activated through O-glycosylation by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT). Addition of this monosaccharide is essential for forming a functional complex. However, in spite of the abundance of OGT in the nucleus, the impact of nuclear O-glycosylation by OGT remains largely unclear. To address this issue, the present study was undertaken to test the impact of nuclear O-glycosylation in a monocytic cell line, THP-1. Using a cytokine array, MIP-1{alpha} and -1{beta} genes were found to be regulated by nuclear O-glycosylation. Biochemical purification of the OGT interactants from THP-1 revealed that OGT is an associating partner for distinct co-regulatory complexes. OGT recruitment and protein O-glycosylation were observed at the MIP-1{alpha} gene promoter; however, the known OGT partner (HCF-1) was absent when the MIP-1{alpha} gene promoter was not activated. From these findings, we suggest that OGT could be a co-regulatory subunit shared by functionally distinct complexes supporting epigenetic regulation.

  7. Miners compensated for pneumoconiosis and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans-Martin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of quartz-containing dust produces reversible inflammatory changes in lungs resulting in irreversible fibrotic changes termed pneumoconiosis. Due to the inflammatory process in the lungs, highly reactive substances are released that may be detoxified by glutathione S-transferases. Therefore, 90 hard coal miners with pneumoconiosis as a recognized occupational disease (in Germany: Berufskrankheit BK 4101) were genotyped for glutathione S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) according to standard methods. Furthermore, occupational exposure and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaire. Changes in a chest x-ray were classified according to ILO classification 2000. Of the investigated hard coal miners 43% were GSTM1 negative whereas 57% were GSTM1 positive. The arithmetic mean of the age at time of investigation was 74.2 yr (range: 42-87 yr). Seventy-four percent of the hard coal miners reported being ever smokers, while 26% denied smoking. All hard coal miners provided pneumoconiosis-related changes in the chest x-ray. The observed frequency of GSTM1 negative hard coal miners was not different from frequencies reported for general Caucasian populations and in agreement with findings reported for Chinese coal miners. In contrast, in a former study, 16 of 19 German hard coal miners (84%) with urinary bladder cancer displayed a GSTM1 negative genotype. The outcome of this study provides evidence that severely occupationally exposed Caucasian hard coal miners do not present an elevated level of GSTM1 negative individuals. PMID:22686319

  8. Characterisation of the Candida albicans Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt2 as a Potential Antifungal Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Dobb, Katharine S.; Kaye, Sarah J.; Beckmann, Nicola; Thain, John L.; Stateva, Lubomira; Birch, Mike; Oliver, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs acting via new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat the increasing numbers of severe fungal infections caused by pathogens such as Candida albicans. The phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Aspergillus fumigatus, encoded by the essential gene pptB, has previously been identified as a potential antifungal target. This study investigated the function of its orthologue in C. albicans, PPT2/C1_09480W by placing one allele under the control of the regulatable MET3 promoter, and deleting the remaining allele. The phenotypes of this conditional null mutant showed that, as in A. fumigatus, the gene PPT2 is essential for growth in C. albicans, thus fulfilling one aspect of an efficient antifungal target. The catalytic activity of Ppt2 as a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and the acyl carrier protein Acp1 as a substrate were demonstrated in a fluorescence transfer assay, using recombinant Ppt2 and Acp1 produced and purified from E.coli. A fluorescence polarisation assay amenable to high-throughput screening was also developed. Therefore we have identified Ppt2 as a broad-spectrum novel antifungal target and developed tools to identify inhibitors as potentially new antifungal compounds. PMID:26606674

  9. Structural and thermodynamic properties of kappa class glutathione transferase from Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Fouad, Dalia; Labrou, Nikolaos E; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Ismael, Mohamed A; Saeed, Hesham M; Ataya, Farid S

    2016-07-01

    The Arabian camel, Camelus dromedarius is naturally adapted to extreme desert climate and has evolved protective mechanisms to limit oxidative stress. The mitochondrial kappa class glutathione transferase enzyme is a member of GST supergene family that represents an important enzyme group in cellular Phase II detoxification machinery and is involved in the protection against oxidative stress and xenobiotics. In the present study, C. dromedarius kappa class glutathione transferase (CdGSTK1-1) was cloned, expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and its structural, thermodynamic and unfolding pathway was investigated. The results showed that CdGSTK1-1 has unique trimeric structure, exhibits low thermostability and a complex equilibrium unfolding profile. It unfolds through three folding states with formation of thinly populated intermediate species. The melting points (Tm) of the first unfolding transition was 40.3±0.2°C and Tm of the second unfolding transition was 49.1±0.1°C. The van't Hoff enthalpy of the first and second transition were 298.7±13.2 and 616.5±2.4kJ/mol, respectively. Moreover, intrinsic fluorescence and near-UV CD studies indicates that substrate binding does not leads to major conformational changes in CdGSTK1-1. PMID:27044344

  10. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Luke A.; Durrant, Benjamin P.; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J.; Gilbert, Robert J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3′ ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164–N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes—for example by the binding of protein co-factors—may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3′ termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  11. Functional Diversification of Fungal Glutathione Transferases from the Ure2p Class

    PubMed Central

    Thuillier, Anne; Ngadin, Andrew A.; Thion, Cécile; Billard, Patrick; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Gelhaye, Eric; Morel, Mélanie

    2011-01-01

    The glutathione-S-transferase (GST) proteins represent an extended family involved in detoxification processes. They are divided into various classes with high diversity in various organisms. The Ure2p class is especially expanded in saprophytic fungi compared to other fungi. This class is subdivided into two subclasses named Ure2pA and Ure2pB, which have rapidly diversified among fungal phyla. We have focused our analysis on Basidiomycetes and used Phanerochaete chrysosporium as a model to correlate the sequence diversity with the functional diversity of these glutathione transferases. The results show that among the nine isoforms found in P. chrysosporium, two belonging to Ure2pA subclass are exclusively expressed at the transcriptional level in presence of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Moreover, we have highlighted differential catalytic activities and substrate specificities between Ure2pA and Ure2pB isoforms. This diversity of sequence and function suggests that fungal Ure2p sequences have evolved rapidly in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22164343

  12. SecM-Stalled Ribosomes Adopt an Altered Geometry at the Peptidyl Transferase Center

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Shashi; Hoffmann, Thomas; Seidelt, Birgit; Frauenfeld, Jens; Mielke, Thorsten; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N.; Beckmann, Roland

    2011-01-01

    As nascent polypeptide chains are synthesized, they pass through a tunnel in the large ribosomal subunit. Interaction between specific nascent chains and the ribosomal tunnel is used to induce translational stalling for the regulation of gene expression. One well-characterized example is the Escherichia coli SecM (secretion monitor) gene product, which induces stalling to up-regulate translation initiation of the downstream secA gene, which is needed for protein export. Although many of the key components of SecM and the ribosomal tunnel have been identified, understanding of the mechanism by which the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome is inactivated has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a SecM-stalled ribosome nascent chain complex at 5.6 Å. While no cascade of rRNA conformational changes is evident, this structure reveals the direct interaction between critical residues of SecM and the ribosomal tunnel. Moreover, a shift in the position of the tRNA–nascent peptide linkage of the SecM-tRNA provides a rationale for peptidyl transferase center silencing, conditional on the simultaneous presence of a Pro-tRNAPro in the ribosomal A-site. These results suggest a distinct allosteric mechanism of regulating translational elongation by the SecM stalling peptide. PMID:21267063

  13. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  14. Nucleoside Diphosphate Sugar-Starch Glucosyl Transferase Activity of wx Starch Granules 1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Chourey, Prem S.; Chang, Ming Tu

    1978-01-01

    Starch granule preparations from the endosperm tissue of all waxy maize (Zea mays L.) mutants tested have low and approximately equal capability to incorporate glucose from adenosine diphosphate glucose into starch. As the substrate concentration is reduced, however, the activity of waxy preparations relative to nonmutant increases until, at the lowest substrate concentration utilized (0.1 μM), the activity of the waxy preparations is nearly equal to that of the nonmutant preparation. The apparent Km (adenosine diphosphate glucose) for starch granule preparations from wx-C/wx-C/wx-C endosperms was 7.1 × 10−5 M, which is compared to 3 × 10−3 M for preparations from nonwaxy endosperms. Starch granule preparations from three other waxy mutants of independent mutational origin have levels of enzymic activity approximately equal to wx-C at a given substrate concentration giving rise to similar apparent Km estimates. We conclude that there is in maize endosperm starch granules a second starch granule-bound glycosyl transferase, whose presence is revealed when mutation eliminates activity of the more active glucosyl transferase catalyzing the same reaction. PMID:16660522

  15. Context-specific inhibition of translation by ribosomal antibiotics targeting the peptidyl transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Marks, James; Kannan, Krishna; Roncase, Emily J.; Klepacki, Dorota; Kefi, Amira; Orelle, Cédric; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The first broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol and one of the newest clinically important antibacterials, linezolid, inhibit protein synthesis by targeting the peptidyl transferase center of the bacterial ribosome. Because antibiotic binding should prevent the placement of aminoacyl-tRNA in the catalytic site, it is commonly assumed that these drugs are universal inhibitors of peptidyl transfer and should readily block the formation of every peptide bond. However, our in vitro experiments showed that chloramphenicol and linezolid stall ribosomes at specific mRNA locations. Treatment of bacterial cells with high concentrations of these antibiotics leads to preferential arrest of translation at defined sites, resulting in redistribution of the ribosomes on mRNA. Antibiotic-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis is most efficient when the nascent peptide in the ribosome carries an alanine residue and, to a lesser extent, serine or threonine in its penultimate position. In contrast, the inhibitory action of the drugs is counteracted by glycine when it is either at the nascent-chain C terminus or at the incoming aminoacyl-tRNA. The context-specific action of chloramphenicol illuminates the operation of the mechanism of inducible resistance that relies on programmed drug-induced translation arrest. In addition, our findings expose the functional interplay between the nascent chain and the peptidyl transferase center. PMID:27791002

  16. High yield production of myristoylated Arf6 small GTPase by recombinant N-myristoyl transferase

    PubMed Central

    Padovani, Dominique; Zeghouf, Mahel; Traverso, José A.; Giglione, Carmela; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Arf family (Arf GTPases) interact with multiple cellular partners and with membranes to regulate intracellular traffic and organelle structure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms requires in vitro biochemical assays to test for regulations and functions. Such assays should use proteins in their cellular form, which carry a myristoyl lipid attached in N-terminus. N-myristoylation of recombinant Arf GTPases can be achieved by co-expression in E. coli with a eukaryotic N-myristoyl transferase. However, purifying myristoylated Arf GTPases is difficult and has a poor overall yield. Here we show that human Arf6 can be N-myristoylated in vitro by recombinant N-myristoyl transferases from different eukaryotic species. The catalytic efficiency depended strongly on the guanine nucleotide state and was highest for Arf6-GTP. Large-scale production of highly pure N-myristoylated Arf6 could be achieved, which was fully functional for liposome-binding and EFA6-stimulated nucleotide exchange assays. This establishes in vitro myristoylation as a novel and simple method that could be used to produce other myristoylated Arf and Arf-like GTPases for biochemical assays. PMID:23319116

  17. Predicted binding of certain antifilarial compounds with glutathione-S-transferase of human Filariids

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohd; Baig, Mohd Hassan; Bajpai, Preeti; Srivastava, Ashwini Kumar; Ahmad, Khurshid; Mustafa, Huma

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase is a major phase-II detoxification enzyme in parasitic helminthes. Previous research highlights the importance of GSTs in the establishment of chronic infections in cytotoxic microenvironments. Filarial nematodes depend on these detoxification enzymes for their survival in the host. GST plays an important role in filariasis and other diseases. GST from W.bancrofti and B.malayi are very much different from human GST. This structural difference makes GST potential chemotherapeutic targets for antifilarial treatment. In this study we have checked the efficacy of some well known antifilarial compounds against GST from B.malayi and W.bancrofti. The structure of BmGST was modeled using modeller9v10 and was submitted to PMDB. Molecular docking study reveals arbindazole to be the most potent compounds against GST from both the filarial parasites. Role of some residues playing important role in the binding of compounds within the active site of GST has also been revealed in the present study. The BmGST and WbGST structural information and docking studies could aid in screening new antifilarials or selective inhibitors for chemotherapy against filariasis. Abbreviations GST - Glutathione-S-transferase, Bm - Brugia malayi, Wb - Wuchereria bancrofti. PMID:23516334

  18. Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyl Transferase 2: A Promising Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chunhui; Qi, Jia; Deng, Quanwen; Chen, Rihong; Zhai, Duanyang; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers all over the world. It is essential to search for more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods for CRC. Abnormal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has been considered as a characteristic of cancer cells. In this study, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) as well as p53-mediated cancer signaling pathways were investigated in patients with colorectal cancer. The CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from 95 untreated colorectal cancer patients and were stained for expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2) and p53. The survival rate was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted as well. Our data demonstrated that expression of NMNAT2 and p53 was significantly higher in CRC tissues, while NMNAT2 expression is in correlation with the invasive depth of tumors and TNM stage. Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of NMNAT2 and the expression of p53. However, NMNAT2 expression was not a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, our results indicated that NMNAT2 might participate in tumorigenesis of CRC in a p53-dependent manner and NMNAT2 expression might be a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27218101

  19. Conductimetric assays for the hydrolase and transferase activities of phospholipase D enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mezna, M; Lawrence, A J

    1994-05-01

    Measurement of solution electrical conductance (conductimetry) is a simple direct assay method for the protogenic, hydrolytic reactions catalyzed by all phospholipase enzymes. The technique is especially suitable for assay of phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes where cleavage of zwitterionic substrates reinforces the pH dependent conductance change and allows the method to be used over a much wider pH range than the equivalent titrimetric assay. The ability to detect zwitterion cleavage enables the method to assay reactions in which phospholipase D transfers neutral, or anionic, alcohol species to the zwitterionic substrates phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The method can follow the sequential attack by different phospholipases and provides a simple technique for investigating the effect of substrate structure on susceptibility to various phospholipase enzymes. The results confirm that PLD from Streptomyces chromofuscus can attack lysophospholipids, but cannot transfer primary alcohols to the phosphatidyl residue, while the PLD from savoy cabbage is an efficient transferase, but cannot attack lysophospholipids. The data suggest that the bacterial PLD fails to act as a transferase because it hydrolyzes the transphosphatidylation products. Some phosphatidyl alcohols are more highly susceptible to PLA2 attack than the parent phosphatidyl choline derivatives.

  20. Corneal aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activity after excimer laser keratectomy in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bilgihan, K.; Bilgihan, A.; Turkozkan, N.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The free radical balance of the eye may be changed by excimer laser keratectomy. Previous studies have demonstrated that excimer laser keratectomy increases the corneal temperature, decreases the superoxide dismutase activity of the aqueous, and induces lipid peroxidation in the superficial corneal stroma. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are known to play an important role in corneal metabolism, particularly in detoxification of aldehydes, which are generated from free radical reactions.
METHODS—In three groups of guinea pigs mechanical corneal de-epithelialisation was performed in group I, superficial corneal photoablation in group II, and deep corneal photoablation in group III, and the corneal ALDH and GST activities measured after 48 hours.
RESULTS—The mean ALDH and GST activities of group I and II showed no differences compared with the controls (p>0.05). The corneal ALDH activities were found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05) and GST activities increased (p<0.05) in group III.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that excimer laser treatment of high myopia may change the ALDH and GST activities, metabolism, and free radical balance of the cornea.

 Keywords: excimer laser keratectomy; aldehyde dehydrogenase; glutathione S-transferase PMID:9602629

  1. Substrate profiling of glutathione S-transferase with engineered enzymes and matched glutathione analogues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shan; Zhang, Lei; Adilijiang, Gulishana; Liu, Jieyuan; Luo, Minkui; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-07-01

    The identification of specific substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is important for understanding drug metabolism. A method termed bioorthogonal identification of GST substrates (BIGS) was developed, in which a reduced glutathione (GSH) analogue was developed for recognition by a rationally engineered GST to label the substrates of the corresponding native GST. A K44G-W40A-R41A mutant (GST-KWR) of the mu-class glutathione S-transferases GSTM1 was shown to be active with a clickable GSH analogue (GSH-R1) as the cosubstrate. The GSH-R1 conjugation products can react with an azido-based biotin probe for ready enrichment and MS identification. Proof-of-principle studies were carried to detect the products of GSH-R1 conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and dopamine quinone. The BIGS technology was then used to identify GSTM1 substrates in the Chinese herbal medicine Ganmaocongji.

  2. Evolutionary divergence of Ure2pA glutathione transferases in wood degrading fungi.

    PubMed

    Roret, Thomas; Thuillier, Anne; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Didierjean, Claude; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular systems of detoxification are crucial for the survival of wood degrading fungi. Within these systems, glutathione transferases could play a major role since this family of enzymes is specifically extended in lignolytic fungi. In particular the Ure2p class represents one third of the total GST number in Phanerochaete chrysosporium. These proteins have been phylogenetically split into two subclasses called Ure2pA and Ure2pB. Ure2pB can be classified as Nu GSTs because of shared structural and functional features with previously characterized bacterial isoforms. Ure2pA can rather be qualified as Nu-like GSTs since they exhibit a number of differences. Ure2pA possess a classical transferase activity, a more divergent catalytic site and a higher structural flexibility for some of them, compared to Nu GSTs. The characterization of four members of this Ure2pA subclass (PcUre2pA4, PcUre2pA5, PcUre2pA6 and PcUre2pA8) revealed specific functional and structural features, suggesting that these enzymes have rapidly evolved and differentiated, probably to adapt to the complex chemical environment associated with wood decomposition.

  3. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Luke A; Durrant, Benjamin P; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2015-03-11

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3' ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164-N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes-for example by the binding of protein co-factors-may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3' termini of RNA molecules.

  4. Structure of Human O-GlcNAc Transferase and its Complex with a Peptide Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    M Lazarus; Y Nam; J Jiang; P Sliz; S Walker

    2011-12-31

    The essential mammalian enzyme O-linked {beta}-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (O-GlcNAc transferase, here OGT) couples metabolic status to the regulation of a wide variety of cellular signalling pathways by acting as a nutrient sensor. OGT catalyses the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to serines and threonines of cytoplasmic, nuclear and mitochondrial proteins, including numerous transcription factors, tumour suppressors, kinases, phosphatases and histone-modifying proteins. Aberrant glycosylation by OGT has been linked to insulin resistance, diabetic complications, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Despite the importance of OGT, the details of how it recognizes and glycosylates its protein substrates are largely unknown. We report here two crystal structures of human OGT, as a binary complex with UDP (2.8 {angstrom} resolution) and as a ternary complex with UDP and a peptide substrate (1.95 {angstrom}). The structures provide clues to the enzyme mechanism, show how OGT recognizes target peptide sequences, and reveal the fold of the unique domain between the two halves of the catalytic region. This information will accelerate the rational design of biological experiments to investigate OGT's functions; it will also help the design of inhibitors for use as cellular probes and help to assess its potential as a therapeutic target.

  5. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  6. Purification and partial characterization of glutathione transferase from the teleost Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Liang, Li; Wei, Tao; Zhang, Daming; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze the transfer of glutathione to a variety of xenobiotic and toxic endogenous compounds. GSTs are phase II biotransformation enzymes and are proposed as biomarkers of environmental pollution. In this study, a cytosolic glutathione transferase (maGST) was purified from liver of the freshwater fish Monopterus albus by affinity chromatography. The maGST appeared to be a homodimer composed of two subunits each with a molecular weight of 26 kDa. This maGST showed high activity towards the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). Kinetic analysis with CDNB as substrate revealed a K(m) of 0.28 mM and V(max) of 15.68 micromol/min per mg of protein. It had maximum activity in the pH range 7.0-7.5, a broad optimum T(m) range of 30 degrees C-55 degrees C, and a high thermal stability with 77% of its initial activity at 45 degrees C. This high thermal stability of maGST could be related to the physiological adaptation of M. albus to high temperatures in tropical and subtropical environments.

  7. Miners compensated for pneumoconiosis and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans-Martin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of quartz-containing dust produces reversible inflammatory changes in lungs resulting in irreversible fibrotic changes termed pneumoconiosis. Due to the inflammatory process in the lungs, highly reactive substances are released that may be detoxified by glutathione S-transferases. Therefore, 90 hard coal miners with pneumoconiosis as a recognized occupational disease (in Germany: Berufskrankheit BK 4101) were genotyped for glutathione S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) according to standard methods. Furthermore, occupational exposure and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaire. Changes in a chest x-ray were classified according to ILO classification 2000. Of the investigated hard coal miners 43% were GSTM1 negative whereas 57% were GSTM1 positive. The arithmetic mean of the age at time of investigation was 74.2 yr (range: 42-87 yr). Seventy-four percent of the hard coal miners reported being ever smokers, while 26% denied smoking. All hard coal miners provided pneumoconiosis-related changes in the chest x-ray. The observed frequency of GSTM1 negative hard coal miners was not different from frequencies reported for general Caucasian populations and in agreement with findings reported for Chinese coal miners. In contrast, in a former study, 16 of 19 German hard coal miners (84%) with urinary bladder cancer displayed a GSTM1 negative genotype. The outcome of this study provides evidence that severely occupationally exposed Caucasian hard coal miners do not present an elevated level of GSTM1 negative individuals.

  8. Indication for joint replacement and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Klein, Torsten; Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In most patients with osteoarthritis (OA), therapy-resistant pain is the indication for hip or knee replacement. Glutathione S-transferases, particularly glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), are involved in metabolism of highly reactive metabolites that may be generated by inflammatory processes. In total, 148 patients with indication for hip or knee replacement and 129 patients of the same hospital without indication for joint replacement were genotyped for GSTM1 and GSTT1 and interviewed by a newly developed questionnaire for occupational and nonoccupational risk factors of hip and/or knee osteoarthritis. Mean age was 70.9 yr in OA cases and 67.4 yr in controls. The frequency of GSTM1 negative in the OA case group was (45%) in the lower range compared to values in Caucasian general population (approximately 50%), whereas the frequency in the controls was normal (51%). The frequency of GSTT1 negative genotype in OA cases and controls was normal. The normal distribution of the GSTM1 negative genotype in patients with indication for hip or knee replacement indicates that the role GSTM1 in these patients is different from that in other aseptic inflammatory diseases such as ozone-related inflammatory reactions of the respiratory tract.

  9. Structural Determinants Allowing Transferase Activity in SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2, Classified as a Family I Glycosyl Hydrolase*

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Rebecca L.; Wang, Kun; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Benning, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2 (SFR2) is classified as a family I glycosyl hydrolase but has recently been shown to have galactosyltransferase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Natural occurrences of apparent glycosyl hydrolases acting as transferases are interesting from a biocatalysis standpoint, and knowledge about the interconversion can assist in engineering SFR2 in crop plants to resist freezing. To understand how SFR2 evolved into a transferase, the relationship between its structure and function are investigated by activity assay, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis. SFR2 has no detectable hydrolase activity, although its catalytic site is highly conserved with that of family 1 glycosyl hydrolases. Three regions disparate from glycosyl hydrolases are identified as required for transferase activity as follows: a loop insertion, the C-terminal peptide, and a hydrophobic patch adjacent to the catalytic site. Rationales for the effects of these regions on the SFR2 mechanism are discussed. PMID:25100720

  10. Differential Activation of Diverse Glutathione Transferases of Clonorchis sinensis in Response to the Host Bile and Oxidative Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An; Ahn, Do-Whan; Lee, Eung-Goo; Kim, Seon-Hee; Cai, Guo-Bin; Kang, Insug; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kong, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis causes chronic cumulative infections in the human hepatobiliary tract and is intimately associated with cholangiocarcinoma. Approximately 35 million people are infected and 600 million people are at risk of infections worldwide. C. sinensis excretory-secretory products (ESP) constitute the first-line effector system affecting the host-parasite interrelationship by interacting with bile fluids and ductal epithelium. However, the secretory behavior of C. sinensis in an environment close to natural host conditions is unclear. C. sinensis differs from Fasciola hepatica in migration to, and maturation in, the hepatic bile duct, implying that protein profile of the ESP of these two trematodes might be different from each other. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted systemic approaches to analyze the C. sinensis ESP proteome and the biological reactivity of C. sinensis glutathione transferases (GSTs), such as global expression patterns and induction profiles under oxidative stress and host bile. When we observed ex host excretion behavior of C. sinensis in the presence of 10% host bile, the global proteome pattern was not significantly altered, but the amount of secretory proteins was increased by approximately 3.5-fold. Bioactive molecules secreted by C. sinensis revealed universal/unique features in relation to its intraluminal hydrophobic residing niche. A total of 38 protein spots identified abundantly included enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (11 spots, 28.9%) and diverse-classes of glutathione transferases (GSTs; 10 spots, 26.3%). Cathepsin L/F (four spots, 10.5%) and transporter molecules (three spots, 7.9%) were also recognized. The universal secretory proteins found in other parasites, such as several enzymes involved in glucose metabolism and oxygen transporters, were commonly detected. C. sinensis secreted less cysteine proteases and fatty acid binding proteins compared to other tissue-invading or intravascular

  11. nolO and noeI (HsnIII) of Rhizobium sp. NGR234 are involved in 3-O-carbamoylation and 2-O-methylation of Nod factors.

    PubMed

    Jabbouri, S; Relić, B; Hanin, M; Kamalaprija, P; Burger, U; Promé, D; Promé, J C; Broughton, W J

    1998-05-15

    Loci unique to specific rhizobia direct the adjunction of special groups to the core lipo-oligosaccharide Nod factors. Host-specificity of nodulation (Hsn) genes are thus essential for interaction with certain legumes. Rhizobium sp. NGR234, which can nodulate >110 genera of legumes, possesses three hsn loci and secretes a large family of Nod factors carrying specific substituents. Among them are 3-O (or 4-O)- and 6-O-carbamoyl groups, an N-methyl group, and a 2-O-methylfucose residue which may bear either 3-O-sulfate or 4-O (and 3-O)-acetyl substituents. The hsnIII locus comprises a nod box promoter followed by the genes nodABCIJnolOnoeI. Complementation and mutation analyses show that the disruption of any one of nodIJ, nolO, or noeI has no effect on nodulation. Conjugation of nolO into Rhizobium fredii extends the host range of the recipient to the non-hosts Calopogonium caeruleum and Lablab purpureus, however. Chemical analyses of the Nod factors produced by the NodI, NolO, and NoeI mutants show that the nolO and noeI gene products are required for 3 (or 4)-O-carbamoylation of the nonreducing terminus and for 2-O-methylation of the fucosyl group, respectively. Confirmation that NolO is a carbamoyltransferase was obtained from analysis of the Nod factors produced by R. fredii containing nolO; all are carbamoylated at O-3 (or O-4) on the nonreducing terminus. Since mutation of both nolO and nodU fails to completely abolish production of monocarbamoylated NodNGR factors, it is clear that a third carbamoyltransferase must exist. Nevertheless, the specificities of the two known enzymes are clearly different. NodU is only able to transfer carbamate to O-6 while NolO is specific for O-3 (or O-4) of NodNGR factors. PMID:9575146

  12. Decreased sensitivity to 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-glycerophosphocholine in MCF-7 cells adapted for serum-free growth correlates with constitutive association of Raf-1 with cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Samadder, P; Arthur, G

    1999-10-01

    We have previously shown that inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation by 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-glycerophosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3) is linked to a drug-induced decrease in membrane Raf-1 levels and the subsequent inhibition of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in response to growth factor stimulation. We now report that adaptation of MCF-7 cells for growth in a serum-free formulation results in decreased sensitivity to growth inhibition by ET-18-OCH3. The decrease in ET-18-OCH3 sensitivity occurred progressively during the adaptation process and correlated with the presence of increasing amounts of inactive Raf-1 that stably associated with MCF-7 cell membranes. ET-18-OCH3 sensitivity could be restored by growing the adapted cells in serum-containing medium, which resulted in the loss of membrane-associated Raf-1. In human normal mammary epithelial cells, which are insensitive to ET-18-OCH3, Raf-1 was also associated with membranes in quiescent cells. In both cell types, incubation with ET-18-OCH3 had no effect on the membrane-Raf-1 levels, suggesting that ET-18-OCH3-induced reduction of Raf-1 levels in growth factor-stimulated MCF-7 cells is due to inhibition of Raf translocation. The activation and termination of the MAP kinase pathway in response to growth factors in the adapted MCF-7 cells and HNME cells occurred without changes to membrane Raf-1 levels. Because membrane translocation is not required to activate Raf in these cells, inhibition of Raf translocation by ET-18-OCH3 subsequent to cell stimulation has no effect on the activation of the membrane-bound Raf and, consequently, the activation of the MAP kinase pathway. The ability of the cells to activate the MAP kinase pathway in the presence of the drugs enables them to resist the growth-inhibitory effects of the drug, leading to the observed ET-18-OCH3 insensitivity of the cells.

  13. Biochemical Studies of Mycobacterial Fatty Acid Methyltransferase: A Catalyst for the Enzymatic Production of Biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Petronikolou, Nektaria; Nair, Satish K

    2015-11-19

    Transesterification of fatty acids yields the essential component of biodiesel, but current processes are cost-prohibitive and generate waste. Recent efforts make use of biocatalysts that are effective in diverting products from primary metabolism to yield fatty acid methyl esters in bacteria. These biotransformations require the fatty acid O-methyltransferase (FAMT) from Mycobacterium marinum (MmFAMT). Although this activity was first reported in the literature in 1970, the FAMTs have yet to be biochemically characterized. Here, we describe several crystal structures of MmFAMT, which highlight an unexpected structural conservation with methyltransferases that are involved in plant natural product metabolism. The determinants for ligand recognition are analyzed by kinetic analysis of structure-based active-site variants. These studies reveal how an architectural fold employed in plant natural product biosynthesis is used in bacterial fatty acid O-methylation.

  14. Biochemical Studies of Mycobacterial Fatty Acid Methyltransferase: A Catalyst for the Enzymatic Production of Biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Petronikolou, Nektaria; Nair, Satish K

    2015-11-19

    Transesterification of fatty acids yields the essential component of biodiesel, but current processes are cost-prohibitive and generate waste. Recent efforts make use of biocatalysts that are effective in diverting products from primary metabolism to yield fatty acid methyl esters in bacteria. These biotransformations require the fatty acid O-methyltransferase (FAMT) from Mycobacterium marinum (MmFAMT). Although this activity was first reported in the literature in 1970, the FAMTs have yet to be biochemically characterized. Here, we describe several crystal structures of MmFAMT, which highlight an unexpected structural conservation with methyltransferases that are involved in plant natural product metabolism. The determinants for ligand recognition are analyzed by kinetic analysis of structure-based active-site variants. These studies reveal how an architectural fold employed in plant natural product biosynthesis is used in bacterial fatty acid O-methylation. PMID:26526103

  15. Octopus S-crystallins with endogenous glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity: sequence comparison and evolutionary relationships with authentic GST enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, S H; Yu, C W; Lin, C W; Pan, F M; Lu, S F; Lee, H J; Chang, G G

    1995-01-01

    S-Crystallin is a major protein present in the lenses of cephalopods (octopus and squid). To facilitate the cloning of this crystallin gene, cDNA was constructed from the poly(A)+ mRNA of octopus lenses, and amplified by PCR for nucleotide sequencing. Sequencing of 10 of 15 positive clones coding for this crystallin revealed three distinct S-crystallin isoforms with 61-64% identity in nucleotide sequences and 42-58% similarity in amino acid sequences when compared with homologous crystallins in squid lenses. These charge-isomeric crystallins also show between 26 and 33% amino acid sequence identity to four major classes of glutathione S-transferase (GST), a major detoxification enzyme present in most mammalian tissues. For further analysis, expression of one of the S-crystallin cDNAs was carried out in the bacterial expression system pQE-30, and the S-crystallin protein produced in Escherichia coli was purified to homogeneity to determine the enzymic properties. We found that the expressed octopus S-crystallin possessed much lower GST activity than the authentic GSTs from other tissues. Sequence comparison and construction of phylogenetic trees for S-crystallins from squid and octopus lenses and various classes of GSTs revealed that S-crystallins represent a multigene family which is structurally related to Alpha-class GSTs and probably derived from the ancestral GST by gene duplication and subsequent multiple mutational substitutions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7639695

  16. Isolation of a cDNA encoding a glutathione S-transferase (GST) class-pi from the bovine ocular ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hernando, N; Martín-Alonso, J M; Ghosh, S; Coca-Prados, M

    1992-11-01

    We have used a polyclonal antiserum to bovine ciliary epithelium, a secretory tissue involved in the formation of aqueous humor, to immunoscreen a directional lambda gt11 Sfi-Not cDNA expression library prepared from bovine ciliary epithelium poly(A)+ RNA. After immunoscreening 6 x 10(5) independent clones, 41 cDNA clones positive for ciliary epithelium were isolated and characterized. About one-third of the positive cDNA clones were found to be identical and to encode a glutathione S-transferase (GST) class-pi. The largest bovine GST cDNA clone isolated, pCN11, contains an open reading frame of 630 bases, encoding a protein of 210 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 23,335 Da. The corresponding amino acid sequence showed an overall identity of 85.6% with the human, and 85.2% with the rat and mouse GST class-pi. Northern analysis of bovine ocular tissues revealed that the GST class-pi gene encodes a 0.8-kilobase mRNA which is expressed most abundantly in cornea, ciliary epithelium and retina, and in lower levels in iris and lens. Cell lines derived from non-pigmented or pigmented bovine ciliary epithelium also showed high levels of GST-pi mRNA expression. These results provide additional evidence for differential gene expression of GST class-pi mRNA in various areas of the bovine eye.

  17. Treatment of Bile Acid Amidation Defects with Glycocholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heubi, James E.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Jha, Pinky; Buckley, Donna; Zhang, Wujuan; Rosenthal, Philip; Potter, Carol; Horslen, Simon; Suskind, David

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid amidation defects were predicted to present with fat/fat soluble vitamin malabsorption with minimal cholestasis. We identified and treated 5 patients (1 male/4 females) from 4 families with defective bile acid amidation due to a genetically confirmed deficiency in bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyl transferase (BAAT) with the conjugated bile acid, glycocholic acid (GCA). Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry analysis of urine and bile at baseline revealed predominantly unconjugated cholic acid and absence of the usual glycine and taurine conjugated primary bile acids. Treatment with 15 mg/kg GCA resulted in total duodenal bile acid concentrations of 23.3 ± 19.1 mmol/L (mean ± SD) and 63.5 ± 4.0% of the bile acids were secreted in bile in the conjugated form of which GCA represented 59.6 ± 9.3% of the total biliary bile acids. Unconjugated cholic acid continued to be present in high concentrations in bile because of partial intestinal deconjugation of orally administered GCA. Serum total bile acid concentrations did not significantly differ between pretreatment and post-treatment samples and serum contained predominantly unconjugated cholic acid. These findings confirmed efficient intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction and biliary secretion of the administered GCA. Oral tolerance tests for vitamin D2 (1000 IU vitamin D2/kg) and tocopherol (100 IU/kg tocopherol acetate) demonstrated improvement in fat-soluble vitamin absorption after GCA treatment. Growth improved in 3/3 growth-delayed prepubertal patients. Conclusions: Oral glycocholic acid therapy is safe and effective in improving growth and fat-soluble vitamin absorption in children and adolescents with inborn errors of bile acid metabolism due to amidation defects. PMID:25163551

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of glutathione transferases from cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, Susanne C.; Tang, Julian; Hansen, Guido; Gorman, Michael A.; Wiktelius, Eric; Stenberg, Gun; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-05-08

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a group of multifunctional enzymes that are found in animals, plants and microorganisms. Their primary function is to remove toxins derived from exogenous sources or the products of metabolism from the cell. Mammalian GSTs have been extensively studied, in contrast to bacterial GSTs which have received relatively scant attention. A new class of GSTs called Chi has recently been identified in cyanobacteria. Chi GSTs exhibit a high glutathionylation activity towards isothiocyanates, compounds that are normally found in plants. Here, the crystallization of two GSTs are presented: TeGST produced by Thermosynechococcus elongates BP-1 and SeGST from Synechococcus elongates PCC 6301. Both enzymes formed crystals that diffracted to high resolution and appeared to be suitable for further X-ray diffraction studies. The structures of these GSTs may shed further light on the evolution of GST catalytic activity and in particular why these enzymes possess catalytic activity towards plant antimicrobial compounds.

  19. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs. PMID:26884677

  20. Review: Human guanidinoacetate n-methyl transferase (GAMT) deficiency: A treatable inborn error of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-11-01

    The creatine biosynthetic pathway is essential for cellular phosphate associated energy production and storage, particularly in tissues having higher metabolic demands. Guanidinoacetate N-Methyl transferase (GAMT) is an important enzyme in creatine endogenous biosynthetic pathway, with highest expression in liver and kidney. GAMT deficiency is an inherited autosomal recessive trait that was the first among creatine deficiency syndrome to be reported in 1994 having characteristic features of no comprehensible speech development, severe mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, involuntary movements and seizures that partly cannot be treated with anti-epileptic drugs. Due to problematic endogenous creatine biosynthesis, systemic depletion of creatine/phosphocreatine and accumulation of guanidinoacetate takes place that are the diagnostic features of this disease. Dietary creatine supplementation alone or along with arginine restriction has been reported to be beneficial for all treated patients, although to various extent. However, none of the GAMT deficient patient has been reported to return to complete normal developmental level. PMID:26639513

  1. Irreversible Inhibition of Glutathione S-Transferase by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate (PEITC), a Dietary Cancer Chemopreventive Phytochemical

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Vandana; Dyba, Marzena A.; Holland, Ryan J.; Liang, Yu-He; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates abundant as glucosinolate precursors in many edible cruciferous vegetables are effective for prevention of cancer in chemically-induced and transgenic rodent models. Some of these agents, including phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), have already advanced to clinical investigations. The primary route of isothiocyanate metabolism is its conjugation with glutathione (GSH), a reaction catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST). The pi class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTP1) is much more effective than the alpha class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTA1) in catalyzing the conjugation. Here, we report the crystal structures of hGSTP1 and hGSTA1 each in complex with the GSH adduct of PEITC. We find that PEITC also covalently modifies the cysteine side chains of GST, which irreversibly inhibits enzymatic activity. PMID:27684484

  2. Structural basis for the interaction of antibiotics with peptidyl transferase center in eubacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schlunzen, Frank; Zarivach, Raz; Harms, Jörg; Bashan, Anat; Tocilj, Ante; Albrecht, Renate; Yonath, Ada; Franceschi, Francois

    2009-10-07

    Ribosomes, the site of protein synthesis, are a major target for natural and synthetic antibiotics. Detailed knowledge of antibiotic binding sites is central to understanding the mechanisms of drug action. Conversely, drugs are excellent tools for studying the ribosome function. To elucidate the structural basis of ribosome-antibiotic interactions, we determined the high-resolution X-ray structures of the 50S ribosomal subunit of the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, complexed with the clinically relevant antibiotics chloramphenicol, clindamycin and the three macrolides erythromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin. We found that antibiotic binding sites are composed exclusively of segments of 23S ribosomal RNA at the peptidyl transferase cavity and do not involve any interaction of the drugs with ribosomal proteins. Here we report the details of antibiotic interactions with the components of their binding sites. Our results also show the importance of putative Mg{sup +2} ions for the binding of some drugs. This structural analysis should facilitate rational drug design.

  3. O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitors: current tools and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Trapannone, Riccardo; Rafie, Karim; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2016-02-01

    The O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) post-translational modification (O-GlcNAcylation) is the dynamic and reversible attachment of N-acetylglucosamine to serine and threonine residues of nucleocytoplasmic target proteins. It is abundant in metazoa, involving hundreds of proteins linked to a plethora of biological functions with implications in human diseases. The process is catalysed by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that add and remove sugar moieties respectively. OGT knockout is embryonic lethal in a range of animal models, hampering the study of the biological role of O-GlcNAc and the dissection of catalytic compared with non-catalytic roles of OGT. Therefore, selective and potent chemical tools are necessary to inhibit OGT activity in the context of biological systems. The present review focuses on the available OGT inhibitors and summarizes advantages, limitations and future challenges.

  4. Diversification of Fungal Specific Class A Glutathione Transferases in Saprotrophic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Frédérique; Harvengt, Luc; Didierjean, Claude; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes and endogenous metabolism. The distribution of fungal-specific class A GSTs was investigated in saprotrophic fungi revealing a recent diversification within this class. Biochemical characterization of eight GSTFuA isoforms from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Coprinus cinereus demonstrated functional diversity in saprotrophic fungi. The three-dimensional structures of three P. chrysosporium isoforms feature structural differences explaining the functional diversity of these enzymes. Competition experiments between fluorescent probes, and various molecules, showed that these GSTs function as ligandins with various small aromatic compounds, derived from lignin degradation or not, at a L-site overlapping the glutathione binding pocket. By combining genomic data with structural and biochemical determinations, we propose that this class of GST has evolved in response to environmental constraints induced by wood chemistry. PMID:24278272

  5. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  6. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase β subunit is essential for male fertility and tip growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Malgorzata; Wnuk, Marta; Nowakowska, Julita; Lichocka, Malgorzata; Stronkowski, Michal M; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Rab proteins, key players in vesicular transport in all eukaryotic cells, are post-translationally modified by lipid moieties. Two geranylgeranyl groups are attached to the Rab protein by the heterodimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RGT) αβ. Partial impairment in this enzyme activity in Arabidopsis, by disruption of the AtRGTB1 gene, is known to influence plant stature and disturb gravitropic and light responses. Here it is shown that mutations in each of the RGTB genes cause a tip growth defect, visible as root hair and pollen tube deformations. Moreover, FM 1-43 styryl dye endocytosis and recycling are affected in the mutant root hairs. Finally, it is demonstrated that the double mutant, with both AtRGTB genes disrupted, is non-viable due to absolute male sterility. Doubly mutated pollen is shrunken, has an abnormal exine structure, and shows strong disorganization of internal membranes, particularly of the endoplasmic reticulum system.

  7. Pharmacogenetics of azathioprine in inflammatory bowel disease: a role for glutathione-S-transferase?

    PubMed

    Stocco, Gabriele; Pelin, Marco; Franca, Raffaella; De Iudicibus, Sara; Cuzzoni, Eva; Favretto, Diego; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Decorti, Giuliana

    2014-04-01

    Azathioprine is a purine antimetabolite drug commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vivo it is active after reaction with reduced glutathione (GSH) and conversion to mercaptopurine. Although this reaction may occur spontaneously, the presence of isoforms M and A of the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) may increase its speed. Indeed, in pediatric patients with IBD, deletion of GST-M1, which determines reduced enzymatic activity, was recently associated with reduced sensitivity to azathioprine and reduced production of azathioprine active metabolites. In addition to increase the activation of azathioprine to mercaptopurine, GSTs may contribute to azathioprine effects even by modulating GSH consumption, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, genetic polymorphisms in genes for GSTs may be useful to predict response to azathioprine even if more in vitro and clinical validation studies are needed.

  8. Atypical features of a Ure2p glutathione transferase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, Anne; Roret, Thomas; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Didierjean, Claude; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie

    2013-07-11

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are known to transfer glutathione onto small hydrophobic molecules in detoxification reactions. The GST Ure2pB1 from Phanerochaete chrysosporium exhibits atypical features, i.e. the presence of two glutathione binding sites and a high affinity towards oxidized glutathione. Moreover, PcUre2pB1 is able to efficiently deglutathionylate GS-phenacylacetophenone. Catalysis is not mediated by the cysteines of the protein but rather by the one of glutathione and an asparagine residue plays a key role in glutathione stabilization. Interestingly PcUre2pB1 interacts in vitro with a GST of the omega class. These properties are discussed in the physiological context of wood degrading fungi.

  9. Structures of aminoarabinose transferase ArnT suggest a molecular basis for lipid A glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Vasileios I; Herrera, Carmen M; Schultz, Kathryn M; Clarke, Oliver B; Vendome, Jérémie; Tomasek, David; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Belcher Dufrisne, Meagan; Kloss, Brian; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Klug, Candice S; Trent, M Stephen; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    Polymyxins are antibiotics used in the last line of defense to combat multidrug-resistant infections by Gram-negative bacteria. Polymyxin resistance arises through charge modification of the bacterial outer membrane with the attachment of the cationic sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose to lipid A, a reaction catalyzed by the integral membrane lipid-to-lipid glycosyltransferase 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose transferase (ArnT). Here, we report crystal structures of ArnT from Cupriavidus metallidurans, alone and in complex with the lipid carrier undecaprenyl phosphate, at 2.8 and 3.2 angstrom resolution, respectively. The structures show cavities for both lipidic substrates, which converge at the active site. A structural rearrangement occurs on undecaprenyl phosphate binding, which stabilizes the active site and likely allows lipid A binding. Functional mutagenesis experiments based on these structures suggest a mechanistic model for ArnT family enzymes.

  10. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups.

    PubMed

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs.

  11. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC Gene Encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104) were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104) was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycero-d-mano-heptose II. The eptC gene is found in all the P. mirabilis strains analyzed in this study. Putative eptC homologues were found for only two additional genera of the Enterobacteriaceae family, Photobacterium and Providencia. The data obtained in this work supports the role of the eptC (PMI3104) product in the transfer of PEtN to the O-6 of l,d-HepII in P. mirabilis strains. PMID:24756091

  12. Probing functions of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center by nucleotide analog interference.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Polacek, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ribosome is a huge ribonucleoprotein complex in charge of protein synthesis in every living cell. The catalytic center of this dynamic molecular machine is entirely built up of 23S ribosomal RNA and therefore the ribosome can be referred to as the largest natural ribozyme known so far. The in vitro reconstitution approach of large ribosomal subunits described herein allows nucleotide analog interference studies to be performed. The approach is based on the site-specific introduction of nonnatural nucleotide analogs into the peptidyl transferase center, the active site located on the interface side of the large ribosomal subunit. This method combined with standard tests of ribosomal functions broadens the biochemical repertoire to investigate the mechanism of diverse aspects of translation considerably and adds another layer of molecular information on top of structural and mutational studies of the ribosome. PMID:22315072

  13. Crystal structure of Glycine max glutathione transferase in complex with glutathione: investigation of the mechanism operating by the Tau class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Axarli, Irene; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-08-13

    Cytosolic GSTs (glutathione transferases) are a multifunctional group of enzymes widely distributed in Nature and involved in cellular detoxification processes. The three-dimensional structure of GmGSTU4-4 (Glycine max GST Tau 4-4) complexed with GSH was determined by the molecular replacement method at 2.7 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. The bound GSH is located in a region formed by the beginning of alpha-helices H1, H2 and H3 in the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. Significant differences in the G-site (GSH-binding site) as compared with the structure determined in complex with Nb-GSH [S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione] were found. These differences were identified in the hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction pattern and, consequently, GSH was found bound in two different conformations. In one subunit, the enzyme forms a complex with the ionized form of GSH, whereas in the other subunit it can form a complex with the non-ionized form. However, only the ionized form of GSH may form a productive and catalytically competent complex. Furthermore, a comparison of the GSH-bound structure with the Nb-GSH-bound structure shows a significant movement of the upper part of alpha-helix H4 and the C-terminal. This indicates an intrasubunit modulation between the G-site and the H-site (electrophile-binding site), suggesting that the enzyme recognizes the xenobiotic substrates by an induced-fit mechanism. The reorganization of Arg111 and Tyr107 upon xenobiotic substrate binding appears to govern the intrasubunit structural communication between the G- and H-site and the binding of GSH. The structural observations were further verified by steady-state kinetic analysis and site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  14. RMF inactivates ribosomes by covering the peptidyl transferase centre and entrance of peptide exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Uchiumi, Toshio; Wada, Akira

    2004-04-01

    In gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, protein synthesis is suppressed by the formation of 100S ribosomes under stress conditions. The 100S ribosome, a dimer of 70S ribosomes, is formed by ribosome modulation factor (RMF) binding to the 70S ribosomes. During the stationary phase, most of the 70S ribosomes turn to 100S ribosomes, which have lost translational activity. This 100S formation is called the hibernation process in the ribosome cycle of the stationary phase. If stationary phase cells are transferred to fresh medium, the 100S ribosomes immediately go back to active 70S ribosomes, showing that inactive 100S <--> active 70S interconversion is a major system regulating translation activity in stationary phase cells. To elucidate the mechanisms of translational inactivation, the binding sites of RMF on 23S rRNA in 100S ribosome of E. coli were examined by a chemical probing method using dimethyl sulphate (DMS). As the results, the nine bases in 23S rRNA were protected from DMS modifications and the modification of one base was enhanced. Interestingly A2451 is included among the protected bases, which is thought to be directly involved in peptidyl transferase activity. We conclude that RMF inactivates ribosomes by covering the peptidyl transferase (PTase) centre and the entrance of peptide exit tunnel. It is surprising that the cell itself produces a protein that seems to inhibit protein synthesis in a similar manner to antibiotics and that it can reversibly bind to and release from the ribosome in response to environmental conditions.

  15. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in human tumours and tumour derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. D.; Forrester, L. M.; Hayes, J. D.; Wareing, C. J.; Carmichael, J.; Harris, A. L.; Mooghen, M.; Wolf, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that glutathione S-transferases play a role in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of tumours to anticancer drugs. In view of the wide use of tumour cell lines to understand the factors which confer either sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents we have determined glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and isozyme composition in nine human cell lines. These data have been compared with the values obtained in solid tumours. In most cases overall GST activity was higher in the tumours than in the cell lines. This was most pronounced for the breast tumour samples relative to MCF7 cell line. The pi class GST subunit was present at similar concentration in the cell lines and the tumours, and in most cases was the most abundant subunit present. The alpha and mu class GST were expressed in most of the cell lines but at much lower concentration than the pi class subunit. Also considerable variability particularly in the expression of the mu subunits was observed. This was also the case for the expression of these subunits in the solid tumour samples. The levels of these GSTs (when expressed) in the solid tumours was invariably higher than that observed in the cell lines. There are therefore several similarities but also some significant differences in GST expression in solid tumours and cell lines. Whether the differences are because expression is lost during the generation of the cell lines or whether it reflects the individuality of human tumours remains to be clearly established. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789940

  16. Glutathione-S-transferase GST M1 "null" genotype and the risk of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, V T; Pjarinen, J; Perola, M; Penttilä, A; Karhunen, P J

    1996-11-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate possible association between the occurrence of glutathione-S-transferase GST M1 "null" genotype and alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The"null" genotype indicating absent activity of class mu glutathione transferase was assessed in 33 abstainers, 43 moderate alcohol consumers, and 313 heavy alcohol consumers by polymerase chain reaction. The genotypes were compared with occurrence of alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic liver fibrosis. The "null" genotype was found among 44.7% of patients in the series, with no significant differences between different consumption groups: controls, 36.4%; moderate consumers, 39.5%; and heavy consumers, 46.3%. Occurrence of GST M1 "null" genotype was not associated with occurrence ALD among moderate alcohol consumers. Frequency of the "null" genotype was, however, statistically nearly significantly [p = 0.07, odds ratio (OR) = 1.75] lower among heavy consumers with normal liver histology than in alcoholics with ALD. Furthermore, when compared with heavy consumers without ALD, the "null" genotype was nearly significantly more frequent among heavy consumers with at least slight liver fibrosis (p = 0.05, OR = 1.8) and statistically significantly more frequent among among alcoholics with advanced liver fibrosis (p < 0.025, OR = 2.3). Results of the present Finnish association study suggest that homozygous deletion of the GST M1 gene may indicate increased susceptibility to develop irreversible liver damage in response to the toxic effects of ethanol. Significant association was found between the occurrence of the "null" genotype and the occurrence of alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

  17. A glutathione transferase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens reveals a novel class of bacterial GST superfamily.

    PubMed

    Skopelitou, Katholiki; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we report a novel class of glutathione transferases (GSTs) originated from the pathogenic soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, with structural and catalytic properties not observed previously in prokaryotic and eukaryotic GST isoenzymes. A GST-like sequence from A. tumefaciens C58 (Atu3701) with low similarity to other characterized GST family of enzymes was identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to a distinct GST class not previously described and restricted only in soil bacteria, called the Eta class (H). This enzyme (designated as AtuGSTH1-1) was cloned and expressed in E. coli and its structural and catalytic properties were investigated. Functional analysis showed that AtuGSTH1-1 exhibits significant transferase activity against the common substrates aryl halides, as well as very high peroxidase activity towards organic hydroperoxides. The crystal structure of AtuGSTH1-1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione (Nb-GSH). Although AtuGSTH1-1 adopts the canonical GST fold, sequence and structural characteristics distinct from previously characterized GSTs were identified. The absence of the classic catalytic essential residues (Tyr, Ser, Cys) distinguishes AtuGSTH1-1 from all other cytosolic GSTs of known structure and function. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that instead of the classic catalytic residues, an Arg residue (Arg34), an electron-sharing network, and a bridge of a network of water molecules may form the basis of the catalytic mechanism. Comparative sequence analysis, structural information, and site-directed mutagenesis in combination with kinetic analysis showed that Phe22, Ser25, and Arg187 are additional important residues for the enzyme's catalytic efficiency and specificity.

  18. Inhibition of DNA methylation by caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid, two common catechol-containing coffee polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jun; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2006-02-01

    We studied the modulating effects of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid (two common coffee polyphenols) on the in vitro methylation of synthetic DNA substrates and also on the methylation status of the promoter region of a representative gene in two human cancer cells lines. Under conditions that were suitable for the in vitro enzymatic methylation of DNA and dietary catechols, we found that the presence of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the DNA methylation catalyzed by prokaryotic M.SssI DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and human DNMT1. The IC50 values of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid were 3.0 and 0.75 microM, respectively, for the inhibition of M.SssI DNMT-mediated DNA methylation, and were 2.3 and 0.9 microM, respectively, for the inhibition of human DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation. The maximal in vitro inhibition of DNA methylation was approximately 80% when the highest concentration (20 microM) of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid was tested. Kinetic analyses showed that DNA methylation catalyzed by M.SssI DNMT or human DNMT1 followed the Michaelis-Menten curve patterns. The presence of caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid inhibited DNA methylation predominantly through a non-competitive mechanism, and this inhibition was largely due to the increased formation of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH, a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation), resulting from the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated O-methylation of these dietary catechols. Using cultured MCF-7 and MAD-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, we also demonstrated that treatment of these cells with caffeic acid or chlorogenic acid partially inhibited the methylation of the promoter region of the RARbeta gene. The findings of our present study provide a general mechanistic basis for the notion that a variety of dietary catechols can function as inhibitors of DNA methylation through increased formation of SAH during the COMT-mediated O-methylation of these dietary

  19. Dimethyl adenosine transferase (KsgA) deficiency in Salmonella Enteritidis confers susceptibility to high osmolarity and virulence attenuation in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Dimethyladenosine transferase (KsgA) performs diverse roles in bacteria including ribosomal maturation, DNA mismatch repair, and synthesis of KsgA is responsive to antibiotics and cold temperature. We previously showed that ksgA mutation in Salmonella Enteritidis results in impaired invasiveness i...

  20. Polymerase θ is a robust terminal transferase that oscillates between three different mechanisms during end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Tatiana; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A; Sfeir, Agnel; Pomerantz, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase θ (Polθ) promotes insertion mutations during alternative end-joining (alt-EJ) by an unknown mechanism. Here, we discover that mammalian Polθ transfers nucleotides to the 3’ terminus of DNA during alt-EJ in vitro and in vivo by oscillating between three different modes of terminal transferase activity: non-templated extension, templated extension in cis, and templated extension in trans. This switching mechanism requires manganese as a co-factor for Polθ template-independent activity and allows for random combinations of templated and non-templated nucleotide insertions. We further find that Polθ terminal transferase activity is most efficient on DNA containing 3’ overhangs, is facilitated by an insertion loop and conserved residues that hold the 3’ primer terminus, and is surprisingly more proficient than terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. In summary, this report identifies an unprecedented switching mechanism used by Polθ to generate genetic diversity during alt-EJ and characterizes Polθ as among the most proficient terminal transferases known. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13740.001 PMID:27311885

  1. COMPARATIVE EXPRESSION OF TWO ALPHA CLASS GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES IN HUMAN ADULT AND PRENATAL LIVER TISSUES. (R827441)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The ability of the fetus to detoxify transplacental drugs and chemicals can be a critical determinant of teratogenesis and developmental toxicity. Developmentally regulated expression of alpha class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is of particular int...

  2. Function and phylogeny of bacterial butyryl-CoA:acetate transferases and their diversity in the proximal colon of swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studying the host-associated butyrate-producing bacterial community is important because butyrate is essential for colonic homeostasis and gut health. Previous research has identified the butyryl-coA:acetate transferase (2.3.8.3) as a the main gene for butyrate production in intestinal ecosystems; h...

  3. CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice is associated with extrasynaptic utrophin in skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Durko, Margaret; Allen, Carol; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Karpati, George

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic muscle disease characterized by the absence of sub-sarcolemmal dystrophin that results in muscle fibre necrosis, progressive muscle wasting and is fatal. Numerous experimental studies with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for the disease, have demonstrated that extrasynaptic upregulation of utrophin, an analogue of dystrophin, can prevent muscle fibre deterioration and reduce or negate the dystrophic phenotype. A different approach for ectopic expression of utrophin relies on augmentation of CT-GalNAc transferase in muscle fibre. We investigated whether CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice influence appearance of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. After electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying an expression cassette of CT-GalNAc transferase into tibialis anterior muscle of wild type and dystrophic mice, muscle sections were examined by immunofluorescence. CT-GalNAc transgene expression augmented sarcolemmal carbohydrate glycosylation and was accompanied by extrasynaptic utrophin. A 6-week time course study showed that the highest efficiency of utrophin overexpression in a plasmid harboured muscle fibres was 32.2% in CD-1 and 52% in mdx mice, 2 and 4 weeks after CT-GalNAc gene transfer, respectively. The study provides evidence that postnatal CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression stimulates utrophin upregulation that is inherently beneficial for muscle structure and strength restoration. Thus CT-GalNAc may provide an important therapeutic molecule for treatment of dystrophin deficiency in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  4. BIOTRANSFORMATION AND GENOTOXICITY OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: DNA BINDING MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2) was
    previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium that overexpress rat glutathione
    transferase theta 1-1 (GSTT1-1). Several experimental approaches were undertaken in this study
    to inve...

  5. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  6. Characterization of the hydrophobic substrate-binding site of the bacterial beta class glutathione transferase from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine; Allocati, Nerino

    2010-09-01

    Since their discovery, bacterial glutathione (GSH)transferases have been characterized in terms of their ability to catalyse a variety of different reactions on a large set of toxic molecules of xenobiotic or endobiotic origin. Furthermore the contribution of different residues in the GSH-binding site to GSH activation has been extensively investigated. Little is known, however, about the contribution to catalysis and overall stability of single residues shaping the hydrophobic co-substrate binding site (H-site). Here we tackle this problem by site-directed mutagenesis of residues facing the H-site in the bacterial beta class GSH transferase from Proteus mirabilis. We investigate the behaviour of these mutants under a variety of conditions and analyse their activity against several co-substrates, representative of the different reactions catalyzed by bacterial GSH transferases. Our work shows that mutations at the H-site can be used to modulate activity at the level of the different catalytic mechanisms operating on the chosen substrates, each mutation showing a different fingerprint. This work paves the way for future studies aimed at improving the catalytic properties of beta class GSH transferases against selected substrates for bioremediation purposes.

  7. LIGNIFICATION IN TRANSGENICS DEFICIENT IN P-COUMARATE 3-HYDROXYLASE (C3H) AND THE ASSOCIATED HYDROXYCINNAMOYL TRANSFERASE (HCT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects on lignification of downregulating most of the genes for enzymes on the monolignol biosynthetic pathway have been reasonably well studied in angiosperms. The exception to this is the crucial hydroxylase, cinnamate 3-hydroxylase (C3H), and its associated hydroxycinnamyl transferase (HCT),...

  8. Molecular mimicry between cockroach and helminth glutathione S-transferases promotes cross-reactivity and cross-sensitization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extensive similarities between helminth proteins and allergens are thought to contribute to helminth-driven allergic sensitization. We investigated the molecular and structural similarities between Bla g 5, a major glutathione-S transferase (GST) allergen of cockroaches, and the GST of Wucherer...

  9. Elucidation of the Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Sorghum Hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and Its Structural Relationship to Other Coenzyme A-Dependent Transferases and Synthases1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alexander M.; Hayes, Robert P.; Youn, Buhyun; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E.; Kang, ChulHee

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) participates in an early step of the phenylpropanoid pathway, exchanging coenzyme A (CoA) esterified to p-coumaric acid with shikimic or quinic acid as intermediates in the biosynthesis of the monolignols coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol. In order to elucidate the mode of action of this enzyme, we have determined the crystal structures of SbHCT in its apo-form and ternary complex with shikimate and p-coumaroyl-CoA, which was converted to its product during crystal soaking. The structure revealed the roles of threonine-36, serine-38, tyrosine-40, histidine-162, arginine-371, and threonine-384 in catalysis and specificity. Based on the exact chemistry of p-coumaroyl-CoA and shikimic acid in the active site and an analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic data of the wild type and mutants, we propose a role for histidine-162 and threonine-36 in the catalytic mechanism of HCT. Considering the calorimetric data, substrate binding of SbHCT should occur sequentially, with p-coumaroyl-CoA binding prior to the acyl acceptor molecule. While some HCTs can use both shikimate and quinate as an acyl acceptor, SbHCT displays low activity toward quinate. Comparison of the structure of sorghum HCT with the HCT involved in chlorogenic acid synthesis in coffee (Coffea canephora) revealed many shared features. Taken together, these observations explain how CoA-dependent transferases with similar structural features can participate in different biochemical pathways across species. PMID:23624856

  10. SeGSTo, a novel glutathione S-transferase from the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua), involved in detoxification and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Han, Ningning; Kang, Tinghao; Zhan, Sha; Lee, Kwang Sik; Jin, Byung Rae; Li, Jianhong; Wan, Hu

    2016-09-01

    Members of the glutathione S-transferase superfamily can protect organisms against oxidative stress. In this study, we characterized an omega glutathione S-transferase from Spodoptera exigua (SeGSTo). The SeGSTo gene contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 744 nucleotides encoding a 248-amino acid polypeptide. The predicted molecular mass and isoelectric point of SeGSTo are 29007 Da and 7.74, respectively. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment analysis shows that the SeGSTo sequence is closely related to the class 4 GSTo of Bombyx mori BmGSTo4 (77 % protein sequence similarity). Homologous modeling and molecular docking reveal that Cys35 may play an essential role in the catalytic process. Additionally, the phylogenetic tree indicates that SeGSTo belongs to the omega group of the GST superfamily. During S. exigua development, SeGSTo is expressed in the midgut of the fifth instar larval stage, but not in the epidermis or fat body. Identification of recombinant SeGSTo via SDS-PAGE and Western blot shows that its molecular mass is 30 kDa. The recombinant SeGSTo was able to protect super-coiled DNA from damage in a metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) system and catalyze the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), but not 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), 4-nitrophenethyl bromide (4-NPB), or 4-nitrobenzyl chloride (4-NBC). The optimal reaction pH and temperature were 8 and 50 °C, respectively, in the catalysis of CDNB by recombinant SeGSTo. The mRNA expression of SeGSTo was up-regulated by various oxidative stresses, such as CdCl2, CuSO4, and isoprocarb, and the catalytic activity of recombinant SeGSTo was noticeably inhibited by heavy metals (Cu(2+) and Cd(2+)) and various pesticides. Taken together, these results indicate that SeGSTo plays an important role in the antioxidation and detoxification of pesticides. PMID:27230212

  11. Genetic and functional analyses of PptA, a phospho-form transferase targeting type IV pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Naessan, Cecilia L; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Heiniger, Ryan W; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Aas, Finn Erik; Røhr, Asmund; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Koomey, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The PilE pilin subunit protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae undergoes unique covalent modifications with phosphoethanolamine (PE) and phosphocholine (PC). The pilin phospho-form transferase A (PptA) protein, required for these modifications, shows sequence relatedness with and architectural similarities to lipopolysaccharide PE transferases. Here, we used regulated expression and mutagenesis as means to better define the relationships between PptA structure and function, as well as to probe the mechanisms by which other factors impact the system. We show here that pptA expression is coupled at the level of transcription to its distal gene, murF, in a division/cell wall gene operon and that PptA can act in a dose-dependent fashion in PilE phospho-form modification. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis provided the first direct evidence that PptA is a member of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily of metalloenzymes with similar metal-binding sites and conserved structural folds. Through phylogenetic analyses and sequence alignments, these conclusions were extended to include the lipopolysaccharide PE transferases, including members of the disparate Lpt6 subfamily, and the MdoB family of phosphoglycerol transferases. Each of these enzymes thus likely acts as a phospholipid head group transferase whose catalytic mechanism involves a trans-esterification step generating a protein-phospho-form ester intermediate. Coexpression of PptA with PilE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulted in high levels of PE modification but was not sufficient for PC modification. This and other findings show that PptA-associated PC modification is governed by as-yet-undefined ancillary factors unique to N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:17951381

  12. Biosynthesis of membrane-derived oligosaccharides: characterization of mdoB mutants defective in phosphoglycerol transferase I activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, B J; Bohin, J P; Kennedy, E P

    1984-01-01

    Phosphoglycerol transferase I, an enzyme of the inner, cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli, catalyzes the in vitro transfer of phosphoglycerol residues from phosphatidylglycerol to membrane-derived oligosaccharides or to the model substrate arbutin (p-hydroxyphenyl-beta-D-glucoside). The products are a phosphoglycerol diester derivative of membrane-derived oligosaccharides or arbutin, respectively, and sn-1,2-diglyceride (B. J. Jackson and E. P. Kennedy, J. Biol. Chem. 258:2394-2398, 1983). Because this enzyme has its active site on the outer aspect of the inner membrane, it also catalyzes the transfer of phosphoglycerol residues to arbutin added to the medium (J.-P. Bohin and E. P. Kennedy, J. Biol. Chem. 259:8388-8393, 1984). When strains bearing the dgk mutation, which are defective in the enzyme diglyceride kinase, are grown in medium containing arbutin, they accumulate large amounts of sn-1,2-diglyceride, a product of the phosphoglycerol transferase I reaction. Growth is inhibited under these conditions. A further mutation in such a dgk strain, leading to the loss of phosphoglycerol transferase I activity, should result in the phenotype of arbutin resistance. We have exploited this fact to obtain strains with such mutations, designated mdoB, that map near min 99. Such mutants lack detectable phosphoglycerol transferase I activity, cannot transfer phosphoglycerol residues to arbutin in vivo, and synthesize membrane-derived oligosaccharides devoid of phosphoglycerol residues. These findings offer strong genetic support for the function of phosphoglycerol transferase I in membrane-derived oligosaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:6094515

  13. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  14. The Sfp-Type 4′-Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt1 of Fusarium fujikuroi Controls Development, Secondary Metabolism and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiemann, Philipp; Albermann, Sabine; Niehaus, Eva-Maria; Studt, Lena; von Bargen, Katharina W.; Brock, Nelson L.; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    The heterothallic ascomycete Fusarium fujikuroi is a notorious rice pathogen causing super-elongation of plants due to the production of terpene-derived gibberellic acids (GAs) that function as natural plant hormones. Additionally, F. fujikuroi is able to produce a variety of polyketide- and non-ribosomal peptide-derived metabolites such as bikaverins, fusarubins and fusarins as well as metabolites from yet unidentified biosynthetic pathways, e.g. moniliformin. The key enzymes needed for their production belong to the family of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs) that are generally known to be post-translationally modified by a Sfp-type 4′phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase). In this study we provide evidence that the F. fujikuroi Sfp-type PPTase FfPpt1 is essentially involved in lysine biosynthesis and production of bikaverins, fusarubins and fusarins, but not moniliformin as shown by analytical methods. Concomitantly, targeted Ffppt1 deletion mutants reveal an enhancement of terpene-derived metabolites like GAs and volatile substances such as α-acorenol. Pathogenicity assays on rice roots using fluorescent labeled wild-type and Ffppt1 mutant strains indicate that lysine biosynthesis and iron acquisition but not PKS and NRPS metabolism is essential for establishment of primary infections of F. fujikuroi. Additionally, FfPpt1 is involved in conidiation and sexual mating recognition possibly by activating PKS- and/or NRPS-derived metabolites that could act as diffusible signals. Furthermore, the effect on iron acquisition of Ffppt1 mutants led us to identify a previously uncharacterized putative third reductive iron uptake system (FfFtr3/FfFet3) that is closely related to the FtrA/FetC system of A. fumigatus. Functional characterization provides evidence that both proteins are involved in iron acquisition and are liable to transcriptional repression of the homolog of the Aspergillus GATA-type transcription factor SreA under

  15. Enzymatic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids with Defined Regioisomeric 2'-5' Linkages.

    PubMed

    Cozens, Christopher; Mutschler, Hannes; Nelson, Geoffrey M; Houlihan, Gillian; Taylor, Alexander I; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-12-14

    Information-bearing nucleic acids display universal 3'-5' linkages, but regioisomeric 2'-5' linkages occur sporadically in non-enzymatic RNA synthesis and may have aided prebiotic RNA replication. Herein we report on the enzymatic synthesis of both DNA and RNA with site-specific 2'-5' linkages by an engineered polymerase using 3'-deoxy- or 3'-O-methyl-NTPs as substrates. We also report the reverse transcription of the resulting modified nucleic acids back to 3'-5' linked DNA with good fidelity. This enables a fast and simple method for "structural mutagenesis" by the position-selective incorporation of 2'-5' linkages, whereby nucleic acid structure and function may be probed through local distortion by regioisomeric linkages while maintaining the wild-type base sequence as we demonstrate for the 10-23 RNA endonuclease DNAzyme.

  16. Cloning, characterization and tissue distribution of a pi-class glutathione S-transferase from clam (Venerupis philippinarum): Response to benzo[alpha]pyrene exposure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoqun; Pan, Luqing; Liu, Na; Wang, Lin; Miao, Jingjing

    2010-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are phase II enzymes involved in major detoxification reactions of xenobiotics in many organisms. In this study, a full-length cDNA of GST-pi was cloned from the gill of Venerupis philippinarum by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method for the first time. The full-length cDNA of V. philippinarum GST-pi (denoted as VpGSTp) was 1142bp, with a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 87bp, a 3' UTR of 438bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 618bp encoding a protein of 205 amino acid residues with an estimated molecular mass of 23.9kDa and an predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 7.9. The comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with GSTs from other species showed that the enzyme belongs to the pi-class, and the amino acids defining the binding sites of glutathione (G-site) and for xenobiotic substrates (H-site) were highly conserved. Tissue distribution analysis of the VpGSTp mRNA revealed that the GST-pi expression level was observed higher in gill, adductor muscle, mantle and foot while lower in digestive gland. Using quantitative real-time PCR, the dose- and time-related effects of benzo[alpha]pyrene (B[alpha]P) on VpGSTp mRNA expression were investigated in gills and digestive gland. The results showed that a time-dependant increase in the expression of VpGSTp was induced by B[alpha]P and appeared a good linear relationship with B[alpha]P concentrations. All these results suggested that GST-pi in bivalve had an antioxidant role and VpGSTp expression may be a useful biomarker candidate for monitoring environmental contaminants such as PAHs.

  17. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  18. Activation and inhibition of rubber transferases by metal cofactors and pyrophosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Deborah J; da Costa, Bernardo M T; Espy, Stephanie C; Keasling, Jay D; Cornish, Katrina

    2003-09-01

    Metal cofactors are necessary for the activity of alkylation by prenyl transfer in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Rubber transferase (RuT, a cis-prenyl transferase) associated with purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Ficus elastica can use magnesium and manganese interchangably to achieve maximum velocity. We define the concentration of activator required for maximum velocity as [A](max). The [A](max)(Mg2+) in F. elastica (100 mM) is 10 times the [A](max)(Mg2+) for either H. brasiliensis (10 mM) or P. argentatum (8 mM). The [A](max)(Mn2+) in F. elastica (11 mM), H. brasiliensis (3.8 mM) and P. argentatum (6.8 mM) and the [A](max)(Mg2+) in H. brasiliensis (10 mM) and P. argentatum (8 mM) are similar. The differences in [A](max)(Mg2+) correlate with the actual endogenous Mg(2+) concentrations in the latex of living plants. Extremely low Mn(2+) levels in vivo indicate that Mg(2+) is the RuT cofactor in living H. brasiliensis and F. elastica trees. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that FPP-Mg(2+) and FPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule initiation, although free FPP and metal cations, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), can interact independently at the active site with the following relative dissociation constants K(d)(FPP)

  19. Synthesis and regulation of chlorogenic acid in potato: Rerouting phenylpropanoid flux in HQT silenced lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the major phenolic sink in potato tubers and can constitute over 90% of total phenylpropanoids. The regulation of CGA biosynthesis in potato and the role of the CGA biosynthetic gene hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was characterized. A sucros...

  20. Production of herbicide-resistant transgenic Panax ginseng through the introduction of the phosphinothricin acetyl transferase gene and successful soil transfer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y E; Jeong, J H; In, J K; Yang, D C

    2003-02-01

    Herbicide-resistant transgenic Panax ginseng plants were produced by introducing the phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) gene that confers resistance to the herbicide Basta (bialaphos) through Agrobacterium tumefaciens co-cultivation. Embryogenic callus gathered from cotyledon explants of P. ginseng were pre-treated with 0.5 M sucrose or 0.05 M MgSO(4 )before Agrobacterium infection. This pre-treatment process markedly enhanced the transient expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene. Embryogenic callus was initially cultured on MS medium supplemented with 400 mg/l cefotaxime for 3 weeks and subsequently subcultured five times to a medium containing 25 mg/l kanamycin and 300 mg/l cefotaxime. Somatic embryos formed on the surfaces of kanamycin-resistant callus. Upon development into the cotyledonary stage, these somatic embryos were transferred to a medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin and 5 mg/l gibberellic acid to induce germination and strong selection. Integration of the transgene into the plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and Southern analyses. Transfer of the transgenic ginseng plantlets to soil was successfully accomplished via acclimatization in autoclaved perlite. Not all of the plantlets survived in soil that had not been autoclaved because of fungal infection, particularly in the region between the roots and leaves. Transgenic plants growing in soil were observed to be strongly resistant to Basta application. PMID:12789431

  1. The characterization of cytosolic glutathione transferase from four species of sea turtles: loggerhead (Caretta caretta), green (Chelonia mydas), olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), and hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Kristine L; Gold-Bouchot, Gerardo; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    Glutathione s-transferases (GST) play a critical role in the detoxification of exogenous and endogenous electrophiles, as well as the products of oxidative stress. As compared to mammals, GST activity has not been extensively characterized in reptiles. Throughout the globe, most sea turtle populations face the risk of extinction. Of the natural and anthropogenic threats to sea turtles, the effects of environmental chemicals and related biochemical mechanisms, such as GST catalyzed detoxification, are probably the least understood. In the present study, GST activity was characterized in four species of sea turtles with varied life histories and feeding strategies: loggerhead (Caretta caretta), green (Chelonia mydas), olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), and hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata). Although similar GST kinetics was observed between species, rates of catalytic activities using class-specific substrates show inter- and intra-species variation. GST from the spongivorous hawksbill sea turtle shows 3-4.5 fold higher activity with the substrate 4-nitrobenzylchloride than the other 3 species. GST from the herbivorous green sea turtle shows 3 fold higher activity with the substrate ethacrynic acid than the carnivorous olive ridley sea turtle. The results of this study may provide insight into differences in biotransformation potential in the four species of sea turtles and the possible health impacts of contaminant biotransformation by sea turtles.

  2. Cloning, Developmental, and Tissue-Specific Expression of Sucrose:Sucrose 1-Fructosyl Transferase from Taraxacum officinale. Fructan Localization in Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Van den Ende, Wim; Michiels, An; Van Wonterghem, Dominik; Vergauwen, Rudy; Van Laere, André

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyl transferase (1-SST) is the key enzyme initiating fructan synthesis in Asteraceae. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we isolated the cDNA for 1-SST from Taraxacum officinale. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence showed very high homology to other Asteracean 1-SSTs (Cichorium intybus 86%, Cynara scolymus 82%, Helianthus tuberosus 80%), but homology to 1-SST from Allium cepa (46%) and Aspergillus foetidus (18%) was much lower. Fructan concentrations, 1-SST activities, 1-SST protein, and mRNA concentrations were compared in different organs during vegetative and generative development of T. officinale plants. Expression of 1-SST was abundant in young roots but very low in leaves. 1-SST was also expressed at the flowering stages in roots, stalks, and receptacles. A good correlation was found between northern and western blots showing transcriptional regulation of 1-SST. At the pre-flowering stage, 1-SST mRNA concentrations and 1-SST activities were higher in the root phloem than in the xylem, resulting in the higher fructan concentrations in the phloem. Fructan localization studies indicated that fructan is preferentially stored in phloem parenchyma cells in the vicinity of the secondary sieve tube elements. However, inulin-like crystals occasionally appeared in xylem vessels. PMID:10806226

  3. Expression of glutathione-S-transferase and its role in plant growth and development in vivo and shoot morphogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Jiao, Yuxia; Hu, Wen-wei; Pua, Eng-chong

    2005-01-01

    The enzymes glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs, E.C.2.5.1.18) have been associated with detoxification of xenobiotics, limiting oxidative damage and other stress responses in plants. In this study, we report the isolation of a mustard gene, BjGSTF2, homologous to the phi class GSTs and changes in plant growth in vivo and shoot regeneration in vitro were related to GST expression. GST transcripts accumulated differentially in mustard organs, where transcript was most abundant in root. Tissues incubated at high temperature or in the presence of exogenous H2O2, HgCl2, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, salicylic acid and paraquat upregulated GST expression, whereas spermidine was inhibitory. To investigate the in vivo function of GST, transgenic Arabidopsis thalianaplants expressing sense (GST-S6), antisense (GST-A4) and double-stranded BjGSTF2 (GST-DS1) RNAs were generated. GST-S6 was shown to flower two days earlier and was relatively more tolerant to HgCl2 and paraquat, whereas GST-DS1 with least stress tolerance flowered one week later compared to WT and GST-A4. In shoot regeneration response, tissues originated from GST-S6 were highly regenerative, whereas no shoot regeneration was observed in GST-DS1 tissues after 30 days of culture. Results of this study provide the evidence showing that GST plays a role in plant growth and development in vivo and shoot regeneration in vitro.

  4. Glyceryl trinitrate metabolism in the quail embryo by the glutathione S-transferases leads to a perturbation in redox status and embryotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bardai, Ghalib K; Hales, Barbara F; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of stage 9 quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) embryos to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) induces malformations that were associated in previous studies with an increase in protein nitration. Increased nitration suggests metabolism of GTN by the embryo. The goals of this study were to characterize the enzymes and co-factors required for GTN metabolism by quail embryos, and to determine the effects of in ovo treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione (GSH), on GTN embryotoxicity. GTN treatment of quail embryos resulted in an increase in nitrite, a decrease in total GSH, and an increase in the ratio of NADP(+)/NADPH, indicating that redox balance may be compromised in exposed embryos. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) purified from the whole embryo (K(m) 0.84 mM; V(max) 36 μM/min) and the embryonic eye (K(m) 0.20 mM; V(max) 30 μM/min) had GTN-metabolizing activity (1436 and 34 nmol/min/mg, respectively); the addition of ethacrynic acid, an inhibitor of GST activity, decreased GTN metabolism. Peptide sequencing of the GST isozymes indicated that alpha- or mu-type GSTs in the embryo and embryonic eye had GTN metabolizing activity. NAC co-treatment partially protected against the effects of GTN exposure. Thus, GTN denitration by quail embryo GSTs may represent a key initial step in the developmental toxicity of GTN.

  5. Quantitative profiling of mRNA expression of glutathione S-transferase superfamily genes in various tissues of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis).

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyu; Xie, Ping; Li, Huiying; Chen, Jun; Hao, Le; Xiong, Qian

    2010-01-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a crucial factor in determining the sensitivity of cells and organs in response to a variety of toxicants. In this study, we cloned the core nucleotide of alpha, kappa, mu, mGST, pi, rho, and theta-like GST genes from bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis). Their derived amino acid sequences were clustered with other vertebrate GSTs in a phylogenetic tree, and the bighead carp GST sequences have the highest similarity with those from common carp and zebrafish. We quantified the constitutive mRNA transcription of GST isoforms in eight different tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, intestine, muscle, heart, brain, and gill). The information obtained from the present study could be distilled into a few generalized principles: multiple GST isoenzymes were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues; majority of GSTs had high constitutive expression in intestine, liver, and kidney. These findings are in agreement with the roles of these tissues in xenobiotic metabolism. At the same time, some unique findings were detected in the current experiment: (1) higher expression of most GSTs was observed in spleen; (2) the expression of GST pi was highest in almost all the studied tissues except muscle; the other two isoforms, GST alpha and rho, were also highly expressed in liver, kidney, intestine, spleen, heart, and brain of bighead carp. All these results strongly imply an important role of these GST isoforms in detoxification of ingested xenobiotics. PMID:20135640

  6. Analysis of protein adduction kinetics by quantitative mass spectrometry: competing adduction reactions of glutathione-S-transferase P1-1 with electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Orton, Christopher R; Liebler, Daniel C

    2007-06-30

    Defining the mechanisms and consequences of protein adduction is crucial to understanding the toxicity of reactive electrophiles. Application of tandem mass spectrometry and data analysis algorithms enables detection and mapping of chemical adducts at the level of amino acid sequence. Nevertheless, detection of adducts does not indicate relative reactivity of different sites. Here, we describe a method to measure the kinetics of competing adduction reactions at different sites on the same protein. Adducts are formed by electrophiles at Cys14 and Cys47 on the metabolic enzyme glutathione-S-transferase P1-1 and modification is accompanied by a loss of enzymatic activity. Relative quantitation of protein adducts was done by tagging N-termini of peptide digests with isotopically labeled phenyl isocyanate and tracking the ratio of light-tagged peptide adducts to heavy-tagged reference samples in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses using a multiple reaction monitoring method. This approach was used to measure rate constants for adduction at both positions with two different model electrophiles, N-iodoacetyl-N-biotinylhexylenediamine and 1-biotinamido-4-(4'-[maleimidoethyl-cyclohexane]-carboxamido)butane. The results indicate that Cys47 was approximately two- to three-fold more reactive toward both electrophiles than was Cys14. This result was consistent with the relative reactivity of these electrophiles in a complex proteome system and with previously reported trends in reactivity of these sites. Kinetic analyses of protein modification reactions provide a means of evaluating the selectivity of reactive mediators of chemical toxicity.

  7. Tyrosine 8 contributes to catalysis but is not required for activity of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, 1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Barycki, J. J.; Colman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Reaction of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, isozyme 1-1, with 4-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoic acid (4-FSB), a xenobiotic substrate analogue, results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme to a final value of 35% of its original activity when assayed at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The rate of inactivation exhibits a nonlinear dependence on the concentration of 4-FSB from 0.25 mM to 9 mM, characterized by a KI of 0.78 mM and kmax of 0.011 min-1. S-Hexylglutathione or the xenobiotic substrate analogue, 2,4-dinitrophenol, protects against inactivation of the enzyme by 4-FSB, whereas S-methylglutathione has little effect on the reaction. These experiments indicate that reaction occurs within the active site of the enzyme, probably in the binding site of the xenobiotic substrate, close to the glutathione binding site. Incorporation of [3,5-3H]-4-FSB into the enzyme in the absence and presence of S-hexylglutathione suggests that modification of one residue is responsible for the partial loss of enzyme activity. Tyr 8 and Cys 17 are shown to be the reaction targets of 4-FSB, but only Tyr 8 is protected against 4-FSB by S-hexylglutathione. DTT regenerates cysteine from the reaction product of cysteine and 4-FSB, but does not reactivate the enzyme. These results show that modification of Tyr 8 by 4-FSB causes the partial inactivation of the enzyme. The Michaelis constants for various substrates are not changed by the modification of the enzyme. The pH dependence of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of glutathione with CDNB for the modified enzyme, as compared with the native enzyme, reveals an increase of about 0.9 in the apparent pKa, which has been interpreted as representing the ionization of enzyme-bound glutathione; however, this pKa of about 7.4 for modified enzyme remains far below the pK of 9.1 for the -SH of free glutathione. Previously, it was considered that Tyr 8 was essential for GST catalysis. In contrast, we conclude that

  8. Joint effect of glutathione S-transferase genotypes and cigarette smoking on idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, S L; Kokhtenko, E V; Churnosov, M I; Solodilova, M A; Polonikov, A V

    2015-11-01

    Inconsistent results of association studies investigated the role of glutathione S-transferase genes in idiopathic male infertility may be explained by ethnical differences in gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. In this study, we investigated a joint contribution of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 gene polymorphisms and cigarette smoking to the risk of idiopathic infertility in Russian men. DNA samples from 203 infertile and 227 fertile men were genotyped by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (GSTP1 I105V) methods. The GSTP1 genotype 105IV was associated with increased risk of male infertility (OR = 1.50 95% CI 1.02-2.20 P = 0.04). Genotype combinations GSTP1 105II/GSTT1 del (G1), GSTM1 del/GSTT1 del (G2) and GSTM1 + /GSTT1 del (G3) were associated with decreased risk of male infertility (P ≤ 0.003), whereas a genotype combination GSTP1 105IV/GSTT1 + (G4) was associated with increased disease risk (P = 0.001). The genotype combinations G3 and G4 showed a significant association with infertility in smokers; however, nonsmokers carriers did show the disease risk. In conclusion, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes are collectively involved in the development of idiopathic male infertility and their phenotypic effects on the disease risk are potentiated by cigarette smoking.

  9. Allyl isothiocyanate depletes glutathione and upregulates expression of glutathione S-transferases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Anders; Stokland, Ragni A.; Åsberg, Signe E.; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Bones, Atle M.

    2015-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a phytochemical associated with plant defense in plants from the Brassicaceae family. AITC has long been recognized as a countermeasure against external threats, but recent reports suggest that AITC is also involved in the onset of defense-related mechanisms such as the regulation of stomatal aperture. However, the underlying cellular modes of action in plants remain scarcely investigated. Here we report evidence of an AITC-induced depletion of glutathione (GSH) and the effect on gene expression of the detoxification enzyme family glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Treatment of A. thaliana wild-type with AITC resulted in a time- and dose-dependent depletion of cellular GSH. AITC-exposure of mutant lines vtc1 and pad2-1 with elevated and reduced GSH-levels, displayed enhanced and decreased AITC-tolerance, respectively. AITC-exposure also led to increased ROS-levels in the roots and loss of chlorophyll which are symptoms of oxidative stress. Following exposure to AITC, we found that GSH rapidly recovered to the same level as in the control plant, suggesting an effective route for replenishment of GSH or a rapid detoxification of AITC. Transcriptional analysis of genes encoding GSTs showed an upregulation in response to AITC. These findings demonstrate cellular effects by AITC involving a reversible depletion of the GSH-pool, induced oxidative stress, and elevated expression of GST-encoding genes. PMID:25954298

  10. Association between herbivore stress and glutathione S-transferase expression in Pinus brutia Ten.

    PubMed

    Semiz, A; Çelik-Turgut, G; Semiz, G; Özgün, Ö; Şen, A

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed mechanisms to defend themselves against many factors including biotic stress such as herbivores and pathogens. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a glutathione-dependent detoxifying enzyme and plays critical roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism in plants. Pinus brutia Ten. is a prominent native forest tree species in Turkey, due to both its economic and ecological assets. One of the problems faced by P. brutia afforestation sites is the attacks by pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni Tams.). In this study, we investigated the changes in activity and mRNA expression of GST in pine samples taken from both resistant and susceptible clones against T. wilkinsoni over a nine month period in a clonal seed orchard. It was found that the average cytosolic GST activities of trees in March and July were significantly higher than the values obtained in November. November was considered to be the control since trees were not under stress yet. In addition, RT-PCR results clearly showed that levels of GST transcripts in March and July samples were significantly higher as compared to the level seen in November. These findings strongly suggest that GST activity from P. brutia would be a valuable marker for exposure to herbivory stress. PMID:27064879

  11. Purification and characterization of a glutathione S-transferase from Mucor mucedo.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Ragaa R; Abu-Shady, Mohamed R; El-Beih, Fawkia M; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem A; Afifi, Ola M

    2005-01-01

    An intracellular glutathione transferase was purified to homogenity from the fungus, Mucor mucedo, using DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange and glutathione affinity chromatography. Gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE revealed that the purified GST is a homodimer with approximate native and subunit molecular mass of 53 kDa and 23.4 kDa, respectively. The enzyme has a pI value of 4.8, a pH optimum at pH 8.0 and apparent activation energy (Ea) of 1.42 kcal mol(-1). The purified GST acts readily on CDNB with almost negligible peroxidase activity and the activity was inhibited by Cibacron Blue (IC50 0.252 microM) and hematin (IC50 3.55 microM). M. mucedo GST displayed a non-Michaelian behavior. At low (0.1-0.3 mM) and high (0.3-2 mM) substrate concentration, Km (GSH) was calculated to be 0.179 and 0.65 mM, whereas Km(CDNB) was 0.531 and 11 mM and k(cat) was 39.8 and 552 s(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed apparent pKa values of 6-6.5 and 8.0.

  12. Cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase activities in freshwater invertebrates as biomarkers to assess pesticide contamination.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Inês; Agra, Ana Raquel; Monaghan, Kieran; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Nogueira, António J A

    2010-01-01

    Studies investigating the use of biomarkers in pesticide risk assessment have greatly increased in recent years; however, issues concerning the ecological meaning of enzymatic responses have proved controversial. Ideally a good biomarker response should be modulated by the environmental contaminants alone and demonstrate a predictable behavior towards certain types of toxins. As these premises are rarely observed, the present study aims to outline research that has contributed to an understanding of the behavior of two widely used biomarkers, cholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferase, describing environmental and biotic factors that affect their response in freshwater invertebrates. Studies were performed in the main classes of aquatic invertebrates with these biomarkers and conclusions were reached concerning their behavior towards the main classes of pesticides. Links between biomarker responses and conventional endpoints were evaluated so that ecological relevance could be attributed to enzymatic responses. Toxicity of mixtures was investigated, and cases of synergism and antagonism were pointed out as factors changing the expected toxicity of aquatic systems and leading to misinterpretations of biomarker responses. Finally, the use of biomarkers as a tool for biomonitoring and in situ assays was investigated, with discussion of advantages and disadvantages of their use.

  13. Recognition and Detoxification of the Insecticide DDT by Drosophila melanogaster Glutathione S-Transferase D1

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Wai Yee; Feil, Susanne C.; Ng, Hooi Ling; Gorman, Michael A.; Morton, Craig J.; Pyke, James; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bieri, Michael; Mok, Yee-Foong; Robin, Charles; Gooley, Paul R.; Parker, Michael W.; Batterham, Philip

    2010-06-14

    GSTD1 is one of several insect glutathione S-transferases capable of metabolizing the insecticide DDT. Here we use crystallography and NMR to elucidate the binding of DDT and glutathione to GSTD1. The crystal structure of Drosophila melanogaster GSTD1 has been determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution, which reveals that the enzyme adopts the canonical GST fold but with a partially occluded active site caused by the packing of a C-terminal helix against one wall of the binding site for substrates. This helix would need to unwind or be displaced to enable catalysis. When the C-terminal helix is removed from the model of the crystal structure, DDT can be computationally docked into the active site in an orientation favoring catalysis. Two-dimensional {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR experiments of GSTD1 indicate that conformational changes occur upon glutathione and DDT binding and the residues that broaden upon DDT binding support the predicted binding site. We also show that the ancestral GSTD1 is likely to have possessed DDT dehydrochlorinase activity because both GSTD1 from D. melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, have this activity.

  14. Dual functionality of O-GlcNAc transferase is required for Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Mariappa, Daniel; Zheng, Xiaowei; Schimpl, Marianne; Raimi, Olawale; Ferenbach, Andrew T; Müller, H-Arno J; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) catalysed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) has been linked to regulation of diverse cellular functions. OGT possesses a C-terminal glycosyltransferase catalytic domain and N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeats that are implicated in protein-protein interactions. Drosophila OGT (DmOGT) is encoded by super sex combs (sxc), mutants of which are pupal lethal. However, it is not clear if this phenotype is caused by reduction of O-GlcNAcylation. Here we use a genetic approach to demonstrate that post-pupal Drosophila development can proceed with negligible OGT catalysis, while early embryonic development is OGT activity-dependent. Structural and enzymatic comparison between human OGT (hOGT) and DmOGT informed the rational design of DmOGT point mutants with a range of reduced catalytic activities. Strikingly, a severely hypomorphic OGT mutant complements sxc pupal lethality. However, the hypomorphic OGT mutant-rescued progeny do not produce F2 adults, because a set of Hox genes is de-repressed in F2 embryos, resulting in homeotic phenotypes. Thus, OGT catalytic activity is required up to late pupal stages, while further development proceeds with severely reduced OGT activity.

  15. Inhibition of insect glutathione S-transferase (GST) by conifer extracts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiling; Zhao, Zhong; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh M; Arnason, John T; Liu, Rui; Walshe-Roussel, Brendan; Waye, Andrew; Liu, Suqi; Saleem, Ammar; Cáceres, Luis A; Wei, Qin; Scott, Ian M

    2014-12-01

    Insecticide synergists biochemically inhibit insect metabolic enzyme activity and are used both to increase the effectiveness of insecticides and as a diagnostic tool for resistance mechanisms. Considerable attention has been focused on identifying new synergists from phytochemicals with recognized biological activities, specifically enzyme inhibition. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), and tamarack larch (Larix laricina (Du Roi) Koch) have been used by native Canadians as traditional medicine, specifically for the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties based on enzyme inhibitory activity. To identify the potential allelochemicals with synergistic activity, ethanol crude extracts and methanol/water fractions were separated by Sephadex LH-20 chromatographic column and tested for in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) inhibition activity using insecticide-resistant Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) midgut and fat-body homogenate. The fractions showing similar activity were combined and analyzed by ultra pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A lignan, (+)-lariciresinol 9'-p-coumarate, was identified from P. mariana cone extracts, and L. laricina and A. balsamea bark extracts. A flavonoid, taxifolin, was identified from P. mariana and P. banksiana cone extracts and L. laricina bark extracts. Both compounds inhibit GST activity with taxifolin showing greater activity compared to (+)-lariciresinol 9'-p-coumarate and the standard GST inhibitor, diethyl maleate. The results suggested that these compounds can be considered as potential new insecticide synergists. PMID:25270601

  16. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in varicocele patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Yin, L; Zhang, J Y

    2015-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) family represents a major group of detoxification and antioxidant enzymes. Studies have shown that high oxidative stress levels are associated with varicocele. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between GSTM1 and GSTT1 null polymorphisms and varicocele using a study group of 497 varicocele patients and 476 control subjects. A systematic literature search (for articles published up to September 2014) utilizing Google Scholar and PubMed was conducted. The chi-square-based Q test and I(2) index were used to evaluate data from retrieved studies. The possible publication bias was evaluated by Begg funnel plot and the Egger test. No statistically significant association was found between GSTM1 or GSTT1 null genotypes and varicocele in the overall data analysis. In a subgroup analysis, only the null GSTM1 genotype was observed at a significantly higher frequency in Caucasian varicocele patients. In the Chinese subgroup, no association was established between the GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes and this condition. More attention should be drawn to oxidative stress-related pathological manifestations for Caucasian varicocele patients. PMID:26782535

  17. Optical biosensor consisting of glutathione-S-transferase for detection of captan.