Science.gov

Sample records for acid ongoing clean-up

  1. Determination of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted SPE clean-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new liquid chromatography method to detect fusaric acid in maize is reported based on molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction clean-up (MISPE) using mimic-templated molecularly-imprinted polymers. Picolinic acid was used as a toxin analog for imprinting polymers during a thermolytic s...

  2. Diethylaminoethyl-cellulose clean-up of a large volume naphthenic acid extract.

    PubMed

    Frank, Richard A; Kavanagh, Richard; Burnison, B Kent; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Der Kraak, Glen Van; Solomon, Keith R

    2006-08-01

    The Athabasca oil sands of Alberta, Canada contain an estimated 174 billion barrels of bitumen. During oil sands refining processes, an extraction tailings mixture is produced that has been reported as toxic to aquatic organisms and is therefore collected in settling ponds on site. Investigation into the toxicity of these tailings pond waters has identified naphthenic acids (NAs) and their sodium salts as the major toxic components, and a multi-year study has been initiated to identify the principal toxic components within NA mixtures. Future toxicity studies require a large volume of a NA mixture, however, a well-defined bulk extraction technique is not available. This study investigated the use of a weak anion exchanger, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DEAE-cellulose), to remove humic-like material present after collecting the organic acid fraction of oil sands tailings pond water. The NA extraction and clean-up procedure proved to be a fast and efficient method to process large volumes of tailings pond water, providing an extraction efficiency of 41.2%. The resulting concentrated NA solution had a composition that differed somewhat from oil sands fresh tailings, with a reduction in the abundance of lower molecular weight NAs being the most significant difference. This reduction was mainly due to the initial acidification of tailings pond water. The DEAE-cellulose treatment had only a minor effect on the NA concentration, no noticeable effect on the NA fingerprint, and no significant effect on the mixture toxicity towards Vibrio fischeri. PMID:16469358

  3. Analysis of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up and ion-pair LC with diode array UV detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusaric acid is a phytotoxin and mycotoxin occasionally found in maize contaminated with Fusarium fungi. A selective sample clean-up procedure was developed to detect fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up coupled with ion-pair liquid chromatography...

  4. SIMPLE SAMPLE CLEAN UP PROCEDURE AND HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CYANURIC ACID IN HUMAN URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanuric acide (CA) is widely used as a chlorine stabilizer in outdoor pools. No simple method exists for CA measurement in the urine of exposed swimmers. The high hydrophilicity of CA makes usage of solid phase sorbents to extract it from urine nearly impossible because of samp...

  5. Passive extraction and clean-up of phenoxy acid herbicides in samples from a groundwater plume using hollow fiber supported liquid membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Fu; Toräng, Lars; Mayer, Philipp; Jönsson, Jan Ake

    2007-08-10

    Hollow fiber supported liquid membranes were applied for the passive extraction of phenoxy acid herbicides from water samples. Polypropylene hollow fiber membranes (240 microm i.d., 30 microm wall thickness, 0.05 microm pore size, 30 cm length) were impregnated with 2.0% tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in di-n-hexyl ether in the pores of the fiber wall to form a liquid membrane. They were then filled with basic solution in the lumen as acceptor and finally placed into the sample (donor). Complete extraction of phenoxy acid herbicides including 2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop, and mecoprop from an acidified sample (4 mL, adjusted to pH 1.5 with HCl) into basic acceptor (10 microL of 0.2M NaOH) was achieved after 4 h of shaking (100 rpm) resulting in an enrichment factor of 400 times. The acceptor was then neutralized by addition of HCl and injected into a HPLC system for the determination of the phenoxy acid herbicides. Environmentally relevant salinity (0-3.5% NaCl) and dissolved organic matter (0-25 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon) had no significant effect on the extraction. The method provided extraction efficiencies of more than 91%, detection limits of 0.3-0.6 microg/L, and combined extraction and clean up in one single step. This procedure was applied to determine aqueous concentrations of phenoxy acid herbicides in groundwater samples collected from an old dumping site (Cheminova, Denmark) with detected concentrations up to 5800 microg/L. Although the samples were very dirty with large amounts of suspended particles, non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and dissolved organic matters, good spike recoveries (80-126%) were obtained for 10 of the 11 samples. PMID:17449052

  6. Evaluation of a solid-phase extraction dual-layer carbon/primary secondary amine for clean-up of fatty acid matrix components from food extracts in multiresidue pesticide analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimelis, Olga; Yang, Yuhui; Stenerson, Katherine; Kaneko, Toshiro; Ye, Michael

    2007-09-21

    The use of dual-layer solid-phase extraction (SPE), a primary-secondary amine (PSA) in combination with graphitized carbon black (GCB), was evaluated for sample clean-up during multiresidue pesticide screening of agricultural and food products. The retention of fatty acids by the PSA sorbent was quantified and the effect of the elution solvent on the retention of fatty acid on the SPE cartridge was evaluated. The use of stronger elution solvents to elute certain pesticides from graphitized carbon was shown to interfere with the capacity of PSA to bind fatty acids. A suitable protocol was tested using GCB/PSA dual-layer SPE to clean-up several food matrices and to simultaneously screen multiple fortified pesticides with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. With a few exceptions, pesticide recoveries were between 85% and 110%, and sample-to-sample differences of less than 5% were achieved, demonstrating the versatile suitability of the dual-layer SPE to sample clean-up. PMID:17689545

  7. 48 CFR 36.512 - Cleaning up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cleaning up. 36.512... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.512 Cleaning up. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-12, Cleaning Up, in solicitations and contracts when a...

  8. 48 CFR 36.512 - Cleaning up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cleaning up. 36.512... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.512 Cleaning up. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-12, Cleaning Up, in solicitations and contracts when a...

  9. 48 CFR 36.512 - Cleaning up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cleaning up. 36.512... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.512 Cleaning up. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-12, Cleaning Up, in solicitations and contracts when a...

  10. 48 CFR 36.512 - Cleaning up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cleaning up. 36.512... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.512 Cleaning up. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-12, Cleaning Up, in solicitations and contracts when a...

  11. 48 CFR 36.512 - Cleaning up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cleaning up. 36.512... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.512 Cleaning up. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-12, Cleaning Up, in solicitations and contracts when a...

  12. Cleaning Up Our Drinking Water

    SciTech Connect

    Manke, Kristin L.

    2007-08-01

    Imagine drinking water that you wring out of the sponge you’ve just used to wash your car. This is what is happening around the world. Rain and snow pass through soil polluted with pesticides, poisonous metals and radionuclides into the underground lakes and streams that supply our drinking water. “We need to understand this natural system better to protect our groundwater and, by extension, our drinking water,” said Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Applied Geology and Geochemistry Group Manager, Wayne Martin. Biologists, statisticians, hydrologists, geochemists, geologists and computer scientists at PNNL work together to clean up contaminated soils and groundwater. The teams begin by looking at the complexities of the whole environment, not just the soil or just the groundwater. PNNL researchers also perform work for private industries under a unique use agreement between the Department of Energy and Battelle, which operates the laboratory for DOE. This research leads to new remediation methods and technologies to tackle problems ranging from arsenic at old fertilizer plants to uranium at former nuclear sites. Our results help regulators, policy makers and the public make critical decisions on complex environmental issues.

  13. TRACKING CLEAN UP AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    CONNELL, C.W.

    2005-05-27

    The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA), is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), The Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for cleaning up the Hanford Site. Established in the 1940s to produce material for nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford is often referred to as the world's large environmental cleanup project. The Site covers more than 580 square miles in a relatively remote region of southeastern Washington state in the US. The production of nuclear materials at Hanford has left a legacy of tremendous proportions in terms of hazardous and radioactive waste. From a waste-management point of view, the task is enormous: 1700 waste sites; 450 billion gallons of liquid waste; 70 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater; 53 million gallons of tank waste; 9 reactors; 5 million cubic yards of contaminated soil; 22 thousand drums of mixed waste; 2.3 tons of spent nuclear fuel; and 17.8 metric tons of plutonium-bearing material and this is just a partial listing. The agreement requires that DOE provide the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to the lead regulatory agency to help guide then in making decisions. The agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in it, or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The Action Plan that supports the TPA requires that Ecology and EPA have access to all data that is relevant to work performed, or to be performed, under the Agreement. Further, the Action Plan specifies two additional requirements: (1) that EPA, Ecology and their respective contractor staffs have access to all the information electronically, and (2) that the databases are accessible to, and used by, all personnel doing TPA

  14. An Optimized High Throughput Clean-Up Method Using Mixed-Mode SPE Plate for the Analysis of Free Arachidonic Acid in Plasma by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Qin, Suzi; Li, Linsen; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Qunjie; Wei, Junfu

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput sample preparation method was developed utilizing mixed-mode solid phase extraction (SPE) in 96-well plate format for the determination of free arachidonic acid in plasma by LC-MS/MS. Plasma was mixed with 3% aqueous ammonia and loaded into each well of 96-well plate. After washing with water and methanol sequentially, 3% of formic acid in acetonitrile was used to elute arachidonic acid. The collected fraction was injected onto a reversed phase column at 30°C with mobile phase of acetonitrile/water (70 : 30, v/v) and detected by LC-MS/MS coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve ranged from 10 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (r2 = 0.9999). The recoveries were in the range of 99.38% to 103.21% with RSD less than 6%. The limit of detection is 3 ng/mL. PMID:25873969

  15. Metalworkers clean up their waste

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1994-10-01

    This article describes how using methods such as chemical precipitation, filtration, and ion exchange, metal parts manufacturers are reducing the pollutants in their wastewater so it can be reused or safely discharged. Metalworking manufacturer are recovering useful materials, lowering their disposal costs, and reducing pollution by treating their wastewater with methods such as chemical precipitation and ion exchange so that it can be reused or safely discharged. They are also reducing wastes by recycling metalworking coolants. The major wastewater treatment technologies identified by the Environmental Protection Agency are chemical precipitation, or adding flocculants to bind waste particles together; membrane ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, in which waste is trapped when the water passes through a membrane; and ion exchange, in which specially formulated resins capture dissolved metal salts. Other treatment techniques cited by Elwood Forsht, chief of the chemicals and metals branch at the EPA, include electrowinning, which uses electrolysis to concentrate metallic ions in wastewater, and coolant recycling, a method that removes metal particles by centrifugal force and kills bacteria by pasteurization. Many metalworking operations create wastewater, including drilling, welding, soldering, surface finishing, electroplating, acid treatment, anodizing, assembly, and machining. Companies use wastewater treatment technologies to recycle their wastewater or clean it so that it meets EPA standards and can be discharged into a municipal waste system, thus avoiding high disposal costs.

  16. 48 CFR 52.236-12 - Cleaning Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cleaning Up. 52.236-12 Section 52.236-12 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED... Cleaning Up. As prescribed in 36.512, insert the following clause: Cleaning Up (APR 1984) The...

  17. 48 CFR 52.236-12 - Cleaning Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cleaning Up. 52.236-12 Section 52.236-12 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED... Cleaning Up. As prescribed in 36.512, insert the following clause: Cleaning Up (APR 1984) The...

  18. 48 CFR 52.236-12 - Cleaning Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cleaning Up. 52.236-12 Section 52.236-12 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED... Cleaning Up. As prescribed in 36.512, insert the following clause: Cleaning Up (APR 1984) The...

  19. 48 CFR 52.236-12 - Cleaning Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cleaning Up. 52.236-12 Section 52.236-12 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED... Cleaning Up. As prescribed in 36.512, insert the following clause: Cleaning Up (APR 1984) The...

  20. 48 CFR 52.236-12 - Cleaning Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cleaning Up. 52.236-12 Section 52.236-12 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED... Cleaning Up. As prescribed in 36.512, insert the following clause: Cleaning Up (APR 1984) The...

  1. Cockroaches probably cleaned up after dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Vršanský, Peter; van de Kamp, Thomas; Azar, Dany; Prokin, Alexander; Vidlička, L'ubomír; Vagovič, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaurs undoubtedly produced huge quantities of excrements. But who cleaned up after them? Dung beetles and flies with rapid development were rare during most of the Mesozoic. Candidates for these duties are extinct cockroaches (Blattulidae), whose temporal range is associated with herbivorous dinosaurs. An opportunity to test this hypothesis arises from coprolites to some extent extruded from an immature cockroach preserved in the amber of Lebanon, studied using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. 1.06% of their volume is filled by particles of wood with smooth edges, in which size distribution directly supports their external pre-digestion. Because fungal pre-processing can be excluded based on the presence of large particles (combined with small total amount of wood) and absence of damages on wood, the likely source of wood are herbivore feces. Smaller particles were broken down biochemically in the cockroach hind gut, which indicates that the recent lignin-decomposing termite and cockroach endosymbionts might have been transferred to the cockroach gut upon feeding on dinosaur feces. PMID:24324610

  2. Cockroaches Probably Cleaned Up after Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Vršanský, Peter; van de Kamp, Thomas; Azar, Dany; Prokin, Alexander; Vidlička, L'ubomír; Vagovič, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaurs undoubtedly produced huge quantities of excrements. But who cleaned up after them? Dung beetles and flies with rapid development were rare during most of the Mesozoic. Candidates for these duties are extinct cockroaches (Blattulidae), whose temporal range is associated with herbivorous dinosaurs. An opportunity to test this hypothesis arises from coprolites to some extent extruded from an immature cockroach preserved in the amber of Lebanon, studied using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. 1.06% of their volume is filled by particles of wood with smooth edges, in which size distribution directly supports their external pre-digestion. Because fungal pre-processing can be excluded based on the presence of large particles (combined with small total amount of wood) and absence of damages on wood, the likely source of wood are herbivore feces. Smaller particles were broken down biochemically in the cockroach hind gut, which indicates that the recent lignin-decomposing termite and cockroach endosymbionts might have been transferred to the cockroach gut upon feeding on dinosaur feces. PMID:24324610

  3. Helping nature clean up oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, A.

    1996-11-01

    Oil spills are nothing new. In fact, for millions of years crude oil has been seeping up to the Earth`s surface, and for all that time Mother Nature has been on the job with microbes, or bacteria, to harmlessly convert the oil to water and carbon dioxide gas. Not all bacteria are bad. True, some can make us sick, however, the good ones help us bake bread, brew beer, and even clean up oil spills by a process known as biodegradation. Oil and bacteria don`t easily get together because oil and water don`t mix and bacteria prefer to stay in water. After some oil tankers spills in the English Channel 25 years ago, major oil companies (Arco, BP, Exxon, and others) developed oil dispersant products-specialized chemicals that make oils and sea water mix. The simplest examples of similar wetting agents are soaps and detergents. Now, thanks to dispersants, the natural bacteria at sea can easily get to the oil and the normally slow biodegradation process goes rather quickly.

  4. 40 CFR 263.31 - Discharge clean up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discharge clean up. 263.31 Section 263.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... up. A transporter must clean up any hazardous waste discharge that occurs during transportation...

  5. 40 CFR 263.31 - Discharge clean up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discharge clean up. 263.31 Section 263.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... up. A transporter must clean up any hazardous waste discharge that occurs during transportation...

  6. 40 CFR 263.31 - Discharge clean up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discharge clean up. 263.31 Section 263.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... up. A transporter must clean up any hazardous waste discharge that occurs during transportation...

  7. 40 CFR 263.31 - Discharge clean up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discharge clean up. 263.31 Section 263.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... up. A transporter must clean up any hazardous waste discharge that occurs during transportation...

  8. 40 CFR 263.31 - Discharge clean up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO TRANSPORTERS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Hazardous Waste Discharges § 263.31 Discharge clean up. A transporter must clean up any hazardous waste discharge that occurs during transportation...

  9. Cleaning up the Streets of Denver

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, R.L.; Wood, T.R.; Hackett, J.R.; Sogue, A.

    2006-07-01

    Between 1913 and 1924, several Denver area facilities extracted radium from carnotite ore mined from the Paradox basin region of Colorado. Tailings or abandoned ores from these facilities were apparently incorporated into asphalt used to pave approximately 7.2 kilometers (4.5 miles) of streets in Denver. A majority of the streets are located in residential areas. The radionuclides are bound within the asphalt matrix and pose minimal risk unless they are disturbed. The City and County of Denver (CCoD) is responsible for controlling repairs and maintenance on these impacted streets. Since 2002, the CCoD has embarked on a significant capital improvement project to remove the impacted asphalt for secure disposal followed by street reconstruction. To date, Parsons has removed approximately 55 percent of the impacted asphalt. This paper discusses the history of the Denver Radium Streets and summarizes on-going project efforts. (authors)

  10. 36. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING BILL KEYS CLEANING UP AFTER THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING BILL KEYS CLEANING UP AFTER THE MILL RUN (NOTE SCREEN FROM MORTAR SETTING ON TABLE, STAMPS ARE HUNG UP). - Wall Street Gold Mill, Twentynine Palms, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Sulfide clean-up of solutions from heavy metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kislinskaya, G.E.; Kozachek, N.N.; Krasnova, G.M.; Shenk, N.I.

    1982-09-20

    The object of the present research was to determine the conditions for thorough clean-up of solutions from cadmium or mercury contamination by use of iron sulfide. Results indicated that the shape of the dependence of the degree of extraction of copper with iron sulfide on the pH value is analogous to the curve for cadmium; that is, copper, like cadmium, is precipitated by chemical reaction. In distinction from cadmium and copper, mercury is extracted by iron sulfide both in acid and also in neutral solutions, that is, it is possible to attain a direct ion exchange by reaction. At high pH values, only small amounts of iron go into solution, therefore FeS can be used very rationally for the extraction of both small (about 1 mg/liter), and also of large (about 1 mg/liter) amounts of mercury from solutions, which are nearly neutral. By adding sodium sulfide and a flocculant, one can accelerate the process of mercury precipitation, and also reduce the solution of iron sulfide. In the present case, iron sulfide plays the role of a substrate for the crystallization of mercury sulfide, since in dilute solutions the latter forms poorly filterable colloidal solutions. Thus when one uses fused iron sulfide with addition of sodium sulfide, a high degree of mercury extraction is attained, and the spent sorbent is filtered well.

  12. Bioremediation: environmental clean-up through pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra; Kang, Seung Hyun; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-10-01

    Given the immense risk posed by widespread environmental pollution by inorganic and organic chemicals, novel methods of decontamination and clean-up are required. Owing to the relatively high cost and the non-specificity of conventional techniques, bioremediation is a promising alternative technology for pollutant clean-up. Advances in bioremediation harness molecular, genetic, microbiology, and protein engineering tools and rely on identification of novel metal-sequestering peptides, rational and irrational pathway engineering, and enzyme design. Recent advances have been made for enhanced inorganic chemical remediation and organic chemical degradation using various pathway-engineering approaches and these are discussed in this review. PMID:18760355

  13. Marine Debris Clean-Ups as Meaningful Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.; Bacon, Joseph Scott

    2010-01-01

    This seven to eight week hands-on Marine Debris Clean-up Project used a service project to provide an introduction of marine science ecology, watershed interrelationships, the scientific method, and environmental stewardship to 8th grade middle school students. It utilized inquiry based learning to introduce marine debris sources and impacts to…

  14. The effect of water spray upon incineration flue gas clean-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haigang; Li, Bin; Liu, Shi; Pan, Zhonggang; Yan, Guizhang

    2000-06-01

    The existence of liquid water was found very important in incineration flue gas clean-up systems for enhancing the absorption of acid components contained. In a newly developed incineration flue gas clean-up tower, which works in a semi-dry mode, the water is injected in the form of spray to maximum its contact surface with the gas. The criteria for the design of the water nozzles would be high water concentration but no liquid impinging on the solid wall and complete evaporation inside the tower. In order to optimize the atomizer design, the effects of the spray type (hollow or solid cone), their initial droplet size distribution and water flow rate on the performance of the acid gas absorption were investigated. The liquid behaviour was studied with a fluid dynamic simulation code, and the overall performance was checked experimentally. This paper presents the use of a commercial CFD code, FLUENT, and some modifications made during such investigation. The modification includes the viscosity of the flue gas defined as a function of the temperature, and the initial mass fraction of different droplet size group described with an exponential distribution formula of Rosin-Rammler. The investigation results (the optimal spray parameters) were used to guide the water nozzle design. The general performance of the flue gas clean-up system measured during the plant operation complied with the design criteria.

  15. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period. PMID:26208666

  16. Clean-up of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In the early sixties a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to Research and Development was built at the French Atomic Energy Commission's centre at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR); it was named Building 18. More buildings were added during the decade: Building 54, storehouses and offices and Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research into natural and depleted uranium. These three buildings together constitute NLF57. Construction work took place between 1959 and 1962 and the buildings entered operation in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF57 involved spent fuel reprocessing studies, waste treatment processes and studies and production of transuranic elements with the related analytical methods development. The research and development program ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF57 clean-up program was launched to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimise HLW and MLW production during the dismantling work. The clean-up work was divided into categories by type to facilitate its organisation: treatment and removal of nuclear material, removal of radioactive sources, treatment and removal of organic and aqueous effluents, treatment and removal of solid waste, pumping out of the PETRUS tank, flushing and decontamination of the tanks and clean-up of buildings. (authors)

  17. Coupling detergent lysis/clean-up methodology with intact protein fractionation for enhanced proteome characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ritin; Dill, Brian; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    The expanding use of surfactants for proteome sample preparations has prompted the need to systematically optimize the application and removal of these MS-deleterious agents prior to proteome measurements. Here we compare four different detergent clean-up methods (Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, Chloroform/Methanol/Water (CMW) extraction, commercial detergent removal spin column method (DRS) and filter-aided sample preparation(FASP)) with respect to varying amounts of protein biomass in the samples, and provide efficiency benchmarks with respect to protein, peptide, and spectral identifications for each method. Our results show that for protein limited samples, FASP outperforms the other three clean-up methods, while at high protein amount all the methods are comparable. This information was used in a dual strategy of comparing molecular weight based fractionated and unfractionated lysates from three increasingly complex samples (Escherichia coli, a five microbial isolate mixture, and a natural microbial community groundwater sample), which were all lysed with SDS and cleaned up using FASP. The two approaches complemented each other by enhancing the number of protein identifications by 8%-25% across the three samples and provided broad pathway coverage.

  18. Tidd hot gas clean up program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Final Report on the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up Program covers the period from initial Proof-of-Concept testing in August, 1990, through final equipment inspections in May, 1995. The Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) system was installed in the Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Plant, which is the first utility-scale PFBC plant in the United States. Detailed design work on the project began in July, 1990, and site construction began in December, 1991. Initial operation of the system occurred in May, 1992, and the hot gas filter was commissioned in October, 1992. The test program ended in March, 1995, when the Tidd Plant was shut down following its four-year test program. Section 1.0 of this report is an executive summary of the project covering the project background, system description, test results and conclusions. Section 2.0 is an introduction covering the program objectives and schedule. Section 3.0 provides detailed descriptions of the system and its major components. Section 4.0 provides detailed results of all testing including observations and posttest inspection results. Sections 5.0 and 6.0 list the program conclusions and recommendations, respectively. Appendix I is a report prepared by Southern Research Institute on the properties of Tidd PFBC ash sampled during the test program. Appendix II is a report prepared by Westinghouse STC on the performance of candle filter fail-safe regenerator devices.

  19. Interim Site Assessment and Clean-up Guidebook

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    In April 1995 an Interim Site Investigation and Clean-up Guidebook (for petroleum hydrocarbon and volatile organic compound impacted sites) was developed for public use. The purpose of the Guidebook was to offer a new approach to the site cleanup process: one that reduces time, cuts costs, and establishes a defined endpoint for investigations and cleanup actions. The Guidebook provided a matrix to screen for low-risk contaminated sites. After a year of use, the Guidebook was revised in May 1996. The most notable change was in the Petroleum Hydrocarbon Section and the modification of the screening table for petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The changes considered the strong influence of lithology on contaminant transport and recognized the large attenuation of the long chain, heavy oil and tar, hydrocarbons in soils.

  20. Clean-up criteria for remediation of contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.; Wilson, J.R.; Sato, Chikashi

    1997-08-01

    {open_quotes}How clean is clean?{close_quotes} is a question commonly raised in the remediation of contaminated soils. To help with the answer, criteria are proposed to serve as guidelines for remedial actions and to define a clean-up level such that the remaining contaminant residuals in the soil will not violate the Drinking Water Standards (DWS). The equations for computing those criteria are developed from the principle of conservation of mass and are functions of the maximum concentration level in the water (MCL) and the sorption coefficient. A multiplier, ranging from 10 to 1000, is also factored into the soil standard equation to reflect the effectiveness of various remediation techniques. Maximum allowable concentration in the soil (MSCL) is presented for several contaminants which are being regulated at the present time. Future modifications are recommended for better estimates of the MSCLs as additional transport mechanisms are incorporated to account for other potentially dominant effects.

  1. Cleaning up the nuclear weapons complex: A herculean challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, K.N.; McGovern, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    For nearly five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors engaged in a highly secretive, complex, and massive endeavor to fabricate nuclear weapons for national security purposes. Large-scale production of nuclear weapons was an unprecedented undertaking requiring thousands of facilities, dozens of large tracts of land, huge volumes of dangerous materials, and great quantities of water. With the Cold Wars end and the emergence of new types of national security concerns, weapons production operations have, for the most part, ceased, and much of the secrecy under which they were shrouded has lifted. The subsequent revelation reveal at many sites tremendous volumes of soil and groundwater are contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous materials. Wastes stored for years pose substantial dangers, and many aging facilities that harbor highly radioactive and sensitive materials are deteriorating. The topics covered in this overview article include the following: more to `cleanup` than cleaning up; a fragmented regulatory regime; new regulatory regimes.

  2. Hudson River PCB clean-up to begin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christie Whitman signed the Record of Decision on 1 February to clean up a stretch of the Hudson River that has been contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The decision calls for dredging 2 million cubic meters of PCB-contaminated sediment from a 64-kilometer stretch of the upper Hudson to remove about 68,000 kilograms of PCBs.The plan follows years of scientific study about whether the PCBs were safely encased in the sediment or posed a continuing hazard, and concern over whether the PCBs can be safely removed without stirring up a larger pollution problem along the river. The EPA found that PCBs in the sediment are not safely buried because erosion and river flows can redistribute river sediment. The agency also found that although PCBs break down naturally over time, this degradation does not render them harmless.

  3. Recent trends at the state and federal level in accelerating CERCLA clean-ups

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, B.

    1996-12-31

    Efforts at accelerating remedial action at the federal level focus on the following: the Superfund accelerated clean-up model (SCAM); Brownfields economic redevelopment initiative; guidance documents and policies; and collaboration with state voluntary cleanup programs. At the state level efforts involved in accelerating clean-ups include voluntary clean-up programs and Brownfields initiatives.

  4. Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368

    SciTech Connect

    Guevara, K.C.; Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R.

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  5. Acetonitrile extraction and dual-layer solid phase extraction clean-up for pesticide residue analysis in propolis.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Propolis is a very complex mixture of substances that is produced by honey bees and is known to be a rather challenging matrix for residue analysis. Besides resins, flavonoids and phenols, high amount of wax is co-extracted resulting in immense matrix effects. Therefore a suitable clean-up is crucial and indispensable. In this study, a reliable solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was developed for pesticide residue analysis in propolis. The clean-up success was quickly and easily monitored by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with different detection possibilities. The final method consists of the extraction of propolis with acetonitrile according to the QuEChERS method followed by an effective extract purification on dual-layer SPE cartridges with spherical hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin/primary secondary amine as sorbent and a mixture of toluene/acetone (95:5, v/v) for elution. Besides fat-soluble components like waxes, flavonoids, and terpenoids, more polar compounds like organic acids, fatty acids, sugars and anthocyanins were also removed to large extent. Method performance was assessed by recovery experiments at spiking levels of 0.5 and 1mg/kg (n=5) for fourteen pesticides that are relevant for propolis. Mean recoveries determined by HPLC-MS against solvent standards were between 40 and 101%, while calculation against matrix-matched standards provided recoveries of 79-104%. Precision of recovery, assessed by relative standard deviations, were below 9%. Thus, the developed dual-layer SPE clean-up enables the reliable pesticide residue analysis in propolis and provides a suitable alternative to time-consuming clean-up procedures proposed in literature. PMID:27059398

  6. Environmental benefits of Boston Harbor clean-up projects

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, M.S.; Smith, W.M. )

    1990-01-09

    The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority has undertaken one of the largest public works projects in the country to control the pollution of Boston Harbor. The project includes construction of a new primary and secondary treatment plant and sludge treatment facilities, excavation of a long ocean outfall and diffuser, and a solution to the overflow of mixed sewage and stormwater during storms; it will take over twenty years and billions of dollars to construct. A comparison of the relative costs and environmental benefits of relative costs and environmental benefits of the various construction projects, and other pollution control strategies, shows that some projects are more cost-effective than others for solving specific pollution problems. The capture and treatment of combined sewer overflow (CSO) will result in a more dramatic reduction of pathogen contamination than will completion of the primary and secondary treatment plants. Although the flow of raw sewage is intermittent and relatively small, it has high concentrations of bacteria and viruses. On the other hand, the new treatment plants will be more important in reducing toxic contamination of fish and shellfish. In summary, all the planned clean-up projects appear to be necessary to reach the goal of a swimmable, fishable Boston Harbor.

  7. PRP: The Proven Solution for Cleaning Up Oil Spills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The basic technology behind PRP is thousands of microcapsules, tiny balls of beeswax with hollow centers. Water cannot penetrate the microcapsule s cell, but oil is absorbed right into the beeswax spheres as they float on the water s surface. This way, the contaminants, chemical compounds that originally come from crude oil such as fuels, motor oils, or petroleum hydrocarbons, are caught before they settle. PRP works well as a loose powder for cleaning up contaminants in lakes and other ecologically fragile areas. The powder can be spread over a contaminated body of water or soil, and it will absorb contaminants, contain them in isolation, and dispose of them safely. In water, it is important that PRP floats and keeps the oil on the surface, because, even if oil exposure is not immediately lethal, it can cause long-term harm if allowed to settle. Bottom-dwelling fish exposed to compounds released after oil spills may develop liver disease, in addition to reproductive and growth problems. This use of PRP is especially effective for environmental cleanup in sensitive areas like coral reefs and mangroves.

  8. Using Phytoremediation to Clean Up Contamination at Military Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Negri, M.C.; Schneider, J.F.; Gatliff, E.G.

    1997-07-01

    During and following World War II, wastes from the production of munitions and other military materials were disposed of using the best available practices acceptable at that time. However, these disposal methods often contaminated soil and groundwater with organic compounds and metals that require cleanup under current regulations. An emerging technology for cleaning contaminated soils and shallow groundwater is phytoremediation, an environmentally friendly, low- cost, and low-tech process. Phytoremediation encompasses all plant- influenced biological, chemical, and physical processes that aid in the uptake, degradation, and metabolism of contaminants by either plants or free-living organisms in the plant`s rhizosphere. A phytoremediation system can be viewed as a biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the soil and below-ground ecosystem for subsequent productive use. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been conducting basic and applied research in phytoremediation since 1990. Initial greenhouse studies evaluated salt-tolerant wetland plants to clean UP and reduce the volume of salty `produced water` from petroleum wells. Results of these studies were used to design a bioreactor for processing produced water that is being demonstrated at a natural gas well in Oklahoma; this system can reduce produced water volume by about 75% in less than eight days, representing substantial savings in waste disposal cost. During 1994, ANL conducted a TNT plant uptake and in situ remediation study in a ridge-and-furrow area used for the disposal of pink water at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant.

  9. Enhanced phyto-extraction not a feasible option to clean up uranium contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Duquene, Lise; Wannijn, Jean; Filip, Tack; Baeten, Joke

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A greenhouse experiment was set up to evaluate the potential of enhanced phyto-extraction to clean up U contaminated soils. One soil had a naturally high U concentration and the other soil was impacted by effluents from the former radium extraction industry. Enhancement of U solubility and uptake by plants (ryegrass and Indian mustard) was monitored after addition of 5 chemical amendments (5 mmol kg{sup -1} soil dry weight): citric acid, ammonium citrate-citric acid mixture, oxalic acid, EDDS and NTA. Uranium solubilization and uptake were highly influenced by the amendment applied and soil-plant combinations. Citric acid was most effective in increasing U solubility (up to 18-fold increase). Citric acid and the ammonium citrate-citric acid mixture were most effective in increasing U uptake by ryegrass (up to 6-fold). For Indian mustard, EDDS and citric acid were most effective (up to 9- fold). In the optimal scenario only 0.16 % of the total uranium present in the soil could be extracted with one harvest and it would take more than 200 years to reduce the initial uranium content with 10 %. Based on these results, we must conclude that phyto-extraction is not a feasible technique to decrease the uranium concentration of historically contaminated soils. (authors)

  10. Addressing the challenges of tetracycline analysis in soil: extraction, clean-up, and matrix effects in LC-MS.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Seamus; Locke, Jonas; Aga, Diana S

    2007-11-01

    An optimized extraction and clean-up method for the analysis of chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline antibiotics in soil is presented in this work. Soil extraction using different solvents was performed, but the use of a 50 : 50 (v/v) methanol : acetate buffer (pH 8) solvent mixture in a pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) system proved to give the best extraction efficiency and reproducibility. The effect of soil composition on the PLE extraction efficiency was also examined, and results indicated that recovery data for one soil is not necessarily consistent with other soil types containing different compositions of clay and organic matter content. The percent recoveries of the optimized PLE method varied between the soils and ranged from 22-99%, depending on soil type, and more specifically clay content. In addition, the extent of ionization suppression caused by co-extracted humic acids was examined in an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS), and a single quadrupole MS. It was found that under positive electrospray ionization, the single quadrupole MS was less susceptible to ionization suppression than the ion trap MS. Therefore, various sample clean-up procedures were evaluated to selectively reduce the amount of co-extracted humic acids in the soil extracts. The most effective clean-up was obtained from the use of StrataX sorbent in combination with a strong anion exchange cartridge. PMID:17968453

  11. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper...

  12. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper...

  13. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper...

  14. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper...

  15. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper...

  16. An investigation of critical parameters for optimum perforation clean-up

    SciTech Connect

    Hovem, K.; Joeranson, H.; Espedal, A.; Wilson, S.

    1995-12-31

    Field data presented in the paper suggest that an open-choke perforating practice improves perforation clean-up. An experimental and numerical investigation of this technique confirmed that an open-choke perforating practice leads to higher core flow efficiency compared to closed-choke perforating with subsequent clean-up flow.

  17. 75 FR 26098 - Safety Zone; Under Water Clean Up of Copper Canyon, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Under Water Clean Up of Copper Canyon, Lake... Clean up, which will involve 40 divers cleaning the river bottom in Lake Havasu. The Coast Guard is... responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. Energy Effects We have analyzed this rule...

  18. [Determination of indicator polychlorinated biphenyls in vegetable oils by double clean-up-gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Ding, Liping; Cai, Chunping; Wang, Danhong

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the residues of seven indicator polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in vegetable oils, a method was established for the determination of trace PCBs in vegetable oils by double clean-up coupled with gas chromatography (GC). After extracted with acetonitrile, the sample extract was concentrated to dryness followed by re-dissolving with hexane. And the solution was pretreated by adding concentrated sulfuric acid followed cleaned-up with silica gel in dispersive solid-phase extraction protocol, then analyzed by GC with external standard meth- od. Under the optimized chromatographic conditions, the analysis was carried out with a capillary column (HP-5, 30 m x 0.32 mm x 0.25 μm) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, and the sample volume was 1.00 μL. Monitoring with an electron-capture detector, all the target analytes were separated by temperature-programming of the column. Good linearities were obtained in the range of 10-500 μg/L for the seven indicator PCBs with the correlation coefficients greater than 0. 999. For different matrices, the limits of detection (S/N = 3) and limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) were in the range of 1.8-8.9 pg/kg and 5.9-29.8 μg/kg, respectively. At three spiked levels of 10, 20 and 100 μg/kg of the seven indicator PCBs in olive oil, palm oil and peanut oil blank samples, the average recoveries ranged from 71.0% to 105.5% with the RSDs of 4.0%-11.3%. The method is simple, rapid and accurate, and can be used for the routine analysis of the indicator PCBs in vegetable oils. PMID:25764663

  19. Diving behaviour of wildlife impacted by an oil spill: A clean-up and rehabilitation success?

    PubMed

    Chilvers, B L; Morgan, K M; Finlayson, G; Sievwright, K A

    2015-11-15

    The value of rehabilitating oiled wildlife is an on-going global debate. On October 5, 2011, the cargo vessel C/V Rena grounded on Astrolabe Reef, New Zealand (NZ), spilling over 300 tonnes of heavy fuel oil. As part of the Rena oil spill response, 383 little blue penguins (LBP, Eudyptula minor) were captured, cleaned, rehabilitated and released back into a cleaned environment. This research investigates foraging behaviour changes due either to the oil spill or by the rehabilitation process by comparing the diving behaviour of rehabilitated (n=8) and non-rehabilitated (n=6) LBPs and with LBP populations throughout NZ. Stabile isotope analysis of feathers was also used to investigate diet. There were no foraging behaviour differences between rehabilitated and non-rehabilitated LBPs and the overall diving behaviour of these LBPs have similar, if not less energetic, foraging behaviour than other LBPs in NZ. This suggests the rehabilitation process and clean-up undertaken after the Rena appears effective and helps justify the rehabilitation of oiled wildlife across the world. PMID:26424224

  20. High School Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts: An Ongoing Challenge for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damanhuri, Muhd Ibrahim Muhamad; Treagust, David F.; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Using a quantitative case study design, the "Acids-Bases Chemistry Achievement Test" ("ABCAT") was developed to evaluate the extent to which students in Malaysian secondary schools achieved the intended curriculum on acid-base concepts. Responses were obtained from 260 Form 5 (Grade 11) students from five schools to initially…

  1. Historical Waste Retrieval and Clean-up Operations at Nuclear facility no.56, at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Santucci, C.

    2008-01-15

    Among the different activities of the CEA research centre in Cadarache, located in the south of France, one of the most important involves cleaning, cleansing dismantling, decommissioning, and recovery of legacy wastes. This presentation will give an overview of the waste retrieval project from the historical interim storage facility called INB 56. The project is divided into three different sub-projects: the historical unpacked waste retrieval, the historical canister retrieval and the draining and clean-up of the spent fuel pools. All the described operations are conducted in accordance with the ALARA principle and the optimization of the waste categorization. The overall project, including the complete clean-up of the facility and its de-licensing, is due to end by 2020. The aim of this document is to outline the general ongoing historical waste retrieval operations and future projects on the INB 56 at the Cadarache research centre. In the final analysis, it can be seen that most of the waste is to be sent to the new CEDRA facility. Nevertheless one major goal of this project is to optimize the waste categorization and therefore to send the canisters to the ANDRA LLW site whenever possible. Two means will allow us to reach this goal: - The sorting out of un-packed waste in order to constitute a LLW canister - A wide range of measurements (gamma spectrometry, neutron measurement, tomography) in order to assess the exact nature of the contents in the historical canisters. Taking waste treatment and conditioning into account well in advance is a factor of prime importance that must be managed early in the elaboration of the decommissioning scenario. Precise knowledge of the physical and radiological inventories is of the utmost importance in defining the best waste pathway. Overall operations on the facility are due to end by 2020 including complete clean-up of the facility and its de-licensing.

  2. Separation and determination of citrinin in corn using HPLC fluorescence detection assisted by molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction clean-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A liquid chromatography based method to detect citrinin in corn was developed using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) sample clean-up. Molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized using 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid as the template and an amine functional monomer. Density func...

  3. EVALUATION OF PERSONAL COOLING DEVICES FOR A DIOXIN CLEAN-UP OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study investigated the use of personal coolers to increase worker productivity and safety while working at elevated, ambient temperatures cleaning up dioxin contaminated soil.^The study included laboratory tests to measure the thermal characteristics of the chemical protectiv...

  4. Passive treatment technology cleans up colorado mining waste

    SciTech Connect

    Morea, S.; Olsen, R. ); Wildeman, T. )

    1990-12-01

    This article describes the performance of a module designed to treat acid mine drainage from an mining tunnel. The site is one of the many abandoned mineral mines in Colorado. At optimum conditions passive treatment removed up to 98% of the zinc, 99% of the copper, 94% of the lead, and 86% of the iron in the mine drainage. It also increased pH from 3.0 to a value greater than 6.5. This treatment meets the need for a low cost operating and maintenance system. Because of the success of the pilot plant, the project team has obtained a Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program grant from the EPA to continue operating the pilot plant for two additional years and to prepare the first design manual on passive treatment technology.

  5. Attitudes toward managing hazardous waste: What should be cleaned up and who should pay for it

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, J.; Kunreuther, H. ); Gowda, R. )

    1993-04-01

    Hazardous waste policy in the United States uses a liability-based approach, including strict, retroactive, and joint and several liability. To assess attitudes toward these basic principles of liability, and toward priorities for clean-up of wastes, a questionnaire was mailed to legislators, judges, executives of oil and chemical companies, environmentalists, and economists. The questionnaire consisted of abstract, simplified cases, which contrasted basic principles rather than dealing with real-world scenarios. Subjects were asked how they would allocate clean-up costs between companies and government as a function of such factors as adherence to standards, adoption of best available technology (BAT), and influence of penalties on future behavior. Most subjects felt that, if the company followed government standards or used the best available technology (BAT), it should pay for only a portion of the clean-up cost, with the government paying the rest. In general, responses did not support the principles underlying current law - strict, retroactive, and joint-and-several liability. Most subjects were more interested in polluters paying for damages than in deterrence or future benefit - even to the extent that they would have harmless' waste sites cleaned up. A bias was found toward complete clean-up of some sites, or zero risk.' Different groups of subjects gave similar answers, although more committed environmentalists were more willing to make companies pay and to clean up waste regardless of the cost. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Mercury-binding membranes for flue gas clean-up

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Franklin O. Kroh; Thane Morgan

    2001-07-31

    All Phase I objectives were met. In the Phase I program, TPL developed a material, T- 450, capable of removing elemental mercury from air. It was found to have high porosity, good mechanical strength, good affinity for aqueous ionic mercury, and good stability to hot acidic gas. The material, used as a granular solid, was tested for adsorption of mercury in two protocols, one involving static room-temperature air and one using flowing hot air. In each case, it was superior to activated carbon. The following results were obtained: 1. Sol-gel methods were found to be applicable for synthesis of silicates containing oxidized thiol (disulfide) groups. 2. Synthetic parameters were determined for silicates with a variety of physical properties and performances. 3. Measurement of physical properties indicate high porosity strength, and stability to conditions found in flue gases. 4. The Hg° adsorption of T-450 was superior to that of activated carbon; static testing indicated a 2.4-fold increase in mercury adsorption, while a flow system mimicking hot flue gas indicated a 3.6-fold increase in Hg adsorption. 5. Economic analysis indicated that T-450 is a strong candidate for scale-up and commercial development. For the cost of removing Hg from flue gas, a savings of 23.5% is estimated, relative to use of activated carbon.

  7. Cleaning up

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, T.S.

    1993-02-01

    This article reports on the electronics manufacturer's response to findings that chemicals used in manufacturing integrated circuits induced miscarriages in plant workers and other environmental problems such as ozone depletion and the use of heavy metals and toxic gases in manufacturing. The topics of the article include the finding that a photoresist is at fault, the phase-out of ethylene glycol ethers, alternatives to ethylene glycol ethers, ozone-eating CFCs, use of citrus derived substitutes for CFCs, alternative manufacturing processes, substitutes for other ozone depleting chemicals, and the use of heavy metals in electronics manufacturing.

  8. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  9. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  10. Oak Ridge Cleanup Vision: Moving to the Future by Cleaning Up the Past - 13291

    SciTech Connect

    Cange, Susan M.; Wieland, Christopher C.; DePaoli, Susan M.

    2013-07-01

    received buy-in from the leadership in Headquarters, the regulators, and the community. Issues EM was facing in 2009 are presented. Resulting lessons learned and subsequent changes that the Office has gone through in the past several years in order to improve performance in the safe execution of work, relationships with external stakeholders, and communications both internally and externally are discussed. Results of these efforts are provided as a summary of Program accomplishments, including a strong focus on the future. EM's motto, Moving to the Future by Cleaning up the Past, will be demonstrated through the Program's mission, which includes protecting the region's health and environment; ensuring the continuation of ongoing vital missions being conducted by DOE on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and making clean land available for future use at all three sites, with a near-term focus on Re-industrialization of ETTP. (authors)

  11. Kinetics of combined SO/sub 2//NO in flue gas clean-up

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.

    1985-03-01

    The kinetics of reactions involving SO/sub 2/, NO, and ferrous chelate additives in wet flue gas simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification scrubbers are discussed. The relative importance of these reactions are assessed. The relevance of these reactions to spray dryer processes for combined SO/sub 2//NO flue gas clean-up is addressed. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Exposure and Subjective Symptoms in Residents Participating in Clean-Up Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Eun-Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Choi, Yeyong; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Hur, Jongil; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Im, Hosub

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to examine the relationship between crude oil exposure and physical symptoms among residents participating in clean-up work associated with the Hebei Spirit oil spill, 2007 in Korea. Methods A total of 288 residents responded to a questionnaire regarding subjective physical symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and clean-up activities that occurred between two and eight weeks after the accident. Additionally, the urine of 154 of the respondents was analyzed for metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. To compare the urinary levels of exposure biomarkers, the urine of 39 inland residents who were not directly exposed to the oil spill were analyzed. Results Residents exposed to oil remnants through clean-up work showed associations between physical symptoms and the exposure levels defined in various ways, including days of work, degree of skin contamination, and levels of some urinary exposure biomarkers of VOCs, metabolites and metals, although no major abnormalities in urinary exposure biomarkers were observed. Conclusions This study provides evidence of a relationship between crude oil exposure and acute human health effects and suggests the need for follow-up to evaluate the exposure status and long-term health effects of clean-up participants. PMID:22125768

  13. Case Study: Using Microbe Molecular Biology for Gulf Oil Spill Clean Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This case has the student actively investigate the regulation of expression of a novel bacterial gene in the context of attempts to solve a real world problem, clean up of the April 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Although the case is fictitious, it is based on factual gene regulatory characteristics of oil-degrading…

  14. TECHNICAL APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZING AND CLEANING UP BROWNFIELDS SITES: GUIDANCE DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-1741 SAIC. Technical Approaches to Characterizing and Cleaning up Brownfields Sites. EPA/625/R/00/009 (NTIS PB2002-105021) , Available: 68-C7-0011. The guidance document gives assistance to communities, decision-makers, states and municipalities, academia, and the p...

  15. Efficiency of different protocols for enamel clean-up after bracket debonding: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sigilião, Lara Carvalho Freitas; Marquezan, Mariana; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos; Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the efficiency of six protocols for cleaning-up tooth enamel after bracket debonding. Methods: A total of 60 premolars were divided into six groups, according to the tools used for clean-up: 12-blade bur at low speed (G12L), 12-blade bur at high speed (G12H), 30-blade bur at low speed (G30L), DU10CO ORTHO polisher (GDU), Renew System (GR) and Diagloss polisher (GD). Mean roughness (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) of enamel surface were analyzed with a profilometer. Paired t-test was used to assess Ra and Rz before and after enamel clean-up. ANOVA/Tukey tests were used for intergroup comparison. The duration of removal procedures was recorded. The association between time and variation in enamel roughness (∆Ra, ∆Rz) were evaluated by Pearson's correlation test. Enamel topography was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: In Groups G12L and G12H, original enamel roughness did not change significantly. In Groups G30L, GDU, GR and GD, a smoother surface (p < 0.05) was found after clean-up. In Groups G30L and GD, the protocols used were more time-consuming than those used in the other groups. Negative and moderate correlation was observed between time and (∆Ra, ∆Rz); Ra and (∆Ra, ∆Rz); Rz (r = - 0.445, r = - 0.475, p < 0.01). Conclusion: All enamel clean-up protocols were efficient because they did not result in increased surface roughness. The longer the time spent performing the protocol, the lower the surface roughness. PMID:26560825

  16. Improved clean-up for the determination of lasalocid in 'difficult' food matrices.

    PubMed

    Tarbin, J A; Rawlings, E; Tyler, D; Sharman, M

    2002-01-01

    Methodology has been developed for the determination of lasalocid in analytically 'difficult' matrices such as processed and spiced foods. The procedure was based on an existing silica-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up to which was added a novel NH2 SPE step before HPLC with fluorescence detection. Use of the additional step enabled the determination of lasalocid in matrices such as baby food, meat pies ('pasties'), etc. Analysis of these matrices was not possible using the standard clean-up on its own. Chromatography showed a massive reduction in the amount of co-extractives and interferences. Validation data were obtained down to the 10-40 mg kg(-1) level for a range of products. Recoveries ranged from 74% at 10 microg kg(-1) for pork sausages to 96% at 40 microg kg(-1) for meat pies. PMID:11817373

  17. An alternative clean-up column for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Ndunda, Elizabeth N; Madadi, Vincent O; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-12-01

    The need for continuous monitoring of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has necessitated the development of analytical techniques that are sensitive and selective with minimal reagent requirement. In light of this, we developed a column for clean-up of soil and sediment extracts, which is less demanding in terms of the amount of solvent and sorbent. The dual-layer column consists of acidified silica gel and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). MIPs were synthesized via aqueous suspension polymerization using PCB 15 as the dummy template, 4-vinylpyridine as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker and the obtained particles characterized via SEM, BET, and batch rebinding assays. Pre-concentration of the spiked real-world water sample using MISPE gave recoveries between 85.2 and 104.4% (RSD < 8.69). On the other hand, the specific dual-layer column designed for clean-up of extracts from complex matrices provided recoveries of 91.6-102.5% (RSD < 4%) for spiked soil, which was comparable to clean-up using acidified silica (70.4-90.5%; RSD < 3.72%) and sulfoxide modified silica (89.7-103.0%; RSD < 13.0%). However, the polymers were reusable maintaining recoveries of 79.8-111.8% after 30 cycles of regeneration and re-use, thereby availing a cost-effective clean-up procedure for continuous monitoring of PCBs. Method detection limits were 0.01-0.08 ng g(-1) and 0.002-0.01 ng mL(-1) for solid matrices and water, respectively. PMID:26560633

  18. Immuno-ultrafiltration as a new strategy in sample clean-up of aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Elisabeth Viktoria; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Chung, Duck-Hwa; Zentek, Jürgen; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim

    2009-05-01

    The present paper describes the development of a new clean-up strategy for the analysis of aflatoxins (AFs) in food. The sample preparation method is based on immuno-ultrafiltration (IUF) which, in contrast to immunoaffinity chromatography, makes use of antibodies in free form. After selecting an appropriate ultrafiltration (UF) device and optimizing different operation conditions the IUF method was applied to the clean-up of maize and rice. Quantification of AFs was carried out by HPLC and fluorescence detection, after postcolumn derivatization in a Kobracell. The IUF method was shown to be as selective as sample clean-up using commercial immunoaffinity columns. Recovery rates and RSD for the AFs G(2), G(1), B(2) and B(1) in spiked rice were found to be 76 +/- 3, 76 +/- 2, 83 +/- 5 and 99 +/- 14%, respectively. The analysis of a FAPAS (food analysis performance assessment scheme) maize material resulted in AFs concentrations which were in the range assigned by the producer of the reference material. PMID:19472274

  19. Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Nacht

    2000-02-01

    The Sectored Clean-up Work Plan (SCWP) replaces the Housekeeping Category Corrective Action Unit Work Plan and provides a strategy to be used for conducting housekeeping activities using a sectored clean-up approach. This work plan provides a process by which one or more existing housekeeping category Corrective Action Sites (CASS) from the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and/or non-FFACO designated waste site(s) are grouped into a sector for simultaneous remediation and cleanup. This increases effectiveness and efficiencies in labor, materials, equipment, cost, and time. This plan is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to expedite work in a more organized and efficient approach. The objectives of this plan are to: Group housekeeping FFACO CASS and non-FFACO housekeeping sites into sectors and remediate during the same field visit; Provide consistent documentation on FFACO CAS and non-FFACO clean-up activities; Perform similar activities under one approved document; Remediate areas inside the Deactivation and Decommissioning facilities and compounds in a campaign-style remediation; and Increase efficiencies and cost-effectiveness, accelerate cleanups, reduce mobilization, demobilization, and remediation costs.

  20. Clean-up of a pesticide-lanolin mixture by gel permeation chromatography.

    PubMed

    López-Mesas, M; Crespi, M; Brach, J; Mullender, J P

    2000-12-01

    In this study, the efficiency of a clean-up method by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for the separation of pesticides from lanolin is analyzed. The pesticides analyzed belong to two different families, organophosphorous and synthetic pyrethroids. Lanolin, a standard mixture of the pesticides, and a lanolin-pesticides mixture are injected in a GPC column. The recoveries and elution times from the GPC column of lanolin (by a gravimetric method) and pesticides (by gas chromatography-electron capture detector) are determined. From this column, a good separation of the lanolin-pesticides mixture is observed. PMID:11144515

  1. Determination of amphetamines in hair by integrating sample disruption, clean-up and solid phase derivatization.

    PubMed

    Argente-García, A; Moliner-Martínez, Y; Campíns-Falcó, P; Verdú-Andrés, J; Herráez-Hernández, R

    2016-05-20

    The utility of matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) for the direct analysis of amphetamines in hair samples has been evaluated, using liquid chromatography (LC) with fluorescence detection and precolumn derivatization. The proposed approach is based on the employment of MSPD for matrix disruption and clean-up, followed by the derivatization of the analytes onto the dispersant-sample blend. The fluorogenic reagent 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC) has been used for derivatization. Different conditions for MSPD, analyte purification and solid phase derivatization have been tested, using amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (MET), ephedrine (EPE) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as model compounds. The results have been compared with those achieved by using ultrasound-assisted alkaline digestion and by MSPD combined with conventional solution derivatization. On the basis of the results obtained, a methodology is proposed for the analysis of amphetamines in hair which integrates sample disruption, clean-up and derivatization using a C18 phase. Improved sensitivity is achieved with respect to that obtained by the alkaline digestion or by the MSPD followed by solution derivatization methods. The method can be used for the quantification of the tested amphetamines within the 2.0-20.0ng/mg concentration interval, with limits of detection (LODs) of 0.25-0.75ng/mg. The methodology is very simple and rapid (the preparation of the sample takes less than 15min). PMID:27108048

  2. Application of electrokinetics for stimulating microbial clean-up of contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I.; Lear, G.

    2006-05-01

    Given sufficient time there are few synthetic compounds that can resist microbial degradation, a fact exploited in environmental clean-up. Despite this the performance of micro-organisms in remedial technologies is often sub-optimal. There are many reasons for the failure of indigenous microbial communities to reduce contaminant concentrations, including issues of bioavailability and the inability of the contaminants to switch on genes (catabolic) responsible for contaminant degradation. Even if the presence of the required catabolic genes is confirmed, there continues to be a significant need to develop procedures to stimulate their activity. We have investigated the potential of soil electrokinetics (3-4 A m-2) to stimulate microbial degradation of organic pollutants and move the soil contaminants relative to the degradative microorganisms, so increasing contact between the two components. Using soils contaminated with pentachlorophenol as our model laboratory system, we have demonstrated that the technique is effective at causing gross and controlled movement of PCP through soils at the laboratory-scale. It can also stimulate rates (up to 25% over that of the control) by which introduced bacteria degrade the contaminant. The additional potential benefits of electrokinetics in regard to stimulating microbial activity and soil clean-up will be discussed.

  3. Early aging in Chernobyl clean-up workers: long-term study.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, V; Kryukov, V; Samedova, E; Emelianova, I; Ryzhova, I

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents data of long-term open prospective study. 312 male clean-up workers, who participated in elimination of the Chernobyl disaster consequences in 1986-87, were observed and examined in Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry. The average age of patients was 57,0 ± 6,8 years. All patients were diagnosed with psychoorganic syndrome, caused by combination of different factors, which led to early cerebrovascular pathology, which was confirmed by clinical, neuropsychological, and instrumental examination. Anamnesis and the level of social adaptation were also assayed. Clinical estimation was done with the use of specially developed Clinical Psychopathological Chart. All the symptoms were divided into 4 groups (asthenic, psychovegetative, dysthymic, and cognitive symptom-complexes). No pronounced signs of dementia were observed. The control group included 44 clean-up workers without mental disorders. Predomination of various exogenous factors before and after accident was noted. Therapy included different vasotropic remedies, as well as family therapy, art therapy, and cognitive training. The possibilities of the reverse development of symptoms were statistically proved. The results allow making a conclusion that these disorders could not be explained either by radiation effects or by PTSD but connected with cerebrovascular pathology. PMID:25692150

  4. Spinning filter separation system for oil spill clean-up operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrle, J.; Fischer, E.C.; Kenney, W.P.; Korczynski, J.F.; Gracik, T.D.

    1996-09-26

    According to current technology, effective clean up of oil spills from the surface of ocean water is performed by an oil sweeper vessel within which oil contaminated water is collected for transport to remotely located on-shore equipment within which oil separation and disposal is performed. The processing of large quantities of oil polluted ocean water is accordingly time consuming as well as costly. It is therefore an important object of the present invention to provide a less costly oil spill clean up system involving more rapid processing of large quantities of oil polluted ocean water. In accordance with the present invention, oil polluted ocean water is processed at an oil spill location by continuous separation during pressurized flow of the water through at least two separator devices within which successive reduction in oil concentration is effected with respect to a separated portion of the water by filtered flow through porous membrane walls to correspondingly increase the oil concentration within the other remaining portion of water being processed. The first portion of the processed water when sufficiently reduced in oil concentration is discharged for return to the oil spill location, while the remaining portion is collected until a sufficient level of oil concentration therein is achieved to permit disposal thereof by burning at the oil spill site.

  5. Early Aging in Chernobyl Clean-Up Workers: Long-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, V.; Kryukov, V.; Samedova, E.; Emelianova, I.; Ryzhova, I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents data of long-term open prospective study. 312 male clean-up workers, who participated in elimination of the Chernobyl disaster consequences in 1986-87, were observed and examined in Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry. The average age of patients was 57,0 ± 6,8 years. All patients were diagnosed with psychoorganic syndrome, caused by combination of different factors, which led to early cerebrovascular pathology, which was confirmed by clinical, neuropsychological, and instrumental examination. Anamnesis and the level of social adaptation were also assayed. Clinical estimation was done with the use of specially developed Clinical Psychopathological Chart. All the symptoms were divided into 4 groups (asthenic, psychovegetative, dysthymic, and cognitive symptom-complexes). No pronounced signs of dementia were observed. The control group included 44 clean-up workers without mental disorders. Predomination of various exogenous factors before and after accident was noted. Therapy included different vasotropic remedies, as well as family therapy, art therapy, and cognitive training. The possibilities of the reverse development of symptoms were statistically proved. The results allow making a conclusion that these disorders could not be explained either by radiation effects or by PTSD but connected with cerebrovascular pathology. PMID:25692150

  6. Estimation of the uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps in pesticide residue analysis of plant commodities.

    PubMed

    Omeroglu, P Yolci; Ambrus, A; Boyacioglu, D

    2013-01-01

    Extraction and clean-up constitute important steps in pesticide residue analysis. For the correct interpretation of analytical results, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps should be taken into account when the combined uncertainty of the analytical result is estimated. In the scope of this study, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps were investigated by spiking (14)C-labelled chlorpyrifos to analytical portions of tomato, orange, apple, green bean, cucumber, jackfruit, papaya and starfruit. After each step, replicate measurements were carried out with a liquid scintillation counter. Uncertainties in extraction and clean-up steps were estimated separately for every matrix and method combination by using within-laboratory reproducibility standard deviation and were characterised with the CV of recoveries. It was observed that the uncertainty of the ethyl acetate extraction step varied between 0.8% and 5.9%. The relative standard uncertainty of the clean-up step with dispersive SPE used in the method known as QuEChERS was estimated to be around 1.5% for tomato, apple and green beans. The highest variation of 4.8% was observed in cucumber. The uncertainty of the clean-up step with gel permeation chromatography ranged between 5.3% and 13.1%, and it was relatively higher than that obtained with the dispersive SPE method. PMID:23216411

  7. Development of sample preparation method for auxin analysis in plants by vacuum microwave-assisted extraction combined with molecularly imprinted clean-up procedure.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuling; Li, Yuanwen; Zhang, Yi; Li, Gongke; Chen, Yueqin

    2011-04-01

    A novel sample preparation method for auxin analysis in plant samples was developed by vacuum microwave-assisted extraction (VMAE) followed by molecularly imprinted clean-up procedure. The method was based on two steps. In the first one, conventional solvent extraction was replaced by VMAE for extraction of auxins from plant tissues. This step provided efficient extraction of 3-indole acetic acid (IAA) from plant with dramatically decreased extraction time, furthermore prevented auxins from degradation by creating a reduced oxygen environment under vacuum condition. In the second step, the raw extract of VMAE was further subjected to a clean-up procedure by magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) beads. Owing to the high molecular recognition ability of the magnetic MIP beads for IAA and 3-indole-butyric acid (IBA), the two target auxins in plants can be selectively enriched and the interfering substance can be eliminated by dealing with a magnetic separation procedure. Both the VMAE and the molecularly imprinted clean-up conditions were investigated. The proposed sample preparation method was coupled with high-performance liquid chromatogram and fluorescence detection for determination of IAA and IBA in peas and rice. The detection limits obtained for IAA and IBA were 0.47 and 1.6 ng/mL and the relative standard deviation were 2.3% and 2.1%, respectively. The IAA contents in pea seeds, pea embryo, pea roots and rice seeds were determined. The recoveries were ranged from 70.0% to 85.6%. The proposed method was also applied to investigate the developmental profiles of IAA concentration in pea seeds and rice seeds during seed germination. PMID:20953778

  8. Molecularly imprinted polymers for the clean-up of a basic drug from environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Florence; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Pichon, Valérie; Tuffal, Gilles; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2006-12-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized and evaluated to selectively extract an alpha-blocker, i.e. alfuzosin, from human plasma. The synthesis of the MIP was performed in dichloromethane with methacrylic acid as monomer and the target drug as template. A first series of experiments was carried out in dichloromethane to estimate the potential of the MIP in its specific recognition medium, i.e. dichloromethane, by developing a selective procedure and by measuring the capacity of the sorbent. An optimized procedure was developed for the selective extraction of alfuzosin with a recovery close to 100% in this medium and a specific capacity of 1.3 micromol g(-1) of MIP was measured. A study in aqueous media was also carried out by a comprehensive approach of the retention mechanism in order to build a selective procedure of extraction. The effects of the amount and of the charge of cations were studied and an optimal pH value was defined to limit matrix effects. Then, the alfuzosin MIP was then directly used to selectively extract the target drug from human plasma with an extraction recovery of 60%. Lastly, a soil was extracted by a pressurized solvent and the resulting extract was cleaned up on the MIP, showing the possibility to use this selective sorbent for the sample treatment of various complex matrices. PMID:17055520

  9. Cleaning-up atrazine-polluted soil by using Microbial Electroremediating Cells.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Garay, Ainara; Boltes, Karina; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradation of pollutants in soil is greatly limited by the availability of terminal electron acceptors required for supporting microbial respiration. Such limitation can be overcome if soil-buried electrodes accept the electrons released in the microbial metabolism. We propose the term bioelectroventing for such a environmental treatment. The process would be performed in a device so-called Microbial Electroremediating Cell. Indeed, our studies demonstrate that the presence of electrodes as electron acceptors effectively stimulated by 5-fold the biodegradation rate of the herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropyl amino-1,3,5-triazine) in comparison with soil natural attenuation. Furthermore, a different set of toxicological test using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata green alga e, Salmonella typhimorium bacteria and Sorghum saccharatum plant seeds respectively, confirm that atrazine-polluted soil can be effectively cleaned-up in short time by the use of MERCs. PMID:27448317

  10. Soil clean up by in-situ aeration. 6. Effects of variable permeabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Lahoz, C.; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M. ); Wilson, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    Soil vapor stripping (vacuum extraction) has become an important tool in the remediation of hazardous waste sites contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose zone. A mathematical model for in-situ soil vapor stripping is developed and used to examine the effects of a spatially variable pneumatic permeability tensor on the rate of clean-up of a site contaminated with volatile organic compounds. Runs are made with low-permeability clay lenses placed at various locations in the domain of interest; also the effect of soil moisture distribution on the soil gas flow field is examined. The model permits one to carry out a sensitivity analysis of the effects of heterogeneity in the permeability, and to develop strategies for minimizing the damaging effects of domains of low permeability.

  11. Studies of leukemia and thyroid disease among Chernobyl clean-up workers from the Baltics

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Tekkel, M.; Rahu, M.

    1997-03-01

    Following the reactor accident at Chernobyl in late April of 1986, hundreds of thousands of men from throughout the former Soviet Union were sent to Chernobyl to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris, and help decontaminate the local environment. They remained for an average of three months and were allowed to accumulate up to 25 cGy of radiation before being sent home. Doses for some workers may have exceeded the allowable limit. The experience of Chernobyl clean-up workers is potentially informative about cancer risk associated with protracted exposure to low levels of radiation. Cohorts of clean-up workers from the Baltic Republics were assembled for study, based on military records and other lists. The study population includes 4,833 men from Estonia 5,709 from Latvia and at least 5,446 from Lithuania, where a pilot study is underway. They are being monitored for cancer incidence through linkages with the corresponding national cancer registries. Biodosimetric assays, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosome translocation analysis and the glycophorin A (GPA) somatic cell mutation assay, are being used to supplement information about radiation doses from worker records and questionnaires. Thyroid screening examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsies were performed on nearly 2,000 workers in the Estonian cohort (mean age, 40 y) during the spring of 1995, nine years after the reactor accident. The study is still in progress. Work began first in Estonia, and results presented here pertain to this subgroup except as otherwise noted. The average age at the time of arrival at Chernobyl was 31 years. 62% were sent in 1986. Possible reasons for the apparent absence or rarity of radiation-induced thyroid nodules include low and protracted doses, low susceptibility among men exposed as adults, and insufficient passage of time since the accident.

  12. Enamel Surface Roughness after Debonding of Orthodontic Brackets and Various Clean-Up Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Akbari, Majid; Akbari, Javad; Dabiri, Ghahraman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate enamel roughness after adhesive removal using different burs and an Er:YAG laser. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of forty human premolars were sealed by two layers of nail varnish, except for a circular area of 3 mm in diameter on the middle third. The enamel surfaces were initially subjected to profilometry analysis and four parameters of surface irregularity (Ra, Rq, Rt and Rz) were recorded. Following bracket bonding and debonding, adhesive remnants were removed by tungsten carbide burs in low- or high- speed handpieces (group 1 and 2, respectively), an ultrafine diamond bur (group 3) or an Er:YAG laser (250 mJ, long pulse, 4 Hz) (group 4), and surface roughness parameters were measured again. Then, the buccal surfaces were polished and the third profilometry measurements were performed. Results: The specimens that were cleaned with a low speed tungsten carbide bur showed no significant difference in surface irregularity between the different treatment stages (p>0.05). Surface roughness increased significantly after clean-up with the diamond bur and the Er:YAG laser (p<0.01). In comparison between groups, adhesive removal with tungsten carbide burs at slow- or high-speed handpieces produced the lowest, while enamel clean-up with the Er:YAG laser caused the highest values of roughness measurements (P<0.05). Conclusion: Under the study conditions, application of the ultrafine diamond bur or the Er:YAG laser caused irreversible enamel damage on tooth surface, and thus these methods could not be recommended for removing adhesive remnants after debonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:23724206

  13. The integration of science and politics to clean up 50 years in the nuclear sandbox

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, C.E.; Holeman, T.

    1999-07-01

    The Cold War was fought between world superpowers for approximately 40 years from the end of the second World War until the end of the 1980s. During that time, the US government devoted billions of dollars to the development and production of nuclear weapons. Now the Cold War is over and the US is left with numerous nuclear weapons factories, stockpiles of nuclear materials, and mountains of waste to decontaminate and decommission. In the heat of the Cold War, little or no thought was given to how the facilities building bombs would be dismantled. Far too little attention was paid to the potential human health and environmental impact of the weapons production. Now, dozens of communities across the country face the problems this negligence created. In many cases, the location, extent, and characteristics of the waste and contamination are unknown, due to negligence or due to intentional hiding of waste and associated problems. Water supplies are contaminated and threatened; air quality is degraded and threatened; workers and residents risk contamination and health impacts; entire communities risk disaster from potential nuclear catastrophe. The US government, in the form of the US Department of Energy (DOE), now accepts responsibility for creating and cleaning up the mess. But it is the local communities, the home towns of the bomb factories and laboratories, that carry a significant share of the burden of inventing the science and politics required to clean up 50 years in the nuclear sandbox. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of the local community in addressing the cleanup of the US nuclear weapons complex. Local governments do not own nor are responsible for the environmental aftermath, but remain the perpetual neighbor to the facility, the hometown of workers, and long-term caretaker of the off-site impacts of the on-site contamination and health risks.

  14. Comparison of Clean-Up Methods for Ochratoxin A on Wine, Beer, Roasted Coffee and Chili Commercialized in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Prelle, Ambra; Spadaro, Davide; Denca, Aleksandra; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2013-01-01

    The most common technique used to detect ochratoxin A (OTA) in food matrices is based on extraction, clean-up, and chromatography detection. Different clean-up cartridges, such as immunoaffinity columns (IAC), molecular imprinting polymers (MIP), Mycosep™ 229, Mycospin™, and Oasis® HLB (Hydrophilic Lipophilic balance) as solid phase extraction were tested to optimize the purification for red wine, beer, roasted coffee and chili. Recovery, reproducibility, reproducibility, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were calculated for each clean-up method. IAC demonstrated to be suitable for OTA analysis in wine and beer with recovery rate >90%, as well as Mycosep™ for wine and chili. On the contrary, MIP columns were the most appropriate to clean up coffee. A total of 120 samples (30 wines, 30 beers, 30 roasted coffee, 30 chili) marketed in Italy were analyzed, by applying the developed clean-up methods. Twenty-seven out of 120 samples analyzed (22.7%: two wines, five beers, eight coffees, and 12 chili) resulted positive to OTA. A higher incidence of OTA was found in chili (40.0%) more than wine (6.6%), beers (16.6%) and coffee (26.6%). Moreover, OTA concentration in chili was the highest detected, reaching 47.8 µg/kg. Furthermore, three samples (2.5%), two wines and one chili, exceeded the European threshold. PMID:24152987

  15. Comparison of clean-up methods for ochratoxin A on wine, beer, roasted coffee and chili commercialized in Italy.

    PubMed

    Prelle, Ambra; Spadaro, Davide; Denca, Aleksandra; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2013-10-01

    The most common technique used to detect ochratoxin A (OTA) in food matrices is based on extraction, clean-up, and chromatography detection. Different clean-up cartridges, such as immunoaffinity columns (IAC), molecular imprinting polymers (MIP), Mycosep™ 229, Mycospin™, and Oasis® HLB (Hydrophilic Lipophilic balance) as solid phase extraction were tested to optimize the purification for red wine, beer, roasted coffee and chili. Recovery, reproducibility, reproducibility, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were calculated for each clean-up method. IAC demonstrated to be suitable for OTA analysis in wine and beer with recovery rate >90%, as well as Mycosep™ for wine and chili. On the contrary, MIP columns were the most appropriate to clean up coffee. A total of 120 samples (30 wines, 30 beers, 30 roasted coffee, 30 chili) marketed in Italy were analyzed, by applying the developed clean-up methods. Twenty-seven out of 120 samples analyzed (22.7%: two wines, five beers, eight coffees, and 12 chili) resulted positive to OTA. A higher incidence of OTA was found in chili (40.0%) more than wine (6.6%), beers (16.6%) and coffee (26.6%). Moreover, OTA concentration in chili was the highest detected, reaching 47.8 µg/kg. Furthermore, three samples (2.5%), two wines and one chili, exceeded the European threshold. PMID:24152987

  16. [Non-Parametric Analysis of Radiation Risks of Mortality among Chernobyl Clean-Up Workers].

    PubMed

    Gorsky, A I; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Shchukina, N V; Chekin, S Yu; Ivanov, V K

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the relationship between dose and mortality from cancer and circulation diseases in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers based on the data from the National Radiation and Epidemiological Registry was performed. Medical and dosimetry information on the clean-up workers, males, who got radiation doses from April 26, 1986 to April 26, 1987, which was accumulated from 1992 to 2012, was used for the analysis. The total size of the cohort was 42929 people, 12731 deaths were registered in the cohort, among them 1893 deaths from solid cancers and 5230 deaths were from circulation diseases. An average age of the workers was 39 years in 1992 and the mean dose was 164 mGy. The dose-effect relationship was estimated with the use of non-parametric analysis of survival with regard to concurrence of risks of mortality. The risks were estimated in 6 dose groups of similar size (1-70, 70-130, 130-190, 190-210, 210-230 and.230-1000 mGy). The group "1-70 mGy" was used as control. Estimated dose-effect relationship related to cancers and circulation diseases is described approximately with a linear model, coefficient of determination (the proportion of variability explained by the linear model) for cancers was 23-25% and for circulation diseases - 2-13%. The slope coefficient of the dose-effect relationship normalized to 1 Gy for the ratio of risks for cancers in the linear model was 0.47 (95% CI: -0.77, 1.71), and for circulation diseases it was 0.22 (95% CI: -0.58, 1.02). Risks coefficient (slope coefficient of excess mortality at a dose of 1 Gy) for solid cancers was 1.94 (95% CI: - 3.10, 7.00) x 10(-2) and for circulation diseases it was 0.67 (95% CI: -9.61, 11.00) x 10(-2). 137 deaths from radiation-induced cancers and 47 deaths from circulation diseases were registered during a follow up period. PMID:27534064

  17. Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Timothy; Nelson, Roger

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over

  18. Determination of organochlorine and pyrethroid pesticides in fruit and vegetables using solid phase extraction clean-up cartridges.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Zawiyah; Man, Yaakob Bin Che; Hamid, Nazimah Sheikh Abdul; Keat, Chin Cheow

    2006-09-15

    A method to determine six organochlorine and three pyrethroid pesticides in grape, orange, tomato, carrot and green mustard based on solvent extraction followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up is described. The pesticides were spiked into the sample prior to analysis, extracted with ethyl acetate, evaporated and reconstituted with a solvent mixture of acetone:n-hexane (3:7). Three different sorbents (Strong Anion Exchanger/Primary Secondary Amine (SAX/PSA), Florisil and C18) were used for the clean-up step. Pesticides were eluted with 5mL of acetone:n-hexane (3:7, v/v) and determined by gas chromatography and electron-capture detection (GC-ECD). SAX/PSA was the sorbent, which provided chromatograms with less interference and the mean recoveries obtained were within 70-120% except for captafol. The captafol recoveries for grape were within acceptable range with C18 clean-up column. PMID:16857206

  19. Multiresidue determination of pesticides in plants by high-performance liquid chromatography following gel permeation chromatographic clean-up.

    PubMed

    Balinova, A

    1998-10-01

    Gel permeation chromatography was applied as a clean-up step in a HPLC multiresidue method for the determination of several pesticides in plants, not amenable to analysis by GC. The pesticides investigated were diflubenzuron, triflumuron, clofentezine, hexythiazox and flufenoxuron. The clean-up technique resulted in a good separation of analytes from co-extractive matrix compounds. Complete HPLC separation of all pesticides was achieved under the conditions selected. The analytical procedure was characterized with high accuracy and precision and acceptable sensitivity to meet requirements for monitoring these pesticides in crops. PMID:9818389

  20. Hanford tank clean up: A guide to understanding the technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gephart, R.E.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most difficult technical challenges in cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State will be to process the radioactive and chemically complex waste found in the Site`s 177 underground storage tanks. Solid, liquid, and sludge-like wastes are contained in 149 single- and 28 double-shelled steel tanks. These wastes contain about one half of the curies of radioactivity and mass of hazardous chemicals found on the Hanford Site. Therefore, Hanford cleanup means tank cleanup. Safely removing the waste from the tanks, separating radioactive elements from inert chemicals, and creating a final waste form for disposal will require the use of our nation`s best available technology coupled with scientific advances, and an extraordinary commitment by all involved. The purpose of this guide is to inform the reader about critical issues facing tank cleanup. It is written as an information resource for the general reader as well as the technically trained person wanting to gain a basic understanding about the waste in Hanford`s tanks -- how the waste was created, what is in the waste, how it is stored, and what are the key technical issues facing tank cleanup. Access to information is key to better understanding the issues and more knowledgeably participating in cleanup decisions. This guide provides such information without promoting a given cleanup approach or technology use.

  1. Photochemical sample treatment for extracts clean up in PCB analysis from sediments.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Salvatore; Orecchio, Santino; Pace, Andrea

    2013-01-15

    Sample purification can be considered the most polluting step of the whole analytical process for PCBs determination in sediment samples. The use of photochemical sample treatment represents an alternative methodology for extracts clean up allowing for a reduction of the used amount of organic solvents. The first application of a photochemical sample treatment for the selective removal or reduction of organic substances interfering with PCBs analyses in sediments is reported. The method's efficiency and robustness were compared with currently used chromatographic purification. Quality parameters such as recovery, linearity and reproducibility were studied. The entire procedure was validated by four replicate analysis of certified reference sediment. The quantification limits (LOQ) obtained by us ranged from 1 to 3.1 ng g(-1). The RSD for each congener was below 15% and recoveries were in the range 40-130%. Results based on the analysis of real and certified samples showed similar or improved detection thresholds and pointed out the advantages of the photochemical methodology in terms of costs and environmental friendly conditions. PMID:23200398

  2. Capacity of the bioremediation technology for clean-up of soil and groundwater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Masak, Jan; Machackova, Jirina; Siglova, Martina; Cejkova, Alena; Jirku, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    A column reactor was designed and used to simulate conditions affecting the bioremediations of petroleum hydrocarbons. The work illustratively describes the aerobic (model) clean-up of soil samples enabling to predict the efficiency of a technology installed in parallel on contaminated former airport. The data showing the performance of thus precharacterized technology are presented. PMID:14524696

  3. Extraction and clean-up of contaminants and toxicants from food for mass spectrometric analysis--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Reid, W J

    1986-01-01

    This report presents a review of the literature on the extraction and clean-up procedures used prior to the analysis, by mass spectrometry, of organic contaminants and toxicants in foods and food-related materials. It includes a brief description of the uses of a mass spectrometer and shows how the mode of operation of the machine can influence the amount of clean-up necessary before a sample is presented for analysis. The review covers a variety of contaminants of different compound types in a wide range of foods and not only discusses sample preparation techniques that have been used for contaminant analysis by mass spectrometry but also considers some that could be used. The most commonly used techniques involve solvent extraction followed by a clean-up using liquid-liquid partition or column chromatography or both, although a number of newer methods being evolved are moving towards the ideal of a single-step extraction and clean-up process. PMID:3514283

  4. Ecologically-based clean-up criteria for nitroaromatic explosives using toxicity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Duh, D.; Roberts, B.; Buzgo, S.

    1995-12-31

    A former trinitrotoluene (TNT) production and storage facility was the focus of a Remedial Investigation (RI). Contaminants identified during the RI included 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,6-DNT, and 2,4,6-TNT, PCBs, arsenic, lead and chromium. The Conceptual Site Model determined there to be several complete exposure pathways. One of these identified a route by which soil invertebrate communities could be affected through dermal contact and ingestion of soil contaminants. Maintenance of the soil invertebrate community was chosen as the assessment endpoints for this pathway in the Ecological Risk Assessment. The corresponding measurement endpoint was survival of earthworms in 14-day toxicity tests in which they were exposed to site soils. Seven surficial soil samples were collected from Areas of Concern. Each sample was evaluated for acute toxicity to earthworms using standard USEPA protocols. Chemical concentrations were also measured. An artificial soil was used as the control and diluent to establish the Lethal Concentration (LC{sub 50}) of the test soils to earthworms. From the toxicity test results and the corresponding chemical analysis, a matrix of toxicity and contaminant levels was developed. This table was used to determine a concentration of each contaminant at which no acute lethality would be expected. Lower bounds to the chemical specific LC{sub 50} values were determined and, based on sample-specific toxicity units, appropriate LC{sub 50} values were derived (333 mg/kg 2,4-DNT, 182 mg/kg 2,6-DNT, and 1960 mg/kg 2,4,6TNT). Extrapolation of this level to a chronic No Observable Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) provided a means of proposing site-specific ecologically based clean-up criteria for the constituents of concern which would be protective of the chosen assessment endpoint.

  5. Denitrification: a Clean-Up Mechanism for High Nitrate Ground Water Near an Active Swine Facility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, M. A.

    2001-05-01

    An active swine facility in south central Kansas appears to be cleaning up nitrate in regional ground water in an area with shallow ground water (<10 m), sandy soils, and irrigated and dry land row crop farming. This study used nitrogen stable isotopes and standard water chemistry to determine the impact of a bentonite lined hog lagoon on shallow ground-water chemistry. Regional ground water surrounding the facility had nitrate-nitrogen values routinely measured above 10 ppm. Chloride concentrations in the area ranged from 3 to 25 ppm and bicarbonate values ranged from 45 to 200 ppm. Two periods of sampling in the area showed nitrogen isotope values in the fertilizer range (<+2 to +8) and nitrate-N values above 10 ppm for all wells within a mile of a swine facility except for the monitoring well downgradient of the facility. This well had nitrate-N values of 4 to 5 ppm and nitrogen isotope values in the animal waste range (+13 to +20) which is similar to the value measured for the waste lagoon (+18). Chloride and bicarbonate values at all of the monitoring wells, except the well downgradient from the lagoon, were similar to the regional ground water. The lagoon water had >500 ppm chloride and >1400 ppm ammonium-N. The downgradient monitoring well had chloride values > 100 ppm and bicarbonate values above 400 ppm for the two sampling periods. Use of chloride ratios showed that approximately 30% of the water contributing to the downgradient well sample was from lagoon leakage. Preliminary calculations of the amount of bicarbonate resulting from denitrification processes, chloride ratios, and nitrogen isotope values suggest that the sampled water is a mixture of denitrified regional ground water plus lagoon water. Although the nitrate values near the swine facility appear to be decreasing, the long-term impact of increased salt load on the regional ground water is unknown at this time.

  6. Establishing a universal swabbing and clean-up protocol for the combined recovery of organic and inorganic explosive residues.

    PubMed

    Song-im, Nopporn; Benson, Sarah; Lennard, Chris

    2012-11-30

    A single-step solvent extraction and a solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up procedure was developed and optimised in order to establish a universal sampling and clean-up protocol for the combined recovery of organic and inorganic explosive residues. Mixtures of three common swabbing solvents (acetone, acetonitrile and methanol) with water, in various ratios, were assessed for the extraction of four target organic explosives [pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP)] and two inorganic anions (chlorate and nitrate) from alcohol wipes that were used as a swabbing medium. An efficient, single-step extraction of both organic and inorganic compounds from the wipes was achieved using 60% v/v methanol/water. To develop a clean-up procedure, four commercially available SPE cartridges (Oasis HLB, Isolute(®) C18, Bond-Elut(®) ENV and ABS ELUT Nexus) and an in-house packed XAD-7 cartridge were firstly evaluated for their retention capacity toward three organic explosives (PETN, TNT and RDX) in a mixture of methanol and water. A SPE technique was then developed and optimised from the short-listed sorbents with four representative organic explosives (including TATP). The Nexus cartridge was found to provide a suitable sorbent for extract clean-up following swab extraction with 60% v/v methanol/water. By incorporating the optimised clean-up procedure with the application of a polyester-based alcohol wipe as a sampling medium, a universal swabbing protocol for the combined recovery of both organic and inorganic explosive residues was established. The feasibility of the proposed protocol was assessed by collection and quantitation of the residue from a mixture of TNT, PETN and chlorate deposited on a laminate test surface. PMID:22959657

  7. Clinical aspects of the health disturbances in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident clean-up workers (liquidators) from Latvia.

    PubMed

    Eglite, M E; Zvagule, T J; Rainsford, K D; Reste, J D; Curbakova, E V; Kurjane, N N

    2009-06-01

    The health status of some 6,000 workers from Latvia who went to clean-up the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) site following the explosion on 26 April 1986 has been analyzed. The data on these workers have been recorded in the Latvian State Register of Occupational disease patients and people exposed to ionizing radiation due to Chernobyl NPP accident (Latvian State Register) that was established in 1994. From these data, estimates have been made of external ionizing radiation to which these workers were exposed together with observations on the impact of exposure to heavy metals (especially lead and zinc) and radioactive isotopes released during the reactor 'meltdown'. These factors along with psycho-emotional and social-economic stresses account for a marked excess of mortality and morbidity in the group of CNPP accident clean-up workers compared with that of the non-exposed normal Latvian population adjusted for age and sex. The number of diseases or conditions in the CNPP accident clean-up workers has progressively risen from an average of 1.3 in 1986 to 10.9 in 2007. This exceeds for the Latvian population when adjusted for age and sex. The most serious conditions affect the nervous, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine (especially thyroid) and immunological systems. While the morbidity associated with diseases of the respiratory and digestive systems has decreased in recent years that in the other systems is increasing. In recent years, there has been an increased occurrence of cancers affecting the thyroid, prostate and stomach. Clinical and laboratory investigations suggest that surviving CNPP accident clean-up workers exhibit signs of immuno-inflammatory reactions causing premature aging with evidence of autoimmune diseases and immunological deficiencies or abnormalities. It is suggested that the CNPP accident clean-up workers may have a specific syndrome, the 'Chernobyl post-radiation neurosomatic polypathy', due to sustained oxidant

  8. Policies to clean up toxic industrial contaminated sites of Gela and Priolo: a cost-benefit analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cost-benefit analysis is a transparent tool to inform policy makers about the potential effect of regulatory interventions, nevertheless its use to evaluate clean-up interventions in polluted industrial sites is limited. The two industrial areas of Gela and Priolo in Italy were declared "at high risk of environmental crisis" in 1990. Since then little has been done to clean the polluted sites and reduce the health outcomes attributable to pollution exposure. This study, aims to quantify the monetary benefits resulting from clean-up interventions in the contaminated sites of Gela and Priolo. Methods A damage function approach was used to estimate the number of health outcomes attributable to industrial pollution exposure. Extensive one way analyses and probabilistic analyses were conducted to investigate the sensitivity of results to different model assumptions. Results It has been estimated that, on average, 47 cases of premature death, 281 cases of cancer and 2,702 cases of non-cancer hospital admission could be avoided each year by removing environmental exposure in these two areas. Assuming a 20 year cessation lag and a 4% discount rate we calculate that the potential monetary benefit of removing industrial pollution is €3,592 million in Priolo and €6,639 million in Gela. Conclusions Given the annual number of health outcomes attributable to pollution exposure the effective clean-up of Gela and Priolo should be prioritised. This study suggests that clean-up policies costing up to €6,639 million in Gela and €3,592 million in Priolo would be cost beneficial. These two amounts are notably higher than the funds allocated thus far to clean up the two sites, €127.4 million in Gela and €774.5 million in Priolo, implying that further economic investments - even considerable ones - could still prove cost beneficial. PMID:21797993

  9. "Get Ready for Migration: Clean-Up Your Collection"--What Does that Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Peg; Weber, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses some of the premigration tasks at Minnesota State Mankato in preparation for migration to a new integrated library system, ALEPH. The authors describe the review of circulation policies to make sure that only relevant, current data and practices were carried over. There is emphasis on the need for ongoing review of policies…

  10. From conceptual model to remediation: bioavailability, a key to clean up heavy metal contaminated soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2013-04-01

    Processes of metal bioavailability in the soil To know the bioavailability processes at site specific levels is essential to understand in detail the risks associated with pollution, and to support the decision-making process, i.e. description of the conceptual model and choice of clean up technologies. It is particularly important to assess how chemical, physical and biological processes in the soil affect the reactions leading to adsorption, precipitation or release of contaminants. The measurement of bioavailability One of the main difficulties in the practical application of the bioavailability concept in soil remediation is the lack of consensus on the method to be used to measure bioavailability. The best strategy is to apply a series of tests to assess bioavailability, since no applicable method is universally valid under all conditions. As an example, bioavailability tests for phytotechnology application should consider two distinct aspects: a physico-chemical driven solubilization process and a physiologically driven uptake process. Soil and plant characteristics strongly influence bioavailability. Bioavailability as a tool in remediation strategies Bioavailability can be used at all stages in remediation strategies: development of the conceptual model, evaluation of risk assessment, and selection of the best technology, considering different scenarios and including different environmental objectives. Two different strategies can be followed: the reduction and the increase of bioavailability. Procedures that reduce bioavailability aim to prevent the movement of pollutants from the soil to the living organisms, essentially by: i) removal of the labile phase of the contaminant, i.e. the fraction which is intrinsic to the processes of bioavailability (phytostabilization); ii) conversion of the labile fraction into a stable fraction (precipitation or adsorption); iii) increase of the resistance to mass transfer of the contaminants (inertization). Procedures

  11. UTILIZING INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CLEAN-UP, SAVAHHAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. During operations, which started in 1951, hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) were released to the environment. The releases occurred as a result of inadvertent spills and waste disposal in unlined pits and basins which was common practice before environmental regulations existed. The hazardous substances have migrated to the vadose zone and groundwater in many areas of the SRS, resulting in 515 waste units and facilities that are required by environmental regulations, to undergo characterization and, if needed, remediation. In the initial years of the SRS environmental cleanup program (early 1990s), the focus was to use common technologies (such as pump and treat, air stripping, excavation and removal) that actively and tangibly removed contamination. Exclusive use of these technologies required continued and significant funding while often failing to meet acceptable clean-up goals and objectives. Recognizing that a more cost-effective approach was needed, SRS implemented new and complementary remediation methods focused on active and passive technologies targeted to solve specific remediation problems. Today, SRS uses technologies such as chemical/pH-adjusting injection, phytoremediation, underground cutoff walls, dynamic underground stripping, soil fracturing, microbial degradation, baroballs, electrical resistance heating, soil vapor extraction, and microblowers to more effectively treat contamination at lower costs. Additionally, SRS's remediation approach cost effectively maximizes cleanup as SRS works proactively with multiple regulatory agencies. Using GIS, video, animation, and graphics, SRS is able to provide an accurate depiction of the evolution of SRS groundwater and vadose zone cleanup activities to convince stakeholders and regulators of the effectiveness of various cleanup

  12. Enrichment of perfluorinated alkyl substances on polyethersulfone using 1-methylpyperidine as ion-pair reagent for the clean-up of carrot and amended soil extracts.

    PubMed

    Bizkarguenaga, Ekhiñe; Zabaleta, Itsaso; Iparraguirre, Arantza; Aguirre, Josu; Fernández, Luis Ángel; Berger, Urs; Prieto, Ailette; Zuloaga, Olatz

    2015-10-01

    The development of a simple, cheap and environment friendly analytical method for the simultaneous determination of different perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) including seven perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, three perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids and perfluorooctanesulfonamide in carrot and amended soil was carried out in the present work. The method was based on focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction followed by extract clean-up through enrichment of the target compounds on a polymeric material using an ion-pair reagent and detection by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The following variables affecting the clean-up step were evaluated: the nature of the polymeric material (polyethersulfone, PES, versus silicone rod), the amount of the polymeric material (from 1 to 9 mg), the ion-pair reagent (1-methylpyperidine, 1-MP, versus tetrabutylammonium salts), the concentration of the ion-pair reagent (from 5 to 50 mM) and the extraction time (from 15 min to 24 h). Optimum clean-up conditions were obtained using preconcentration on 9 mg of PES polymeric material combined with 5 mM 1-MP as ion-pair reagent for 3h. The method was validated in terms of apparent recoveries in the range of 77-140% and 95-137% at the low concentration (50 ng g(-1)) and in the range of 70-136% and 79-132% at the high concentration (290 ng g(-1)) for amended soil and carrot, respectively, after correction with the corresponding labeled standards. Precision, as relative standard deviation, was within 2-23%, while method detection limits were 0.31-2.85 ng g(-1) for amended soil and 0.11-1.83 ng g(-1) for carrot. In the absence of a certified reference material for the target analytes in the matrices studied, inter-method comparison was carried out and the same samples were processed using two independent clean-up procedures, the one developed in the present work and a classical based on solid-phase extraction. Statistically comparable results were obtained according to the one

  13. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in edible vegetable oils by liquid chromatography and programmed fluorescence detection. Comparison of caffeine complexation and XAD-2 chromatography sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Welling, P; Kaandorp, B

    1986-08-01

    Two clean-up procedures were compared for the analysis for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in edible vegetable oils. One method comprises a liquid-liquid extraction followed by XAD-2 chromatography and the other a caffeine-formic acid complexation. The clean-up step is followed by gradient reversed-phase HPLC in combination with wavelength-programmed fluorescence detection. Due to better repeatability and simplicity, the XAD-2 method was selected for the determination of PAHs in 14 different vegetable oils. Between the different oil samples large differences were observed in PAH concentrations. PAH concentrations in vegetable oils sampled from the Dutch market appear to be comparable with those found in other countries. PMID:3765851

  14. Methodology and data used for estimating the complex-wide impacts of alternative environmental restoration clean-up goals

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, M.R.; Short, S.M.; Stiles, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the methodologies and data used for estimating the complex-wide impacts of alternative strategies for conducting remediation of all DOE sites and facilities, but does not address issues relating to Waste Management capabilities. Clean-up strategies and their corresponding goals for contaminated media may be driven by concentration-based regulatory standards, land-use standards (e.g., residential, industrial, wild life reserve, or totally restricted), risk-based standards, or other standards determined through stakeholder input. Strategies implemented to achieve these goals usually require the deployment of (a) clean-up technologies to destroy, remove, or contain the contaminants of concern; (b) institutional controls to prevent potential receptors from coming into contact with the contaminants; or (c) a combination of the above.

  15. Variable-Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE): Stability code development and clean-up glove data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was to establish an improved swept wing transition criterion. The development of the Unified Stability System gave a way of quickly examining disturbance growth for a wide variety of laminar boundary layers. The disturbance growth traces shown are too scattered to define a transition criteria to replace the F-111 data band, which has been used successfully to design NLF gloves. Still, a careful review of the clean-up glove data may yield cases for which the transition location is known more accurately. Liquid crystal photographs of the clean-up glove show much spanwise variation in the transition front for some conditions, and this further complicates the analyses. Several high quality cases are needed in which the transition front is well defined and at a relatively constant chordwise station.

  16. Effects of demolition and beach clean-up operations on birds on a coastal mudflat in New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Joanna

    1988-07-01

    Coastal lands are increasingly exposed to disturbances from demolition, beach clean-up, and construction for development. Although data exist concerning the effects of investigators on breeding populations, little information is available for migrant populations. I investigated the effects of demolition and beach clean-up on resident and migrant birds on a coastal mudflat in New Jersey. A year's censusing before work initiation was used to determine when demolition and clean-up would affect the least number of birds. Work activity on and along the beach was from 15 October to 15 November 1985. The overall population size was lower in 1985 compared to the same period in 1984, although the drop in numbers was not due solely to human disturbance. Human work activity influenced avian distribution along the mudflat: birds moved farther along the beach and out onto the mudflat when activity began, and moved back onto the mudflat when activity ceased. For gulls, foraging efficiency was lowered when work began and did not return to previous levels until 60-90 min after work began. Gulls that moved farther out on the mudflat had significantly lower foraging efficiencies than did those that remained close to the beach. Efforts to mitigate the adverse effects on birds by restricting human activity to a 100 m stretch of beach at any one time succeeded in significantly reducing adverse effects and in allowing birds some space to rest and feed.

  17. Novel fracture technology proves marginal Viking prospect economic, part II: Well clean-up, flowback and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, S.; Rylance, M.; Tybero, G.

    1996-12-31

    Having completed both fracture treatments as discussed in a companion paper, this paper continues on to describe the post fracture shut-in, clean-up and well testing operations that took place on the Viking Wx exploration well 49/17-12. These operations involved the removal of Resin Coated Proppant (RCP) from the wellbore, via Coiled Tubing (CT), through the use of a specially designed jetting nozzle. The RCP pack stability at a concentration of 3.0 lb/ft{sup 2} (as per planned design) had already been tested in a flowback cell. The use of a Surface Read-Out (SRO) gauge, combined with gas, water and proppant flow rates as well as the viscosity of fracturing fluids returns, enabled real time calculation of the drag forces, on the proppant pack, during clean-up. The flow rate, in the field, was controlled such that the calculated drag forces remained below those observed in the laboratory. Following the clean-up a flow and build-up test was conducted, to evaluate the fracture half length and fracture conductivity, from which a Pseudo-radial skin was calculated. The Non-Darcy effects in the fracture were also evaluated, and finally the short term and long term well deliverabilities were assessed.

  18. A Team of Seven--The Tanks Focus Area program providing technical solutions for cleaning up DOE's radioactive waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Cosby, Wayne C.

    2000-09-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) concept in 1994 to integrate the cleanup efforts of the sites containing radioactive tank wastes. A team of seven contractors and national laboratories was assembled to develop and implement technical solutions to the unique problems encountered in cleaning up large quantities of highly radioactive wastes in tanks that can only be accessed through riser pipes. TFA work focuses on safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure. Many technologies are under development, two of which are the highly successful cesium removal system and the robotic light duty utility arm for deploying equipment inside tanks.

  19. Absorbent pads for Containment, Neutralization, and Clean-Up of Environmental Spills Containing Chemically-Reactive Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A pad for cleaning up liquid spills is described which contains a porous surface covering, and an absorbent interior containing chemically reactive reagents for neutralizing noxious chemicals within the spilled liquid. The porous surface and the absorbent component would normally consist of chemically resistant materials allowing tentative spill to pass. The absorbent interior which contains the neutralizing reagents can but is not required to be chemically resilient and conducts the liquid chemical spill towards the absorbent interior containing the chemically reactive reagents where the dangerous and undesirable chemicals within the chemical spill are then neutralized as well as removed from the premises.

  20. Absorbent Pads for Containment, neutralization, and clean-up of environmental spills containing chemically-reactive agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A pad for cleaning up liquid spills is described which contains a porous surface covering, and an absorbent interior containing chemically reactive reagents for neutralizing noxious chemicals within the spilled liquid. The porous surface and the absorbent component would normally consist of chemically resistant materials allowing tentative spill to pass. The absorbent interior which contains the neutralizing reagents can but is not required to be chemically resilient and conducts the liquid chemically reactive reagents where the dangerous and undesirable chemicals within the chemical spill are then neutralized as well as removed from the premises.

  1. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Rossa W.; Zoll, August H.

    1982-01-01

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  2. [The retrospective cytogenetic dosimetry using the results of conventional chromosomal analysis in Chernobyl clean-up workers].

    PubMed

    Maznik, N A; Vinnikov, V A

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the cohortal biodosimetry carried out in 435 Chernobyl clean-up workers, who were surveyed with the conventional cytogenetic technique in terms from several days to 10 years after the end of their duties in the Chernobyl accident exclusive zone. An empirical model of the aberrant cell dynamics was utilized for the calculation of mean initial yields of dicentrics and centric rings in groups with different terms and duration of staying in the Chernobyl zone. Corresponding protracted irradiation doses estimated from aberration levels ranged from 79 to 670 mGy. The probabilistic distribution of the radiation doses was constructed by the applying the Bayesian analysis to initial individual chromosome exchange yields extrapolated to the exposure termination moment. This distribution was characterized by the mean dose about 460 mGy and maximum of probability density in the interval of 50-300 mGy. For the late somatic risk assessment in clean-up workers the probabilistic distribution of equivalentally-acute radiation doses was proposed; that had the mean value about 270 mGy, modal classes of 250-350 mGy and 99.8% of the probability density concentrated within the dose range from 0 to 1000 mGy. PMID:16454338

  3. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in vegetable oils combining gel permeation chromatography with solid-phase extraction clean-up.

    PubMed

    Fromberg, A; Højgård, A; Duedahl-Olesen, L

    2007-07-01

    A semi-automatic method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in edible oils using a combined gel permeation chromatography/solid-phase extraction (GPC/SPE) clean-up is presented. The method takes advantage of automatic injections using a Gilson ASPEC XL sample handling system equipped with a GPC column (S-X3) and pre-packed silica SPE columns for the subsequent clean-up and finally gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination. The method was validated for the determination of PAHs in vegetable oils and it can meet the criteria for the official control of benzo[a]pyrene levels in foods laid down by the Commission of the European Communities. A survey of 69 vegetable oils sampled from the Danish market included olive oil as well as other vegetable oils such as rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, grape seed oil and sesame oil. Levels of benzo[a]pyrene in all the oils were low (<0.2-0.8 microg kg(-1)), except for one sample of sunflower oil containing 11 microg kg(-1) benzo[a]pyrene. PMID:17613061

  4. Determination of etoxazole residues in fruits and vegetables by SPE clean-up and HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Malhat, Farag; Badawy, Hany; Barakat, Dalia; Saber, Ayman

    2013-01-01

    A method for determination of etoxazole residues in apples, strawberries and green beans was developed and validated. The analyte was extracted with acetonitrile from foodstuff and a charcoal-celite cartridge was used for clean-up of raw extracts. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was used for the determination and quantification of etoxazole residues in the studied samples. The calibration graphs of etoxazole in a solvent or three blank matrixes were linear within the tested intervals 0.01-2 mg L(-1), with correlation coefficient of determination >0.999. The combined solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up and the chromatographic method steps were sensitive and reliable for simultaneous determination of etoxazole residues in the studied samples. The average recoveries of etoxazole in the tested foodstuffs were between 93.4 to 102% at spiking levels of 0.01, 0.10, and 0.50 mg kg(-1), with relative standard deviations ranging from 2.8 to 4.7%, in agreement with directives for method validation in residue analyses. The limit of detection (LOD) of the HPLC-DAD system was 100 pg. The limit of quantification of the entire method was 0.01 mg kg(-1). PMID:23431971

  5. Application of single immunoaffinity clean-up for simultaneous determination of regulated mycotoxins in cereals and nuts.

    PubMed

    Vaclavikova, Marta; MacMahon, Shaun; Zhang, Kai; Begley, Timothy H

    2013-12-15

    A rapid and sensitive analytical strategy for the simultaneous determination of twelve mycotoxins (aflatoxins, fumonisins, zearalenon, deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A, T-2 and HT-2 toxins) using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was developed and validated. The method was validated for peanuts, barley and maize-breakfast cereals; selected as they represent the matrices most often contaminated by mycotoxins. The method is designed for fast and reliable analyses of mycotoxins in regulatory, industrial and private laboratories. Multi-target immunoaffinity columns containing antibodies for all mycotoxins studied herein were used for sample clean-up. Method optimization was predominantly focused on the simplification of extraction and clean-up procedure recommended by column producers. This newly developed and simplified procedure decreased both the sample preparation time and the solvent volumes used for their processing. The analysis of all regulated mycotoxins was conducted by a newly developed UHPLC-MS/MS method with a sample run time of only ten minutes. The method trueness was tested with analytical spikes and certified reference materials, with recoveries ranging from 71% to 112% for all of the examined mycotoxins. PMID:24209351

  6. Phytoextraction for clean-up of low-level uranium contaminated soil evaluated.

    PubMed

    Vandenhove, H; Van Hees, M

    2004-01-01

    Spills in the nuclear fuel cycle have led to soil contamination with uranium. In case of small contamination just above release levels, low-cost yet sufficiently efficient remedial measures are recommended. This study was executed to test if low-level U contaminated sandy soil from a nuclear fuel processing site could be phytoextracted in order to attain the required release limits. Two soils were tested: a control soil (317 Bq 238U kg(-1)) and the same soil washed with bicarbonate (69 Bq 238U kg(-1)). Ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Melvina) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea cv. Vitasso) were used as test plants. The annual removal of soil activity by the biomass was less than 0.1%. The addition of citric acid (25 mmol kg(-1)) 1 week before the harvest increased U uptake up to 500-fold. With a ryegrass and mustard yield of 15,000 and 10,000 kg ha(-1), respectively, up to 3.5% and 4.6% of the soil activity could be removed annually by the biomass. With a desired activity reduction level of 1.5 and 5 for the bicarbonate-washed and control soil, respectively, it would take 10-50 years to attain the release limit. However, citric acid addition resulted in a decreased dry weight production. PMID:15162854

  7. Rapid screening method for quinolone residues in livestock and fishery products using immobilised metal chelate affinity chromatographic clean-up and liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Gotoh, M; Matsuoka, T

    2011-09-01

    An efficient LC method was developed for screening the presence of quinolones (QLs)--comprising fluoroquinolones (FQs) and acidic quinolones (AQs)--residues in various livestock and fishery products. Targeted analytes were for nine FQs of marbofloxacin (MAR), ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR), ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), danofloxacin (DAN), orbifloxacin (ORB), difloxacin (DIF) and sarafloxacin (SAR), and three AQs of oxolinic acid (OXA), nalidixic acid (NAL) and flumequine (FMQ). Samples comprised ten different food products covering five matrices: muscle (cattle, swine and chicken), liver (chicken), raw fish (shrimp and salmon), egg (chicken), and processed food (ham, sausage and fish sausage). This method involved a simple extraction with (1:1) acetonitrile-methanol, a highly selective clean-up with an immobilised metal chelate affinity column charged with Fe(3+), a fast isocratic LC analysis using a short column (20 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) with a mobile phase of (15:85:0.1) methanol/water/formic acid, and fluorescence detection (excitation/emission wavelengths of 295 nm/455 nm for FQs (495 nm for MAR), and 320 nm/365 nm for AQs). Among FQs, pairs of NOR/OFL, ORB/DIF and ENR/DAN were incompletely resolved. A confirmatory LC run with a Mg(2+) containing methanolic mobile phase was also proposed for the samples suspected of being positive. The optimised method gave satisfactory recoveries of 88.5% (56.1-108.6%) and 78.7% (44.1-99.5%) for intra- and inter-day assays with relative standard deviations of 7.2% (0.7-18.4%) and 6.8% (1.4-16.6%), respectively. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.8 µg kg(-1) (DAN) to 6.5 µg kg(-1) (SAR). This method was successfully employed to analyse 113 real samples and two positive samples were found: fish sausage (CIP 990 µg kg(-1)) and shrimp (ENR 20 µg kg(-1)). PMID:21749230

  8. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. |

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

  9. Planar solid phase extraction clean-up for pesticide residue analysis in tea by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2012-10-19

    Efficient clean-up is indispensable for preventing matrix effects in multi-residue analysis of pesticides in food by liquid and gas chromatography (LC and GC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). High-throughput planar solid phase extraction (HTpSPE) was recently introduced as a new clean-up concept in residue analysis of pesticides in fruit and vegetables (C. Oellig, W. Schwack, 2011 [45]). Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was used to completely separate pesticides from matrix compounds and to focus them into a sharp zone, followed by extraction of the target zone by the TLC-MS interface. As rather challenging matrices, tea samples were chosen in this study. Besides chlorophylls and polyphenols, high amount of caffeine is co-extracted resulting in strong matrix effects both in LC-MS and GC-MS. The former HTpSPE procedure was adapted to initial extracts of green and black tea resulting in colorless extracts nearly free of matrix effects and interferences, as shown for seven chemically representative pesticides (acetamiprid, penconazole, azoxystrobin, chlorpyrifos, pirimicarb, fenarimol, and mepanipyrim). LC-MS/MS calibration curves obtained in the range of 0.002-0.5 mg/kg from matrix-matched standards and solvent standards were nearly identical and demonstrated the effectiveness of clean-up by HTpSPE. Mean recoveries determined by LC-MS/MS against solvent standards at spiking levels of 0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg ranged between 72 and 114% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.7-4.7% (n=4), while LC-MS measurements of tea samples spiked at 1 mg/kg provided recoveries of 81-104% with RSDs of 1.2-4.9% (n=6). Using LC-MS/MS, the method showed high sensitivity with signal-to-noise ratios>10 for concentrations below 0.002 mg/kg. HTpSPE of one sample was done in a few minutes, while numerous samples were cleaned in parallel at minimal costs with very low sample and solvent consumption. PMID:22981507

  10. Concurrent extraction, clean-up, and analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, hexabromocyclododecane isomers, and tetrabromobisphenol A in human milk and serum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhixiong; Wang, Yifei; Niu, Piye; Wang, Jiandi; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shuhua; Wu, Yongning

    2013-10-01

    A method has been developed and validated for the concurrent extraction, clean-up, and analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), α-, β-, and γ-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in human milk and serum. Milk and serum samples were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction with acetone/hexane 1:1, v/v and liquid-liquid extraction with methyl-tert-butyl ether/hexane 1:1, v/v, respectively. The removal of co-extracted biogenic materials was achieved by gel permeation chromatography followed by sulfuric acid treatment. The fractionation of the PBDEs and HBCD/TBBPA was performed using a Supelco LC-Si SPE cartridge. The detection of the PBDEs was then performed by GC-MS and that of the HBCDs and the TBBPA was performed using UPLC-MS/MS. The pretreatment procedure was optimized, and the characteristic ions and fragmentation of the analytes were studied by MS or MS/MS. A recovery test was performed using a matrix spiking test at concentrations of 0.05-10 ng/g. The recoveries ranged from 78.6-108.8% with RSDs equal to or lower than 14.04%. The LODs were 1.8-60 pg/g. The usefulness of the developed method was tested by the analysis of real human samples, and several brominated flame retardants in different samples were detected and analyzed. PMID:23929782

  11. High-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of the anthelmintic nitroxynil in cattle muscle tissue with on-line anion-exchange clean-up.

    PubMed

    Tarbin, J A; Shearer, G

    1993-04-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of the anthelmintic nitroxynil has been developed. The drug was extracted from cattle muscle tissue with 1% triethylamine in acetonitrile. The extract was evaporated to dryness and taken up in 0.1 M ammonium acetate-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v). The extract was then injected onto a polymeric anion-exchange precolumn. After clean-up with 0.1 M ammonium acetate-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) for 5 min, the precolumn was eluted with 1% aqueous trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) onto a PLRP-S polymer column and chromatographed with a mobile phase of 0.01 M phosphate pH 7-acetonitrile (80:20, v/v). Detection was by ultraviolet at 273 nm. Average recoveries at four levels from 0.005 to 1.000 mg kg-1 were > 88%. The limit of determination was 0.005 mg kg-1. PMID:8491824

  12. THE ROLE OF LIQUID WASTE PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLVING THE DOE CLEAN-UP MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, B; Sheryl Bush, S

    2008-10-31

    transition metal hydroxides that precipitate when the spent acidic process solutions are rendered alkaline with sodium hydroxide. The sludges contain Sr-90 and transuranic elements. The wastes stored at each site have been generated and stored for over fifty years. Although the majority of the wastes were generated to support nuclear weapons production and reprocessing, the wastes differ substantially between the sites. Table 5 shows the volumes and total radioactivity (including decay daughters) of the waste phases stored in tanks at each site. At Hanford, there are 177 tanks that contain 56.5 Mgal of waste. SRS has 51 larger tanks, of which 2 are closed, that contain 36.5 Mgal. Mainly due to recovery operations, the waste stored at Hanford has less total curies than that stored at Savannah River. The total radioactivity of the Hanford wastes contains approximately 190 MCi, and the total radioactivity of the Savannah River wastes contains 400 MCi.

  13. Survey of aflatoxins in rice from Iran using immunoaffinity column clean-up and HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Feizy, J; Beheshti, H R; Fahim, N Khoshbakht; Janati, S S Fakoor; Davari, G

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine levels of aflatoxins in rice. A total of 261 rice samples were analyzed by HPLC using a method was based on the extraction of 50 g of finely ground rice plus 5 g NaCl with 200 ml of 80% methanol. After filtration and immunoaffinity clean-up, 20 µl was injected onto the HPLC. HPLC analysis was carried out using a Genesis RP C18 column (250 × 4.6, 4 µm I.D.) and a mobile phase with a linear gradient of water/methanol/acetonitrile (6 : 2 : 2 v/v) over 16 min. Aflatoxins were determined after post-column derivatisation with iodine by fluorescence detection at excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 and 445 nm, respectively. It was found that 68.9% of the rice samples contained aflatoxin B1 at levels greater than 0.2 ng g(-1). PMID:24779626

  14. Cleaning up of a nuclear facility: Destocking of Pu radioactive waste and nuclear Non-Destructive Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallu, F.; Allinei, P.-G.; Bernard, Ph.; Loridon, J.; Pouyat, D.; Torreblanca, L.

    2012-07-01

    In view to clean up a nuclear facility located at the CEA, Cadarache, France, three Non Destructive Assay (NDA) methods have been combined to characterize 2714 old, 100 L radioactive waste drums produced between 1980 and 1997. The results of X-ray radiography, passive neutron measurement and gamma-ray spectrometry are used together to extract both the βγ and α activities, and the Pu mass contained in each drum. Those drums will then be re-conditioned and cemented in 870 L containers, in order to be sent to the adequate disposal or interim storage. This paper presents the principle of the three NDA methods, the dedicated measurement setups, and it gives details about the setups, which have been especially designed and developed for that application. Uncertainties are dealt with in the last part of the paper.

  15. Effective clean-up and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for isoflavone determination in legumes.

    PubMed

    Vila-Donat, Pilar; Caprioli, Giovanni; Maggi, Filippo; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Torregiani, Elisabetta; Vittori, Sauro; Sagratini, Gianni

    2015-05-01

    Legumes are an excellent source of macronutrients and phytochemicals as isoflavones. The aim of this work was to develop a new analytical method for determining five isoflavone compounds, three of which are aglycons, namely daidzein, genistein, biochanin A, and two of which, daidzin and genistin, are glycosilated, in lentils and other pulses, using an effective clean-up system and UHPLC-MS/MS (triple quadrupole) method. The recoveries obtained by spiking the lentil samples with a standard mixture of isoflavones at three levels of fortification (5, 25 and 100 μg kg(-1)) were in the range of 54.4-111.1%, 68.6-91.1%, and 84.4-114%, respectively. The method was applied to analyse 48 lentil samples from central Italy and pulses for determining the isoflavone content, which was found to range from 1.1 to 95.6 μg kg(-1). PMID:25529710

  16. A new multiple-stage electrocoagulation process on anaerobic digestion effluent to simultaneously reclaim water and clean up biogas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Stromberg, David; Liu, Xuming; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-21

    A new multiple-stage treatment process was developed via integrating electrocoagulation with biogas pumping to simultaneously reclaim anaerobic digestion effluent and clean up biogas. The 1st stage of electrocoagulation treatment under the preferred reaction condition led to removal efficiencies of 30%, 81%, 37% and >99.9% for total solids, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively. Raw biogas was then used as a reactant and pumped into the effluent to simultaneously neutralize pH of the effluent and remove H2S in the biogas. The 2nd stage of electrocoagulation treatment on the neutralized effluent showed that under the selected reaction condition, additional 60% and 10% of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand were further removed. The study concluded a dual-purpose approach for the first time to synergistically combine biogas purification and water reclamation for anaerobic digestion system, which well addresses the downstream challenges of anaerobic digestion technology. PMID:25540943

  17. Separation techniques for the clean-up of radioactive mixed waste for ICP-AES/ICP-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-03-17

    Two separation techniques were investigated for the clean-up of typical radioactive mixed waste samples requiring elemental analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). These measurements frequently involve regulatory or compliance criteria which include the determination of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List (TAL). These samples usually consist of both an aqueous phase and a solid phase which is mostly an inorganic sludge. Frequently, samples taken from the waste tanks contain high levels of uranium and thorium which can cause spectral interferences in ICP-AES or ICP-MS analysis. The removal of these interferences is necessary to determine the presence of the EPA TAL elements in the sample. Two clean-up methods were studied on simulated aqueous waste samples containing the EPA TAL elements. The first method studied was a classical procedure based upon liquid-liquid extraction using tri-n- octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in cyclohexane. The second method investigated was based on more recently developed techniques using extraction chromatography; specifically the use of a commercially available Eichrom TRU[center dot]Spec[trademark] column. Literature on these two methods indicates the efficient removal of uranium and thorium from properly prepared samples and provides considerable qualitative information on the extraction behavior of many other elements. However, there is a lack of quantitative data on the extraction behavior of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List. Experimental studies on these two methods consisted of determining whether any of the analytes were extracted by these methods and the recoveries obtained. Both methods produced similar results; the EPA target analytes were only slightly or not extracted. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated and found to be comparable.

  18. Separation techniques for the clean-up of radioactive mixed waste for ICP-AES/ICP-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-03-17

    Two separation techniques were investigated for the clean-up of typical radioactive mixed waste samples requiring elemental analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). These measurements frequently involve regulatory or compliance criteria which include the determination of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List (TAL). These samples usually consist of both an aqueous phase and a solid phase which is mostly an inorganic sludge. Frequently, samples taken from the waste tanks contain high levels of uranium and thorium which can cause spectral interferences in ICP-AES or ICP-MS analysis. The removal of these interferences is necessary to determine the presence of the EPA TAL elements in the sample. Two clean-up methods were studied on simulated aqueous waste samples containing the EPA TAL elements. The first method studied was a classical procedure based upon liquid-liquid extraction using tri-n- octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in cyclohexane. The second method investigated was based on more recently developed techniques using extraction chromatography; specifically the use of a commercially available Eichrom TRU{center_dot}Spec{trademark} column. Literature on these two methods indicates the efficient removal of uranium and thorium from properly prepared samples and provides considerable qualitative information on the extraction behavior of many other elements. However, there is a lack of quantitative data on the extraction behavior of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List. Experimental studies on these two methods consisted of determining whether any of the analytes were extracted by these methods and the recoveries obtained. Both methods produced similar results; the EPA target analytes were only slightly or not extracted. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated and found to be comparable.

  19. Application of zirconium dioxide nanoparticle sorbent for the clean-up step in post-harvest pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Uclés, Ana; Herrera López, Sonia; Dolores Hernando, Maria; Rosal, Roberto; Ferrer, Carmen; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2015-11-01

    The use of yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide nanoparticles as d-SPE clean-up sorbent for a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the determination of post-harvest fungicides (carbaryl, carbendazim, chlorpropham, diphenylamine, ethoxyquin, flutriafol, imazalil, iprodione, methomyl, myclobutanil, pirimiphos-methyl, prochloraz, pyrimethanil, thiabendazole, thiophanate-methyl and tolclofos-methyl) in orange and pear samples has been evaluated and validated. The sample preparation was a modification of the QuEChERS extraction method using yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanoparticles as the solid phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up sorbents prior to injecting the ten-fold diluted extracts into the LC system. By using the yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide extraction method, more recoveries in the 70-120% range were obtained - thus this method was used for the validation. Quantification was carried out using a matrix-matched calibration curve which was linear in the 1-500 µg kg(-1) range for almost all the pesticides studied. The validated limit of quantification was 10 µg kg(-1) for most of the studied compounds, except chlorpropham, ethoxyquin and thiophanate-methyl. Pesticide recoveries at the 10 and 100 µg kg(-1) concentration levels were satisfactory, with values between 77% and 120% and relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 10% (n=5). The developed method was applied for the determination of selected fungicides in 20 real orange and pear samples. Four different pesticide residues were detected in 10 of these commodities; 20% of the samples contained pesticide residues at a quantifiable level (equal to or above the LOQs) for at least one pesticide residue. The most frequently-detected pesticide residues were: carbendazim, thiabendazole and imazalil-all were below the MRL. The highest concentration found was imazalil at 1175 µg kg

  20. Cleaning up Floor Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Richard; McLean, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how educational-facility maintenance departments can cut costs in floor cleaning through careful evaluation of floor equipment and products. Tips for choosing carpet detergents are highlighted. (GR)

  1. Cleaning Up Your Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    In this article the author discusses how inadequate ventilation, poor air quality, mold and other conditions can have a detrimental impact on the health of students and school staff. She states that, these unsafe environmental conditions can cause a negative effect on students' health as well as their achievement. Furthermore, she discusses…

  2. Cleaning Up the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Don; Pruett, Lindsay

    2005-01-01

    Environmental community service projects provide many opportunities for students to help the environment and connect with their communities. In Washington State, students are allowed to obtain a high school varsity letter in community service if they complete over 150 community service hours in a calendar year. To help students toward this goal,…

  3. Cleaning Up High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittner-Heir, Robbin M.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses cleaning techniques and equipment for areas in a school that are hard to reach, such as the high spacious ceilings, the tall windows of a school atrium, and high points in gymnasiums and auditoriums. (GR)

  4. Clean Up after Yourself.

    PubMed

    Lepelley, Alice; Ghosh, Sankar

    2016-03-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome activation is accompanied by induction of mitochondrial damage. In the current issue of Cell, Zhong et al. describe an intracellular mechanism orchestrated by NF-κB to remove inflammasome-activating damaged mitochondria and prevent pathologic inflammation. PMID:26942667

  5. Oil spill clean up

    SciTech Connect

    Claxton, L.D.; Houk, V.S.; Williams, R.; Kremer, F.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the consideration of bioremediation for oil spills, it is important to understand the ecological and human health implications of bioremediation efforts. During biodegradation, the toxicity of the polluting material may actually increase upon the conversion of non-toxic constituents to toxic species. Also, toxic compounds refractory to biological degradation may compromise the effectiveness of the treatment technique. In the study, the Salmonella mutagenicity assay showed that both the Prudhoe Bay crude oil and its weathered counterpart collected from oil-impacted water were weakly mutagenic. Results also showed that the mutagenic components were depleted at a faster rate than the overall content of organic material.

  6. CLEAN-UP Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Mikulski, Barbara A. [D-MD

    2011-05-12

    05/12/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  8. Electrical field assisted matrix solid phase dispersion as a powerful tool to improve the extraction efficiency and clean-up of fluoroquinolones in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Mariana Cristina; Orlando, Ricardo Mathias; Faria, Adriana Ferreira

    2016-08-26

    This work presents a new method by electrical matrix solid phase dispersion for the extraction and clean-up of marbofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, difloxacin and sarafloxacin in bovine milk. Composition and pH of the eluent, applied electrical potential and polarity were optimized by experimental designs. The combination of the chromatographic and electrophoretic mechanisms allowed the extraction and clean-up in one step with low organic solvent consumption, high extraction throughput and elution automation. Linearity, precision, trueness and limit of quantification were evaluated and provided values in accordance with other methods recently developed for the analysis of fluoroquinolones in milk. This technique proved to be promising for the extraction and clean-up of ionizable analytes in different milk matrices. PMID:27492598

  9. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  10. Feasibility of photocatalytic oxidation for wastewater clean-up and reuse. Report for 4 Mar 81-31 Mar 81

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, G.R.; DeBerry, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted on a new treatment technology for the destruction of pollutant compounds in wastewater. The process uses solar energy to drive an oxidation which is photocatalyzed at the surface of a semiconductor powder. The process is being investigated particularly for water clean-up prior to industrial resuse, because of its non-energy-intensive nature. Five compounds (chloroform, dimethylamine, methanol, phenol, and ammonia) were used as model substrates, and removal at several pH values, using three different semiconductors (TiO2, ZnO, and Fe2O3) was investigated in the laboratory, using a xenon lamp to simulate solar radiation. While Fe2O3 was found to be ineffective, both ZnO and TiO2 catalyzed the removal of all compounds. Ammonia was not very effectively destroyed, but all four organic compounds experienced 30-50% removal in six hours at intensities slightly above that of normal solar radiation. Favorable cases were confirmed using sunlight. Quantum efficiencies for both sets of experiments were 13-20% for TiO2 and 4-7% using ZnO. Estimated treatment cost for a 1 mgd stream using laboratory conditions ranged from $0.18-$0.72 per thousand gallons, depending on the values of engineering parameters which were not investigated in this feasibility study.

  11. Using integrated geospatial mapping and conceptual site models to guide risk-based environmental clean-up decisions.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Henry J; Greenberg, Michael R; Burger, Joanna; Gochfield, Michael; Powers, Charles; Kosson, David; Keren, Roger; Danis, Christine; Vyas, Vikram

    2005-04-01

    Government and private sector organizations are increasingly turning to the use of maps and other visual models to provide a depiction of environmental hazards and the potential risks they represent to humans and ecosystems. Frequently, the graphic presentation is tailored to address a specific contaminant, its location and possible exposure pathways, and potential receptors. Its format is usually driven by the data available, choice of graphics technology, and the audience being served. A format that is effective for displaying one contaminant at one scale at one site, however, may be ineffective in accurately portraying the circumstances surrounding a different contaminant at the same site, or the same contaminant at a different site, because of limitations in available data or the graphics technology being used. This is the daunting challenge facing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which is responsible for the nation's legacy wastes from nuclear weapons research, testing, and production at over 100 sites in the United States. In this article, we discuss the development and use of integrated geospatial mapping and conceptual site models to identify hazards and evaluate alternative long-term environmental clean-up strategies at DOE sites located across the United States. While the DOE probably has the greatest need for such information, the Department of Defense and other public and private responsible parties for many large and controversial National Priority List or Superfund sites would benefit from a similar approach. PMID:15876215

  12. Physicochemical regeneration of high silica zeolite Y used to clean-up water polluted with sulfonamide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Braschi, I; Blasioli, S; Buscaroli, E; Montecchio, D; Martucci, A

    2016-05-01

    High silica zeolite Y has been positively evaluated to clean-up water polluted with sulfonamides, an antibiotic family which is known to be involved in the antibiotic resistance evolution. To define possible strategies for the exhausted zeolite regeneration, the efficacy of some chemico-physical treatments on the zeolite loaded with four different sulfonamides was evaluated. The evolution of photolysis, Fenton-like reaction, thermal treatments, and solvent extractions and the occurrence in the zeolite pores of organic residues eventually entrapped was elucidated by a combined thermogravimetric (TGA-DTA), diffractometric (XRPD), and spectroscopic (FT-IR) approach. The chemical processes were not able to remove the organic guest from zeolite pores and a limited transformation on embedded molecules was observed. On the contrary, both thermal treatment and solvent extraction succeeded in the regeneration of the zeolite loaded from deionized and natural fresh water. The recyclability of regenerated zeolite was evaluated over several adsorption/regeneration cycles, due to the treatment efficacy and its stability as well as the ability to regain the structural features of the unloaded material. PMID:27155437

  13. Does further clean-up reduce the matrix enhancement effect in gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in food?

    PubMed

    Schenck, F J; Lehotay, S J

    2000-01-28

    Sample extracts of apples, peas, green beans, oranges, raspberries, clementines, carrots, and wheat obtained using the Food and Drug Administration (acetone extraction) and Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency (acetonitrile extraction) multiresidue methods for pesticides were subjected to clean-up using different solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the matrix enhancement effect. The matrix enhancement effect is related to the blocking of active sites on the injector liner by matrix components, thereby increasing signal in the presence of matrix versus standards in solvent in which the pesticides themselves interact with the active sites. Graphitized carbon black (GCB) was often used in combination with various anion-exchange SPE cartridges. The extracts were then spiked with organophosphorus insecticides. These process standards were then compared to standards in acetone of the same concentration using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection or ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Sample matrix enhancement varied from little to no effect for some pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, malathion) to >200% in the case of certain susceptible pesticides. The GCB removed color components but showed little effect in reducing matrix enhancement by itself. The anion-exchange cartridges in combination with GCB or not, substantially reduced the matrix enhancement effect but did not eliminate it. PMID:10677079

  14. EVALUATION OF GEL PERMEATION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR CLEAN UP OF HUMAN ADIPOSE TISSUE SAMPLES FOR GC/MS ANALYSIS OF PESTICIDES AND OTHER CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) has been evaluated for clean up of human adipose tissue sample extracts in preparation for confirmatory analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Studies were conducted with standard solutions, fortified chicken fat, and actual ...

  15. A LC/UV/Vis method for determination of cyanocobalamin in multivitamin dietary supplements with on-line sample clean-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A HPLC-UV method using a two-column strategy with a switching valve for on-line sample clean-up was developed for the determination of cyanocobalamin (CN-CBL-vitamin B12, in dietary supplements. The method uses two columns, an Agilent Zorbax C8 (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 um particle) reversed-phase column...

  16. Multiplug filtration clean-up with multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the analysis of pesticide residues using LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengyue; Fan, Sufang; Yu, Chuanshan; Zhang, Junyan; Pan, Canping

    2013-10-01

    A novel design for a rapid clean-up method was developed for the analysis of pesticide residues in fruit and vegetables followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The acetonitrile-based sample extraction technique was used to obtain the extracts, and further clean-up was carried out by applying the streamlined procedure on a multiplug filtration clean-up column coupled with a syringe. The sorbent used for clean-up in this research is multiwalled carbon nanotubes, which was mixed with anhydrous magnesium sulfate to remove water from the extracts. This method was validated on 40 representative pesticides and apple, cabbage, and potato sample matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100 μg/kg. It exhibited recoveries between 71 and 117% for most pesticides with RSDs < 15%. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination >0.995 for most studied pesticides between concentration levels of 10-500 μg/L. The LOQs for 40 pesticides ranged from 2 to 50 μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market fruit and vegetable samples. PMID:23939876

  17. Analysis of sterigmatocystin in cereals, animal feed, seeds, beer and cheese by immunoaffinity column clean-up and HPLC and LC-MS/MS quantification.

    PubMed

    Marley, Elaine; Brown, Phyllis; Mackie, Jennifer; Donnelly, Carol; Wilcox, Joyce; Pietri, Amedeo; Macdonald, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A method is reported for the analysis of sterigmatocystin in various food and feed matrices using a commercial sterigmatocystin immunoaffinity column (IAC) for sample clean-up prior to HPLC analysis by UV with mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS). Cereals (wheat, oats, rye, maize and rice), sunflower seeds and animal feed were spiked with sterigmatocystin at levels from 0.75 to 50 µg kg(-1) to establish method performance. Using acetonitrile/water extraction followed by IAC clean-up, and analysis by HPLC with detection at 325 nm, recoveries ranged from 68% to 106%, with repeatability from 4.2% to 17.5%. The limit of quantification with UV detection in these matrices was 1.5 µg kg(-1). For the analysis of beer and cheese the sample preparation prior to IAC clean-up was changed to accommodate the different properties of the matrix, prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. For beer and cheese spiked at 5.0 µg kg(-1) the recoveries were 94% and 104%, and precision (RSDs) were 1.9% and 2.9% respectively. The limits of quantification by LC-MS/MS in beer and cheese were 0.02 and 0.6 µg kg(-1) respectively. The sterigmatocystin IAC was demonstrated to provide an efficient clean-up of various matrices to enable this mycotoxin to be determined by either HPLC with UV detection or LC-MS/MS. PMID:26515281

  18. Development And Implementation Of A Strategic Technical Baseline Approach For Nuclear Decommissioning And Clean Up Programmes In The UK

    SciTech Connect

    Brownridge, M.; Ensor, B.

    2008-07-01

    The NDA mission as set out within the Energy Act 2004 and stated in the NDA strategy is clear: - 'to deliver a world class programme of safe, cost-effective, accelerated and environmentally responsible decommissioning of the UK's civil nuclear legacy in an open and transparent manner and with due regard to the socio-economic impacts on our communities. Critical to achieving the NDA main objective and overall mission is to accelerate and deliver clean-up programmes through the application of appropriate and innovative technology. The NDA remit also requires us to secure good practice by contractors and carry out and promote research into matters relating to the decommissioning and clean up of nuclear installations and sites. NDA have defined a strategic approach for the underpinning of operational and decommissioning activities where each nuclear site is required to write within the Life Time Plans (LTP) the proposed technical baseline for those activities. This enables the robustness of the activities to be assessed, the gaps and opportunities and accompanying Research and Developments (R and D) requirements to be highlighted and investment to be targeted at key technical issues. NDA also supports the development of a commercial framework where innovation is encouraged and improvements can be demonstrated against the technical baseline. In this paper we will present NDA's overall strategic approach, the benefits already realised and highlight the areas for continued development. In conclusion: The development and implementation of a strategic approach to robustly underpin the technical components of the lifetime plans for operational and decommissioning activities on NDA sites has been extremely successful. As well as showing how mature technology assumptions are and where the key gaps and risks are it has also provided a method for highlighting opportunities to improve on that baseline. The use of a common template across all NDA LTPs has enabled direct comparison

  19. Overview of extraction, clean-up and detection techniques for the determination of organic pollutants in sewage sludge: a review.

    PubMed

    Zuloaga, O; Navarro, P; Bizkarguenaga, E; Iparraguirre, A; Vallejo, A; Olivares, M; Prieto, A

    2012-07-29

    analytical procedure (extraction, clean-up and analysis) have been reviewed. PMID:22769001

  20. Determination of diphenamide, napropamide and metolachlor in tobacco by gel permeation chromatographic clean-up and high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Dang, Yuanlin; Zhang, Shusheng; Liu, Huimin; Qu, Lingbo; Liao, Xincheng; Zhao, Yufen; Wu, Yangjie

    2005-05-01

    Diphenamide, napropamide and metolachlor (FIG. 1) are selective, pre-emergence arylamide herbicides used to control the growth of annual grasses and broadleaf weeds in a variety of fields, e.g. fruit trees, nuts, corns, green crops, etc. They possess high activity and moderate toxicity. For food and environment safety, the detailed investigations on their residues and metabolism are very important. Diphenamide, napropamide and metolachlor in the pesticide products, serum, urine, soil, environmental water, fruits and wine have been widely analyzed by ELISA, fluorescence, phosphorescence, capillary electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography(GC) and GC mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, to our knowledge, simultaneous residue analysis of diphenamide, napropamide and metolachlor in tobacco samples has not been extensively documented. Tobacco is greatly consumed by smokers throughout the world. The pesticide residue in tobaccos might be potentially harmful to smokers' health. With this in mind the residue determination and control of diphenamide, napropamide and metolachlor in the tobacco leaves are very important for tobacco products and consumers. For these three herbicides, the tolerable maximum residue limits (MRLs) have been limited ranging from 0.05 (for tobacco products) to 5 mg/kg (for tobacco leaves) in different European countries. For the complex tobacco samples, the GC and HPLC with UV detection suffer from matrix interference making quantification and identification of these herbicides difficult. In such cases the removal of the matrix effects and identification of the target compounds are of great importance. The present work reports the extraction and clean up procedures, as well as, the chromatographic conditions developed for the simultaneous determination of diphenamide, napropamide and metolachlor residues in the fluecured tobacco leaves, from the different sources using HPLC-UV method. PMID:16477944

  1. Selective clean-up applicable to aqueous acetone extracts for the determination of carbendazim and thiabendazole in fruits and vegetables by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Di Muccio, A; Girolimetti, S; Attard Barbini, D; Pelosi, P; Generali, T; Vergori, L; De Merulis, G; Leonelli, A; Stefanelli, P

    1999-02-12

    Fungicide residues in vegetables (benomyl, carbendazim, thiabendazole) are analyzed through a clean-up procedure that uses a portion of the aqueous acetone extract prepared for multiresidue methodology. A portion of the aqueous acetone extract (equivalent to 5 g of vegetables) is loaded onto an Extrelut-20 cartridge (the cartridge is filled with a coarse, large-pore diatomaceous material). Then, acetone is partially removed by an upward stream of nitrogen at 2l/min for 30 min. Benzimidazolic fungicides are recovered by percolating the cartridge with 100 ml of 0.1 M phosphoric acid solution, which also serves to convert benomyl to carbendazim. The percolating acid solution is drained on-line through a strong cation-exchange (SCX) solid-phase extraction cartridge with the aid of a slight vacuum. Benzimidazolic fungicides are retained on the SCX cartridge. The phosphoric acid solution is discarded together with the washings of the SCX cartridge, i.e., water followed by methanol-water (75:25), that remove unwanted coextractives. Finally, benzimidazolic fungicides are recovered by eluting the SCX cartridge with methanol-ammonium formate buffer (75:25). The final extract is then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC with UV detection. Recoveries from crops such as apples, lettuce, strawberries and citrus fruits are generally greater than 80% and no interferences were observed. The clean-up is simple and straightforward, requires only disposable items, water solutions and a few milliliters of solvent and a minimum number of manipulations, and does not require concentration steps or electrical equipment. PMID:10074700

  2. A Strategy for Skills to meet the demands of Nuclear Decommissioning and Clean-up in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Brownridge, M.; Ensor, B.

    2008-07-01

    The NDA remit as set out within the Energy Act includes - 'to ensure the availability of skills required to deliver the overall decommissioning and nuclear clean-up mission'. The NDA approach to meeting their statutory obligation is by: - finding the best ways of re-training, re-skilling or re-deploying people in a way that encourages a more flexible workforce; - identifying and communicating the skills and workforce requirements to deliver the mission; and - developing the infrastructure and capability initiatives in line with long term needs, for example, a National Skills Academy for Nuclear, Nuclear Institute, National Graduate Scheme, and - developing locally specific provision. Firstly, NDA has set the requirement for nuclear sites to write down within the Life Time Plans (LTP), at a high level, their Site Skills Strategies; furthermore, a National Skills Working Group has been established to develop tactical cross sector solutions to support the NDA's Skills Strategy. In support of the short, medium and long term needs to meet demands of the NDA sites and the nuclear decommissioning sector, as well as being aware of the broader nuclear sector, investments have been made in infrastructure and skills programmes such as: - A National Skills Academy for Nuclear - including UK wide representation of the whole nuclear sector; - A Nuclear Institute in partnership with the University of Manchester focussing on world class research and skills in Radiation Sciences and Decommissioning Engineering; - Post Graduate sponsorship for decommissioning related projects; - A National Graduate Scheme partnership with nuclear related employers; - Vocational qualifications and Apprenticeship Schemes - Engaging 14-19 year old students to encourage the take up of Science related subjects; and - A sector wide 'Skills Passport'. In conclusion: The skills challenge has many dimensions but requires addressing due to the clear link to improved business performance and the availability

  3. A Membrane-Based Electro-Separation Method (MBES) for Sample Clean-Up and Norovirus Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wei; Cannon, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis and foodborne illnesses in the United States. Enhanced methods for detecting noroviruses in food matrices are needed as current methods are complex, labor intensive and insensitive, often resulting in inhibition of downstream molecular detection and inefficient recovery. Membrane-based electro-separation (MBES) is a technique to exchange charged particles through a size-specific dialysis membrane from one solution to another using electric current as the driving force. Norovirus has a net negative surface charge in a neutrally buffered environment, so when placed in an electric field, it moves towards the anode. It can then be separated from the cathodic compartment where the sample is placed and then collected in the anodic compartment for downstream detection. In this study, a MBES-based system was designed, developed and evaluated for concentrating and recovering murine norovirus (MNV-1) from phosphate buffer. As high as 30.8% MNV-1 migrated from the 3.5 ml sample chamber to the 1.5 ml collection chamber across a 1 μm separation membrane when 20 V was applied for 30 min using 20 mM sodium phosphate with 0.01% SDS (pH 7.5) as the electrolyte. In optimization of the method, weak applied voltage (20 V), moderate duration (30 min), and low ionic strength electrolytes with SDS addition were needed to increase virus movement efficacy. The electric field strength of the system was the key factor to enhance virus movement, which could only be improved by shortening the electrodes distance, instead of increasing system applied voltage because of virus stability. This study successfully demonstrated the norovirus mobility in an electric field and migration across a size-specific membrane barrier in sodium phosphate electrolyte. With further modification and validation in food matrixes, a novel, quick, and cost-effective sample clean-up technique might be developed to separate norovirus particles from food

  4. Simultaneous extraction and clean-up of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls from sheep liver tissue by selective pressurized liquid extraction and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zulin; Ohiozebau, Ehimai; Rhind, Stewart M

    2011-02-25

    We describe a selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) method, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), for the simultaneous extraction and clean-up of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sheep liver tissue samples. The on-line clean-up of liver tissue by SPLE was tested using differing amount of acid-modified silica (sulphuric acid:silica gel, 1:2, w/w), the most effective amount being 20 g. Different extraction solvents (iso-hexane and dichloromethane), either alone or in various combinations, were used to extract these target compounds from spiked liver samples. Variables affecting the SPLE extraction efficiency, including temperature, pressure, number of extraction cycles and static extraction time were studied; the optimum parameters were 80 °C, 10.3 MPa, 2 cycles and 5 min, respectively. The SPLE based method was compared with more traditional Soxhlet, off-line PLE, ultrasonic and heating extraction methods. Overall the mean percentage recoveries for all target chemicals using SPLE were 86-103% (n=3, SD < 9%), and compared favourably with the Soxhlet (63-109%, n=3, SD < 8%), off-line PLE (82-104%, n=3, SD < 18%), ultrasonic (86-99%, n=3, SD < 11%) and heating (72-102%, n=3, SD < 21%) extraction methods. The limits of detection of the proposed method were 5-96 pg g⁻¹ and 2-29 pg g⁻¹ for the different PBDE and PCB chemicals studied, respectively. The outputs of the proposed method were linear over the range from 0.02 to 30 ng g⁻¹, for all PCB and PBDE congeners except for PBDE 100 and 153 (0.05-30 ng g⁻¹) and PBDE 183 (0.1-30 ng g⁻¹). The method was successfully applied to sheep liver samples for the determination of the target PBDE and PCB compounds. PMID:21256501

  5. A review of polymer nanofibres by electrospinning and their application in oil-water separation for cleaning up marine oil spills.

    PubMed

    Sarbatly, Rosalam; Krishnaiah, Duduku; Kamin, Zykamilia

    2016-05-15

    The growths of oil and gas exploration and production activities have increased environmental problems, such as oil spillage and the resulting pollution. The study of the methods for cleaning up oil spills is a critical issue to protect the environment. Various techniques are available to contain oil spills, but they are typically time consuming, energy inefficient and create secondary pollution. The use of a sorbent, such as a nanofibre sorbent, is a technique for controlling oil spills because of its good physical and oil sorption properties. This review discusses about the application of nanofibre sorbent for oil removal from water and its current developments. With their unique physical and mechanical properties coupled with their very high surface area and small pore sizes, nanofibre sorbents are alternative materials for cleaning up oil spills. PMID:27016959

  6. I{ Relationship between source clean up and mass flux of chlorinated solvents in low permeability settings with fractures}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerg, P. L.; Chambon, J. C.; Christiansen, C. M.; Broholm, M. M.; Binning, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contamination by chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethylene (PCE), often occurs via leaching from complex sources located in low permeability sediments such as clayey tills overlying aquifers. Clayey tills are mostly fractured, and contamination migrating through the fractures spreads to the low permeability matrix by diffusion. This results in a long term source of contamination due to back-diffusion. Leaching from such sources is further complicated by microbial degradation under anaerobic conditions to sequentially form the daughter products trichloroethylene, cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. This process can be enhanced by addition of electron donors and/or bioaugmentation and is termed Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD). This work aims to improve our understanding of the physical, chemical and microbial processes governing source behaviour under natural and enhanced conditions. That understanding is applied to risk assessment, and to determine the relationship and time frames of source clean up and plume response. To meet that aim, field and laboratory observations are coupled to state of the art models incorporating new insights of contaminant behaviour. The long term leaching of chlorinated ethenes from clay aquitards is currently being monitored at a number of Danish sites. The observed data is simulated using a coupled fracture flow and clay matrix diffusion model. Sequential degradation is represented by modified Monod kinetics accounting for competitive inhibition between the chlorinated ethenes. The model is constructed using Comsol Multiphysics, a generic finite- element partial differential equation solver. The model is applied at well characterised field sites with respect to hydrogeology, fracture network, contaminant distribution and microbial processes (lab and field experiments). At one of the study sites (Sortebrovej), the source areas are situated in a clayey till with fractures and

  7. Development of sample clean up methods for the analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methyl mycocerosate biomarkers in sputum extracts by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nicoara, Simona C.; Turner, Nicholas W.; Minnikin, David E.; Lee, Oona Y.-C.; O'Sullivan, Denise M.; McNerney, Ruth; Mutetwa, Reggie; Corbett, Liz E.; Morgan, Geraint H.

    2015-01-01

    A proof of principle gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method is presented, in combination with clean up assays, aiming to improve the analysis of methyl mycocerosate tuberculosis biomarkers from sputum. Methyl mycocerosates are generated from the transesterification of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs), extracted in petroleum ether from sputum of tuberculosis suspect patients. When a high matrix background is present in the sputum extracts, the identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to the methyl derivatives of PDIMs analytes may be hindered by the closely eluting methyl ether of cholesterol, usually an abundant matrix constituent frequently present in sputum samples. The purification procedures involving solid phase extraction (SPE) based methods with both commercial Isolute-Florisil cartridges, and purpose designed molecularly imprinted polymeric materials (MIPs), resulted in cleaner chromatograms, while the mycocerosates are still present. The clean-up performed on solutions of PDIMs and cholesterol standards in petroleum ether show that, depending on the solvent mix and on the type of SPE used, the recovery of PDIMs is between 64 and 70%, whilst most of the cholesterol is removed from the system. When applied to petroleum ether extracts from representative sputum samples, the clean-up procedures resulted in recoveries of 36–68% for PDIMs, allowing some superior detection of the target analytes. PMID:25728371

  8. Efficient sample clean-up and online preconcentration for sensitive determination of melamine in milk samples by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-ling; Chen, Xiao-wei; Zhang, Zhu-bao; Li, Jing; Xie, Tian-yao

    2014-10-01

    Based on an efficient sample clean-up and field-amplified sample injection online preconcentration technique in capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection, a new analytical method for the sensitive determination of melamine in milk samples was established. In order to remove the complex matrix interference, which resulted in a serious problem during field-amplified sample injection, liquid-liquid extraction was utilized. As a result, liquid-liquid extraction provides excellent sample clean-up efficiency when ethyl acetate was used as organic extraction by adjusting the pH of the sample solution to 9.5. Both inorganic salts and biological macromolecules are effectively removed by liquid-liquid extraction. The sample clean-up procedure, capillary electrophoresis separation parameters and field-amplified sample injection conditions are discussed in detail. The capillary electrophoresis separation was achieved within 5 min under the following conditions: an uncoated fused-silica capillary, 12 mM HAc + 10 mM NaAc (pH = 4.6) as running buffer, separation voltage of +13 kV, electrokinetic injection of +12 kV × 10 s. Preliminary validation of the method performance with spiked melamine provided recoveries >90%, with limits of detection and quantification of 0.015 and 0.050 mg/kg, respectively. The relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day were below 6%. This newly developed method is sensitive and cost effective, therefore, suitable for screening of melamine contamination in milk products. PMID:25082754

  9. Determination of eight sulfonamides in bovine kidney by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with on-line extraction and sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Van Eeckhout, N; Perez, J C; Van Peteghem, C

    2000-01-01

    A sensitive, high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric (i.e. mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry; LC/MS/MS) method with on-line extraction and sample clean-up for the screening and confirmation of residues of sulfonamides in kidney is described. The sulfonamides are extracted from homogenized kidney with methanol. After centrifugation of the extract, an aliquot of the extract is directly injected on the LC/MS/MS system with further extraction and clean-up of the sample on-line. Detection of the analytes was achieved by positive electrospray ionization (ESI) followed by multiple reaction monitoring. For each sulfonamide the collisional decomposition of the protonated molecule to a common, abundant fragment ion was monitored. The method has been validated for sulfadimethoxine, sulfaquinoxaline, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfathiazole, sulfamethoxazole, sulfadiazine and sulfapyridine. Calibration curves resulting from spiked blank kidney samples at the 10-200 microg/kg level showed good linear correlation. At the level of 50, 100 and 200 microg/kg both within- and between-day precision, as measured by relative standard deviation (RSD), were less than 16%. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 5 to 13.5 microg/kg. The recoveries ranged from 78 to 82%. The procedure provides a rapid, reliable and sensitive method for the determination of residues of sulfonamides in bovine kidney. The advantage of this method over existing methods is its decreased sample preparation and analysis time, which makes the method more suitable for routine analysis. PMID:11114046

  10. Innovative integration of decommissioning and deactivation program with soil-groundwater clean up program has positive results on budget and schedule: a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Schappell, Bruce G.; Rucker, Gregory G.

    2007-07-01

    An innovative approach to integrate the activities of a decommissioning and deactivation program (D and D) with a soil-groundwater clean up program has had significant positive results saving both money and time at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. The accomplishments that have been achieved by the combining the two programs have been remarkable including significant cost savings, economies of scale for sampling and document generation, and alignment of common objectives. Because of the coordination of both activities area-wide 'end states' can be formulated and be consistent with the customers' cleanup goals and federal regulations. This coordinates and aligns both the environmental clean up and D and D objectives because each must be addressed simultaneously and comprehensively. In this respect, resources from both organizations can be pooled to take advantage of the strengths of each. The new approach allows more efficient use of lean financial resources and optimizes workforce activities to attain the common objectives while being more cost effective, more protective of the environment, and optimizing the use existing resources. (authors)

  11. Determination of pesticides in edible oils by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry employing new generation materials for dispersive solid phase extraction clean-up.

    PubMed

    Dias, Jonatan V; Cutillas, Victor; Lozano, Ana; Pizzutti, Ionara R; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of several sorbents on removal fats from edible oils (olive, soya and sunflower) during the clean-up step for posterior determination of 165 pesticides by UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS system. The extraction procedure employed in this work was the citrate version of QuEChERS method followed by a step of freezing out with dry ice and clean-up evaluation using i) PSA with magnesium sulfate (d-SPE); ii) magnesium sulfate and Z-sep sorbent (d-SPE); iii) Z-sep (column SPE) and iv) Agilent Bond Elut QuEChERS Enhanced Matrix Removal-Lipid (EMR-Lipid). After evaluation of the recovery results at 10, 20 and 50μgkg(-1), the EMR-Lipid showed important advantages comparing to the other sorbents evaluated, such as better recovery rates and RSD%. The method was validated at the three concentrations described above. Analytical curves linearity was evaluated by spiking blank oil samples at 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500μgkg(-1). The method demonstrated good recoveries values between the acceptable range of 70-120% and RSD%<20 for most of evaluated pesticides. In order to evaluate the performance of the method, this same procedure was employed to other oils such as soya and sunflower with very good results. PMID:27507727

  12. Determination of Aflatoxin M1 in Milk Powder by Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Dispersive Solid-Phase Clean-up.

    PubMed

    Manoochehri, Mahboobeh; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Safaei, Mahdi

    2015-07-01

    This work describes the application of ultrasound-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction (UA-DSPE) as a sample preparation approach for aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) and also its subsequent determination by HPLC-fluorescence detection. A Box-Behnken design in combination with response surface methodology was implemented to determine the variables affecting the extraction procedure. The effects of different variables, including type and quantity of clean-up phase, ultrasonication time, ultrasonication temperature, nature and volume of the leaching solvent, were investigated in the optimization study. Primary secondary amine (PSA) and acetonitrile were selected as the clean-up phase and the leaching solvent, respectively. The obtained optimized values were 30 mg of PSA, 10 min ultrasonication time, 32°C ultrasonication temperature and 10 mL of acetonitrile. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.0012 and 0.0045 µg kg(-1), respectively. The recoveries of the UA-DSPE procedure ranged from 80 to 92%, with relative standard deviations lower than 10% in all cases. Eventually, this method was successfully applied to the extraction of AFM1 in milk powder samples. PMID:25378372

  13. Determination of triazine herbicides in seaweeds: development of a sample preparation method based on Matrix Solid Phase Dispersion and Solid Phase Extraction Clean-up.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, N; González-Castro, M J; Beceiro-González, E; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2014-04-01

    A method using dual process columns of Matrix Solid Phase Dispersion (MSPD) and Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) has been developed for extracting and cleaning-up of nine triazine herbicides (ametryn, atrazine, cyanazine, prometryn, propazine, simazine, simetryn, terbuthylazine and terbutryn) in seaweed samples. Under optimized conditions, samples were blended with 2g of octasilyl-derivatized silica (C8) and transferred into an SPE cartridge containing ENVI-Carb II/PSA (0.5/0.5 g) as a clean up co-sorbent. Then the dispersed sample was washed with 10 mL of n-hexane and triazines were eluted with 20 mL ethyl acetate and 5 mL acetonitrile. Finally the extract was concentrated to dryness, re-constituted with 1 mL methanol:water (1:1) and injected into the HPLC-DAD system. The linearity of the calibration curves was excellent in matrix matched standards, and yielded the coefficients of determination>0.995 for all the target analytes. The recoveries ranged from 75% to 100% with relative standard deviations lower than 7%. The achieved LOQs (<10 µg kg(-1)) for all triazines under study permits to ensure proper determination at the maximum allowed residue levels set in the European Union Legislation. Samples of three seaweeds were subjected to the procedure proving the suitability of MSPD method for the analysis of triazines in different seaweeds samples. PMID:24607126

  14. Innovative Integration of Decommissioning and Deactivation Program with Soil-Groundwater Clean Up Program Has Positive Results on Budget and Schedule: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schappell, B; Rucker, G

    2007-07-25

    An innovative approach to integrate the activities of a decommissioning and deactivation program (D&D) with a soil-groundwater clean up program has had significant positive results saving both money and time at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. The accomplishments that have been achieved by the combining the two programs have been remarkable including significant cost savings, economies of scale for sampling and document generation, and alignment of common objectives. Because of the coordination of both activities area-wide ''end states'' can be formulated and be consistent with the customers' cleanup goals and federal regulations. This coordinates and aligns both the environmental clean up and D&D objectives because each must be addressed simultaneously and comprehensively. In this respect, resources from both organizations can be pooled to take advantage of the strengths of each. The new approach allows more efficient use of lean financial resources and optimizes workforce activities to attain the common objectives while being more cost effective, more protective of the environment, and optimizing the use existing resources.

  15. [Simultaneous determination of zeranols and chloramphenicol in foodstuffs of animal origin by combination immunoaffinity column clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Guomin; Xi, Cunxian; Li, Xianliang; Chen, Dongdong; Tang, Bobin; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Hua

    2014-06-01

    A combination immunoaffinity column (IAC-CZ) clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical method was successfully developed for zearalenol, beta-zearalenol and zearalenone) and chloramphenicol (CAP) in foodstuffs of animal origin. The samples (fish, liver, milk and honey) were enzymatically digested by beta-glucuronidase/sulfatase for about 16 h and then extracted with ether. The extracts were evaporated to dryness and then the residues were dissolved by 1.0 mL of 50% acetonitrile solution. After filtered and diluted with PBS buffer, the reconstituted solution were cleaned-up with a IAC-CZ and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Shimadzu Shim-pack VP-ODS column with gradient elution by acetonitrile and 2 mmol/L ammonium acetate solution. The detection was carried out by electrospray negative ionization mass spectrometry in MRM mode. The proposed method was validated by the limit of detection (0.04-0.10 microg/kg), linearity (R2 > or = 0.999 0), average recoveries (70.9%-95.6%) and precisions (2.0% - 11.8%). The developed method is reliable, sensitive and has good applicability. The combination immunoaffinity column was proved to be an effective pretreatment technique to decrease the matrix effect, and it met the requirements of residue analysis of co-occurring zeranols and chloramphenicol. PMID:25269264

  16. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty. PMID:26960103

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of ochratoxin A in artificially contaminated cocoa beans using automated sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Hurst, W J; Martin, R A

    1998-06-12

    A HPLC method is described for the analysis of ochratoxin A at low-ppb levels in samples of artificially contaminated cocoa beans. The samples are extracted in a mixture of methanol-water containing ascorbic acid, adjusted to pH and evaporated to dryness. Samples in this state are then placed onto a Benchmate sample preparation workstation where C18 solid-phase extraction operations are performed. The resulting materials are evaporated to dryness and analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC with fluorescence detection. The method was evaluated for accuracy and precision with R.S.D.s for multiple injections of sample and standard calculated to 1.1% and 2.5% for sample and standard, respectively. Recoveries of ochratoxin A added to cocoa beans ranged from 87-106% over the range of the assay. PMID:9691293

  18. Metal associations in soils before and after EDTA extractive decontamination: implications for the effectiveness of further clean-up procedures.

    PubMed

    Barona, A; Aranguiz, I; Elías, A

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of Pb, Ni and Zn in two contaminated soils was determined before and after treating the soils with an EDTA solution. After the EDTA extraction, the proportion of Pb accumulated in the acid-extractable fraction considerably increased, which was related to the greater degree of metal extraction from the other fractions. EDTA was also able to extract certain amounts of Pb, Zn and Ni from the silicate matrix, which implied that these extractable amounts were not so strongly fixed to the residual fraction as previously supposed. As a consequence, after EDTA application, metal content (especially Pb) remained more weakly adsorbed to soil components (more easily leachable), potentially favouring the application of phytoremediation technologies. The extraction recoveries (for only one application) were generally low for the three metals (33-37% for Pb, 5-11% for Ni and 14-19% for Zn), although this fact is an advantage as plants would not be able to assimilate very high mobilised contents of metals. PMID:11351764

  19. Planar solid phase extraction clean-up and microliter-flow injection analysis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for multi-residue screening of pesticides in food.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2014-07-18

    For multi-residue analysis of pesticides in food, a sufficient clean-up is essential for avoiding matrix effects in liquid and gas chromatography (LC and GC) analysis coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). In the last two years, high-throughput planar solid phase extraction (HTpSPE) was established as a new clean-up concept for pesticide residue analysis in fruits and vegetables (C. Oellig, W. Schwack, 2011) and tea (C. Oellig, W. Schwack, 2012). HTpSPE results in matrix-free extracts almost free of interferences and matrix effects. In this study, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) was applied to directly analyze HTpSPE extracts for pesticide residues. This HTpSPE-microliter-flow injection analysis (μL-FIA)-TOFMS approach detects all pesticides at once in a single mass spectrum, without a liquid chromatographic separation step. Complete sample information was obtained after the injection of the cleaned extract within a single peak. Recovery studies for seven representative pesticides in four different matrices (apples, red grapes, cucumbers, tomatoes) provided mean recoveries of 86-116% with relative standard deviations of 1.3-10% (n=5) using the mass signal intensities under the entire sample peak. Comparing the mass spectra of sample peaks from spiked extracts and solvent standards indicated the efficiency of HTpSPE clean-up. A pesticide database search detected all spiked pesticides with a low incidence of false-positives. HTpSPE of one sample required a few minutes, and numerous samples could be cleaned in parallel at minimal cost with low sample and solvent consumption. The μL-FIA-TOFMS screening then needed an additional 6min per sample. The novel screening approach was successfully applied to QuEChERS extracts of several real samples, and the pesticides identified by HTpSPE-μL-FIA-TOFMS were identical to the pesticides detected by common target LC-MS/MS analyses. The high degree of concordantly identified pesticides by the new developed HTp

  20. Dispersive solid-phase extraction as a simplified clean-up technique for biological sample extracts. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Ariel R; Camargo, Alejandra; Martinez, Luis D; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2011-05-01

    Dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE) is proposed for the first time as a simplified, fast and low cost clean-up technique of biological sample extracts for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determination. The combination of a traditional extraction technique, such as ultrasound-assisted leaching (USAL) with DSPE was successfully applied for sample preparation prior to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) analysis. The analytes were first extracted from 1g homogenized sample in n-hexane:dichloromethane (8:2) by applying USAL technique and further cleaned-up using DSPE with 0.20 g C(18)-silica as sorbent material. Different solvent mixtures, sorbent type and amount, and lipid digestion procedures were evaluated in terms of clean-up and extraction efficiency. Under optimum conditions, the method detection limits (MDLs) for PBDEs, calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) were within the range 9-44 pg g(-1) wet weight. The calibration graphs were linear within the concentration range of 53-500,000 pg g(-1), 66-500,000 pg g(-1), 89-500,000 pg g(-1) and 151-500,000 pg g(-1) for BDE-47, BDE-100, BDE-99 and BDE-153, respectively; and the coefficient of determination (r(2)) exceeded 0.9992 for all analytes. The proposed methodology was compared with a reference solid-phase extraction technique. The applicability of the methodology for the screening of PBDEs has been demonstrated by analyzing spiked and real samples of biological nature (fish, egg and chicken) with different lipid content as well as reference material (WELL-WMF-01). Recovery values ranged between 75% and 114% and the measured concentrations in certified material showed a reasonable agreement with the certified ones. BDE-47, BDE-100 and BDE-99 were quantified in three of the seven analyzed samples and the concentrations ranged between 91 and 140 pg g(-1). In addition, this work is the first description of PBDEs detected in fish of Argentinean environment. PMID

  1. Multiresidue determination of 11 new fungicides in grapes and wines by liquid-liquid extraction/clean-up and programmable temperature vaporization injection with analyte protectants/gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Cancho-Grande, Beatriz; Simal-Gándara, Jesús

    2009-08-01

    A gas chromatographic ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-ITMS) method was developed for the determination of 11 new generation fungicides (benalaxyl, benalaxyl-M, boscalid, cyazofamid, famoxadone, fenamidone, fluquinconazole, iprovalicarb, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin and zoxamide) in grapes and wines. Samples were extracted with ethyl acetate:hexane (1:1, v/v) and cleaned-up with graphitized carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA) solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges using acetonitrile:toluene (3:1, v/v) as eluent. The addition of analyte protectants (3-ethoxy-1,2-propanediol, d-sorbitol and l-gulonic acid gamma-lactone) in the final extracts allowed to avoid the matrix-induced response enhancement effect on quantitation process with absolute recoveries ca. 100%. Precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) was lower than 16% for all fungicides. Limits of detection and quantitation were lower than 0.01 mg/kg or mg/L, except for cyazofamid, much smaller in all cases than maximum residue levels (MRLs) established by European Union for grapes and by Switzerland and Italy for wines. The proposed method was applied to determine fungicide residues in three different white grapes for vinification produced in Ribeiro area in Galicia (NW Spain), as well as in their corresponding final wines. PMID:19576591

  2. Use of gel permeation chromatography for clean-up in the analysis of coccidiostats in eggs by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chico, J; Rúbies, A; Centrich, F; Companyó, R; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2013-05-01

    An analytical method for determination and confirmation of nine coccidiostatics in eggs is reported. Ethyl acetate is used as extraction solvent, with satisfactory results, and simple automated clean-up is based on gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) . The target compounds are then analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated in-house in accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Trueness and precision were determined at four concentrations, and the mean errors obtained were <10 %, with relative standard deviations ranging from 3 to 18 %. For three non-authorized coccidiostatics (clopidol, ethopabate, and ronizadole), decision limit and detection capability were in the ranges 0.12-0.16 and 0.18-0.23 μg kg(-1), respectively. The results obtained prove the suitability of this new analytical method for routine monitoring of these substances in eggs. PMID:23535744

  3. Improvement of chemical analysis of antibiotics. IX. A simple method for residual tetracyclines analysis in honey using a tandem cartridge clean-up system.

    PubMed

    Oka, H; Ikai, Y; Kawamura, N; Uno, K; Yamada, M; Harada, K; Uchiyama, M; Asukabe, H; Mori, Y; Suzuki, M

    1987-03-13

    A simple, rapid and precise analytical method for the residual tetracyclines in honey has been established using a tandem cartridge clean-up system (prepacked reversed-phase and ion-exchange cartridges) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The recoveries of oxytetracycline (OTC), tetracycline (TC), chlortetracycline (CTC) and doxycycline (DC) from honey spiked at a level of 1.0 ppm are 87.1, 85.3, 98.0 and 99.0%, respectively, with coefficients of variation of 1.1-3.9%. The detection limits in honey are 0.02 ppm for OTC and TC, and 0.05 ppm for CTC and DC, respectively. The time required for the analysis of four samples is only 1 h. PMID:3106387

  4. Rapid determination of 88 veterinary drug residues in milk using automated TurborFlow online clean-up mode coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-xia; Yang, Ji-zhou; Wang, Zhao-xing; Wang, Cai-juan; Liu, Ya-feng; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    A novel method based on TurborFlow online solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been established for simultaneous screening and confirmation of 88 wide-range veterinary drugs belonging to eight families (20 sulfonamides, 7 macrolides, 15 quinolones, 8 penicillins, 13 benzimidazoles, 4 tetracyclines, 2 sedatives, and 19 hormones) in milk. The preparation method consists of sample dilution and ultrasonic extraction, followed by an automated turbulent flow cyclone chromatography sample clean-up system. The detection was achieved in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM). The total run time was within 39 min, including automated extraction, analytical chromatography and re-equilibration of the turboflow system. The optimization of different experimental parameters including extraction, purification, separation, and detection were evaluated separately in this study. The developed method was validated and good performing characteristics were obtained. The linear regression coefficients (R(2)) of matrix-match calibration standard curves established for quantification were higher than 0.9930. The limits of detection (LOD) were in the range of 0.2-2.0 μg/kg given by signal-noise ratio ≥3 (S/N) and the limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N≥10) ranged between 0.5 μg/kg and 10 μg/kg. Average recoveries of spiked target compounds with different levels were between 63.1% and 117.4%, with percentage relative standard deviations (RSD) in the range of 3.3-17.6%. The results indicated that the developed method has great potential for the routine laboratory analysis of large numbers of samples on measuring different classes of compounds. In comparison to traditional procedures, the automated sample clean-up ensures rapid, effective, sensitive analyses of veterinary drugs in milk. PMID:26653466

  5. Simultaneous determination of four aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginger and related products by HPLC with fluorescence detection after immunoaffinity column clean-up and postcolumn photochemical derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Kong, Weijun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Meihua

    2013-12-01

    Ginger, a widely used spice and traditional Chinese medicine, is prone to be contaminated by mycotoxins. A simple, sensitive, and reproducible method based on immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with HPLC and on-line postcolumn photochemical derivatization with fluorescence detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of aflatoxins (AFs) B1 , B2 , G1 , G2 , and ochratoxin A (OTA) in 25 batches of gingers and related products marketed in China for the first time. The samples were first extracted by ultrasonication with methanol/water (80:20, v/v) and then cleaned up with immunoaffinity columns for analysis. Under the optimized conditions, the LODs and LOQs for the five mycotoxins were 0.03-0.3 and 0.1-0.9 μg/kg, respectively. The average recoveries ranged from 81.3-100.8% for AFs and from 88.6-99.5% for OTA at three spiking levels. Good linearity was observed for the analytes with correlation coefficients all >0.9995. All moldy gingers were contaminated with at least one kind of the five investigated mycotoxins, while none of them were found in normal gingers. Ginger powder samples were contaminated slightly with the contamination levels below the LOQs, while ginger tea bags were mainly contaminated by OTA at 1.05-1.19 μg/kg and ginger black tea bags were mainly contaminated by AFs at 3.37-5.76 μg/kg. All the contamination levels were below the legally allowable limits. PMID:24115567

  6. Determination of endocrine disrupting compounds in fish liver, brain, and muscle using focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction and dispersive solid phase extraction as clean-up strategy.

    PubMed

    Ros, Oihana; Vallejo, Asier; Olivares, Maitane; Etxebarria, Nestor; Prieto, Ailette

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new method for the simultaneous extraction of several endocrine disrupting compounds, including alkylphenols (APs), estrogen, bisphenol-A (BPA) and one phthalate metabolite (mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, MEHP) in fish liver, brain, and muscle. Parameters affecting the extraction (extraction solvent and temperature) and the clean-up (dispersive phase nature and amount) steps were evaluated. The extraction was performed by means of focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) using 10 mL of n-hexane:acetone (50:50, v/v) for 5 min at ~0 °C, and the clean-up was done by means of dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) using 100 mg of ENVI-CARB and 100 mg of MgSO4 for the cleaning of brain and muscle extracts together with 100 mg of PSA in the case of liver extracts. Good apparent recoveries were obtained in the case of liver (62-132 %), brain (66-120 %), and muscle (74-129 %), relative standard deviation (RSD%) was always below 26 %, and the method detection limits (MDLs) were at low ng/g level. The developed method was applied to fish captured in Urdaibai estuary (Bay of Biscay) in December 2015, and the concentrations obtained were in the range MDL-1115 ng/g in brain, MDL-962 ng/g in muscle, and MDL-672 ng/g in liver. In general, the highest concentrations were measured in liver, followed by brain and muscle. In addition, diethylstilbestrol was only detected in fish brain. Graphical Abstract MS method scheme for the/MS method scheme for the determination of EDCs in fish liver, brain and muscle. PMID:27342793

  7. Simultaneous analysis of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from marine samples using automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and Power Prep™ clean-up.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Al-Rashdan, Amal; Ibtisam, A

    2012-05-30

    An automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method followed by Power Prep™ clean-up was developed for organochlorinated pesticide (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analysis in environmental marine samples of fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp. OCPs and PCBs were simultaneously determined in a single chromatographic run using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-negative chemical ionization (GC-MS-NCI). About 5 g of each biological marine sample was mixed with anhydrous sodium sulphate and placed in the extraction cell of the PLE system. PLE is controlled by means of a PC using DMS 6000 software. Purification of the extract was accomplished using automated Power Prep™ clean-up with a pre-packed disposable silica column (6 g) supplied by Fluid Management Systems (FMS). All OCPs and PCBs were eluted from the silica column using two types of solvent: 80 mL of hexane and a 50 mL mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (1:1). A wide variety of fish and shellfish were collected from the fish market and analyzed using this method. The total PCB concentrations were 2.53, 0.25, 0.24, 0.24, 0.17 and 1.38 ng g(-1) (w/w) for fish, squid, bivalves, shells, octopus and shrimp, respectively, and the corresponding total OCP concentrations were 30.47, 2.86, 0.92, 10.72, 5.13 and 18.39 ng g(-1) (w/w). Lipids were removed using an SX-3 Bio-Beads gel permeation chromatography (GPC) column. Analytical criteria such as recovery, reproducibility and repeatability were evaluated through a range of biological matrices. PMID:22608412

  8. Molecularly imprinted polymers applied to the clean-up of zearalenone and alpha-zearalenol from cereal and swine feed sample extracts.

    PubMed

    Urraca, Javier L; Marazuela, María Dolores; Moreno-Bondi, María C

    2006-08-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer prepared using 1-allylpiperazine (1-ALPP) as the functional monomer, trimethyltrimethacrylate (TRIM) as the crosslinker and the zearalenone (ZON)-mimicking template cyclododecanyl-2,4-dihydroxybenzoate (CDHB) has been applied to the clean-up and preconcentration of this mycotoxin (zearalenone) and a related metabolite, alpha-zearalenol (alpha-ZOL), from cereal and swine feed sample extracts. The extraction of ZON and alpha-ZOL from the food samples was accomplished using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) with MeOH/ACN (50:50, v/v) as the extraction solvent, at 50 degrees C and 1500 psi. The extracted samples were cleaned up and preconcentrated through the MIP cartridge and analyzed using HPLC with fluorescence detection (lambda (exc)=271/ lambda (em)=452 nm). The stationary phase was a polar endcapped C18 column, and ACN/MeOH/water 10/55/35 (v/v/v, 15 mM ammonium acetate) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) was used as the mobile phase. The method was applied to the analysis of ZON and alpha-ZOL in wheat, corn, barley, rye, rice and swine feed samples fortified with 50, 100 and 400 ng g(-1) of both mycotoxins, and it gave recoveries of between 85 and 97% (RSD 2.1-6.7%, n=3) and 87-97% (RSD 2.3-5.6%, n=3) for alpha-ZOL and ZON, respectively. The method was validated using a corn reference material for ZON. PMID:16628404

  9. Exhaust gas clean up process

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.

    1989-04-11

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/. and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt.

  10. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

  11. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOEpatents

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  12. Screening of pollution control and clean-up materials for river chemical spills using the multiple case-based reasoning method with a difference-driven revision strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rentao; Jiang, Jiping; Guo, Liang; Shi, Bin; Liu, Jie; Du, Zhaolin; Wang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    In-depth filtering of emergency disposal technology (EDT) and materials has been required in the process of environmental pollution emergency disposal. However, an urgent problem that must be solved is how to quickly and accurately select the most appropriate materials for treating a pollution event from the existing spill control and clean-up materials (SCCM). To meet this need, the following objectives were addressed in this study. First, the material base and a case base for environment pollution emergency disposal were established to build a foundation and provide material for SCCM screening. Second, the multiple case-based reasoning model method with a difference-driven revision strategy (DDRS-MCBR) was applied to improve the original dual case-based reasoning model method system, and screening and decision-making was performed for SCCM using this model. Third, an actual environmental pollution accident from 2012 was used as a case study to verify the material base, case base, and screening model. The results demonstrated that the DDRS-MCBR method was fast, efficient, and practical. The DDRS-MCBR method changes the passive situation in which the choice of SCCM screening depends only on the subjective experience of the decision maker and offers a new approach to screening SCCM. PMID:26922461

  13. Determination of chemotherapeutic drugs in human urine by capillary electrophoresis with UV and fluorimetric detection using solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction for sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Sánchez, María del Carmen; Acedo-Valenzuela, María Isabel; Durán-Merás, Isabel; Rodríguez-Cáceres, María Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Capillary electrophoresis was used for the rapid determination of three chemotherapeutic drugs employed to treat colorectal cancer: irinotecan, tegafur, and leucovorin, and their main metabolites (7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and 5-fluorouracil), in human urine samples. A phosphate buffer (pH 11.34; 20 mM) was selected as the background electrolyte. A hydrodynamic injection (9 s, 30 mbar) was applied and the separation was carried out using a separation temperature and voltage of 25°C and 25 kV, respectively. A capillary with two detection windows for serial online UV and fluorescence detection was satisfactorily employed. A solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction procedure was optimized for the clean-up of the urine samples and the extraction of the analytes. Matrix effects were assessed and signal suppression was observed for three of the analytes, thus, matrix-matched calibration was used for compensating residual matrix effects on these analytes. The proposed method allows the separation and quantification of the chemotherapeutics in less than 6 min. Detection limits range between 0.01 and 0.30 mg/L. The method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of the target compounds in human urine samples, with recoveries of 92.4-107.7%. PMID:25820908

  14. [Simultaneous determination of 16 organophosphorous pesticides in vegetables, fruits and tea by gas chromatography coupled with clean-up by mesoporous alumina as solid-phase extraction adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yeqin; Xi, Cunxian; Cao, Shurui; Wang, Guomin; Li, Xianliang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yunhuai

    2014-07-01

    A gas chromatographic method based on solid-phase extraction was developed for the simultaneous determination of 16 organophosphorous pesticides in vegetables, fruits and tea, including cabbage, lettuce, pumpkin, onion, tomato, turnip, apple, pear and tea. The samples were extracted with ethyl acetate, and clean-up with mesoporous alumina as solid-phase extraction adsorbent. The separation of target compounds was performed on a DB-1701 capillary column, and the quantitative analysis of the organophosphorous pesticides was carried out by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. The results showed that the calibration curves of the 16 organophosphorous pesticides were linear in the range of 10-2 000 microg/L with good correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.997). The recoveries of the pesticides in different samples at three spiked levels ranged from 83.2% to 103.8% with the relative standard deviations of 2.0%-9.9%. This method has high sensitivity, high accuracy and good repeatability, and can be applied to the determination of the organophosphorus pesticide residues in vegetables, fruits and tea. PMID:25255574

  15. Fast and selective pressurized liquid extraction with simultaneous in cell clean up for the analysis of alkylphenols and bisphenol A in bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzoa, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2012-12-28

    A novel and green analytical methodology for the determination of alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol technical mixture) and bisphenol A in bivalve mollusc samples was developed and validated. The method was based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) with a simultaneous in cell clean up combined with liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative mode (LC–ESI-MS/MS). Quantitation was performed by standard addition curves in order to correct matrix effects. The analytical features of the method were satisfactory: relative recoveries varied between 80 and 107% and repeatability and intermediate precision were <20% for all compounds. Uncertainty assessment of measurement was estimated on the basis of an in-house validation according to EURACHEM/CITAC guide. Quantitation limits of the method (MQL) ranged between 0.34 (4-n-octylphenol) and 3.6 ng g(−1) dry weight (nonylphenol). The main advantages of the method are sensitivity, selectivity, automaticity, low volumes of solvents required and low sample analysis time (according with the principles of Green Chemistry). The method was applied to the analysis of mussel samples of Galicia coast (NW of Spain). Nonylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenol were measured in all samples at concentrations between 9.3 and 372 ng g(−1) dw. As an approach, the human daily intake of these compounds was estimated and no risk for human health was found. PMID:23218190

  16. A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

    1993-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming.

  17. Results of the clean-up operation to reduce pollution on flooded agricultural fields after the red mud spill in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Uzinger, Nikolett; Anton, Áron Dániel; Ötvös, Károly; Tamás, Péter; Anton, Attila

    2015-07-01

    In Hungary, the dam of a red mud reservoir breached shortly after noon on October 4, 2010. Approximately 0.7-1 million m(3) highly alkaline red mud with very low dry matter content flowed into the Torna Creek and the surrounding area, covering 1017 ha of agricultural land. Results of the risk assessment of the accident indicated that the red mud should be removed from the surface of fields where it formed a continuous layer of more than 5 cm. After the removal, samples were taken manually from depths of 0.0-0.2 m and 0.2-0.4 m in a sampling grid and background samples unaffected by red mud from the depth of 0.0-0.3 m. Total element contents (Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn, and Na) and pH values were measured, and the results were analysed using correlation analysis and the Kruskal-Wallis probe. Dependence of the measured variables from elevation above sea level was studied using a 10 m by 10 m digital elevation model. Only ∼6.5% of the flooded area was temporarily designated as unsuitable for the production of food and fodder crops. In summary, the clean-up operation can be said to have been a success. PMID:25647492

  18. In-cell clean-up pressurized liquid extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination of hydrophobic persistent and emerging organic pollutants in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2016-01-15

    The main goal of this work was to develop, optimize and validate a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 97 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organophosphorus flame retardants, and several types of pesticides in marine sediment samples. Extraction and cleanup were integrated into the same step using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) with in-cell clean-up (1g of alumina). The extraction was performed using dichloromethane at 100 °C, 1500 psi and 3 extraction cycles (5 min per cycle). Extracts were derivatized with N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) to improve the signal and sensitivity of some target compounds (i.e., triclosan, 2-hydroxybenzophenone). Separation, identification and quantification of analytes were carried out by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Under optimal conditions, the optimized protocol showed good recovery percentages (70-100%), linearity (>0.99) and limits of detection below 1 ng g(-1) for all compounds. Finally, the method was applied to the analysis of sediment samples from different coastal areas from Andalusia (Spain), where occurrence and distribution of emerging contaminants in sediments is very scarce. Twenty five compounds out of 98 were detected in all samples, with the endocrine disruptor nonylphenol and the fragrance galaxolide showing the highest concentrations, up to 377.6 ng g(-1) and 237.4 ng g(-1), respectively. PMID:26747688

  19. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  20. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation. PMID:26914056

  1. Development of sample extraction and clean-up strategies for target and non-target analysis of environmental contaminants in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Baduel, Christine; Mueller, Jochen F; Tsai, Henghang; Gomez Ramos, Maria Jose

    2015-12-24

    Recently, there has been an increasing trend towards multi-targeted analysis and non-target screening methods as a means to increase the number of monitored analytes. Previous studies have developed biomonitoring methods which specifically focus on only a small number of analytes with similar physico-chemical properties. In this paper, we present a simple and rapid multi-residue method for simultaneous extraction of polar and non-polar organic chemicals from biological matrices, containing up to 5% lipid content. Our method combines targeted multi-residue analysis using gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) and a multi-targeted analysis complemented with non-target screening using liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). The optimization of the chemical extraction procedure and the effectiveness of different clean-up methods were evaluated for two biological matrices: fish muscle (lipid content ∼2%) and breast milk (∼4%). To extract a wide range of chemicals, the partition/extraction procedure used for the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was tested as the initial step for the extraction of 77 target compounds covering a broad compound domain. All the target analytes have different physico-chemical properties (log Kow ranges from -0.3 to 10) and cover a broad activity spectrum; from polar pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) to highly lipophilic chemicals such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochloride pesticides (OCPs). A number of options were explored for the clean-up of lipids, proteins and other impurities present in the matrix. Zirconium dioxide-based sorbents as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) and protein-lipid removal filter cartridges (Captiva ND Lipids) provided the best results for GC-MS and LC-MS analysis

  2. Method validation for aflatoxin M1 determination in yoghurt using immunoaffinity column clean-up prior to high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Mahsa; Karim, Guity; Ghavami, Mehrdad; Chamani, Mohammad

    2011-08-01

    Yoghurt is a popular dairy product in Iran because of its beneficial influence on human health and nutritional value. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is the metabolite of potential carcinogen aflatoxin B1, which can contaminate milk through the feed and is not eliminated by common processing heat treatment. An analytical method using immunoaffinity column for extraction and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for quantification was developed for AFM1 in this study. An HPLC method with fluorimetric detection for the determination of AFM1 in yoghurt milk has been optimized and validated according to Commission Decision BS EN ISO 14501: 2007 by using the conventional validation approach. The procedure for determining selectivity, recovery, precision, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) of the method has been reported. The results of the validation process demonstrate the agreement of the method with the provisions of Commission Regulation 401: 2006:EC. A new HPLC method with fluorescence detection was developed to determine aflatoxin M1. The detection limit was 1 ng/kg for yoghurt. The calibration curve was linear from 0.1 to 3.0 μg l⁻¹ injected. The method includes a preliminary clean-up and the average recoveries determined on three different days at the concentration levels of 0.025, 0.050 and 0.075 μg kg⁻¹ were in the range of 72.57%-86.66% with RSD in the range of 2.56%-8.41%. The interday and interlevel mean recovery value, which has been used to correct routine analysis results, was 80%. The method is rapid, easily automatable and therefore useful for accurate and precise screening of aflatoxin M1 in yoghurt. PMID:21385770

  3. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: Rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Roman G; Siciliano, Steven D; Römbke, Jörg; Oorts, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely recognized that microorganisms are essential for sustaining soil fertility, structure, nutrient cycling, groundwater purification, and other soil functions, soil microbial toxicity data were excluded from the derivation of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States. Among the reasons for such exclusion were claims that microbial toxicity tests were too difficult to interpret because of the high variability of microbial responses, uncertainty regarding the relevance of the various endpoints, and functional redundancy. Since the release of the first draft of the Eco-SSL Guidance document by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, soil microbial toxicity testing and its use in ecological risk assessments have substantially improved. A wide range of standardized and nonstandardized methods became available for testing chemical toxicity to microbial functions in soil. Regulatory frameworks in the European Union and Australia have successfully incorporated microbial toxicity data into the derivation of soil threshold concentrations for ecological risk assessments. This article provides the 3-part rationale for including soil microbial processes in the development of soil clean-up values (SCVs): 1) presenting a brief overview of relevant test methods for assessing microbial functions in soil, 2) examining data sets for Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mo that incorporated soil microbial toxicity data into regulatory frameworks, and 3) offering recommendations on how to integrate the best available science into the method development for deriving site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil. Although the primary focus of this article is on the development of the approach for deriving SCVs for metals and metalloids in the United States, the recommendations provided in this article may also be applicable in other jurisdictions that aim at developing ecological soil threshold values for protection of

  4. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Ion Recovery and Clean-Up of MS and MS/MS Spectra Obtained from Low Abundance Viral Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Crispin, Max; Bonomelli, Camille; Scrivens, Jim H.

    2015-07-01

    Many samples of complex mixtures of N-glycans released from small amounts of material, such as glycoproteins from viruses, present problems for mass spectrometric analysis because of the presence of contaminating material that is difficult to remove by conventional methods without involving sample loss. This study describes the use of ion mobility for extraction of glycan profiles from such samples and for obtaining clean CID spectra when targeted m/z values capture additional ions from those of the target compound. N-glycans were released enzymatically from within SDS-PAGE gels, from the representative recombinant glycoprotein, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus, and examined by direct infusion electrospray in negative mode followed by ion mobility with a Waters Synapt G2 mass spectrometer (Waters MS-Technologies, Manchester, UK). Clean profiles of singly, doubly, and triply charged N-glycans were obtained from samples in cases where the raw electrospray spectra displayed only a few glycan ions as the result of low sample concentration or the presence of contamination. Ion mobility also enabled uncontaminated CID spectra to be obtained from glycans when their molecular ions displayed coincidence with ions from fragments or multiply charged ions with similar m/z values. This technique proved to be invaluable for removing extraneous ions from many CID spectra. The presence of such ions often produces spectra that are difficult to interpret. Most CID spectra, even those from abundant glycan constituents, benefited from such clean-up, showing that the extra dimension provided by ion mobility was invaluable for studies of this type.

  5. Positive- and negative-ion mass spectrometry of diphenylmethane antihistaminics and their analogues and rapid clean-up of them from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Seno, H; Hattori, H; Kumazawa, T; Suzuki, O

    1993-12-01

    Positive-ion electron impact (PIEI), positive-ion chemical ionization (PICI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectra are presented for 15 compounds of diphenylmethane antihistaminics and their analogues, and each fragmentation pathway was analyzed. In the PIEI mode, molecular peaks were very small or missing for most compounds. Peaks at m/z 58, due to a dimethylaminomethyl group liberated, constituted base peaks in five compounds. Peaks at m/z 165 and/or 167, due to diaromatic rings plus a methyl group, appeared in most compounds. In the PICI mode, peaks due to M+H and M+C2H5 appeared in all compounds. Peaks due to diaromatic rings plus a methyl or ethyl group constituted base peaks in five compounds, which had an ether bond in their structures. In the NICI mode, anions at m/z M-H appeared in most compounds. Peaks at m/z 35 were observed for compounds having a chlorine group in their structures. Detection limits for total ion monitoring of these compounds were 20-50 ng on column in the PIEI mode, 100-200 ng in the PICI mode and 500-1000 ng in the NICI mode. A rapid and simple clean-up procedure of these drugs with use of Sep-Pak C18 cartridges is also presented. The drugs could be detected by gas chromatography with DB-1 and DB-17 capillary columns with satisfactory separation from impurities in their underivatized forms. The recovery of the drugs, which had been added to whole blood and urine, was more than 60% except for meclizine. PMID:8307529

  6. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus. PMID:25762281

  7. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers. PMID:23627476

  8. Copper clean-up procedure for ultrasonic extraction and analysis of pyrethroid and phenylpyrazole pesticides in sediments by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Lin, Youjian; Lu, Jian; Wilson, Chris

    2011-08-15

    A rapid ultrasonic extraction method coupled with a heated-copper clean-up procedure for removing interfering constituents was developed for analyzing pyrethroid and phenylpyrazole pesticides in sediments. Incubation of the 60 mL extract with 12 g copper granules at 60 °C for 2h was determined to be the optimal conditions for removing the interfering constituents. Eleven pyrethroid and phenylpyrazole pesticides were spiked into sediment samples to determine the effectiveness of the ultrasonic extraction method. The average recoveries of pyrethroids and phenylpyrazoles in sediment at 4 °C storage on day 0, 1, 7, 14, and 21 ranged from 98.6 to 120.0%, 79.2 to 116.0%, 85.0 to 119.7%, 93.6 to 118.7%, and 92.1 to 118.2%, respectively, with all percent relative standard deviations less than 10% (most <6%). This illustrated the stability of pyrethroids and phenylpyrazoles in sediment during sediment aging at 4 °C. Recoveries of the pesticides ranged from 98.6% to 120.0% for lowest fortification level (2-16 μg kg⁻¹), from 97.8% to 117.9% for middle fortification level (10-80 μg kg⁻¹), and from 94.3% to 118.1% for highest fortification level (20-160 μg kg⁻¹). Relative standard deviations of pesticide recoveries were usually less than 7%. Method detection limits of target pesticides ranged from 0.22 μg kg⁻¹ to 3.72 μg kg⁻¹. Furthermore, field sediment samples collected from four residential lakes during a three-month monitoring period were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. Bifenthrin was detected in all of sediment samples (highest concentration 260.33±41.71 μg kg⁻¹, lowest concentration 5.68±0.38 μg kg⁻¹, and fipronil sulfone was detected at least once in sediment samples collected from three sites with concentrations ranging from 1.73±0.53 to 7.53±0.01 μg kg⁻¹. PMID:21684581

  9. Determination of cocaine in postmortem human liver exposed to overdose. Application of an innovative and efficient extraction/clean up procedure and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Elisângela Jaqueline; Ribeiro de Queiroz, Maria Eliana Lopes; Penido, Marcus Luiz de Oliveira; Paiva, Marco Antônio Ribeiro; Teodoro, Janaína Aparecida Reis; Augusti, Rodinei; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-09-27

    A simple and efficient method was developed for the determination of cocaine in post-mortem samples of human liver via solid-liquid extraction with low temperature partitioning (SLE-LTP) and analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The extraction procedure was optimized by evaluating the influence of the following variables: pH of the extract, volume and composition of the extractor solvent, addition of a sorbent material (PSA: primary-secondary amine) and NaCl to clean up and increase the ionic strength of the extract. A bovine liver sample that was free of cocaine was used as a blank for the optimization of the SLE-LTP extraction procedure. The highest recovery was obtained when crushed bovine liver (2g) was treated with 2mL of ultrapure water plus 8mL of acetonitrile at physiological pH (7.4). The results also indicated no need for using PSA and NaCl. The complete analytical procedure was validated for the following figures of merit: selectivity, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), calibration curve, recovery, precision and accuracy (for within-run and between-run experiments), matrix effect, dilution integrity and stability. The within-run and between-run precision (at four levels) varied from 2.1% to 9.4% and from 4.0% to 17.0%, respectively. A maximum deviation of 11.62% for the within-run and between-run accuracies in relation to the nominal concentrations was observed. Moreover, the LLOQ value for cocaine was 50.0ngg(-1) whereas no significant effects were noticed in the assays of dilution integrity and stability. To assess its overall performance, the optimized method was applied to the analysis of eight human liver samples collected from individuals who died due to the abusive consumption of cocaine. Due to the existence of a significant matrix effect, a blank human liver was used to construct a matrix-matched analytical curve. The concentrations of cocaine found in these samples ranged from 333.5 to 5969ngg(-1). PMID

  10. Application of ion-exchange cartridge clean-up in food analysis. V. Simultaneous determination of sulphonamide antibacterials in animal liver and kidney using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Oka, H; Ikai, Y; Matsumoto, H; Miyazaki, Y; Nagase, H

    2000-11-10

    A simple, rapid, and reliable method for the determination of residual sulphonamide antibacterials (SAs) (sulfadiazine, sulfamerazine, sulfadimidine, sulfamethoxypiridazine, sulfisozole, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfisoxazole, sulfadimethoxine, and sulfaquinoxaline) in animal liver and kidney was developed using a combination of clean-up on a Bond Elut PSA cartridge and HPLC with UV detection. The SAs were extracted with ethyl acetate and then dissolved in 5 ml of 50 v/v% ethyl acetate-n-hexane after being evaporated to dryness. For clean-up of the crude sample, the resuspended extract was applied to a Bond Elut PAS (primary/secondary amine cartridge), and then SAs were eluted from the cartridge using 5 ml of 20 v/v% acetonitrile-0.05 M ammonium formate before being analysed by HPLC. Recoveries of the SAs at the levels of 0.5 and 0.1 microg/g were 70.8-98.2%, the rerative standard deviation were less than 7.0%, and the detection limits were 0.03 microg/g. The present analysis method of SAs in animal kidney and liver using HPLC with a clean-up procedure was demonstrated to be highly applicable to the direct LC-MS-MS analysis without any modification. PMID:11185627

  11. The use of immunoaffinity columns connected in tandem for selective and cost-effective mycotoxin clean-up prior to multi-mycotoxin liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analysis in food matrices.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Joyce; Donnelly, Carol; Leeman, David; Marley, Elaine

    2015-06-26

    This paper describes the use of two immunoaffinity columns (IACs) coupled in tandem, providing selective clean-up, based on targeted mycotoxins known to co-occur in specific matrices. An IAC for aflatoxins+ochratoxin A+fumonisins (AOF) was combined with an IAC for deoxynivalenol+zearalenone+T-2/HT-2 toxins (DZT); an IAC for ochratoxin A (O) was combined with a DZT column; and an aflatoxin+ochratoxin (AO) column was combined with a DZT column. By combining pairs of columns it was demonstrated that specific clean-up can be achieved as required for different matrices. Samples of rye flour, maize, breakfast cereal and wholemeal bread were analysed for mycotoxins regulated in the EU, by spiking at levels close to EU limits for adult and infant foods. After IAC clean-up extracts were analysed by LC-MS/MS with quantification using multiple reaction monitoring. Recoveries were found to be in range from 60 to 108%, RSDs below 10% depending on the matrix and mycotoxin combination and LOQs ranged from 0.1n g/g for aflatoxin B1 to 13.0 ng/g for deoxynivalenol. Surplus cereal proficiency test materials (FAPAS(®)) were also analysed with found levels of mycotoxins falling within the satisfactory range of concentrations (Z score ≤ ± 2), demonstrating the accuracy of the proposed multi-mycotoxin IAC methods. PMID:25990350

  12. Science Selections. Accounts of Ongoing Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornberg, Warren, Ed.

    This publication is intended to present science teachers with an opportunity to communicate to students the idea that science is an ongoing and never-ending process. The booklet contains supplemental materials, valuable as enrichment materials. A selection of ongoing research in the biological sciences, physics and astronomy, oceanography,…

  13. The Ongoing and Open-Ended Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores a novel form of classroom simulation that differs from published examples in two important respects. First, it is ongoing. While most simulations represent a single learning episode embedded within a course, the ongoing simulation is a continuous set of interrelated events and decisions that accompany learning throughout…

  14. Combining the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe approach and clean-up by immunoaffinity column for the analysis of 15 mycotoxins by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Tessiot, Sabine; Bessaire, Thomas; Racault, Lucie; Fiorese, Elisa; Urbani, Alessandro; Chan, Wai-Chinn; Cheng, Pearly; Mottier, Pascal

    2014-04-11

    Optimization and validation of a multi-mycotoxin method by LC-MS/MS is presented. The method covers the EU-regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 and HT-2), as well as nivalenol and 3- and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol for analysis of cereals, cocoa, oil, spices, infant formula, coffee and nuts. The proposed procedure combines two clean-up strategies: First, a generic preparation suitable for all mycotoxins based on the QuEChERS (for quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) protocol. Second, a specific clean-up devoted to aflatoxins and ochratoxin A using immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up. Positive identification of mycotoxins in matrix was conducted according to the confirmation criteria defined in EU Commission Decision 2002/657/EC while quantification was performed by isotopic dilution using (13)C-labeled mycotoxins as internal standards. Limits of quantification were at or below the maximum levels set in the EC/1886/2006 document for all mycotoxin/matrix combinations under regulation. In particular, the inclusion of an IAC step allowed achieving LOQs as low as 0.05 and 0.25μg/kg in cereals for aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, respectively. Other performance parameters like linearity [(r)(2)>0.99], recovery [71-118%], precision [(RSDr and RSDiR)<33%], and trueness [78-117%] were all compliant with the analytical requirements stipulated in the CEN/TR/16059 document. Method ruggedness was proved by a verification process conducted by another laboratory. PMID:24636559

  15. New method for the determination of parabens and bisphenol A in human milk samples using ultrasound-assisted extraction and clean-up with dispersive sorbents prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, R; Dorival-García, N; Zafra-Gómez, A; Camino-Sánchez, F J; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive and accurate analytical method for the determination of methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben and bisphenol A in human milk samples has been developed and validated. The combination of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and a simplified and rapid clean-up technique that uses sorbent materials has been successfully applied for the preparation of samples prior to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. The analytes were extracted from freeze-dried human milk samples using acetonitrile and ultrasonic radiation (three 15-min cycles at 70% amplitude), and further cleaned-up with C18 sorbents. The most influential parameters affecting the UAE method and the clean-up steps were optimized using design of experiments. Negative electrospray ionization (ESI) in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode was used for MS detection. The use of two reactions for each compound allowed simultaneous quantification and identification in one run. The analytes were separated in less than 10min. Deuterium-labeled ethylparaben-d5 (EPB-d5) and deuterium-labeled bisphenol A-d16 (BPA-d16) were used as surrogates. The limits of quantification ranged from 0.4 to 0.7ngmL(-1), while inter- and intra-day variability was under 11.1% in all cases. In the absence of certified reference materials, recovery assays with spiked samples using matrix-matched calibration were used to validate the method. Recovery rates ranged from 93.8% to 112.2%. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of four selected parabens and bisphenol A in human milk samples obtained from nursing mothers living in the province of Granada (Spain). PMID:25942557

  16. Optimization of ultrasonic extraction and clean-up protocol for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine sediments by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuewei; Yan, Guofang; Li, Xianguo; Guo, Xinyun; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, Yan

    2012-09-01

    The procedures of ultrasonic extraction and clean-up were optimized for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in marine sediments. Samples were ultrasonically extracted, and the extracts were purified with a miniaturized silica gel chromatographic column and analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector. Ultrasonication with methanol-dichloromethane (2:1, v/v) mixture gave higher extraction efficiency than that with dichloromethane. Among the three elution solvents used in clean-up step, dichloromethane-hexane (2:3, v/v) mixture was the most satisfactory. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries in the range of 54.82% to 94.70% with RSDs of 3.02% to 23.22% for a spiked blank, and in the range of 61.20% to 127.08% with RSDs of 7.61% to 26.93% for a spiked matrix, were obtained for the 15 PAHs studied, while the recoveries for a NIST standard reference SRM 1941b were in the range of 50.79% to 83.78% with RSDs of 5.24% to 21.38%. The detection limits were between 0.75 ng L-1 and 10.99 ng L-1for different PAHs. A sample from the Jiaozhou Bay area was examined to test the established methods.

  17. Evaluation of alternative sorbents for dispersive solid-phase extraction clean-up in the QuEChERS method for the determination of pesticide residues in rice by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Liziara da C; Caldas, Sergiane S; Prestes, Osmar D; Primel, Ednei G; Zanella, Renato

    2016-05-01

    Many compounds are used for pest control during the production and storage of rice, making it necessary to employ multiclass methods for pesticide residues determination. For this purpose, QuEChERS-based methods are very efficient, fast and accurate, and improvements in the clean-up step are important, especially for complex matrices, like cereals. In this work, different sorbents such as chitosan, florisil(®) , alumina, diatomaceous earth, graphitized carbon black, besides the commonly used primary secondary amine and octadecylsilane, were evaluated for dispersive solid-phase extraction clean-up in acetate-buffered QuEChERS method for the determination of residues of 20 representative pesticides and one metabolite in rice by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The sorbent C18 presented the best results, however, chitosan showed similar results, and the best performance among the unconventional sorbents evaluated. The method limit of quantification, attending accuracy (70-120% recovery) and precision (RSD ≤20%) criteria, ranged from 5 to 20 μg/kg. Results showed that chitosan is an effective alternative to reduce analysis costs, maintaining the method reliability and accuracy. PMID:27004927

  18. Croatian Meteor Network: ongoing work 2014 - 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Andreić, Ž.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing work mainly between 2014-2015 International Meteor Conferences (IMC) has been presented. Current sky coverage, software updates, orbit catalogues updates, shower search updates, international collaboration as well as new fields of research and educational efforts made by the Croatian Meteor Network are described.

  19. Overview of Ongoing NRMRL GI Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of ongoing NRMRL Green Infrastructure research and addresses the question: What do we need to know to present a cogent estimate of the value of Green Infrastructure? Discussions included are: stormwater well study, rain gardens and permeable su...

  20. 12 CFR 238.66 - Ongoing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ongoing requirements. 238.66 Section 238.66 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION LL) Financial Holding Company Activities §...

  1. 12 CFR 238.66 - Ongoing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ongoing requirements. 238.66 Section 238.66 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION LL) Financial Holding Company Activities §...

  2. 12 CFR 238.66 - Ongoing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ongoing requirements. 238.66 Section 238.66 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION LL) Financial Holding Company Activities §...

  3. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  4. Sensitive and precise HPLC method with back-extraction clean-up step for the determination of sildenafil in rat plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Strach, Beata; Wyska, Elżbieta; Pociecha, Krzysztof; Krupa, Anna; Jachowicz, Renata

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive HPLC method was developed and validated for the determination of sildenafil concentrations in rat plasma (200 μL) using a liquid-liquid extraction procedure and paroxetine as an internal standard. In order to eliminate interferences and improve the peak shape, a back-extraction into an acidic solution was utilized. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a cyanopropyl bonded-phase column with a mobile phase composed of 50 m m potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 4.5) and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v), pumped at the flow rate of 1 mL/min. A UV detector was set at 230 nm. A calibration curve was constructed within a concentration range from 10 to 1500 ng/mL. The limit of detection was 5 ng/mL. The inter- and intra-day precisions of the assay were in the ranges 2.91-7.33 and 2.61-6.18%, respectively, and the accuracies for inter- and intra-day runs were within 0.14-3.92 and 0.44-2.96%, respectively. The recovery of sildenafil was 85.22 ± 4.54%. Tests confirmed the stability of sildenafil in plasma during three freeze-thaw cycles and during long-term storage at -20 and -80°C for up to 2 months. The proposed method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats. PMID:25864807

  5. NCW 2002: Chemistry Keeps Us Clean. Chemists Clean Up: A History and Exploration of the Craft of Soapmaking How Soap Came to be Common in America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, Kim; McKay, David D.

    2002-10-01

    Soap is an article whose commonplace presence and obvious necessity we take for granted at the dawn of the twenty-first century. For most of American history bath soap, however, was a luxury product. This paper explores the confluence of the cultural and technological changes that led to its transformation into the ubiquitous and well-used object it is today. We pick up the timeline for the development of soap in the early American republic when soapmaking was a householder's task and soap use was generally limited to laundering clothes. We then trace the rise of the American cleanliness movement and correlate this rise to the increased manufacturing capabilities of the nation's large soapmakers. This technological forward movement included improvements in producing alkalis as well as the inception and growth of the oleochemicals industry. Additional growth agents were the development of market analysis, advertising campaigns, and factory-scale hydrolysis of fatty acids from their parent fats.

    See Featured Molecules.

  6. Simultaneous determination of 14 oil-soluble synthetic dyes in chilli products by high performance liquid chromatography with a gel permeation chromatography clean-up procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Zhao, Bo; Xiao, Ruiqi; Yun, Wen; Xiao, Zhaojing; Tu, Dawei; Chen, Shiqi

    2014-02-15

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 14 fat-soluble dyes in chilli products. The samples were extracted with hexane/acetone. The cleanup was performed with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) cleanup system. A HPLC separation was performed using variable wavelength detector and a gradient elution with 0.1% formic acid and methanol-acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) as the mobile phases. Good linearity (R² ≥ 0.995) was observed between 0.1 and 5.0 μg/mL. Detection limits of the investigated dyes, which were evaluated at signal to noise ratio of 3, were in the ranges of 11-71 μg/kg. The recoveries of the 14 synthetic colourants in three matrices ranged from 73.4% to 103.5%. Relative standard deviations ranged from 3.7% to 12.3%. The method has been successfully used for the determination of banned dyes in real samples. PMID:24128569

  7. Preparation of molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction using bensulfuron-methyl imprinted polymer and clean-up for the sulfonylurea-herbicides in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kaijie; Chen, Shangwei; Gu, Xiaohong; Wang, Haijun; Dai, Jun; Tang, Jian

    2008-04-28

    A pre-treatment methodology based on the molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MI-SPE) procedure was developed for the determination of bensulfuron-methyl (BSM), tribenuron-methyl (TBM), metsulfuron-methyl (MSM) and nicosulfuron (NS) in soybean samples. A molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) was prepared by precipitation polymerization using BSM as the template molecule, alpha-methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as the cross-linker and dichloromethane as the porogen. The binding behaviors of the template BSM and its analogues on the MIP were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then, solid phase extraction (SPE) with a BSM molecularly imprinted polymer (BSM-MIP) as adsorbent was investigated and the optimum loading, washing, and eluting conditions for MI-SPE of the selected BSM, MSM, TBM, and NS were established. The optimized MI-SPE procedure was used to extract the sulfonylureas and a high recovery was obtained in the soybean samples. PMID:18405688

  8. Simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination in nutmeg by ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction and immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with liquid chromatography and on-line post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Shu-Yu; Qiu, Feng; Xiao, Xiao-He; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A simple and sensitive analytical method based on ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction and immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with high performance liquid chromatography and on-line post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection (USLE-IAC-HPLC-PCD-FLD) has been developed for simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2 (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in 13 edible and medicinal nutmeg samples marketed in China. AFs and OTA were extracted from nutmeg samples by ultrasonication using a methanol : water (80 : 20, v/v) solution, followed by an IAC clean-up step. Different USL extraction conditions, pre-processing ways for nutmeg sample and clean-up columns for mycotoxins, as well as HPLC-PCD-FLD parameters (mobile phase, column temperature, elution procedure, excitation and emission wavelengths) were optimized. This method, which was appraised for analyzing nutmeg samples, showed satisfactory results with reference to limits of detection (LODs) (from 0.02 to 0.25 μg kg(-1)), limits of quantification (LOQs) (from 0.06 to 0.8 μg kg(-1)), linear ranges (up to 30 ng mL(-1) for AFB1, AFG1 and OTA and 9 ng mL(-1) for AFB2 and AFG2), intra- and inter-day variability (all <2%) and average recoveries (from 79.6 to 90.8% for AFs and from 93.6 to 97.3% for OTA, respectively). The results of the application of developed method in nutmeg samples have elucidated that four samples were detected with contamination of AFs and one with OTA. AFB1 was the most frequently found mycotoxin in 30.8% of nutmeg samples at contamination levels of 0.73-16.31 μg kg(-1). At least two different mycotoxins were co-occurred in three samples, and three AFs were simultaneously detected in one sample. PMID:23486692

  9. A pathogenic mechanism of chronic ongoing myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Yamamura, T; Fukuta, S; Matsumori, A; Matsuzaki, M

    1996-08-01

    To clarify the pathogenetic mechanism of chronic ongoing myocarditis, we produced Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis in A/J mice and immunopathologically examined the microcirculation in the chronic phase of myocarditis. Forty-two 3-week-old A/J mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with Coxsackievirus B3 (Nancy strain) 2 x 10(4) PFU (plaque-forming units) and sacrificed 7, 14, 21, 50, 90, or 120 days later. To evaluate myocardial microcirculation, 18 of the hearts were perfused from the thoracic aorta with warm 2% gelatin/carbon solution. The remaining hearts were quickly frozen for immunologic analysis with an enzyme immunostaining assay using monoclonal antibodies against CD4, CD8, macrophages, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and major histocompatibility complex class I or II. The presence of viral RNA genome in the myocardium at 40, 50, or 60 days after inoculation was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction. The lesions in chronic ongoing myocarditis consisted of myocardial damage, myocardial calcification, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of mononuclear cells. These infiltrated lymphocytes were predominantly CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, microvascular abnormalities, including dilatation, tortuosity, constriction, and abrupt termination, were observed around the lesions. There was marked infiltration by mononuclear cells around the microvessels. ICAM-1 was strongly expressed in the endothelial cells of the vessels. Coxsackie B3 viral genome was not detected in the myocardium of mice with chronic ongoing myocarditis in each stage examined. These results suggest that an autoimmune mechanism is involved in the persistent inflammation seen in chronic ongoing myocarditis. PMID:8889664

  10. A novel method for high preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of B₁, B₂, G₁ and G₂ aflatoxins in edible oils by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction after immunoaffinity column clean-up.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Ghanbarian, Maryam; Mostafavi, Ali; Shamspur, Tayebeh; Ghaseminezhad, Sima

    2012-07-20

    In the present study, a new approach which uses immunoaffinity column clean-up combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is proposed for the preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of aflatoxins (B₁, B₂, G₁ and G₂). The aflatoxins are then determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescent detector. Samples are extracted by immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up, and their eluents are used as dispersants of the subsequent DLLME, for further enrichment of aflatoxins. Various parameters (the type of elution solvent, the type and volume of extraction solvent and disperser solvent, extraction time, and centrifugation time) that affect the efficiency of the two steps are optimized. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent: 120 μL of chloroform, disperser solvent: 500 μL of acetonitrile, sample pH: 7.4, centrifugation time: 3 min), the calibration for B₁, B₂, G₁ and G₂ was found to be linear with coefficient of estimation (R²) of 0.9994, 0.9976, 0.9989, 0.9973 respectively and the limit of detection (LOD) was between 1.1 × 10⁻⁴ to 5.3 × 10⁻³ ng mL⁻¹ (3σ(b)/m, n=9). The recoveries at the two spiked levels ranged from 96.0 to 110.0% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 7.8% (n=9). The results show that dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with HPLC is a selective, simple, sensitive, and effective analytical method for the preconcentration and determination of ultra trace amounts of aflatoxins. The proposed method was applied for preconcentration and determination of B₁, B₂, G₁ and G₂ aflatoxin in edible oils. Analysis of aflatoxins in FAPAS test material showed that the proposed method has good accuracy. PMID:22673813

  11. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    PubMed

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory. PMID:12929791

  12. Ongoing SETI Observation Programs at the ATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array is designed for commensal observing with multiple users making spectral images at multiple freqeuncies and forming real time single-pixel beams in multiple directions at the same time. At the ATA, most SETI observations use beamforming and very high spectral resolution to perform targeted and wide area surveys of the sky, sometimes sharing the observing time with conventional astronomical observations with the imaging correlator. We shall briefly review several ongoing SETI programs as demonstrations of the capabilities of the ATA.

  13. A practical strategy for ongoing reinforcer assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, S A; McGee, G G; Farmer-Dougan, V; Risley, T R

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for practical methods of reinforcer assessment that systematically track ongoing changes in clients' preferences. In this study, the effects of a time-efficient reinforcer assessment package were evaluated in a multiple baseline across 3 preschoolers with autism, comparing individualized item selections by experienced teachers with children's presession preferences for items of various sensory qualities. Systematic assessment of children's reinforcers for correct responding virtually eliminated nontargeted maladaptive behaviors, as well as yielding expected improvements in accuracy. The powerful side-effects of potent reinforcers underline the importance of increased attention to reinforcer assessment in research and practice. PMID:2745238

  14. Upton bill offers clean-up incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.

    1994-07-01

    Like castor oil, the Superfund law can be difficult medicine to swallow, and no one wants to volunteer for a dose. Indeed, the law`s harsh and unbending liability scheme sometimes hinders the cleanup of contaminated property. Confronted with the choice of redeveloping an old {open_quotes}brownfield{close_quotes} urban industrial site or building at a pristine new {open_quotes}greenfield{close_quotes} location, most companies opt for the latter. The brownfield problem is especially troubling because the law often prevents voluntary cleanups at relatively low priority sites that usually don`t get caught up in the Superfund program. This paper describes the Upton Bill which would require the US EPA to establish cleanup standards for hazrdous substances, allow for public comment on a proposed response plan, and require a voluntary party to submit detailed annual reports and maintain records.

  15. Clean Up Your School Custodial Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steller, Arthur W.; Pell, Carroll

    1986-01-01

    Administrators can improve their school's custodial program by following steps that increase productivity, reduce costs, and provide long-term benefits of higher cleanliness standards. Administrators should work toward improved building cleanliness by insisting on a school board policy that establishes objectives for the custodial department.…

  16. Tanker industry progressing in cleaning up operations

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1993-10-18

    The international tanker industry has made significant strides in improving the safety and environmental awareness of its operations in recent years. With a string of mishaps following the Exxon Valdez spill, public scrutiny focused on the tanker industry and found it lacking. The U.S. government reacted strongly with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. OPA 90 set narrow requirements for tanker construction, forced the creation of a national spill response program, and made tanker operators solely liable for spill damage. The Aegean Sea and Braer accidents around the end of last year forced the pace of European legislation. Since then global initiatives have been announced to improve design and maintenance of tankers and take steps toward eliminating substandard ships and operators. The paper discusses priorities, tanker design, the tanker fleet, OPA status, spill response, the Tampa Bay spill, spill liability, European spills, EC legislation, and the Department of Transportation inquiry.

  17. Progress and challenges in cleaning up Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents captioned viewgraphs which briefly summarize cleanup efforts at the Hanford Site. Underground waste tank and spent nuclear fuel issues are described. Progress is reported for the Plutonium Finishing Plant, PUREX plant, B-Plant/Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, and Fast Flux Test Facility. A very brief overview of costs and number of sites remediated and/or decommissioned is given.

  18. Cleaning up: Battling Germs in School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerba, Charles P.

    2009-01-01

    Every school year, parents, teachers, and administrators must deal with an overwhelming number of sick children. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average child catches at least eight colds a year, and kids in the United States miss as many as 189 million school days annually due to colds. Good hygiene…

  19. Cleaning up the customer satisfaction waste dump

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, C.; Katz, G.M.

    1994-11-01

    Most electric utilities have been measuring Customer Satisfaction for several years now with the explicit goal of inducing their employees to improve their handling of customers. While many companies experienced early improvements, the scores have now leveled off. Increasingly, utilities are finding that their Customer Satisfaction Measurement system has reverted to little more than a {open_quotes}report card,{close_quotes} with no clear connection to business practice or processes. Even more alarming is the fact that many companies are now questioning the value of this complicated and expensive effort. This phenomenon is not unique to the electric utility industry -- it is happening in almost every industry in America. What companies really need is a way to tie customer satisfaction to business practices. To accomplish this, the Southern Company, along with several other utilities, are using the Voice of the Customer Process, which came out of the Japanese auto industry. It combines Customer Satisfaction Measurement with Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in order to guide the company into linking specific customer wants and needs to explicit performance measures and business process improvement efforts.

  20. Research on Cleaning Up in San Diego.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleman, Stanley

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of a set of research programs (dealing with the removal of liquid contaminants from surfaces) used to introduce graduate students to methods of design, evaluation, and modification within the context of a larger research program. Stresses the simultaneity and interaction of theoretical and experimental studies. (JM)

  1. Simultaneous determination of a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds in carrot, lettuce and amended soil by means of focused ultrasonic solid-liquid extraction and dispersive solid-phase extraction as simplified clean-up strategy.

    PubMed

    Mijangos, L; Bizkarguenaga, E; Prieto, A; Fernández, L A; Zuloaga, O

    2015-04-10

    The present study is focused on the development of an analytical method based on focused ultrasonic solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) followed by dispersive solid-phase extraction (dSPE) clean-up and liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) optimised for the simultaneous analysis of certain endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), including alkylphenols (APs), bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan (TCS) and several hormones and sterols in vegetables (lettuce and carrot) and amended soil samples. Different variables affecting the chromatographic separation, the electrospray ionisation and mass spectrometric detection were optimised in order to improve the sensitivity of the separation and detection steps. Under the optimised extraction conditions (sonication of 5min at 33% of power with pulse times on of 0.8s and pulse times off of 0.2s in 10mL of n-hexane:acetone (30:70, v:v) mixture using an ice bath), different dSPE clean-up sorbents, such as Florisil, Envi-Carb, primary-secondary amine bonded silica (PSA) and C18, or combinations of them were evaluated for FUSLE extracts before LC-MS/MS. Apparent recoveries and precision in terms of relative standard deviation (RSDs %) of the method were determined at two different fortification levels (according to the matrix and the analyte) and values in the 70-130% and 2-27% ranges, respectively, were obtained for most of the target analytes and matrices. Matrix-matched calibration approach and the use of labelled standards as surrogates were needed for the properly quantification of most analytes and matrices. Method detection limits (MDLs), estimated with fortified samples, in the ranges of 0.1-100ng/g for carrot, 0.2-152ng/g for lettuce and 0.9-31ng/g for amended soil were obtained. The developed methodology was applied to the analysis of 11 EDCs in both real vegetable bought in a local market and in compost (from a local wastewater treatment plant, WWTP) amended soil samples. PMID:25746759

  2. Pathological tau disrupts ongoing network activity.

    PubMed

    Menkes-Caspi, Noa; Yamin, Hagar G; Kellner, Vered; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Cohen, Dana; Stern, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Pathological tau leads to dementia and neurodegeneration in tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown to disrupt cellular and synaptic functions, yet its effects on the function of the intact neocortical network remain unknown. Using in vivo intracellular and extracellular recordings, we measured ongoing activity of neocortical pyramidal cells during various arousal states in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, prior to significant cell death, when only a fraction of the neurons show pathological tau. In transgenic mice, membrane potential oscillations are slower during slow-wave sleep and under anesthesia. Intracellular recordings revealed that these changes are due to longer Down states and state transitions of membrane potentials. Firing rates of transgenic neurons are reduced, and firing patterns within Up states are altered, with longer latencies and inter-spike intervals. By changing the activity patterns of a subpopulation of affected neurons, pathological tau reduces the activity of the neocortical network. PMID:25704951

  3. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is ongoing.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-01

    The 5th anniversary of the Fukushima disaster and the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the two most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history, both occurred recently. Images of Chernobyl are replete with the international sign of radioactive contamination (a circle with three broad spokes radiating outward in a yellow sign). In contrast, ongoing decontamination efforts at Fukushima lack international warnings about radioactivity. Decontamination workers at Fukushima appear to be poorly protected against radiation. It is almost as if the effort is to make the Fukushima problem disappear. A more useful response would be to openly acknowledge the monumental problems inherent in managing a nuclear plant disaster. Lessons from Chernobyl are the best predictors of what the Fukushima region of Japan is coping with in terms of health and environmental problems following a nuclear catastrophe. PMID:27214552

  4. Ongoing challenges in the management of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    This article gives an overview of some of the ongoing challenges that are faced in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Malaria causes approximately 881,000 deaths every year, with nine out of ten deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to the human burden of malaria, the economic burden is vast. It is thought to cost African countries more than US$12 billion every year in direct losses. However, great progress in malaria control has been made in some highly endemic countries. Vector control is assuming a new importance with the significant reductions in malaria burden achieved using combined malaria control interventions in countries such as Zanzibar, Zambia and Rwanda. The proportion of patients treated for malaria who have a confirmed diagnosis is low in Africa compared with other regions of the world, with the result that anti-malarials could be used to treat patients without malaria, especially in areas where progress has been made in reducing the malaria burden and malaria epidemiology is changing. Inappropriate administration of anti-malarials could contribute to the spread of resistance and incurs unnecessary costs. Parasite resistance to almost all commonly used anti-malarials has been observed in the most lethal parasite species, Plasmodium falciparum. This has presented a major barrier to successful disease management in malaria-endemic areas. ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) has made a significant contribution to malaria control and to reducing disease transmission through reducing gametocyte carriage. Administering ACT to infants and small children can be difficult and time consuming. Specially formulating anti-malarials for this vulnerable population is vital to ease administration and help ensure that an accurate dose is received. Education of healthworkers and communities about malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment is a vital component of effective case management, especially as diagnostic policies change

  5. Pressurized liquid extraction with in-cell clean-up followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the selective determination of parabens and triclosan in indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Canosa, P; Pérez-Palacios, D; Garrido-López, A; Tena, M T; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Cela, R

    2007-08-17

    A sample preparation method based on the use of pressurized liquid extraction is proposed for the determination of four alkyl parabens and triclosan in indoor dust. Extraction of analytes and removal of interfering species were achieved in the same step, by placing an appropriate sorbent in the extraction cell and by choosing a right combination of washing and elution solvents. Compounds, as silylated derivatives, were determined by gas chromatography in combination with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Factors affecting the yield and selectivity of the sample preparation procedure were carefully evaluated. Under final conditions, dried samples (0.5 g of dust and 1g of sodium sulphate) were dispersed with 3g of Florisil and loaded into an 11 mL stainless-steel extraction cell containing 1g of the same material as clean-up sorbent. Non-polar species were removed with n-hexane under mild conditions (40 degrees C, 3.4 MPa) and then analytes were extracted with ethyl acetate. The best compromise extraction conditions were 103 degrees C, 13.8 MPa and 3 static extraction cycles of 1 min. The proposed method provided recoveries from 76 to 98%, relative standard deviations under 11% (operating under reproducibility conditions) and quantification limits from 1 to 4 ng/g. The analysis of dust samples from private houses and office buildings confirmed the ubiquitous presence of target bacteriocides in these environments. PMID:17585923

  6. A new solid phase extraction clean-up method for the determination of 12 type A and B trichothecenes in cereals and cereal-based food by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Klötzel, Marianna; Lauber, Uwe; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-03-01

    A new reliable and cost-efficient solid phase extraction-based clean-up method for the determination of 12 type A and B trichothecenes [deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, neosolaniol, monoacetoxy-scirpenol, diacetoxyscirpenol, T-2 triol and T-2 tetraol] in cereals and cereal-based food is presented. Furthermore, the suitability for the simultaneous determination of zearalenone is examined. Toxins were extracted from cereal samples using ACN/water (80/20, v/v), purified by means of a new Bond Elut Mycotoxin column and analyzed via liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Limits of detection were calculated for the matrix wheat and ranged from 0.3 to 5 ng/g, depending on the toxin. Average recovery rates for the tested compounds in seven cereal-based matrices have been determined ranging from 65 to 104%. The relative standard deviations of the complete method ranged from 2.67 (DON, wheat) to 20.0% (T-2 toxin, oats). PMID:16521159

  7. Detection of multiple steroidal compounds in synthetic urine using comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) combined with a molecularly imprinted polymer clean-up protocol.

    PubMed

    Zulfiqar, Adnan; Morgan, Geraint; Turner, Nicholas W

    2014-10-01

    A method capable of screening for multiple steroids in urine has been developed, using a series of twelve structurally similar, and commercially relevant compounds as target analytes. A molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction clean-up step was used to make the sample suitable for injection onto a GC×GC-MS setup. Significant improvements compared to a commercially available C-18 material were observed. Each individual steroid was able to be separated and identified, using both the retention profile and diagnostic fragmentation ion monitoring abilities of the comprehensive chromatographic-mass spectrometry method. Effective LODs of between 11.7 and 27.0 pg were calculated for individual steroids, effectively equivalent to concentration levels of between 0.234 and 0.540 ng mL(-1) in urine, while the application of multiple screen was demonstrated using a 10 ng mL(-1) mixed sample. The nature of this study also removes the need for sample derivitisation which speeds up the screening process. PMID:25083511

  8. Epilepsy Surgery: Current Status and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    KAWAI, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of surgical treatment of epilepsy and introduces the ongoing challenges. Seizure outcome of resective surgery for focal seizures associated with focal lesions is satisfactory. Particularly for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, surgical treatment should be considered from the earlier stage of the disease. Meanwhile, surgical outcome in nonlesional extratemporal lobe epilepsy is still to be improved using various approaches. Disconnective surgeries reduce surgical complications of extensive resections while achieving equivalent or better seizure outcomes. Multiple subpial transection is still being modified expecting a better outcome by transection to the vertical cortices along the sulci- and multi-directional transection from a single entry point. Hippocampal transection is expected to preserve memory function while interrupting the abnormal epileptic synchronization. Proper selection or combination of subdural and depth electrodes and a wide-band analysis of electroencephalography may improve the accurate localization of epileptogenic region. Patients for whom curative resective surgery is not indicated because of generalized or bilateral multiple nature of their epilepsies, neuromodulation therapies are options of treatment which palliate their seizures. PMID:25925752

  9. Ongoing Recovery Basic Information Tool (ORBIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, Donald

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Drug Free Work Place Program (DFWP) has now matured to the point of being able to return employees to sensitive testing designated positions (TDP) after completion of treatment of their addiction. The known tendency of addicted individuals to suffer multiple relapses prior to their final recovery has resulted in several positive urine tests (relapses) occurring among those Federal employees who have already completed treatment and who have been returned to TDP's. The very real potential for further relapses occurring after additional employees return to TDP's will be a critical factor in the ultimate success of the DFWP and in the public's impression of the program's effectiveness. In response to this concern, NASA has begun development of its Ongoing Recovery Basic Information Tool (ORBIT) instrument. The aim of the NASA ORBIT is to provide Employee Assistance Program (EAP) professionals with an advanced clinical tool which will be helpful in supporting recovery from substance abuse and which will allow more accurate determinations of when clients may be successfully returned to sensitive positions.

  10. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  11. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy. PMID:26546163

  12. Increased ongoing neural variability in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Gonen-Yaacovi, Gil; Arazi, Ayelet; Shahar, Nitzan; Karmon, Anat; Haar, Shlomi; Meiran, Nachshon; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-08-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been described as a disorder where frequent lapses of attention impair the ability of an individual to focus/attend in a sustained manner, thereby generating abnormally large intra-individual behavioral variability across trials. Indeed, increased reaction time (RT) variability is a fundamental behavioral characteristic of individuals with ADHD found across a large number of cognitive tasks. But what is the underlying neurophysiology that might generate such behavioral instability? Here, we examined trial-by-trial EEG response variability to visual and auditory stimuli while subjects' attention was diverted to an unrelated task at the fixation cross. Comparisons between adult ADHD and control participants revealed that neural response variability was significantly larger in the ADHD group as compared with the control group in both sensory modalities. Importantly, larger trial-by-trial variability in ADHD was apparent before and after stimulus presentation as well as in trials where the stimulus was omitted, suggesting that ongoing (rather than stimulus-evoked) neural activity is continuously more variable (noisier) in ADHD. While the patho-physiological mechanisms causing this increased neural variability remain unknown, they appear to act continuously rather than being tied to a specific sensory or cognitive process. PMID:27179150

  13. Coping with Selfish On-Going Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupferman, Orna; Tamir, Tami

    A rational and selfish environment may have an incentive to cheat the system it interacts with. Cheating the system amounts to reporting a stream of inputs that is different from the one corresponding to the real behavior of the environment. The system may cope with cheating by charging penalties to cheats it detects. In this paper, we formalize this setting by means of weighted automata and their resilience to selfish environments. Automata have proven to be a successful formalism for modeling the on-going interaction between a system and its environment. In particular, weighted finite automata (WFAs), which assign a cost to each input word, are useful in modeling an interaction that has a quantitative outcome. Consider a WFA A over the alphabet Σ. At each moment in time, the environment may cheat A by reporting a letter different from the one it actually generates. A penalty function η:Σ×Σ→IR ≥ 0 maps each possible false-report to a penalty, charged whenever the false-report is detected. A detection-probability function p:Σ×Σ→[0,1] gives the probability of detecting each false-report. We say that A is (η,p)-resilient to cheating if <η,p> ensures that the minimal expected cost of an input word is achieved with no cheating. Thus, a rational environment has no incentive to cheat A.

  14. On-Going Temperature Extremes in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordov, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes accompanied by the restructuring of global processes in the atmosphere and biosphere are strongly pronounced in the Northern Eurasia regions, especially in Siberia. Temperature trends (grows up to 0.5 °C per decade), more frequent occurrence of temperature extremes provoked serious natural disasters (2010 heat waves in Russia, 2013 flood in Russia's Far East) led to socio-economical impact (crop damages, infrastructure failures, respectively). To get reliable knowledge on location, frequency and magnitude of observed extremes we have studied daily max/min temperature trends based on ECMWF ERA Interim Reanalysis data (0,25°×0,25°). This dataset is most accurately reproduces observed temperature behavior in the region. Statistical analysis of daily temperature time series (1979-2012) indicates the asymmetric changes in distribution tails of such extreme indices as warm/cold days/nights. Namely, the warming during winter cold nights is stronger than during warm nights, especially over the north of Siberia. Increases in minimum temperatures are more significant than in maximum temperatures. Warming determined at the high latitudes of the region is achieved mostly due to winter temperature changes. South area of Siberia has slightly cooling during winter and summer. Results obtained provide regional decision-makers with detailed high spatial and temporal resolution climatic information required for adaptation and mitigation measures development. Calculations presented have been realized using information-computational web-GIS system "Climate" (http://climate.scert.ru/) which automatically generates the archive of calculated fields ready for multidisciplinary studies of regional climate change impacts. The authors acknowledge partial financial support for this research from the RFBR (13-05-12034, 14-05-00502), SB RAS 131 and VIII.80.2.1.) and grant of the President of RF (№ 181).

  15. Improved method for the simultaneous determination of aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and Fusarium toxins in cereals and derived products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after multi-toxin immunoaffinity clean up.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Veronica Maria Teresa; Ciasca, Biancamaria; Powers, Stephen; Visconti, Angelo

    2014-08-01

    An improved method for the quantitative determination of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2), ochratoxin A, fumonisins (B1, B2), zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, T-2 and HT-2 toxins in cereals and derived products, at levels comparable with EU maximum permitted levels, was developed. The effective co-extraction of the mycotoxins under investigation was achieved in 4min by a double extraction approach, using water followed by methanol. Clean up of the extract was performed by a new multi-toxin immunoaffinity column. Analytical performance characteristics were evaluated through single laboratory validation. Raw wheat and maize, corn flakes and maize snacks were chosen as representative matrices for method validation. The validation assay was carried out at 50, 100 and 150% of EU maximum permitted levels for each mycotoxin. Statistical analysis of the results (ANOVA) provided the within laboratory reproducibility and the error contributions from repeatability, between day effects, and influences from different matrix composition. Recoveries generally higher than 70% were obtained for all tested mycotoxins with relative standard deviation (within laboratory reproducibility) lesser than 37%. Limits of quantification (calculated as the lowest amount of each analyte which could be determined with a precision of 10%) ranged from 1μg/kg to 30μg/kg. The trueness of generated data was assessed by analysis of reference materials. The proposed method was proven to be suitable to assess, with a single analysis, compliance of the selected cereal based foods with the EU maximum permitted or recommended levels for all regulated mycotoxins. PMID:24969088

  16. Rapid estimation of readily leachable triazine residues in soils using automatic kinetic bioaccessibility assays followed by on-line sorptive clean-up as a front-end to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Zagatto, Elias A G; Miró, Manuel

    2016-08-15

    An automatic batchwise bioaccessibility test was proposed for on-line monitoring of readily mobile pools of ametryn and atrazine residues in agricultural soils with different physicochemical properties. A 0.01molL(-1) CaCl2 solution mimicking rainwater percolation through the soil profiles was used for the herbicide extractions. The extract aliquots were successively sampled at regular time intervals in order to investigate the extraction kinetics. For extract clean-up and retention of freely dissolved target species, 30mg of restricted-access like copolymer were used as in-line sorptive material followed by elution with methanol and on-line heart-cut injection towards a C18 silica reversed-phase monolithic column (100×4.6mm) in a liquid chromatographic system. A mathematical model emphasized that the readily available pools vs time can be in most instances described by a first-order exponential equation, thus an asymptotical value is approached. Consequently, the leaching assays can be performed without attaining chemical equilibrium. Enhancement factors and detection limits were 10.2 and 18.8, and 0.40 and 0.37mgkg(-1) for ametryn and atrazine, respectively. The automatic method features good repeatability for leaching tests (r.s.d.: 11.8-10.2% for sandy and 3.7-6.2% for clayey soil). Reliable data, demonstrated with relative recoveries in the soil leachates ranging from 86 to 104%, were achieved in less than 35min, thus avoiding the need for up to 24h as recommended by standard leaching methods. PMID:27260437

  17. Deriving site-specific clean-up criteria to protect ecological receptors (plants and soil invertebrates) exposed to metal or metalloid soil contaminants via the direct contact exposure pathway

    PubMed Central

    Checkai, Ron; Van Genderen, Eric; Sousa, José Paulo; Stephenson, Gladys; Smolders, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Soil contaminant concentration limits for the protection of terrestrial plants and soil invertebrates are commonly based on thresholds derived using data from laboratory ecotoxicity tests. A comprehensive assessment has been made for the derivation of ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States; however, these limits are conservative because of their focus on high bioavailability scenarios. Here, we explain and evaluate approaches to soil limit derivation taken by 4 jurisdictions, 2 of which allow for correction of data for factors affecting bioavailability among soils, and between spiked and field-contaminated soils (Registration Evaluation Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals [REACH] Regulation, European Union [EU], and the National Environment Protection Council [NEPC], Australia). Scientifically advanced features from these methods have been integrated into a newly developed method for deriving soil clean-up values (SCVs) within the context of site-specific baseline ecological risk assessment. Resulting site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability may permit a greater residual concentration in soil when compared to generic screening limit concentrations (e.g., Eco-SSL), while still affording acceptable protection. Two choices for selecting the level of protection are compared (i.e., allowing higher effect levels per species, or allowing a higher percentile of species that are potentially unprotected). Implementation of this new method is presented for the jurisdiction of the United States, with a focus on metal and metalloid contaminants; however, the new method can be used in any jurisdiction. A case study for molybdate shows the large effect of bioavailability corrections and smaller effects of protection level choices when deriving SCVs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:346–357. PMID:24470189

  18. Association between health information, use of protective devices and occurrence of acute health problems in the Prestige oil spill clean-up in Asturias and Cantabria (Spain): a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, José Miguel; Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Suárez, Berta; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Pollán, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper examines the association between use of protective devices, frequency of acute health problems and health-protection information received by participants engaged in the Prestige oil spill clean-up in Asturias and Cantabria, Spain. Methods We studied 133 seamen, 135 bird cleaners, 266 volunteers and 265 paid workers selected by random sampling, stratified by type of worker and number of working days. Information was collected by telephone interview conducted in June 2003. The association of interest was summarized, using odds ratios (OR) obtained from logistic regression. Results Health-protection briefing was associated with use of protective devices and clothing. Uninformed subjects registered a significant excess risk of itchy eyes (OR:2.89; 95%CI:1.21–6.90), nausea/vomiting/dizziness (OR:2.25; 95%CI:1.17–4.32) and throat and respiratory problems (OR:2.30; 95%CI:1.15–4.61). There was a noteworthy significant excess risk of headaches (OR:3.86: 95%CI:1.74–8.54) and respiratory problems (OR:2.43; 95%CI:1.02–5.79) among uninformed paid workers. Seamen, the group most exposed to the fuel-oil, were the worst informed and registered the highest frequency of toxicological problems. Conclusion Proper health-protection briefing was associated with greater use of protective devices and lower frequency of health problems. Among seamen, however, the results indicate poorer dissemination of information and the need of specific guidelines for removing fuel-oil at sea. PMID:16390547

  19. Ongoing climatic extreme dynamics in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Shulgina, T. M.; Okladnikov, I. G.; Titov, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes accompanied by the restructuring of global processes in the atmosphere and biosphere are strongly pronounced in the Northern Eurasia regions, especially in Siberia. Recent investigations indicate not only large changes in averaged climatic characteristics (Kabanov and Lykosov, 2006, IPCC, 2007; Groisman and Gutman, 2012), but more frequent occurrence and stronger impacts of climatic extremes are reported as well (Bulygina et al., 2007; IPCC, 2012: Climate Extremes, 2012; Oldenborh et al., 2013). This paper provides the results of daily temperature and precipitation extreme dynamics in Siberia for the last three decades (1979 - 2012). Their seasonal dynamics is assessed using 10th and 90th percentile-based threshold indices that characterize frequency, intensity and duration of climatic extremes. To obtain the geographical pattern of these variations with high spatial resolution, the sub-daily temperature data from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis and daily precipitation amounts from APHRODITE JMA dataset were used. All extreme indices and linear trend coefficients have been calculated using web-GIS information-computational platform Climate (http://climate.scert.ru/) developed to support collaborative multidisciplinary investigations of regional climatic changes and their impacts (Gordov et al., 2012). Obtained results show that seasonal dynamics of daily temperature extremes is asymmetric for tails of cold and warm temperature extreme distributions. Namely, the intensity of warming during cold nights is higher than during warm nights, especially at high latitudes of Siberia. The similar dynamics is observed for cold and warm day-time temperatures. Slight summer cooling was observed in the central part of Siberia. It is associated with decrease in warm temperature extremes. In the southern Siberia in winter, we also observe some cooling mostly due to strengthening of the cold temperature extremes. Changes in daily precipitation extremes

  20. EIDA Next Generation: ongoing and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, Angelo; Quinteros, Javier; Sleeman, Reinoud; Trani, Luca; Clinton, John; Stammler, Klaus; Danecek, Peter; Pedersen, Helle; Ionescu, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA; http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/eida.html) is the distributed Data Centre system within ORFEUS, providing transparent access and services to high quality, seismic data across (currently) 9 large data archives in Europe. EIDA is growing, in terms of the number of participating data centres, the size of the archives, the variability of the data in the archives, the number of users, and the volume of downloads. The on-going success of EIDA is thus providing challenges that are the driving force behind the design of the next generation (NG) of EIDA, which is expected to be implemented within EPOS IP. EIDA ORFEUS must cope with further expansion of the system and more complex user requirements by developing new techniques and extended services. The EIDA NG is being designed to work on standard FDSN web services and two additional new web services: Routing Service and QC (quality controlled) service. This presentation highlights the challenges EIDA needs to address during the EPOS IP and focuses on these 2 new services. The Routing Service can be considered as the core of EIDA NG. It was designed to assist users and clients to locate data within a federated, decentralized data centre (e.g. EIDA). A detailed, FDSN-compliant specification of the service has been developed. Our implementation of this service will run at every EIDA node, but is also capable of running on a user's computer, allowing anyone to define virtual or integrate existing data centres. This (meta)service needs to be queried in order to locate the data. Some smart clients (in a beta status) have been also provided to offer the user an integrated view of the whole EIDA, hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication. The QC Service is developed to cope with user requirements to query for relevant data only. The web service provides detailed information on the

  1. Development of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with ultrasound-assisted extraction and auto solid-phase clean-up method for the determination of Fusarium toxins in animal derived foods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongmei; Cao, Xiaoqin; Tao, Yanfei; Wu, Qinghua; Pan, Yuanhu; Peng, Dapeng; Liu, Zhenli; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-10-11

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of 19 Fusarium toxins and their metabolites including deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), T-2 toxin (T-2), HT-2 toxin (HT-2), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-AcDON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-AcDON), neosolaniol (NEO), fusarenon-X (F-X), diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), monoacetoxyscirpenol (MAS), zearalanone (ZAN), zearalenone (ZON), α-Zearalenol (α-ZOL), β-Zearalenol (β-ZOL), a-Zearalanol (α-ZAL), β-Zearalanol (β-ZAL), T-2 triol, T-2 tetraol, deepoxy-deoxynialenol (DOM-1) in the muscle, liver, kidney, fat of swine, bovine and sheep, muscle and liver of chicken, muscle and skin of fish, as well as milk and eggs. Sample preparation procedure includes ultrasound-assisted extraction with acetonitrile/water (90/10, v/v), defatting with n-hexane and final clean-up with auto solid phase extraction (SPE) on Bond Elut Mycotoxin cartridges. The detection and quantification of the analytes were performed by a reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS). DON, NIV, DOM-1, 3-AcDON, 15-AcDON, F-X, ZON, ZAN, α-ZOL, β-ZOL, α-ZAL, β-ZAL, T-2 triol and T-2 tetraol were detected in a negative ion mode, while T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, NEO, DAS and MAS were detected in a positive ion mode. The CCα and CCβ of the analytes in different samples varied from 0.16 to 1.37μg/kg and 0.33 to 2.34μg/kg, respectively. The recoveries of spiked sample from 0.5μg/kg to 8μg/kg ranged from 64.8% to 108.2% with the relative standard deviations of less than 19.4%. Performances of the whole analytical procedure meet the criteria established by the European Commission for mass spectrometric detection. PMID:24011505

  2. 10 CFR 1045.20 - Ongoing call for declassification proposals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ongoing call for declassification proposals. 1045.20 Section 1045.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Identification of Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data Information § 1045.20 Ongoing...

  3. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  4. Antireflux surgery does not change ongoing renal functional deterioration.

    PubMed

    Arslansoyu Çamlar, Seçil; Çağlar, Sevinç; Soylu, Alper; Türkmen, Mehmet Atilla; Kavukçu, Salih

    2016-04-01

    Aim Treatment modalities of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) consist of antimicrobial prophylaxis and antireflux surgery. In this study, we aimed to determine if antireflux surgery changes the course of renal functional deterioration in children with VUR and urinary tract infections (UTI). Methods Medical files of patients with VUR diagnosed during evaluation for UTI were evaluated retrospectively for gender, age, follow-up period, and renal ultrasonography (US) and serial 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) scintigraphy findings. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary protein levels were determined at the initial and last visits, and before the operation in children who had antireflux surgery. The patients were divided into two groups as solely medically treated (Group 1) and both medically and surgically treated (Group 2). Group 2 was further divided as those with stable renal function (Group 2a) and with progressive renal injury (Group 2b). Results There were 140 patients (77 female; mean age 51.6 ± 51.9 months). Group 1 and Group 2 included 82 and 58 patients, respectively. In Group 2, the number of patients with the abnormal US, DMSA scintigraphy, and renal function was higher than in Group 1. Recurrent UTI rate was similar, but progressive scarring was more prominent in the antireflux surgery group. In Group 2, 31 patients had a stable renal function (Group 2a) while 27 had progressive deterioration of renal functions (Group 2b). These subgroups were not different with respect to the rate of high-grade VUR, the presence of a renal scar in DMSA, and UTI recurrence. However, the bilateral renal scar was more common in Group 2b. Conclusion Antireflux surgery does not change the course of ongoing renal injury and renal functional deterioration. PMID:26786885

  5. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period....

  6. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period....

  7. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception.

    PubMed

    Wohlschläger, Afra M; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain's ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants' left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  8. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain’s ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants’ left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  9. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  10. EMERGING CONTAMINANTS: AN OVERVIEW OF ON-GOING RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation covers an overview of research on emerging contaminants on-going at

    U.S. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory in Las Vegas. Due to the

    improvements and sophistication of recent analytical instruments, increasing numbers of

    chemicals a...

  11. DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE INCREASES SEVERITY OF AN ONGOING INFLUENZA INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants including diesel exhaust (DE) alter host defense responses, resulting in decreased resistance to respiratory infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on the severity of an ongoing influenza in...

  12. Getting a Seat at the Table--An Ongoing Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing effort in the Massachusetts School Library Association (MSLA). Library media specialists who are members of the MSLA have utilized key components to successfully advocate for library media centers in the state of Massachusetts. These key components have resulted in their acquiring seats at important decision…

  13. A Response to Frederick Hess: An Ongoing Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacchetti, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on the article "An Ongoing Conversation", by Frederick Hess. The author points out that the increasing polarization of the public's views on public education serves us poorly and we need to revive the skill and will to engage in more thoughtful dialogue.

  14. Ongoing dynamics in large-scale functional connectivity predict perception

    PubMed Central

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most brain activity occurs in an ongoing manner not directly locked to external events or stimuli. Regional ongoing activity fluctuates in unison with some brain regions but not others, and the degree of long-range coupling is called functional connectivity, often measured with correlation. Strength and spatial distributions of functional connectivity dynamically change in an ongoing manner over seconds to minutes, even when the external environment is held constant. Direct evidence for any behavioral relevance of these continuous large-scale dynamics has been limited. Here, we investigated whether ongoing changes in baseline functional connectivity correlate with perception. In a continuous auditory detection task, participants perceived the target sound in roughly one-half of the trials. Very long (22–40 s) interstimulus intervals permitted investigation of baseline connectivity unaffected by preceding evoked responses. Using multivariate classification, we observed that functional connectivity before the target predicted whether it was heard or missed. Using graph theoretical measures, we characterized the difference in functional connectivity between states that lead to hits vs. misses. Before misses compared with hits and task-free rest, connectivity showed reduced modularity, a measure of integrity of modular network structure. This effect was strongest in the default mode and visual networks and caused by both reduced within-network connectivity and enhanced across-network connections before misses. The relation of behavior to prestimulus connectivity was dissociable from that of prestimulus activity amplitudes. In conclusion, moment to moment dynamic changes in baseline functional connectivity may shape subsequent behavioral performance. A highly modular network structure seems beneficial to perceptual efficiency. PMID:26106164

  15. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  16. Dynamics of multistable states during ongoing and evoked cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2015-05-27

    Single-trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory, and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single-neuron multistability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bistable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multistability in single-neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intracluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the model's ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single-neuron multistability into bistability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Together, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model. PMID:26019337

  17. Dynamics of Multistable States during Ongoing and Evoked Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Single-trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory, and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single-neuron multistability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bistable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multistability in single-neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intracluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the model's ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single-neuron multistability into bistability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Together, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model. PMID:26019337

  18. Offsetting Ongoing Methane Emissions --- An Alternative to Emission Equivalence Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clisby, N.; Enting, I. G.; Lauder, A.; Carter, J.; Cowie, A.; Henry, B.; Raupach, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Warming Potential (GWP) has been widely adopted as a metric for comparing the climate impact of different greenhouse gases. As has been frequently noted, there are many problems with using GWPs to define emission equivalence in spite of the use of GWPs for this purpose in contexts such as the Kyoto Protocol. We propose that for methane, rather than define emission equivalence, the appropriate comparison is between ongoing emissions of 0.9 to 1.0 kg of CH4 per year and one-off emissions of 1 tonne of carbon. This approach represents an approximate solution to the inverse problem of defining a forcing equivalent index (FEI) that gives exact equivalence of radiative forcing over a range of timescales. In our approach, if ongoing methane emissions are offset by a one-off carbon removal that is built up with 40-year e-folding time, then the result is close to radiatively neutral over periods from years to centuries. In contrast, the GWP provides radiative equivalence (in integrated terms) only at a single time, with large discrepancies at other times. Our approach also follows from consideration of greenhouse gas stabilisation, since stabilising atmospheric CO2 requires an approximate cap on total emissions, while stabilising methane requires stabilisation of ongoing emissions. Our quantitative treatment recognises that, on time scales of centuries, removal of 1 tonne of carbon only lowers the atmospheric carbon content by 0.3 to 0.35 tonnes. We discuss the implications for rangeland grazing systems. In the absence of effective mitigation techniques for methane from rangeland systems, this approach may provide an attractive offset mechanism in spite of requiring that woody vegetation be established and maintained over about 15% of the landscape, or an equivalent amount of carbon storage in soil.

  19. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: On-going results and new instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Since June 2011, the ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) has been collecting abyssal oceanographic data. The ACO is at Station ALOHA 100 km north of Oahu, the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has collected biological, physical, and chemical oceanographic data since 1988. At 4728 m water depth, it is the world's deepest operating cabled observatory. On-going results will be presented along with results from two new instrument packages to be deployed: a basic sensor package (CTDO2, fluorometer, acoustic modem, ADCP), and a video/light/hydrophone combination. Plans for future research will be discussed. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  20. Ongoing Fixed Wing Research within the NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christie; Heeg, Jennifer; Hur, Jiyoung; Sanetrik, Mark; Scott, Robert; Silva, Walter; Stanford, Bret; Wiseman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch is involved in a number of research programs related to fixed wing aeroelasticity and aeroservoelasticity. These ongoing efforts are summarized here, and include aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport wing structures, experimental and numerical assessment of truss-braced wing flutter and limit cycle oscillations, and numerical modeling of high speed civil transport configurations. Efforts devoted to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification of aeroelastic physics in a workshop setting are also discussed. The feasibility of certain future civil transport configurations will depend on the ability to understand and control complex aeroelastic phenomena, a goal that the Aeroelasticity Branch is well-positioned to contribute through these programs.

  1. The Need For Ongoing Surveys About Physician Practice Costs.

    PubMed

    Berk, Marc L

    2016-09-01

    Physicians continue to be the subject of many survey efforts asking them about a wide range of issues including training, retirement plans, satisfaction with practice, practice organization, and practice costs. The resources dedicated to the collection of different types of data have changed over time. Collection efforts have both expanded and contracted. Here I discuss this phenomenon for several types of physician surveys, with particular focus on the reduction in ongoing survey efforts about physician practice costs. The diminution of efforts to collect information about these costs represents an important challenge since the lack of timely, high-quality data could impair the correct calculation of reimbursement rates. PMID:27605646

  2. Cingulate GABA levels inversely correlate with the intensity of ongoing chronic knee osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Reckziegel, Diane; Raschke, Felix; Cottam, William J

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the role of the mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid levels in chronic nociceptive pain. The molecular mechanisms of pain chronification are not well understood. In fibromyalgia, low mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid was associated with high pain suggesting a role of prefrontal disinhibition. We hypothesize that mid-anterior cingulate cortex GABAergic disinhibition may underpin chronic pain independent of the pain etiology and comorbid negative affect. Proton magnetic resonance spectra were acquired at 3T from the mid-anterior cingulate cortex in 20 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis, and 19 healthy pain-free individuals using a point resolved spectroscopy sequence optimized for detection of γ-aminobutyric acid. Participants underwent questionnaires for negative affect (depression and anxiety) and psychophysical pain phenotyping. Results No differences in mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid or other metabolite levels were detected between groups. Ratings of perceived intensity of ongoing osteoarthritis pain were inversely correlated with γ-aminobutyric acid (r = −0.758, p < 0.001), but no correlations were seen for negative affect or pain thresholds. The pain γ-aminobutyric acid interrelation remained strong when controlling for depression (r = −0.820, p < 0.001). Combined levels of glutamine and glutamate were unrelated to psychometric or to pain thresholds. Conclusion Our study supports mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid as a potential marker of pain severity in chronic nociceptive pain states independent of negative affect. The findings suggest that GABAergic disinhibition of the salience network may underlie sensitization to averse stimuli as a mechanism contributing to pain chronification. PMID:27206661

  3. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  4. Molecular evidence for ongoing complementarity and horizontal gene transfer in endosymbiotic systems of mealybugs

    PubMed Central

    López-Madrigal, Sergio; Beltrà, Aleixandre; Resurrección, Serena; Soto, Antonia; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Gil, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial supply of essential amino acids is common among sap-feeding insects, thus complementing the scarcity of nitrogenous compounds in plant phloem. This is also the role of the two mealybug endosymbiotic systems whose genomes have been sequenced. In the nested endosymbiotic system from Planococcus citri (Pseudococcinae), “Candidatus Tremblaya princeps” and “Candidatus Moranella endobia” cooperate to synthesize essential amino acids, while in Phenacoccus avenae (Phenacoccinae) this function is performed by its single endosymbiont “Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola.” However, little is known regarding the evolution of essential amino acid supplementation strategies in other mealybug systems. To address this knowledge gap, we screened for the presence of six selected loci involved in essential amino acid biosynthesis in five additional mealybug species. We found evidence of ongoing complementarity among endosymbionts from insects of subfamily Pseudococcinae, as well as horizontal gene transfer affecting endosymbionts from insects of family Phenacoccinae, providing a more comprehensive picture of the evolutionary history of these endosymbiotic systems. Additionally, we report two diagnostic motifs to help identify invasive mealybug species. PMID:25206351

  5. Process for producing and recovering elemental sulfur from acid gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. L.

    1985-03-26

    A system and process produce high actual levels of sulfur recovery from acid gas. The system includes two conventional Claus reactors and two cold bed adsorption (CBA) reactors. Four condensers are provided, one disposed before each of the catalytic reactors, and one disposed after the CBA reactor. The system includes a gas clean-up treatment zone for hydrogenation, drying and oxidation of gas to provide stoichiometric ratio of H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/. The gas is passed through the clean-up treatment zone prior to being fed to the first of the CBA reactors. The system is designed to operate either in a recovery mode or in a regeneration mode. In the recovery mode, the reactors are in series and the CBA reactors are operated below dew point of sulfur. In regeneration mode, effluent from the clean-up treatment zone is heated in a heat exchanger using effluent from the first catalytic reactor as the heat source. The resulting regeneration gas is fed to one of the two CBA reactors to vaporize sulfur and regenerate the catalyst. The vaporized sulfur is recovered in the condenser. The effluent from the condenser is passed to the other CBA reactor which is operated in the recovery mode during regeneration.

  6. Ongoing Development of NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Kato, Hiroko; Zaitchik, Ben

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) produces global fields of land surface states (e.g., soil moisture and temperature) and fluxes (e.g., latent heat flux and runoff) by driving offline land surface models with observation-based inputs, using the Land Information System (LIS) software. Since production began in 2001, GLDAS has supported more than 100 scientific investigations and applications. Some examples are GEWEX and NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) global water and energy budget analyses, interpretations of hydrologic data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, and forecast model initiation studies at NOAA and NASA. At the same time, the GLDAS team has continued improve results through the development of new modeling and data assimilation techniques. Here we describe several recent and ongoing innovations. These include global implementation of a runoff routing procedure, GRACE data assimilation, advanced snow cover assimilation, and irrigation modeling.

  7. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  8. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  9. Group crisis intervention for children during ongoing war conflict.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Abdel Aziz; Vostanis, Panos; Karim, Khalid

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term impact of a group crisis intervention for children aged 9-15 years from five refugee camps in the Gaza Strip during ongoing war conflict. Children were selected if they reported moderate to severe posttraumatic stress reactions, and were allocated to group intervention (N=47) encouraging expression of experiences and emotions through storytelling, drawing, free play and role-play; education about symptoms (N=22); or no intervention (N=42). Children completed the CPTSD-RI and the CDI pre- and post-intervention. No significant impact of the group intervention was established on children's posttraumatic or depressive symptoms. Possible explanations of the findings are discussed, including the continuing exposure to trauma and the non-active nature of the intervention. PMID:15981138

  10. Evaluation of ongoing oxycodone abuse among methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Sigmon, Stacey C; McGee, Mark R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. This study presents results from an internal quality assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis-testing methods. One hundred five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic's usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, whereas the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration, and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. Although future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication-dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  11. Evaluation of Ongoing Oxycodone Abuse among Methadone-Maintained Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; McGee, Mark R.; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. The current study presents results from an internal quality-assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone-maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis testing methods. One-hundred and five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic’s usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, while the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. While future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges. PMID:18295434

  12. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1) patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2) surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. Principal Findings We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333) of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623) of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150) used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150) as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150), primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61) of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59) in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22) in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months). Conclusions There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs. PMID:22916183

  13. San Diego perspective on UST clean-ups

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1994, CalEPA State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) contracted with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/University of California (LLNL/UC) to review the current UST regulatory framework and cleanup process. As a result of their review, LLNL/UC recommended changes to expedite the cleanup process at leaking UST sites. The LLNL/UC report concludes that natural attenuation of petroleum is an important factor in stabilizing plumes and may be the only remedial activity necessary in the absence of the source. After a review of existing literature and a study of selected leaking UST cases primarily from Coastal Range sedimentary or valley alluvium hydrogeochemical provinces, the LLNL/UC report found that petroleum plumes tend to stabilize close to the source, generally occur in shallow groundwater, and rarely impact drinking water wells in the state. The study and report recommendations focused solely on fuel petroleum hydrocarbon constituents.

  14. Training Workers for Environmental Clean-Up Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred

    1993-01-01

    Describes the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) Hazmat Training Program (Beckley, WV). It is the largest program in the nation for training skilled workers to safely handle toxic and hazardous wastes. This program has produced more than 450 certified instructors, who, in turn, have trained more than 18,000 workers. (LP)

  15. News from Online: Cleaning Up--Soap, Detergent, and More.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Carolyn Sweeney

    2002-01-01

    Provides a guide to web resources on cleaning and hygiene. Answers the questions, What do you want to clean--your hair? your carpet? your rusty lawn furniture? Develops special products for different tasks. Focuses on products to use and the environmental impact of our choices. (MM)

  16. Robotic soil sampler for hazardous waste clean up

    SciTech Connect

    Jaselskis, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    An innovative field sampling system using LA-ICP-AES (laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma -- atomic emission spectrometry) technology is currently being developed through an integrated team approach at Ames Laboratory to provide in-situ, real time analysis of inorganic hazardous waste. This sampling approach is conducted through a mobile testing facility which consists of an instrumentation vehicle called the Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies (MDLEST), and an attached trailer called the Robotic Sampling Accessory (RSA). The RSA provides automated sampling capabilities through an attached three-degree-of-freedom robot that will be equipped with surface and subsurface sampling probes. The probes are currently being designed by a multidisciplinary team consisting of engineers and scientists at Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, and Lockheed. This system is expected to improve sample quality assurance, reduce sampling time and cost, and improve worker safety. Limitations and future areas of research for the MDLEST-RSA are also discussed.

  17. Robotic soil sampler for hazardous waste clean up

    SciTech Connect

    Jaselskis, E.J.

    1992-06-01

    An innovative field sampling system using LA-ICP-AES (laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma -- atomic emission spectrometry) technology is currently being developed through an integrated team approach at Ames Laboratory to provide in-situ, real time analysis of inorganic hazardous waste. This sampling approach is conducted through a mobile testing facility which consists of an instrumentation vehicle called the Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies (MDLEST), and an attached trailer called the Robotic Sampling Accessory (RSA). The RSA provides automated sampling capabilities through an attached three-degree-of-freedom robot that will be equipped with surface and subsurface sampling probes. The probes are currently being designed by a multidisciplinary team consisting of engineers and scientists at Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, and Lockheed. This system is expected to improve sample quality assurance, reduce sampling time and cost, and improve worker safety. Limitations and future areas of research for the MDLEST-RSA are also discussed.

  18. Bioenergy residues as novel sorbents to clean up pesticide pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Santanu

    2016-04-01

    Worldwide, water contamination from agricultural use of pesticides has received increasing attention within the last decades. In general, sources of pesticide water pollution are categorized into diffuse (stemming from treated fields) and point sources (stemming from farmyards and spillages). Research has demonstrated that 40 to 90% of surface water pesticide contamination is due to point source pollution. To reduce point pollution from farm yards, where the spray equipment is washed, biobed or biofilter systems are used to treat the washing water. The organic material usually used in these systems is often not environmentally sustainable (e.g. peat) and incorporated organic material such as straw leads to a highly heterogeneous water flow, with negative effects on the retention and degradation behavior of the pesticides. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the suitability of alternative materials based on bioenergy residues (biochar and digestate) for use in biofilters. To this aim the sorption-desorption potential of three contrasting pesticides (bentazone, boscalid, and pyrimethanil) on mixtures of soil with digestate and/or biochar were investigated in laboratory batch equilibrium experiments. The results indicate that the mixture of digestate and biochar increased pesticide sorption potential, whereby in all cases, the Kd des / Kf des values were lower than the Kd ads / Kf ads values indicating that the retention of the pesticides was weak. Thus, as Kf des were lower than the Kf ads values and H values were below 1, it can be concluded that the biomixtures presented negative desorption (higher hysteresis) in those cases. A higher Kd (>78 L kg-1), Kf (>400 μM1-1/nf L1/nfkg-1) and KL (>40 L kg-1) was obtained for all pesticides for the digestate and biochar based mixtures, which had a higher organic matter content. However, lower sorption of the pesticides was observed in blank soil compared to the other biomixtures, which was attributed to the lower organic carbon content of the blank soil. Our results showed that boscalid and pyrimethanil are highly sorbed to the mixture of digestate and biochar. SUVA254 values justified the aromatic character of digestate (5%) and biochar (5%) mixture which showed highest Koc values among all mixtures for all pesticides. This mixture was found to be the most promising substrate amongst the tested ones for a biobed setup and can be used as an effective and alternative adsorbent for removing pesticides, because of its higher adsorption capacity.

  19. DOE and Public Involvement A Key to Successful Clean Up

    SciTech Connect

    Sarten, S.

    2008-07-01

    The combination of two vital elements in the Oak Ridge, TN area are the Department of Energy and the education of the public, at any age, of the necessary work that is and has been going on this region of the country since the setting aside of land during the World War II era. A wide variety of interested citizens from surrounding counties make up a group of individuals that bring different elements of education and involvement to form a committee of whose interest is the Department of Energy's handling of contaminated material. The effort of one of the committees on this board has given the public a resource of material to develop a better understanding of the history and stewardship efforts taking place at the Oak Ridge Reservation. (authors)

  20. MSO spent salt clean-up recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M G; Brummond, W A; Hipple, D L; Hsu, P C; Summers, L J; Von Holtz, E H; Wang, F T

    1997-02-01

    An effective process has been developed to separate metals, mineral residues, and radionuclides from spent salt, a secondary waste generated by Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). This process includes salt dissolution, pH adjustment, chemical reduction and/or sulfiding, filtration, ion exchange, and drying. The process uses dithionite to reduce soluble chromate and/or sulfiding agent to suppress solubilities of metal compounds in water. This process is capable of reducing the secondary waste to less than 5% of its original weight. It is a low temperature, aqueous process and has been demonstrated in the laboratory [1].

  1. Growing Up and Cleaning Up: The Environmental Kuznets Curve Redux.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Rachel S; Ruth, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Borrowing from the Kuznets curve literature, researchers have coined the term "environmental Kuznets curve" or EKC to characterize the relationship between pollution levels and income: pollution levels will increase with income but some threshold of income will eventually be reached, beyond which pollution levels will decrease. The link between the original Kuznets curve, which posited a similar relationship between income and inequality, and its pollution-concerned offspring lies primarily with the shape of both curves (an upside-down U) and the central role played by income change. Although the EKC literature has burgeoned over the past several years, few concrete conclusions have been drawn, the main themes of the literature have remained constant, and no consensus has been reached regarding the existence of an environmental Kuznets curve. EKC research has used a variety of types of data and a range of geographical units to examine the effects of income levels on pollution. Changes in pollution levels might also be at least partly explained by countries' position in the demographic transition and their general population structure, however little research has included this important aspect in the analysis. In addition, few analyses confine themselves to an evaluation for one country of the long-term relationship between income and pollution. Using United States CO2 emissions as well as demographic, employment, trade and energy price data, this paper seeks to highlight the potential impact of population and economic structure in explaining the relationship between income and pollution levels. PMID:25214678

  2. Beyond Symbiosis: Cleaner Shrimp Clean Up in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Militz, Thane A.; Hutson, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Cleaner organisms exhibit a remarkable natural behaviour where they consume ectoparasites attached to “client” organisms. While this behaviour can be utilized as a natural method of parasitic disease control (or biocontrol), it is not known whether cleaner organisms can also limit reinfection from parasite eggs and larvae within the environment. Here we show that cleaner shrimp, Lysmata amboinensis, consume eggs and larvae of a harmful monogenean parasite, Neobenedenia sp., in aquaculture. Shrimp consumed parasite eggs under diurnal (63%) and nocturnal (14%) conditions as well as infectious larvae (oncomiracidia) diurnally (26%). Furthermore, we trialled the inclusion of cleaner shrimp for preventative parasite management of ornamental fish, Pseudanthias squamipinnis, and found shrimp reduced oncomiracidia infection success of host fish by half compared to controls (held without shrimp). Fish held without cleaner shrimp exhibited pigmentation changes as a result of infection, possibly indicative of a stress response. These results provide the first empirical evidence that cleaner organisms reduce parasite loads in the environment through non-symbiotic cleaning activities. Our research findings have relevance to aquaculture and the marine ornamental trade, where cleaner shrimp could be applied for prophylaxis and control of ectoparasite infections. PMID:25706952

  3. 75 FR 62923 - WRC-07 Table Clean-up Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...This document makes non-substantive, editorial revisions to the Table of Frequency Allocations (Allocation Table), and to various other Commission rules. The purpose of this action is to update and clarify the Allocation Table, to remove obsolete and outdated provisions from the Commission's rules, and to ensure that the Allocation Table and related rules are consistent with the Commission's......

  4. Cleaning Up the Seas. UNEP Environment Brief No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya).

    While the open oceans remain relatively unpolluted, many coastal areas are suffering from oil, sewage, industrial wastes, and agricultural run-off. This document presents some of the key facts related to these kinds of water pollution. It focuses on the major sources of contamination in the world's seas, and provides an overview of how these…

  5. Cleaning up That Mess: A Framework for Classifying Educational Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherner, Todd; Dix , Judy; Lee, Corey

    2014-01-01

    As tablet technologies continue to evolve, the emergence of educational applications (apps) is impacting the work of teacher educators. Beyond online lists of best apps for education and recommendations from colleagues, teacher educators have few resources available to support their teaching of how to select educational apps. In response, this…

  6. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully trapping rodents in and around the home. Seal Up! Seal up holes inside and outside the home to ... infested areas. Before cleaning, trap the rodents and seal up any entryways to ensure that no rodents ...

  7. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  8. GaAs clean up studied with synchrotron radiation photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Adelmann, Christoph; Delabie, Annelies; van Elshocht, Sven; Caymax, Matty; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2012-12-01

    In this contribution we describe the chemical changes at the surface of GaAs upon adsorption of tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA). TMA is used to grow Al2O3 with atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually using H2O as oxygen source. Recently, it was pointed out that the adsorption of TMA on various III-V surfaces reduces the native oxide, allowing the growth of an abrupt III-V/High-K interface with reduced density of defects. Synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) is a powerful method to characterize surfaces and interfaces of many materials, as it is capable to determine their chemical composition as well as the electronic properties. We performed in-situ SR-PES measurements after exposing a GaAs surface to TMA pulses at about 250°C. Upon using the possibility of tuning the incident photon energy we compared the Ga3d spectra at 41 eV, 71 eV, 91 eV and 121 eV, as well as the As3d at 71 eV and 91 eV. Finally, we show that using SR-PES allows a further understanding of the surface composition, which is usually not accessible with other techniques.

  9. Growing Up and Cleaning Up: The Environmental Kuznets Curve Redux

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Rachel S.; Ruth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Borrowing from the Kuznets curve literature, researchers have coined the term “environmental Kuznets curve” or EKC to characterize the relationship between pollution levels and income: pollution levels will increase with income but some threshold of income will eventually be reached, beyond which pollution levels will decrease. The link between the original Kuznets curve, which posited a similar relationship between income and inequality, and its pollution-concerned offspring lies primarily with the shape of both curves (an upside-down U) and the central role played by income change. Although the EKC literature has burgeoned over the past several years, few concrete conclusions have been drawn, the main themes of the literature have remained constant, and no consensus has been reached regarding the existence of an environmental Kuznets curve. EKC research has used a variety of types of data and a range of geographical units to examine the effects of income levels on pollution. Changes in pollution levels might also be at least partly explained by countries’ position in the demographic transition and their general population structure, however little research has included this important aspect in the analysis. In addition, few analyses confine themselves to an evaluation for one country of the long-term relationship between income and pollution. Using United States CO2 emissions as well as demographic, employment, trade and energy price data, this paper seeks to highlight the potential impact of population and economic structure in explaining the relationship between income and pollution levels. PMID:25214678

  10. The 7% Solution - Cleaning Up After Fred Vine's Outstanding Successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    Fred Vine was the first & greatest of the wiggle pickers, founding the marine magnetic anomaly field with his 1963 Vine & Matthews paper. Two of his classic study areas were Juan de Fuca & the Reykjanes Ridge. In Juan de Fuca, he recognized the axial symmetry in the Raff & Mason data that had shown the existence of magnetic stripes on the seafloor, demonstrating the seafloor spreading there that Tuzo Wilson had predicted. Fred's iconic color figure of these anomalies perfectly correlated with the magnetic reversal time scale (after the discovery of the Jaramillo event) became the striking cover illustration of 'The History of the Earth's Crust', the symposium volume of the influential 1966 Goddard meeting that confirmed the reality of seafloor spreading & continental drift. Everything Fred did in Juan de Fuca was correct, but fortunately for me he didn't do everything. Some of the linear magnetic anomaly offsets there became a major puzzle in 1967 when Jason Morgan & Dan McKenzie discovered plate tectonics, because those offsets were oblique to the ridges & transforms & thus were incompatible with simple plate tectonics. Although the oblique anomaly offsets look like faults, they instead turned out to be propagating rift pseudofault wakes with no relative motion along them, an interpretation resulting from my analysis of Galapagos magnetic anomalies. Fred's other iconic color figure was his correlation of the Heirtzler et al. Reykjanes Ridge aeromagnetic data with the reversal timescale. This figure, showing the symmetry predicted by seafloor spreading & field reversals, was another key step in the scientific revolution. At the Goddard Symposium Fred was asked if he'd tested the symmetry statistically & he replied "I never touch statistics. I just deal with the facts'. Fred was trying to have a scientific revolution, & of course on that scale pretty symmetric seafloor spreading is a reality. However, fine-scale asymmetric spreading can be seen in his figure (the asymmetry increases towards Iceland where we had the great advantage of working), & contrary to conventional wisdom the V-shaped ridges, scarps & troughs (VSRs) discovered by Peter Vogt are not symmetric about the Reykjanes Ridge axis. Analysis of magnetic anomaly data from our 2007 expedition by Benediktsdóttir et al. shows these asymmetries were created by rift propagation both away from & towards Iceland, suggesting a tectonic alternative to the magmatic pulsing plume explanation for the VSRs. These results further suggest that the massive transform-eliminating North Atlantic plate boundary reorganization that created the linear obliquely-spreading Reykjanes Ridge might also be a propagating rift phenomenon instead of a thermal phenomenon as generally assumed, & we hope to present results from a new Reykjanes Ridge expedition later this summer designed to determine exactly how this reorganization is occurring. That so much research for several decades has resulted from the small (the 7% number in the title is made up - inspired by Fred I never did learn statistics) modification of Fred's results is a tribute to the overwhelming success of seafloor spreading & plate tectonics. Unfortunately for Vine, Morgan & McKenzie, this scientific revolution appears to have been too profound for Nobel Prizes.

  11. Cleaning up: Colleges Do Their Part to Revitalize the Gulf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violino, Bob

    2011-01-01

    When the deepwater horizon offshore oil drilling rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010, 11 crewmen were killed; the accident led to the largest oil spill in U.S. history. Forty workers on the rig managed to escape the catastrophe, thanks largely to a safety-training program they had taken at community colleges in the Louisiana Community…

  12. Beyond symbiosis: cleaner shrimp clean up in culture.

    PubMed

    Militz, Thane A; Hutson, Kate S

    2015-01-01

    Cleaner organisms exhibit a remarkable natural behaviour where they consume ectoparasites attached to "client" organisms. While this behaviour can be utilized as a natural method of parasitic disease control (or biocontrol), it is not known whether cleaner organisms can also limit reinfection from parasite eggs and larvae within the environment. Here we show that cleaner shrimp, Lysmata amboinensis, consume eggs and larvae of a harmful monogenean parasite, Neobenedenia sp., in aquaculture. Shrimp consumed parasite eggs under diurnal (63%) and nocturnal (14%) conditions as well as infectious larvae (oncomiracidia) diurnally (26%). Furthermore, we trialled the inclusion of cleaner shrimp for preventative parasite management of ornamental fish, Pseudanthias squamipinnis, and found shrimp reduced oncomiracidia infection success of host fish by half compared to controls (held without shrimp). Fish held without cleaner shrimp exhibited pigmentation changes as a result of infection, possibly indicative of a stress response. These results provide the first empirical evidence that cleaner organisms reduce parasite loads in the environment through non-symbiotic cleaning activities. Our research findings have relevance to aquaculture and the marine ornamental trade, where cleaner shrimp could be applied for prophylaxis and control of ectoparasite infections. PMID:25706952

  13. Novel Sorbent to Clean Up Biogas for CHPs

    SciTech Connect

    Alptekin, Gökhan O.; Jayataman, Ambalavanan; Schaefer, Matthew; Ware, Michael; Hunt, Jennifer; Dobek, Frank

    2015-05-30

    In this project, TDA Research Inc. (TDA) has developed low-cost (on a per unit volume of gas processed basis), high-capacity expendable sorbents that can remove both the H2S and organic sulfur species in biogas to the ppb levels. The proposed sorbents will operate downstream of a bulk desulfurization system as a polishing bed to provide an essentially sulfur-free gas to a fuel cell (or any other application that needs a completely sulfur-free feed). Our sorbents use a highly dispersed mixed metal oxides active phase with desired modifiers prepared over on a mesoporous support. The support structure allows the large organic sulfur compounds (such as the diethyl sulfide and dipropyl sulfide phases with a large kinetic diameter) to enter the sorbent pores so that they can be adsorbed and removed from the gas stream.

  14. Making Use of Manure for a Clean-Up Job

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wastes should no longer be wasted. This article describes how animal manure can be utilized by converting it into activated carbons. These activated carbons are then utilized to adsorb unwanted pollutants because of their high porosity. The animal manure will eventually help to remove odors from dr...

  15. Continuously on-going hindcast simulations for impact applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Ivonne; Geyer, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Observations for e.g. temperature, precipitation, radiation, or wind are often used as meteorological forcing for different impact models, like e.g. crop models, urban models, economic models and energy system models. To assess a climate signal, the time period covered by the observation is often too short, they have gaps in between, and are inhomogeneous over time, due to changes in the measurements itself or in the near surrounding. Thus output from global and regional climate models can close the gap and provide homogeneous and physically consistent time series of meteorological parameters. CORDEX evaluation runs performed for the IPCC-AR5 provide a good base for the regional scale. However, with respect to climate services, continuously on-going hindcast simulations are required for regularly updated applications. In this study two projects are presented where hindcast-simulations optimized for a region of interest are performed continuously. The hindcast simulation performed by HZG covering Europe includes the EURO-CORDEX domain with a wider extend to the north to cover the ice edge. The simulation under consideration of the coastDat-experiences is available for the period of 1979 - 2015, prolonged ongoing and fulfills the customer's needs with respect of output variables, levels, intervals and statistical measures. CoastDat - customers are dealing e.g. with naval architecture, renewable energies, offshore wind farming, shipping emissions, coastal flood risk and others. The evaluation of the hindcast is done for Europe by using the EVAL-tool of the CCLM community and by comparison with HYRAS - data for Germany and neighbouring countries. The Climate Research group at the national Austrian weather service, ZAMG, is focusing on high mountain regions and, especially on the Alps. The hindcast-simulation is forced by ERA-interim and optimized for the Alpine Region. One of the main tasks is to capture strong precipitation events which often occur during summer when

  16. New insights in the ongoing surge of the Austfonna icecap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, T.; Dunse, T.; Kääb, A.; Hagen, J. O.; Schuler, T.; Reijmer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Basin-3, a major drainage basin of the Austfonna icecap in NE-Svalbard switched to full surge mode in autumn 2012 after a multiannual, stepwise acceleration of its northern branch. A time series of velocity maps from repeat TerraSAR-X acquisitions revealed a maximum speed at the terminus of >18 m d-1 around the turn of the year 2012. The frontal ablation of Basin-3 was estimated to 4.2±1.6 Gt a-1 between April 2012 and May 2013, tripling the total dynamic mass loss from the largest icecap in the Eurasian arctic. Today, TerraSAR-X, Radarsat-2 and GPS data show that the surge is still ongoing. While the speed at the calving front dropped to 10 m d-1 until July 2014, areas further inland continued to accelerate after the climax, and 10 m d-1 were also measured ~20 km inland in summer 2014. This development will be further investigated by exploiting a time series of velocity maps based on Radarsat-2 Fine Beam data starting from July 2014, which will, other than the TerraSAR-X data, cover almost the entire fast flowing part of the basin. By combining both datasets we will extend the estimation of the frontal ablation and related sea-level rise contribution of the Basin-3 surge.

  17. Ongoing behavior predicts perceptual report of interval duration

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa, Thiago S.; Monteiro, Tiago; Soares, Sofia; Atallah, Bassam V.; Paton, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to estimate the passage of time is essential for adaptive behavior in complex environments. Yet, it is not known how the brain encodes time over the durations necessary to explain animal behavior. Under temporally structured reinforcement schedules, animals tend to develop temporally structured behavior, and interval timing has been suggested to be accomplished by learning sequences of behavioral states. If this is true, trial to trial fluctuations in behavioral sequences should be predictive of fluctuations in time estimation. We trained rodents in an duration categorization task while continuously monitoring their behavior with a high speed camera. Animals developed highly reproducible behavioral sequences during the interval being timed. Moreover, those sequences were often predictive of perceptual report from early in the trial, providing support to the idea that animals may use learned behavioral patterns to estimate the duration of time intervals. To better resolve the issue, we propose that continuous and simultaneous behavioral and neural monitoring will enable identification of neural activity related to time perception that is not explained by ongoing behavior. PMID:24672473

  18. Early recurrence and ongoing parietal driving during elementary visual processing.

    PubMed

    Plomp, Gijs; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Astolfi, Laura; Michel, Christoph M

    2015-01-01

    Visual stimuli quickly activate a broad network of brain areas that often show reciprocal structural connections between them. Activity at short latencies (<100 ms) is thought to represent a feed-forward activation of widespread cortical areas, but fast activation combined with reciprocal connectivity between areas in principle allows for two-way, recurrent interactions to occur at short latencies after stimulus onset. Here we combined EEG source-imaging and Granger-causal modeling with high temporal resolution to investigate whether recurrent and top-down interactions between visual and attentional brain areas can be identified and distinguished at short latencies in humans. We investigated the directed interactions between widespread occipital, parietal and frontal areas that we localized within participants using fMRI. The connectivity results showed two-way interactions between area MT and V1 already at short latencies. In addition, the results suggested a large role for lateral parietal cortex in coordinating visual activity that may be understood as an ongoing top-down allocation of attentional resources. Our results support the notion that indirect pathways allow early, evoked driving from MT to V1 to highlight spatial locations of motion transients, while influence from parietal areas is continuously exerted around stimulus onset, presumably reflecting task-related attentional processes. PMID:26692466

  19. Early recurrence and ongoing parietal driving during elementary visual processing

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Gijs; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Astolfi, Laura; Michel, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    Visual stimuli quickly activate a broad network of brain areas that often show reciprocal structural connections between them. Activity at short latencies (<100 ms) is thought to represent a feed-forward activation of widespread cortical areas, but fast activation combined with reciprocal connectivity between areas in principle allows for two-way, recurrent interactions to occur at short latencies after stimulus onset. Here we combined EEG source-imaging and Granger-causal modeling with high temporal resolution to investigate whether recurrent and top-down interactions between visual and attentional brain areas can be identified and distinguished at short latencies in humans. We investigated the directed interactions between widespread occipital, parietal and frontal areas that we localized within participants using fMRI. The connectivity results showed two-way interactions between area MT and V1 already at short latencies. In addition, the results suggested a large role for lateral parietal cortex in coordinating visual activity that may be understood as an ongoing top-down allocation of attentional resources. Our results support the notion that indirect pathways allow early, evoked driving from MT to V1 to highlight spatial locations of motion transients, while influence from parietal areas is continuously exerted around stimulus onset, presumably reflecting task-related attentional processes. PMID:26692466

  20. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    PubMed

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients. PMID:26432465

  1. Enterprise SRS: Leveraging Ongoing Operations to Advance National Programs - 13108

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.E.; Murray, A.M.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-07-01

    The SRS is re-purposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, strategic view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with ongoing missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established the Center for Applied Nuclear Materials Processing and Engineering Research (CANMPER). The key objective of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear materials management advancements and large-scale deployment of the technology by leveraging SRS assets (e.g. facilities, staff, and property) for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. CANMPER will coordinate the demonstration of R and D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R and D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the R and D team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of CANMPER will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, CANMPER also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform R and D demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOE's critical

  2. Morphological stasis in an ongoing gastropod radiation from Lake Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Hunt, Gene

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary processes leading to adaptive radiation regularly occur too fast to be accurately recorded in the fossil record but too slowly to be readily observed in living biota. The study of evolutionary radiations is thereby confronted with an epistemological gap between the timescales and approaches used by neontologists and paleontologists. Here we report on an ongoing radiation of extant Bellamya species (n = 4) from the African Rift Lake Malawi that provides an unusual opportunity to bridge this gap. The substantial molecular differentiation in this monophyletic Bellamya clade has arisen since Late Pleistocene megadroughts in the Malawi Basin caused by climate change. Morphological time-series analysis of a high-resolution, radiocarbon-dated sequence of 22 faunas spanning the Holocene documents stasis up to the middle Holocene in all traits studied (shell height, number of whorls, and two variables obtained from geometric morphometrics). Between deposition of the last fossil fauna (∼5 ka) and the present day, a drastic increase in morphological disparity was observed (3.7–5.8 times) associated with an increase in species diversity. Comparison of the rates of morphological evolution obtained from the paleontological time-series with phylogenetic rates indicates that the divergence in two traits could be reconstructed with the slow rates documented in the fossils, that one trait required a rate reduction (stabilizing selection), and the other faster rates (divergent selection). The combined paleontological and comparative approach taken here allows recognition that morphological stasis can be the dominant evolutionary pattern within species lineages, even in very young and radiating clades. PMID:23924610

  3. Turtles to Terabytes: The Ongoing Revolution in Volcano Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Volcano geodesy is in the midst of a revolution. GPS and InSAR, together with extensive ground-based sensor networks, have enabled major advances in understanding how and why volcanoes deform. Surveying techniques that produced a few bytes of information per benchmark per year have been replaced by continuously operating deformation networks and imaging radar satellites that generate terabytes of data at resolutions unattainable only a few decades ago. These developments have enabled more detailed assessments of volcano hazards, more accurate forecasts of volcanic activity, and better insights into how volcanoes behave over a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Forty years ago, repeated leveling surveys showed that the floor of the Yellowstone caldera had risen more than 70 cm in the past 5 decades. Today a network of GPS stations tracks surface movements continuously with millimeter-scale accuracy and the entire deformation field is imaged frequently by a growing number of SAR satellites, revealing a far more complex style of deformation than was recognized previously. At Mount St. Helens, the 1980-1986 eruption taught us that a seemingly quiescent volcano can suddenly become overtly restless, and that accurate eruption predictions are possible at least in some limited circumstances given sufficient observations. The lessons were revisited during the volcano's 2004-2008 eruption, during which a new generation of geodetic sensors and methods detected a range of co-eruptive changes that enabled new insights into the volcano's magma storage and transport system. These examples highlight volcano deformation styles and scales that were unknown just a few decades ago but now have been revealed by a growing number of data types and modeling methods. The rapid evolution that volcano geodesy is currently experiencing provides an ongoing challenge for geodesists, while also demonstrating that geodetic unrest is common, widespread, and illuminating. Vive la révolution!

  4. Robustness of Traveling Waves in Ongoing Activity of Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nauhaus, Ian; Busse, Laura; Ringach, Dario L.; Carandini, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed traveling waves of activity in sensory cortex, both following sensory stimulation and during ongoing activity. We contributed to this body of work by measuring the spike-triggered average of the local field potential (stLFP) at multiple concurrent locations (Nauhaus et al., 2009) in the visual cortex of anesthetized cats and macaques. We found the stLFP to be progressively delayed at increasing distances from the site of the triggering spikes, and interpreted this as a traveling wave of depolarization originating from that site. Our results were criticized, however, on two grounds. First, a study using the same recording techniques in the visual cortex of awake macaques reported an apparent lack of traveling waves, and proposed that traveling waves could arise artifactually from excessive filtering of the field potentials (Ray and Maunsell, 2011). Second, the interpretability of the stLFP was questioned (Kenneth Miller, personal communication), as the stLFP must reflect not only interactions between spike trains and field potentials, but also correlations within and across the spike trains. Here, we show that our data and interpretation are not imperiled by these criticisms. We reanalyzed our field potentials to remove any possible artifact due to filtering and to discount the effects of correlations within and across the triggering spike trains. In both cases, we found that the traveling waves were still present. In fact, closer inspection of Ray and Maunsell's (2011) data from awake cortex shows that they do agree with ours, as they contain clear evidence for traveling waves. PMID:22378881

  5. The Ongoing Impact of Modular Localization on Particle Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2014-08-01

    Modular localization is the concise conceptual formulation of causal localization in the setting of local quantum physics. Unlike QM it does not refer to individual operators but rather to ensembles of observables which share the same localization region, as a result it explains the probabilistic aspects of QFT in terms of the impure KMS nature arising from the local restriction of the pure vacuum. Whereas it played no important role in the perturbation theory of low spin particles, it becomes indispensible for interactions which involve higher spin s≥1 fields, where is leads to the replacement of the operator (BRST) gauge theory setting in Krein space by a new formulation in terms of stringlocal fields in Hilbert space. The main purpose of this paper is to present new results which lead to a rethinking of important issues of the Standard Model concerning massive gauge theories and the Higgs mechanism. We place these new findings into the broader context of ongoing conceptual changes within QFT which already led to new nonperturbative constructions of models of integrable QFTs. It is also pointed out that modular localization does not support ideas coming from string theory, as extra dimensions and Kaluza-Klein dimensional reductions outside quasiclassical approximations. Apart from hologarphic projections on null-surfaces, holograhic relations between QFT in different spacetime dimensions violate the causal completeness property, this includes in particular the Maldacena conjecture. Last not least, modular localization sheds light onto unsolved problems from QFT's distant past since it reveals that the Einstein-Jordan conundrum is really an early harbinger of the Unruh effect.

  6. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Hannes; Krebs, Ruth M; Wolfensteller, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one's own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations) can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-)R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO) learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-)R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the CO control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are "actively" integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-)R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode. PMID:23205016

  7. Morphological stasis in an ongoing gastropod radiation from Lake Malawi.

    PubMed

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Hunt, Gene

    2013-08-20

    Evolutionary processes leading to adaptive radiation regularly occur too fast to be accurately recorded in the fossil record but too slowly to be readily observed in living biota. The study of evolutionary radiations is thereby confronted with an epistemological gap between the timescales and approaches used by neontologists and paleontologists. Here we report on an ongoing radiation of extant Bellamya species (n = 4) from the African Rift Lake Malawi that provides an unusual opportunity to bridge this gap. The substantial molecular differentiation in this monophyletic Bellamya clade has arisen since Late Pleistocene megadroughts in the Malawi Basin caused by climate change. Morphological time-series analysis of a high-resolution, radiocarbon-dated sequence of 22 faunas spanning the Holocene documents stasis up to the middle Holocene in all traits studied (shell height, number of whorls, and two variables obtained from geometric morphometrics). Between deposition of the last fossil fauna (~5 ka) and the present day, a drastic increase in morphological disparity was observed (3.7-5.8 times) associated with an increase in species diversity. Comparison of the rates of morphological evolution obtained from the paleontological time-series with phylogenetic rates indicates that the divergence in two traits could be reconstructed with the slow rates documented in the fossils, that one trait required a rate reduction (stabilizing selection), and the other faster rates (divergent selection). The combined paleontological and comparative approach taken here allows recognition that morphological stasis can be the dominant evolutionary pattern within species lineages, even in very young and radiating clades. PMID:23924610

  8. Ongoing Evolution on the Geospace Electrodynamic Connections Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Buchanan, R. P.

    Solar Terrestrial Probes (STP) Program, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) mission Geospace Electrodynamic Connections (GEC) is to be launched near the end of this decade. It consists of several identical spacecraft, in 83o inclination, eccentric (2000 km to 185 km) orbits. The spacecraft observations will be coordinated with global land-based facilities to delineate the complex spatial and temporal scaled processes in the ionosphere that are most important for energy and momentum transfer between the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. It will provide key in situ plasma and neutral particle measurements at the low altitudes where magnetosphere energy and momentum are dissipated. To best accomplish the science goals, the technical design of the mission must strive to minimally disturb the environment, to maximize the number of spacecraft and the amount of propulsion fuel (for deep dipping campaigns, down to ~ 130 km), and to efficiently manage a spacecraft constellation in a pearls-on-a-string configuration with variable spacecraft separations. These are the challenging goals, given the fixed mission cost cap, that are being sought in the ongoing formulation of the mission architecture. An initial spacecraft/systems concept for the mission was suggested by the GSFC Integrated Mission Design Center. NASA is now further defining the mission architecture by utilizing university and industry participation. In order to further understand the magnitude of the aerodynamic impacts of the deep dipping orbits, a NASA grant to the University of Maryland numerically assessed how different spacecraft geometries provide tradeoffs between the negative effects of atmospheric drag and the positive effects of lift. These analyses led to recommended spacecraft geometries. U. S. industry accommodation studies have just been completed providing a refined breakdown of the risks and cost-driving aspects of the mission. These will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Ongoing monitoring of data clustering in multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multicenter study designs have several advantages, but the possibility of non-random measurement error resulting from procedural differences between the centers is a special concern. While it is possible to address and correct for some measurement error through statistical analysis, proactive data monitoring is essential to ensure high-quality data collection. Methods In this article, we describe quality assurance efforts aimed at reducing the effect of measurement error in a recent follow-up of a large cluster-randomized controlled trial through periodic evaluation of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for continuous measurements. An ICC of 0 indicates the variance in the data is not due to variation between the centers, and thus the data are not clustered by center. Results Through our review of early data downloads, we identified several outcomes (including sitting height, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure) with higher than expected ICC values. Further investigation revealed variations in the procedures used by pediatricians to measure these outcomes. We addressed these procedural inconsistencies through written clarification of the protocol and refresher training workshops with the pediatricians. Further data monitoring at subsequent downloads showed that these efforts had a beneficial effect on data quality (sitting height ICC decreased from 0.92 to 0.03, waist circumference from 0.10 to 0.07, and systolic blood pressure from 0.16 to 0.12). Conclusions We describe a simple but formal mechanism for identifying ongoing problems during data collection. The calculation of the ICC can easily be programmed and the mechanism has wide applicability, not just to cluster randomized controlled trials but to any study with multiple centers or with multiple observers. PMID:22413923

  10. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process

    PubMed Central

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  11. Ongoing pharmaceutical reforms in France: implications for key stakeholder groups.

    PubMed

    Sermet, Catherine; Andrieu, Veronique; Godman, Brian; Van Ganse, Eric; Haycox, Alan; Reynier, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The rapid rise in pharmaceutical costs in France has been driven by new technologies and the growing prevalence of chronic diseases as well as considerable prescribing freedom and choice of physician among patients. This has led to the introduction of a number of reforms and initiatives in an attempt to moderate expenditure whilst ensuring universal coverage and rewarding innovation. These reforms include accelerating access to and granting average European prices for new innovative drugs, delisting drugs where there are concerns over their value and instigating rebates for excessive prescribing. Alongside this, ongoing initiatives to improve the quality and efficiency of prescribing include programmes to enhance generic prescribing and dispensing as well as to reduce antibacterial and anxiolytic/hypnotic prescribing. However, there have been few publications documenting the impact of specific reforms on the overall costs and quality of care, which have been exacerbated by compartmentalization of budgets. Estimates suggest savings of over 27 million euro/year by decreasing antibacterial prescribing, 450 million euro/year by not reimbursing ineffective drugs, 670 million euro/year from pharmaceutical company rebates and approximately 1 billion euro/year from increased prescribing and dispensing of generics (year 2003-7 values). Additional savings of at least 1.5 billion euro/year are seen as being possible from increased use of generics such as generic proton pump inhibitors, statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) and ACE inhibitors instead of current branded products such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]). Delisting drugs when there are concerns about their value provides an example to other countries with currently limited demand-side measures. Other possible examples include price : volume agreements and multifaceted campaigns to enhance generic prescribing and dispensing and reduce antibacterial prescribing

  12. Titan Lake Probe: The Ongoing NASA Decadal Study Preliminary Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Hunter; Brockwell, Tim; Elliot, John; Reh, Kim; Spencer, John; Outer Planets Satellites Decadal Subpanel, The

    2010-05-01

    This talk provides an update on the scientific requirements and preliminary design of a Titan Lake Probe for a future NASA Flagship mission. The starting point for this study is the joint NASA ESA TSSM mission. Using this as a starting point we have revisited the scientific requirements and expanded them to include the possibility of a lake floater and a submersible. The preliminary results of this ongoing study will be presented. The scientific objectives of a Titan Lake Probe mission are: 1) to understand the formation and evolution of Titan and its atmosphere through measurement of the composition of the target lake (e.g., Kraken Mare), with particular emphasis on the isotopic composition of dissolved minor species and on dissolved noble gases, 2) to study the lake-atmosphere interaction in order to determine the role of Titan's lakes in the methane cycle, 3) to investigate the target lake as a laboratory for both pre-biotic organic chemistry in both water (or ammonia-enriched water) solutions and non-water solvents, and 4) to determine if Titan has an interior ocean by measuring tidal changes in the level of the lake over the course of Titan's sixteen-day orbit. The driving requirements for the mission are: 1) the need to land on and explore the lake at depth while adequately communicating the data back to Earth via either direct to Earth or relay communications, 2) thermal design that allows sustained (>32 days) sampling of the 94K lake environment, and 3) a mass spectrometer inlet system that allows sampling of gas, liquid, and solids from the 94K environment. The primary payload is an analytical chemistry laboratory that includes an inlet system for sampling gas, liquid, and solids in and above the lake feeding two capable mass spectrometers that determine the organic and isotopic composition of the sampled materials. The instrumentation also includes a meteorological package that can measure the rate of gas exchange between the lake and the atmosphere, and

  13. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Ongoing Efforts in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.; Woodman, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in spaceflight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers, and from industry. It is our intent to develop a common core avionic system that has standard capabilities and interfaces, and contains the basic elements and functionality needed for any spacecraft. This common core will be scalable and tailored to specific missions. It will incorporate hardware and software from multiple vendors, and be upgradeable in order to infuse incremental capabilities and new technologies. It will maximize the use of reconfigurable open source software (e.g., Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Core Flight Software (CFS)). Our long-term focus is on improving functionality, reliability, and autonomy, while reducing size, weight, and power. Where possible, we will leverage terrestrial commercial capabilities to drive down development and sustaining costs. We will select promising technologies for evaluation, compare them in an objective manner, and mature them to be available for future programs. The remainder of this paper describes our approach, technical areas of emphasis, integrated test experience and results as of mid-2014, and future plans. As a part of the AES

  14. Mg rechargeable batteries: an on-going challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Gershinsky, G; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2013-08-01

    The first working Mg rechargeable battery prototypes were ready for presentation about 13 years ago after two breakthroughs. The first was the development of non-Grignard Mg complex electrolyte solutions with reasonably wide electrochemical windows in which Mg electrodes are fully reversible. The second breakthrough was attained by demonstrating high-rate Mg cathodes based on Chevrel phases. These prototypes could compete with lead-acid or Ni-Cd batteries in terms of energy density, very low self-discharge, a wide temperature range of operation, and an impressive prolonged cycle life. However, the energy density and rate capability of these Mg battery prototypes were not attractive enough to commercialize them. Since then we have seen gradual progress in the development of better electrolyte solutions, as well as suggestions of new cathodes. In this article we review the recent accumulated experience, understandings, new strategies and materials, in the continuous R&D process of nonaqueous Mg batteries. This paper provides a road-map of this field during the last decade.

  15. Ongoing Pharmacological Management of Chronic Pain in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Källén, Bengt; Reis, Margareta

    2016-06-01

    The article discusses possible effects of the use of analgesics during pregnancy. It summarizes the pertinent literature and reports some previously unpublished data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Most likely the use of analgesics does not cause spontaneous abortion. Only small malformation risk increases are seen after the use of opioids and perhaps non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. If possible, the latter should be avoided during the first trimester. If exposure has occurred there is no reason to consider an interruption of the pregnancy. Continued use of analgesics may increase the risk of preeclampsia and of preterm birth, especially valid for opioids. Use of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in late pregnancy should be avoided because of the risk of bleeding and (valid also for NSAIDs) premature closure of the ductus arteriosus. A small risk for neonatal abstinence syndrome may exist after the use of opioids for chronic pain, notably during the third trimester and long-lasting effects on child development can possibly occur. For a woman with chronic pain, adequate use of pain killers during pregnancy is needed. It is prudent to avoid ASA and NSAIDs towards the end of the pregnancy, while acetaminophen is an acceptable option all through pregnancy. If continued use of opioids is necessary, the associated risks are low. Triptans can be used for migraine during pregnancy. If possible sumatriptan is preferable to other triptans as data for the latter are largely lacking. Ergots are preferably avoided as not enough data are available. PMID:27154242

  16. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  17. Spontaneous Dominant Mutations in Chlamydomonas Highlight Ongoing Evolution by Gene Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Alix; Drapier, Dominique; Razafimanantsoa, Hélène; Wostrikoff, Katia; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Pascal, Kevin; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Vallon, Olivier; Wollman, Francis-André; Choquet, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We characterized two spontaneous and dominant nuclear mutations in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ncc1 and ncc2 (for nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression), which affect two octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins encoded in a cluster of paralogous genes on chromosome 15. Both mutations cause a single amino acid substitution in one OPR repeat. As a result, the mutated NCC1 and NCC2 proteins now recognize new targets that we identified in the coding sequences of the chloroplast atpA and petA genes, respectively. Interaction of the mutated proteins with these targets leads to transcript degradation; however, in contrast to the ncc1 mutation, the ncc2 mutation requires on-going translation to promote the decay of the petA mRNA. Thus, these mutants reveal a mechanism by which nuclear factors act on chloroplast mRNAs in Chlamydomonas. They illustrate how diversifying selection can allow cells to adapt the nuclear control of organelle gene expression to environmental changes. We discuss these data in the wider context of the evolution of regulation by helical repeat proteins. PMID:25804537

  18. Ongoing advances in quantitative PpIX fluorescence guided intracranial tumor resection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Jonathan D.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Bravo, Jaime J.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-03-01

    Aminolevulinc-acid induced protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) is being investigated as a biomarker to guide neurosurgical resection of brain tumors. ALA-PpIX fluorescence can be observed visually in the surgical field; however, raw fluorescence emissions can be distorted by factors other than the fluorophore concentration. Specifically, fluorescence emissions are mixed with autofluorescence and attenuated by background absorption and scattering properties of the tissue. Recent work at Dartmouth has developed advanced fluorescence detection approaches that return quantitative assessments of PpIX concentration, which are independent of background optical properties. The quantitative fluorescence imaging (qFI) approach has increased sensitivity to residual disease within the resection cavity at the end of surgery that was not visible to the naked eye through the operating microscope. This presentation outlines clinical observations made during an ongoing investigation of ALA-PpIX based guidance of tumor resection. PpIX fluorescence measurements made in a wide-field hyperspectral imaging approach are co-registered with point-assessment using a fiber optic probe. Data show variations in the measured PpIX accumulation among different clinical tumor grades (i.e. high grade glioma, low grade glioma), types (i.e. primary tumors. metastases) and normal structures of interest (e.g. normal cortex, hippocampus). These results highlight the contrast enhancement and underscore the potential clinical benefit offered from quantitative measurements of PpIX concentration during resection of intracranial tumors.

  19. SGLT-2 inhibitors and cardiovascular risk: proposed pathways and review of ongoing outcome trials.

    PubMed

    Inzucchi, Silvio E; Zinman, Bernard; Wanner, Christoph; Ferrari, Roberto; Fitchett, David; Hantel, Stefan; Espadero, Rosa-Maria; Woerle, Hans-Jürgen; Broedl, Uli C; Johansen, Odd Erik

    2015-03-01

    Given the multi-faceted pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), it is likely that interventions to mitigate this risk must address cardiovascular (CV) risk factors beyond glucose itself. Sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are newer antihyperglycaemic agents with apparent multiple effects. Inherent in their mode of action to decrease glucose reabsorption by the kidneys by increasing urinary glucose excretion, these agents improve glycaemic control independent of insulin secretion with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. In this review, we outline those CV risk factors that this class appears to influence and provide the design features and trial characteristics of six ongoing outcome trials involving more than 41,000 individuals with T2DM. Those risk factors beyond glucose that can potentially be modulated positively with SGLT-2 inhibitors include blood pressure, weight, visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinaemia, arterial stiffness, albuminuria, circulating uric acid levels and oxidative stress. On the other hand, small increases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels have also been observed for the class, which theoretically might offset some of these benefits. The potential translational impact of these effects is being tested with outcome trials, also reviewed in this article, powered to assess both macrovascular as well as certain microvascular outcomes in T2DM. These are expected to begin to report in late 2015. PMID:25589482

  20. SGLT-2 inhibitors and cardiovascular risk: Proposed pathways and review of ongoing outcome trials

    PubMed Central

    Inzucchi, Silvio E; Zinman, Bernard; Wanner, Christoph; Ferrari, Roberto; Fitchett, David; Hantel, Stefan; Espadero, Rosa-Maria; Woerle, Hans-Jürgen; Broedl, Uli C

    2015-01-01

    Given the multi-faceted pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), it is likely that interventions to mitigate this risk must address cardiovascular (CV) risk factors beyond glucose itself. Sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are newer antihyperglycaemic agents with apparent multiple effects. Inherent in their mode of action to decrease glucose reabsorption by the kidneys by increasing urinary glucose excretion, these agents improve glycaemic control independent of insulin secretion with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. In this review, we outline those CV risk factors that this class appears to influence and provide the design features and trial characteristics of six ongoing outcome trials involving more than 41,000 individuals with T2DM. Those risk factors beyond glucose that can potentially be modulated positively with SGLT-2 inhibitors include blood pressure, weight, visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinaemia, arterial stiffness, albuminuria, circulating uric acid levels and oxidative stress. On the other hand, small increases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels have also been observed for the class, which theoretically might offset some of these benefits. The potential translational impact of these effects is being tested with outcome trials, also reviewed in this article, powered to assess both macrovascular as well as certain microvascular outcomes in T2DM. These are expected to begin to report in late 2015. PMID:25589482

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorder under ongoing threat: a review of neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings

    PubMed Central

    Fragkaki, Iro; Thomaes, Kathleen; Sijbrandij, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies have investigated the neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after single finished trauma, studies on PTSD under ongoing threat are scarce and it is still unclear whether these individuals present similar abnormalities. Objective The purpose of this review is to present the neurobiological and neuroendocrine findings on PTSD under ongoing threat. Ongoing threat considerably affects PTSD severity and treatment response and thus disentangling its neurobiological and neuroendocrine differences from PTSD after finished trauma could provide useful information for treatment. Method Eighteen studies that examined brain functioning and cortisol levels in relation to PTSD in individuals exposed to intimate partner violence, police officers, and fire fighters were included. Results Hippocampal volume was decreased in PTSD under ongoing threat, although not consistently associated with symptom severity. The neuroimaging studies revealed that PTSD under ongoing threat was not characterized by reduced volume of amygdala or parahippocampal gyrus. The neurocircuitry model of PTSD after finished trauma with hyperactivation of amygdala and hypoactivation of prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was also confirmed in PTSD under ongoing threat. The neuroendocrine findings were inconsistent, revealing increased, decreased, or no association between cortisol levels and PTSD under ongoing threat. Conclusions Although PTSD under ongoing threat is characterized by abnormal neurocircuitry patterns similar to those previously found in PTSD after finished trauma, this is less so for other neurobiological and in particular neuroendocrine findings. Direct comparisons between samples with ongoing versus finished trauma are needed in future research to draw more solid conclusions before administering cortisol to patients with PTSD under ongoing threat who may already exhibit increased endogenous cortisol levels. Highlights of

  2. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  3. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  4. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  5. 7 CFR 25.403. - Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. 25.403. Section... COMMUNITIES Post-Designation Requirements § 25.403. Ongoing 2-year work plan requirement. (a) Each Empowerment... interval of the designation period. (b) The 2-year work plan shall be submitted to USDA 45 days prior...

  6. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  7. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  8. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  9. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  10. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  11. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  12. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  13. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  14. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  15. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  16. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  17. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance § 35.1220 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  18. 24 CFR 35.825 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance and reevaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES HUD-Owned and Mortgagee-in-Possession Multifamily Property § 35.825 Ongoing lead-based paint... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  19. 24 CFR 35.935 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Rehabilitation § 35.935 Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. In the case of a rental... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based...

  20. 10 CFR 51.12 - Application of subpart to ongoing environmental work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of subpart to ongoing environmental work. 51.12 Section 51.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... extent practicable to NRC's ongoing environmental work. (b) No environmental report or any supplement...

  1. 11 CFR 116.2 - Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees. 116.2 Section 116.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL DEBTS OWED BY CANDIDATES AND POLITICAL COMMITTEES § 116.2 Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and...

  2. Assessing Ongoing Electronic Resource Purchases: Linking Tools to Synchronize Staff Workflows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jeffrey D.; Major, Colleen; O'Neal, Nada; Tofanelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing electronic resource purchases represent a substantial proportion of collections budgets. Recognizing the necessity of systematic ongoing assessment with full selector engagement, Columbia University Libraries appointed an Electronic Resources Assessment Working Group to promote the inclusion of such resources within our current culture of…

  3. Ongoing Savings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevington, E. Milton

    2002-01-01

    Education institutions rely heavily on good HVAC systems. Maintaining these systems can be expensive and are a significant factor in operating costs. Energy conservation is a real resource that is often overlooked. This article addresses what causes energy waste, how schools can find sources of energy waste, and how schools can improve…

  4. Ongoing exposure versus intense periodic exposure to military conflict and terror attacks in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lahad, Mooli; Leykin, Dmitry

    2010-12-01

    The manifestation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in two clinical samples in Israel (N = 212) was examined. Individuals suffering ongoing exposure to shelling were compared with subjects exposed to intense periodic exposure. Elevated arousal and avoidance symptoms, but not intrusion were reported in the ongoing exposure group. When compared by age, young participants in the ongoing exposure group had significantly lower PTSD scores, whereas no differences were found between participants among the intense periodic exposure age groups. No gender differences in symptoms were found among participants from intense periodic exposure, whereas in the other ongoing group the difference was in avoidance. Results are discussed in light of past research on exposure to terrorism. PMID:21171129

  5. Prospective memory in young and older adults: the effects of task importance and ongoing task load.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Hunt, R Reed

    2014-01-01

    Remembering to perform an action in the future, called prospective memory, often shows age-related differences in favor of young adults when tested in the laboratory. Recently Smith, Horn, and Bayen (2012; Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 19, 495) embedded a PM task in an ongoing color-matching task and manipulated the difficulty of the ongoing task by varying the number of colors on each trial of the task. Smith et al. found that age-related differences in PM performance (lower PM performance for older adults relative to young adults) persisted even when older adults could perform the ongoing task as well or better than the young adults. The current study investigates a possible explanation for the pattern of results reported by Smith et al. by including a manipulation of task emphasis: for half of the participants the prospective memory task was emphasize, while for the other half the ongoing color-matching task was emphasized. Older adults performed a 4-color version of the ongoing color-matching task, while young adults completed either the 4-color or a more difficult 6-color version of the ongoing task. Older adults failed to perform as well as the young adults on the prospective memory task regardless of task emphasis, even when older adults were performing as well or better than the young adults on the ongoing color-matching task. The current results indicate that the lack of an effect of ongoing task load on prospective memory task performance is not due to a perception that one or the other task is more important than the other. PMID:24628461

  6. Characterizing direct emissions of perfluoroalkyl substances from ongoing fluoropolymer production sources: A spatial trend study of Xiaoqing River, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Vestergren, Robin; Xu, Lin; Song, Xiaowei; Niu, Xiameng; Zhang, Chunhui; Cai, Yaqi

    2015-11-01

    The spatial trend of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) along Xiaoqing River and its tributaries was studied to characterize isomer profiles and quantify emissions from fluoropolymer (FP) manufacturers in China. Substantially elevated ∑PFAS concentrations downstream of tributary 4 demonstrated that the emissions from this FP manufacturer dominated total riverine discharges. Isomer profiles of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water displayed a stepwise increase in percentage branched PFOA downstream of tributary 3 (14.0%) and 4 (22.7%) reflecting the importance of FP sources. Strong positive correlations between PFOA isomers in water downstream of tributary 4 indicated that isomer profiles were conserved from emission sources to the final reservoir. Riverine discharges of PFOA (23-67 t/yr) were in agreement with theoretical emission calculations from FP production (68 t/yr) whereas large discrepancies between the two methodologies were observed for perfluorobutanoic acid and perfluoropentanoic acid. Collectively, this study fills critical knowledge gaps for understanding ongoing global sources of PFASs. PMID:26160670

  7. Ongoing EEG Phase as a Trial-by-Trial Predictor of Perceptual and Attentional Variability

    PubMed Central

    VanRullen, R.; Busch, N. A.; Drewes, J.; Dubois, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Even in well-controlled laboratory environments, apparently identical repetitions of an experimental trial can give rise to highly variable perceptual outcomes and behavioral responses. This variability is generally discarded as a reflection of intrinsic noise in neuronal systems. However, part of this variability may be accounted for by trial-by-trial fluctuations of the phase of ongoing oscillations at the moment of stimulus presentation. For example, the phase of an electro-encephalogram (EEG) oscillation reflecting the rapid waxing and waning of sustained attention can predict the perception of a subsequent visual stimulus at threshold. Similar ongoing periodicities account for a portion of the trial-by-trial variability of visual reaction times. We review the available experimental evidence linking ongoing EEG phase to perceptual and attentional variability, and the corresponding methodology. We propose future tests of this relation, and discuss the theoretical implications for understanding the neuronal dynamics of sensory perception. PMID:21716580

  8. Ongoing victim suffering increases prejudice: the case of secondary anti-semitism.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Roland; Banse, Rainer

    2009-12-01

    Some people have postulated that the perception of Jews' ongoing suffering from past atrocities can result in an increase in anti-Semitism. This postulated secondary anti-Semitism is compatible with a number of psychological theories, but until now there has been no empirical evidence in support of this notion. The present study provides the first evidence that ongoing suffering evokes an increase in prejudice against the victims. However, this effect became apparent only if respondents felt obliged to respond truthfully because of a bogus pipeline (BPL); without this constraint, the perception of ongoing victim suffering led to a socially desirable reduction in self-reported prejudice. The validity of the BPL manipulation was confirmed by the finding that it moderated the relation between explicit and implicit anti-Semitism, as measured with an affect misattribution procedure. PMID:19845891

  9. Partitioning of Eu(III) between acidic aqueous Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, J.C.; Harrington, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    2008-07-01

    As the Hanford site undergoes remediation, significant economies could be realized if aluminum is kept from High-Level Waste glass. An acidic scrub of the Hanford sludge could enhance Al removal; however, a caveat is the potential mobilization of transuranic elements, which would require a secondary cleanup of the Al/Cr waste stream. Previous solvent extraction (SX) studies have shown that >99% of the Eu and U can be extracted from simulated acidic Al/Cr waste. This study examines the use of extraction chromatographic methods. Results indicate the systems behave comparably and either method could be considered for Hanford clean-up purposes. (authors)

  10. Titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer for sulfonic acid dyes prepared by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Li, Rong; Tan, Jin; Jiang, Zi-Tao

    2013-03-30

    A novel titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized through sol-gel process with sunset yellow (Sun) as template, without use of functional monomer. MIP was used as a solid-phase extraction material for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in beverages. The results showed that MIP exhibited better selectivity, higher recovery and adsorption capacity for the sulfonic acid dyes compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP). MIP presented highest extraction selectivity to Sun when pH less than or equal to 3. The adsorption capacity was 485.9 mg g(-1), which was larger than that of NIP (384.7 mg g(-1)). The better clean-up ability demonstrated the capability of MIP for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in complicated food samples. The mean recoveries for the sulfonic acid dyes on MIP were from 81.9% to 97.2% in spiked soft drink. PMID:23598213

  11. 24 CFR 35.1220 - Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ongoing lead-based paint maintenance activities. 35.1220 Section 35.1220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Tenant-Based Rental Assistance §...

  12. Assessing ongoing sources of dissolved-phase polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dang, Viet D.; Walters, David M.; Lee, Cindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies assess the potential of ongoing sources of “fresh” polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to aquatic systems when direct discharge to the environment has been eliminated. In the present study, the authors used single-layered, low-density polyethylene samplers (PEs) to measure total PCB concentrations, congener profiles, and enantiomeric fractions (EFs) in a contaminated stream and to provide multiple lines of evidence for assessing ongoing inputs of PCB. Concentrations were well above background levels that have been monitored for years. Concentrations significantly increased with distance, the farthest downstream PE concentrations being almost five times greater than those at 79 m downstream of a historical point source. The PCBs in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the contamination source were dominated by low KOW congeners, similar to those in the mixture of Aroclors 1016 and 1254 (4:1 v/v) historically released from the former capacitor manufacturer. The only two chiral congeners detected in the PEs downstream were PCBs 91 and 95. The EF values were nonracemic for PCB 91, while the values were either racemic or near racemic for PCB 95. Increased PCB concentrations with distance and a congener composition of predominantly low-weight congeners in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the plant site suggested an ongoing PCB source from the plant site. Chiral signatures suggested aerobic biotransformation of dissolved PCBs but did not shed any light on possible ongoing PCB inputs.

  13. Quality Matters™: An Educational Input in an Ongoing Design-Based Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Deborah; Shattuck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Quality Matters (QM) has been transforming established best practices and online education-based research into an applicable, scalable course level improvement process for the last decade. In this article, the authors describe QM as an ongoing design-based research project and an educational input for improving online education.

  14. Initial and Ongoing Teacher Preparation and Support: Current Problems and Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    The effective initial preparation and ongoing support of teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing has always been a difficult and controversial task. Changes in student demographic characteristics and educational settings, combined with the rapidly diminishing number and diversity of deaf education teacher preparation (DETP) programs,…

  15. Assessing the Impact of Ongoing National Terror: Social Workers in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between social workers' personal and professional exposure to national terror in Israel and their professional and personal distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. Data were collected from 406 social workers from Israel who worked in agencies that provide help to victims of…

  16. Latest Job Benefit--Ongoing Learning: School System in Missouri Offers Professional Development for All Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Parkway School District in Chesterfield, Mo., creates a system in which all their employees have opportunities to experience ongoing professional learning. District leadership believes that all employees, whether or not they interact with students, contribute to the school district's success. The Parkway support staff development is building a…

  17. 15 CFR 921.40 - Ongoing oversight and evaluations of designated National Estuarine Research Reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ongoing oversight and evaluations of designated National Estuarine Research Reserves. 921.40 Section 921.40 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  18. EXPOSURE TO DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES THE SEVERITY OF AN ONGOING INFLUENZA INFECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants including diesel exhaust (DE), alter host defense responses to decrease resistance to respiratory infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on the severity of an ongoing influenza infection in ...

  19. Deaf Children with Complex Needs: Parental Experience of Access to Cochlear Implants and Ongoing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Wendy; Turner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of parents of deaf children with additional complex needs (ACN) in accessing cochlear implant (CI) services and achieving ongoing support. Of a total study group of fifty-one children with ACN, twelve had been fitted with a CI. The parental accounts provide a rich and varied picture of service access. For some…

  20. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  1. A Collaborative, Ongoing University Strategic Planning Framework: Process, Landmines, and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Susan E. Kogler; Thomas, Edward G.; Keller, Lawrence F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the strategic planning process at Cleveland State University, a large metropolitan state university in Ohio. A faculty-administrative team used a communicative planning approach to develop a collaborative, ongoing, bottom-up, transparent strategic planning process. This team then spearheaded the process through plan…

  2. Adolescents' Mental Health Outcomes According to Different Types of Exposure to Ongoing Terror Attacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Celestin-Westreich, Smadar; Celestin, Leon-Patrice; Verte, Dominique; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of several types of exposure to terror attacks on adolescents' psychological outcomes in the context of ongoing terror. A total of 913 adolescents (51 girls) aged 12 to 18 years (12-13.6 = 33%; 13.7-15.6 = 38%; 15.7-18 = 28%) took part in the study. Detailed data were collected concerning objective, subjective…

  3. Aftershocks of Chile's Earthquake for an Ongoing, Large-Scale Experimental Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Lorenzo; Trevino, Ernesto; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Mendive, Susana; Reyes, Joaquin; Godoy, Felipe; Del Rio, Francisca; Snow, Catherine; Leyva, Diana; Barata, Clara; Arbour, MaryCatherine; Rolla, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation designs for social programs are developed assuming minimal or no disruption from external shocks, such as natural disasters. This is because extremely rare shocks may not make it worthwhile to account for them in the design. Among extreme shocks is the 2010 Chile earthquake. Un Buen Comienzo (UBC), an ongoing early childhood program in…

  4. 29 CFR 801.20 - Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under Exemptions § 801.20 Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption... upon the analysis of a polygraph test chart or the refusal to take a polygraph test, without...

  5. 29 CFR 801.20 - Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under Exemptions § 801.20 Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption... upon the analysis of a polygraph test chart or the refusal to take a polygraph test, without...

  6. 29 CFR 801.20 - Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under Exemptions § 801.20 Adverse employment action under ongoing investigation exemption... upon the analysis of a polygraph test chart or the refusal to take a polygraph test, without...

  7. A Kenyan Cloud School. Massive Open Online & Ongoing Courses for Blended and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, William

    2013-01-01

    This research describes the predicted outcomes of a Kenyan Cloud School (KCS), which is a MOOC that contains all courses taught at the secondary school level in Kenya. This MOOC will consist of online, ongoing subjects in both English and Kiswahili. The KCS subjects offer self-testing and peer assessment to maximize scalability, and digital badges…

  8. A Sample of Ongoing Career Education Curriculum Development Activities of Federal Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towne, Douglas C.

    The report surveys curriculum development projects ongoing in 1972 in seven Federal agencies relating to vocational/technical, manpower, adult, and career education. It describes a variety of ways (ranging from personal visitation to utilization of existing publications) in which data can be obtained without undue requests for assistance from the…

  9. Factors contributing to ongoing intimate partner abuse: childhood betrayal trauma and dependence on one's perpetrator.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Rebecca L; Deprince, Anne P

    2013-05-01

    Identifying the factors that contribute to ongoing intimate partner abuse (IPA) among survivors of childhood abuse is essential to developing appropriate interventions. The current study assessed prospectively whether childhood betrayal trauma (BT) history and women's potential dependence on their perpetrators (unemployment, number of children below 13) increased women's risk of ongoing victimization, while controlling for trauma-related symptoms (PTSD, depression, dissociation). Women survivors of IPA (N = 190) from an urban U.S. city were recruited based on an IPA incident reported to the police. At the initial interview, women reported on childhood betrayal trauma experiences, their employment status, number of children, and current trauma-related symptoms. Women returned 6 months later and reported on ongoing events of victimization (physical, sexual, psychological aggression, and injury) in their relationships with the initial IPA perpetrator. Results showed that higher levels of childhood BT were associated with ongoing victimization over the course of 6 months. Women's unemployment status predicted greater physical and sexual aggression and injuries. Higher levels of depression and lower levels of PTSD symptoms were also associated with increases in physical, sexual, and psychological aggression, and bodily injury. The findings have important implications for interventions by demonstrating the need to process women's betrayal trauma experiences, target depression symptoms, and increase women's economic opportunities to prevent further victimization. PMID:23266993

  10. Assessing ongoing sources of dissolved-phase polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated stream.

    PubMed

    Dang, Viet D; Walters, David M; Lee, Cindy M

    2013-03-01

    Few studies assess the potential of ongoing sources of "fresh" polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to aquatic systems when direct discharge to the environment has been eliminated. In the present study, the authors used single-layered, low-density polyethylene samplers (PEs) to measure total PCB concentrations, congener profiles, and enantiomeric fractions (EFs) in a contaminated stream and to provide multiple lines of evidence for assessing ongoing inputs of PCB. Concentrations were well above background levels that have been monitored for years. Concentrations significantly increased with distance, the farthest downstream PE concentrations being almost five times greater than those at 79 m downstream of a historical point source. The PCBs in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the contamination source were dominated by low K(OW) congeners, similar to those in the mixture of Aroclors 1016 and 1254 (4:1 v/v) historically released from the former capacitor manufacturer. The only two chiral congeners detected in the PEs downstream were PCBs 91 and 95. The EF values were nonracemic for PCB 91, while the values were either racemic or near racemic for PCB 95. Increased PCB concentrations with distance and a congener composition of predominantly low-weight congeners in the PEs at 79 m downstream of the plant site suggested an ongoing PCB source from the plant site. Chiral signatures suggested aerobic biotransformation of dissolved PCBs but did not shed any light on possible ongoing PCB inputs. PMID:23258773

  11. Behavioral and neurochemical analysis of ongoing bone cancer pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Remeniuk, Bethany; Sukhtankar, Devki; Okun, Alec; Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain is described as dull, aching ongoing pain. Ongoing bone cancer pain was characterized after intratibial injection of breast cancer cells in rats. Cancer produced time-dependent bone remodeling and tactile hypersensitivity but no spontaneous flinching. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and enhanced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell was observed after peripheral nerve block (PNB) selectively in tumor-bearing rats revealing nociceptive-driven ongoing pain. Oral diclofenac reversed tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity but did not block PNB-induced CPP or NAc DA release. Tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity, and PNB-induced CPP and NAc DA release, was blocked by prior subcutaneous implantation of a morphine pellet. In sham rats, morphine produced a modest but sustained increase in NAc DA release. In contrast, morphine produced a transient 5-fold higher NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats compared with sham morphine rats. The possibility that this increased NAc DA release reflected the reward of pain relief was tested by irreversible blockade of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) μ-opioid receptors (MORs). The rACC MOR blockade prevented the morphine-induced transient increased NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats but did not affect morphine-induced effects in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical experience, ongoing cancer pain was controlled by morphine but not by a dose of diclofenac that reversed evoked hypersensitivity. Additionally, the intrinsic reward of morphine can be dissociated from the reward of relief of cancer pain by blockade of rACC MOR. This approach allows mechanistic and therapeutic assessment of ongoing cancer pain with likely translation relevance. PMID:25955964

  12. Behavioral and neurochemical analysis of ongoing bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Remeniuk, Bethany; Sukhtankar, Devki; Okun, Alec; Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y.; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer-induced bone pain is described as dull, aching ongoing pain. Ongoing bone cancer pain was characterized after intratibial injection of breast cancer cells in rats. Cancer produced time-dependent bone remodeling and tactile hypersensitivity but no spontaneous flinching. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and enhanced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell was observed after peripheral nerve block (PNB) selectively in tumor-bearing rats revealing nociceptive-driven ongoing pain. Oral diclofenac reversed tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity but did not block PNB-induced CPP or NAc DA release. Tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity, and PNB-induced CPP and NAc DA release, was blocked by prior subcutaneous implantation of a morphine pellet. In sham rats, morphine produced a modest but sustained increase in NAc DA release. In contrast, morphine produced a transient 5-fold higher NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats compared with sham morphine rats. The possibility that this increased NAc DA release reflected the reward of pain relief was tested by irreversible blockade of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) μ-opioid receptors (MORs). The rACC MOR blockade prevented the morphine-induced transient increased NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats but did not affect morphine-induced effects in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical experience, ongoing cancer pain was controlled by morphine but not by a dose of diclofenac that reversed evoked hypersensitivity. Additionally, the intrinsic reward of morphine can be dissociated from the reward of relief of cancer pain by blockade of rACC MOR. This approach allows mechanistic and therapeutic assessment of ongoing cancer pain with likely translation relevance. PMID:25955964

  13. Model system of ongoing care for native Americans--a 5-year followup.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, A J; Olson, A L

    1986-01-01

    In 1979, continuing care from a personal physician was identified as a priority at the Indian Health Service site in Zuni, NM, a rural hospital and ambulatory care center serving 7,000 Zuni people. To encourage such care, a system was established that assigned each patient to a regular physician and organized physicians into teams. Three teams, each consisting of three clinicians and other support personnel, served specific geographic regions of the village. Five years later, the ongoing care provided for active randomly selected prenatal, diabetic, and general clinic patients was evaluated. The physician staff of the site had gone through a complete turnover during the previous five years. Based on a chart review for the year prior to patient identification, patients saw their regular physician from 48 to 61 percent of the time in all their visits, and their regular physician or his or her team colleague from 71 to 82 percent of the time in all their visits. Ongoing care from a personal physician or close colleague can be achieved in the Indian Health Service. Organization of physicians into teams appeared to be the critical element in promoting ongoing care at this site where physician turnover is high. Team physicians seldom all leave at once, and ongoing care as a priority is passed on by the attitude of other team physicians, by transfer of specific patients, and by patient expectation. Given the established benefits, ongoing care from a personal provider should be encouraged in the Indian Health Service as in other primary care settings. PMID:3083473

  14. The Effect of Ongoing Blood Loss on Human Serum Concentrations of Perfluorinated Acids - Poster Presentation (August 2011)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we examined the significance of blood loss as an elimination route of PFAAs in humans, thus indirectly investigating the need for hypotheses other than menstruation to explain the gender differences observed in humans.

  15. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria.

    PubMed

    Domanović, D; Kitchen, A; Politis, C; Panagiotopoulos, T; Bluemel, J; Van Bortel, W; Overbosch, D; Lieshout-Krikke, R; Fabra, C; Facco, G; Zeller, H

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of locally acquired Plasmodium vivax malaria in Greece started in 2009 and peaked in 2011. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing transmission of malaria raised questions of how to define spatial boundaries of such an area and when to trigger any specific blood safety measures, including whether and which blood donation screening strategy to apply. To provide scientific advice the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) organised expert meetings in 2013. The outcomes of these consultations are expert opinions covering spatial targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria and blood donation screening strategy for evidence of malaria infection in these areas. Opinions could help EU national blood safety authorities in developing a preventive strategy during malaria outbreaks. PMID:27238883

  16. Ongoing Clinical Trials for Vasovagal Syncope: Where are we in 2014?

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, Samuel T; Raj, Satish R

    2014-01-01

    Vasovagal Syncope (VVS) can lead to a markedly diminished quality of life for some patients. While there are many treatments for this condition including physical, mechanical, pharmacologic, and device-based control of heart rate, there are few that have been shown to be effective in randomized clinical trials. In our local experience, we have achieved significant improvement in symptom frequency and quality of life using algorithms based on the data available and on clinical acumen for the majority of patients with VVS. Despite this, there are still many patients who suffer from treatment refractory VVS. Fortunately, there are a number of ongoing clinical trials that are likely to add to our knowledge. Ongoing clinical trials are reviewed to examine new treatment methods for VVS that were listed on public trial registries as of April 15, 2014. Data from these trials should inform future strategies in the care of patients with VVS. PMID:24913692

  17. Ongoing Surveillance for Lymphatic Filariasis in Togo: Assessment of Alternatives and Nationwide Reassessment of Transmission Status

    PubMed Central

    Budge, Philip J.; Dorkenoo, Ameyo M.; Sodahlon, Yao K.; Fasuyi, Omofolarin B.; Mathieu, Els

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made towards the goal of global elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF) transmission by 2020. The number of endemic countries reducing LF transmission through mass drug administration continues to increase, and therefore, the need for effective post-intervention surveillance also continues to increase. Togo is the first sub-Saharan African country to implement LF surveillance, and it has 6 years of experience with this passive surveillance system. We herein report the results of a recent evaluation of the Togolese LF surveillance system, including an evaluation of blood donors as a surveillance population, and provide updated results of ongoing surveillance, including expansion in remote areas. Since implementation of LF surveillance in 2006, only three cases of positive Wuchereria bancrofti filaremia have been detected, suggesting that interruption of transmission has been sustained. Given the impracticality of validating the surveillance system in the absence of ongoing transmission, we confirmed the lack of transmission through a nationwide reassessment survey. PMID:24189363

  18. Report of a successful ongoing pregnancy as a result of IMSI with assisted oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Doroftei, Bogdan; Zlei, Mihaela; Simionescu, Gabriela; Maftei, Radu; Cumpata, Simona; Emerson, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    We report a successful ongoing pregnancy obtained in a case of total globozoospermia after intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) with oocyte activation. The first semen analysis on investigation showed partial globozoospermia. However, under high magnification assessment at oocyte retrieval only round headed sperm were observed. Considering the high risk of a complete failure to fertilize from IMSI the couple gave written informed consent to the use of oocyte activation media post IMSI. One embryo fertilized, developed to a hatching blastocyst and was transferred resulting in an ongoing pregnancy. This successful outcome shows the use of IMSI is useful in the evaluation of total globozooozpermia and therefore aids in the justification of the use of oocyte activation media. PMID:25935518

  19. Effectiveness of an Ongoing, Community-Based Breast Cancer Prevention Program for Korean American Women.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun; Choi, Ga-Young; Cho, Ji Young

    2016-02-01

    The study evaluates the effectiveness of an ongoing, community-based breast cancer prevention program offered by a local social services agency in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Korean American women who participated in this breast cancer prevention program were compared with those who did not participate in their knowledge, attitude, and screening behaviors. The study found that the intervention group was more knowledgeable on breast cancer and related services and reported more positive attitudes toward breast cancer screening services than the comparison group. The participants in the intervention group were also more likely to plan to receive a mammogram than those in the comparison group. However, significant differences were not observed in the two groups in their intention to receive a clinical breast examination. The study findings suggest that an ongoing, community-based breast cancer prevention program can be an effective method of addressing breast cancer prevention disparities observed among Korean American women. PMID:26946886

  20. Living with uncertainty: from the precautionary principle to the methodology of ongoing normative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Jean-Pierre; Grinbaum, Alexei

    2005-03-01

    The analysis of our epistemic situation regarding singular events, such as abrupt climate change, shows essential limitations in the traditional modes of dealing with uncertainty. Typical cognitive barriers lead to the paralysis of action. What is needed is taking seriously the reality of the future. We argue for the application of the methodology of ongoing normative assessment. We show that it is, paradoxically, a matter of forming a project on the basis of a fixed future which one does not want, and this in a coordinated way at the level of social institutions. Ongoing assessment may be viewed as a prescription to live with uncertainty, in a particular sense of the term, in order for a future catastrophe not to occur. The assessment is necessarily normative in that it must include the anticipation of a retrospective ethical judgment on present choices (notion of moral luck). To cite this article: J.-P. Dupuy, A. Grinbaum, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  1. Fatigue and Fracture Branch: A compendium of recently completed and on-going research projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1984-01-01

    This compendium of recently completed and ongoing research projects from the Fatigue and Fracture Branch at NASA Langley Research Center provides technical descriptions and key results of all such projects expected to lead to publication of significant findings. The common thread to all these studies is the application of fracture mechanics analyses to engineering problems in metals and composites, with particular emphasis on airframe structural materials. References to recent publications are included where appropriate.

  2. An ongoing measles outbreak linked to a suspected imported case, Ireland, April to June 2016.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Peter; Chaintarli, Katerina; Ryan, Fiona; Cotter, Suzanne; Cronin, Anthony; Carlton, Louise; MacSweeney, Mary; McDonnell, Mairead; Connell, Jeff; Fitzgerald, Rose; Hamilton, Douglas; Ward, Mary; Glynn, Ronan; Migone, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    We report an outbreak of measles which started in April 2016 and which, by 13 June, has resulted in 22 confirmed and five probable measles cases occurring in four regions of Ireland. Genotype B3 was identified. We describe the identification, ongoing investigation and control measures being implemented. This outbreak occurs during a period of very low measles transmission in Ireland, with only one confirmed case (imported) notified in 2016 before this event. PMID:27416848

  3. Ongoing microseismicity in Nicoya of Costa Rica: What it says about megathrust locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Newman, A. V.; Du, C.; Peng, Z.; Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V. M.; Schwartz, S. Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica is unusually close to the Middle America Trench (MAT), such that interface locking along the megathrust is observable under land. Here, rapid convergence between the downgoing Cocos and over-riding Caribbean plates at ~85mm/yr allows for observable high strain rates, frequent large earthquakes, and ongoing microseismicity. By taking advantage of this ideal location, a network of 20 on-land broad-band seismometers was established in cooperation between UC Santa Cruz, Georgia Tech, and OVSICORI, with most stations operating since 2008. To evaluate what seismicity tells us about the ongoing state of coupling along the interface, we must consistently evaluate the location and magnitude of ongoing microseismicity. Because of large levels of anthropogenic, biologic, and coastal noise automatic detection of earthquakes remains problematic in this region. Thus, we resorted to detailed manual investigation of earthquake phases. Thus far, we have detected nearly 7000 earthquakes below or near Nicoya between February and August 2009. From these events we evaluate the frequency-magnitude distribution (FMD) along the subduction megathrust. The results from this 'b-value mapping' are compared with an earlier study of the seismicity almost 10 years prior. As well, we evaluate them relative to the latest geodetically derived locking. Preliminary comparisons of spatial and temporal variations will be reported here. Because ongoing manual detection is extremely laborious, we are implementing a match-filter detection algorithm to evaluate continuing events. This new approach has been previously successful in identifying aftershocks of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. To do so, we use the waveforms of approximately 2000 analyst-detected events as templates to search for similarly repeating events over periods not yet analyzed. Preliminary results on the effectiveness of this technique will be reported. The overall goal of this research is to evaluate

  4. Possible ongoing hard-to-soft transition of GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, S. E.; Belloni, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The latest MAXI observation of the black-hole candidate GX 339-4 (19 January 2015) shows that the source might be leaving the low-hard state. The BAT count rate (15-50 keV) has been dropping for the last 5 days (from ~360 mCrab to ~180mCrab), suggesting that a transition to the soft state might be ongoing.

  5. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle Geiser, William; Heintz, Philip; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-11-15

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography.

  6. Magma accumulation or second boiling - Investigating the ongoing deformation field at Montserrat, West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Amy; Neuberg, Jurgen; Pascal, Karen

    2016-04-01

    For over 20 years, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat has been in a state of volcanic unrest. Intermittent periods of dome building have been punctuated by explosive eruptions and dome collapse events, endangering the lives of the inhabitants of the island. The last episode of active magma extrusion was in February 2010, and the last explosive event (ash venting) in March 2012. Despite a lack of eruptive activity recently, the volcano continues to emit significant volumes of SO2 and shows an ongoing trend of island inflation. Through the aid of three-dimensional numerical modelling, using a finite element method, we explore the potential sources of the ongoing island inflation. We consider both magmatic (dykes and chamber) and tectonic sources. Whilst a magmatic source suggests the possibility for further eruption, a tectonic source may indicate cessation of volcanic activity. We show that a magmatic source is the most likely scenario, and illustrate the effect of different sources (shapes, characters and depths) on the surface displacement. Furthermore, through the inclusion of topographic data, we investigate how the topography may affect the displacement pattern at the surface. We investigate the conflicting scenarios of magma chamber resupply versus second boiling - crystallisation-induced degassing. Based on numerical modelling results, we suggest the required pressurisation is too high for crystallisation-induced degassing to be the dominant process - thereby suggesting magma accumulation may be ongoing. However, we show that second boiling may be a contributing factor, particularly when taking into account the local tectonics and regional stretching.

  7. Biosimilars: a systematic review of published and ongoing clinical trials of antipsoriatics in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Nast, Alexander; Rosumeck, Stefanie; Seidenschnur, Karin

    2015-04-01

    Biosimilars for psoriasis treatment are currently being developed. Comparison of their efficacy and safety is a challenge. For approval, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) considers indirect evidence from other indications (for example, rheumatoid arthritis) as sufficient. Systematic review of biosimilars for psoriasis and other indications, review of ongoing trials in trial registers. Systematic search for randomized controlled trials (RCT) on biosimilars to adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, and ustekinumab compared to their reference medication: (1) Publications in Medline, Medline In-Process, Embase, Cochrane Library (efficacy, safety, immunogenicity) and (2) ongoing studies in clinical trial registers. No trials on biosimilars in psoriasis patients were identified. As to the infliximab biosimilar, there is data on patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, indicating no clinically relevant differences regarding efficacy and safety. Currently, there are two registered studies of an adalimumab biosimilar and one study of an etanercept biosimilar in psoriasis patients. Further ongoing studies on biosimilars to adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab - all in rheumatoid arthritis patients - were identified. There is currently only limited data regarding RCTs with biosimilars. Provision of further clinical data and inclusion of patients in patient registers will be crucial. PMID:25819235

  8. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151.

    PubMed

    Jones, A Kyle; Heintz, Philip; Geiser, William; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-11-01

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography. PMID:26520756

  9. Skipped-Stimulus Approach Reveals That Short-Term Plasticity Dominates Synaptic Strength during Ongoing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    All synapses show activity-dependent changes in strength, which affect the fidelity of postsynaptic spiking. This is particularly important at auditory nerve synapses, where the presence and timing of spikes carry information about a sound's structure, which must be passed along for proper processing. However, it is not clear how synaptic plasticity influences spiking during ongoing activity. Under these conditions, conventional analyses erroneously suggest that synaptic plasticity has no influence on EPSC amplitude or spiking. Therefore, we developed new approaches to study how ongoing activity influences synaptic strength, using voltage- and current-clamp recordings from bushy cells in brain slices from mouse anteroventral cochlear nucleus. We applied identical trains of stimuli, except for one skipped stimulus, and found that EPSC amplitude was affected for 60 ms following a skipped stimulus. We further showed that the initial probability of release, calcium-dependent mechanisms of recovery, and desensitization all play a role even during ongoing activity. Current-clamp experiments indicated that these processes had a significant effect on postsynaptic spiking, as did the refractory period to a smaller extent. Thus short-term plasticity has real, important functional consequences. PMID:26019343

  10. Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments.

    PubMed

    Knox, Anna Sophia; Paller, Michael H; Milliken, Charles E; Redder, Todd M; Wolfe, John R; Seaman, John

    2016-09-01

    A challenge to all remedial approaches for contaminated sediments is the continued influx of contaminants from uncontrolled sources following remediation. We investigated the effects of ongoing contamination in mesocosms employing sediments remediated by different types of active and passive caps and in-situ treatment. Our hypothesis was that the sequestering agents used in active caps and in situ treatment will bind elements (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc) from ongoing sources thereby reducing their bioavailability and protecting underlying remediated sediments from recontamination. Most element concentrations in surface water remained significantly lower in mesocosms with apatite and mixed amendment caps than in mesocosms with passive caps (sand), uncapped sediment, and spike solution throughout the 2520h experiment. Element concentrations were significantly higher in Lumbriculus variegatus from untreated sediment than in Lumbriculus from most active caps. Pearson correlations between element concentrations in Lumbriculus and metal concentrations in the top 2.5cm of sediment or cap measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) sediment probes were generally strong (as high as 0.98) and significant (p<0.05) for almost all tested elements. Metal concentrations in both Lumbriculus and sediment/cap were lowest in apatite, mixed amendment, and activated carbon treatments. These findings show that some active caps can protect remediated sediments by reducing the bioavailable pool of metals/metalloids in ongoing sources of contamination. PMID:27135572

  11. Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knox, Anna Sophia; Paller, Michael H.; Milliken, Charles E.; Redder, Todd M.; Wolfe, John R.; Seaman, John

    2016-04-29

    One challenge to all remedial approaches for contaminated sediments is the continued influx of contaminants from uncontrolled sources following remediation. We investigated the effects of ongoing contamination in mesocosms employing sediments remediated by different types of active and passive caps and in-situ treatment. Our hypothesis was that the sequestering agents used in active caps and in situ treatment will bind elements (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc) from ongoing sources thereby reducing their bioavailability and protecting underlying remediated sediments from recontamination. Most element concentrations in surface water remained significantly lower in mesocosms with apatite and mixedmore » amendment caps than in mesocosms with passive caps (sand), uncapped sediment, and spike solution throughout the 2520 hour experiment. Element concentrations were significantly higher in Lumbriculus variegatus from untreated sediment than in Lumbriculus from most active caps. Moreover, Pearson correlations between element concentrations in Lumbriculus and metal concentrations in the top 2.5 cm of sediment or cap measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) sediment probes were generally strong (as high as 0.98) and significant (p<0.05) for almost all tested elements. Metal concentrations in both Lumbriculus and sediment/cap were lowest in apatite, mixed amendment, and activated carbon treatments. Finally, these findings show that some active caps can protect remediated sediments by reducing the bioavailable pool of metals/metalloids in ongoing sources of contamination.« less

  12. Development of a rapid and direct method for the determination of organic acids in peach fruit using LC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Sandín-España, Pilar; Mateo-Miranda, M; López-Goti, Carmen; De Cal, A; Alonso-Prados, José Luis

    2016-02-01

    An accurate, simple and rapid liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method for the determination of organic acids in peach fruit has been developed. Direct injection and sample clean-up with a mixed-mode sorbent was compared. The best results for the determination of gluconic, oxalic, malic, citric and fumaric acids were obtained with only a simple dilution and filtration step, and nylon filters should be avoided since some organic acids are retained by them. It is the first time that gluconic acid has been determined in peach fruit. Different parameters involved in the separation and detection process have been optimized. Since matrix effects were observed in the peach commodity, organic acids were quantified by the standard addition method. All validation parameters of the method were found acceptable of all organic acids. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the analysis of samples of peach from two cultivars. PMID:26304346

  13. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  14. Quantitative microanalysis of bile acids in biological samples. Collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, F

    1988-10-28

    The analysis of bile acids in biological samples has always presented a problem because of their complex nature and low concentration. Recently, newer analytical procedures for bile acids have become available, including enzymatic analysis, radioimmunoassay, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selected ion monitoring (SIM). However, they differ greatly with respect to specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and simplicity. On the other hand, the choice of analytical procedure differs according to the specific aims and the nature of biological samples to be analysed. These newer procedures have been compared in a double-blind fashion by distributing bile, plasma and urine samples to seven participating laboratories. GC-MS-SIM was found to be the most sensitive and reliable, but it requires other procedures for preliminary clean-up and fractionation steps. Enzymatic analysis is simple and gives small analytical errors but tends to over-estimate plasma bile acids. Radioimmunoassay gives variable results but is useful as a screening procedure for large numbers of plasma samples. TLC gives reliable results for biliary bile acids in experienced hands, except for differentiation between conjugated dihydroxycholanoic acids. HPLC, whether using derivatization or with fixed 3 alpha-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase detection, is suitable for the analysis of major bile acids in normal human serum but not for the identification of unknown minor peaks. PMID:3243854

  15. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii: the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid* #

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Ting-qiang

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils. Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance, translocation, and accumulation in plants. The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation in the zinc (Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study. By the addition of organic acids, short-term (2 h) root uptake of 109Cd increased significantly, and higher 109Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake, when compared to controls. About 85% of the 109Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid (CA) treatments, as compared with 75% within controls. No such effect was observed for tartaric acid (TA). Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA. Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants, but the effects varied with exposure time and levels. The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation and tolerance in S. alfredii, whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd. PMID:23365009

  16. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii: the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Ting-qiang

    2013-02-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils. Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance, translocation, and accumulation in plants. The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation in the zinc (Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study. By the addition of organic acids, short-term (2 h) root uptake of (109)Cd increased significantly, and higher (109)Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake, when compared to controls. About 85% of the (109)Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid (CA) treatments, as compared with 75% within controls. No such effect was observed for tartaric acid (TA). Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA. Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants, but the effects varied with exposure time and levels. The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation and tolerance in S. alfredii, whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd. PMID:23365009

  17. Ascidian Mitogenomics: Comparison of Evolutionary Rates in Closely Related Taxa Provides Evidence of Ongoing Speciation Events

    PubMed Central

    Griggio, Francesca; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Iannelli, Fabio; Justy, Fabienne; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Xavier, Turon; Pesole, Graziano; Douzery, Emmanuel J.P.; Mastrototaro, Francesco; Gissi, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ascidians are a fascinating group of filter-feeding marine chordates characterized by rapid evolution of both sequences and structure of their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Moreover, they include several model organisms used to investigate complex biological processes in chordates. To study the evolutionary dynamics of ascidians at short phylogenetic distances, we sequenced 13 new mitogenomes and analyzed them, together with 15 other available mitogenomes, using a novel approach involving detailed whole-mitogenome comparisons of conspecific and congeneric pairs. The evolutionary rate was quite homogeneous at both intraspecific and congeneric level, and the lowest congeneric rates were found in cryptic (morphologically undistinguishable) and in morphologically very similar species pairs. Moreover, congeneric nonsynonymous rates (dN) were up to two orders of magnitude higher than in intraspecies pairs. Overall, a clear-cut gap sets apart conspecific from congeneric pairs. These evolutionary peculiarities allowed easily identifying an extraordinary intraspecific variability in the model ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, where most pairs show a dN value between that observed at intraspecies and congeneric level, yet consistently lower than that of the Ciona intestinalis cryptic species pair. These data suggest ongoing speciation events producing genetically distinct B. schlosseri entities. Remarkably, these ongoing speciation events were undetectable by the cox1 barcode fragment, demonstrating that, at low phylogenetic distances, the whole mitogenome has a higher resolving power than cox1. Our study shows that whole-mitogenome comparative analyses, performed on a suitable sample of congeneric and intraspecies pairs, may allow detecting not only cryptic species but also ongoing speciation events. PMID:24572017

  18. Dynamic synchronization of ongoing neuronal activity across spinal segments regulates sensory information flow

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, E; Chávez, D; Rudomin, P

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the correlation between spontaneous cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbar spinal segments of anaesthetized cats suggested the operation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that modulates, in a differential manner, transmission along pathways mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition and pathways mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. In order to gain further insight into the possible neuronal mechanisms that underlie this process, we have measured changes in the correlation between the spontaneous activity of individual dorsal horn neurones and the cord dorsum potentials associated with intermittent activation of these inhibitory pathways. We found that high levels of neuronal synchronization within the dorsal horn are associated with states of incremented activity along the pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition relative to pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that ongoing changes in the patterns of functional connectivity within a distributed ensemble of dorsal horn neurones play a relevant role in the state-dependent modulation of impulse transmission along inhibitory pathways, among them those involved in the central control of sensory information. This feature would allow the same neuronal network to be involved in different functional tasks. Key points We have examined, in the spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat, the relationship between ongoing correlated fluctuations of dorsal horn neuronal activity and state-dependent activation of inhibitory reflex pathways. We found that high levels of synchronization between the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones occur in association with the preferential activation of spinal pathways leading to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition relative to activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that changes in synchronization of ongoing activity within a

  19. Chronic administration of antipsychotics attenuates ongoing and ketamine-induced increases in cortical γ oscillations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paul M; Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J; Jones, Nigel C

    2014-11-01

    Noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) antagonists can elicit many of the symptoms observed in schizophrenia in healthy humans, and induce a behavioural phenotype in animals relevant to psychosis. These compounds also elevate the power and synchrony of gamma (γ) frequency (30-80 Hz) neural oscillations. Acute doses of antipsychotic medications have been shown to reduce ongoing γ power and to inhibit NMDAr antagonist-mediated psychosis-like behaviour in rodents. This study aimed to investigate how a chronic antipsychotic dosing regimen affects ongoing cortical γ oscillations, and the electrophysiological and behavioural responses induced by the NMDAr antagonist ketamine. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with haloperidol (0.25 mg/kg/d), clozapine (5 mg/kg/d), LY379268 (0.3 mg/kg/d) or vehicle for 28 d, delivered by subcutaneous (s.c.) osmotic pumps. Weekly electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings were acquired. On day 26, ketamine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered, and ECoG and locomotor activity were simultaneously measured. These results were compared with data generated previously following acute treatment with these antipsychotics. Sustained and significant decreases in ongoing γ power were observed during chronic administration of haloperidol (64%) or clozapine (43%), but not of LY379268 (2% increase), compared with vehicle. Acute ketamine injection concurrently increased γ power and locomotor activity in vehicle-treated rats, and these effects were attenuated in rats chronically treated with all three antipsychotics. The ability of haloperidol or clozapine to inhibit ketamine-induced elevation in γ power was not observed following acute administration of these drugs. These results indicate that modulation of γ power may be a useful biomarker of chronic antipsychotic efficacy. PMID:24964190

  20. Ongoing Buildup of Refractory Organic Carbon in Boreal Soils During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smittenberg, R. H.; Eglinton, T. I.; Schouten, S.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe

    2006-11-01

    Radiocarbon ages of vascular plant wax derived n-alkanes preserved in well-dated Holocene sediments in an anoxic fjord (Saanich Inlet, Canada) were found to be not only substantially older than the depositional age but increasingly so during the Holocene. Assuming that n-alkanes serve as a proxy for recalcitrant terrigenous organic matter, this indicates that the accumulation of refractory organic carbon in soils that developed after the deglaciation of the American Pacific Northwest is ongoing and may still be far from equilibrium with mineralization and erosion rates.

  1. Ongoing evaluation of sources and factors affecting emissions from engineered wood products

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.L.; Martin, C.B.; Sheldon, L.S.; Baskir, J.N.; Howard, E.M.

    1998-09-01

    The paper describes an ongoing evaluation of sources and factors affecting emissions from engineered wood products. It summarizes early results from emissions testing of engineered wood products. These tests have shown the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the alcohol, aldehyde/ketone, ester, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon, monoterpene, sesquiterpene, indene, and alkyl ether chemical families from engineered wood samples. This information will be used to target pollution prevention approaches, such as alternate materials and production technologies for raw board and engineered wood products, for reducing VOC emissions.

  2. Inflammatory myositis complicating hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis despite on-going immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Chew, Gary Y J; Gatenby, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    We present a patient with previously diagnosed hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, with skin, lung, and renal involvement, who presented with congestive cardiac failure. During the course of her hospitalization, she was also found to have profound proximal muscle weakness in both upper and lower limbs associated with raised creatinine kinase levels. A muscle biopsy was performed, which demonstrated evidence of an inflammatory myositis with vasculitis, which had returned despite on-going immunosuppression. This occurrence of a new autoimmune disease may well be an example of the "waste disposal" hypothesis. PMID:16944070

  3. Soft tissue infection caused by Legionella bozemanii in a patient with ongoing immunosuppressive treatment

    PubMed Central

    Neiderud, Carl-Johan; Vidh, Angela Lagerqvist; Salaneck, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The Legionellaceae family consists of approximately 50 species, of which the most commonly identified species is L. pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. Other Legionella ssp. most often cause clinical infections in the immune-compromised patients, in which L. bozemanii has been known to cause both pneumonia and lung abscesses. In the presented case, a soft tissue infection in a patient with ongoing immunosuppression was determined to be due to L. bozemanii. Hence, in immune-deficient patients, L. bozemanii could be considered a possible agent in soft tissue infections when other common pathogens have been ruled out. PMID:24023988

  4. The impact of ongoing national terror on the community of hospital nurses in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between the exposure of nurses in Israel to national terror and the levels of distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. The data were collected from 214 nurses from various parts of Israel who work in three types of heath services (mainly hospital departments) and provide help to victims of terror. The nurses reported very high levels of burnout, high levels of stress and medium-to high levels of intrusive memories. Levels of exposure were associated with burnout, intrusive memories and level of stress. More professional attention should be given to hospital nurses who provide care for trauma patients. PMID:23982180

  5. 28 CFR 115.283 - Ongoing medical and mental health care for sexual abuse victims and abusers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ongoing medical and mental health care... Facilities Medical and Mental Care § 115.283 Ongoing medical and mental health care for sexual abuse victims and abusers. (a) The facility shall offer medical and mental health evaluation and, as...

  6. 28 CFR 115.383 - Ongoing medical and mental health care for sexual abuse victims and abusers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ongoing medical and mental health care... Medical and Mental Care § 115.383 Ongoing medical and mental health care for sexual abuse victims and abusers. (a) The facility shall offer medical and mental health evaluation and, as appropriate,...

  7. 76 FR 72725 - Draft License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance LR-ISG-2011-05: Ongoing Review of Operating Experience

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-05, ``Ongoing Review of Operating Experience.'' This LR-ISG provides... on how the ongoing review of operating experience should be used to ensure the effectiveness of the... their programmatic activities for operating experience reviews are appropriate for considering...

  8. 5 CFR 2641.203 - One-year restriction on any former employee's representations, aid, or advice concerning ongoing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... employee's representations, aid, or advice concerning ongoing trade or treaty negotiation. 2641.203 Section... representations, aid, or advice concerning ongoing trade or treaty negotiation. (a) Basic prohibition of 18 U.S.C... trade or treaty negotiation in which, during his last year of Government service, he...

  9. 7 CFR 1710.204 - Filing requirements for borrowers that must maintain an approved load forecast on an ongoing basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... an approved load forecast on an ongoing basis. 1710.204 Section 1710.204 Agriculture Regulations of... AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Load Forecasts § 1710.204 Filing requirements for borrowers that must maintain an approved load forecast on an ongoing basis....

  10. Predicting Carriers of Ongoing Selective Sweeps without Knowledge of the Favored Allele

    PubMed Central

    Zakov, Shay; Rosenberg, Noah A.; Bafna, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Methods for detecting the genomic signatures of natural selection have been heavily studied, and they have been successful in identifying many selective sweeps. For most of these sweeps, the favored allele remains unknown, making it difficult to distinguish carriers of the sweep from non-carriers. In an ongoing selective sweep, carriers of the favored allele are likely to contain a future most recent common ancestor. Therefore, identifying them may prove useful in predicting the evolutionary trajectory—for example, in contexts involving drug-resistant pathogen strains or cancer subclones. The main contribution of this paper is the development and analysis of a new statistic, the Haplotype Allele Frequency (HAF) score. The HAF score, assigned to individual haplotypes in a sample, naturally captures many of the properties shared by haplotypes carrying a favored allele. We provide a theoretical framework for computing expected HAF scores under different evolutionary scenarios, and we validate the theoretical predictions with simulations. As an application of HAF score computations, we develop an algorithm (PreCIOSS: Predicting Carriers of Ongoing Selective Sweeps) to identify carriers of the favored allele in selective sweeps, and we demonstrate its power on simulations of both hard and soft sweeps, as well as on data from well-known sweeps in human populations. PMID:26402243

  11. Ongoing trials with yttrium 90-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Ivana N M

    2004-10-01

    Targeted radiation therapy or radioimmunotherapy has been an important recent advance in the treatment of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Yttrium 90-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) comprises the murine monoclonal antibody ibritumomab, the linker chelator tiuxetan, and the radiolabeled isotope yttrium 90. Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of B-cell NHL. Initial phase I/II trials established the therapeutic dose of ibritumomab tiuxetan for low-grade NHL to be 0.4 mCi/kg, or 0.3 mCi/kg for patients with mild thrombocytopenia. Currently, there are many ongoing trials of ibritumomab tiuxetan with different dose schedules and dose intensities in combination with chemotherapy and autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation in an attempt to improve response rate and duration and to study its effectiveness in other B-cell lymphomas including mantle cell lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This article reviews the ongoing trials with 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan. Radioimmunotherapy has great promise, and the safe incorporation of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan into treatment will hopefully result in improved survival for patients with NHL. PMID:15498147

  12. Equality in Healthcare: The Formation and Ongoing Legacy of an LGBT Advisory Council.

    PubMed

    Rosa, William; Fullerton, Chelsea; Keller, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the literature on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) health disparities and workplace discrimination, as well as the context that led to the formation of an institutional LGBT Advisory Council. The Council was developed in order to demonstrate our ongoing commitment to LGBT inclusion and to improve the lived experiences for both LGBT patients and staff. A retrospective approach is utilized to explore the LGBT Advisory Council's journey to spearhead advocacy efforts at our institution. The Council's accomplishments include taking a leadership role in obtaining nationally recognized designations such as the Healthcare Equality Index and the Magnet Exemplar for Cultural Sensitivity, as well as adding sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression fields to our institution's electronic medical record system. Additionally, the Council guides and promotes ongoing house-wide cultural sensitivity staff training efforts. Most recently, the Council marched as a contingency in the world's largest Pride March for the first time in institutional history. It is our hope that our Council will become an inspiration and exemplar for similar groups to form at healthcare institutions and organizations across the nation. Allowing LGBT members of each individual healthcare community the agency to determine the direction of advocacy efforts is incredibly important; however, this must be coupled with an organizational commitment on behalf of leadership to follow through on these initiatives and to provide them with the resources they need in order to be successful. PMID:26788769

  13. Leaks in the pipeline: separating demographic inertia from ongoing gender differences in academia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Allison K; Stanton, Daniel E

    2012-09-22

    Identification of the causes underlying the under-representation of women and minorities in academia is a source of ongoing concern and controversy. This is a critical issue in ensuring the openness and diversity of academia; yet differences in personal experiences and interpretations have mired it in controversy. We construct a simple model of the academic career that can be used to identify general trends, and separate the demographic effects of historical differences from ongoing biological or cultural gender differences. We apply the model to data on academics collected by the National Science Foundation (USA) over the past three decades, across all of science and engineering, and within six disciplines (agricultural and biological sciences, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences, physical sciences, psychology, and social sciences). We show that the hiring and retention of women in academia have been affected by both demographic inertia and gender differences, but that the relative influence of gender differences appears to be dwindling for most disciplines and career transitions. Our model enables us to identify the two key non-structural bottlenecks restricting female participation in academia: choice of undergraduate major and application to faculty positions. These transitions are those in greatest need of detailed study and policy development. PMID:22719028

  14. The French design code: RCC-M status and on-going developments

    SciTech Connect

    Faidy, C.

    1996-12-01

    Since 1978, an important effort has been on-going between Framatome and Electricite de France (EDF) to develop and update technical rules for the design and construction of nuclear power plants. Two design codes are developed, one for PWRs: RCC-M and one for FBRs: RCC-MR. After some comments on the organization of RCCM Commission, the paper presents: (1) the major differences with the ASME Section III Code for fatigue, plastic shakedown and rupture analysis; (2) the review of some important facts in terms of availability or maintenance costs (in-service inspection, replacements, repairs, etc.) of operating plants like underclad cracking, stratification, CRDM nozzles, cast elbows, steam generator tubes, etc.; (3) how can one take into consideration this operating feedback in RCC-M Code; and (4) few examples of major on-going developments for fracture analysis on different components and fatigue analysis of valves. In conclusion, the standardization of the plants is a fruitful benefit because it allow inclusion of operating feedback in the design rules, earlier in the process of new designs or replacement parts.

  15. Pulsed Out of Awareness: EEG Alpha Oscillations Represent a Pulsed-Inhibition of Ongoing Cortical Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Kyle E.; Lleras, Alejandro; Beck, Diane M.; Fabiani, Monica; Ro, Tony; Gratton, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Alpha oscillations are ubiquitous in the brain, but their role in cortical processing remains a matter of debate. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate in support of a role for alpha oscillations in attention selection and control. Here we first review evidence that 8–12 Hz oscillations in the brain have a general inhibitory role in cognitive processing, with an emphasis on their role in visual processing. Then, we summarize the evidence in support of our recent proposal that alpha represents a pulsed-inhibition of ongoing neural activity. The phase of the ongoing electroencephalography can influence evoked activity and subsequent processing, and we propose that alpha exerts its inhibitory role through alternating microstates of inhibition and excitation. Finally, we discuss evidence that this pulsed-inhibition can be entrained to rhythmic stimuli in the environment, such that preferential processing occurs for stimuli at predictable moments. The entrainment of preferential phase may provide a mechanism for temporal attention in the brain. This pulsed inhibitory account of alpha has important implications for many common cognitive phenomena, such as the attentional blink, and seems to indicate that our visual experience may at least some times be coming through in waves. PMID:21779257

  16. Reduced variability of ongoing and evoked cortical activity leads to improved behavioral performance.

    PubMed

    Ledberg, Anders; Montagnini, Anna; Coppola, Richard; Bressler, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    Sensory responses of the brain are known to be highly variable, but the origin and functional relevance of this variability have long remained enigmatic. Using the variable foreperiod of a visual discrimination task to assess variability in the primate cerebral cortex, we report that visual evoked response variability is not only tied to variability in ongoing cortical activity, but also predicts mean response time. We used cortical local field potentials, simultaneously recorded from widespread cortical areas, to gauge both ongoing and visually evoked activity. Trial-to-trial variability of sensory evoked responses was strongly modulated by foreperiod duration and correlated both with the cortical variability before stimulus onset as well as with response times. In a separate set of experiments we probed the relation between small saccadic eye movements, foreperiod duration and manual response times. The rate of eye movements was modulated by foreperiod duration and eye position variability was positively correlated with response times. Our results indicate that when the time of a sensory stimulus is predictable, reduction in cortical variability before the stimulus can improve normal behavioral function that depends on the stimulus. PMID:22937021

  17. The adaptation of a reflex response to the ongoing phase of locomotion in fish.

    PubMed

    Grillner, S; Rossignol, S; Wallén, P

    1977-10-24

    The reflex response to stimulation of the tail fin has been studied in the swimming fish, by bilateral electromyographical (EMG) recordings in several segments along the body. The response varies with the phase of swimming. When the muscles on one side (segment) are active, a large response will occur on this side but no response on the contralateral side at the same level. When the other side becomes active an identical stimulus will cause an activation of this side but no response on the previously active side. When the movements were filmed a powerful mechanical effect was demonstrated with an augmentation of the ongoing movement, that would result in an instantaneous increase in speed. The stimulus causes in addition a shortening of the duration of the swimming cycle and its components. Most of the results were obtained on spinal dogfish, which also exhibits spontaneous locomotion after a spinal transection. Mainly electrical bipolar stimulation of the tail fin was used. Identical stimuli applied in different phases on an ongoing movement, thus give a reflex response that changes dramatically with the phase of the movement. This phase dependent reflex reversal is functionally meaningful; it is fast and due to spinal mechanisms. PMID:590408

  18. 4-D noise-based seismology at volcanoes: Ongoing efforts and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, Florent; Rivet, Diane; Obermann, Anne; Nakata, Nori; Boué, Pierre; Lecocq, Thomas; Campillo, Michel; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring magma pressure buildup at depth and transport to surface is a key point for improving volcanic eruption prediction. Seismic waves, through their velocity dependence to stress perturbations, can provide crucial information on the temporal evolution of the mechanical properties of volcanic edifices. In this article, we review past and ongoing efforts for extracting accurate information of temporal changes of seismic velocities at volcanoes continuously in time using records of ambient seismic noise. We will first introduce the general methodology for retrieving accurate seismic velocity changes from seismic noise records and discuss the origin of seismic velocity temporal changes in rocks. We will then discuss in a second part how noise-based monitoring can improve our knowledge about magmatic activity at a long (years) to a short (days) time scale taking example from Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion). We will also mention ongoing efforts for operational noise-based seismic monitoring on volcanoes. Further, we will discuss perspectives for improving the spatial localization of detected velocity changes at depth with a special focus on the use of dense seismic arrays. In the last part, we will finally explore the complex response of volcanic regions to seismic shaking with an example from Japan and show how imaging seismic velocity susceptibility allows characterizing the state of pressurized fluids in volcanic regions.

  19. Citric acid-assisted phytoextraction of lead: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Eriberto Vagner; Nascimento, Clístenes Williams; Souza, Adailson; Silva, Fernando Bruno

    2013-06-01

    Soil contamination with heavy metals has become a serious environmental problem that requires affordable strategies of remediation. This study was carried out to assess the performance of maize and vetiver in the phytoextraction of Pb from a soil contaminated by battery recycling activities. The species were planted with different spacings between rows (0.80, 0.65 and 0.50m). Citric acid (40mmolkg(-1)) was applied on each experimental plot on the 61st d of cultivation in order to solubilize the Pb and assist the phytoextraction. The results showed that the chelating agent promoted a 14-fold increase in the Pb concentration in maize shoots as compared to the control, which accumulated only 111mgkg(-1) of the metal. The citric acid induced a Pb concentration in vetiver shoots that was 7.2-6.7-fold higher than the control at both the 0.65 and 0.50m plant spacing, respectively. The use of citric acid increased substantially the uptake and translocation of Pb to the shoots, regardless of plant spacing. Citric acid was efficient in solubilizing Pb from the soil and inducing its uptake by both species. Environmentally-friendly and cost effective, commercial citric acid is recommended for assisting Pb-phytoextraction in the studied area. Due to the low natural solubility of Pb and a time frame needed of longer than 150yr to accomplish the clean-up, phytoextraction with no chelate assistance is not recommended for the area. PMID:23490185

  20. Analysis of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in water, plant materials and soil.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, William C; Marek, LeEtta J; Hall, Kathleen E

    2016-03-01

    There is a need for simple, fast, efficient and sensitive methods of analysis for glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in diverse matrices such as water, plant materials and soil to facilitate environmental research needed to address the continuing concerns related to increasing glyphosate use. A variety of water-based solutions have been used to extract the chemicals from different matrices. Many methods require extensive sample preparation, including derivatization and clean-up, prior to analysis by a variety of detection techniques. This review summarizes methods used during the past 15 years for analysis of glyphosate and AMPA in water, plant materials and soil. The simplest methods use aqueous extraction of glyphosate and AMPA from plant materials and soil, no derivatization, solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns for clean-up, guard columns for separation and confirmation of the analytes by mass spectrometry and quantitation using isotope-labeled internal standards. They have levels of detection (LODs) below the regulatory limits in North America. These methods are discussed in more detail in the review. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26454260

  1. Encapsulation of acid generating mine waste using a sloped terrain at Weedon, Quebec

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, M.; Bedard, C.

    1995-10-01

    The Weedon mine site was remediated by the Government of Quebec in the summer of 1993. Erosion produced a large quantity of oxydized and acid generating tailings spread over more than 13 hectares of wooded land. Vast areas were exposed to leaching and precipitation of metals and sulphur, contaminating the surface waters. A site clean-up was undertaken and the dispersed tailings were excavated and confined in a capsule using a high-density polyethylene geomembrane cover. An innovative concept was developed to encapsulate the tailings on a sloping terrain, using acid generating wasterock for internal and perimeter containment. The cost of containing and covering the contaminated waste was 240 000 $ CAN/hectare.

  2. Genetic Diversity of PspA Types among Nasopharyngeal Isolates Collected during an Ongoing Surveillance Study of Children in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima; Brandileone, Maria Cristina C.; Miyaji, Eliane N.; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Sgambatti de Andrade, Ana Lúcia S.

    2006-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) has been considered a potential candidate for human vaccines because of its serotype-independent protective immunity. Nasopharyngeal (NP) pneumococcal colonization is highly prevalent in infants and precedes the invasive disease. Thus, prevention of NP colonization may reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease in children. Scarce information focusing on PspA from pneumococcal carriage in humans is available. We examined the genetic diversity of PspA from NP isolates obtained during an ongoing pneumococcal surveillance study with children. PspA families and clades of 183 community-acquired Streptococcus pneumoniae NP isolates from healthy children (n = 97) and children with respiratory tract infections (n = 48), pneumonia (n = 33), or meningitis (n = 5) were investigated. Overall, 79.8% (n = 146) of the pneumococcal isolates were classified as PspA family 1 (35.5%) and family 2 (44.3%), whereas 20.2% of the isolates could not be typed. The distribution of PspA families and clades did not differ significantly according to the clinical status of the children. A dendrogram comparing the genetic relationship between the amino acid sequences of the clade-defining region of PspA from NP strains together with 24 invasive reference strains (GenBank) closely reproduced the profile of the families and clades previously reported for pneumococcal invasive strains. These findings strengthen the idea that the use of PspA as a vaccine antigen may protect children against carriage as well as invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:16891500

  3. Adding a treatment arm to an ongoing clinical trial: a review of methodology and practice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dena R; Todd, Susan; Gregory, Walter M; Brown, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating an emerging therapy as a new randomisation arm in a clinical trial that is open to recruitment would be desirable to researchers, regulators and patients to ensure that the trial remains current, new treatments are evaluated as quickly as possible, and the time and cost for determining optimal therapies is minimised. It may take many years to run a clinical trial from concept to reporting within a rapidly changing drug development environment; hence, in order for trials to be most useful to inform policy and practice, it is advantageous for them to be able to adapt to emerging therapeutic developments. This paper reports a comprehensive literature review on methodologies for, and practical examples of, amending an ongoing clinical trial by adding a new treatment arm. Relevant methodological literature describing statistical considerations required when making this specific type of amendment is identified, and the key statistical concepts when planning the addition of a new treatment arm are extracted, assessed and summarised. For completeness, this includes an assessment of statistical recommendations within general adaptive design guidance documents. Examples of confirmatory ongoing trials designed within the frequentist framework that have added an arm in practice are reported; and the details of the amendment are reviewed. An assessment is made as to how well the relevant statistical considerations were addressed in practice, and the related implications. The literature review confirmed that there is currently no clear methodological guidance on this topic, but that guidance would be advantageous to help this efficient design amendment to be used more frequently and appropriately in practice. Eight confirmatory trials were identified to have added a treatment arm, suggesting that trials can benefit from this amendment and that it can be practically feasible; however, the trials were not always able to address the key statistical considerations

  4. Ongoing change of site conditions important for sustainable forest management planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidló, András; Horváth, Adrienn; Gulyás, Krisztina; Gálos, Borbála

    2016-04-01

    Observed tree mortality of the last decades has shown that the vulnerable forest ecosystems are especially affected by the recurrent, long lasting droughts, heat waves and their consequences. From all site conditions climate is changing the fastest, in this way it can be the largest threatening factor in the 21st century. Beyond climate, soil characteristics are playing an important influencing role. Until now, silvicultural technologies and species preferences of many countries are prescribed by binding regulation based on climate conditions that are assumed to be constant over time. Therefore the aim of our research was to investigate the ongoing and projected change of site conditions that are considered to be of primary importance in terms of tree species selection. For a case study region in Hungary (Keszthely Mountains, near to Lake Balaton) long-term climate tendencies have been determined for the period 1961-2100, as well as a detailed soil sample analysis has been carried out including ~100 sites. Results show a 0.5 degree increase of temperature and a 6-7 % decrease of the precipitation amount for the summer months in the last decades. For the future, significant warming and drying of summers is expected. Decrease of the summer precipitation sum can exceed 25 % until the end of the century, probability of extreme hot days may increase. These tendencies together with the unfavourable soil conditions and biotic damages can be the reason of the ongoing forest dieback. One of the characteristic soil type of the region is rendzina with a thin topsoil layer and an unfavourable water holding capacity. These properties are limiting the amount of available water for plants, especially in case of intense precipitation events. Black pine stands planted on rendzinas after many years of grazing; therefore erosion may have played a significant role. Not only microclimate conditions but also soil types show a large diversity within a relatively small distance. However

  5. Comparative genomics of eukaryotic small nucleolar RNAs reveals deep evolutionary ancestry amidst ongoing intragenomic mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small nucleolar (sno)RNAs are required for posttranscriptional processing and modification of ribosomal, spliceosomal and messenger RNAs. Their presence in both eukaryotes and archaea indicates that snoRNAs are evolutionarily ancient. The location of some snoRNAs within the introns of ribosomal protein genes has been suggested to belie an RNA world origin, with the exons of the earliest protein-coding genes having evolved around snoRNAs after the advent of templated protein synthesis. Alternatively, this intronic location may reflect more recent selection for coexpression of snoRNAs and ribosomal components, ensuring rRNA modification by snoRNAs during ribosome synthesis. To gain insight into the evolutionary origins of this genetic organization, we examined the antiquity of snoRNA families and the stability of their genomic location across 44 eukaryote genomes. Results We report that dozens of snoRNA families are traceable to the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA), but find only weak similarities between the oldest eukaryotic snoRNAs and archaeal snoRNA-like genes. Moreover, many of these LECA snoRNAs are located within the introns of host genes independently traceable to the LECA. Comparative genomic analyses reveal the intronic location of LECA snoRNAs is not ancestral however, suggesting the pattern we observe is the result of ongoing intragenomic mobility. Analysis of human transcriptome data indicates that the primary requirement for hosting intronic snoRNAs is a broad expression profile. Consistent with ongoing mobility across broadly-expressed genes, we report a case of recent migration of a non-LECA snoRNA from the intron of a ubiquitously expressed non-LECA host gene into the introns of two LECA genes during the evolution of primates. Conclusions Our analyses show that snoRNAs were a well-established family of RNAs at the time when eukaryotes began to diversify. While many are intronic, this association is not evolutionarily stable across

  6. Strongyloidiasis in a young French woman raises concern about possible ongoing autochthonous transmission in Spain.

    PubMed

    Duvignaud, Alexandre; Pistone, Thierry; Malvy, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the most common geohelminth infections in tropical and subtropical areas. Accurate diagnosis remains challenging, leading to an overall underestimation of strongyloidiasis prevalence. The possibility of ongoing autochthonous transmission in some temperate areas and especially in southern Europe is still debated, and data supporting this hypothesis are scarce. The case of a young French woman, who had travelled frequently to Spain and had acquired Strongyloides stercoralis infection as revealed by gastrointestinal symptoms and hypereosinophilia, is reported here. Physicians should keep in mind the risk of being infected in some areas of southern Europe, even if low, in order to avoid the life-threatening manifestations of strongyloidiasis favoured by pathological or therapeutic immunosuppression. PMID:26617257

  7. X-ray Observation of an Ongoing Merger at the Galaxy Cluster Abell 3653

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Turgay; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2016-07-01

    We present structural analysis results of A3653 based on XMM-Newton and Chandra archival data. The X-ray emission is elongated SE to NW, which gives an impression of a binary system. The cluster central plasma has an average temperature of 4.6 keV and 0.2 solar abundance values. There is NW cool clump with 3.2 keV temperature. Both XMM-Newton and Chandra observations show temperature fluctuations, which can be interpreted as recent merger. There are cool regions coinciding with the binary like structures with 4.4 keV and 3.2 keV temperature values, respectively. There is a ˜6.5 keV hot region between SE and NW clumps, which is probably shock heated by a recent dynamical activities. Our analysis results suggest A3653 is clearly not a relaxed system and has an ongoing merger along SE to NW direction.

  8. How we conduct ongoing programmatic evaluation of our medical education curriculum.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly; Abendroth, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of undergraduate medical education programs is necessary to meet accreditation standards; however, implementation and maintenance of an adequate evaluation process is challenging. A curriculum evaluation committee (CEC) was established at the Penn State University College of Medicine in 2000 to complement the already established activities of the Office of the Vice Dean for Medical Education and the Committee on Undergraduate Medical Education. Herein, we describe the methodology used by the CEC at our academic medical center and outcomes attributable to the curriculum evaluation process that was enacted. Strengths of our process include ongoing, regular assessments that guarantee a course is reviewed at least every two years and a feedback loop whereby course directors are held accountable for implementing changes when necessary. Our evaluative process has proven effective, sustainable, and has identified additional areas for curricular improvements. PMID:22816980

  9. A Modeling Study of the On-Going Drought and Heat Wave over the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, S.; Wang, H.; Koster, R.; Suarez, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ensembles of AGCM experiments have been conducted to examine the causes of the on-going drought and heat wave affecting much of the United States. The results show that the drought and hot temperatures that have been especially severe over Texas and parts of Mexico since late 2010 are the result of a combination of SST forcing from both the tropical Pacific and the tropical Atlantic, with the latter playing a particularly important role during later half of the summer of 2011, and the warm SSTs off the East Coast contributing to the warm conditions along the East Coast. An extension of the model simulations into the summer of 2012 suggests that the warm conditions are again primarily driven by SST forcing - despite the return of the tropical Pacific to neutral conditions. The results of additional experiments currently being conducted to separate the influences of the 2012 SST anomalies in the various ocean basins will be discussed.

  10. Thermal Filters for the ATHENA X-IFU: Ongoing Activities Toward the Conceptual Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Marco; Argan, A.; Bozzo, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Collura, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Gatti, F.; Jimenez Escobar, A.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Nuzzo, F.; Paltani, S.; Parodi, G.; Piro, L.; Rauw, G.; Sciortino, L.; Sciortino, S.; Villa, F.

    2016-02-01

    ATHENA is the L2 mission selected by ESA to pursue the science theme "Hot and Energetic Universe." One of the two focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit, an array of TES microcalorimeters operated at T < 100 mK. To allow the X-ray photons focused by the telescope to reach the detector, windows have to be opened on the cryostat thermal shields. X-ray transparent filters need to be mounted on these open windows to attenuate the IR radiation from warm surfaces, to attenuate RF electromagnetic interferences on TES sensors and SQUID electronics, and to protect the detector from contamination. This paper reviews the ongoing activities driving the design of the X-IFU thermal filters.

  11. Treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma: ongoing trials, critical issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Blanchard, P; Moreau, F; Guigay, J; Hartl, D M; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-04-01

    Due to the generally poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), treatment has been intensified, these last decades, leading to an increase of serious side effects. High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection has been recently etiologically linked to a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is on the increase. These tumors are different, at the clinical and molecular level, when compared to tumors caused by traditional risk factors. Additionally, their prognosis is much more favorable which has led the medical community to consider new treatment strategies. Indeed, it is possible that less intensive treatment regimens could achieve similar efficacy with less toxicity and improved quality of life. Several clinical trials, investigating different ways to de-escalate treatment, are currently ongoing. In this article, we review these main approaches, discuss the rationale behind them and the issues raised by treatment de-escalation in HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:24622970

  12. 7T MRI in natalizumab-associated PML and ongoing MS disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Sinnecker, Tim; Othman, Jalal; Kühl, Marc; Mekle, Ralf; Selbig, Inga; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kunkel, Annett; Wienecke, Peter; Kern, Peter; Faiss, Juergen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the ability of ultra-high-field MRI to distinguish early progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) from multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in a rare case of simultaneous presentation of natalizumab–associated PML and ongoing MS activity. Methods: Advanced neuroimaging including 1.5T, 3T, and 7T MRI with a spatial resolution of up to 0.08 mm3 was performed. Results: 7T MRI differentiated between PML-related and MS-related brain damage in vivo. Ring-enhancing MS plaques displayed a central vein, whereas confluent PML lesions were preceded by punctate or milky way–like T2 lesions. Conclusions: Given the importance of early diagnosis of treatment-associated PML, future systematic studies are warranted to assess the value of highly resolving MRI in differentiating between early PML- and MS-induced brain parenchymal lesions. PMID:26568970

  13. High Pressure - High Temperature Polymorphism in Ta: Resolving an Ongoing Experimental Controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Burkovsky, L; Chen, S P; Preston, D L; Belonoshko, A B; Rosengren, A; Mikhaylushkin, A S; Simak, S I; Moriarty, J A

    2010-04-07

    Phase diagrams of refractory metals remain essentially unknown. Moreover, there is an ongoing controversy over the high pressure (P) melting temperatures of these metals: results of diamond anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave experiments differ by at least a factor of two. From an extensive ab initio study on tantalum we discovered that the body-centered cubic phase, its physical phase at ambient conditions, transforms to another solid phase, possibly hexagonal omega phase, at high temperature (T). Hence the sample motion observed in DAC experiments is not due to melting but internal stresses accompanying a solid-solid transformation, as explained in more detail in our work. In view of our results on tantalum and previous work on molybdenum, as well as other published data, it is highly plausible that high-PT polymorphism is a general feature of Groups V and VI refractory metals.

  14. Thermal Filters for the ATHENA X-IFU: Ongoing Activities Toward the Conceptual Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Marco; Argan, A.; Bozzo, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Collura, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Gatti, F.; Jimenez Escobar, A.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Nuzzo, F.; Paltani, S.; Parodi, G.; Piro, L.; Rauw, G.; Sciortino, L.; Sciortino, S.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    ATHENA is the L2 mission selected by ESA to pursue the science theme "Hot and Energetic Universe." One of the two focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit, an array of TES microcalorimeters operated at T < 100 mK. To allow the X-ray photons focused by the telescope to reach the detector, windows have to be opened on the cryostat thermal shields. X-ray transparent filters need to be mounted on these open windows to attenuate the IR radiation from warm surfaces, to attenuate RF electromagnetic interferences on TES sensors and SQUID electronics, and to protect the detector from contamination. This paper reviews the ongoing activities driving the design of the X-IFU thermal filters.

  15. Study of ongoing inflation at Uturuncu Volcano in Bolivia, 2003-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motagh, M.; Hooper, A. J.; Walter, T. R.; Anderssohn, J.

    2009-12-01

    Geodetic measurements of surface deformation are critical in volcano and earthquake studies to place constraints on associated deformation sources, to understand the interaction between volcanic processes and tectonics surroundings, and to detect and investigate emplacement of magmas prior to eruptions. In this paper, we use Envisat data from 2003 to 2009 and apply an InSAR time-series technique to study ongoing deformation at Uturuncu volcano in SW Bolivia. Following this observation, we employ analytical models to infer information about the source of deformation at depth; perform detailed GIS analysis and numerical stress models to analyze the geology surroundings and compare the results. We also model, using Envisat data acquired in Wide Swath and Image Mode, the deformation associated with the 14 November 2007 Tocopilla earthquake that occurred approx. 300 km west of Uturuncu and investigate whether the stress change caused by the fault slip during this subduction event triggered a response in the movement of source beneath Uturuncu Volcano.

  16. Enterprise SRS: leveraging ongoing operations to advance nuclear fuel cycles research and development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.; Marra, J.E.; Wilmarth, W.R.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is re-purposing its vast array of assets (including H Canyon - a nuclear chemical separation plant) to solve issues regarding advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies, nuclear materials processing, packaging, storage and disposition. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into SRS facilities but also in other facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research has been established in SRS.

  17. Extraction and Characterization of Essential Discharge Patterns from Multisite Recordings of Spiking Ongoing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Storchi, Riccardo; Biella, Gabriele E. M.; Liberati, Diego; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background Neural activation patterns proceed often by schemes or motifs distributed across the involved cortical networks. As neurons are correlated, the estimate of all possible dependencies quickly goes out of control. The complex nesting of different oscillation frequencies and their high non-stationariety further hamper any quantitative evaluation of spiking network activities. The problem is exacerbated by the intrinsic variability of neural patterns. Methodology/Principal Findings Our technique introduces two important novelties and enables to insulate essential patterns on larger sets of spiking neurons and brain activity regimes. First, the sampling procedure over N units is based on a fixed spike number k in order to detect N-dimensional arrays (k-sequences), whose sum over all dimension is k. Then k-sequences variability is greatly reduced by a hierarchical separative clustering, that assigns large amounts of distinct k-sequences to few classes. Iterative separations are stopped when the dimension of each cluster comes to be smaller than a certain threshold. As threshold tuning critically impacts on the number of classes extracted, we developed an effective cost criterion to select the shortest possible description of our dataset. Finally we described three indexes (C,S,R) to evaluate the average pattern complexity, the structure of essential classes and their stability in time. Conclusions/Significance We validated this algorithm with four kinds of surrogated activity, ranging from random to very regular patterned. Then we characterized a selection of ongoing activity recordings. By the S index we identified unstable, moderatly and strongly stable patterns while by the C and the R indices we evidenced their non-random structure. Our algorithm seems able to extract interesting and non-trivial spatial dynamics from multisource neuronal recordings of ongoing and potentially stimulated activity. Combined with time-frequency analysis of LFPs could provide a

  18. Genesis of anxiety, depression, and ongoing abdominal discomfort in ulcerative colitis-like colon inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghong; Winston, John H; Fu, Yu; Guptarak, Jutatip; Jensen, Kathryn L; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Green, Thomas A; Sarna, Sushil K

    2015-01-01

    Psychological disorders are prevalent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease; the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that ulcerative colitis-like inflammation induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) exacerbates the ongoing spontaneous activity in colon-projecting afferent neurons that induces abdominal discomfort and anxiety, and depressive-like behaviors in rats. In this study, we used the conditioned place preference and standard tests for anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. DSS rats developed anxiety- and depression-like behaviors 10 to 20 days after the start of inflammation. Single-fiber recordings showed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity in L6-S1 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) roots. Prolonged desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-expressing colonic afferents by resiniferatoxin (RTX) suppressed the spontaneous activity, as well as the anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Reduction in spontaneous activity in colon afferents by intracolonic administration of lidocaine produced robust conditioned place preference (CPP) in DSS rats, but not in control rats. Patch-clamp studies demonstrated a significant decrease in the resting membrane potential, lower rheobase, and sensitization of colon-projecting L6-S1 DRG neurons to generate trains of action potentials in response to current injection in DSS rats. DSS inflammation upregulated the mRNA levels of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and TRPV1 channels and downregulated that of Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 channels. Ulcerative colitis-like inflammation in rats induces anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, as well as ongoing abdominal discomfort by exacerbating the spontaneous activity in the colon-projecting afferent neurons. Alterations in the expression of voltage- and ligand-gated channels are associated with the induction of mood disorders following colon inflammation. PMID:25411361

  19. Genesis of anxiety, depression, and ongoing abdominal discomfort in ulcerative colitis-like colon inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinghong; Winston, John H.; Fu, Yu; Guptarak, Jutatip; Jensen, Kathryn L.; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychological disorders are prevalent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease; the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that ulcerative colitis-like inflammation induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) exacerbates the ongoing spontaneous activity in colon-projecting afferent neurons that induces abdominal discomfort and anxiety, and depressive-like behaviors in rats. In this study, we used the conditioned place preference and standard tests for anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. DSS rats developed anxiety- and depression-like behaviors 10 to 20 days after the start of inflammation. Single-fiber recordings showed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity in L6-S1 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) roots. Prolonged desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-expressing colonic afferents by resiniferatoxin (RTX) suppressed the spontaneous activity, as well as the anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Reduction in spontaneous activity in colon afferents by intracolonic administration of lidocaine produced robust conditioned place preference (CPP) in DSS rats, but not in control rats. Patch-clamp studies demonstrated a significant decrease in the resting membrane potential, lower rheobase, and sensitization of colon-projecting L6-S1 DRG neurons to generate trains of action potentials in response to current injection in DSS rats. DSS inflammation upregulated the mRNA levels of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and TRPV1 channels and downregulated that of Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 channels. Ulcerative colitis-like inflammation in rats induces anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, as well as ongoing abdominal discomfort by exacerbating the spontaneous activity in the colon-projecting afferent neurons. Alterations in the expression of voltage- and ligand-gated channels are associated with the induction of mood disorders following colon inflammation. PMID:25411361

  20. Mapping ongoing European research activities examining the infectious aetiology of chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Semenza, J C; Svederud, I; Medin, E; Orrskog, S; Tsolova, S

    2013-09-01

    Chronic conditions contribute to the majority of the mortality and morbidity burden in Europe. The extent to which infectious agents are responsible for the chronic disease burden remains elusive. The complex nature of the natural history of chronic conditions calls for an overview of ongoing research activities linking infectious agents with these conditions in order to guide research endeavours, direct research funding, steer prevention efforts, and point health policy towards promising interventions. A selection of websites hosted by institutions either financing or conducting research within the European Union was screened for ongoing research activities examining infectious aetiology of chronic conditions. The searches were conducted until September 2011, applying search strategies and inclusion criteria predefined in a study protocol. In total, 25 research activities met the inclusion criteria. Of those, ten activities were focused to investigate infectious aetiology of cancer, four focused on type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 11 focused on a wide spectrum of other chronic conditions. The identified research projects did not cover areas such as mental and behavioural disorders. Infectious agents analysed included enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus, human rhinoviruses, P. gingivalis, human papillomaviruses, cytomegalovirus, Helicobacter spp. and human parvovirus. Only three projects specifically addressed therapeutic interventions. Ultimately, linking infectious agents with chronic conditions may translate into prevention efforts with vaccinations or treatment strategies with antimicrobial agents, and could, thus, eventually reduce the heavy disease burden from chronic conditions. However, little translational research on therapeutic interventions was found in our search and should be fostered, particularly for more established infectious-chronic disease associations. PMID:23046318

  1. Environmental analysis of Acid/middle Pueblo Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Hansen, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, and Pueblo Canyon found residual radioactivity at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons, all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of radioactive material is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. The only areas where residual radioactivity exceeds the proposed cleanup criteria are at the former vehicle decontamination facility, located between the former treatment plant site and Acid Canyon, around the former untreated waste outfall and for a short distance below, and in two small areas farther down in Acid Canyon. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to fence the areas where the residual radioactivity exceeds the proposed criteria (minimal action), and (3) to clean up the former vehicle decontamination facility and around the former untreated waste outfall. Calculations based on actual measurements indicate that the annual dose at the location having the greatest residual radioactivity would be about 12% of the applicable guideline. Most doses are much smaller than that. No environmental impacts are associated with either the no-action or minimal action alternatives. The impact associated with the cleanup alternative is very small. The preferred alternative is to clean up the areas around the former vehicle decontamination facility and the untreated waste outfall. This course of action is recommended not because of any real danger associated with the residual radioactivity, but rather because the cleanup operation is a minor effort and would conform with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) philosophy.

  2. Effects of ongoing task context and target typicality on prospective memory performance: the importance of associative cueing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowinski, Jessica Lang; Dismukes, Key R.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether prospective memory performance is influenced by contextual cues. In our automatic activation model, any information available at encoding and retrieval should aid recall of the prospective task. The first experiment demonstrated an effect of the ongoing task context; performance was better when information about the ongoing task present at retrieval was available at encoding. Performance was also improved by a strong association between the prospective memory target as it was presented at retrieval and the intention as it was encoded. Experiment 2 demonstrated boundary conditions of the ongoing task context effect, which implicate the association between the ongoing and prospective tasks formed at encoding as the source of the context effect. The results of this study are consistent with predictions based on automatic activation of intentions.

  3. 76 FR 52995 - Draft License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance LR-ISG-2011-05: Ongoing Review of Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ...The NRC requests public comment on Draft License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-05, ``Ongoing Review of Operating Experience.'' This LR-ISG provides guidance and clarification concerning ongoing review of plant-specific and industry-wide operating experience as an attribute of aging management programs used at nuclear power plants for compliance with Title 10 of the Code......

  4. 77 FR 15818 - License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance LR-ISG-2011-05: Ongoing Review of Operating Experience

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing the final License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-05, ``Ongoing Review of Operating Experience.'' This LR-ISG provides guidance and clarification concerning ongoing reviews of plant-specific and industry-wide operating experience as an attribute of aging management programs used at nuclear power plants as described in......

  5. Ongoing activity in the optic tectum is correlated on a trial-by-trial basis with the pupil dilation response.

    PubMed

    Netser, Shai; Dutta, Arkadeb; Gutfreund, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    The selection of the appropriate stimulus to induce an orienting response is a basic task thought to be partly achieved by tectal circuitry. Here we addressed the relationship between neural activity in the optic tectum (OT) and orienting behavioral responses. We recorded multiunit activity in the intermediate/deep layers of the OT of the barn owl simultaneously with pupil dilation responses (PDR, a well-known orienting response common to birds and mammals). A trial-by-trial analysis of the responses revealed that the PDR generally did not correlate with the evoked neural responses but significantly correlated with the rate of ongoing neural activity measured shortly before the stimulus. Following this finding, we characterized ongoing activity in the OT and showed that in the intermediate/deep layers it tended to fluctuate spontaneously. It is characterized by short periods of high ongoing activity during which the probability of a PDR to an auditory stimulus inside the receptive field is increased. These high-ongoing activity periods were correlated with increase in the power of gamma band local field potential oscillations. Through dual recordings, we showed that the correlation coefficients of ongoing activity decreased as a function of distance between recording sites in the tectal map. Significant correlations were also found between recording sites in the OT and the forebrain entopallium. Our results suggest that an increase of ongoing activity in the OT reflects an internal state during which coupling between sensory stimulation and behavioral responses increases. PMID:24304859

  6. Ectopic Lymphoid Structures Support Ongoing Production of Class-Switched Autoantibodies in Rheumatoid Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Antonio; Kelly, Stephen; Blades, Mark C; Kirkham, Bruce; Spencer, Jo; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2009-01-01

    Background Follicular structures resembling germinal centres (GCs) that are characterized by follicular dendritic cell (FDC) networks have long been recognized in chronically inflamed tissues in autoimmune diseases, including the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is debated whether these ectopic structures promote autoimmunity and chronic inflammation driving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA) are highly specific markers of RA, predict a poor prognosis, and have been suggested to be pathogenic. Therefore, the main study objectives were to determine whether ectopic lymphoid structures in RA synovium: (i) express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme required for somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes; (ii) support ongoing CSR and ACPA production; and (iii) remain functional in a RA/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) chimera model devoid of new immune cell influx into the synovium. Methods and Findings Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative Taqman real-time PCR (QT-PCR) in synovial tissue from 55 patients with RA, we demonstrated that FDC+ structures invariably expressed AID with a distribution resembling secondary lymphoid organs. Further, AID+/CD21+ follicular structures were surrounded by ACPA+/CD138+ plasma cells, as demonstrated by immune reactivity to citrullinated fibrinogen. Moreover, we identified a novel subset of synovial AID+/CD20+ B cells outside GCs resembling interfollicular large B cells. In order to gain direct functional evidence that AID+ structures support CSR and in situ manufacturing of class-switched ACPA, 34 SCID mice were transplanted with RA synovium and humanely killed at 4 wk for harvesting of transplants and sera. Persistent expression of AID and Iγ-Cμ circular transcripts (identifying ongoing IgM-IgG class-switching) was observed in synovial grafts expressing FDCs/CD21L. Furthermore, synovial

  7. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Andrew M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mandelker, Diana L.; Platt, Mia Y.; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M.; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E.; Levy, Bruce P.; McClintock, David S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank C.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular “learning laboratories”. Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows’ ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of

  8. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Andrew M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mandelker, Diana L; Platt, Mia Y; Rao, Luigi K F; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E; Levy, Bruce P; McClintock, David S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank C; Gilbertson, John R

    2014-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows' ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the

  9. Lessons Learned from Ongoing Field Tests of Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, B.; McColpin, G.; Rutledge, J.; Pawar, R.; Deo, M.; Rose, P.; Lee, S.; Han, W.; Lu, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present lessons learned - an attempt to describe what we know and do not know- based on ongoing field tests of geologic carbon sequestration. The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, is conducting three separate field tests of geologic sequestration that include extensive monitoring and analysis of the fate of injected CO2. The CO2 injection sites include the Aneth oilfield in southern Utah, the coalbed "fairway" in the San Juan basin in northern New Mexico, and the SACROC oilfield in the Permian basin of west Texas. Results of the ongoing sequestration field tests are both encouraging and problematic. At the San Juan basin coalbed injection test, we forecasted coalbed swelling following injection to be detectable at the surface. Tiltmeter results indicated subsidence, not uplift, and poroelastic models of the site suggest that swelling is likely occurring, but cleat compaction may be responsible for the net subsidence. In a similar context, initial poroelastic models of the Aneth, Utah injection site suggested minimal rock strain would be induced by the 100,000 tons of CO2 injected over the past year, but this forecast is belied by daily microearthquakes recorded at the site (albeit very small events: M -1 to 0 ). On the other hand, our initial multiphase flow models of the Aneth site provided forecasts of CO2 migration that turned out to be extremely consistent with observed tracer test results, suggesting that our estimated permeability distributions and other model parameters were effective to some extent. These field tests suggest that probably the greatest challenges are (1) verification or confirmation of trapping mechanisms, and (2) monitoring of processes in the "intermediate zone," the section of strata above the sequestration formation topseal unit and below the upper 100 m of the section, (3) developing meaningful geologic

  10. Ongoing calving-frontal dynamics of glaciers in the Northern Patagonia Icefield, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, F.; Rivera, A.; Burger, F.; Carrión, D.; Cisternas, S.; Gacitúa, G.; Pena, M.; Oberreuter, J.; Silva, R.; Uribe, J. A.; Wendt, A.; Zamora, R.

    2013-05-01

    compared with ongoing thinning rates due to higher ablation. In the long term perspective, San Rafael is a good example of the tidewater calving cycle described for several glaciers in Alaska and Patagonia. At the eastern side glaciers, frontal retreats have been bigger than at San Rafael in recent years, but in the long term (since the Little Ice Age), San Rafael experienced a much stronger frontal recession (more than 12 km). This contrasting calving behavior between eastern and western margin glaciers, is only enhancing ice losses differences, but not changing ongoing receding trends.;

  11. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  12. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G; Luther, Sanjiv A; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  13. Hypoxia and radiation therapy: Past history, ongoing research, and future promise

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Sara; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Kim, Eugene Y.; Marrison, S. Tucker; Vu, Van Thuc

    2009-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia influences the outcome of treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and even surgery, not only for the treatment of large bulky tumors with extensive necrosis, but also in the treatment of very small primary tumors and recurrences, micrometastases, and surgical margins with microscopic tumor involvement. Because hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiation and to many anticancer drugs, many approaches to circumventing the therapeutic resistance induced by hypoxia have been examined in laboratory studies and clinical trials. In this review, these approaches and the results of past laboratory and clinical studies are described and the limitations of the past agents and their testing are discussed. We describe the importance of new technologies for measuring hypoxia in human tumors, which allow assessment of pretreatment tumor oxygen levels and changes in hypoxia over the course of prolonged treatment regimens. These offer the possibility of improving the design of clinical trials and the selection of patients who will benefit from hypoxia-directed therapies, as well as the possibility of facilitating the development of better agents and regimens for use in hypoxia-directed therapy. We also discuss how the improved understanding of the abnormal vascular beds in solid tumors and of the effects of hypoxia and related microenvironmental insults, resulting from recent and ongoing research, offers the potential for finding new therapeutic targets, that may lead to the development of new agents and novel therapeutic approaches for selectively targeting cells in the adverse microenvironments within solid tumors. PMID:19519402

  14. Ongoing ecological speciation in Cotesia sesamiae, a biological control agent of cereal stem borers

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Laure; Le Ru, Bruno Pierre; Kaoula, Ferial; Paillusson, Corentin; Capdevielle-Dulac, Claire; Obonyo, Julius Ochieng; Herniou, Elisabeth A; Jancek, Severine; Branca, Antoine; Calatayud, Paul-André; Silvain, Jean-François; Dupas, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    To develop efficient and safe biological control, we need to reliably identify natural enemy species, determine their host range, and understand the mechanisms that drive host range evolution. We investigated these points in Cotesia sesamiae, an African parasitic wasp of cereal stem borers. Phylogenetic analyses of 74 individual wasps, based on six mitochondrial and nuclear genes, revealed three lineages. We then investigated the ecological status (host plant and host insect ranges in the field, and host insect suitability tests) and the biological status (cross-mating tests) of the three lineages. We found that one highly supported lineage showed all the hallmarks of a cryptic species. It is associated with one host insect, Sesamia nonagrioides, and is reproductively isolated from the other two lineages by pre- and postmating barriers. The other two lineages had a more variable phylogenetic support, depending on the set of genes; they exhibited an overlapping and diversified range of host species and are not reproductively isolated from one another. We discuss the ecological conditions and mechanisms that likely generated this ongoing speciation and the relevance of this new specialist taxon in the genus Cotesia for biological control. PMID:26366198

  15. Balancing emotional processing with ongoing cognitive activity: the effects of task modality on intrusions and rumination

    PubMed Central

    Curci, Antonietta; Soleti, Emanuela; Lanciano, Tiziana; Doria, Valentina; Rimé, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we aimed to show that competition for resources between post-emotional processes and the execution of a cognitive task will result in two possible effects: (1) an impairment of the cognitive task in the short run and (2) an elongation of intrusions and rumination in the long run. The outcome of this competition is influenced by the interaction of the modality (verbal vs. visuospatial) of cognitive tasks run in the aftermath of an emotional experience and the nature (verbal vs. visuospatial) of the same experience. Non-clinical participants were given a working memory task (OSPAN vs. an analog Visual task) before and after the presentation of negative vs. neutral material (a novel excerpt in Experiment 1 and a video clip in Experiment 2). Intrusions and rumination were measured after a 24-h delay. Rumination was also assessed immediately after the experimental induction. Results showed that exposure to verbal negative material impaired verbal performance (Experiment 1); by contrast, exposure to visual negative material impaired both verbal and visuospatial performance (Experiment 2). Intrusions were only affected by the emotional valence of the original experience, while performing a visuospatial task resulted in enhanced rumination only after exposure to verbal emotional material. The findings of both experiments suggest that emotional processing spreads over time in balance with ongoing cognitive activities, and, in such a balance, the visuospatial processing mode tends to prevail over verbal engagements. PMID:26379598

  16. Speaker's hand gestures modulate speech perception through phase resetting of ongoing neural oscillations.

    PubMed

    Biau, Emmanuel; Torralba, Mireia; Fuentemilla, Lluis; de Diego Balaguer, Ruth; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Speakers often accompany speech with spontaneous beat gestures in natural spoken communication. These gestures are usually aligned with lexical stress and can modulate the saliency of their affiliate words. Here we addressed the consequences of beat gestures on the neural correlates of speech perception. Previous studies have highlighted the role played by theta oscillations in temporal prediction of speech. We hypothesized that the sight of beat gestures may influence ongoing low-frequency neural oscillations around the onset of the corresponding words. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were acquired while participants watched a continuous, naturally recorded discourse. The phase-locking value (PLV) at word onset was calculated from the EEG from pairs of identical words that had been pronounced with and without a concurrent beat gesture in the discourse. We observed an increase in PLV in the 5-6 Hz theta range as well as a desynchronization in the 8-10 Hz alpha band around the onset of words preceded by a beat gesture. These findings suggest that beats help tune low-frequency oscillatory activity at relevant moments during natural speech perception, providing a new insight of how speech and paralinguistic information are integrated. PMID:25595613

  17. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sin-Hyeog; Barchan, Dora; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C.

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR α-subunit (Hα1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Hα1-205–induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1723–1730 (1999). PMID:10606626

  18. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    1999-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR alpha-subunit (Halpha1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Halpha1-205-induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. PMID:10606626

  19. The Departmental Script as an Ongoing Conversation into the Phronesis of Teaching Science as Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, Wayne; Campbell, Todd; Fazio, Xavier; Bartley, Anthony

    2012-12-01

    This article investigates the extent to which a science department script supports the teaching and learning of science as inquiry and how this script is translated into individual teachers' classrooms. This study was completed at one school in Canada which, since 2000, has developed a departmental script supportive of teaching and learning of science as inquiry. Through a mixed-method strategy, multiple data sources were drawn together to inform a cohesive narrative about scripts, science departments, and individual classrooms. Results of the study reveal three important findings: (1) the departmental script is not an artefact, but instead is an ongoing conversation into the episteme, techne and phronesis of science teaching; (2) the consistently reformed teaching practices that were observed lead us to believe that a departmental script has the capacity to enhance the teaching of science as inquiry; and, (3) the existence of a departmental script does not mean that teaching will be `standardized' in the bureaucratic sense of the word. Our findings indicate that a departmental script can be considered to concurrently operate as an epistemic script that is translated consistently across the classes, and a social script that was more open to interpretation within individual teachers' classrooms.

  20. An Ongoing Role for Structural Sarcomeric Components in Maintaining Drosophila melanogaster Muscle Function and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Alexander D.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Animal muscles must maintain their function while bearing substantial mechanical loads. How muscles withstand persistent mechanical strain is presently not well understood. The basic unit of muscle is the sarcomere, which is primarily composed of cytoskeletal proteins. We hypothesized that cytoskeletal protein turnover is required to maintain muscle function. Using the flight muscles of Drosophila melanogaster, we confirmed that the sarcomeric cytoskeleton undergoes turnover throughout adult life. To uncover which cytoskeletal components are required to maintain adult muscle function, we performed an RNAi-mediated knockdown screen targeting the entire fly cytoskeleton and associated proteins. Gene knockdown was restricted to adult flies and muscle function was analyzed with behavioural assays. Here we analyze the results of that screen and characterize the specific muscle maintenance role for several hits. The screen identified 46 genes required for muscle maintenance: 40 of which had no previously known role in this process. Bioinformatic analysis highlighted the structural sarcomeric proteins as a candidate group for further analysis. Detailed confocal and electron microscopic analysis showed that while muscle architecture was maintained after candidate gene knockdown, sarcomere length was disrupted. Specifically, we found that ongoing synthesis and turnover of the key sarcomere structural components Projectin, Myosin and Actin are required to maintain correct sarcomere length and thin filament length. Our results provide in vivo evidence of adult muscle protein turnover and uncover specific functional defects associated with reduced expression of a subset of cytoskeletal proteins in the adult animal. PMID:24915196

  1. Ongoing Spontaneous Activity Controls Access to Consciousness: A Neuronal Model for Inattentional Blindness

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Even in the absence of sensory inputs, cortical and thalamic neurons can show structured patterns of ongoing spontaneous activity, whose origins and functional significance are not well understood. We use computer simulations to explore the conditions under which spontaneous activity emerges from a simplified model of multiple interconnected thalamocortical columns linked by long-range, top-down excitatory axons, and to examine its interactions with stimulus-induced activation. Simulations help characterize two main states of activity. First, spontaneous gamma-band oscillations emerge at a precise threshold controlled by ascending neuromodulator systems. Second, within a spontaneously active network, we observe the sudden “ignition” of one out of many possible coherent states of high-level activity amidst cortical neurons with long-distance projections. During such an ignited state, spontaneous activity can block external sensory processing. We relate those properties to experimental observations on the neural bases of endogenous states of consciousness, and particularly the blocking of access to consciousness that occurs in the psychophysical phenomenon of “inattentional blindness,” in which normal subjects intensely engaged in mental activity fail to notice salient but irrelevant sensory stimuli. Although highly simplified, the generic properties of a minimal network may help clarify some of the basic cerebral phenomena underlying the autonomy of consciousness. PMID:15819609

  2. Propeller peregrinations: Ongoing observations of disk-embedded migration in Saturn’s rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    2016-05-01

    The "propeller" moons within Saturn's rings are the first objects ever to have their orbits tracked while embedded in a disk, rather than moving through empty space (Tiscareno et al. 2010, ApJL). The km-sized "giant propellers" whose orbits have been tracked in the outer-A ring, as well as their smaller 0.1-km-sized brethren swarming in the mid-A ring, are not seen directly; rather, their locations are inferred by means of the propeller-shaped disturbances they create in the surrounding ring material (Tiscareno et al. 2006, Nature; Sremcevic et al. 2007, Nature; Tiscareno et al. 2008, AJ). The orbits of giant propellers are primarily Keplerian, but with clear excursions of up to several degrees longitude over a decade of observations. Most theories that have been proposed to explain the non-Keplerian motion of propeller moons (e.g., Pan et al. 2012, MNRAS; Tiscareno 2013, P&SS) rely on gravitational and/or collisional interactions between the moon and the surrounding disk, and thus hold out the prospect for directly observing processes that are important in protoplanetary scenarios and other disk systems. We will review the current dynamical models and report on recent ongoing observations by the Cassini imaging camera.

  3. Annex III-evaluation of past and ongoing enhanced oil recovery projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Infill Drilling Predictive Model (IDPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp (SSI) for the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The model and certain adaptations thereof were used in conjunction with other models to support the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission`s (IOGCC) 1993 state-by-state assessment of the potential domestic reserves achievable through the application of Advanced Secondary Recovery (ASR) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques. Funding for this study was provided by the DOE/BPO, which additionally provided technical support. The IDPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (oil and water) model which uses a minimal amount of reservoir and geologic data to generate production and recovery forecasts for ongoing waterflood and infill drilling projects. The model computes water-oil displacement and oil recovery using finite difference solutions within streamtubes. It calculates the streamtube geometries and uses a two-dimensional reservoir simulation to track fluid movement in each streamtube slice. Thus the model represents a hybrid of streamtube and numerical simulators.

  4. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennington, Ninfa; Haney, Matt; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford; Freymueller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok’s caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. Themagnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/ormagmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation sourcemay be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  5. Ongoing Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus in Rural Parts of the Netherlands, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Soetens, Loes C.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.; Urbanus, Anouk; Cremer, Jeroen; Benschop, Kimberly S. M.; Rietveld, Ariene; van Dijk, Erik I.; Hahné, Susan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reported acute hepatitis B incidence in the Netherlands reached its nadir in 2013. However, regional signals about increased number of hepatitis B cases raised the question how hepatitis B incidence was distributed over the country. In this study, regional differences in hepatitis B epidemiology were investigated using epidemiological and molecular data. Methods Acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, reported between 2009–2013, were included. If serum was available, a fragment of S and C gene of the HBV was amplified and sequenced. Regional differences in incidence were studied by geographical mapping of cases and cluster analysis. Regional differences in transmission were studied by constructing regional maximum parsimony trees based on the C gene to assess genetic clustering of cases. Results Between 2009 and 2013, 881 cases were notified, of which respectively 431 and 400 cases had serum available for S and C gene sequencing. Geographical mapping of notified cases revealed that incidences in rural border areas of the Netherlands were highest. Cluster analysis identified two significant clusters (p<0.000) in the South-western and North-eastern regions. Genetic cluster analysis showed that rural border areas had relatively large clusters of cases with indistinguishable sequences, while other regions showed more single introductions. Conclusion This study showed that regional differences in HBV epidemiology were present in the Netherlands. Rural border regions showed higher incidences and more ongoing transmission, mainly among MSM, than the more urban inland areas. Therefore, preventive measures should be enhanced in these regions. PMID:25706759

  6. Ongoing Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Among Inmates at a State Correctional Facility

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amy J.; Simard, Edgar P.; Bower, William A.; Wurtzel, Heather L.; Khristova, Marina; Wagner, Karla D.; Arnold, Kathryn E.; Nainan, Omana V.; LaMarre, Madeleine; Bell, Beth P.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence, associated exposures, and incidence among male inmates at a state correctional facility. Methods. A cross-sectional serological survey was conducted in June 2000, and susceptible inmates were retested in June 2001. Results. At baseline, 230 inmates (20.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=18.2%, 22.9%) exhibited evidence of HBV infection, including 11 acute and 11 chronic infections. Inmates with HBV infection were more likely than susceptible inmates to have injected drugs (38.8% vs 18.0%; adjusted prevalence odds ratio [OR]=3.0; 95% CI=1.9, 4.9), to have had more than 25 female sex partners (27.7% vs 17.5%; adjusted prevalence OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.4, 3.0), and to have been incarcerated for more than 14 years (38.4% vs 17.6%; adjusted prevalence OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.1, 2.6). One year later, 18 (3.6%) showed evidence of new HBV infection. Among 19 individuals with infections, molecular analysis identified 2 clusters involving 10 inmates, each with a unique HBV sequence. Conclusions. We documented ongoing HBV transmission at a state correctional facility. Similar transmission may occur at other US correctional facilities and could be prevented by vaccination of inmates. PMID:16186457

  7. Investigation of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields: Ongoing animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. Many of the observed effects appear to be directly or indirectly associated with the neural or neuroendocrine systems. Such effects include increased neuronal excitability, chemical and hormonal changes in the nervous system, altered behavioral responses, some of which are related to sensing the presence of the field, and changes in endogenous biological rhythms. Additional indices of general physiological status appear relatively unaffected by exposure, although effects have occasionally been described in bone growth and fracture repair, reproduction and development, and immune system function. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Three major challenges exist for ongoing research: (1) knowledge about the mechanisms underlying observed bioeffects is incomplete, (2) researchers do not as yet understand what physical aspects of exposure produce biological responses, and (3) health consequences resulting from ELF exposure are unknown. Although no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, several are suggestive of potential health impacts. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss biological responses to ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposures.

  8. Ongoing cell death and immune influences on regeneration in the vestibular sensory organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, M. E.; Matsui, J. I.; Simkus, E. L.; Ogilive, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Hair cells in the vestibular organs of birds have a relatively short life span. Mature hair cells appear to die spontaneously and are then quickly replaced by new hair cells that arise from the division of epithelial supporting cells. A similar regenerative mechanism also results in hair cell replacement after ototoxic damage. The cellular basis of hair cell turnover in the avian ear is not understood. We are investigating the signaling pathways that lead to hair cell death and the relationship between ongoing cell death and cell production. In addition, work from our lab and others has demonstrated that the avian inner ear contains a resident population of macrophages and that enhanced numbers of macrophages are recruited to sites of hair cells lesions. Those observations suggest that macrophages and their secretory products (cytokines) may be involved in hair cell regeneration. Consistent with that suggestion, we have found that treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone reduces regenerative cell proliferation in the avian ear, and that certain macrophage-secreted cytokines can influence the proliferation of vestibular supporting cells and the survival of statoacoustic neurons. Those results suggest a role for the immune system in the process of sensory regeneration in the inner ear.

  9. Evidence for regular ongoing introductions of mosquito disease vectors into the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Cedeño, Virna; Cruz, Marilyn; Eastwood, Gillian; Fonseca, Dina M.; Causton, Charlotte E.; Azuero, Ronal; Loayza, Jose; Martinez, Jose D. Cruz; Goodman, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Wildlife on isolated oceanic islands is highly susceptible to the introduction of pathogens. The recent establishment in the Galápagos Islands of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, a vector for diseases such as avian malaria and West Nile fever, is considered a serious risk factor for the archipelago's endemic fauna. Here we present evidence from the monitoring of aeroplanes and genetic analysis that C. quinquefasciatus is regularly introduced via aircraft into the Galápagos Archipelago. Genetic population structure and admixture analysis demonstrates that these mosquitoes breed with, and integrate successfully into, already-established populations of C. quinquefasciatus in the Galápagos, and that there is ongoing movement of mosquitoes between islands. Tourist cruise boats and inter-island boat services are the most likely mechanism for transporting Culex mosquitoes between islands. Such anthropogenic mosquito movements increase the risk of the introduction of mosquito-borne diseases novel to Galápagos and their subsequent widespread dissemination across the archipelago. Failure to implement and maintain measures to prevent the human-assisted transport of mosquitoes to and among the islands could have catastrophic consequences for the endemic wildlife of Galápagos. PMID:19675009

  10. Subnuclear distribution of topoisomerase I is linked to ongoing transcription and p53 status.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yinghui; Mehl, Issac R; Muller, Mark T

    2002-02-01

    The nonconserved, hydrophilic N-terminal domain of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is dispensable for catalytic activity in vitro but essential in vivo. There are at least five putative nuclear localization signals and a nucleolin-binding signal within the first 215 residues of the topo I N-terminal domain. We have investigated physiological functions of the topo I N-terminal domain by fusing it to an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The first 170 residues of the N-terminal domain allow efficient import of chimeric proteins into nuclei and nucleoli. The nucleolar localization of this protein does not depend on its interaction with nucleolin, whereas ongoing rDNA transcription clearly is crucial. Immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that the topo I N terminus (topoIN)-EGFP fusion protein associates with the TATA-binding protein in cells. Furthermore, DNA damage results in extensive nuclear redistribution of the topoIN-EGFP chimeric product. The redistribution is also p53-dependent and the N terminus of topo I appears to interact with p53 in vivo. These results show that the topo I localization to the nucleolus is related to the p53 and DNA damage, as well as changes in transcriptional status. Nucleolar release of topo I under conditions of cellular duress may represent an important, antecedent step in tumor cell killing by topoisomerase active agents. PMID:11805286

  11. Adolescents' mental health outcomes according to different types of exposure to ongoing terror attacks.

    PubMed

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Celestin-Westreich, Smadar; Celestin, Leon-Patrice; Verté, Dominique; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid

    2009-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of several types of exposure to terror attacks on adolescents' psychological outcomes in the context of ongoing terror. A total of 913 adolescents (51% girls) aged 12 to 18 years (12-13.6 = 33%; 13.7-15.6 = 38%; 15.7-18 = 28%) took part in the study. Detailed data were collected concerning objective, subjective and "mixed" types of exposure to terror, as well as demographics, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), emotional and behavioral problems and overall psychological and psychiatric difficulties. Subjective exposure was found to be the most important contributor to adolescents' post-traumatic stress and other mental health problems in this context. Gender also had important effects. The effects of objective and mixed types of exposure, as well as age, were less prominent. We did find, however, that the more adolescents consulted media, the less they experienced behavioral and emotional problems. Given that subjective experiences appear to be the best factor in explaining mental health outcomes when adolescents are confronted with persistent terror, the cognitive and emotional dynamics along with the coping behavior linked to such experiences merit further investigation. PMID:19636786

  12. An experimental analysis of ongoing verbal behavior: Reinforcement, verbal operants, and superstitious behavior

    PubMed Central

    Leigland, Sam

    1996-01-01

    Four adult humans were asked to asked to “find” and talk about a particular topic to a person in an adjoining room, and were instructed that they would hear a short beep (the only form of reply from the other person) when they were talking about the topic, or were “close” to the topic. In Session 1, the experimenter in the adjoining room presented the beeps in the manner of shaping, or the differential reinforcement of successive approximations, “toward” the designated topic. In Session 2, the same conditions were in effect but the experimenter was unable to hear the subject and the beeps were presented noncontingently in a way that roughly matched the frequency and distribution of presentations in Session 1. In Session 3, shaping conditions were again in effect but with a different topic than that designated for Session 1. Audio recordings were transcribed in a way that was designed to show the progress of shaping over time. These and additional forms of supporting data and accompanying rationale are presented and discussed in detail. Issues raised by the methodology and results of the experiment include the nature of the verbal operant, superstitious verbal behavior, and a variety of methodological issues relevant to the experimental analysis of ongoing or continuous verbal behavior. PMID:22477112

  13. New Insights on Retrieval-Induced and Ongoing Memory Consolidation: Lessons from Arc

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The mainstream view on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying memory formation states that memory traces reside on the network of cells activated during initial acquisition that becomes active again upon retrieval (reactivation). These activation and reactivation processes have been called “conjunctive trace.” This process implies that singular molecular events must occur during acquisition, strengthening the connection between the implicated cells whose synchronous activity must underlie subsequent reactivations. The strongest experimental support for the conjunctive trace model comes from the study of immediate early genes such as c-fos, zif268, and activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein. The expressions of these genes are reliably induced by behaviorally relevant neuronal activity and their products often play a central role in long-term memory formation. In this review, we propose that the peculiar characteristics of Arc protein, such as its optimal expression after ongoing experience or familiar behavior, together with its versatile and central functions in synaptic plasticity could explain how familiarization and recognition memories are stored and preserved in the mammalian brain. PMID:26380114

  14. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Haney, Matthew; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford H.; Freymueller, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok's caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. The magnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/or magmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation source may be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  15. Ongoing Coxsackievirus Myocarditis Is Associated with Increased Formation and Activity of Myocardial Immunoproteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Gudrun; Meiners, Silke; Voigt, Antje; Lauber, Jörg; Spieth, Christian; Speer, Nora; Sauter, Martina; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Zell, Andreas; Klingel, Karin; Stangl, Karl; Kandolf, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that viral infections of the heart contribute to ongoing myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Murine models of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis mimic the human disease and allow identification of susceptibility factors that modulate the course of viral myocarditis. Susceptible mouse strains develop chronic myocarditis on the basis of restricted viral replication, whereas resistant strains recover after successful virus elimination. In comparative whole-genome microarray analyses of infected hearts, several genes involved in the processing and presentation of viral epitopes were found to be uniformly up-regulated in acutely CVB3-infected susceptible mice compared with resistant animals. In particular, expression of the catalytic subunits LMP2, LMP7, and MECL-1, immunoproteasome proteins important in the generation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted peptides, was clearly enhanced in the susceptible host. Increased expression resulted in enhanced formation of immunoproteasomes and altered proteolytic activities of proteasomes in the heart. This was accompanied by a concerted up-regulation of the antigen-presenting machinery in susceptible mice. Thus, we propose that increased formation of immunoproteasomes in susceptible mice affects the generation of antigenic peptides and the subsequent T-cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:16651621

  16. Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adornato, Philip

    Incorporating research into a high school classroom is an excellent way to teach students fundamental concepts in science. One program that incorporates this approach is the Waksman Student Scholar Program (WSSP), which allows high school students, teachers and Rutgers professors to work side by side on an ongoing molecular biology research program. Students in the program first isolated plasmid clones from bacteria that contain cDNA fragments of genes from the Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana. They then determined the size of the DNA by performing molecular biology experiments. Students then analyzed the DNA sequence and after review from WSSP staff and high school teachers, the student's sequences were published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. This was often the last step in the project the students performed. However, if the project were being conducted in a research lab instead of a high school, the cDNA clone would often be further analyzed. In the past, safety, convenience, and affordability have limited the availability of these experiments in a high school setting. Although additional bioinformatic experiments could easily be performed in the high school, there is a strong need for additional "wet lab" experiments to keep the students engaged and motivated to work on the project. I have worked on developing three experimental modules that can be performed in a high school setting. These experiments were tested with the students and teachers of the WSSP. This work will expand the scope of experiments that can be performed in a high school environment.

  17. Biochemical markers of ongoing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis - current and future applications, limitations and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease associated with potentially debilitating joint inflammation, as well as altered skeletal bone metabolism and co-morbid conditions. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to control disease activity offers the highest likelihood of preserving function and preventing disability. Joint inflammation is characterized by synovitis, osteitis, and/or peri-articular osteopenia, often accompanied by development of subchondral bone erosions, as well as progressive joint space narrowing. Biochemical markers of joint cartilage and bone degradation may enable timely detection and assessment of ongoing joint damage, and their use in facilitating treatment strategies is under investigation. Early detection of joint damage may be assisted by the characterization of biochemical markers that identify patients whose joint damage is progressing rapidly and who are thus most in need of aggressive treatment, and that, alone or in combination, identify those individuals who are likely to respond best to a potential treatment, both in terms of limiting joint damage and relieving symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe currently available biochemical markers of joint metabolism in relation to the pathobiology of joint damage and systemic bone loss in RA; to assess the limitations of, and need for additional, novel biochemical markers in RA and other rheumatic diseases, and the strategies used for assay development; and to examine the feasibility of advancement of personalized health care using biochemical markers to select therapeutic agents to which a patient is most likely to respond. PMID:21539724

  18. Notes from the Field: Ongoing Cholera Outbreak - Kenya, 2014-2016.

    PubMed

    George, Githuka; Rotich, Jacob; Kigen, Hudson; Catherine, Kiama; Waweru, Bonface; Boru, Waqo; Galgalo, Tura; Githuku, Jane; Obonyo, Mark; Curran, Kathryn; Narra, Rupa; Crowe, Samuel J; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Macharia, Daniel; Montgomery, Joel; Neatherlin, John; De Cock, Kevin M; Lowther, Sara; Gura, Zeinab; Langat, Daniel; Njeru, Ian; Kioko, Jackson; Muraguri, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    On January 6, 2015, a man aged 40 years was admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, with acute watery diarrhea. The patient was found to be infected with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, serotype Inaba. A subsequent review of surveillance reports identified four patients in Nairobi County during the preceding month who met either of the Kenya Ministry of Health suspected cholera case definitions: 1) severe dehydration or death from acute watery diarrhea (more than four episodes in 12 hours) in a patient aged ≥5 years, or 2) acute watery diarrhea in a patient aged ≥2 years in an area where there was an outbreak of cholera. An outbreak investigation was immediately initiated. A confirmed cholera case was defined as isolation of V. cholerae O1 or O139 from the stool of a patient with suspected cholera or a suspected cholera case that was epidemiologically linked to a confirmed case. By January 15, 2016, a total of 11,033 suspected or confirmed cases had been reported from 22 of Kenya's 47 counties (Table). The outbreak is ongoing. PMID:26820494

  19. The ongoing dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vazquez, Angel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity of Popocatépetl volcano has been characterized by emplacement and subsequent destruction of a succession of lava domes. Between the onset of the current eruption in 1994 and the time of this submission, 38 episodes of lava dome formation and removal have been identified. Each dome has showed particular features related to the magma extrusion process. Among other manifestations, dome-emplacement events have been usually accompanied by relatively low-intensity, protracted explosions referred to as exhalations. After variable times of residence, emplacements have ended in partial or total destruction of the domes by strong vulcanian explosions that produced sizeable ash plumes, with most of them also ejecting incandescent debris onto the volcano flanks. Here, we present a detailed account for the observed activity related to the domes' growth and destruction, related seismic monitoring signals, and morphological features of the domes based on 19 years of visual observations and image analysis. We then discuss a model for the process of dome growth and destruction and its hazard implications.

  20. Studies of the Northern Alaskan Coastal System: Ongoing project work and synthesis activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, T. A.; Sturm, M.; Ashjian, C. J.; Jorgensen, T.; Oechel, W. C.; Ping, C.; Rhew, R. C.; Stieglitz, M.

    2006-12-01

    Six ongoing projects focus on a better understanding of processes occurring along the Arctic Alaskan Coast. These projects, grouped as "Studies of the Northern Alaskan Coastal System", or SNACS, combine field, laboratory, modeling and human dimensions research. They include: 1) an investigation of climate variability, ocean processes, sea ice, bowhead whales, and Inupiat subsistence whaling, 2) research on the impact of variability within the ocean and atmosphere on terrestrial fluxes of carbon dioxide, dissolved organic matter and energy, 3) an inventory and description of soil organic carbon fluxes and ground ice in the coastal environment, 4) a determination of whether arctic coastal terrestrial ecosystems are significant sources or sinks of atmospheric methyl halides, chloroform and methane, 5) development of generalized discharge- constituent relationships for arctic basins, and 6) an investigation of the processes controlling mercury deposition to the coastal system. Three broad themes unite the projects: 1) nutrient fluxes from rivers and shoreline erosion in the Arctic coastal zone, 2) impacts of cryospheric changes on the Alaskan Arctic Coast, and 3) potential rapid regime shifts controlled by atmospheric and meteorological processes that could affect the Alaskan Arctic Coast. Warming of the Arctic, particularly its impact on sea ice and nutrient transport in arctic rivers is already affecting fundamental coastal system processes. The six SNACS projects are helping to understand how these impacts will evolve and what their ramifications will be both within and outside of the Arctic.