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Sample records for acid oxalic acid

  1. [Analysis of oxalic acid and oxalates].

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P

    1979-08-01

    It is reported on individual methods for the estimation of the oxalic acid in body fluids, particularly in the urine. The case in question is a survey of the oxalate estimation methods, which, however, has no pretensions to completeness. The at present most actualestimation methods are brought somewhat more in detail. The data are not sufficient for the laboratorytechnical performance of the individual methods, this would transgress the possibilities of the work. However, the original papers are cited which contain all the necessary details. Some technical difficulties and disturbances in the individual estimation methods are also entered. Despite excellent work of several teams the problems of standardization, of the absolutely reliable reference methoda as well as of an objective consideration of advantages and disadvantages of individual, often subjectively judged methods is not yet solved. Comparing these methods, one gets the impression that several reliable methods of the same value are established. It seems that this estimation method brings the greatest progress which will reliably establish so small quantities of oxalate as they are in the blood or in the liquor. By this also the oxalate clearance and the renal oxalate treatment becomes more exactly establishable than up to now.

  2. Measurements of oxalic acid, oxalates, malonic acid, and malonates in atmospheric particulates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Yu, Liya E

    2008-12-15

    This study systematically examined effects of analytical approaches on resultant concentrations of oxalic acid, oxalates, malonic acid, and malonates. Results demonstrated that employing separate water extraction and THF extraction is required to properly quantify dicarboxylic acids vs dicarboxylates using IC or GC-MS. Applications of the recommended methods to analyze PM2.5 collected in Singapore showed that concentrations of oxalate ranged from 361.4 to 481.4 ng m(-3), which were 10-14.7 times higher than that of oxalic acid. Unlike that of oxalates, malonate concentrations (10.5-23.4 ng m(-3)) were no more than half of malonic acid concentration (43.8-53.9 ng m(-3)) in PM2.5. Concentration ratios of oxalate-to-oxalic acid and malonate-to-malonic acid obtained from this work were applied to reported literature data; as a first approximation, in urban environments similar to that in Singapore, quantifiable oxalic acid, oxalates, malonic acid, and malonates in PM2.5 could range from 7.6 to 68.0, 82.2 to 732.8, 6.3 to 150, and 1.3 to 60 ng m(-3), respectively. Because photooxidation properties and hygroscopicity of dicarboxylic acids can substantially differ from that of dicarboxylates, more studies are needed to quantify ambient oxalic acid and malonic acid vs oxalates and malonates.

  3. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A; Miller, Wilson H; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L John

    2009-02-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at -30 degrees C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function.

  4. Metabolic Conversion of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid in Oxalate-accumulating Plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, J C; Loewus, F A

    1975-08-01

    l-Ascorbic acid-1-(14)C and its oxidation product, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid, produced labeled oxalic acid in oxalate-accumulating plants such as spinach seedlings (Spinacia oleracea) and the detached leaves of woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta and O. oregana), shamrock (Oxalis adenopylla), and begonia (Begonia evansiana). In O. oregana, conversion occurred equally well in the presence or absence of light. This relationship between l-ascorbic acid metabolism and oxalic acid formation must be given careful consideration in attempts to explain oxalic accumulation in plants.

  5. Metabolic Conversion of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid in Oxalate-accumulating Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joan C.; Loewus, Frank A.

    1975-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid-1-14C and its oxidation product, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid, produced labeled oxalic acid in oxalate-accumulating plants such as spinach seedlings (Spinacia oleracea) and the detached leaves of woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta and O. oregana), shamrock (Oxalis adenopylla), and begonia (Begonia evansiana). In O. oregana, conversion occurred equally well in the presence or absence of light. This relationship between l-ascorbic acid metabolism and oxalic acid formation must be given careful consideration in attempts to explain oxalic accumulation in plants. PMID:16659288

  6. Gas chromatographic determination of oxalic acid in foods.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, H

    1985-01-01

    A new quantitative gas chromatographic (GC) method has been developed for the determination of oxalic acid in foods. Solid sample is extracted with water (soluble oxalic acid) or 2N hydrochloric acid (total oxalic acid) at room temperature. An aliquot of sample extract is evaporated to dryness, and the oxalic acid in the residue is methylated with 7% hydrochloric acid-methanol. The reaction mixture is extracted with chloroform, and dimethyl oxalate is quantitated by GC. Recovery of oxalic acid added to liquid samples averaged 100.6%; recoveries from extracts of solid samples were 96.2-99.5 and 97.2-100.1% for water and hydrochloric acid extractions, respectively. Results are shown for determination of oxalic acid in spinach and beverages. The technique is simple, rapid, and accurate, and small samples may be used. The limit of determination is 20 micrograms.

  7. Oxalic acid mineralization by electrochemical oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Hui; Shih, Yu-Jen; Liu, Cheng-Hong

    2011-04-15

    In this study, two electrochemical oxidation processes were utilized to mineralize oxalic acid which was a major intermediate compound in the oxidation of phenols and other aromatic compounds. The anode rod and cathode net were made of a titanium coated with RuO(2)/IrO(2) (Ti-DSA) and stainless steel (S.S. net, SUS304), respectively. First, the Fered-Fenton process, which used H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+) as additive reagents, achieved 85% of TOC removal. It proceeded with ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT), which was evidenced by the accumulation of metallic foil on the selected cathode. However, in the absence of H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+), it showed a higher TOC removal efficiency while using Cl(-) only as an additive reagent due to the formation of hypochlorite on the anode. It was also found that the mineralization of oxalic acid by electrolysis generated hypochlorite better than the dosage of commercial hypochlorite without electricity. Also, pH value was a major factor that affected the mineralization efficiency of the oxalic acid due to the chlorine chemistry. 99% TOC removal could be obtained by Cl(-) electrolysis in an acidic environment.

  8. Red facts: Oxalic acid. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    All pesticides sold or used in the United States must be registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing that they can be used without posing unreasonable risks to people or the environment. Because of advances in scientific knowledge, the law requires that pesticides which were first registered years ago be reregistered to ensure that they meet today's more stringent standards. Oxalic acid is registered for use as a disinfectant to control bacteria and germs, and as a sanitizer, in toilet bowls, urinals and bathroom premises. Oxalic acid also has many diverse, non-pesticidal, manufacturing and industrial uses including use in fabric printing and dyeing; bleaching straw hats; removing paint, varnish, rust or ink stains; and cleaning wood.

  9. The function of oxalic acid in the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel Stewart

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions in cells which involve oxalic acid are described. It is shown that this compound is required for the formation of uracil and orotic acid. The former is a component of RNA which is common to all cells in the human metabolism. On the basis of the biochemical reactions described a possible treatment to relieve the effects of calcium oxalate renal calculi whose origin is related to the metabolic concentration of oxalic acid is proposed.

  10. Reregistration eligibility document (RED): Oxalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. This pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED) for oxalic acid discusses the scientific data and other information supporting EPA's regulatory conclusion that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  11. Characterization of oxalic acid pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass using oxalic acid recovered by electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-04-01

    The properties of pretreated biomass and hydrolysate obtained by oxalic acid pretreatment using oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis (ED) were investigated. Most of the oxalic acid was recovered and some of the fermentation inhibitors were removed by ED. For the original hydrolysate, the ethanol production was very low and fermentable sugars were not completely consumed by Pichia stipitis during fermentation. Ethanol yield was less than 0.12 g/g in all stage. For the ED-treated hydrolysate, ethanol production was increased by up to two times in all stages compared to the original hydrolysate. The highest ethanol production was 19.38 g/l after 72 h which correspond to the ethanol yield of 0.33 g/g. Enzymatic conversion of the cellulose to glucose for all the pretreated biomass was in the range of 76.03 and 77.63%. The hydrolysis rate on each pretreated biomass was not significantly changed when oxalic acid recovered by ED was used for pretreatment.

  12. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  13. Oxalic acid and sclerotial differentiation of Polyporus umbellatus.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yong-Mei; Yin, Wan-Qiang; Liu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Chun-Lan; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-06-01

    The present investigation aimed to uncover the effects of exogenous oxalic acid during the sclerotial formation of Polyporus umbellatus, with an emphasis on determining the content of the endogenic oxalic acid in the fungus. To this end, the oxalic acid content of the vegetative mycelia, sclerotia, culture mediums and sclerotial exudate were measured using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Furthermore, the lipid peroxidation was estimated by detecting thiobarbituric bituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The results showed that the exogenous oxalic acid caused a delay in sclerotial differentiation (of up to 9 or more days), suppressed the sclerotial biomass and decreased the lipid peroxidation significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. Oxalic acid was found at very low levels in the mycelia and the maltose medium, whereas it was found at high levels in the mycelia and sucrose medium. After sclerotial differentiation, oxalic acid accumulated at high levels in both the sclerotia and the sclerotial exudate. Oxalic acid was therefore found to inhibit P. umbellatus sclerotial formation.

  14. Oxalic acid in saliva, teeth and tooth tartar.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R; Kallee, E

    1994-11-01

    Oxalic acid was determined in human saliva, teeth, tartar, and in animal teeth. Saliva from dentally healthy male subjects contained 0.10 +/- 0.09 mmol/l (n = 41) and those of dentally healthy female subjects 0.18 +/- 0.17 mmol/l (n = 40). Oxalic acid in tartar from 16 patients was 3.3 +/- 1.2 mmol/kg tartar. In human teeth, oxalic acid was 1.0 +/- 0.3 mmol/kg in milk teeth (n = 12) and 0.9 +/- 0.6 mmol/kg in permanent teeth (n = 60). Human teeth were sorted into age groups and into molars, incisors and premolars. In animal teeth, oxalic acid content varied widely. The formed calcium oxalate is proposed to be a 'physiological' protective mechanism for teeth.

  15. Oxalic acid is available as a natural antioxidant in some systems.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Tomoko; Katayama, Tetsuyuki

    2002-10-10

    Oxalic acid is found in a wide variety of plants. This study showed that oxalic acid suppressed in vitro lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, oxalic acid reduced the rate of ascorbic acid oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and Cu(2+). These results suggest that oxalic acid is available as a natural antioxidant.

  16. Production and Degradation of Oxalic Acid by Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Eduardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted 14C-labeled oxalic acid to CO2 during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized 14C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize 14C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi. PMID:16348522

  17. Oxalic acid degradation by a novel fungal oxalate oxidase from Abortiporus biennis.

    PubMed

    Grąz, Marcin; Rachwał, Kamila; Zan, Radosław; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase was identified in mycelial extracts of a basidiomycete Abortiporus biennis strain. Intracellular enzyme activity was detected only after prior lowering of the pH value of the fungal cultures by using oxalic or hydrochloric acids. This enzyme was purified using size exclusion chromatography (Sephadex G-25) and ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose). This enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 2 when incubated at 40°C, and the optimum temperature was established at 60°C. Among the tested organic acids, this enzyme exhibited specificity only towards oxalic acid. Molecular mass was calculated as 58 kDa. The values of Km for oxalate and Vmax for the enzyme reaction were 0.015 M and 30 mmol min(-1), respectively.

  18. Production of oxalic acid by some fungi infected tubers.

    PubMed

    Faboya, O; Ikotun, T; Fatoki, O S

    1983-01-01

    Oxalic acid (as oxalate) was detected in four tubers commonly used for food in Nigeria-Dioscorea rotundata (White yam), Solanum tuberosum (Irish potato), Ipomoea batatas (Sweet potato), and Manihot esculenta (cassava). Whereas healthy I. batata had the highest oxalic acid content, healthy M. esculenta contained the lowest. When all tubers were artifically inoculated with four fungi-Penicillium oxalicum CURIE and THOM, Aspergillus niger VAN TIEGH, A. flavus and A. tamarii KITA, there was an increase in oxalate content/g of tuber tissue. The greatest amount of oxalate was produced by P. oxalicum in D. rotundata tuber. Consistently higher amounts of oxalate were produced by the four fungi in infected sweet potato tuber than in any other tuber and consistently lower amounts of oxalate were produced by the four fungi in Irish potato tuber. Differences in the carbohydrate type present in the tubers and in the biosynthesis pathway are thought to be responsible for variation in the production of oxalate in the different tubers by the four fungi used.

  19. Dissolution of kaolinite induced by citric, oxalic, and malic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingxiang; Li, Qingman; Hu, Huafeng; Zhang, Taolin; Zhou, Yiyong

    2005-10-15

    Kaolinite is a dominant clay mineral in the soils in tropical and subtropical regions, and its dissolution has an influence on a variety of soil properties. In this work, kaolinite dissolution induced by three kinds of low-molecular-weight organic acid, i.e., citric, oxalic, and malic acids, was evaluated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. The rates of kaolinite dissolution depended on the kind and concentration of organic acids, with the sequence R(oxalate)>R(citrate)>R(malate). Chemical calculation showed the change in concentration of organic ligand relative to change in concentration of organic acid in suspensions of kaolinite and organic acid. The effect of organic acid on kaolinite dissolution was modeled by species of organic anionic ligand. For oxalic acid, L(2-)(oxalic) and HL(-)(oxalic) jointly enhanced the dissolution of kaolinite, but for malic and citric acids, HL(-)(malic) and H2L-(citric) made a higher contribution to the total dissolution rate of kaolinite than L(2-)(malic) and L(3-)(citric), respectively. For oxalic acid, the proposed model was R(Si)=1.89x10(-12)x[(25x)/(1+25x)]+1.93x10(-12)x[(1990x1)/(1+1990x1)] (R2=0.9763), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of HL(oxalic) and L(oxalic), respectively, and x1=10(-3.81)xx/[H+]. For malic acid, the model was R(Si)=4.79x10(-12)x[(328x)/(1+328x)]+1.67x10(-13)x[(1149x1)/(1+1149x1)] (R2=0.9452), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of HL(malic) and L(malic), respectively, and x1=10(-5.11)xx/[H+], and for citric acid, the model was R(Si)=4.73x10(-12)x[(845x)/(1+845x)]+4.68x10(-12)x[(2855x1)/(1+2855x1)] (R2=0.9682), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of H2L(citric) and L(citric), respectively, and [Formula: see text] .

  20. The effect of rumen adaptation to oxalic acid on selection of oxalic-acid-rich plants by goats.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A J; Frutos, P; Young, S A

    2000-01-01

    Rumen microbial degradation is an important route for detoxification of secondary plant compounds encountered in the diets of free-grazing ruminants. Exposure to diets containing particular secondary plant compounds can lead to increased rates of secondary compound degradation in the rumen. An experiment was conducted to determine whether rumen adaptation to oxalic acid would influence the diet selection of goats offered choices between plant species differing in their oxalic acid content. Twelve adult female goats were divided into two groups of six animals each. One group received a daily oral dose, in gelatin capsules, of 0.6 mmol oxalic acid/kg live weight per d throughout the experiment while the other group received placebos consisting of empty gelatin capsules. After an adaptation period of 8 d, the animals were allowed to graze a mixture of spinach (rich in oxalic acid) and cabbage (low in oxalic acid) for 7 h/d on two consecutive days per week during four consecutive 1-week periods. Intervening days were spent on grass pasture. Diet composition and intake were measured using cuticular wax n-alkanes as internal markers. Results showed that adapted goats included a higher proportion of spinach in their diet (P < 0.05) although absolute intakes of spinach were the same for the two groups. Goats in the oxalic-acid-adapted group consumed less cabbage than control animals (P < 0.05) suggesting that adaptation to oxalic acid at the rumen level may have interfered with detoxification of cabbage-derived secondary plant compounds. Voluntary intake increased progressively through the four experimental periods (P < 0.001) with a tendency for higher intakes among control than among adapted animals (P < 0.1). The experiment demonstrates how differences in the rate of degradation of secondary plant compounds may influence diet selection in ruminants.

  1. Means for reducing oxalic acid to a product

    SciTech Connect

    Morduchowitz, A.; Sammells, A.F.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes an apparatus for reducing oxalic acid to a product comprising: a cell including a separator for separating the cell into two chambers, a catholyte chamber and an anolyte chamber, each chamber having an inlet and an outlet; a porous anode arranged within the anolyte section in a manner so that an electrolyte entering through the inlet of the anolyte section will pass through the anode and exit through the outlet of the anolyte section; means for providing an electrolyte to the inlet of the anolyte chamber in a manner so that it will exit through the outlet of the anolyte chamber; means for providing a mixture of oxalic acid and an electrolyte to the inlet of the catholyte chamber; porous cathode means located in the catholyte chamber for reducing the oxalic acid in the oxalic acid-electrolyte mixture to the product within the cathode means when a d.c. voltage provided across the anode and the cathode means, the product exiting the cell by way of the catholyte chamber's outlet; and means for providing a d.c. voltage across the cathode means and the anode so as to cooperate in the reduction of the oxalic acid; and in which the cathode means includes a porous cathode having discrete sites of platinum and mercury as catalysts and the product is ethylene glycol.

  2. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with /sup 45/Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO/sub 3/ and CaCl/sub 2/ than from CaC/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  3. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C M; Martin, B R; Ebner, J S; Krueger, C A

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with 45Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO3 and CaCl2 than from CaC2O4 (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  4. Sonolysis of an oxalic acid solution under xenon lamp irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hisashi; Harada, Hisashi

    2010-06-01

    The photosonolysis of oxalic acid was carried out in an Ar atmosphere. The detectable products of sonolysis were CO(2), CO, H(2), and H(2)O(2). The yield of CO(2) was higher than that for the sum of sonolysis and photolysis reactions. Namely, a synergistic effect was observed during simultaneous irradiations of 200 kHz ultrasound and Xe lamp. The degradation of oxalic acid was promoted by active species such as H(2)O(2) produced from water by sonolysis. An oxalic acid-H(2)O(2) complex is likely to be present in the solution, but could not be detected. The effects of not only the photo-irradiation but also the thermal or incident energy during Xe lamp illumination were also considered.

  5. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  6. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  7. Oxalic acid production by citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger overexpressing the oxaloacetate hydrolase gene oahA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-05-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used worldwide in the industrial production of citric acid. However, under specific cultivation conditions, citric acid-producing strains of A. niger accumulate oxalic acid as a by-product. Oxalic acid is used as a chelator, detergent, or tanning agent. Here, we sought to develop oxalic acid hyperproducers using A. niger as a host. To generate oxalic acid hyperproducers by metabolic engineering, transformants overexpressing the oahA gene, encoding oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC 3.7.1.1), were constructed in citric acid-producing A. niger WU-2223L as a host. The oxalic acid production capacity of this strain was examined by cultivation of EOAH-1 under conditions appropriate for oxalic acid production with 30 g/l glucose as a carbon source. Under all the cultivation conditions tested, the amount of oxalic acid produced by EOAH-1, a representative oahA-overexpressing transformant, exceeded that produced by A. niger WU-2223L. A. niger WU-2223L and EOAH-1 produced 15.6 and 28.9 g/l oxalic acid, respectively, during the 12-day cultivation period. The yield of oxalic acid for EOAH-1 was 64.2 % of the maximum theoretical yield. Our method for oxalic acid production gave the highest yield of any study reported to date. Therefore, we succeeded in generating oxalic acid hyperproducers by overexpressing a single gene, i.e., oahA, in citric acid-producing A. niger as a host.

  8. Isolation of oxalic acid tolerating fungi and decipherization of its potential to control Sclerotinia sclerotiorum through oxalate oxidase like protein.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shivani; Srivastava, Alok K; Singh, Dhanajay P; Arora, Dilip K

    2012-11-01

    Oxalic acid plays major role in the pathogenesis by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum; it lowers the pH of nearby environment and creates the favorable condition for the infection. In this study we examined the degradation of oxalic acid through oxalate oxidase and biocontrol of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. A survey was conducted to collect the rhizospheric soil samples from Indo-Gangetic Plains of India to isolate the efficient fungal strains able to tolerate oxalic acid. A total of 120 fungal strains were isolated from root adhering soils of different vegetable crops. Out of 120 strains a total of 80 isolates were able to grow at 10 mM of oxalic acid whereas only 15 isolates were grow at 50 mM of oxalic acid concentration. Then we examined the antagonistic activity of the 15 isolates against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These strains potentially inhibit the growth of the test pathogen. A total of three potential strains and two standard cultures of fungi were tested for the oxalate oxidase activity. Strains S7 showed the maximum degradation of oxalic acid (23 %) after 60 min of incubation with fungal extract having oxalate oxidase activity. Microscopic observation and ITS (internally transcribed spacers) sequencing categorized the potential fungal strains into the Aspergillus, Fusarium and Trichoderma. Trichoderma sp. are well studied biocontrol agent and interestingly we also found the oxalate oxidase type activity in these strains which further strengthens the potentiality of these biocontrol agents.

  9. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  10. Modulation of polyepoxysuccinic acid on crystallization of calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanqing; Tang, Yongming; Xu, Jinqiu; Zhang, Dongqin; Lu, Gang; Jing, Wenheng

    2015-11-15

    The influence of polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) on the phase composition and crystal morphology of calcium oxalate was investigated in this paper. It was found that the presence of PESA inhibited the growth of the monoclinic calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal and promoted the nucleation of the tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). In addition, with the increase in PESA concentration, the aggregation of COD crystals was reduced but the particle size was increased. Under the conditions of low calcium-to-oxalate ratio and high CaOx concentration, PESA could not effectively stabilize the formation of COD. Based on molecular dynamic simulations, the adsorption of PESA on CaOx crystal faces was confirmed. - Graphical abstract: Introduction of PESA into crystallization solutions promotes the formation of calcium oxalate dehydrate and modifies the morphology of crystals. - Highlights: • PESA induces the formation of COD at low supersaturation. • Establishment of Ca-rich surface augments the adsorption of PESA. • At Ca/Ox=0.5 PESA cannot induce the formation of COD compared with Ca/Ox=2. • Interaction of PESA with COM faces is stronger than that with COD faces.

  11. Bioavailability of oxalic acid from spinach, sugar beet fibre and a solution of sodium oxalate consumed by female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hanson, C F; Frankos, V H; Thompson, W O

    1989-03-01

    Oxalate bioavailability from sugar beet fibre (40 g), spinach (25 g) and a solution of sodium oxalate (182 mg) was tested in nine women using a triplicated 3 x 3 Latin square arrangement. Each test substance provided 120 mg oxalic acid. Throughout the study the volunteers consumed a control diet and the test substances were administered at breakfast on specified days. After an initial 2-day control period, oxalate was administered in three test periods that consisted of one test day followed by one control day. Urine collected during 24-hr periods was analysed daily for oxalate. Oxalate excretion did not differ among the five control days and was not increased significantly following the ingestion of sugar beet fibre by the volunteers. Oxalate excretion was greater (P less than 0.0001) for the mean of the spinach and sodium oxalate solution diets than for the mean of the sugar beet fibre and control diets. Oxalate bioavailability from sugar beet fibre was 0.7% compared with bioavailabilities of 4.5 and 6.2% for spinach and oxalate solutions, respectively. The low bioavailability of oxalate from sugar beet fibre may be attributable to its high ratio of minerals (calcium and magnesium) to oxalate, its complex fibre matrix or the loss of the soluble oxalate during processing of sugar beets.

  12. The influence of dicarboxylic acids: Oxalic acid and tartaric acid on the compressive strength of glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Ahmadi Jaya; Setyawati, Harsasi; Hamami, Murwani, Irmina Kris

    2016-03-01

    Glass ionomer cement (GIC) has limitation on the mechanical properties especially compressive strength. The change of compressive strength of GIC by adding oxalic acid and tartaric acid has been investigated. Oxalic acid and tartaric acid was added to the liquid components at concentrations of 0 - 15% (w/w). Powder component of GIC was made from optimum experimental powder glass SiO2-Al2O3-CaF2. GIC was characterized by compressive strength test, SEM-EDX and FTIR. The addition of tartaric acid to GIC has greater improvement than addition of oxalic acid. The addition of tartaric acid at 10 % (w/w) to GIC has greatest value of compressive strength.

  13. Interaction between oxalic acid and titania in aqueous ethanol dispersions.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Per; Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2013-02-15

    The charging effects resulting from adsorption of oxalic acid and oxalate anions on titania (anatase) surfaces in anhydrous or mixed water-ethanol suspensions is summarized. The suddenly enhanced electrical conductance with respect to titania free solutions has previously been explained in terms of surface-induced electrolytic dissociation (SIED) of weak acids. A recently published model has previously been found to successfully characterize the complex SIED effect. The model is evaluated experimentally by recording the conductance and pH of the dispersion and the zeta potential of the particles. The experimental results can be condensed to master curves, which reveal the major properties of the systems and facilitate further modeling of extensive experimental results. The equilibrium and transport properties of solutions and particles were related, but different mechanisms was found to be active in each case. The results suggest that at least three adsorption equilibria should be considered in order to improve the model.

  14. Natural abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soils: results from aromatic model compounds and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan G; Kotte, Karsten; Schöler, Heinz F

    2013-02-05

    Oxalic acid is the smallest dicarboxylic acid and plays an important role in soil processes (e.g., mineral weathering and metal detoxification in plants). We have first proven its abiotic formation in soils and investigated natural abiotic degradation processes based on the oxidation of soil organic matter, enhanced by Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) as hydroxyl radical suppliers. Experiments with the model compound catechol and further hydroxylated benzenes were performed to examine a common degradation pathway and to presume a general formation mechanism of oxalic acid. Two soil samples were tested for the release of oxalic acid and the potential effects of various soil parameters on oxalic acid formation. Additionally, the soil samples were treated with different soil sterilization methods to prove the oxalic acid formation under abiotic soil conditions. Different series of model experiments were conducted to determine a range of factors including Fe(3+), H(2)O(2), reaction time, pH, and chloride concentration on oxalic acid formation. Under certain conditions, catechol is degraded up to 65.6% to oxalic acid referring to carbon. In serial experiments with two soil samples, oxalic acid was produced, and the obtained results are suggestive of an abiotic degradation process. In conclusion, Fenton-like conditions with low Fe(3+) concentrations and an excess of H(2)O(2) as well as acidic conditions were required for an optimal oxalic acid formation. The presence of chloride reduced oxalic acid formation.

  15. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  16. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  17. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  18. Field Assessment of Yeast- and Oxalic Acid-generated Carbon Dioxide for Mosquito Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    FIELD ASSESSMENT OF YEAST- AND OXALIC ACID –GENERATED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR MOSQUITO SURVEILLANCE1 JAMES F. HARWOOD, ALEC G. RICHARDSON, JENNIFER A...were evaluated in order to address this capability gap: 1) an electrolyzer that converts solid oxalic acid into CO2 gas, and 2) CO2 produced by yeast...surveillance was compared to dry ice and compressed gas in Jacksonville, FL. The electrolyzed oxalic acid only slightly increased the number of

  19. Oxalic acid has an additional, detoxifying function in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heller, Annerose; Witt-Geiges, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the diseases caused by the necrotroph plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not well understood. To investigate the role of oxalic acid during infection high resolution, light-, scanning-, transmission electron microscopy and various histochemical staining methods were used. Our inoculation method allowed us to follow degradation of host plant tissue around single hyphae and to observe the reaction of host cells in direct contact with single invading hyphae. After penetration the outer epidermal cell wall matrix appeared degraded around subcuticular hyphae (12-24 hpi). Calcium oxalate crystals were detected in advanced (36-48 hpi) and late (72 hpi) infection stages, but not in early stages. In early infection stages, surprisingly, no toxic effect of oxalic acid eventually secreted by S. sclerotiorum was observed. As oxalic acid is a common metabolite in plants, we propose that attacked host cells are able to metabolize oxalic acid in the early infection stage and translocate it to their vacuoles where it is stored as calcium oxalate. The effects, observed on healthy tissue upon external application of oxalic acid to non-infected, living tissue and cell wall degradation of dead host cells starting at the inner side of the walls support this idea. The results indicate that oxalic acid concentrations in the early stage of infection stay below the toxic level. In plant and fungi oxalic acid/calcium oxalate plays an important role in calcium regulation. Oxalic acid likely could quench calcium ions released during cell wall breakdown to protect growing hyphae from toxic calcium concentrations in the infection area. As calcium antimonate-precipitates were found in vesicles of young hyphae, we propose that calcium is translocated to the older parts of hyphae and detoxified by building non-toxic, stable oxalate crystals. We propose an infection model where oxalic acid plays a detoxifying role in late infection stages.

  20. Oxalic acid enhances Cr tolerance in the accumulating plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dunqiu; Zhang, Xuehong; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Yinian; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Aili; Jin, Xiaodan

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between oxalic acid and Cr tolerance in an accumulating plant Leersia hexandra Swartz. The plants grown in hydroponics were exposed to Cr at 0, 5, 30, and 60 mg/L (without oxalate), and 0, 40, and 80 mg/L concentrations of Cr (with 70 mg/L oxalate or without oxalate). The results showed that more than 50% of Cr in shoots was found in HCl-extracted fraction (chromium oxalate) when the plants were exposed to Cr. Cr supply significantly increased oxalate concentration in shoots of L. hexandra (p < 0.05), but did not increase oxalate concentration in roots. Under 80 mg/L Cr stress, electrolyte leakages from roots and shoots with oxalate treatment were both significantly lower than those without oxalate treatment (p < 0.05), indicating exogenous oxalate supply alleviated Cr-induced membrane damage. Oxalate added to growth solution ameliorated reduction of biomass and inhibition of root growth induced by Cr, which demonstrated that application of oxalate helped L. hexandra tolerate Cr stress. However, oxalate supply did not affect the Cr concentrations both in roots and shoots of L. hexandra. These results suggest that oxalic acid may act as an important chelator and takes part in detoxifying chromium in internal process of L. hexandra.

  1. Effect of oxalic acid on Nosema ceranae infection.

    PubMed

    Nanetti, Antonio; Rodriguez-García, Cristina; Meana, Aránzazu; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano

    2015-10-01

    Nosema ceranae is a honey bee pathogen parasitizing the ventricular epithelium and potentially causing colony death. The effect of 0.25 M oxalic acid solution administered to the bees in the form of sugar syrup was determined in laboratory and field trials. The spore numbers in an 8-day laboratory experiment were significantly lower when AO was administered (treated: 11.86 ± 0.94 s.e. × 10^6; untreated: 30.64 ± 0.31 s.e.x10^6). When administered in autumn to free flying colonies twice, 3 weeks apart, the infection prevalence decreased in young (relative reduction of 53.8% ± 6.5 s.e.) and old bees (relative reduction of 44.4% ± 6.0 s.e.). Meanwhile increased prevalence in all the controls was detected (young and old bees: relative increase of 45.7% ± 22.8 s.e. and 10.2% ± 5.9 s.e., respectively). While all the treated colonies overwintered correctly, the untreated ones did not (3 out of 5 were dead). In the absence of commercial products approved in several countries to control nosemosis, oxalic acid syrup appears promising in the development of alternative management strategies.

  2. The fluorimetric determination of oxalic acid in blood and other biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Zarembski, P. M.; Hodgkinson, A.

    1965-01-01

    1. Oxalic acid is separated from interfering substances by extraction with tri-n-butyl phosphate followed by co-precipitation with calcium sulphate. The precipitated oxalic acid is then reduced to glyoxylic acid, which is coupled with resorcinol to form a coloured fluorescent complex. 2. The spectrofluorometric method described is sensitive and highly specific, the minimum detectable amount of oxalic acid being 0·9μmole under the recommended conditions. 3. The concentration of oxalic acid in blood from 15 normal adults was 200–320μg./100ml. For serum the range was 135–280μg./100ml. The urinary excretion of oxalic acid by 60 normal adults on a normal diet was 9·0–28·5mg./24hr. PMID:5862411

  3. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 μg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 microg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Oxalic acid biosynthesis is encoded by an operon in Burkholderia glumae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the biosynthesis of oxalic acid is known to occur in a number of bacteria, the mechanism(s) regulating its production remains largely unknown. To date, there is no report on the identification of an oxalic acid biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria. In an attempt to identify such a gene...

  6. Effect of oxalic acid treatment on sediment arsenic concentrations and lability under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Bostick, Benjamin C; Mailloux, Brian J; Ross, James M; Chillrud, Steven N

    2016-07-05

    Oxalic acid enhances arsenic (As) mobilization by dissolving As host minerals and competing for sorption sites. Oxalic acid amendments thus could potentially improve the efficiency of widely used pump-and-treat (P&T) remediation. This study investigates the effectiveness of oxalic acid on As mobilization from contaminated sediments with different As input sources and redox conditions, and examines whether residual sediment As after oxalic acid treatment can still be reductively mobilized. Batch extraction, column, and microcosm experiments were performed in the laboratory using sediments from the Dover Municipal Landfill and the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund sites. Oxalic acid mobilized As from both Dover and Vineland sediments, although the efficiency rates were different. The residual As in both Dover and Vineland sediments after oxalic acid treatment was less vulnerable to microbial reduction than before the treatment. Oxalic acid could thus improve the efficiency of P&T. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the Vineland sediment samples still contained reactive Fe(III) minerals after oxalic acid treatment, and thus released more As into solution under reducing conditions than the treated Dover samples. Therefore, the efficacy of enhanced P&T must consider sediment Fe mineralogy when evaluating its overall potential for remediating groundwater As.

  7. Biosynthesis of L-ascorbic acid and conversion of carbons 1 and 2 of L-ascorbic acid to oxalic acid occurs within individual calcium oxalate crystal idioblasts.

    PubMed

    Kostman, T A; Tarlyn, N M; Loewus, F A; Franceschi, V R

    2001-02-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various (14)C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of (14)C into calcium oxalate crystals. [(14)C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-(14)C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-(14)C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (L-[1-(14)C]galactose; D-[1-(14)C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, D-[1-(14)C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > L-galactose > D-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via D-mannose and L-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments.

  8. The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids on threo-Ds-isocitric acid production from rapeseed oil by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Allayarov, Ramil K; Lunina, Julia N; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids, the inhibitors of the isocitrate lyase, on the production of isocitric acid by the wild strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 grown in the medium containing rapeseed oil was studied. In the presence of oxalic and itaconic acids, strain Y. lipolytica accumulated in the medium isocitric acid (70.0 and 82.7 g/L, respectively) and citric acid (23.0 and 18.4 g/L, respectively). In control experiment, when the inhibitors were not added to the medium, the strain accumulated isocitric and citric acids at concentrations of 62.0 and 28.0 g/L, respectively. Thus, the use of the oxalic and itaconic acids as additives to the medium is a simple and convenient method of isocitric acid production with a minimum content of citric acid.

  9. Crystal structure of di­methyl­ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemi(oxalic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Diallo, Waly; Gueye, Ndongo; Crochet, Aurélien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of the title salt, Me2NH2 +·HC2O4 −·0.5H2C2O4, were isolated as a side product from the reaction involving Me2NH, H2C2O4 and Sn(n-Bu)3Cl in a 1:2 ratio in methanol or by the reaction of the (Me2NH2)2C2O4 salt and Sn(CH3)3Cl in a 2:1 ratio in ethanol. The asymmetric unit comprises a di­methyl­ammonium cation (Me2NH2 +), an hydrogenoxalate anion (HC2O4 −), and half a mol­ecule of oxalic acid (H2C2O4) situated about an inversion center. From a supra­molecular point of view, the three components inter­act together via hydrogen bonding. The Me2NH2 + cations and the HC2O4 − anions are in close proximity through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds, while the HC2O4 − anions are organized into infinite chains via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, propagating along the a-axis direction. In addition, the oxalic acid (H2C2O4) mol­ecules play the role of connectors between these chains. Both the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of each diacid are involved in four inter­molecular inter­actions with two Me2NH2 + and two HC2O4 − ions of four distinct polymeric chains, via two N—H⋯O and two O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The resulting mol­ecular assembly can be viewed as a two-dimensional bilayer-like arrangement lying parallel to (010), and reinforced by a C—H⋯O hydrogen bond. PMID:25995858

  10. The control of Varroa destructor using oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Gregorc, Ales; Planinc, I

    2002-05-01

    Twenty-four honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were used to monitor the efficacy of a solution of 2.9% oxalic acid (OA) and 31.9% sugar against the mite Varroa destructor. Mite mortality was established prior to and after OA treatments, which were conducted in August and September. The treatments resulted in 37% mite mortality as opposed to 1.11% in the controls. OA treatment conducted in September on previously untreated colonies resulted in 25% mite mortality. OA treatments in October and November resulted in approximately 97% mite mortality. These results suggest that OA is effective during the broodless period and less effective when applied to colonies with capped broods. The possible use of OA against the Varroa mite in honeybee colonies as an alternative to routine chemical treatments is discussed.

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF USING DILUTE OXALIC ACID TO DISSOLVEHIGH LEVEL WASTE IRON BASED SLUDGE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E

    2008-07-11

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken South Carolina, there is a crucial need to remove residual quantities of highly radioactive iron-based sludge from large select underground storage tanks (e.g., 19,000 liters of sludge per tank), in order to support tank closure. The use of oxalic acid is planned to dissolve the residual sludge, hence, helping in the removal. Based on rigorous testing, primarily using 4 and 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions, it was concluded that the more concentrated the acid, the greater the amount of residual sludge that would be dissolved; hence, a baseline technology on using 8 wt% oxalic acid was developed. In stark contrast to the baseline technology, reports from other industries suggest that the dissolution will most effectively occur at 1 wt% oxalic acid (i.e., maintaining the pH near 2). The driver for using less oxalic acid is that less (i.e., moles) would decrease the severity of the downstream impacts (i.e., required oxalate solids removal efforts). To determine the initial feasibility of using 1 wt% acid to dissolve > 90% of the sludge solids, about 19,000 liters of representative sludge was modeled using about 530,000 liters of 0 to 8 wt% oxalic acid solutions. With the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium based software results showing that 1 wt% oxalic acid could theoretically work, simulant dissolution testing was initiated. For the dissolution testing, existing simulant was obtained, and an approximate 20 liter test rig was built. Multiple batch dissolutions of both wet and air-dried simulant were performed. Overall, the testing showed that dilute oxalic acid dissolved a greater fraction of the stimulant and resulted in a significantly larger acid effectiveness (i.e., grams of sludge dissolved/mole of acid) than the baseline technology. With the potential effectiveness confirmed via simulant testing, additional testing, including radioactive sludge testing, is planned.

  12. Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 containing an artificial oxalate operon and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin secretes oxalic acid and solubilizes rock phosphate in acidic alfisols.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kavita; Kumar, Chanchal; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate secretion was achieved in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by incorporation of genes encoding Aspergillus niger oxaloacetate acetyl hydrolase (oah), Fomitopsis plaustris oxalate transporter (FpOAR) and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) in various combinations. Pf (pKCN2) transformant containing oah alone accumulated 19 mM oxalic acid intracellularly but secreted 1.2 mM. However, in the presence of an artificial oxalate operon containing oah and FpOAR genes in plasmid pKCN4, Pf (pKCN4) secreted 13.6 mM oxalate in the medium while 3.6 mM remained inside. This transformant solubilized 509 μM of phosphorus from rock phosphate in alfisol which is 4.5 fold higher than the Pf (pKCN2) transformant. Genomic integrants of P. fluorescens (Pf int1 and Pf int2) containing artificial oxalate operon (plac-FpOAR-oah) and artificial oxalate gene cluster (plac-FpOAR-oah, vgb, egfp) secreted 4.8 mM and 5.4 mM oxalic acid, released 329 μM and 351 μM P, respectively, in alfisol. The integrants showed enhanced root colonization, improved growth and increased P content of Vigna radiata plants. This study demonstrates oxalic acid secretion in P. fluorescens by incorporation of an artificial operon constituted of genes for oxalate synthesis and transport, which imparts mineral phosphate solubilizing ability to the organism leading to enhanced growth and P content of V. radiata in alfisol soil.

  13. Determination of trace amount of oxalic acid with zirconium(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) by spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou

    2008-11-01

    A novel method is proposed for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in the present article. In 1.0 M hydrochloric acid medium, oxalic acid can react with the zirconium(IV) in Zr(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) complex and replaces the DBS-arsenazo to produce a hyperchromic effect at 520 nm. The hyperchromic degree is proportional to the concentration of the oxalic acid added over a defined range. Based on this property, a new method for the spectrophotometric determination of trace oxalic acid was developed. Beer's law is held over the concentration range of 9.0 × 10 -6 to 5.0 × 10 -4 M for oxalic acid with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The apparent molar absorptivity of the method is ɛ520 nm = 1.16 × 10 3 L mol -1 cm -1 and the detection limit for oxalic acid is 0.815 μg/mL. The developed method was directly applied to the determination of oxalic acid in tomato samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Determination of trace amount of oxalic acid with zirconium(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) by spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou

    2008-11-15

    A novel method is proposed for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in the present article. In 1.0M hydrochloric acid medium, oxalic acid can react with the zirconium(IV) in Zr(IV)-(DBS-arsenazo) complex and replaces the DBS-arsenazo to produce a hyperchromic effect at 520 nm. The hyperchromic degree is proportional to the concentration of the oxalic acid added over a defined range. Based on this property, a new method for the spectrophotometric determination of trace oxalic acid was developed. Beer's law is held over the concentration range of 9.0 x 10(-6) to 5.0 x 10(-4)M for oxalic acid with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The apparent molar absorptivity of the method is epsilon520 nm = 1.16 x 10(3)L mol(-1)cm(-1) and the detection limit for oxalic acid is 0.815 microg/mL. The developed method was directly applied to the determination of oxalic acid in tomato samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Oxalic acid biosynthesis is encoded by an operon in Burkholderia glumae.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A; He, Cixin

    2010-03-01

    Although the biosynthesis of oxalic acid is known to occur in a number of bacteria, the mechanism(s) regulating its production remains largely unknown. To date, there is no report on the identification of an oxalic acid biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria. In an attempt to identify such a gene(s), a mutant screen was conducted using the simple oxalic acid-producing phytopathogenic bacterium, Burkholderia glumae. Four mutants that failed to produce oxalic acid were isolated from a transposon-mutagenized B. glumae library and named Burkholderia oxalate defective (Bod)1. DNA sequence analysis revealed that each mutant contained an insertion event at different sites in the same ORF, which we referred to as the oxalate biosynthetic component (obc)A locus. Complementation of the Bod1 mutant with the obcA gene, however, resulted only in a partial restoration of the oxalic acid-producing phenotype. Further complementation studies utilizing a larger DNA fragment encompassing the obcA locus coupled with deletion mutagenesis led to the identification of another ORF that we named the obcB locus, which was essential for higher levels of oxalic acid production. Transcript analysis indicated that both obcA and obcB are coexpressed and encoded on a single polycistron message.

  16. Influence of oxalic acid formed on the degradation of phenol by Fenton reagent.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Emi

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this work is to examine the influence of oxalic acid formed on the degradation of phenol by Fenton reagent. Oxalic acid formed at initial stage within 30 min significantly suppresses the reduction of ferric ion, thus terminating degradation reaction. The yield of oxalic acid is dependent on the amount of ferrous ion dosed since the minimal amount of oxalic acid is formed after the degradation reaction terminates. Mineralization of phenol by Fenton reagent stagnates after 120 min under the conditions used in this study. The reason why the mineralization stagnated can be assumed to be following two mechanisms other than the depletion of H(2)O(2). In the case where a small amount of ferrous ions is dosed, the reduction of ferric ions is minimal by oxalic acid formed. In the case where a large amount of ferrous ions is dosed, the amount of degradable organic compounds is insufficient owing to preferential conversion to oxalic acid. The mineralization can be enhanced by the intermittent dosing of ferrous ions, which facilitates the suppression of oxalic acid formation during the degradation by Fenton reagent.

  17. [Catalytic ozonation by ceramic honeycomb for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Ma, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Comparative experiments for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution were carried out in the three processes of ozonation alone, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ceramic honeycomb adsorption. The results show that the degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, ozonation alone and ceramic honeycomb adsorption systems are 37.6%, 2.2% and 0.4%, and the presence of ceramic honeycomb catalyst significantly improves the degradation rate of oxalic acid compared to the results from non-catalytic ozonation and adsorption. With the addition of tert-butanol, the degradation rates of oxalic acid in catalytic ozonation system decrease by 24.1%, 29.0% and 30.1%, respectively, at the concentration of 5, 10 and 15 mg x L(-1). This phenomenon indicates that ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution follows the mechanism of *OH oxidation, namely the heterogeneous surface of catalyst enhances the initiation of *OH. The results of TOC analysis demonstrate that the process of ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation can achieve the complete mineralization level without the formation of intermediary degradation products. The experimental results suggest that the reaction temperature has positive relationship with the degradation rate of oxalic acid. The degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation system are 16.4%, 37.6%, 61.3% and 68.2%, at the respective reaction temperature of 10, 20, 30 and 40 degrees C.

  18. Effect of waters of crystallization on terahertz spectra: anhydrous oxalic acid and its dihydrate.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Korter, Timothy M

    2010-07-08

    Oxalic acid and oxalic acid dihydrate were studied using terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory (DFT) in the spectral range 10-100 cm(-1). The size of the oxalic acid molecule and its limited internal degrees of freedom make it ideal for evaluating the performance of computational methods for the structural and dynamical simulation of strongly hydrogen-bonded solids. Calculations of the solid-state structures and terahertz spectra of oxalic acid and oxalic acid dihydrate were performed using the hybrid B3LYP and B3PW91 and the nonhybrid BLYP and PW91 density functionals employing the 6-311G(2d,2p) basis set. When these simulations were compared to the experimental spectra of the oxalic acid solids, a constant overprediction of the dihydrate frequencies was observed in contrast to the results of the anhydrous system. This change in behavior is connected to the nature of the vibrational motions being accessed. The primary molecular motion contributions to the terahertz vibrations of oxalic acid dihydrate were found to originate in the external motions of the cocrystallized H(2)O molecules. The observed overestimation of the vibrational energies in the simulated terahertz spectra is attributed to increased anharmonicity of the vibrational motions in the dihydrate system versus the anhydrous, resulting from weaker hydrogen bonding through the networked water molecules.

  19. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio.

  20. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface.

  1. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by TiO2 in the presence of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Pengyi

    2011-09-15

    Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of perfluoroocatanoic acid (PFOA) by TiO(2) under 254 nm UV light was investigated. Adding oxalic acid as a hole-scavenger significantly accelerated PFOA decomposition under nitrogen atmosphere. Fluoride ion, formic acid and six shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) bearing C(2)-C(7) were identified as intermediates. When using perchloric acid (HClO(4)) as a replacement of oxalic acid to maintain the same pH of the reaction solution, PFOA did not decomposition efficiently. Compared with oxalic acid, potassium iodide (KI, another hole-scavenger) also led to a slower PFOA decomposition, while the addition of an electron acceptor (potassium persulfate, K(2)S(2)O(8)) obviously inhibited PFOA decomposition. This suggested that oxalic acid played more than one role in PFOA decomposition rather than simply providing acidity and acting as a hole-scavenger. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements confirmed the existence of carboxyl anion radicals (CO(2)(-)) in the photocatalytic process, which was a result of the reaction between oxalic acid and photogenerated hole. These findings indicated that PFOA decomposition was primarily induced by CO(2)(-) radicals, although photogenerated electron was also conducive to PFOA decomposition. A possible mechanism for PFOA decomposition was proposed.

  2. Modeling aqueous ozone/UV process using oxalic acid as probe chemical.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Gurol, Mirat D

    2005-10-15

    A kinetic model that describes the removal of organic pollutants by an ozone/UV process is described. Oxalic acid, which reacts with a very low rate constant with ozone and relatively high rate constant with hydroxyl radical (OH*), was used as the probe chemical to model the process. The model was verified by experimental data on concentrations of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H202) under various experimental conditions, i.e., ozone gas dosage, UV light intensity, and varying oxalic acid concentrations.

  3. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of ultra trace amounts of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, A A; Kazemzadeh, A

    2000-07-01

    A new simple, sensitive and rapid catalytic-spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid has been described based on its catalytic effect on the redox reaction between dichromate and Brilliant cresyl blue in acidic media by means of a flow injection analysis method. The color change of Brilliant cresyl blue due to its oxidation was monitored spectrophotometrically at 625 nm. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.020-4.70 microg/mL oxalic acid with a limit of detection 0.005 microg/mL of oxalic acid. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 0.020 microg/mL and 0.900 microg/mL was 2.2% and 1.7%, respectively. No serious interference was identified. Oxalic acid was determined in wastewater and in spinach by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  4. Acute renal failure and metabolic acidosis due to oxalic acid intoxication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Rie; Morita, Seiji; Aoki, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2011-12-20

    Most of the reports of oxalic acid intoxication are in cases of ethylene glycol intoxication. These symptoms are known to be central nerve system manifestations, cardiopulmonary manifestations and acute renal failure. There have been only a few reports of direct oxalic acid intoxication. However, there have been a few recent reports of oxalic acid intoxication due to the ingestion of star fruit and ascorbic acid. We herein report the case of a patient with acute renal failure and metabolic acidosis caused directly by consumption of oxalic acid. During the initial examination by the physician at our hospital, the patient presented with tachypnea, a precordinal burning sensation, nausea and metabolic acidosis. After admission, the patient developed renal failure and anion gap high metabolic acidosis, but did not develop any CNS or cardio-pulmonary manifestations in the clinical course. The patient benefitted symptomatically from hemodialysis.

  5. Enhanced Nitrogen Availability in Karst Ecosystems by Oxalic Acid Release in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fujing; Liang, Yueming; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Kelin

    2016-01-01

    In karst ecosystems, a high level of CaCO3 enhances the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) and causes nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) limitation in plants. Oxalic acid has been suggested to be involved in the nutrient-acquisition strategy of plants because its addition can temporarily relieve nutrient limitation. Therefore, understanding how oxalic acid drives N availability may help support successful vegetation restoration in the karst ecosystems of southwest China. We tested a model suggested by Clarholm et al. (2015) where oxalate reacts with Ca bridges in SOM, thus exposing previously protected areas to enzymatic attacks in a way that releases N for local uptake. We studied the effects of oxalic acid, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) on potential N mineralization rates in rhizosphere soils of four plant species (two shrubs and two trees) in karst areas. The results showed that rhizosphere soils of shrubs grown on formerly deforested land had significantly lower oxalic acid concentrations and NAG activity than that of trees in a 200-year-old forest. The levels of MBC in rhizosphere soils of shrubs were significantly lower than those of trees in the growing season, but the measure of shrubs and trees were similar in the non-growing season; the potential N mineralization rates showed a reverse pattern. Positive relationships were found among oxalic acid, MBC, NAG activity, and potential N mineralization rates for both shrubs and trees. This indicated that oxalic acid, microbes, and NAG may enhance N availability for acquisition by plants. Path analysis showed that oxalic acid enhanced potential N mineralization rates indirectly through inducing microbes and NAG activities. We found that the exudation of oxalic acid clearly provides an important mechanism that allows plants to enhance nutrient acquisition in karst ecosystems. PMID:27252713

  6. Enhanced Nitrogen Availability in Karst Ecosystems by Oxalic Acid Release in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fujing; Liang, Yueming; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Kelin

    2016-01-01

    In karst ecosystems, a high level of CaCO3 enhances the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) and causes nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) limitation in plants. Oxalic acid has been suggested to be involved in the nutrient-acquisition strategy of plants because its addition can temporarily relieve nutrient limitation. Therefore, understanding how oxalic acid drives N availability may help support successful vegetation restoration in the karst ecosystems of southwest China. We tested a model suggested by Clarholm et al. (2015) where oxalate reacts with Ca bridges in SOM, thus exposing previously protected areas to enzymatic attacks in a way that releases N for local uptake. We studied the effects of oxalic acid, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) on potential N mineralization rates in rhizosphere soils of four plant species (two shrubs and two trees) in karst areas. The results showed that rhizosphere soils of shrubs grown on formerly deforested land had significantly lower oxalic acid concentrations and NAG activity than that of trees in a 200-year-old forest. The levels of MBC in rhizosphere soils of shrubs were significantly lower than those of trees in the growing season, but the measure of shrubs and trees were similar in the non-growing season; the potential N mineralization rates showed a reverse pattern. Positive relationships were found among oxalic acid, MBC, NAG activity, and potential N mineralization rates for both shrubs and trees. This indicated that oxalic acid, microbes, and NAG may enhance N availability for acquisition by plants. Path analysis showed that oxalic acid enhanced potential N mineralization rates indirectly through inducing microbes and NAG activities. We found that the exudation of oxalic acid clearly provides an important mechanism that allows plants to enhance nutrient acquisition in karst ecosystems.

  7. Oxalic acid-induced modifications of postglycation activity of lysozyme and its glycoforms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong Ying; Yaylayan, Varoujan A; Yeboah, Faustinus

    2010-05-26

    The role of selected carboxylic acids and their potential to influence the glycation pattern and the enzymatic activity of lysozyme using glucose and ribose were investigated independently of the pH of the reaction medium. The model systems were incubated with and without selected carboxylic acids (maleic, acetic, oxalic, and citraconic) at 50 degrees C for 12 or 24 and 48 h at constant pH of 6.5. The effect of carboxylic acids on the glycation of lysozyme was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and by the measurement of the residual enzyme activity of lysozyme in the glycated samples. Of the carboxylic acids evaluated, oxalic acid showed the highest antiglycation activity. The residual lysozyme activity in both oxalic acid-glucose and oxalic acid-ribose systems was >80% compared with 46 and 36% activity in the controls of glucose and ribose systems, respectively. On the other hand, maleic, acetic, and citraconic acid containing systems with both sugars did not exhibit any enhanced enzyme activity relative to the controls. The results of this study show that oxalic acid was unique among the carboxylic acids evaluated with respect to its ability to interact with sugars and inhibit glycation.

  8. Downscaled anodic oxidation process for aluminium in oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, M.; Morgenstern, R.; Kuhn, D.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Schubert, A.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing multi-functionality of parts and assemblies in several fields of engineering demands, amongst others, highly functionalised surfaces. For the different applications, on the one hand, there is a need to scale up surface modification processes originating in the nano- and micro-scale. On the other hand, conventional macro-scale surface refinement methods offer a huge potential for application in the said nano- and micro-scale. The anodic oxidation process, which is established especially for aluminium and its alloys, allows the formation of oxide ceramic layers on the surface. The build-up of an oxide ceramic coating comes along with altered chemical, tribological and electrical surface properties. As a basis for further investigations regarding the use of the anodic oxidation process for micro-scale-manufacturing, the scale effects of oxalic acid anodising on commercially pure aluminium as well as on the AlZn5.5MgCu alloy are addressed in the present work. The focus is on the amount of oxide formed during a potentiostatic process in relation to the exchanged amount of charge. Further, the hardness of the coating as an integral measure to assess the porous oxide structure is approached by nano-indentation technique.

  9. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-05

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  10. A biogenic source of oxalic acid and glyoxal in marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, C.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of oxalic acid aerosol measurements samples performed at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20'N, 9°54'W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48'S, 77°34'E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 μm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 μm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric Environment, 37, 2423-2427, 2003. [2] Kawamura & Sakaguchi, J. Geophys. Res., 104, D3, 3501-3509, 1999. [3] Fu et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, D15303, doi:10.1029/2007JD009505, 2008 [4] Sinreich et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 15075-15107, 2010.

  11. Availability to rats of iron from spinach: Effects of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Van Campen, D R; Welch, R M

    1980-08-01

    The availability to rats of iron from two varieties of spinach was determined. Also, the absorption of Fe was compared between FeCl3 and Fe-oxalate and the effects of adding 0.75% oxalate to the diet were determined. Absorption of iron from both varieties of spinach was comparable to that from FeCl3 and the iron was equally available from Fe-oxalate and FeCl3. The addition of 0.75% oxalic acid to the diet did not depress iron absorption and, if anything, appeared to enhance iron utilization by rats.

  12. Alleviation of chilling injury in tomato fruit by exogenous application of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Yin, Fei; Song, Lijun; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The effects of oxalic acid on the development of chilling injury (CI), energy metabolism and lycopene metabolism in tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were investigated. Mature green tomatoes were dipped in 10mmoll(-1) oxalic acid (OA) solution for 10min at 25°C. Tomatoes were subsequently stored at 4±0.5°C for 20days before being transferred to 25°C for 12days. Oxalic acid treatment apparently alleviated CI development and membrane damage; maintained higher levels of ATP and ADP; increased activities of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) and H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (H(+)-ATPase); and elevated lycopene accumulation associated with the upregulation of PSY1 and ZDS expression in tomatoes during a period at room temperature following exposure to chilling stress. Thus, oxalic acid treatment benefited the control of CI and the maintenance of fruit quality in tomatoes stored for long periods (approximately 32days).

  13. The combination of oxalic acid with power ultrasound fully degrades chrysotile asbestos fibres.

    PubMed

    Turci, Francesco; Tomatis, Maura; Mantegna, Stefano; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Fubini, Bice

    2007-10-01

    The simultaneous action of power ultrasound and oxalic acid, as a chelating agent, rapidly converts chrysotile asbestos into water soluble material and a non-asbestos debris, not classifiable as hazardous under worldwide safety regulations.

  14. The pathogenic white-rot fungus Heterobasidion parviporum responds to spruce xylem defense by enhanced production of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Kvaalen, Harald; Fongen, Monica; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Clarke, Nicholas; Solheim, Halvor; Hietala, Ari M

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen challenge of tree sapwood induces the formation of reaction zones with antimicrobial properties such as elevated pH and cation content. Many fungi lower substrate pH by secreting oxalic acid, its conjugate base oxalate being a reductant as well as a chelating agent for cations. To examine the role of oxalic acid in pathogenicity of white-rot fungi, we conducted spatial quantification of oxalate, transcript levels of related fungal genes, and element concentrations in heartwood of Norway spruce challenged naturally by Heterobasidion parviporum. In the pathogen-compromised reaction zone, upregulation of an oxaloacetase gene generating oxalic acid coincided with oxalate and cation accumulation and presence of calcium oxalate crystals. The colonized inner heartwood showed trace amounts of oxalate. Moreover, fungal exposure to the reaction zone under laboratory conditions induced oxaloacetase and oxalate accumulation, whereas heartwood induced a decarboxylase gene involved in degradation of oxalate. The excess level of cations in defense xylem inactivates pathogen-secreted oxalate through precipitation and, presumably, only after cation neutralization can oxalic acid participate in lignocellulose degradation. This necessitates enhanced production of oxalic acid by H. parviporum. This study is the first to determine the true influence of white-rot fungi on oxalate crystal formation in tree xylem.

  15. Old acid, new chemistry. Negative metal anions generated from alkali metal oxalates and others.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sharon; Renaud, Justin; Holmes, John L; Mayer, Paul M

    2010-11-01

    A brief search in Sci Finder for oxalic acid and oxalates will reward the researcher with a staggering 129,280 hits. However, the generation of alkali metal and silver anions via collision-induced dissociation of the metal oxalate anion has not been previously been reported, though Tian and coworkers recently investigated the dissociation of lithium oxalate. The exothermic decomposition of alkali metal oxalate anion to carbon dioxide in the collision cell of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer leaves no place for the electron to reside, resulting in a double electron-transfer reaction to produce an alkali metal anion. This reaction is facilitated by the negative electron affinity of carbon dioxide and, as such, the authors believe that metal oxalates are potentially unique in this respect. The observed dissociation reactions for collision with argon gas (1.7-1.8 × 10(-3) mbar) for oxalic acid and various alkali metal oxalates are discussed and summarized. Silver oxalate is also included to demonstrate the propensity of this system to generate transition-metal anions, as well.

  16. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  17. Evaluation of Pt Alloys as Electrocatalysts for Oxalic Acid Oxidation: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    DOE PAGES

    Perry, Albert; Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; ...

    2016-07-14

    Here in this study we combined experimental approaches and density functional theory to evaluate novel platinum-based materials as electrocatalysts for oxalic acid oxidation. Several Pt alloys, PtSn (1:1), PtSn (19:1), PtRu (1:4), PtRuSn (5:4:1), and PtRhSn (3:1:4), were synthetized using sacrificial support method and tested for oxidation of oxalic acid at pH 4. It was shown that PtSn (1:1) and PtRu (1:4) have higher mass activity relative to Pt. These two materials along with Pt and one of the least active alloys, PtSn (19:1), were further analyzed for the oxidation of oxalic acid at different pHs. The results show thatmore » all samples tested followed an identical trend of decreased onset potential with increased pH and increased catalytic activity with decreased pH. Density functional theory was further utilized to gain a fundamental knowledge about the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt, PtSn (1:1), and PtRu (1:4). In conclusion, the results of the calculations along with the experimentally observed dependence of generated currents on the oxalic acid concentration indicate that the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt proceeds without the participation of surface oxidizing species, while on Pt alloys it involves their participation.« less

  18. Evaluation of Pt Alloys as Electrocatalysts for Oxalic Acid Oxidation: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Albert; Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Neumman, Anica; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-07-14

    Here in this study we combined experimental approaches and density functional theory to evaluate novel platinum-based materials as electrocatalysts for oxalic acid oxidation. Several Pt alloys, PtSn (1:1), PtSn (19:1), PtRu (1:4), PtRuSn (5:4:1), and PtRhSn (3:1:4), were synthetized using sacrificial support method and tested for oxidation of oxalic acid at pH 4. It was shown that PtSn (1:1) and PtRu (1:4) have higher mass activity relative to Pt. These two materials along with Pt and one of the least active alloys, PtSn (19:1), were further analyzed for the oxidation of oxalic acid at different pHs. The results show that all samples tested followed an identical trend of decreased onset potential with increased pH and increased catalytic activity with decreased pH. Density functional theory was further utilized to gain a fundamental knowledge about the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt, PtSn (1:1), and PtRu (1:4). In conclusion, the results of the calculations along with the experimentally observed dependence of generated currents on the oxalic acid concentration indicate that the mechanism of oxalic acid oxidation on Pt proceeds without the participation of surface oxidizing species, while on Pt alloys it involves their participation.

  19. Oxalic acid: a signal molecule for fungus-feeding bacteria of the genus Collimonas?

    PubMed

    Rudnick, M B; van Veen, J A; de Boer, W

    2015-10-01

    Mycophagous (=fungus feeding) soil bacteria of the genus Collimonas have been shown to colonize and grow on hyphae of different fungal hosts as the only source of energy and carbon. The ability to exploit fungal nutrient resources might require a strategy for collimonads to sense fungi in the soil matrix. Oxalic acid is ubiquitously secreted by soil fungi, serving different purposes. In this study, we investigated the possibility that collimonads might use oxalic acid secretion to localize a fungal host and move towards it. We first confirmed earlier indications that collimonads have a very limited ability to use oxalic acid as growth substrate. In a second step, with using different assays, we show that oxalic acid triggers bacterial movement in such a way that accumulation of cells can be expected at micro-sites with high free oxalic acid concentrations. Based on these observations we propose that oxalic acid functions as a signal molecule to guide collimonads to hyphal tips, the mycelial zones that are most sensitive for mycophagous bacterial attack.

  20. [Research on Raman spectra of oxalic acid during decarboxylation under high temperature and high pressure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-yuan; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-03-01

    The present research studied the thermal stability of oxalic acid under high temperature and pressure and its in-situ transformation by Raman spectroscopy using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. Raman spectra allow the detection of ionic and covalent atomic aggregates through the acquisition of vibrational spectra that are characteristic of their structures and molecular bond types. The result showed that there was no change in characteristic vibrational Raman peaks of oxalic acid in the low-temperature stage. With the increase in temperature and pressure, the characteristic vibrational Raman peaks of oxalic acid became weaker and the peaks disappeared at a certain high temperature, and decarboxylation happened. Oxalic acid decomposes to produce CO2 and H2, according to the reaction: C2 H2O4-2CO2 + H2. It was found that the decarboxylation was highly related with pressure and that the decarboxylation would be hindered at high pressure. Decarboxylation of oxalic acid under high temperature and pressure showed a linear relationship between temperature and pressure. The data fitting generated the formula: P(MPa) = 12. 839T(K)-5 953.7, R2 = 0.99. The molar volume change of decarboxylation of oxalic acid can be described by deltaV(cm(-3) x mol(-1)) = 16.69-0.002P (MPa) + 0.005 2T(K), R = 0.99.

  1. Role of Oxalic Acid Overexcretion in Transformations of Toxic Metal Minerals by Beauveria caledonica

    PubMed Central

    Fomina, M.; Hillier, S.; Charnock, J. M.; Melville, K.; Alexander, I. J.; Gadd, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    The fungus Beauveria caledonica was highly tolerant to toxic metals and solubilized cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc minerals, converting them into oxalates. This fungus was found to overexcrete organic acids with strong metal-chelating properties (oxalic and citric acids), suggesting that a ligand-promoted mechanism was the main mechanism of mineral dissolution. Our data also suggested that oxalic acid was the main mineral-transforming agent. Cadmium, copper, and zinc oxalates were precipitated by the fungus in the local environment and also in association with the mycelium. The presence of toxic metal minerals often led to the formation of mycelial cords, and in the presence of copper-containing minerals, these cords exhibited enhanced excretion of oxalic acid, which resulted in considerable encrustation of the cords by copper oxalate hydrate (moolooite). It was found that B. caledonica hyphae and cords were covered by a thick hydrated mucilaginous sheath which provided a microenvironment for chemical reactions, crystal deposition, and growth. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed that mycogenic metal oxalates overgrew parental fungal hyphae, leaving a labyrinth of fungal tunnels within the newly formed mineral matter. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that oxygen ligands played a major role in metal coordination within the fungal biomass during the accumulation of mobilized toxic metals by B. caledonica mycelium; these ligands were carboxylic groups in copper phosphate-containing medium and phosphate groups in pyromorphite-containing medium. PMID:15640211

  2. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2011-10-20

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia mallei. The discovered gene was named oxalate biosynthetic component (obc)1. Complementation of Burkholderia oxalate defective (Bod)1, a Burkholderia glumae mutant that lacks expression of a functional oxalic acid biosynthetic operon, revealed that the obc1 was able to rescue the no oxalate mutant phenotype. This single gene rescue is in contrast to the situation found in B. glumae which required the expression of two genes, obcA and obcB, to achieve complementation. Enzyme assays showed that even though the two Burkholderia species differed in the number of genes required to encode a functional enzyme, both catalyzed the same acyl-CoA dependent biosynthetic reaction. In addition, mutagenesis studies suggested a similar domain structure of the assembled oxalate biosynthetic enzymes whether encoded by one or two genes.

  3. Comparison of sulfuric and oxalic acid anodizing for preparation of thermal control coatings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong G.; Watcher, John M.; Smith, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of thermal control surfaces, which maintain stable solar absorptivity and infrared emissivity over long periods, is challenging due to severe conditions in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Some candidate coatings are second-surface silver-coated Teflon; second-surface, silvered optical solar reflectors made of glass or quartz; and anodized aluminum. Sulfuric acid anodized and oxalic acid anodized aluminum was evaluated under simulated LEO conditions. Oxalic acid anodizing shows promise of greater stability in LEO over long missions, such as the 30 years planned for the Space Station. However, sulfuric acid anodizing shows lower solar absorptivity.

  4. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  5. Acetate induced enhancement of photocatalytic hydrogen peroxide production from oxalic acid and dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Nomura, Akifumi; Miyahigashi, Takamitsu; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-05-09

    The addition of acetate ion to an O2-saturated mixed solution of acetonitrile and water containing oxalic acid as a reductant and 2-phenyl-4-(1-naphthyl)quinolinium ion (QuPh(+)-NA) as a photocatalyst dramatically enhanced the turnover number of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. In this photocatalytic H2O2 production, a base is required to facilitate deprotonation of oxalic acid forming oxalate dianion, which acts as an actual electron donor, whereas a Brønsted acid is also necessary to protonate O2(•-) for production of H2O2 by disproportionation. The addition of acetate ion to a reaction solution facilitates both the deprotonation of oxalic acid and the protonation of O2(•-) owing to a pH buffer effect. The quantum yield of the photocatalytic H2O2 production under photoirradiation (λ = 334 nm) of an O2-saturated acetonitrile-water mixed solution containing acetate ion, oxalic acid and QuPh(+)-NA was determined to be as high as 0.34, which is more than double the quantum yield obtained by using oxalate salt as an electron donor without acetate ion (0.14). In addition, the turnover number of QuPh(+)-NA reached more than 340. The reaction mechanism and the effect of solvent composition on the photocatalytic H2O2 production were scrutinized by using nanosecond laser flash photolysis.

  6. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease. PMID:27258452

  7. Biological Control of Meloidogyne incognita by Aspergillus niger F22 Producing Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Choi, Yong Ho; Shin, Teak Soo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, In Seon; Myung, Eul Jae; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Restricted usage of chemical nematicides has led to development of environmentally safe alternatives. A culture filtrate of Aspergillus niger F22 was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita with marked mortality of second-stage juveniles (J2s) and inhibition of egg hatching. The nematicidal component was identified as oxalic acid by organic acid analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Exposure to 2 mmol/L oxalic acid resulted in 100% juvenile mortality at 1 day after treatment and suppressed egg hatching by 95.6% at 7 days after treatment. Oxalic acid showed similar nematicidal activity against M. hapla, but was not highly toxic to Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. The fungus was incubated on solid medium and dried culture was used for preparation of a wettable powder-type (WP) formulation as an active ingredient. Two WP formulations, F22-WP10 (ai 10%) and oxalic acid-WP8 (ai 8%), were prepared using F22 solid culture and oxalic acid. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, application of a mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 at 1,000- and 500-fold dilutions significantly reduced gall formation on the roots of watermelon plants by 58.8 and 70.7%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control. The disease control efficacy of the mixture of F22-WP10 + oxalic acid-WP8 was significantly higher than that of a chemical nematicide, Sunchungtan (ai 30% fosthiazate). These results suggest that A. niger F22 can be used as a microbial nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode disease.

  8. Interaction of gas phase oxalic acid with ammonia and its atmospheric implications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  9. Interaction of Gas Phase Oxalic Acid with Ammonia and its Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Oxalic Acid and Sodium Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-06-24

    Nickel based Alloy 22 (NO6022) is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solution and to compare its behavior to sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solutions increased rapidly as the temperature and the acid concentration increased. Extrapolation studies show that even at a concentration of 10{sup -4}M oxalic acid, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 would be higher in oxalic acid than in 1 M NaCl solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in oxalic acid solutions. Cyclic polarization tests in 1 M NaCl showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C but was not susceptible at 60 C.

  11. Fungal production of citric and oxalic acid: importance in metal speciation, physiology and biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Gadd, G M

    1999-01-01

    The production of organic acids by fungi has profound implications for metal speciation, physiology and biogeochemical cycles. Biosynthesis of oxalic acid from glucose occurs by hydrolysis of oxaloacetate to oxalate and acetate catalysed by cytosolic oxaloacetase, whereas on citric acid, oxalate production occurs by means of glyoxylate oxidation. Citric acid is an intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with metals greatly influencing biosynthesis: growth limiting concentrations of Mn, Fe and Zn are important for high yields. The metal-complexing properties of these organic acids assist both essential metal and anionic (e.g. phosphate) nutrition of fungi, other microbes and plants, and determine metal speciation and mobility in the environment, including transfer between terrestrial and aquatic habitats, biocorrosion and weathering. Metal solubilization processes are also of potential for metal recovery and reclamation from contaminated solid wastes, soils and low-grade ores. Such 'heterotrophic leaching' can occur by several mechanisms but organic acids occupy a central position in the overall process, supplying both protons and a metal-complexing organic acid anion. Most simple metal oxalates [except those of alkali metals, Fe(III) and Al] are sparingly soluble and precipitate as crystalline or amorphous solids. Calcium oxalate is the most important manifestation of this in the environment and, in a variety of crystalline structures, is ubiquitously associated with free-living, plant symbiotic and pathogenic fungi. The main forms are the monohydrate (whewellite) and the dihydrate (weddelite) and their formation is of significance in biomineralization, since they affect nutritional heterogeneity in soil, especially Ca, P, K and Al cycling. The formation of insoluble toxic metal oxalates, e.g. of Cu, may confer tolerance and ensure survival in contaminated environments. In semi-arid environments, calcium oxalate formation is important in the formation and

  12. Influence of Amitraz and Oxalic Acid on the Cuticle Proteolytic System of Apis mellifera L. Workers

    PubMed Central

    Strachecka, Aneta; Paleolog, Jerzy; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Borsuk, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    This work verifies that amitraz and oxalic acid treatment affect honeybee cuticle proteolytic enzymes (CPE). Three bee groups were monitored: oxalic acid treatment, amitraz treatment, control. Electrophoresis of hydrophilic and hydrophobic CPE was performed. Protease and protease inhibitor activities (in vitro) and antifungal/antibacterial efficiencies (in vivo), were analyzed. Amitraz and oxalic acid treatment reduced hydrophobic, but did not affect hydrophilic, protein concentrations and reduced both hydrophilic and hydrophobic body surface asparagine and serine protease activities in relation to most substrates and independently of pH. The activities of natural cuticle inhibitors of acidic, neutral, and alkaline proteases were suppressed as a result of the treatments, corresponding with reduced antifungal and antibacterial activity. Electrophoretic patterns of low-, medium-, and high-molecular-weight proteases and protease inhibitors were also affected by the treatments. PMID:26466630

  13. Inhibitory effect of oxalic acid on bacterial spoilage of raw chilled chicken.

    PubMed

    Anang, D M; Rusul, G; Radu, Son; Bakar, Jamilah; Beuchat, L R

    2006-08-01

    Oxalic acid was evaluated as a treatment for reducing populations of naturally occurring microorganisms on raw chicken. Raw chicken breasts were dipped in solutions of oxalic acid (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0%, wt/vol) for 10, 20, and 30 min, individually packed in oxygen-permeable polyethylene bags, and stored at 4 degrees C. Total plate counts of aerobic bacteria and populations of Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae on breasts were determined before treatment and after storage for 1, 3, 7, 10, and 14 days. The pH and Hunter L, a, and b values of the breast surface were measured. Total plate counts were ca. 1.5 and 4.0 log CFU/g higher on untreated chicken breasts after storage for 7 and 14 days, respectively, than on breasts treated with 0.5% oxalic acid, regardless of dip time. Differences in counts on chicken breasts treated with water and 1.0 to 2.0% of oxalic acid were greater. Populations of Pseudomonas spp. on chicken breasts treated with 0.5 to 2.0% oxalic acid and stored at 4 degrees C for 1 day were less than 2 log CFU/g (detection limit), compared with 5.14 log CFU/g on untreated breasts. Pseudomonas grew on chicken breasts treated with 0.5% oxalic acid to reach counts not exceeding 3.88 log CFU/g after storage for 14 days. Counts on untreated chicken exceeded 8.83 log CFU/g at 14 days. Treatment with oxalic acid caused similar reductions in Enterobacteriaceae counts. Kocuria rhizophila was the predominant bacterium isolated from treated chicken. Other common bacteria included Escherichia coli and Empedobacter brevis. Treatment with oxalic acid caused a slight darkening in color (decreased Hunter L value), retention of redness (increased Hunter a value), and increase in yellowness (increased Hunter b value). Oxalic acid has potential for use as a sanitizer to reduce populations of spoilage microorganisms naturally occurring on raw chicken, thereby extending chicken shelf life.

  14. [Uric acid and oxalate lithiasis. Physico-chemical and crystallo-chemical explanation of the relationship].

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P

    1980-03-01

    It is tried to explain physico-chemically or crystallo-chemically the so-called "salting out effect", i.e. the influence of the Ca-oxalate precipitation by uric often discussed in urolith research which, indeed, is regarded as real by several researchers and by other investigators refused with emphasis, in order to understand better the connections between hyperuricosuria and oxalate lithiasis which obtrude themselves from the observation material. However, this phenomenon of the facilitated oxalate precipitation at increased uric acid level in the urine further needs directed research.

  15. The adsorption and photo-degradation of oxalic acid at the TiO2 surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendive, Cecilia; Blesa, Miguel; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    Oxalic acid is the simplest model compound to study the heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of pollutants on TiO2 containing more than one carboxylate group. We have carried out a study of a system of an oxalic acid solution in contact with a thin film of TiO2 particles employing ATR - FTIR in combination with quantum chemical calculations. Thus, possible adsorption structures have been identified and molecular dynamic simulations have been used to compare their predictions with the experimental data. It was found that the adsorption of oxalic acid on TiO2 in the dark can be explained in terms of two surface complexation modes for the anatase phase and only one surface complexation mode for the rutile phase. We have found that under illumination one of the complexes on the anatase phase preferably undergoes photo-degradation. At the same time water molecules are desorbed from the TiO2 surface by a thermal mechanism induced by the absorption of photons. Both processes favor the adsorption of more molecules of oxalic acid at the TiO2 surface which is thus enriched in the second complexation mode. A similar mechanism was found to occur on the rutile phase. The only complexation mode appears not to be photo-sensitive but the TiO2 surface is enriched in oxalic acid under illumination due to the replacement of photo-desorbed water molecules.

  16. Tungsten carbide nanotubes supported platinum nanoparticles as a potential sensing platform for oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Maiyalagan, Thandavarayan; Kannan, Palanisamy; Jönsson-Niedziolka, Martin; Niedziolka-Jönsson, Joanna

    2014-08-05

    Supported tungsten carbide is an efficient and vital nanomaterial for the development of high-performance, sensitive, and selective electrochemical sensors. In this work, tungsten carbide with tube-like nanostructures (WC NTs) supported platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) are synthesized and explored as an efficient catalyst toward electrochemical oxidation of oxalic acid for the first the time. The WC NTs supported PtNPs modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode is highly sensitive toward the electrochemical oxidation of oxalic acid. A large decrease in the oxidation overpotential (220 mV) and significant enhancement in the peak current compared to unmodified and Pt/C modified GC electrodes have been observed without using any redox mediator. Moreover, WC NTs supported PtNPs modified electrode possessed wide linear concentration ranges from 0 to 125 nM and a higher sensitivity toward the oxidation of oxalic acid (80 nA/nM) achieved by the amperometry method. The present modified electrode showed an experimentally determined lowest detection limit (LOD) of 12 nM (S/N = 3). Further, WC NTs supported PtNPs electrode can be demonstrated to have an excellent selectivity toward the detection of oxalic acid in the presence of a 200-fold excess of major important interferents. The practical application of WC NTs supported PtNPs has also been demonstrated in the detection of oxalic acid in tomato fruit sample, by differential pulse voltammetry under optimized conditions.

  17. Removal of oxalic acid, oxamic acid and aniline by a combined photolysis and ozonation process.

    PubMed

    Orge, C A; Faria, J L; Pereira, M F R

    2015-01-01

    Aniline (ANL), an aromatic amine, oxalic acid (OXA) and oxamic acid (OMA), short-chain carboxylic acids, were chosen as model organic pollutants for testing the combined effect of neat photolysis and ozonation in the treatment of aqueous effluents. In order to better understand the results, single ozonation and neat photolysis were also carried out. OXA has a high refractory character relatively to single ozonation and neat photolysis only accounted for 26% conversion of OXA after 2 h of reaction. On the other hand, OXA complete degradation was observed in less than an hour when ozone and light were used simultaneously. Despite OMA, a compound never studied before by a combined ozonation and photolysis treatment, being highly refractory to oxidation, more than 50% was removed by photo-ozonation after 3 h of reaction. In the case of ANL, both single ozonation and photo-ozonation resulted in 100% removal in a short reaction period due to the high reactivity of ozone to attack this type of molecules; however, only the combined method leads to efficient mineralization (89%) after 3 h of reaction. A significant synergetic effect was observed in the degradation of the selected contaminants by the simultaneous use of ozone and light, since the mineralization rate of combined method is higher than the sum of the mineralization rates of the individual treatments. The promising results observed in the degradation of the selected contaminants are paving the way to the application of photo-ozonation in the treatment of wastewater containing this type of pollutants.

  18. The Role of Oxalic Acid in New Particle Formation from Methanesulfonic Acid, Methylamine, and Water.

    PubMed

    Arquero, Kristine D; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2017-02-21

    Atmospheric particles are notorious for their effects on human health and visibility and are known to influence climate. Though sulfuric acid and ammonia/amines are recognized as main contributors to new particle formation (NPF), models and observations have indicated that other species may be involved. It has been shown that nucleation from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines, which is enhanced with added water, can also contribute to NPF. While organics are ubiquitous in air and likely to be involved in NPF by stabilizing small clusters for further growth, their effects on the MSA-amine system are not known. This work investigates the effect of oxalic acid (OxA) on NPF from the reaction of MSA and methylamine (MA) at 1 atm and 294 K in the presence and absence of water vapor using an aerosol flow reactor. OxA and MA do not efficiently form particles even in the presence of water, but NPF is enhanced when adding MSA to OxA-MA with and without water. The addition of OxA to MSA-MA mixtures yields a modest NPF enhancement, whereas the addition of OxA to MSA-MA-H2O has no effect. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed.

  19. Urinary excretion of orally administered oxalic acid in saccharin and o-phenylphenol-fed NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Salminen, E; Salminen, S

    1986-01-01

    Both saccharin and o-phenylphenol have been suggested to be carcinogenic to the urinary bladder in experimental animals, but the mechanism has remained unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary saccharin and o-phenylphenol on the urinary excretion of dietary oxalic acid. Male NMRI mice were gradually adapted to either 3% o-phenylphenol or 5% saccharin in their diet. Having being adapted to these diets for 1 week or after consuming them for 3 months, the animals were fasted for 6 h and given a 2.5-microCi oral dose of U-14C-oxalic acid. Dosed animals were kept in metabolism cages for 48 h to monitor urinary and fecal excretion of the label. Adaptation to dietary o-phenylphenol appeared to increase the urinary excretion of orally administered U-14C-oxalic acid when food and water were available during urinary and fecal collections. Adaptation to dietary saccharin had little effect on urinary oxalate levels when compared to control animals. These results indicate that changes in urinary oxalate levels should be more carefully studied in connection with potential urinary bladder carcinogens to avoid the possibility of bladder irritation by increased urinary oxalate excretion.

  20. Biodegradation of oxalic acid from spinach using cereal radicles.

    PubMed

    Betsche, Thomas; Fretzdorff, Barbara

    2005-12-14

    A high level of oxalate intake constitutes a health risk for infants and metabolically disposed adults. Spinach, acclaimed for its many health benefits, is among the vegetables richest in oxalate. Blanching reduces oxalate unsatisfactorily and unspecifically. An alternative, biological method is proposed on the basis of rye seedlings or radicles (also barley and wheat) containing an oxalate-specific oxalate oxidase by nature. Dissolved oxalate (0.25 mM) was rapidly degraded in the presence of radicles (e.g., 70% within 100 min). With commercial deep-frozen spinach, near-complete degradation of soluble oxalate was achieved at pH 3.5. The total level of oxalate was reduced by half. Similarly high rates occurred from 18 to 35 degrees C. Even at 55 degrees C appreciable rates were observed. The seedling as a whole is effective, too, and enrichment with cereal-specific healthy components would occur. Removal of oxalate from other vegetables, juices, cycled process waters, or feeds is conceivable with fresh or heat-dried cereal seedlings or radicles.

  1. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  2. On the factors governing the abundance of oxalic acid in tropospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusuess, C.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Müller, K.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid is frequently observed as one of the most abundant single organic compounds in tropospheric particles. Its sources are commonly believed to be of secondary nature. In state-of-the-art multiphase chemistry models, different pathways exist, which can lead to oxalic acid as final product. Anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions can be photochemically degraded to glyoxal and methyglyoxal, which - after partitioning into deliquescent particles or cloud droplets - are further oxidized via glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid [Herrmann et al., 2005]. A biogenic oxidation pathway starts with isoprene or monoterpene emissions and leads to glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal via methacrolein and methylvinylketone, followed by aqueous phase oxalic acid formation [Lim et al., 2005]. As suggested by Warneck, 2003, a marine pathway might exist, starting from marine ethene emissions and leading via glycolaldehyde to oxalic acid. The aim of this study was to elucidate from field measurements the importance of each of these pathways. To this aim, oxalic acid concentrations from 144 size-resolved particle samples (5-stage Berner impactor) from different continental and coastal European sampling sites were statistically analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). Hourly back trajectories were calculated for each sampling interval using the HYSPLIT model [Draxler and Rolph, 2003] and combined in a novel way with global land cover data to yield “residence times” of the sampled air masses above urban, agricultural, forested, and oceanic areas. These residence times served as quantitative proxies for different emission regimes (anthropogenic, biogenic, marine) in the statistical analysis. Additionally, meteorological parameters such as sunflux along the trajectories or mixing layer depth at the sampling site were retrieved from the HYSPLIT output. PCA of the continental dataset retrieved two factors that were connected to the oxalic acid concentrations. A first one showed high

  3. A role for oxalic acid generation in ozone-induced signallization in Arabidopis cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Daniel; Kadono, Takashi; Molas, Maria Lia; Errakhi, Rafik; Briand, Joël; Biligui, Bernadette; Kawano, Tomonori; Bouteau, François

    2013-03-01

    Ozone (O(3) ) is an air pollutant with an impact increasingly important in our industrialized world. It affects human health and productivity in various crops. We provide the evidences that treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana with O(3) results in ascorbate-derived oxalic acid production. Using cultured cells of A. thaliana as a model, here we further showed that oxalic acid induces activation of anion channels that trigger depolarization of the cell, increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, generation of reactive oxygen species and cell death. We confirmed that O(3) reacts with ascorbate in the culture, thus resulting in production of oxalic acid and this could be part of the O(3) -induced signalling pathways that trigger programmed cell death.

  4. Spectra investigation on surface characteristics of graphene oxide nanosheets treated with tartaric, malic and oxalic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Xiyao; Yan, Manqing; Bi, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The surface characteristics of graphene oxide nanosheets (GO) treated respectively with tartaric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid, have been investigated by mainly using optical spectroscopic methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, the electrochemical property of the products has also been studied. The data revealed that oxygen-containing groups such as sbnd OH, sbnd COOH and sbnd Cdbnd O on the GO surface have been almost removed and thus reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (RGN) were obtained. Interestingly, the number of sp2 domains of RGN increases as treated by tartaric acid < malic acid < oxalic acid whereas the steric hindrance (SH) decreases and the ionization constant (IC) differs among these three acids. Furthermore, the specific capacitances (Cs) of GO have been greatly promoted from 2.4 F g-1 to 100.8, 112.4, and 147 F g-1 after treated with tartaric, malic and oxalic acids, respectively. This finding agrees well with the spectra result of the tendency of surface conjugated degree alteration. We claim that the difference in both SH and IC among these acids is the main reason for the diverse surface characteristics as well as the improved Cs of the RGN.

  5. Spectra investigation on surface characteristics of graphene oxide nanosheets treated with tartaric, malic and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiyao; Yan, Manqing; Bi, Hong

    2014-01-24

    The surface characteristics of graphene oxide nanosheets (GO) treated respectively with tartaric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid, have been investigated by mainly using optical spectroscopic methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, the electrochemical property of the products has also been studied. The data revealed that oxygen-containing groups such as OH, COOH and CO on the GO surface have been almost removed and thus reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (RGN) were obtained. Interestingly, the number of sp(2) domains of RGN increases as treated by tartaric acidacid acid whereas the steric hindrance (SH) decreases and the ionization constant (IC) differs among these three acids. Furthermore, the specific capacitances (Cs) of GO have been greatly promoted from 2.4 F g(-1) to 100.8, 112.4, and 147 F g(-1) after treated with tartaric, malic and oxalic acids, respectively. This finding agrees well with the spectra result of the tendency of surface conjugated degree alteration. We claim that the difference in both SH and IC among these acids is the main reason for the diverse surface characteristics as well as the improved Cs of the RGN.

  6. Catalytic ozonation of oxalic acid using carbon nanofibres on macrostructured supports.

    PubMed

    Restivo, J; Órfão, J J M; Pereira, M F R; Vanhaecke, E; Rönning, M; Iouranova, T; Kiwi-Minsker, L; Armenise, S; Garcia-Bordejé, E

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were grown on different macrostructured supports such as cordierite monoliths, carbon felts and sintered metal fibres. The resulting composites exhibited excellent resistance to attrition/corrosion and its porosity is mainly due to mesoporous structures. The CNF/structured materials were tested in the ozonation of oxalic acid in a conventional semi-batch reactor after being crushed to powder form, and in a newly designed reactor that may operate in semi-batch or continuous operation. The CNFs supported on the different structured materials exhibited high catalytic activity in the mineralization of oxalic acid.

  7. Effects of oxalic acid on availability of zinc from spinach leaves and zinc sulfate to rats.

    PubMed

    Welch, R M; House, W A; Van Campen, D

    1977-06-01

    Some effects of dietary oxalic acid on availability of zinc from organic and inorganic sources were assessed. Male rats fed zinc-deficient diets with and without added sodium oxalate were orally dosed once with either 65Zn-labeled spinach leaves or 65Zn-labeled zinc sulfate. Spinach plants (Spinacia oleracea, var. "Winter Bloomsdale") were grown in 65Zn-labeled nutrient solutions that contained 0.033, 0.131 or 0.262 ppm zinc. Increasing zinc supply to the plants increased zinc concentration in the leaves. Oxalic acid content in all leaves was about 7% dry weight. Dietary oxalate enhanced the availability of 65Zn from zinc sulfate, but had no effect on absorption and retention of 65Zn from spinach leaves. Regardless of dietary oxalate levels, absorption and retention of 65Zn was greater from spinach leaves than from zinc sulfate. We concluded that endogenous zinc in spinach leaves was readily available to zinc-deficient rats, and that dietary oxalate was not deleterious to zinc availability.

  8. Reduction of carbadox mediated by reaction of Mn(III) with oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ru; Liu, Cun; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2013-02-05

    Manganese(III) geocomponents are commonly found in the soil environment, yet their roles in many biogeochemical processes remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Mn(III) generated from the reaction of MnO(2) and oxalic acid caused rapid and extensive decompositions of a quinoxaline-di-N-oxide antibiotics, viz carbadox. The reaction occurred primarily at the quinoxaline-di-N-oxide moiety resulting in the removal of one -O from N1-oxide and formation of desoxycarbadox. The reaction rate was accelerated by increasing amounts of Mn(III), carbadox and oxalate. The critical step in the overall reaction was the formation of a quinoxaline-di-N-oxide/Mn(III)/oxalate ternary complex in which Mn(III) functioned as the central complexing cation and electron conduit in which the arrangement of ligands facilitated electron transfer from oxalate to carbadox. In the complex, the C-C bond in oxalate was cleaved to create CO(2)(-•) radicals, followed by electron transfer to carbadox through the Mn(III) center. This proposed reaction mechanism is supported by the reaction products formed, reaction kinetics, and quantum mechanical calculations. The results obtained from this study suggest that naturally occurring Mn(III)-oxalic acid complexes could reductively decompose certain organic compounds in the environment such as the antibiotic quinoxaline-di-N-oxide.

  9. Heterogeneous photochemistry of oxalic acid on Mauritanian sand and Icelandic volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Styler, Sarah A; Donaldson, D J

    2012-08-21

    Teragram quantities of crustal and volcanic aerosol are released into the atmosphere on an annual basis. Although these substrates contain photoactive metal oxides, little is known about the role that they may play in catalyzing the heterogeneous phototransformation of semivolatile organic species. In the present study, we have investigated oxalic acid photochemistry at the surface of Fe(2)O(3), TiO(2), Mauritanian sand, and Icelandic volcanic ash in the presence and absence of oxygen using a photochemical Knudsen cell reactor. Illumination of all sample types resulted in the production of gas-phase CO(2). In the case of Mauritanian sand, the production of gas-phase CO(2) scaled with the loss of surface oxalic acid. In the absence of oxygen, the production of CO(2) by the sand and ash films scaled with the absorption spectrum of iron oxalate, which suggests that the reaction is at least in part iron-mediated. The presence of oxygen suppressed CO(2) production at the Fe(2)O(3) surface, enhanced CO(2) production at the Mauritanian sand surface, and did not have a net effect upon CO(2) production at the Icelandic ash surface. These different oxygen dependencies imply that oxalic acid photochemistry at the authentic surfaces under study was not solely iron-mediated. Experiments at the TiO(2) surface, which showed enhanced CO(2) production from oxalic acid in the presence of oxygen, suggest that Ti-mediated photochemistry played an important role. In summary, these results provide evidence that solid-phase aerosol photochemistry may influence the atmospheric lifetime of oxalic acid in arid regions, where its removal via wet deposition is insignificant.

  10. Effects of pyruvate salts, pyruvic acid, and bicarbonate salts in preventing experimental oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Tanaka, T; Morozumi, M

    1986-05-01

    Sodium pyruvate, potassium pyruvate, pyruvic acid, sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet (a glycolic-acid diet) in order to determine their effects in preventing lithogenicity. Male Wistar-strain rats who had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within four weeks. Rats in the sodium and potassium pyruvate groups had, however, almost no stones in the urinary system. Rats in the bicarbonate and pyruvic-acid groups showed slightly less effect than those in the pyruvate groups. Urinary oxalate excretion was high in all the groups during the experiment. The urinary oxalate concentration was relatively higher in the sodium-pyruvate group, and significantly higher in the potassium-pyruvate group, than in the glycolic-acid group. Urinary citrate excretion was high both in the pyruvate and bicarbonate groups; the urinary citrate concentration was, however, significantly higher in the pyruvate groups than in the bicarbonate groups at the fourth experimental week. The urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations were irrelevant to the diets administered. Therefore, it can be concluded that pyruvate salts inhibit urinary calculi formation, not by decreasing oxalate synthesis, but by increasing the urinary citrate concentration; bicarbonate salts work in the same manner, but a little less effectively.

  11. Reuse of washing effluent containing oxalic acid by a combined precipitation-acidification process.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mihee; Kim, Myoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the reuse feasibility of effluent produced by the soil washing of mine tailings with oxalic acid. Alkaline chemicals such as NaOH, Ca(OH)(2), and Na(2)CO(3) are used for the precipitation of arsenic and heavy metals in the effluent containing oxalic acid. All of the target contaminants are removed with very high efficiency (up to 100%) at high pH. The precipitation using NaOH at pH 9 is determined to be the most cost-effective method for the removal of arsenic as well as heavy metals in the effluent. The effluent decontaminated by NaOH is consecutively reused for the soil washing of raw mine tailings, resulting in considerable efficiency. Furthermore, even more arsenic and heavy metals are extracted from raw mine tailings by acidifying the decontaminated effluent under the alkaline condition, compared with direct reuse of the decontaminated effluent. Here, the oxalic acid, which is a weak complex-forming ligand as well as a weak acid, has noticeable effects on both soil washing and effluent treatment by precipitation. It extracts efficiently the contaminants from the mine tailings without adverse change of soil and also makes possible the precipitation of the contaminants in the effluent unlike strong chelating reagent. Reuse of the washing effluent containing oxalic acid would make the existing soil washing process more environment-friendly and cost-effective.

  12. Sugar yields from dilute oxalic acid pretreatment of maple wood compared to those with other dilute acids and hot water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taiying; Kumar, Rajeev; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-30

    Dilute oxalic acid pretreatment was applied to maple wood to improve compatibility with downstream operations, and its performance in pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was compared to results for hydrothermal and dilute hydrochloric and sulfuric acid pretreatments. The highest total xylose yield of ∼84% of the theoretical maximum was for both 0.5% oxalic and sulfuric acid pretreatment at 160 °C, compared to ∼81% yield for hydrothermal pretreatment at 200 °C and for 0.5% hydrochloric acid pretreatment at 140 °C. The xylooligomer fraction from dilute oxalic acid pretreatment was only 6.3% of the total xylose in solution, similar to results with dilute hydrochloric and sulfuric acids but much lower than the ∼70% value for hydrothermal pretreatment. Combining any of the four pretreatments with enzymatic hydrolysis with 60 FPU cellulase/g of glucan plus xylan in the pretreated maple wood resulted in virtually the same total glucose plus xylose yields of ∼85% of the maximum possible.

  13. A feasibility study on the multistage process for the oxalic acid pretreatment of a lignocellulosic biomass using electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Ahn, Sung Ju; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of the recovery and reuse oxalic acid in a multistage process for the pretreatment of a lignocellulosic biomass. Electrodialysis (ED), an electrochemical process using ion exchange membranes, was used to recover and reuse oxalic acid in the multistage process. The ED optimal condition for recover oxalic acid was potential of 10V and pH 2.2 in synthetic solutions. The recovery efficiency of oxalic acid from hydrolysates reached 100% at potential of 10V. The power consumption to treat 1mol of oxalic acid was estimated to be 41.0wh. At the same time, ethanol production increased up to 19g/L in the ED-treated hydrolysate, corresponding to ethanol productivity of 0.27g/L/h. It was clearly shown that bioethanol fermentation efficiency increased using the ED process, due to a small loss of fermentable sugar and a significantly high removal of inhibitory chemicals.

  14. Dilute oxalic acid pretreatment for high total sugar recovery in pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Qing; Huang, Meizi; He, Yucai; Wang, Liqun; Zhang, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Oxalic acid was evaluated as an alternative reagent to mineral inorganic acid in pretreatment of corncob to achieve high xylose yield in addition to highly digestible solid residue. A quadratic polynomial model of xylose formation was developed for optimization of pretreatment process by the response surface methodology based on the impact factors of pretreatment temperature, reaction time, acid concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio. The highest xylose yield was 94.3 % that was obtained under the pretreatment condition of 140 °C for 40 min with 0.5 wt% oxalic acid at a solid loading of 7.5 %. Under these conditions, the xylose yield results of verification experiments were very close to the model prediction, which indicated that the model was applicable. The solid residue generated under this condition also demonstrated a satisfactory enzymatic digestibility and fermentability.

  15. Simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation of oxalic acid pretreated corncob assessed with response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Rodrigues, Rita C L B; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2009-12-01

    Response surface methodology was used to evaluate optimal time, temperature and oxalic acid concentration for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corncob particles by Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. Fifteen different conditions for pretreatment were examined in a 2(3) full factorial design with six axial points. Temperatures ranged from 132 to 180 degrees C, time from 10 to 90 min and oxalic acid loadings from 0.01 to 0.038 g/g solids. Separate maxima were found for enzymatic saccharification and hemicellulose fermentation, respectively, with the condition for maximum saccharification being significantly more severe. Ethanol production was affected by reaction temperature more than by oxalic acid and reaction time over the ranges examined. The effect of reaction temperature was significant at a 95% confidence level in its effect on ethanol production. Oxalic acid and reaction time were statistically significant at the 90% level. The highest ethanol concentration (20 g/l) was obtained after 48 h with an ethanol volumetric production rate of 0.42 g ethanol l(-1) h(-1). The ethanol yield after SSF with P. stipitis was significantly higher than predicted by sequential saccharification and fermentation of substrate pretreated under the same condition. This was attributed to the secretion of beta-glucosidase by P. stipitis. During SSF, free extracellular beta-glucosidase activity was 1.30 pNPG U/g with P. stipitis, while saccharification without the yeast was 0.66 pNPG U/g.

  16. Response to oxalic acid as a resistance assay for Sclerotinia minor in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to oxalic acid was evaluated as a potential assay for screening peanut breeding lines for resistance to Sclerotinia blight caused by Sclerotinia minor. Detached stems of seven Spanish- and six runner-type peanut cultivars and advanced breeding lines, varying in resistance to Sclerotinia bl...

  17. The role of nanoparticulate agglomerates in TiO2 photocatalysis: degradation of oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Irina; Mendive, Cecilia B.; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous bimodal study of the photocatalytic oxalic acid degradation by aqueous TiO2 suspensions revealed that particular systems possess the capacity to protect a certain amount of oxalic acid from oxidation, thus hindering, to some extent, the photocatalytic reaction. While measurements of the oxalic acid concentration in the bulk liquid phase indicated full photocatalytic degradation; in situ pH-stat measurements allowed the quantification of the amount of oxalic acid remaining in the part of the nanoparticulate agglomerates where light could apparently not access. An explanation for this phenomenon takes into account the possibility of the formation of TiO2 agglomerates in which these molecules are hidden from the effect of the light, thus being protected from photocatalytic degradation. Studies of different TiO2 materials with different particle sizes allowed a deeper exploration of this phenomenon. In addition, because this property of encapsulating pollutant molecules by photocatalytic systems is found to be a reversible phenomenon, P25 appears to be more convenient and advantageous as compared to the use of large surface area photocatalysts.

  18. Preferential Enrichment of DL-Leucine Using Cocrystal Formation With Oxalic Acid Under Nonequilibrium Crystallization Conditions.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Kochunnoonny; Takahashi, Hiroki; Morita, Yoko; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Iwama, Sekai; Tsue, Hirohito; Tamura, Rui

    2015-07-01

    By utilizing the preferential enrichment (PE) technique, we achieved an improved enantiomeric resolution of DL-leucine (Leu) using a 1:1 cocrystal (DL-) of DL-Leu and oxalic acid. The crystal structure analysis of DL- indicated the occurrence of a novel type of phase transition and subsequent preferential redissolution of one enantiomer from the resulting crystals into solution.

  19. Efficacy of oxalic acid to reduce Salmonella spp. at various states of poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microbiological safety of fresh eviscerated poultry has continued to be a major concern of the consumer and the poultry industry due to the frequent foodborne illnesses caused by Salmonella spp. Oxalic acid (OA) was evaluated as an antimicrobial treatment at equivalent dip, scalding, and chillin...

  20. Oxalic acid complexes: promising draw solutes for forward osmosis (FO) in protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-03-21

    Highly soluble oxalic acid complexes (OACs) were synthesized through a one-pot reaction. The OACs exhibit excellent performance as draw solutes in FO processes with high water fluxes and negligible reverse solute fluxes. Efficient protein enrichment was achieved. The diluted OACs can be recycled via nanofiltration and are promising as draw solutes.

  1. Induction of an oxalate decarboxylase in the filamentous fungus Trametes versicolor by addition of inorganic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui Xia; Hong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve yields and to reduce the cost of oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC, EC 4.1.1.2), the induction of OxDC in the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was studied in this work. OxDC was induced by addition of inorganic acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid to culture media. The results showed that all the acids could enhance OxDC expression. The activity of the acid-induced OxDC rose continuously. All of the OxDC volumetric activities induced by the inorganic acids were higher than 20.0 U/L and were two times higher than that obtained with oxalic acid. OxDC productivity was around 4.0 U*L(-1)*day(-1). The highest specific activity against total protein was 3.2 U/mg protein at day 8 after induction of sulfuric acid, and the specific activity against mycelial dry weight was 10.6 U/g at day 9 after induction of hydrochloric acid. The growth of mycelia was inhibited slightly when the pH values in culture media was around 2.5-3.0, while the growth was inhibited heavily when the pH was lower than 2.5.

  2. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J; Keimowitz, Alison R; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N

    2014-09-25

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949-1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m(2)) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale.

  3. Immobilization of lead in anthropogenic contaminated soils using phosphates with/without oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Jun; Fu, Qingling; Zuo, Jichao; Liu, Yonghong; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effects of oxalic acid (OA) on the immobilization of Pb(II) in contaminated soils by phosphate materials, has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for the soil. A series of phosphate amendments with/without oxalic acid were applied to two anthropogenic contaminated soils. We investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) by KH2PO4, phosphate rock (PR), activated phosphate rock (APR) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) at different phosphate:Pb (P:Pb) molar ratios (0, 0.6, 2.0 and 4.0) in the presence/absence of 50 mmol oxalic acid/kg soil, respectively. The effects of treatments were evaluated using single extraction with deionized water or CaCl2, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) methods. Our results showed that the concentration of water extractable, exchangeable and TCLP-Pb all decreased with incubation time. The concentration of water-extractable Pb after 120 days was reduced by 100% when soils were amended with APR, HAP and HAP+OA, and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L for the red soil at P:Pb molar ratio 4.0. Water-soluble Pb could not be detected and the TCLP-Pb was <5 mg/L at all treatments applied to the yellow-brown soil. BCR results indicated that APR was most effective, although a slight enhancement of water-soluble phosphate was detected at the P:Pb molar ratio 4.0 at the beginning of incubation. Oxalic acid activated phosphates, and so mixing insoluble phosphates with oxalic acid may be a useful strategy to improve their effectiveness in reducing Pb bioavailability.

  4. Correlation between the production of exopolysaccharides and oxalic acid secretion by Ganoderma applanatum and Tyromyces palustris.

    PubMed

    Osińska-Jaroszuk, Monika; Wlizło, Kamila; Szałapata, Katarzyna; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The secretion of exopolysaccharides and oxalic acid in cultures of a white rot Ganoderma applanatum strain and a brown rot Tyromyces palustris strain were tested in terms of culture time, pH range, and temperature. The high yield of exopolysaccharides (EPS) required a moderate temperature of 28 °C for G. applanatum and 20 °C for T. palustris. G. applanatum and T. palustris accumulated more EPS when the concentration of the carbon source (maltose for G. applanatum and fructose for T. palustris) was 30 g/L. The results indicate that the production of oxalic acid by G. applanatum is correlated with the initial pH value of the culture medium and the concentration of oxalic acid increased to 1.66 ± 0.2 mM at the initial pH of 6.5 during the fungal growth. During the growth of T. palustris, the reduction of the initial pH value of the growing medium lowered the oxalic acid concentration from 7.7 ± 0.6 mM at pH 6.0 to 1.99 ± 0.2 mM at pH 3.5. T. palustris accumulated considerably more oxalic acid than G. applanatum and its presence did not affect significantly the production of exopolysaccharides. We also observed that the maximum amounts of exopolysaccharides secreted during cultivation of G. applanatum and T. palustris were 45.8 ± 1.2 and 19.1 ± 1.2 g/L, respectively.

  5. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J.; Keimowitz, Alison R.; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949–1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m2) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale. PMID:25598701

  6. Evaluation of Oxalic Acid Treatments against the Mite Varroa destructor and Secondary Effects on Honey Bees Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Adjlane, Noureddine; Tarek, El-Ounass; Haddad, Nizar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Varroa destructor varroasis is a very serious parasite of honeybee Apis mellifera. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Varroa treatment using organic acid (oxalic acid) in Algeria identifying its side effects on bee colonies. Methods: Treatment was conducted in one apiary consisting 30 colonies kept in Langstroth hives kind. Oxalic acid dripped directly on bees 5ml of this solution of oxalic acid per lane occupied by a syringe. Three doses were tested: 4.2, 3.2 and 2.1% oxalic acid is 100, 75 and 50 g of oxalic acid dehydrate in one litter of sugar syrup (1water to1 surge) concentration. Results: The percentage of average efficiency obtained for the first dose was 81%, 72.19% for the second dose, and 65% for third one, while the dose of 100 g oxalic acid causes a weakening of honey bee colonies. Conclusion: The experiments revealed that clear variation in the treatment efficiency among colonies that this might be related to brood presence therefore in order to assure the treatment efficiency oxalic acid should be part of a bigger strategy of Varroa treatment. PMID:28032102

  7. Equilibrium aluminium hydroxo-oxalate phases during initial clay formation; H +-Al 3+-oxalic acid-Na + system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilinski, Halka; Horvath, Laszlo; Ingri, Nils; Sjöberg, Staffan

    1986-09-01

    The conditions necessary for initial clay formation have been studied in different model systems comprising different organic acids besides Si and Al. In the present paper the solid phases and the precipitation boundary characterizing the subsystem H +-Al 3+-oxalic acid (H 2L) are discussed. pH and tyndallometric measurements were performed in an ionic medium of 0.6 M Na(Cl) at 25 °C. The two phases Al 3(OH) 7(C 2O 4) · 3H 2O (phase I) and NaAl(OH) 2(C 2O 4) · 3H 2O (phase II) determine the precipitation boundary. The following formation constants for the two phases were deduced: lgβ1 = lg([ Al3+] -3[ H2C2O4] -1[ H+] 9 = -21.87 ± 0.08 and lgβ11 = lg([ Al3+] -1[ H2C2O4] -1[ H+] 4 = -5.61 ± 0.06. Phase I exists in the range [ Al] tot≥ 10 -4.4moldm-3,[ H2C2O4] tot ≥ 10 -4.9moldm-3 and at pH < 6.8, thus being a possible precipitate in oxalic-rich natural waters. The more soluble sodium phase is unlikely to exist in natural waters. The two phases are metastable relative to crystalline gibbsite and may be considered as the first precipitation step in the transition from aqueous Al oxalates down to stable Al hydroxide. Model calculations illustrating these competing hydrolysis-complexation reactions are discussed in terms of predominance and speciation diagrams. The solid phases have been characterized by X-ray analysis of powders, TGA and IR spectra, and tentative structures are proposed. Phase I seems to be an octahedral layer structure, in which 3/5 of the octahedral sites between two close packed oxygen sheets are occupied by Al 3+ and the oxalate ion acts as a bridge ligand between two aluminium atoms. Phase II forms a more open sheet structure and has ion exchange properties. Powder data for a phase crystallized from the studied solution after a year are also presented. This phase, Na 4Al 2(OH) 2(C 2O 4) 4 · 10H 2O, supports the results from the equilibrium analysis of recent solution data by SJöBERG and ÖHMAN (1985), who have found the dinuclear

  8. Evaluation Of Sludge Heel Dissolution Efficiency With Oxalic Acid Cleaning At Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sudduth, Christie; Vitali, Jason; Keefer, Mark

    2014-01-08

    The chemical cleaning process baseline strategy at the Savannah River Site was revised to improve efficiency during future execution of the process based on lessons learned during previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning activities and to account for operational constraints imposed by safety basis requirements. These improvements were also intended to transcend the difficulties that arise from waste removal in higher rheological yield stress sludge tanks. Tank 12 implemented this improved strategy and the bulk oxalic acid cleaning efforts concluded in July 2013. The Tank 12 radiological removal results were similar to previous bulk oxalic acid cleaning campaigns despite the fact that Tank 12 contained higher rheological yield stress sludge that would make removal more difficult than the sludge treated in previous cleaning campaigns. No appreciable oxalate precipitation occurred during the cleaning process in Tank 12 compared to previous campaigns, which aided in the net volume reduction of 75-80%. Overall, the controls established for Tank 12 provide a template for an improved cleaning process.

  9. Spectroscopic evidence for organic diacid complexation with dissolved silica in aqueous systems—I. Oxalic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marley, N.A.; Bennett, P.; Janecky, D.R.; Gaffney, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Increased solubility of quartz and mobilization in contaminated groundwater due to the complexation with dissolved organic acids has been recently proposed [Bennett and Siegel, Nature326, 684–686 (1987)]. Using laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, we have examined mixed solutions of oxalic and silicic acids at near neutral pH in the tenth molar concentration ranges in an attempt to directly observe the proposed organo-silicate complexes.In both laser Raman and infrared spectra, product bands were observed that indicate an oxalate/silicic acid ester is being formed in the reaction. These data support the observation that organic diacids can lead to enhanced solubility of quartz in hydrogeological systems.

  10. Enhanced bioethanol production from yellow poplar by deacetylation and oxalic acid pretreatment without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Chandan; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce ethanol from yellow poplar, deacetylation was performed using sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Optimal deacetylation conditions were determined by a response surface methodology. The highest acetic acid concentration obtained was 7.06 g/L when deacetylation was performed at 60 °C for 80 min with 0.8% NaOH. Acetic acid was recovered by electrodialysis from the deacetylated hydrolysate. The oxalic acid pretreatment of deacetylated biomass was carried out and the hydrolysate directly used for ethanol production without detoxification. Ethanol yields ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 g/g and the highest ethanol yield was obtained when pretreatment was carried out at 150 °C with 50 mM oxalic acid. The highest ethanol concentration obtained from pretreated biomass was 27.21 g/L at 170 °C, using a 50 mM of oxalic acid for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Overall, 20.31 g of ethanol was obtained by hydrolysate and SSF from 100 g of deacetylated yellow poplar.

  11. Repression of oxalic acid-mediated mineral phosphate solubilization in rhizospheric isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae by succinate.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Mahendrapal Singh; Naresh Kumar, G; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2013-02-01

    Two strains of Klebsiella (SM6 and SM11) were isolated from rhizospheric soil that solubilized mineral phosphate by secretion of oxalic acid from glucose. Activities of enzymes for periplasmic glucose oxidation (glucose dehydrogenase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and glyoxylate oxidase) responsible for oxalic acid production were estimated. In presence of succinate, phosphate solubilization was completely inhibited, and the enzymes glucose dehydrogenase and glyoxylate oxidase were repressed. Significant activity of isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme for carbon flux through glyoxylate shunt and oxalic acid production during growth on glucose suggested that it could be inducible in nature, and its inhibition by succinate appeared to be similar to catabolite repression.

  12. Kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of safranine by dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Abbasi, S.; Rezaei, B.

    2001-08-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid has been described based on its catalytic effect on the redox reaction between safranine and dichromate in dilute sulfuric acid media. The reaction is monitored photometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of safranine at the maximum wavelength of 530 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a calibration graph from 0.10 to 10.00 μg ml -1 of oxalic acid with a detection limit of 0.08 μg ml -1 was obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for ten replicate measurements of 1.0 and 5.0 μg ml -1 oxalic acid was 2.7 and 2.5%, respectively. The purposed method is simple, sensitive, selective and inexpensive. The applicability of the proposed method was determined by the determination of oxalic acid in spinach and wastewater samples with satisfactory results.

  13. Kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of safranine by dichromate.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, A A; Abbasi, S; Rezaei, B

    2001-08-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid has been described based on its catalytic effect on the redox reaction between safranine and dichromate in dilute sulfuric acid media. The reaction is monitored photometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of safranine at the maximum wavelength of 530 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a calibration graph from 0.10 to 10.00 microg ml(-1) of oxalic acid with a detection limit of 0.08 microg ml(-1) was obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for ten replicate measurements of 1.0 and 5.0 microg ml(-1) oxalic acid was 2.7 and 2.5%, respectively. The purposed method is simple, sensitive, selective and inexpensive. The applicability of the proposed method was determined by the determination of oxalic acid in spinach and wastewater samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Morphological control of calcium oxalate particles in the presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaguo; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Bei; Zhao, Xiujian

    2004-10-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) particles exhibiting different shapes and phase structures were fabricated by a simple precipitation reaction of sodium oxalate with calcium chloride in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA) as a crystal modifier at room temperature. The as-obtained products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of reaction conditions including pH, [Ca2+]/[C2O42-] ratio and concentration of PSMA and CaC2O4 on the crystal forms and morphologies of the as-obtained calcium oxalate were investigated. The results show that various crystal morphologies of calcium oxalate, such as parallelograms, plates, spheres, bipyramids etc. can be obtained depending on the experimental conditions. Higher polymer concentration favors formation of the metastable calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals. Lower pH is beneficial to the formation of plate-like CaOx crystals. Especially, the monodispersed parallelogram-like CaOx crystals can be produced by PSMA as an additive at pH 2. PSMA may act as a good inhibitor for urolithiasis since it induces the formation of COD and reduces the particle size of CaOx. This research may provide new insight into the morphological control of CaOx particles and the prevention of urolithiasis.

  15. YfdW and YfdU are required for oxalate-induced acid tolerance in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Elise M; Ezelle, Karen E; Gabreski, Lauren N; Giglio, Eleanor R; McAfee, John M; Mills, Alexandria C; Qureshi, Maryam N; Salmon, Kristin M; Toyota, Cory G

    2013-04-01

    Escherichia coli has several mechanisms for surviving low-pH stress. We report that oxalic acid, a small-chain organic acid (SCOA), induces a moderate acid tolerance response (ATR) in two ways. Adaptation of E. coli K-12 at pH 5.5 with 50 mM oxalate and inclusion of 25 mM oxalate in pH 3.0 minimal challenge medium separately conferred protection, with 67% ± 7% and 87% ± 17% survival after 2 h, respectively. The combination of oxalate adaptation and oxalate supplementation in the challenge medium resulted in increased survival over adaptation or oxalate in the challenge medium alone. The enzymes YfdW, a formyl coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, and YfdU, an oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase, are required for the adaptation effect but not during challenge. Unlike other SCOAs, this oxalate ATR is not a part of the RpoS regulon but appears to be linked to the signal protein GadE. We theorize that this oxalate ATR could enhance the pathogenesis of virulent E. coli consumed with oxalate-containing foods like spinach.

  16. YfdW and YfdU Are Required for Oxalate-Induced Acid Tolerance in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Elise M.; Ezelle, Karen E.; Gabreski, Lauren N.; Giglio, Eleanor R.; McAfee, John M.; Mills, Alexandria C.; Qureshi, Maryam N.; Salmon, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli has several mechanisms for surviving low-pH stress. We report that oxalic acid, a small-chain organic acid (SCOA), induces a moderate acid tolerance response (ATR) in two ways. Adaptation of E. coli K-12 at pH 5.5 with 50 mM oxalate and inclusion of 25 mM oxalate in pH 3.0 minimal challenge medium separately conferred protection, with 67% ± 7% and 87% ± 17% survival after 2 h, respectively. The combination of oxalate adaptation and oxalate supplementation in the challenge medium resulted in increased survival over adaptation or oxalate in the challenge medium alone. The enzymes YfdW, a formyl coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, and YfdU, an oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase, are required for the adaptation effect but not during challenge. Unlike other SCOAs, this oxalate ATR is not a part of the RpoS regulon but appears to be linked to the signal protein GadE. We theorize that this oxalate ATR could enhance the pathogenesis of virulent E. coli consumed with oxalate-containing foods like spinach. PMID:23335415

  17. Degradation of oxalic acid by the mycoparasite Coniothyrium minitans plays an important role in interacting with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coniothyrium minitans is a mycoparasite of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum produces a virulence factor oxalic acid (OA) which is toxic to plants and also to C. minitans, and C. minitans detoxifies OA by degradation. In this study, two oxalate decarboxyla...

  18. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS has utilized oxalic acid to accomplish this task. Since the waste tanks are constructed of carbon steel, a significant amount of corrosion may occur. Although the total amount of corrosion may be insignificant for a short contact time, a significant amount of hydrogen may be generated due to the corrosion reaction. Linear polarization resistance and anodic/cathodic polarization tests were performed to investigate the corrosion behavior during the process. The effect of process variables such as temperature, agitation, aeration, sample orientation, light as well as surface finish on the corrosion behavior were evaluated. The results of the tests provided insight into the corrosion mechanism for the iron-oxalic acid system.

  19. Deuterium MAS NMR studies of dynamics on multiple timescales: histidine and oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Wimperis, Stephen; Gervais, Christel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Duma, Luminita

    2015-01-12

    Deuterium ((2) H) magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to monitor the dynamics of the exchanging labile deuterons of polycrystalline L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate-d7 and α-oxalic acid dihydrate-d6 . Direct experimental evidence of fast dynamics is obtained from T1Z and T1Q measurements. Further motional information is extracted from two-dimensional single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) MAS spectra. Differences between the SQ and DQ linewidths clearly indicate the presence of motions on intermediate timescales for the carboxylic moiety and the D2 O in α-oxalic acid dihydrate, and for the amine group and the D2 O in L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate. Comparison of the relaxation rate constants of Zeeman and quadrupolar order with the relaxation rate constants of the DQ coherences suggests the co-existence of fast and slow motional processes.

  20. Composites of manganese oxide with carbon materials as catalysts for the ozonation of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Orge, C A; Órfão, J J M; Pereira, M F R

    2012-04-30

    Manganese oxide and manganese oxide-carbon composites were prepared and tested as catalysts for the removal of oxalic acid by ozonation. Their performances were compared with the parent carbon material (activated carbon or carbon xerogel) used to prepare the composites. Oxalic acid degradation by carbon materials is slower than that attained with manganese oxide or manganese oxide-carbon composites. A complete degradation after 90 and 45 min of reaction was obtained for carbon materials and for the catalysts containing manganese, respectively. The ozonation in the presence of the prepared composites are supposed to occur mainly by surface reactions, following a direct oxidation mechanism by molecular ozone and/or surface oxygenated radicals.

  1. Characterization of ofloxacin-oxalic acid complex by PXRD, NMR, and THz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Limwikrant, Waree; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2009-12-01

    A novel ofloxacin-oxalic acid complex was prepared by the cogrinding method. The obtained complex was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared (IR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. The PXRD measurement revealed that the ofloxacin-oxalic acid complex induced by cogrinding was formed at a molar ratio of 1:2. Weak interaction between two components, not a hydrogen bonding, was found by IR and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The distinctive THz spectrum showed that the vibrational modes of the complex were different from those of the starting materials, suggesting that THz spectroscopy is an alternative tool to evaluate complex formation through weak interactions.

  2. IN-SITU MONITORING OF CORROSION DURING A LABORATORY SIMULATION OF OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J; Michael Poirier, M; John Pareizs, J; David Herman, D; David Beam, D; Samuel Fink, S; Fernando Fondeur, F

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS used oxalic acid to accomplish this task. To better understand the conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of the carbon steel waste tanks, laboratory simulations of the process were conducted to determine the corrosion rate of carbon steel and the generation of gases such as hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Open circuit potential measurements, linear polarization measurements, and coupon immersion tests were performed in-situ to determine the corrosion behavior of carbon steel during the demonstration. Vapor samples were analyzed continuously to determine the constituents of the phase. The combined results from these measurements indicated that in aerated environments, such as the tank, that the corrosion rates are manageable for short contact times and will facilitate prediction and control of the hydrogen generation rate during operations.

  3. Poly(acrylic acid) to induce competitive crystallization of a theophylline/oxalic acid cocrystal and a theophylline polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jisun; Kim, Il Won

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric additives to induce competitive crystallization of pharmaceutical compounds were explored. A cocrystal of theophylline and oxalic acid was used as a model system, and poly(acrylic acid), poly(caprolactone), and poly(ethylene glycol) were the additives. The cocrystal formation was selectively hindered with addition of poly(acrylic acid). First the size of the cocrystals were reduced, and eventually the cocrystallization was inhibited to generate neat theophylline crystals. The theophylline crystals were of a distinctively different crystal structure from known polymorphs, based on powder X-ray diffraction. They were also obtained in nanoscale size, when millimeter-scale crystals formed without poly(acrylic acid). Polymeric additives that could form specific interactions with crystallizing compounds seem to be useful tools for the phase and size control of pharmaceutical crystals.

  4. Oxidation of ferrocene by thiocyanic acid in the presence of ammonium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruslin, Farah bt; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2014-09-03

    A flake-like crystalline salt was obtained from the reaction of ferrocene, oxalic acid and ammonium thiocyanate in ethanol The elemental analysis and spectroscopic data were in agreement with the preliminary X-ray molecular structure. The compound consists of four ferrocenium moieties and a counter anion consisting of two (tetraisothiocyanato)iron(III) linked by an oxalato bridging group in such a way that both iron central atoms adopt octahedral geometries.

  5. Bioethanol production from deacetylated yellow poplar pretreated with oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Chandan; Jeong, So-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Won

    2016-05-01

    Electrodialysis (ED) was used to develop a multistage oxalic acid recovery and pretreatment system to produce ethanol from deacetylated yellow poplar. Pretreatment of the biomass was performed at 150°C for 42 min using 0.16 M oxalic acid. The efficiency of oxalic acid recovery from the hydrolysate reached up to 92.32% in all the stages. Ethanol production and ethanol yield of ED-treated hydrolysate in each stage showed a uniform pattern ranging from 6.81 g/L to 7.21 g/L and 0.40 g/g to 0.43 g/g, respectively. The results showed that efficiency of ethanol production increased when deacetylated biomass and ED process was used. Ethanol yield from the pretreated biomass using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was in the range of 80.59-83.36% in all the stages. The structural characterization of the pretreated biomass at each stage was investigated and structural changes were not significantly different among the various pretreated biomass.

  6. Theoretical study on the structure and stabilities of molecular clusters of oxalic acid with water.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kevin H; Morales, Francisco J; Tao, Fu-Ming

    2012-11-29

    The importance of aerosols to humankind is well-known, playing an integral role in determining Earth's climate and influencing human health. Despite this fact, much remains unknown about the initial events of nucleation. In this work, the molecular properties of common organic atmospheric pollutant oxalic acid and its gas phase interactions with water have been thoroughly examined. Local minima single-point energies for the monomer conformations were calculated at the B3LYP and MP2 level of theory with both 6-311++G(d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets and are compared with previous works. Optimized geometries, relative energies, and free energy changes for the stable clusters of oxalic acid conformers with up to six waters were then obtained from B3LYP calculations with 6-31+G(d) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Initially, cooperative binding is predicted to be the most important factor in nucleation, but as the clusters grow, dipole cancellations are found to play a pivotal role. The clusters of oxalic acid hydrated purely with water tend to produce extremely stable and neutral core systems. Free energies of formation and atmospheric implications are discussed.

  7. Communication: Remarkable electrophilicity of the oxalic acid monomer: an anion photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Buonaugurio, Angela; Graham, Jacob; Buytendyk, Allyson; Bowen, Kit H; Ryder, Matthew R; Keolopile, Zibo G; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej

    2014-06-14

    Our experimental and computational results demonstrate an unusual electrophilicity of oxalic acid, the simplest dicarboxylic acid. The monomer is characterized by an adiabatic electron affinity and electron vertical detachment energy of 0.72 and 1.08 eV (±0.05 eV), respectively. The electrophilicity results primarily from the bonding carbon-carbon interaction in the singly occupied molecular orbital of the anion, but it is further enhanced by intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The well-resolved structure in the photoelectron spectrum is reproduced theoretically, based on Franck-Condon factors for the vibronic anion → neutral transitions.

  8. [EXPERIENCE OF USE OF BLEMAREN® IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS IN URIC ACID AND CALCIUM OXALATE UROLITHIASIS].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, O V; Yanenko, E K

    2015-01-01

    154 patients with urolithiasis were under outpatient observation for 2-8 years. Among them there were 76 women and 78 men aged 21-66 years, of which 46 patients with uric acid urolithiasis, and 88--with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Treatment of patients was carried out systematically, depending on their condition. Indications for the application of Blemaren® included the presence of uric acid stones, uric acid and/or oxalate crystalluria. The duration of treatment was 6.1 months. The dosage of the drug varied from 6 to 18 g per day and was selected individually, depending on the purpose of the appointment of Blemaren®. Reduction of the urine pH to 6.2- 6.8-7.2 was the criterion for properly selected dose. To dissolve uric acid stones in the presence of hyperuricemia and/or hyperuricuria, Blemaren® was administered in combination with allopurinol at a dose of 0.1 g 3-4 times a day. Besides pharmacotherapy, treatment included diet therapy. It was found that the morning urine pH in urate urolithiasis is sustainable and has a range of 5.0-6.0, in 80.4% of cases--range of 5.0-5.5. In calcium oxalate urolithiasis this parameter is also stable and has a range of 5.0-6.7, in 82.9% of cases--range of 5.5-6.0. Optimal urine pH to eliminate uric acid and oxalate crystalluria in patients with uric acid and calcium oxalate urolithiasis is the interval of 6.2-6.4. It was shown that Blemaren® is a highly effective agent for treatment and prevention of uric acid and calcium oxalate crystalluria in calcium oxalate and uric acid urolithiasis. Further, its effectiveness in dissolving of uric acid stones in the absence of an infectious inflammatory process is 82.3%.

  9. Use of microfocused X-ray techniques to investigate the mobilization of arsenic by oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wovkulich, Karen; Mailloux, Brian J.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Dong, Hailiang; Bishop, Michael E.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2012-08-01

    Improved linkages between aqueous phase transport and solid-phase reactions are needed to better predict and model transport of contaminants through the subsurface. Here we develop and apply a new method for measuring As mobilization in situ within soil columns that utilizes synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. By performing these measurements in situ during column transport experiments, we simultaneously monitor grain-scale solid phase reactions and column-scale transport. Arsenic may be effectively mobilized by oxalic acid but the geochemical and mineralogical factors that influence the rate and extent of mobilization are not well understood. Column experiments (˜4 cm long × 0.635 cm ID) using As contaminated sediments from the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site were performed on the laboratory bench as well as in the synchrotron beamline. Microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) maps for As and Fe were collected at the same location in the columns (<1 mm2) before and during treatment with 10 mM oxalic acid. The fraction of As and Fe removed by oxalic acid treatment was calculated from the change in flux-normalized counts for each pixel in the map images, and these data were used to calculate kinetic parameters over the studied area. Between 79% and 83% of the As was removed from the sediments by the oxalic acid treatment based on μSXRF data; these removal percentages agreed well with laboratory data based on column effluent (88-95%). Considerably less Fe was removed by oxalic acid treatment, 14-25% based on μSXRF counts, which is somewhat higher than the 7-9% calculated from laboratory column effluent concentrations. Microfocused X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μXANES) on a subset of points indicates most of the Fe was oxidized and present as a mixture of goethite, hematite, and ferrihydrite on sand grain coatings. Treatment with oxalic acid led to subtle shifts in Fe (III) species following oxalic acid treatment, either removing

  10. Use of Microfocused X-ray Techniques to Investigate the Mobilization of As by Oxalic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Mailloux, Brian J.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Dong, Hailiang; Bishop, Michael E.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2012-01-01

    Improved linkages between aqueous phase transport and solid-phase reactions are needed to better predict and model transport of contaminants through the subsurface. Here we develop and apply a new method for measuring As mobilization in situ within soil columns that utilizes synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. By performing these measurements in situ during column transport experiments, we simultaneously monitor grain-scale solid phase reactions and column-scale transport. Arsenic may be effectively mobilized by oxalic acid but the geochemical and mineralogical factors that influence the rate and extent of mobilization are not well understood. Column experiments (~4 cm long × 0.635 cm ID) using As contaminated sediments from the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site were performed on the laboratory bench as well as in the synchrotron beamline. Microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) maps for As and Fe were collected at the same location in the columns (<1 mm2) before and during treatment with 10 mM oxalic acid. The fraction of As and Fe removed by oxalic acid treatment was calculated from the change in flux-normalized counts for each pixel in the map images, and these data were used to calculate kinetic parameters over the studied area. Between 79% and 83% of the As was removed from the sediments by the oxalic acid treatment based on μSXRF data; these removal percentages agreed well with laboratory data based on column effluent (88–95%). Considerably less Fe was removed by oxalic acid treatment, 14–25% based on μSXRF counts, which is somewhat higher than the 7–9% calculated from laboratory column effluent concentrations. Microfocused X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μXANES) on a subset of points indicates most of the Fe was oxidized and present as a mixture of goethite, hematite, and ferrihydrite on sand grain coatings. Treatment with oxalic acid led to subtle shifts in Fe (III) species following oxalic acid treatment, either

  11. Biosynthesis of l-Ascorbic Acid and Conversion of Carbons 1 and 2 of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid Occurs within Individual Calcium Oxalate Crystal Idioblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Kostman, Todd A.; Tarlyn, Nathan M.; Loewus, Frank A.; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    2001-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various 14C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of 14C into calcium oxalate crystals. [14C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-14C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-14C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (l-[1-14C]galactose; d-[1-14C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, d-[1-14C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > l-galactose > d-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via d-mannose and l-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments. PMID:11161021

  12. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro by uropontin: another member of the aspartic acid-rich protein superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Shiraga, H; Min, W; VanDusen, W J; Clayman, M D; Miner, D; Terrell, C H; Sherbotie, J R; Foreman, J W; Przysiecki, C; Neilson, E G

    1992-01-01

    The majority of human urinary stones are primarily composed of calcium salts. Although normal urine is frequently supersaturated with respect to calcium oxalate, most humans do not form stones. Inhibitors are among the multiple factors that may influence the complex process of urinary stone formation. We have isolated an inhibitor of calcium oxalate crystal growth from human urine by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and acidic amino acid content of this aspartic acid-rich protein, uropontin, are similar to those of other pontin proteins from bone, plasma, breast milk, and cells. The inhibitory effect of uropontin on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro supports the concept that pontins may have a regulatory role. This function would be analogous to that of other members of the aspartic acid-rich protein superfamily, which stereospecifically regulate the mineralization fronts of calcium-containing crystals. Images PMID:1729712

  13. The Relationship between Serum Oxalic Acid, Central Hemodynamic Parameters and Colonization by Oxalobacter formigenes in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gulhan, Baris; Turkmen, Kultigin; Aydin, Merve; Gunay, Murat; Cıkman, Aytekin; Kara, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Elevated pulse wave velocity (PWV) and central aortic blood pressures are independent predictors of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Oxalic acid is a uremic retention molecule that is extensively studied in the pathogenesis of calcium oxalate stones. Oxalobacter formigenes, a member of the colon microbiota, has important roles in oxalate homeostasis. Data regarding the colonization by and the exact role of O. formigenes in the pathogenesis of oxalic acid metabolism in HD patients are scant. Hence, we aimed to determine the relationship between fecal O. formigenes colonization, serum oxalic acid and hemodynamic parameters in HD patients with regard to the colo-reno-cardiac axis. Methods Fifty HD patients were enrolled in this study. PWV and central aortic systolic (cASBP) and diastolic blood pressures (cADBP) were measured with a Mobil-O-Graph (I.E.M. GmbH, Stolberg, Germany). Serum oxalic acid levels were assessed by ELISA, and fecal O. formigenes DNA levels were isolated and measured by real-time PCR. Results Isolation of fecal O. formigenes was found in only 2 HD patients. One of them had 113,609 copies/ml, the other one had 1,056 copies/ml. Serum oxalic acid levels were found to be positively correlated with PWV (r = 0.29, p = 0.03), cASBP (r = 0.33, p = 0.001) and cADBP (r = 0.42, p = 0.002) and negatively correlated with LDL (r = −0.30, p = 0.03). In multivariate linear regression analysis, PWV was independently predicted by oxalic acid, glucose and triglyceride. Conclusions This is the first study that demonstrates the absence of O. formigenes as well as a relation between serum oxalic acid and cASBP, cADBP and PWV in HD patients. Replacement of O. formigenes with pre- and probiotics might decrease serum oxalic acid levels and improve cardiovascular outcomes in HD patients. PMID:26195968

  14. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  15. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  16. Suppression of Growth Rate of Colony-Associated Fungi by High Fructose Corn Syrup Feeding Supplement, Formic Acid, and Oxalic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Select colony-associated fungi (bee isolates). Absidia sp., Ascosphaera apis, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium sp., Penicillium glabrum, Mucor sp., showed a 40% reduction in radial growth rate with formic acid, a 28% reduction with oxalic acid, and a 15% reduction with fructose and high fructose corn sy...

  17. Polyacrylonitrile/manganese acetate composite nanofibers and their catalysis performance on chromium (VI) reduction by oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Li, Xiang; Bian, Xiujie; Zheng, Tian; Wang, Ce

    2012-08-30

    Polyacrylonitrile(PAN)/manganese acetate(Mn(CH(3)COO)(2)) composite nanofibers have been fabricated by electrospinning, a simple and effective technology. The obtained composite nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR). The composite nanofibers are amorphous in structure, continuous, even and smooth. At the same time, the reduction performance of Cr(VI) by oxalic acid in the presence of the composite nanofibers is also investigated. The results indicate that the composite nanofibers have exhibited excellent catalysis performance for Cr(VI) reduction from a Cr(2)O(7)(2-)-containing solution by oxalic acid. And the critical parameters, such as the catalyst dosage, oxalic acid content, chromium concentration, the pH value of the reaction solution and light have important impact on the reduction process. Under the simulated solar light irradiation, after only 60 min, 1.2mM initial Cr(VI) solution was reduced absolutely in the presence of PAN/Mn(CH(3)COO)(2) composite nanofibers containing 17.5 wt.% Mn(CH(3)COO)(2) by 0.3 mL 0.5M oxalic acid. In light, the reduction of Cr(VI) by oxalic acid is markedly accelerated.

  18. Adsorption and oxidation of oxalic acid on anatase TiO2 (001) surface: A density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-09-15

    Anatase TiO2 (001) surfaces have attracted great interest for photo-degradation of organic species recently due to their high reactivity. In this work, adsorption properties and oxidation mechanisms of oxalic acid on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface have been theoretically investigated using the first-principles density functional theory. Various possible adsorption configurations are considered by diversifying the connectivity of carboxylic groups with the surface. It is found that the adsorption of oxalic acid on the anatase (001) surface prefer the dissociative states. A novel double-bidentate configuration has been found due to the structural match between oxalic acid and the (001) surface. More charge is transferred from the adsorbed oxalic acid to the surface with the double-bidentate configuration when comparing with other adsorption structures. Thus, there is a positive correlation relationship between the transferred charge amount and the interfacial bond numbers when oxalic acid adsorbs on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface. The adsorption energies with dispersion corrections have demonstrated that the van der Waals interactions play an important role in the adsorption, especially when adsorbates are close to the surface.

  19. The roles of xylan and lignin in oxalic acid pretreated corncob during separate enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Rodrigues, Rita C L B; Kim, Hyun Joo; Choi, In-Gyu; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2010-06-01

    High yields of hemicellulosic and cellulosic sugars are critical in obtaining economical conversion of agricultural residues to ethanol. To optimize pretreatment conditions, we evaluated oxalic acid loading rates, treatment temperatures and times in a 2(3) full factorial design. Response-surface analysis revealed an optimal oxalic acid pretreatment condition to release sugar from the cob of Zea mays L. ssp. and for Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. To ferment the residual cellulosic sugars to ethanol following enzymatic hydrolysis, highest saccharification and fermentation yields were obtained following pretreatment at 180 degrees C for 50 min with 0.024 g oxalic acid/g substrate. Under these conditions, only 7.5% hemicellulose remained in the pretreated substrate. The rate of cellulose degradation was significantly less than that of hemicellulose and its hydrolysis was not as extensive. Subsequent enzymatic saccharification of the residual cellulose was strongly affected by the pretreatment condition with cellulose hydrolysis ranging between 26.0% and 76.2%. The residual xylan/lignin ratio ranged from 0.31 to 1.85 depending on the pretreatment condition. Fermentable sugar and ethanol were maximal at the lowest ratio of xylan/lignin and at high glucan contents. The model predicts optimal condition of oxalic acid pretreatment at 168 degrees C, 74 min and 0.027 g/g of oxalic acid. From these findings, we surmised that low residual xylan was critical in obtaining maximal glucose yields from saccharification.

  20. COMPARISON OF OXALIC ACID CLEANING RESULTS AT SRS AND HANFORD AND THE IMPACT ON ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING DEPLOYMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, R.; Ketusky, E.

    2010-01-05

    Waste tanks must be rendered clean enough to satisfy very rigorous tank closure requirements. During bulk waste removal, most of the radioactive sludge and salt waste is removed from the waste tank. The waste residue on the tank walls and interior components and the waste heel at the bottom of the tank must be removed prior to tank closure to render the tank clean enough to meet the regulatory requirement for tank closure. Oxalic acid has been used within the DOE complex to clean residual materials from carbon steel tanks with varying degrees of success. Oxalic acid cleaning will be implemented at both the Savannah River Site and Hanford to clean tanks and serves as the core cleaning technology in the process known as Enhanced Chemical Cleaning. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning also employs a process that decomposes the spent oxalic acid solutions. The oxalic acid cleaning campaigns that have been performed at the two sites dating back to the 1980's are compared. The differences in the waste characteristics, oxalic acid concentrations, flushing, available infrastructure and execution of the campaigns are discussed along with the impact on the effectiveness of the process. The lessons learned from these campaigns that are being incorporated into the project for Enhanced Chemical Cleaning are also explored.

  1. Structural tuning of photoluminescence in nanoporous anodic alumina by hard anodization in oxalic and malonic acids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Abel; Alba, Maria; Rahman, Mahbubur M; Formentín, Pilar; Ferré-Borrull, Josep; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluis F

    2012-04-19

    We report on an exhaustive and systematic study about the photoluminescent properties of nanoporous anodic alumina membranes fabricated by the one-step anodization process under hard conditions in oxalic and malonic acids. This optical property is analysed as a function of several parameters (i.e. hard anodization voltage, pore diameter, membrane thickness, annealing temperature and acid electrolyte). This analysis makes it possible to tune the photoluminescent behaviour at will simply by modifying the structural characteristics of these membranes. This structural tuning ability is of special interest in such fields as optoelectronics, in which an accurate design of the basic nanostructures (e.g. microcavities, resonators, filters, supports, etc.) yields the control over their optical properties and, thus, upon the performance of the nanodevices derived from them (biosensors, interferometers, selective filters, etc.).

  2. Structural tuning of photoluminescence in nanoporous anodic alumina by hard anodization in oxalic and malonic acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report on an exhaustive and systematic study about the photoluminescent properties of nanoporous anodic alumina membranes fabricated by the one-step anodization process under hard conditions in oxalic and malonic acids. This optical property is analysed as a function of several parameters (i.e. hard anodization voltage, pore diameter, membrane thickness, annealing temperature and acid electrolyte). This analysis makes it possible to tune the photoluminescent behaviour at will simply by modifying the structural characteristics of these membranes. This structural tuning ability is of special interest in such fields as optoelectronics, in which an accurate design of the basic nanostructures (e.g. microcavities, resonators, filters, supports, etc.) yields the control over their optical properties and, thus, upon the performance of the nanodevices derived from them (biosensors, interferometers, selective filters, etc.) PMID:22515214

  3. Novel approach to recover cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion battery using oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui; Shen, Bingyu

    2015-09-15

    With the booming of consumer electronics (CE) and electric vehicle (EV), a large number of spent lithium-ion battery (LIBs) have been generated worldwide. Resource depletion and environmental concern driven from the sustainable industry of CE and EV have motivated spent LIBs should be recovered urgently. However, the conventional process combined with leaching, precipitating, and filtering was quite complicated to recover cobalt and lithium from spent LIBs. In this work, we developed a novel recovery process, only combined with oxalic acid leaching and filtering. When the optimal parameters for leaching process is controlled at 150 min retention time, 95 °C heating temperature, 15 g L(-1) solid-liquid ratio, and 400 rpm rotation rate, the recovery rate of lithium and cobalt from spent LIBs can reach about 98% and 97%, respectively. Additionally, we also tentatively discovered the leaching mechanism of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) using oxalic acid, and the leaching order of the sampling LiCoO2 of spent LIBs. All the obtained results can contribute to a short-cut and high-efficiency process of spent LIBs recycling toward a sound closed-loop cycle.

  4. Cadmium induced oxalic acid secretion and its role in metal uptake and detoxification mechanisms in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Piao; Leng, Yang; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Zhao, Meihua; Wei, Zhen; Li, Ningjie; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Chen; Li, Fangling; Cheng, Min

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the role of oxalic acid in the uptake of Cd and participation in detoxification process in Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Cd-induced oxalic acid secretion was observed with growth inhibition and enzyme inactivation (LiP and MnP) of P. chrysosporium. The peak value of oxalic acid concentration was 16.6 mM at initial Cd concentration of 100 mg L(-1). During the short-term uptake experiments, the uptake of Cd was enhanced and accelerated in the presence of oxalic acid and resulted in alleviated growth and enzyme inhibition ratios. The formation of a metal-oxalate complex therefore may provide a detoxification mechanism via effect on metal bioavailability, whereby many fungi can survive and grow in environments containing high concentrations of toxic metals. The present findings will advance the understanding of fungal resistance to metal stress, which could show promise for a more useful application of microbial technology in the treatment of metal-polluted waste.

  5. Facile C(sp(2))-C(sp(2)) bond cleavage in oxalic acid-derived radicals.

    PubMed

    Molt, Robert W; Lecher, Alison M; Clark, Timothy; Bartlett, Rodney J; Richards, Nigel G J

    2015-03-11

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the Mn-dependent conversion of the oxalate monoanion into CO2 and formate. Many questions remain about the catalytic mechanism of OxDC although it has been proposed that the reaction proceeds via substrate-based radical intermediates. Using coupled cluster theory combined with implicit solvation models we have examined the effects of radical formation on the structure and reactivity of oxalic acid-derived radicals in aqueous solution. Our results show that the calculated solution-phase free-energy barrier for C-C bond cleavage to form CO2 is decreased from 34.2 kcal/mol for oxalic acid to only 9.3 kcal/mol and a maximum of 3.5 kcal/mol for the cationic and neutral oxalic acid-derived radicals, respectively. These studies also show that the C-C σ bonding orbital of the radical cation contains only a single electron, giving rise to an elongated C-C bond distance of 1.7 Å; a similar lengthening of the C-C bond is not observed for the neutral radical. This study provides new chemical insights into the structure and stability of plausible intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of OxDC, and suggests that removal of an electron to form a radical (with or without the concomitant loss of a proton) may be a general strategy for cleaving the unreactive C-C bonds between adjacent sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms.

  6. Mineralization of the recalcitrant oxalic and oxamic acids by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes using a boron-doped diamond anode.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Brillas, Enric

    2011-04-01

    Oxalic and oxamic acids are the ultimate and more persistent by-products of the degradation of N-aromatics by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs). In this paper, the kinetics and oxidative paths of these acids have been studied for several EAOPs using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel or an air-diffusion cathode. Anodic oxidation (AO-BDD) in the presence of Fe(2+) (AO-BDD-Fe(2+)) and under UVA irradiation (AO-BDD-Fe(2+)-UVA), along with electro-Fenton (EF-BDD), was tested. The oxidation of both acids and their iron complexes on BDD was clarified by cyclic voltammetry. AO-BDD allowed the overall mineralization of oxalic acid, but oxamic acid was removed much more slowly. Each acid underwent a similar decay in AO-BDD-Fe(2+) and EF-BDD, as expected if its iron complexes were not attacked by hydroxyl radicals in the bulk. The faster and total mineralization of both acids was achieved in AO-BDD-Fe(2+)-UVA due to the high photoactivity of their Fe(III) complexes that were continuously regenerated by oxidation of their Fe(II) complexes. Oxamic acid always released a larger proportion of NH(4)(+) than NO(3)(-) ion, as well as volatile NO(x) species. Both acids were independently oxidized at the anode in AO-BDD, but in AO-BDD-Fe(2+)-UVA oxamic acid was more slowly degraded as its content decreased, without significant effect on oxalic acid decay. The increase in current density enhanced the oxidation power of the latter method, with loss of efficiency. High Fe(2+) contents inhibited the oxidation of Fe(II) complexes by the competitive oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). Low current densities and Fe(2+) contents are preferable to remove more efficiently these acids by the most potent AO-BDD-Fe(2+)-UVA method.

  7. Theoretical study on stable small clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia and water.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kevin H; Liu, Qian; Tao, Fu-Ming

    2014-02-27

    Thermodynamically stable small clusters of oxalic acid (CO2H)2, ammonia (NH3), and water (H2O) are studied through quantum chemical calculations. The (CO2H)2-NH3 core system with up to three waters of hydration was examined by B3LYP density functional theory and MP2 molecular orbital theory with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The (CO2H)2-NH3 core complexes are observed to hydrogen bond strongly and should be found in appreciably significant concentrations in the atmosphere. Subsequent hydration of the (CO2H)2-NH3 core, however, is found to be somewhat prohibitive under ambient conditions. Relative populations of the examined clusters are predicted and the binding patterns detailed. Atmospheric implications related to new particle formations are discussed.

  8. Voltammetric Detection of Oxalic Acid by Using Glassy Carbon Electrodes with Covalently Attached Nitrogen-containing Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hiroaki; Akabe, Syuhei; Kitamura, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Takuto; Uchiyama, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel voltammetric detection of oxalic acid by using glassy carbon electrodes with covalently attached nitrogen-containing functional groups prepared by stepwise electrolysis. A glassy carbon electrode electrooxidized in an ammonium carbamate solution was electroreduced at -1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in 1.0 M sulfuric acid for a long time. We found that the electrocatalytic oxidation wave of oxalic acid obtained by this modified glassy carbon electrode was moved to a more negative potential region than that obtained by a platinum electrode in an acidic medium. A good linearity for the peak current signals was observed in the concentration range from 0.1 to 50 mM.

  9. Oxalic Acid from Lentinula edodes Culture Filtrate: Antimicrobial Activity on Phytopathogenic Bacteria and Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, A-Min; Lee, In-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Yeop

    2016-01-01

    The culture filtrate of Lentinula edodes shows potent antimicrobial activity against the plant pathogenic bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum. Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted using Diaion HP-20 column chromatography, and the insoluble active compound was not adsorbed on the resin. Further fractionation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) suggested that the active compounds were organic acids. Nine organic acids were detected in the culture filtrate of L. edodes; oxalic acid was the major component and exhibited antibacterial activity against nine different phytopathogenic bacteria. Quantitative analysis by HPLC revealed that the content of oxalic acid was higher in the water extract from spent mushroom substrate than in liquid culture. This suggests that the water extract of spent L. edodes substrate is an eco-friendly control agent for plant diseases. PMID:28154495

  10. Improvement of the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates by detoxification using electrodialysis and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jeong, So-Yeon; Trinh, Ly Thi Phi; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    A two-step detoxification process consisting of electrodialysis and adsorption was performed to improve the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates. The constituents of the hydrolysate differed significantly between mixed hardwood and softwood. Acetic acid and furfural concentrations were high in the mixed hardwood, whereas 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration was relatively low compared with that of the mixed softwood. The removal efficiency of acetic acid reached 100% by electrodialysis (ED) process in both hydrolysates, while those of furfural and HMF showed very low, due to non-ionizable properties. Most of the remaining inhibitors were removed by XAD-4 resin. In the mixed hardwood hydrolysate without removal of the inhibitors, ethanol fermentation was not completed. Meanwhile, both ED-treated hydrolysates successfully produced ethanol with 0.08 and 0.15 g/Lh ethanol productivity, respectively. The maximum ethanol productivity was attained after fermentation with 0.27 and 0.35 g/Lh of detoxified hydrolysates, which were treated by ED, followed by XAD-4 resin.

  11. A Neat Trick Using Oxalic Acid Dihydrate and Potassium Permanganate and Other Experiments with Small Organic Amine or Oxygenated Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelland, Malcolm A.

    2011-01-01

    Solid potassium permanganate (KMnO[subscript 4]) is shown to react in a variety of ways with small organic amines or oxygenated compounds depending on whether they are liquids or solids and whether water is present. In particular, its reaction with solid oxalic acid dihydrate can be initiated by the moisture in one's breath, making an intriguing…

  12. Impact of oxalic acid on rumen function and bacterial community in sheep.

    PubMed

    Belenguer, A; Ben Bati, M; Hervás, G; Toral, P G; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R; Frutos, P

    2013-06-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is a secondary compound occurring in a wide range of plants consumed by ruminants, especially in saline lands or in arid and semi-arid regions. However, its impact on the rumen microbial community and its changes over time, as well as the potential consequences on ruminal function, remain unknown. To examine this impact, five ewes fitted with a ruminal cannula and fed low-quality grass hay were dosed daily with 0.6 mmol of OA/kg body weight through the cannula for 14 days. On days 0 (before the start), 4, 7 and 14 of the administration period, samples of ruminal digesta were collected throughout the day (0, 3, 6 and 9 h after the morning feeding) for analysis of the bacterial community and fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations). In addition, two feedstuffs were incubated in situ using the nylon bag technique to estimate ruminal degradation. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was employed to monitor the dynamics of total bacteria, and quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate the abundance of the oxalate-degrading Oxalobacter formigenes. Neither pH nor total VFA concentrations were affected. Nevertheless, OA dosing altered molar proportions of most individual VFA and ammonia concentrations (P < 0.001). The dry matter disappearance of alfalfa hay was reduced on days 7 and 14 and that of barley straw only on day 7 (P < 0.01). These slight changes were related to others observed in the relative frequency of a number of terminal restriction fragments. Variations in the ruminal microbiota occurred rapidly with OA administration, which did not modify the bacterial diversity significantly but altered the structure of the community. However, many of these changes were reversed by the end of the experiment, with no significant differences between days 0 and 14 of dosing. These results suggest a rapid adaptation of the rumen bacterial community linked to the estimated increase in the

  13. Influence of multi-step washing using Na2EDTA, oxalic acid and phosphoric acid on metal fractionation and spectroscopy characteristics from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun

    2016-11-01

    A multi-step soil washing test using a typical chelating agent (Na2EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid), and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated with heavy metals near an arsenic mining area. The aim of the test was to improve the heavy metal removal efficiency and investigate its influence on metal fractionation and the spectroscopy characteristics of contaminated soil. The results indicated that the orders of the multi-step washing were critical for the removal efficiencies of the metal fractions, bioavailability, and potential mobility due to the different dissolution levels of mineral fractions and the inter-transformation of metal fractions by XRD and FT-IR spectral analyses. The optimal soil washing options were identified as the Na2EDTA-phosphoric-oxalic acid (EPO) and phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na2EDTA (POE) sequences because of their high removal efficiencies (approximately 45 % for arsenic and 88 % for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects that were determined by the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals based on the metal stability (I R ) and modified redistribution index ([Formula: see text]).

  14. The relationship between colonization of Oxalobacter formigenes serum oxalic acid and endothelial dysfunction in hemodialysis patients: from impaired colon to impaired endothelium.

    PubMed

    Turkmen, K; Erdur, F M

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). Oxalic acid is a uremic retention molecule that has been extensively studied in the pathogenesis of calcium-oxalate stones. Oxalobacter formigenes (O. formigenes), a component of the colonic microbiota, plays an important role in oxalate homeostasis. Little is known regarding the colonization of HD patients by O. formigenes and the exact role of this bacterial species in oxalic acid metabolism in these patients. We hypothesized that oxalic acid may be insufficiently degraded in HD patients due to under colonization of the colon by O. formigenes in these patients. To test this hypothesis, we sought to quantitatively measure fecal O. formigenes levels and serum oxalic acid levels in HD patients. We also suggest that increased oxalic acid levels may be associated with endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffness, both of which are commonly observed in HD patients. Increased colonization with O. formigenes via the ingestion of prebiotics and probiotics could potentially decrease serum oxalic acid levels and improve cardiovascular outcomes in HD patients.

  15. Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

    2012-10-11

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

  16. Porous aluminum room temperature anodizing process in a fluorinated-oxalic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, S.; Fazio, E.; Barreca, F.; Neri, F.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2016-08-01

    Anodizing of aluminum is used for producing porous insulating films suitable for different applications in electronics and microelectronics. Porous-type aluminum films are most simply realized by galvanostatic anodizing in aqueous acidic solutions. The improvement in application of anodizing technique is associated with a substantial reduction of the anodizing voltage at appropriate current densities as well as to the possibility to carry out the synthesis process at room temperature in order to obtain a self-planarizing dielectric material incorporated in array of super-narrow metal lines. In this work, the anodizing of aluminum to obtain porous oxide was carried out, at room temperature, on three different substrates (glass, stainless steel and aluminum), using an oxalic acid-based electrolyte with the addition of a relatively low amount of 0.4 % of HF. Different surface morphologies, from nearly spherical to larger porous nanostructures with smooth edges, were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy. These evidences are explained by considering the formation, transport and adsorption of the fluorine species which react with the Al3+ ions. The behavior is also influenced by the nature of the original substrate.

  17. Atmospheric oxalic acid and related secondary organic aerosols in Qinghai Lake, a continental background site in Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Cao, Junji

    2013-11-01

    Summertime PM2.5 aerosols collected from Qinghai Lake (3200 m a.s.l.), a remote continental site in the northeastern part of Tibetan Plateau, were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyals. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant dicarboxylic acid in the samples, followed by malonic, succinic and azelaic acids. Total dicarboxylic acids (231 ± 119 ng m-3), ketocarboxylic acids (8.4 ± 4.3 ng m-3), and α-dicarbonyls (2.7 ± 2.1 ng m-3) at the Tibetan background site are 2-5 times less than those detected in lowland areas such as 14 Chinese megacities. Compared to those in other urban and marine areas enhancements in relative abundances of C2/total diacids and diacids-C/WSOC of the PM2.5 samples suggest that organic aerosols in the region are more oxidized due to strong solar radiation. Molecular compositions and air mass trajectories demonstrate that the above secondary organic aerosols in the Qinghai Lake atmosphere are largely derived from long-range transport. Ratios of oxalic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal to levoglucosan in PM2.5 aerosols emitted from household burning of yak dung, a major energy source for Tibetan in the region, are 30-400 times lower than those in the ambient air, which further indicates that primary emission from biomass burning is a negligible source of atmospheric oxalic acid and α-dicarbonyls at this background site.

  18. Screening of indigenous oxalate degrading lactic acid bacteria from human faeces and South Indian fermented foods: assessment of probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Gomathi, Sivasamy; Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Kavitha, Murugan; Selvi, M S; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have the potential to degrade intestinal oxalate and this is increasingly being studied as a promising probiotic solution to manage kidney stone disease. In this study, oxalate degrading LAB were isolated from human faeces and south Indian fermented foods, subsequently assessed for potential probiotic property in vitro and in vivo. Based on preliminary characteristics, 251 out of 673 bacterial isolates were identified as LAB. A total of 17 strains were found to degrade oxalate significantly between 40.38% and 62.90% and were subjected to acid and bile tolerance test. Among them, nine strains exhibited considerable tolerance up to pH 3.0 and at 0.3% bile. These were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius using 16S rDNA sequencing. Three strains, Lactobacillus fermentum TY5, Lactobacillus fermentum AB1, and Lactobacillus salivarius AB11, exhibited good adhesion to HT-29 cells and strong antimicrobial activity. They also conferred resistance to kanamycin, rifampicin, and ampicillin, but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The faecal recovery rate of these strains was observed as 15.16% (TY5), 6.71% (AB1), and 9.3% (AB11) which indicates the colonization ability. In conclusion, three efficient oxalate degrading LAB were identified and their safety assessments suggest that they may serve as good probiotic candidates for preventing hyperoxaluria.

  19. Screening of Indigenous Oxalate Degrading Lactic Acid Bacteria from Human Faeces and South Indian Fermented Foods: Assessment of Probiotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Murugan; Selvi, M. S.; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have the potential to degrade intestinal oxalate and this is increasingly being studied as a promising probiotic solution to manage kidney stone disease. In this study, oxalate degrading LAB were isolated from human faeces and south Indian fermented foods, subsequently assessed for potential probiotic property in vitro and in vivo. Based on preliminary characteristics, 251 out of 673 bacterial isolates were identified as LAB. A total of 17 strains were found to degrade oxalate significantly between 40.38% and 62.90% and were subjected to acid and bile tolerance test. Among them, nine strains exhibited considerable tolerance up to pH 3.0 and at 0.3% bile. These were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius using 16S rDNA sequencing. Three strains, Lactobacillus fermentum TY5, Lactobacillus fermentum AB1, and Lactobacillus salivarius AB11, exhibited good adhesion to HT-29 cells and strong antimicrobial activity. They also conferred resistance to kanamycin, rifampicin, and ampicillin, but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The faecal recovery rate of these strains was observed as 15.16% (TY5), 6.71% (AB1), and 9.3% (AB11) which indicates the colonization ability. In conclusion, three efficient oxalate degrading LAB were identified and their safety assessments suggest that they may serve as good probiotic candidates for preventing hyperoxaluria. PMID:24723820

  20. Light-induced multiphase chemistry of gas phase ozone on aqueous pyruvic and oxalic acids: Aerosol chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Grgic, I.; Net, S.; Böge, O.; Iinuma, Y.; Kahnt, A.; Scheinhardt, S.; Herrmann, H.; Wortham, H.

    2010-12-01

    The light-absorbing organic compounds present in and on condensed aerosol particles interacting with trace gases such as ozone can initiate a new and potentially important photo-induced multiphase chemistry. However, investigations of light induced multiphase processes are very scarce at present. We have launched the idea of pyruvic acid (PA) acting as a photosensitizer in the multiphase reactions between gas-phase ozone and aqueous oxalic acid (OA). The performed photochemical batch experiments yielded a complex suite of organic molecules which resulted primarily from the oligomerization of OA/PA and subsequent reactions, including decarboxylation and cycloadition (Grgic et al., 2010). In the atmosphere, pyruvic acid will always be accompanied by other carboxylic acids (and also other organics) which are constituents of either aerosol particles or aqueous droplets the effects of a possible photochemistry triggered by pyruvic acid should be experimentally studied in depth and under natural conditions as far as possible. Hence, in a very recent study experiments in the aerosol chamber facility LEAK at IFT, Leipzig, were performed to verify the influence of pyruvic on the multiphase (photo)oxidation of oxalic acid. The aim of these experiments was to study the multiphase photo-induced oxidation reactions with airborne deliquescent particles to demonstrate the applicability of the reactions mentioned above under more realistic conditions than in a batch reactor. State of the art sampling and analytical tools were applied for the analysis of the ongoing chamber runs and the formed particulate products which include denuder sampling, carbonyl compound derivatisation, PTR-MS measurements, GC-MS measurements and HPLC-MS and CE-MS for the particle phase. First results from these joint complex chamber experiments will be presented and discussed. Reference: Grgić I., Nieto-Gligorovski L.I., Net S., Temime-Roussel B., Gligorovski S., Wortham H. Light induced multiphase

  1. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process.

  2. Oxalic acid-assisted combustion synthesized LiVO3 cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, X. M.; Wenren, H. Q.; Huang, S.; Shi, S. J.; Wang, X. L.; Gu, C. D.; Tu, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    LiVO3 materials are synthesized by combustion method with oxalic acid as fuel. Owing to its relatively low crystallization and small particle size, the LiVO3 calcined at 450 °C for 2 h displays optimal electrochemical performances, delivering a high discharge capacity of 298.4 mAh g-1 and 262.5 mAh g-1 between 1.0 and 3.5 V at a current density of 50 mA g-1 and 500 mA g-1 respectively, and exhibiting good cyclic stability. In this work, the chemical diffusion coefficient of Li+ (DLi+) in the LiVO3 electrode is determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). The value calculated by EIS is in the range of 10-9-10-8 cm2 s-1, while it calculated by GITT is 10-9.5-10-8 cm2 s-1.

  3. Synthesis, growth, optical and mechanical studies of ferroelectric urea-oxalic acid single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizhi, R. Ezhil; Dhivya, R.; Babu, D. Rajan

    2016-10-01

    A single crystal of urea oxalic acid was grown by slow evaporation method. The lattice parameters are a=5.13 Å, b=12.48 Å, c=7.07 Å, β=98.13° with V=448.5 Å3 which belongs to monoclinic system with space group P21/c obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. UV-visible spectrum was recorded from the wavelength region of 200-800 nm and its cutoff wavelength was found to be 270 nm. Optical energy band gap of 4.57 eV was determined using Tau's plot relation. Fourier transform infrared vibrational spectrum confirmed the presence of N-H asymmetric stretching which occurs at 3444 cm-1 and 1853 cm-1 arising due to the amide C=O symmetric stretching. The emission was observed at 364 nm from the photoluminescence spectrum. The mechanical stability of the grown crystal was estimated by Vickers microhardness studies and it is evident that the grown crystal belongs to soft material category. Hardness related parameters such as elastic stiffness constant, fracture mechanics, brittleness index and yield strength were also evaluated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the grown crystal were carried out as a function of frequency for different temperatures.

  4. Non-enzymatic oxalic acid sensor using platinum nanoparticles modified on graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomei; Cai, Zhixiong; Huang, Zhiyong; Oyama, Munetaka; Jiang, Yaqi; Chen, Xi

    2013-07-07

    An enzyme-free oxalic acid (OA) electrochemical sensor was assembled using a platinum nanoparticle-loaded graphene nanosheets (PtNPGNs)-modified electrode. The PtNPGNs, with a high yield of PtNPs dispersed on the graphene nanosheets, were successfully achieved by a green, rapid, one-step and template-free method. The resulting PtNPGNs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and an X-ray diffraction technique. Electrochemical oxidation of OA on the PtNPGNs-modified electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods. Based on the results, the modified electrode exhibited high electrochemical activity with well-defined peaks of OA oxidation and a notably decreased overpotential compared to the bare or even the GNs-modified electrode. Under optimized conditions, a good linear response was observed for the concentration of OA and its current response was in the range of 0.1-15 mM and 15-50 mM with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 10 μM. Furthermore, the electrochemical sensor presented good characteristics in terms of stability and reproducibility, promising the applicability of the sensor in practical analysis.

  5. Fermentation parameter optimization of microbial oxalic acid production from cashew apple juice.

    PubMed

    Betiku, Eriola; Emeko, Harrison A; Solomon, Bamidele O

    2016-02-01

    The potential of cashew apple juice (CAJ) as a carbon source for oxalic acid (OA) production via fermentation process was investigated in this study. The effects and interactions of CAJ concentration, time, pH, NaNO3 concentration and methanol concentration on OA production were determined in a central composite design (CCD) and the process was modelled and optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that OA fermentation can be described significantly (p < 0.05) by a quadratic model giving regression coefficient (R (2)) of 0.9964. NaNO3 concentration was the most significant positive variable while methanol was not a significant variable. A maximum OA concentration of 122.68 g/l could be obtained using the optimum levels of CAJ of 150.0 g/l, pH of 5.4, time of 7.31 days, NaNO3 of 2 g/l and methanol of 1% volume. The production of OA was found to increase from 106.75 to 122.68 g/l using the statistically design optimization. This study revealed that CAJ could serve as an inexpensive and abundant feedstock for fermentative OA production, the resulting model could be used in the design of a typical pilot plant for a scale up production.

  6. Comparing oxalic acid and sucrocide treatments for Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) control under desert conditions.

    PubMed

    Sammataro, D; Finley, J; Underwood, R

    2008-08-01

    The effectiveness of oxalic acid (OA) and Sucrocide (S) (AVA Chemical Ventures, L.L.C., Portsmouth, NH) in reducing populations of the varroa mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies was measured under the desert conditions of Arizona, USA. OA and S were applied three times 7 d apart. A 3.2% solution of OA was applied in sugar syrup via a large volume syringe, trickling 5 ml per space between frames in the colony. S was applied at a concentration of 0.625% (mixed with water), according to the label directions, using a compressed air Chapin sprayer at 20 psi to apply 59 ml per frame space. Varroa mites, collected on a sticky board before, during, and after the treatments, were counted to assess the effectiveness of the treatments. This study showed that a desert climate zone did not confer any positive or negative results on the acaricidal properties of OA. Even with brood present in colonies, significant varroa mite mortality occurred in the OA colonies. In contrast, we found that Sucrocide was not effective as a mite control technique. Despite its ability to increase mite mortality in the short-term, varroa mite populations measured posttreatment were not affected any more by Sucrocide than by no treatment at all.

  7. Oxalic acid: a prospective tool for reducing Varroa mite populations in package bees.

    PubMed

    Aliano, Nicholas P; Ellis, Marion D

    2009-08-01

    Numerous studies have investigated using oxalic acid (OA) to control Varroa mites in honey bee colonies. In contrast, techniques for treating package bees with OA have not been investigated. The goal of this study was to develop a protocol for using OA to reduce mite infestation in package bees. We made 97 mini packages of Varroa-infested adult bees. Each package contained 1,613 +/- 18 bees and 92 +/- 3 mites, and represented an experimental unit. We prepared a 2.8% solution of OA by mixing 35 g OA with 1 l of sugar water (sugar:water = 1:1; w:w). Eight treatments were assigned to the packages based on previous laboratory bioassays that characterized the acute contact toxicity of OA to mites and bees. We administered the treatments by spraying the OA solution directly on the bees through the mesh screen cage using a pressurized air brush and quantified mite and bee mortality over a 10-day period. Our results support applying an optimum volume of 3.0 ml of a 2.8% OA solution per 1,000 bees to packages for effective mite control with minimal adult bee mortality. The outcome of our research provides beekeepers and package bee shippers guidance for using OA to reduce mite populations in package bees.

  8. Rotenone and oxalic acid as alternative acaricidal treatments for Varroa destructor in honeybee colonies.

    PubMed

    Gregorc, Ales; Poklukar, Janez

    2003-02-27

    This experiment assessed the efficacy of rotenone and oxalic acid (OA) in an aqueous sugar solution in controlling the honeybee mite Varroa destructor. Colonies were populated with mite-infested brood combs and worker bees. Three rotenone or OA treatments administered during the period with capped brood on 31 July, 14 and 18 August resulted in an average efficacy of 24.10%. In untreated colonies mite mortality averaged 5.40%. No significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the rotenone and OA treatments. Three OA treatments administered on 9, 12 and 18 September resulted in a 77.93% mite mortality. An increase in mite drop (P<0.05) was observed at 2 and 4 days after each treatment. OA applications in broodless colonies resulted in significantly (P<0.001) higher mite mortality rates (98.65% average) than the three treatments of rotenone or OA in colonies with capped brood. The dynamics of mite mortality after each rotenone or OA treatment are discussed in this study.

  9. Esophageal mucosa exfoliation induced by oxalic acid poisoning: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIERU; KAN, BAOTIAN; JIAN, XIANGDONG; WU, XIAOPENG; YU, GUANCAI; SUN, JING

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with oral oxalic acid poisoning. As the illness progressed, the patient exhibited severe metabolic acidosis, large-area esophageal mucosa injury and acute kidney injury, which required dialysis. A guide wire slipped out of position during the process of hemodialysis and moved back and forth in the veins, but was removed successfully by interventional endovascular treatment. However, the patient's esophageal mucosa exfoliated, which lead to severe benign esophageal stenosis and dysphagia. Balloon distention was conducted twice in the upper digestive tract using X-ray location in combination with a dumb-bell bladder and interventional wire. The patient exhibited convulsions, shock, embolism and loss of consciousness while undergoing the second balloon distention procedure. Following symptomatic treatment, the patient eventually remained in a stable condition, the digestive tract expansion procedure was not resumed and a jejunostomy was performed in order to facilitate enteral nutrition, which was administered via the jejunum and had little stimulatory effect on the pancreas. Following various treatments, the patient's condition improved markedly, with renal function returning to normal. PMID:26889241

  10. Degradation of 17beta-estradiol in aqueous solution by ozonation in the presence of manganese(II) and oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Jianmeng; Ji, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Natural estrogens, such as 17beta-estradiol (E2), are the main substances responsible for estrogenic activity found in domestic sewage. In the work described herein, the degradation of E2 has been investigated by single ozonation and catalytic ozonation in the presence of manganese ion (Mn2+) and oxalic acid. The presence of Mn2+ and oxalic acid in the ozonation processes significantly improved the E2 degradation and, hence, the reduction of estrogenic activity in aqueous solution. The addition of Mn2+ and oxalic acid produced many more hydroxyl radicals in the catalytic ozonation system than in the single ozonation system. Oxidation products formed during ozonation of E2 have been identified by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), on the basis of which a possible reaction pathway for E2 degradation by ozonation is proposed. E2 was first oxidized to hydroxyl-semiquinone isomers, and these were subsequently degraded to low molecular weight compounds such as oxalic acid and malonic acid. The latter were easily oxidized by ozone to form carbon dioxide (CO2). The results demonstrate that the ozonation-Mn(2+)-oxalic acid system may serve as a powerful tool for removing E2, and the addition of Mn2+ and oxalic acid is favourable for the complete removal of estrogenic activity induced by steroid estrogens in aqueous solution.

  11. Removal of aqueous oxalic acid by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation with MnOx/sewage sludge-derived activated carbon as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanxing; Sun, Yaru; Xu, Zhihua; Luo, Mengyu; Zhu, Chunlei; Li, Liang

    2017-01-01

    MnOx/sewage sludge-derived activated carbon (MnOx/SAC) was prepared as catalysts to improve the performance of aqueous oxalic acid degradation by ozonation. The results indicated that MnOx/SAC had excellent catalytic activity in mineralization of oxalic acid during heterogeneous catalytic ozonation process. MnOx/SAC with a manganese load of 30% exhibited the strongest catalytic activity under the condition of solution pH3.5, which enhanced the oxalic acid removal from 10.3% to 92.2% in 60min compared with that treated by ozone alone. Increase of catalyst dosage and aqueous ozone concentration was advantageous for oxalic acid removal from water. On the basis of catalyst characterization analysis and the observation of inhibitory effect induced by higher pH, less catalyst dosage as well as the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger, it was deduced that the reaction mechanism involved both hydroxyl radicals attack and surface reactions.

  12. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  13. The effect of natural iron oxide and oxalic acid on the photocatalytic degradation of isoproturon: a kinetics and analytical study.

    PubMed

    Boucheloukh, H; Remache, W; Parrino, F; Sehili, T; Mechakra, H

    2017-03-27

    The photocatalytic degradation of isoproturon, a persistent toxic herbicide, was investigated in the presence of natural iron oxide and oxalic acid and under UV irradiation. The influence of the relevant parameters such as the pH and the iron oxide and oxalic acid concentrations has been studied. The presence of natural iron oxide and oxalic acid in the system effectively allow the degradation of isoproturon, whereas the presence of t-butyl alcohol adversely affects the phototransformation of the target pollutant, thus indicating that an OH radical initiated the degradation mechanism. The degradation mechanism of isoproturon was investigated by means of GC-MS analysis. Oxidation of both the terminal N-(CH3)2 and isopropyl groups is the initial process leading to N-monodemethylated (NHCH3), N-formyl (N(CH3)CHO), and CHCH3OH as the main intermediates. The substitution of the isopropyl group by an OH group is also observed as a side process.

  14. Sequential electrokinetic treatment and oxalic acid extraction for the removal of Cu, Cr and As from wood.

    PubMed

    Isosaari, Pirjo; Marjavaara, Pieti; Lehmus, Eila

    2010-10-15

    Removal of Cu, Cr and As from utility poles treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) was investigated using different one- to three-step combinations of oxalic acid extraction and electrokinetic treatment. The experiments were carried out at room temperature, using 0.8% oxalic acid and 30 V (200 V/m) of direct current (DC) or alternating current in combination (DC/AC). Six-hour extraction removed only 15%, 11% and 28% and 7-day electrokinetic treatment 57%, 0% and 17% of Cu, Cr and As from wood chips, respectively. The best combination for all the metals was a three-step process consisting of pre-extraction, electrokinetics and post-extraction steps, yielding removals of 67% for Cu, 64% for Cr and 81% for As. Oxalic acid extraction prior to electrokinetic treatment was deleterious to further removal of Cu, but it was necessary for Cr and As removal. Chemical equilibrium modelling was used to explain the differences in the behaviour of Cu, Cr and As. Due to the dissimilar nature of these metals, it appeared that even more process sequences and/or stricter control of the process conditions would be needed to obtain the >99% removals required for safe recycling of the purified wood material.

  15. Ascorbate metabolism and the developmental demand for tartaric and oxalic acids in ripening grape berries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Fresh fruits are well accepted as a good source of the dietary antioxidant ascorbic acid (Asc, Vitamin C). However, fruits such as grapes do not accumulate exceptionally high quantities of Asc. Grapes, unlike most other cultivated fruits do however use Asc as a precursor for the synthesis of both oxalic (OA) and tartaric acids (TA). TA is a commercially important product in the wine industry and due to its acidifying effect on crushed juice it can influence the organoleptic properties of the wine. Despite the interest in Asc accumulation in fruits, little is known about the mechanisms whereby Asc concentration is regulated. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into Asc metabolism in wine grapes (Vitis vinifera c.v. Shiraz.) and thus ascertain whether the developmental demand for TA and OA synthesis influences Asc accumulation in the berry. Results We provide evidence for developmentally differentiated up-regulation of Asc biosynthetic pathways and subsequent fluctuations in Asc, TA and OA accumulation. Rapid accumulation of Asc and a low Asc to dehydroascorbate (DHA) ratio in young berries was co-ordinated with up-regulation of three of the primary Asc biosynthetic (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway genes. Immature berries synthesised Asc in-situ from the primary pathway precursors D-mannose and L-galactose. Immature berries also accumulated TA in early berry development in co-ordination with up-regulation of a TA biosynthetic gene. In contrast, ripe berries have up-regulated expression of the alternative Asc biosynthetic pathway gene D-galacturonic acid reductase with only residual expression of Smirnoff-Wheeler Asc biosynthetic pathway genes and of the TA biosynthetic gene. The ripening phase was further associated with up-regulation of Asc recycling genes, a secondary phase of increased accumulation of Asc and an increase in the Asc to DHA ratio. Conclusion We demonstrate strong developmental regulation of Asc biosynthetic, recycling and catabolic

  16. Oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 are cross-species markers of sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Weljie, Aalim M; Meerlo, Peter; Goel, Namni; Sengupta, Arjun; Kayser, Matthew S; Abel, Ted; Birnbaum, Morris J; Dinges, David F; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-02-24

    Sleep is an essential biological process that is thought to have a critical role in metabolic regulation. In humans, reduced sleep duration has been associated with risk for metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of sleep loss is only in its nascent stages. In this study we used rat and human models to simulate modern-day conditions of restricted sleep and addressed cross-species consequences via comprehensive metabolite profiling. Serum from sleep-restricted rats was analyzed using polar and nonpolar methods in two independent datasets (n = 10 per study, 3,380 measured features, 407 identified). A total of 38 features were changed across independent experiments, with the majority classified as lipids (18 from 28 identified). In a parallel human study, 92 metabolites were identified as potentially significant, with the majority also classified as lipids (32 of 37 identified). Intriguingly, two metabolites, oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3, were robustly and quantitatively reduced in both species following sleep restriction, and recovered to near baseline levels after sleep restriction (P < 0.05, false-discovery rate < 0.2). Elevated phospholipids were also noted after sleep restriction in both species, as well as metabolites associated with an oxidizing environment. In addition, polar metabolites reflective of neurotransmitters, vitamin B3, and gut metabolism were elevated in sleep-restricted humans. These results are consistent with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and disruptions of the circadian clock. The findings provide a potential link between known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction, and potential biomarkers for sleep loss.

  17. Beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ilczyszyn, M M

    2003-03-01

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate complex has been reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction method at 293 K. Formation of monoclinic crystal system belonging to C2/c space group and consisting of semi-oxalate chains, diprotonated beta-alanine dimers and water molecules bonded to both these units is confirmed. New results are obtained for distances in the carboxylic groups and hydrogen bonds. These structural observations are used for protonation degree monitoring on the carboxylic oxygen atoms. They are in accordance with our vibrational study. The 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  18. Pre-harvest application of oxalic acid increases quality and resistance to Penicillium expansum in kiwifruit during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuyan; Yu, Jie; Brecht, Jeffrey K; Jiang, Tianjia; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Bruno) fruits were sprayed with 5mM oxalic acid (OA) at 130, 137, and 144 days after full blossom, and then harvested at commercial maturity [soluble solid content (SSC) around 10.0%] and stored at room temperature (20 ± 1 °C). Pre-harvest application of OA led to fruit with higher ascorbic acid content at harvest, slowed the decreases in fruit firmness and ascorbic acid content and increase in SSC during storage, and also decreased the natural disease incidence, lesion diameter, and patulin accumulation in fruit inoculated with Penicillium expansum, indicating that the OA treatment increased quality and induced disease resistance in kiwifruit. It was suggested that the increase in activities of defense-related enzymes and in levels of substances related to disease resistance might collectively contribute to resistance in kiwifruit against fungi such as P. expansum in storage.

  19. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline nickel oxide using NaOH and oxalic acid as oxide sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathishkumar, K.; Shanmugam, N.; Kannadasan, N.; Cholan, S.; Viruthagiri, G.

    2014-04-01

    Precursors of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesized through a simple chemical precipitation method by changing the oxide source used for the synthesis. The synthesized precursors were subjected to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the temperature at which the precursors decompose into nickel oxide. The obtained results of TGA suggest that precursor NiO prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) showed NiO formation at 600 °C, whereas, when oxalic acid was used as oxide source the formation of NiO took place at 400 °C. After calcinations of the precursors at respective temperatures, NiO nanocrystals have been harvested. The synthesized NiO powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. An FE-TEM image of NiO prepared using oxalic acid showed spherical and elliptical particles with sizes in the range of 15 nm. The Williamson-Hall (W-H) plots were drawn for the annealed products to study their lattice strain and crystallite size. The sizes of NiO nanocrystals obtained from W-H analysis are well correlated with sizes estimated using Scherrer’s formula. The relatively low saturation magnetization of NiO confirms its super paramagnetic behavior.

  1. Effect of Macerase, Oxalic Acid, and EGTA on Deep Supercooling and Pit Membrane Structure of Xylem Parenchyma of Peach

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Michael; Davis, Glen; Arora, Rajeev

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if calcium cross-linking of pectin in the pit membrane of xylem parenchyma restricts water movement which results in deep supercooling. Current year shoots of `Loring' peach (Prunus persica) were infiltrated with oxalic acid or EGTA solutions for 24 or 48 hours and then either prepared for ultrastructural analysis or subjected to differential thermal analysis. The effect of 0.25 to 1.0% pectinase (weight/volume) on deep supercooling was also investigated. The use of 5 to 50 millimolar oxalic acid and pectinase resulted in a significant reduction (flattening) of the low temperature exotherm and a distinct swelling and partial degradation of the pit membrane. EGTA (10 millimolar) for 24 or 48 hours shifted the low temperature exotherm to warmer temperatures and effected the outermost layer of the pit membrane. A hypothesis is presented on pectin-mediated regulation of deep supercooling of xylem parenchyma. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668341

  2. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  3. Degradation of oxalic acid by the mycoparasite Coniothyrium minitans plays an important role in interacting with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li-Mei; Zhang, Jing; Han, Yong-Chao; Yang, Long; Wu, Ming-de; Jiang, Dao-Hong; Chen, Weidong; Li, Guo-Qing

    2014-08-01

    Coniothyrium minitans (Cm) is a mycoparasite of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Ss). Ss produces a virulence factor oxalic acid (OA) which is toxic to plants and also to Cm, and Cm detoxifies OA by degradation. In this study, two oxalate decarboxylase genes, Cmoxdc1 and Cmoxdc2, were cloned from Cm strain Chy-1. OA and low pH induced expression of Cmoxdc1, but not Cmoxdc2. Cmoxdc1 was partially responsible for OA degradation, whereas Cmoxdc2 had no effect on OA degradation. Disruption of Cmoxdc1 in Cm reduced its ability to infect Ss in dual cultures where OA accumulated. Compared with Chy-1, the Cmoxdc1-disrupted mutants had reduced expression levels of two mycoparasitism-related genes chitinase (Cmch1) and β-1,3-glucanase (Cmg1), and had no detectable activity of extracellular proteases in the presence of OA. On the other hand, the cultural filtrates of the Cmoxdc1-disrupted mutants in OA-amended media showed enhanced antifungal activity, possibly because of increased production of antifungal substances under acidic pH condition resulted from reduced Cmoxdc1-mediated OA degradation. This study provides direct genetic evidence of OA degradation regulating mycoparasitism and antibiosis of Cm against Ss, and sheds light on the sophisticated strategies of Cm in interacting with metabolically active mycelia and dormant sclerotia of Ss.

  4. Prestorage oxalic acid treatment maintained visual quality, bioactive compounds, and antioxidant potential of pomegranate after long-term storage at 2 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Sayyari, Mohammad; Valero, Daniel; Babalar, Mesbah; Kalantari, Siamak; Zapata, Pedro J; Serrano, María

    2010-06-09

    Oxalic acid at three concentrations (2, 4, and 6 mM) was applied by dipping to pomegranate fruits of cv. Mollar de Elche, which were then stored for 84 days at 2 degrees C. Pomegranate is a chilling-sensitive fruit and, thus, control fruits exhibited chilling injury (CI) symptoms after long-term storage at 2 degrees C that were accompanied by increased respiration rate, weight loss, and electrolyte leakage (EL). The CI symptoms were significantly reduced by oxalic acid treatment, especially for the 6 mM concentration. In addition, control pomegranates showed significant reduction in the content of total phenolics and ascorbic acid as well as in total antioxidant activity (TAA), in both hydrophilic (H-TAA) and lipophilic (L-TAA) fractions. The application of oxalic acid led to lower losses of total phenolics and significant increase in both ascorbic acid content and H-TAA, whereas L-TAA remained unaffected. Thus, oxalic acid could be a promising postharvest treatment to alleviate CI and increase antioxidant potential.

  5. Mode of Action: Oxalate Crystal-Induced Renal Tubule Degeneration and Glycolic Acid-Induced Dysmorphogenesis—Renal and Developmental Effects of Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Meek, M E.; Carney, E W.

    2005-10-01

    Ethylene glycol can cause both renal and developmental toxicity, with metabolism playing a key role in the mode of action (MOA) for each form of toxicity. Renal toxicity is ascribed to the terminal metabolite oxalic acid, which precipitates in the kidney in the form of calcium oxalate crystals and is believed to cause physical damage to the renal tubules. The human relevance of the renal toxicity of ethylene glycol is indicated by the similarity between animals and humans of metabolic pathways, the observation of renal oxalate crystals in toxicity studies in experimental animals and human poisonings, and cases of human kidney and bladder stones related to dietary oxalates and oxalate precursors. High-dose gavage exposures to ethylene glycol also cause axial skeletal defects in rodents (but not rabbits), with the intermediary metabolite, glycolic acid, identified as the causative agent. However, the mechanism by which glycolic acid perturbs development has not been investigated sufficiently to develop a plausible hypothesis of mode of action, nor have any cases of ethylene glycol-induced developmental effects been reported in humans. Given this, and the variations in sensitivity between animal species in response, the relevance to humans of ethylene glycol-induced developmental toxicity in animals is unknown at this time.

  6. Reaction mechanism and metal ion transformation in photocatalytic ozonation of phenol and oxalic acid with Ag(+)/TiO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Xie, Yongbing; Yang, Jun; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Photocatalytic ozonation of phenol and oxalic acid (OA) was conducted with a Ag(+)/TiO2 catalyst and different pathways were found for the degradation of different compounds. Ag(+) greatly promoted the photocatalytic degradation of contaminants due to its role as an electron scavenger. It also accelerated the removal rate of OA in ozonation and the simultaneous process for its complex reaction with oxalate. Phenol could be degraded both in direct ozonation and photolysis, but the TOC removal rates were much higher in the simultaneous processes due to the oxidation of hydroxyl radicals resulting from synergetic effects. The sequence of photo-illumination and ozone exposure in the combined process showed quite different effects in phenol degradation and TOC removal. The synergetic effects in different combined processes were found to be highly related to the properties of the target pollutants. The color change of the solution and TEM result confirmed that Ag(+) was easily reduced and deposited on the surface of TiO2 under photo-illumination, and dissolved again into solution in the presence of ozone. This simple cycle of enrichment and distribution of Ag(+) can greatly benefit the design of advanced oxidation processes, in which the sequences of ozone and photo-illumination can be varied according to the needs for catalyst recycling and the different properties of pollutants.

  7. Oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase gene mutants of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum do not accumulate oxalic acid, but do produce limited lesions on host plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaofei; Liberti, Daniele; Li, Moyi; Kim, Young-Tae; Hutchens, Andrew; Wilson, Ron; Rollins, Jeffrey A

    2015-08-01

    The oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase (OAH, EC 3.7.1.1)-encoding gene Ss-oah1 was cloned and functionally characterized from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Ss-oah1 transcript accumulation mirrored oxalic acid (OA) accumulation with neutral pH induction dependent on the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator Ss-Pac1. Unlike previously characterized ultraviolet (UV)-induced oxalate-deficient mutants ('A' mutants) which retain the capacity to accumulate OA, gene deletion Δss-oah1 mutants did not accumulate OA in culture or during plant infection. This defect in OA accumulation was fully restored on reintroduction of the wild-type (WT) Ss-oah1 gene. The Δss-oah1 mutants were also deficient in compound appressorium and sclerotium development and exhibited a severe radial growth defect on medium buffered at neutral pH. On a variety of plant hosts, the Δss-oah1 mutants established very restricted lesions in which the infectious hyphae gradually lost viability. Cytological comparisons of WT and Δss-oah1 infections revealed low and no OA accumulation, respectively, in subcuticular hyphae. Both WT and mutant hyphae exhibited a transient association with viable host epidermal cells at the infection front. In summary, our experimental data establish a critical requirement for OAH activity in S. sclerotiorum OA biogenesis and pathogenesis, but also suggest that factors independent of OA contribute to the establishment of primary lesions.

  8. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  9. [Characterization and analysis of direction extraction and precipitation of cerium loading organic phase by oxalic acid solution].

    PubMed

    Mei, Yan; Xia, Chuan; Chen, Xiao-Li; Sun, He; Nie, Zuo-Ren

    2011-11-01

    In the condition of sodium hydroxide saponification, the test results using direction extraction and precipitation of cerium from P507 loading organic phase by oxalic acid solution were studied. Infared (IR) spectrum, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG-DSC) were used to study and characterize organic cerium precipitates and the final calcined products. The results showed that organic cerium precipitates and final calcined products were spheric organic cerium coordination and spheric cube CeO2 crystal, respectively, showing their morphologies were successive. IR made out that the structures of organic cerium precipitates and final calcined products were different. TG-DSC indicated that the final calcined products weightlessness was 3.5% and chemical composing was CeO2 x 1/3H2O.

  10. Preharvest treatments with malic, oxalic, and acetylsalicylic acids affect the phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity of coriander, dill and parsley.

    PubMed

    El-Zaeddi, Hussein; Calín-Sánchez, Ángel; Nowicka, Paulina; Martínez-Tomé, Juan; Noguera-Artiaga, Luis; Burló, Francisco; Wojdyło, Aneta; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2017-07-01

    The effects of a preharvest treatment with malic (MA), oxalic (OA), or acetylsalicylic (ASA) acid at three concentrations (1, 2 and 3mM) on the bioactivity and antioxidant capacity of coriander, dill, and parsley were investigated. The antioxidant capacity of the herbs extracts was assayed by spectrophotometric methods by using three different analytical methods: ORAC, FRAP, and ABTS; the effects of treatments were very positive in coriander, produced intermediate results in dill, and no effects were found in parsley plants. Polyphenol compounds were identified by LC-MS-QTof and quantified by UPLC-PDA-FL. Thirty phenolic compounds were identified in these three herbs. The major compounds were (i) coriander: dimethoxycinnamoyl hexoside and quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, (ii) dill: neochlorogenic acid and quercetin glucuronide, and (iii) parsley: apigenin-7-apiosylglucoside (apiin) and isorhamnetin-3-O-hexoside. The application of these three organic acids favored the accumulation of phenolic compounds in coriander plants, but had no significant positive effects on dill and parsley. The treatments leading to the best results in all three plants were the application of MA or OA at 1mM.

  11. Preharvest application of oxalic acid increased fruit size, bioactive compounds, and antioxidant capacity in sweet cherry cultivars (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Esplá, Alejandra; Zapata, Pedro Javier; Valero, Daniel; García-Viguera, Cristina; Castillo, Salvador; Serrano, María

    2014-04-16

    Trees of 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late' sweet cherry cultivars (Prunus avium L.) were treated with oxalic acid (OA) at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mM at 98, 112, and 126 days after full blossom. Results showed that all treatments increased fruit size at harvest, manifested by higher fruit volume and weight in cherries from treated trees than from controls, the higher effect being found with 2.0 mM OA (18 and 30% higher weight for 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late', respectively). Other quality parameters, such as color and firmness, were also increased by OA treatments, although no significant differences were found in total soluble solids or total acidity, showing that OA treatments did not affect the on-tree ripening process of sweet cherry. However, the increases in total anthocyanins, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity associated with the ripening process were higher in treated than in control cherries, leading to fruit with high bioactive compounds and antioxidant potential at commercial harvest (≅45% more anthocyanins and ≅20% more total phenolics). In addition, individual anthocyanins, flavonols, and chlorogenic acid derivatives were also increased by OA treatment. Thus, OA preharvest treatments could be an efficient and natural way to increase the quality and functional properties of sweet cherries.

  12. Chrysotile asbestos detoxification with a combined treatment of oxalic acid and silicates producing amorphous silica and biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Valouma, Aikaterini; Verganelaki, Anastasia; Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, Pagona; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-03-15

    This study was primarily imposed by the ever increasing need for detoxification of asbestos and asbestos containing materials (ACM), with potential application onsite. The present work investigates potential detoxification of pure chrysotile (Chr) asbestos via a combined treatment of oxalic acid dihydrate (Oxac) (Η2C2Ο4·2Η2Ο) with silicates, such as tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) (SiH20C8O4) and pure water glass (WG) (potassium silicate) (K2SiO3). These reagents used in the experimental procedure, do not cause adverse effects on the environment and are cost effective. The results of FTIR, XRD, optical and scanning microscopy coupled with EDS analyses indicated that all of the applied treatments destructed the Chr structure and yielded silica of amorphous phase and the biomaterial glushinskite from the Oxac reacted with brucite [Mg(OH)2] layer. Each of the proposed formulations can be applied for the detoxification of asbestos, according to priorities related to the specific products of the recovery treatment. Therefore, Oxac acid leaching followed by the TEOS addition is preferred in cases of glushinskite recovery; TEOS treatment of asbestos with subsequent Oxac addition produced amorphous silica production; finally Oxac acid leaching followed by WG encapsulated the asbestos fibers and can be used in cases of onsite asbestos and ACM detoxification.

  13. A new approach to the decontamination of asbestos-polluted waters by treatment with oxalic acid under power ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Turci, Francesco; Tomatis, Maura; Mantegna, Stefano; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Fubini, Bice

    2008-04-01

    A suspension of chrysotile asbestos fibres in aqueous 0.5M oxalic acid was subjected to power ultrasound with the aim to disrupt and detoxify the mineral by the leaching action of oxalic acid on its structural cations acting simultaneously with a vigorous acoustic cavitation. Sonication was performed in a "cavitating tube", a vertical hollow vibrating cylinder made of titanium, operating at 19.2 kHz and 150 W. Treatment lasted from 2.5 to 21 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the joint action of the chelating agent and ultrasound (though not of either when applied independently) mostly converted asbestos fibres into micrometric aggregates and nano-sized debris, whose morphology totally differed from asbestos fibres. When treated suspensions were filtered through CA membranes (pore size 0.20 microm), more than half of the asbestos went through the filter because it had either been brought in solution or dispersed in the form of extremely small particles. Most of the structural metal ions were brought into solution (ICP-AES). After the treatment the BET surface area of the recovered solid was tenfold greater than the original. The crystalline fraction of residual solids, though resembling the original sample in XRD, was shown by micro-Raman spectra to be made of antigorite, a polymorph form of serpentine. Furthermore, as the length of these antigorite fibrils lay outside the fibre range rated as a health hazard under worldwide regulations, our procedure can be employed for the decontamination of chrysotile-polluted waters and sediments.

  14. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in mango fruit by modulating proline metabolism and energy status under chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Zheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of oxalic acid on chilling injury, proline metabolism and energy status in mango fruit were investigated after mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zill) were dipped in 5mM oxalic acid solution for 10min at 25°C and then stored at low temperature (10±0.5°C) for 49days thereafter transferred to 25°C for 4days. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid apparently inhibited the development of chilling injury, notably elevated proline accumulation actually associated with increase in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) activity and decrease in proline dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the peel and the flesh, without activation of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) activity, and maintained high ATP level and energy charge in the flesh during storage. It was suggested that these effects of oxalic acid might collectively contribute to improving chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating chilling injury and maintaining quality of mango fruit in long term cold storage.

  15. Influence of oxalic and malic acids in chickpea leaf exudates on the biological activity of CryIAc towards Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Devi, V Surekha; Sharma, Hari C; Rao, P Arjuna

    2013-04-01

    Efforts are being made to express toxin genes from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in chickpea for minimizing the losses due to the pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera. However, there is an apprehension that acidic exudates in chickpea leaves may influence the protoxin-toxin conversion in the insect midgut, and thus, reduce the efficacy of Bt toxins. Therefore, we studied the influence of organic acids (oxalic acid and malic acid) present in the trichome exudates of chickpea on the biological activity and binding of Bt δ-endotoxin Cry1Ac to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of the pod borer, H. armigera. Oxalic and malic acids in combination at concentrations present in chickpea leaves did not influence the biological activity of Bt toxin Cry1Ac towards H. armigera larvae. Amounts of Cry1Ac protein in the midgut of insects reared on diets with organic acids were similar to those reared on artificial diet without the organic acids. However, very high concentrations of the organic acids reduced the amounts of Cry1Ac in the midgut of H. armigera larvae. Organic acids in the artificial diet also increased the excretion of Cry1Ac in the fecal matter. Organic acids reduced the amount of protein in the BBMV of insects reared on diets with Cry1Ac, possibly because of reduced size of the larvae. Oxalic and malic acids at concentrations present in chickpea leaves did not affect the biological activity of Cry1Ac, but it will be desirable to have high levels of expression of Cry1Ac toxin proteins in chickpea for effective control of the pod borer, H. armigera.

  16. New cloud chamber experiments on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the deposition nucleation and immersion freezing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Wagner, R.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are ubiquitous components of the water-soluble organic fraction of the tropospheric aerosol. Their contribution to the total particulate organic carbon typically ranges from 1 - 3 wt% in urban and semi-urban areas to up to 10 wt% in remote marine atmospheres [1,2]. Oxalic acid, malonic acid, and succinic acid are usually the most abundant species, partly comprising more than 80% of the total diacid mass concentrations [3]. Several recent studies have addressed the ice nucleation potential of solid low-molecular weight dicarboxylic acids. On the one hand, the dicarboxylic acids can act as deposition mode ice nuclei provided that they are directly exposed to an ice supersaturated environment, e.g. in form of a coating layer that was formed by physical and chemical processing on prevalent particulates such as mineral dust and soot. At typical tropospheric relative humidities, diacids of low water solubility like oxalic and succinic acid may, on the other hand, also be present as solids that are immersed in aqueous inorganic and/or organic solution droplets [4,5]. These embedded crystals can act as ice nuclei in the immersion mode. Here we present new results from recent experiments at the aerosol and cloud chamber facility of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The ice nucleation ability of aqueous and crystalline oxalic acid aerosol particles was investigated at expansion cooling conditions in the temperature range between 244 and 228 K [6]. Oxalic acid dihydrate particles with diameters between 0.03 to 0.8 μm, that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets, showed a high deposition mode ice activity at temperatures around 244 K. The ice onset humidity was below 110 % with respect to ice, and the ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles

  17. Tipping the balance: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum secreted oxalic acid suppresses host defenses by manipulating the host redox environment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Kabbage, Mehdi; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Britt, Robert; Dickman, Martin B

    2011-06-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a necrotrophic ascomycete fungus with an extremely broad host range. This pathogen produces the non-specific phytotoxin and key pathogenicity factor, oxalic acid (OA). Our recent work indicated that this fungus and more specifically OA, can induce apoptotic-like programmed cell death (PCD) in plant hosts, this induction of PCD and disease requires generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the host, a process triggered by fungal secreted OA. Conversely, during the initial stages of infection, OA also dampens the plant oxidative burst, an early host response generally associated with plant defense. This scenario presents a challenge regarding the mechanistic details of OA function; as OA both suppresses and induces host ROS during the compatible interaction. In the present study we generated transgenic plants expressing a redox-regulated GFP reporter. Results show that initially, Sclerotinia (via OA) generates a reducing environment in host cells that suppress host defense responses including the oxidative burst and callose deposition, akin to compatible biotrophic pathogens. Once infection is established however, this necrotroph induces the generation of plant ROS leading to PCD of host tissue, the result of which is of direct benefit to the pathogen. In contrast, a non-pathogenic OA-deficient mutant failed to alter host redox status. The mutant produced hypersensitive response-like features following host inoculation, including ROS induction, callose formation, restricted growth and cell death. These results indicate active recognition of the mutant and further point to suppression of defenses by the wild type necrotrophic fungus. Chemical reduction of host cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) or potassium oxalate (KOA) restored the ability of this mutant to cause disease. Thus, Sclerotinia uses a novel strategy involving regulation of host redox status to establish infection. These results address a long-standing issue involving the

  18. The YvrI Alternative σ Factor Is Essential for Acid Stress Induction of Oxalate Decarboxylase in Bacillus subtilis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Shawn R.; Helmann, John D.; Antelmann, Haike

    2009-01-01

    YvrI is a recently identified alternative σ factor in Bacillus subtilis that requires the coactivator YvrHa to activate transcription. Previously, a strain engineered to overproduce YvrI was found to overproduce oxalate decarboxylase (OxdC), and further analysis identified three YvrI-activated promoters preceding the yvrI-yvrHa, yvrJ, and oxdC-yvrL operons. Independently, proteome analyses identified OxdC as a highly abundant, cell wall-associated protein that accumulated under acidic growth conditions. We show here that the accumulation of OxdC in the cell wall proteome under acidic growth conditions is absolutely dependent on YvrI and is correlated with enhanced transcription of both the yvrI-yvrHa and the oxdC-yvrL operons. Conversely, OxdC accumulates to a high level even under nonacidic growth conditions in cells lacking YvrL, a negative regulator of YvrI/YvrHa-dependent transcription. These results indicate that YvrI and its associated coregulators YvrHa and YvrL are required for the regulation of OxdC expression by acid stress. The high-level accumulation of OxdC depends, in part, on a strong oxdC promoter. A regulatory sequence with similarity to an upstream promoter element (UP) was identified upstream of the oxdC promoter and is required for high-level promoter activity. Conservation of the YvrI/YvrHa/YvrL regulatory system among related species allowed us to deduce an expanded consensus sequence for the compositionally unusual promoters recognized by this new σ factor. PMID:19047353

  19. Synthesis and characterization of polymorphs of photoluminescent Eu(III)-(2,5-furandicarboxylic acid, oxalic acid) MOFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fa-Nian; Ananias, Duarte; Yang, Ting-Hai; Rocha, João

    2013-08-01

    A novel metal organic framework (MOF) formulated as [Eu(H2O)2(fdc)(ox)0.5·(H2O)]n (1, fdc2-=2,5-furandicarboxylate, ox2-=oxalate), was hydrothermally synthesized via in situ ox2- generation from the partial decomposition of the fdc2- ligand. This material crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, unit cell parameters of 1: a=16.7570(10), b=10.5708(7), c=13.5348(14) Å, β=116.917(2)° (Z=8), and exhibits a three-dimensional (3D)-porous framework, with guest water molecules residing in the channel linking all other ligands (H2O, ox2-and fdc2-) via hydrogen bonding interactions. Compound 2 is a polymorph of 1 crystallizing in monoclinic P21/c space group. The photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 were studied at room temperature. The spectra show the typical Eu3+ red emission and the differences observed reflects the slightly different structures of these polymorphs.

  20. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  1. Effect of organic and conventional cropping systems on ascorbic acid, vitamin C, flavonoids, nitrate, and oxalate in 27 varieties of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Koh, Eunmi; Charoenprasert, Suthawan; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2012-03-28

    This study was undertaken to compare the levels of ascorbic acid, vitamin C, flavonoids, nitrate, and oxalate in 27 spinach varieties grown in certified organic and conventional cropping systems. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)MS/MS) of methanolic extracts of spinach demonstrated 17 flavonoids, including glucuronides and acylated di- and triglycosides of methylated and methylenedioxyderivatives of 6-oxygenated flavonoids. The mean levels of ascorbic acid and flavonoids were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the organically grown [40.48 ± 6.16 and 2.83 ± 0.03 mg/kg of fresh weight (FW)] spinach compared to the conventionally grown spinach (25.75 ± 6.12 and 2.27 ± 0.02 mg/kg of FW). Conversely, the mean levels of nitrate were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the conventionally grown spinach compared to the organically grown spinach. No significant effects were observed in the oxalate content of spinach from either production system. The levels of nitrate correlated negatively with those of ascorbic acid, vitamin C, and total flavonoids and showed a positive correlation with the oxalate content. These results suggest that organic cropping systems result in spinach with lower levels of nitrates and higher levels of flavonoids and ascorbic acid.

  2. Dissociation of protonated oxalic acid [HOOC-C(OH)2]+ into H3O+ + CO + CO2: An experimental and CBS-QB3 computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervasti, Henri K.; Lee, Richard; Burgers, Peter C.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2006-03-01

    The predominant dissociation process observed for metastable protonated oxalic acid ions HOOC-C(OH)2+ (generated by self-protonation) leads to H3O++ CO + CO2. We have traced the mechanism of this intriguing reaction using the CBS-QB3 model chemistry. Our calculations show that a unique ter-body complex, OCO...H3O+...CO, plays a key role in the rearrangement process. This complex can also dissociate to the proton bound dimers [H2O...H...OCO]+ and [H2O...H...CO]+ which are minor processes observed in the metastable ion mass spectrum. A further minor process leads to the proton bound dimer OCO...H+...CO which is formed by water extrusion from the ter-body complex. Arguments are provided that the ter-body complex is also generated in the ion source by the collision encounter between neutral and ionized oxalic acid.

  3. Preparation of iron oxide-impregnated spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composite and its photocatalytic removal of methylene blue in the presence of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Kadirova, Zukhra C; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Sharipov, Khasan; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composites (GAC-Fe) with different iron oxide contents (Fe mass% = 0.6-10) were prepared by a pore volume impregnation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2-adsorption results confirm the presence of amorphous iron oxide, pyrolytic carbon, and graphitized globular carbon nanoparticles covered with amorphous carbon in the CAG-Fe. The rate of photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light in the presence of oxalic acid correlates with porosity of the prepared materials. The total MB removal includes the combination of adsorption and photodegradation without the addition of H2O2. The results of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis reveal that the decolorization of MB in aqueous solution containing oxalic acid corresponds to the decomposition of organic compounds to CO2 and H2O.

  4. Graphene-supported PtPd Bimetallic Gathered Nanocrystals for Non-enzymatic Sensing of Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhixiong; Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A novel non-enzymatic oxalic acid (OA) sensor was developed using a nanocrystal PtPd loaded reduced graphene nanosheets (PtPdNCs/RGO)-modified electrode. PtPdNCs/RGO were successfully achieved by a facile, one-step and template-free method, in which PtPd nanoparticles with 100 nm-scale were assembled from polyhedral PtPd nanocrystals of various shapes and dispersed on the graphene nanosheets. Resulting PtPdNCs/RGO were characterized and used for PtPdNCs/RGO-modified electrodes. Electrochemical oxidation of OA on the modified electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Well-defined peaks of OA oxidation could be obtained using an electrode that indicated its high electrochemical activity. The concentration of OA and the current responses could be obtained in the ranges of 0.5 - 10 and 10 - 35 mM with correlation coefficients of 0.9994 and 0.9952; the detection limit (S/N = 3) was found to be 0.05 mM. The modified electrode presented good characteristics in terms of both stability and reproducibility, promising its applicability in practical analysis.

  5. Efficacy of repeated trickle applications of oxalic acid in syrup for varroosis control in Apis mellifera: influence of meteorological conditions and presence of brood.

    PubMed

    Bacandritsos, Nicolaos; Papanastasiou, Iosif; Saitanis, Costas; Nanetti, Antonio; Roinioti, Erifylli

    2007-09-01

    Oxalic acid field trails for the control of varroosis (Varroa destructor) were carried out in an apiary located on the Mt. Imittos (Attica, Greece). The colonies received four successive applications (approximately one every 16 days) with 4.2% oxalic acid (OA) and 60% sugar solution by trickling method with two alternative types of syringes (an automatic self-filling dosing and a single-use) from the broodright to broodless period. The results indicate that the first three applications (from 6th October to 25th November-broodright period) resulted in 65.3% cumulative mite mortality, while only the last application (after the 26th November-broodless period) resulted in 77.3% mite mortality. Very low outern temperatures reduce to the minimum the bee movability, which may result into a slower development of the OA efficacy. No poor colony growth or queen loss were observed even if the bee colonies were received the four successive OA applications with the last one taken place at a very low outern temperature (6.2 degrees C). The trickling method using an automatic-filling syringe seems to be a very quick way for applying oxalic acid in large apiaries (approximately 150hives/h).

  6. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox.more » Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent actinides and early lanthanides to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of Ox. Furthermore, the work is also applicable to the accurate modeling transport of rare earth elements in various environments under the surface conditions.« less

  7. Complex dynamic behavior in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Mn(II) oscillating reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Lucyane C.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2007-05-01

    The oscillating reaction bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Mn(II)-sulfuric acid was observed for the first time in a CSTR at 20 °C. Depending on the bromate concentrations and flow rate, the system showed large amplitude oscillations, two kinds of mixed mode oscillations, quasiperiodicity and bursts of large amplitude oscillations, all mapped in a phase diagram. More complex behavior was favored at low bromate concentrations. The system without acetone was discovered to oscillate too, but the more complex patterns were not seen, indicating that acetone is implied in their formation.

  8. Removal of arsenic and cadmium with sequential soil washing techniques using Na2EDTA, oxalic and phosphoric acid: Optimization conditions, removal effectiveness and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-08-01

    Testing of sequential soil washing in triplicate using typical chelating agent (Na2EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid) and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated by heavy metals close to a mining area. The aim of the testing was to improve removal efficiency and reduce mobility of heavy metals. The sequential extraction procedure and further speciation analysis of heavy metals demonstrated that the primary components of arsenic and cadmium in the soil were residual As (O-As) and exchangeable fraction, which accounted for 60% and 70% of total arsenic and cadmium, respectively. It was determined that soil washing agents and their washing order were critical to removal efficiencies of metal fractions, metal bioavailability and potential mobility due to different levels of dissolution of residual fractions and inter-transformation of metal fractions. The optimal soil washing option for arsenic and cadmium was identified as phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na2EDTA sequence (POE) based on the high removal efficiency (41.9% for arsenic and 89.6% for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects of the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals.

  9. High abundances of oxalic, azelaic, and glyoxylic acids and methylglyoxal in the open ocean with high biological activity: Implication for secondary OA formation from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric dicarboxylic acids (DCA) are a ubiquitous water-soluble component of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), affecting the Earth's climate. Despite the high abundances of oxalic acid and related compounds in the marine aerosols, there is no consensus on what controls their distributions over the open ocean. Marine biological productivity could play a role in the production of DCA, but there is no substantial evidence to support this hypothesis. Here we present latitudinal distributions of DCA, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols from the remote Pacific. Their concentrations were found several times higher in more biologically influenced aerosols (MBA) than less biologically influenced aerosols. We propose isoprene and unsaturated fatty acids as sources of DCA as inferred from significantly higher abundances of isoprene-SOA tracers and azelaic acid in MBA. These results have implications toward the reassessment of climate forcing feedbacks of marine-derived SOA.

  10. Combined administration of oxalic acid, succimer and its analogue for the reversal of gallium arsenide-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Kannan, Gurusamy M; Pant, Bhagwat P; Jaiswal, Devendra K

    2002-06-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a group III-VA intermetallic semiconductor, possesses superior electronic and optical properties and has a wide application in the electronics industry. Exposure to GaAs in the semiconductor industry is a potential occupational hazard because cleaning and slicing GaAs ingots to yield the desired wafer could generate GaAs particles. The ability of GaAs to induce oxidative stress has not yet been reported. The present study reports the role of oxidative stress in GaAs-induced haematological and liver disorders and its possible reversal overturn by administration of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and one of its analogue, monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA), either individually or in combination with oxalic acid. While DMSA and MiADMSA are potential arsenic chelators, oxalic acid is reported to be an effective gallium chelator. Male rats were exposed to 10 mg/kg GaAs orally, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. GaAs exposure was then stopped and rats were given a 0.5 mmol/kg dose of succimers (DMSA or MiADMSA), oxalic acid or a combination of the two, intraperitoneally once daily for 5 consecutive days. We found a significant fall in blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and blood glutathione (GSH) level, and an increased urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in erythrocytes of rats exposed to GaAs. Hepatic GSH levels decreased, whereas there was an increase in GSSG and MDA levels. The results suggest a role of oxidative stress in GaAs-induced haematological and hepatic damage. Administration of DMSA and MiADMSA produced effective recovery in most of the above variables. However, a greater effectiveness of the chelation treatment (i.e. removal of both gallium and arsenic from body organs) could be achieved by combined administration of succimer (DMSA) with oxalic acid since, after MiADMSA administration, a marked loss of essential metals (copper and zinc) is of concern.

  11. Mineralogical basis for the interpretation of multi-element (ICP-AES), oxalic acid, and aqua regia partial digestions of stream sediments for reconnaissance exploration geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Mosier, E.L.; Motooka, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have applied partial digestion procedures, primarily oxalic acid and aqua regia leaches, to several regional geochemical reconnaissance studies carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analytical methods. We have chosen to use these two acids because the oxalic acid primarily attacks those compounds formed during secondary geochemical processes, whereas aqua regia will digest the primary sulfide phases as well as secondary phases. Application of the partial digestion technique has proven superior to total digestion because the concentration of metals in hydromorphic compounds and the sulfides is enhanced relative to the metals bound in the unattacked silicate phases. The aqua regia digestion attacks and leaches metals from the mafic chain silicates and the phyllosilicates (coordination number of VI or more), yielding a characteristic geochemical signature, but does not leach appreciable metal from many other silicates. In order to interpret the results from these leach studies, we have initiated an investigation of a large suite of hand-picked mineral separates. The study includes analyses of about two hundred minerals representing the common rock-forming minerals as well as end-member compositions of various silicates, oxides, sulfides, carbonates, sulfates, and some vanadates, molybdates, tungstates, and phosphates. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of leaching by acids of particular lattice sites in specific mineral structures. ?? 1987.

  12. Speciation in experimental C-O-H fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, G.B.; Chou, I.-Ming; Pasteris, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid speciations and their related reaction pathways were studied in C-O-H-system fluids produced by the thermal dissociation of oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD: H2C2O4 ?? 2H2O) sealed in silica glass capsules. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 230-750??C, with bulk fluid densities in the range 0.01-0.53 g/cm3. Pressure was controlled by temperature and density in the isochoric systems. The quenched products of dissociation experiments were an aqueous liquid and one (supercritical fluid) or, rarely, two (vapor plus liquid) carbonic phase (s). In-situ Raman microanalyses were performed on the quenched carbonic phases at room temperature, at which fluid pressures ranged from about 50 to 340 bars. Bulk fluid speciations were reconstructed from the Raman analyses via mass balance constraints, and appear to monitor the true fluid speciations at run conditions. In experiments from the lowtemperature range (230-350??C), fluid speciations record the dissociation of OAD according to the reaction OAD = CO2 + CO + 3H2O. A process of the form CO + H2O = CO2 + H2 is driven to the right with increasing temperature. The hydrogen gas produced tends to escape from the sample systems via diffusion into/through the silica glass capsules, shifting bulk compositions toward equimolar binary H2O-CO2 mixtures. The speciations of fluids in experiments with minimal hydrogen loss show poor agreement with speciations calculated for equilibrium fluids by the corresponding-states model of Saxena and Fei (1988). Such disagreement suggests that the formations of CH4 and graphite are metastably inhibited in the current experiments, which correlates with their absence or trivial abundances in experimental products. Moreover, calculations in which the stabilities of methane and graphite are suppressed suggest that such metastable equilibrium is approached only in experiments at temperatures greater than about 600-650??C. These results have applications to fluid processes in geological

  13. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox. Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent

  14. Seasonal characteristics of oxalic acid and related SOA in the free troposphere of Mt. Hua, central China: implications for sources and formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Ren, Yanqin; Huang, Yao; Cheng, Yuting; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Ting

    2014-09-15

    PM10 aerosols from the summit of Mt. Hua (2060 m a.s.l) in central China during the winter and summer of 2009 were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular composition of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11) in the free tropospheric aerosols reveals that oxalic acid (C2, 399 ± 261 ng m(-3) in winter and 522 ± 261 ng m(-3) in summer) is the most abundant species in both seasons, followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids, being consistent with that on ground levels. Most of the diacids are more abundant in summer than in winter, but adipic (C6) and phthalic (Ph) acids are twice lower in summer, suggesting more significant impact of anthropogenic pollution on the wintertime alpine atmosphere. Moreover, glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (mGly) are also lower in summer (12 ± 6.1 ng m(-3)) than in winter (22 ± 13 ng m(-3)). As both dicarbonyls are a major precursor of C2, their seasonal variation patterns, which are opposite to those of the diacids, indicate that the mountain troposphere is more oxidative in summer. C2 showed strong linear correlations with levoglucosan in winter and oxidation products of isoprene and monoterpene in summer. PCA analysis further suggested that the wintertime C2 and related SOA in the Mt. Hua troposphere mostly originate from photochemical oxidations of anthropogenic pollutants emitted from biofuel and coal combustion in lowland regions. On contrast, the summertime C2 and related SOA mostly originate from further oxidation of the mountainous isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. The AIM model calculation results showed that oxalic acid concentration well correlated with particle acidity (R(2)=0.60) but not correlated with particle liquid water content, indicating that particle acidity favors the organic acid formation because aqueous-phase C2 production is the primary mechanism of C2 formation in ambient aerosols and is driven by acid-catalyzed oxidation.

  15. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. ... national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. This ...

  16. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent.

  17. [Current status of prevention and therapy of urinary calculi and peroral chemo-litholysis with special attention to the relationship of increased excretion of uric acid in oxalate lithiasis].

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P

    1980-03-01

    A survey shall be given of the present state of prevention and therapy of urolithiasis as well as of the up to now much restricted possibilities of the chemolitholysis. Particular attention is paid to calcium on account of its participation in the development of oxalate and phosphate calculi which together might be 70--80% of all calculi as well as to the rather limited possibilities of the reduction of the oxalate secretion in the urine. The encouragement of the oxalate lithiasis by increased uric acid in the urine as well as the reduction of the frequency of relapses not only of the concrements of the uric acid but also of the oxalate concrements by the uricostatic Allopurinol (e.g. zyloric) is dealt with.

  18. Zirconium-carbon hybrid sorbent for removal of fluoride from water: oxalic acid mediated Zr(IV) assembly and adsorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Jimenez, Litza Halla; Hurt, Robert H; Matos, Juan; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2014-01-21

    When activated carbon (AC) is modified with zirconium(IV) by impregnation or precipitation, the fluoride adsorption capacity is typically improved. There is significant potential to improve these hybrid sorbents by controlling the impregnation conditions, which determine the assembly and dispersion of the Zr phases on carbon surfaces. Here, commercial activated carbon was modified with Zr(IV) together with oxalic acid (OA) used to maximize the zirconium dispersion and enhance fluoride adsorption. Adsorption experiments were carried out at pH 7 and 25 °C with a fluoride concentration of 40 mg L(-1). The OA/Zr ratio was varied to determine the optimal conditions for subsequent fluoride adsorption. The data was analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. FTIR, XPS, and the surface charge distribution were performed to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Potentiometric titrations showed that the modified activated carbon (ZrOx-AC) possesses positive charge at pH lower than 7, and FTIR analysis demonstrated that zirconium ions interact mainly with carboxylic groups on the activated carbon surfaces. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrated that Zr(IV) interacts with oxalate ions, and the fluoride adsorption mechanism is likely to involve -OH(-) exchange from zirconyl oxalate complexes.

  19. Zirconium-carbon hybrid sorbent for removal of fluoride from water: oxalic acid mediated Zr(IV) assembly and adsorption mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Halla, Velazquez-Jimenez Litza; Hurt Robert, H; Juan, Matos; Rene, Rangel-Mendez Jose

    2014-01-01

    When activated carbon (AC) is modified with zirconium(IV) by impregnation or precipitation, the fluoride adsorption capacity is typically improved. There is significant potential to improve these hybrid sorbent by controlling the impregnation conditions, which determine the assembly and dispersion of the Zr phases on carbon surfaces. Here, commercial activated carbon was modified with Zr(IV) together with oxalic acid (OA) used to maximize the zirconium dispersion and enhance fluoride adsorption. Adsorption experiments were carried out at pH 7 and 25 °C with a fluoride concentration of 40 mg L−1. The OA/Zr ratio was varied to determine the optimal conditions for subsequent fluoride adsorption. The data was analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. FTIR, XPS and the surface charge distribution were performed to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Potentiometric titrations showed that the modified activated carbon (ZrOx-AC) possesses positive charge at pH lower than 7, and FTIR analysis demonstrated that zirconium ions interact mainly with carboxylic groups on the activated carbon surfaces. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrated that Zr(IV) interacts with oxalate ions, and the fluoride adsorption mechanism is likely to involve –OH− exchange from zirconyl oxalate complexes. PMID:24359079

  20. Mineral balances of men fed a diet containing fiber in fruits and vegetables and oxalic acid in spinach for six weeks.

    PubMed

    Kelsay, J L; Prather, E S; Clark, W M; Canary, J J

    1988-10-01

    In an investigation of the effects of fiber and oxalic acid on weekly mineral balances, 12 men consumed two diets consisting of natural foods for 6 wk each in a crossover design. One diet contained about 25 g neutral detergent fiber (NDF) in fruits and vegetables and included 100 g spinach, which is high in oxalic acid, every other day. The second diet was a low fiber diet that contained about 5 g NDF and the same amount of spinach as the first diet. On the basis of mean values for 6 wk, balances for calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc or manganese were not significantly different due to diet. Copper balances were significantly lower when the low fiber diet was consumed than when the diet containing fiber in fruits and vegetables and consequently a higher level of copper was consumed. Mineral balances were significantly different due to week. When results of both diets were considered together, mean mineral balances decreased at some time after wk 1 and returned to the wk 1 level during wk 6. Balances for wk 1 and 6 were not significantly different for any of the six minerals. These results demonstrate the importance of determining weekly balances for several weeks when conducting a human metabolic study.

  1. Reuse of sewage sludge as a catalyst in ozonation--efficiency for the removal of oxalic acid and the control of bromate formation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gang; Pan, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Jun; Liu, Zheng-Qian; Zhao, Lei; Li, Jun-Jing

    2012-11-15

    Sewage derived sludge is produced with an annual amount increase of 2% all over the world and it is an urgent issue to be addressed by human being. In the present study, sludge was converted into sludge-based catalyst (SBC) with ZnCl2 as activation agent and characterized by several methods (e.g., scanning electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope). Then it was used as a catalyst to enhance the removal of refractory organic matter, oxalic acid, and to control the formation of bromate (BrO3-) in bench semi-continuous ozonation experiments. The effects of various operating parameters on the control of BrO3- formation were investigated. Furthermore, the mechanism for the enhancement of organic matter removal and the control of BrO3- formation was discussed as well. Results indicate that the combination of SBC with ozone shows a strong synergistic effect, resulting in a notable improvement on oxalic acid removal. A crucial surface reaction mechanism for the enhancement of organic matter removal is proposed on the basis of negative effect of higher pH and no inhibition effect of tert-butanol. The control for BrO3- formation was demonstrated and the reason for its control in the process of O3/SBC is the combined effect of SBC reductive properties, ozone exposure decrease and hydrogen peroxide concentration increase.

  2. Three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded structures in the hydrated proton-transfer salts of isonipecotamide with the dicarboxylic oxalic and adipic acid homologues.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2013-10-01

    The structures of the 1:1 hydrated proton-transfer compounds of isonipecotamide (piperidine-4-carboxamide) with oxalic acid, 4-carbamoylpiperidinium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate, C6H13N2O(+)·C2HO4(-)·2H2O, (I), and with adipic acid, bis(4-carbamoylpiperidinium) adipate dihydrate, 2C6H13N2O(+)·C6H8O4(2-)·2H2O, (II), are three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded constructs involving several different types of enlarged water-bridged cyclic associations. In the structure of (I), the oxalate monoanions give head-to-tail carboxylic acid O-H···O(carboxyl) hydrogen-bonding interactions, forming C(5) chain substructures which extend along a. The isonipecotamide cations also give parallel chain substructures through amide N-H···O hydrogen bonds, the chains being linked across b and down c by alternating water bridges involving both carboxyl and amide O-atom acceptors and amide and piperidinium N-H···O(carboxyl) hydrogen bonds, generating cyclic R4(3)(10) and R3(2)(11) motifs. In the structure of (II), the asymmetric unit comprises a piperidinium cation, half an adipate dianion, which lies across a crystallographic inversion centre, and a solvent water molecule. In the crystal structure, the two inversion-related cations are interlinked through the two water molecules, which act as acceptors in dual amide N-H···O(water) hydrogen bonds, to give a cyclic R4(2)(8) association which is conjoined with an R4(4)(12) motif. Further N-H···O(water), water O-H···O(amide) and piperidinium N-H···O(carboxyl) hydrogen bonds give the overall three-dimensional structure. The structures reported here further demonstrate the utility of the isonipecotamide cation as a synthon for the generation of stable hydrogen-bonded structures. The presence of solvent water molecules in these structures is largely responsible for the non-occurrence of the common hydrogen-bonded amide-amide dimer, promoting instead various expanded cyclic hydrogen-bonding motifs.

  3. Kinetics of Mo, Ni, V and Al leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2011-02-28

    The kinetics of molybdenum, nickel, vanadium and aluminium leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effects of temperature and particle size were examined. In addition, the reaction mechanism for the dissolution of the spent catalyst was discussed. The results of the kinetic analysis for various experimental conditions indicated that the reaction rate of leaching process is controlled by chemical reaction at the particle surface. The values of the activation energies of 31±2, 36±4, 30±4 and 57±3 kJ mol(-1) for Mo, Ni, V and Al, respectively, are characteristic for mechanism controlled by chemical reaction.

  4. Preparation and thermal characterization of oxalic acid dihydrate/bentonite composite as shape-stabilized phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lipeng; Xie, Shaolei; Sun, Jinhe; Jia, Yongzhong

    2017-03-01

    Oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD) which has very high initial phase transition enthalpy is a promising phase change material (PCM). In this paper, shape-stabilized composite PCMs composed of OAD and bentonite were prepared by a facile blending method to overcome the problem of leakage. FT-IR results indicated the interactions between OAD and bentonite, such as the capillary force and the hydrogen bonding, resulting in the confined crystallization process. As a result, the OAD was confined to be amorphous. The thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscope results showed that sample had the best coating effect when the amount of bentonite was 17.7%. The differential scanning calorimetry analyses demonstrated that a decrease in the OAD content was accompanied by a continuous decrease in the melting point and phase change enthalpy of the composites.

  5. Adsorption of dyestuff from aqueous solutions through oxalic acid-modified swede rape straw: adsorption process and disposal methodology of depleted bioadsorbents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanfang; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Wu, Yonghong; Zhou, Hui; Xue, Lihong; He, Shiying; Yang, Linzhang

    2013-06-01

    Swede rape straw (Brassica napus L.) was modified by oxalic acid under mild conditions producing an efficient dye adsorbent (SRSOA). This low-cost and environmental friendly bioadsorbent was characterized by various techniques and then applied to purify dye-contaminated aqueous solutions. Equilibrium study showed that the Langmuir model demonstrated the best fit to the equilibrium data and the methylene blue (MB) adsorption capacity calculated by this model was 432mgg(-1). The adsorption process and mechanism is also discussed. To properly deal with the dye-loaded bioadsorbents, the disposal methodology is discussed and a biochar based on depleted bioadsorbents was for the first time produced and examined. This method both solved the disposal problem of contaminant-loaded bioadsorbents and produced an useful adsorbent thereafter. The study indicates that SRSOA is a promising substitute for ACs in purifying dye-contaminated wastewater and that producing biochars from contaminant-loaded bioadsorbents maybe a feasible disposal method.

  6. Impact of oxalate desensitizer combined with ethylene-diamine tetra acetic acid-conditioning on dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesives during dry bonding

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Doozandeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elimination of water entrapment in hybrid layer during bonding procedure would increase bonding durability. Aims: This study evaluated the effect of oxalate desensitizer (OX) pretreatment on bond strength of three one-bottle adhesives to ethylene-diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA)-conditioned dentin under dry bonding. Materials and Methods: Three adhesive systems, One-Step Plus (OS), Optibond Solo Plus (OP) and Adper Single Bond (SB) were bonded on dentin surfaces under four bonding conditions: (1) Wet-bonding on acid-etched dentin, (2) wet bonding on EDTA-conditioned dentin, (3) dry bonding on EDTA-conditioned dentin, (4) dry bonding associated with OX on the EDTA-conditioned dentin. After storage and thermo cycling, shear bond strength test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Wet bonding with EDTA or acid etching showed similar bond strength for test adhesives. Dry bonding with EDTA significantly decreased the bond strength of OS, but it had no effect on the bonding of OP and SB. OX application in the forth bonding condition, in comparison with the third condition, had a negative effect on the bond strength of OP, but not influence on OS and SB. Conclusions: The use of an OX on EDTA-conditioned dentin compromised the bonding efficacy of OS and OP under dry bonding but compatible for SB. PMID:23833461

  7. Theoretical description of hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid dimer and trimer based on the combined extended-transition-state energy decomposition analysis and natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV).

    PubMed

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P; Kurczab, Rafał; Boczar, Marek; Michalak, Artur

    2010-11-01

    In the present study we have analyzed hydrogen bonding in dimer and trimer of oxalic acid, based on a recently proposed charge and energy decomposition scheme (ETS-NOCV). In the case of a dimer, two conformations, α and β, were considered. The deformation density contributions originating from NOCV's revealed that the formation of hydrogen bonding is associated with the electronic charge deformation in both the σ-(Δρ(σ)) and π-networks (Δρ(π)). It was demonstrated that σ-donation is realized by electron transfer from the lone pair of oxygen on one monomer into the empty P*(H-O) orbital of the second oxalic acid fragment. In addition, a covalent contribution is observed by the density transfer from hydrogen of H-O group in one oxalic acid monomer to the oxygen atom of the second fragment. The resonance assisted component (Δρ(π)), is based on the transfer of electron density from the π-orbital localized on the oxygen of OH on one oxalic acid monomer to the oxygen atom of the other fragment. ETS-NOCV allowed to conclude that the σ(O---HO) component is roughly eight times as important as π (RAHB) contribution in terms of energetic estimation. The electrostatic factor (ΔE(elstat)) is equally as important as orbital interaction term (ΔE(orb)). Finally, comparing β-dimer of oxalic acid with trimer we found practically no difference concerning each of the O---HO bonds, neither qualitative nor quantitative.

  8. Specific detection of pathological three-repeat tau after pretreatment with potassium permanganate and oxalic acid in PSP/CBD brains.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Toshiki; Nakamura, Ayako; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Yagishita, Saburo

    2011-03-01

    Immunohistochemisty with RD3, a monoclonal antibody specific for three-repeat (3R) tau, is sometimes hampered by diffuse neuronal staining on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections pretreated with formic acid and heating. Additional pretreatment with potassium permanganate followed by oxalic acid completely eliminated this diffuse RD3-immunoreactivity (IR) in neurons. Furthermore, this additional pretreatment uniformly enhanced RD3-IR, as well as RD4-IR, a monoclonal antibody specific for four-repeat (4R) tau, on pathological deposits with tau IR. This enhanced sensitivity and specificity may allow more reliable identification of 3R and 4R tau in pathological deposits, which may be variable dependent on disease and regions. Cerebral cortex and midbrain from 8 patients [5 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 3 corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] were screened for RD3- and RD4-IR with this improved procedure. In addition to RD4-positive structures found both in cerebral cortex and brainstem, RD3-positive neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were also found in midbrain in 7 of these 8 cases but not in the cortex. Multi-labeling study demonstrated that most of RD3-negative neurons were positive for RD4. This reliable demonstration of pathological 3R tau deposits in the brainstem of PSP/CBD, so far presumably characterized by deposition of 4R tau, is useful to map tau-positive lesions according to their biochemical composition.

  9. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Emadaldin; Ghanemi, Kamal; Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi; Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali

    2013-01-31

    A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride-oxalic acid (ChCl-Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl-Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100°C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO(3) (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P=0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the use of safe and inexpensive components demonstrate the high potential of ChCl-Ox (1:2) for routine trace metal analysis in biological samples.

  10. Concentrations and stable carbon isotope compositions of oxalic acid and related SOA in Beijing before, during, and after the 2014 APEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiayuan; Wang, Gehui; Gao, Jian; Wang, Han; Ren, Yanqin; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Wu, Can; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Shulan; Chai, Fahe

    2017-01-01

    To ensure good air quality for the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, stringent emission controls were implemented in Beijing and its surrounding regions, leading to a significant reduction in PM2.5 loadings. To investigate the impact of the emission controls on aerosol chemistry, high-volume PM2.5 samples were collected in Beijing from 8 October to 24 November 2014 and determined for secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA, i.e., SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+), dicarboxylic acids, keto-carboxylic acid, and α-dicarbonyls, as well as stable carbon isotope composition of oxalic acid (C2). Our results showed that SIA, C2, and related secondary organic aerosols in PM2.5 during APEC were 2-4 times lower than those before APEC, which is firstly ascribed to the strict emission control measures and secondly attributed to the relatively colder and drier conditions during the event that are unfavorable for secondary aerosol production.C2 in the polluted air masses, which mostly occurred before APEC, are abundant and enriched in 13C. On the contrary, C2 in the clean air masses, which mostly occurred during APEC, is much less abundant but still enriched in 13C. In the mixed type of clean and polluted air masses, which mostly occurred after APEC, C2 is lower than that before APEC but higher than that during APEC and enriched in lighter 12C. A comparison on chemical composition of fine particles and δ13C values of C2 in two events that are characterized by high loadings of PM2.5 further showed that after APEC SIA and the total detected organic compounds (TDOC) are much less abundant and fine aerosols are enriched with primary organics and relatively fresh, compared with those before APEC.

  11. A one-pot gold seed-assisted synthesis of gold/platinum wire nanoassemblies and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Juan; Fang, Chun-Long; Liu, Zong-Huai; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) noble metal nanoassemblies composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires have been attracting much interest due to the unique physical and chemical properties of 1D nanowires as well as the particular interconnected open-pore structure of 3D nanoassemblies. In this work, well-defined Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were synthesized by using a facile NaBH4 reduction method in the presence of a branched form of polyethyleneimine (PEI). A study of the growth mechanism indicated the morphology of the final product to be highly related to the molecular structure of the polymeric amine. Also, the preferred Pt-on-Pt deposition contributed to the formation of the 1D Pt nanowires. The Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were functionalized with PEI at the same time that these nanoassemblies were synthesized due to the strong N-Pt bond. The chemically functionalized Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies exhibited better electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of oxalic acid than did commercial Pt black.Three-dimensional (3D) noble metal nanoassemblies composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires have been attracting much interest due to the unique physical and chemical properties of 1D nanowires as well as the particular interconnected open-pore structure of 3D nanoassemblies. In this work, well-defined Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were synthesized by using a facile NaBH4 reduction method in the presence of a branched form of polyethyleneimine (PEI). A study of the growth mechanism indicated the morphology of the final product to be highly related to the molecular structure of the polymeric amine. Also, the preferred Pt-on-Pt deposition contributed to the formation of the 1D Pt nanowires. The Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were functionalized with PEI at the same time that these nanoassemblies were synthesized due to the strong N-Pt bond. The chemically functionalized Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies exhibited better electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of oxalic acid than

  12. Absorption kinetics of oxalate from oxalate-rich food in man.

    PubMed

    Prenen, J A; Boer, P; Dorhout Mees, E J

    1984-11-01

    The absorption of oxalate was investigated in a healthy subject after ingestion of oxalate-rich meals (spinach and rhubarb) with and without addition of 14C-labeled oxalic acid and calcium oxalate, and after oxalate-free meals with addition of nonlabeled sodium oxalate and calcium oxalate. Under these conditions, calcium oxalate was absorbed to the same extent as soluble oxalate; only a small percentage (2.4 +/- 0.7) of the total oxalate load was absorbed. Significant oxalate absorption occurred within 1 to 8 h after ingestion. The results suggest that under normal conditions the proximal part of the small bowel is a major absorption site.

  13. CO2-Free Power Generation on an Iron Group Nanoalloy Catalyst via Selective Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol to Oxalic Acid in Alkaline Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Kitano, Sho; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Miho

    2014-07-01

    An Fe group ternary nanoalloy (NA) catalyst enabled selective electrocatalysis towards CO2-free power generation from highly deliverable ethylene glycol (EG). A solid-solution-type FeCoNi NA catalyst supported on carbon was prepared by a two-step reduction method. High-resolution electron microscopy techniques identified atomic-level mixing of constituent elements in the nanoalloy. We examined the distribution of oxidised species, including CO2, produced on the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst in the EG electrooxidation under alkaline conditions. The FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst exhibited the highest selectivities toward the formation of C2 products and to oxalic acid, i.e., 99 and 60%, respectively, at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), without CO2 generation. We successfully generated power by a direct EG alkaline fuel cell employing the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst and a solid-oxide electrolyte with oxygen reduction ability, i.e., a completely precious-metal-free system.

  14. A one-pot gold seed-assisted synthesis of gold/platinum wire nanoassemblies and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juan; Fang, Chun-Long; Liu, Zong-Huai; Chen, Yu

    2016-02-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) noble metal nanoassemblies composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires have been attracting much interest due to the unique physical and chemical properties of 1D nanowires as well as the particular interconnected open-pore structure of 3D nanoassemblies. In this work, well-defined Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were synthesized by using a facile NaBH4 reduction method in the presence of a branched form of polyethyleneimine (PEI). A study of the growth mechanism indicated the morphology of the final product to be highly related to the molecular structure of the polymeric amine. Also, the preferred Pt-on-Pt deposition contributed to the formation of the 1D Pt nanowires. The Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies were functionalized with PEI at the same time that these nanoassemblies were synthesized due to the strong N-Pt bond. The chemically functionalized Au/Pt wire nanoassemblies exhibited better electrocatalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of oxalic acid than did commercial Pt black.

  15. Analysis of nanopore arrangement and structural features of anodic alumina layers formed by two-step anodizing in oxalic acid using the dedicated executable software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaraska, Leszek; Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Sulka, Grzegorz D.; Ciepiela, Eryk; Jaskuła, Marian

    2014-02-01

    Anodic porous alumina layers were fabricated by a two-step self-organized anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid under various anodizing potentials ranging from 30 to 60 V at two different temperatures (10 and 17 ∘C). The effect of anodizing conditions on structural features and pore arrangement of AAO was investigated in detail by using the dedicated executable publication combined with ImageJ software. With increasing anodizing potential, a linear increase of the average pore diameter, interpore distance, wall thickness and barrier layer thickness, as well as a decrease of the pore density, were observed. In addition, the higher pore diameter and porosity values were obtained for samples anodized at the elevated temperature, independently of the anodizing potential. A degree of pore order was investigated on the basis of Delaunay triangulations (defect maps) and calculation of pair distribution or angle distribution functions (PDF or ADF), respectively. All methods confirmed that in order to obtain nanoporous alumina with the best, hexagonal pore arrangement, the potential of 40 V should be applied during anodization. It was confirmed that the dedicated executable publication can be used to a fast and complex analysis of nanopore arrangement and structural features of nanoporous oxide layers.

  16. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  17. Expanding the applications of the ilmenite mineral to the preparation of nanostructures: TiO2 nanorods and their photocatalytic properties in the degradation of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Dan; Zhang, Hongzhou; Liu, Sanly; Amal, Rose; Sharma, Neeraj; Glushenkov, Alexey M

    2013-01-14

    The mineral ilmenite is one of the most abundant ores in the Earth's crust and it is the main source for the industrial production of bulk titanium oxide. At the same time, methods to convert ilmenite into nanostructures of TiO(2) (which are required for new advanced applications, such as solar cells, batteries, and photocatalysts) have not been explored to any significant extent. Herein, we describe a simple and effective method for the preparation of rutile TiO(2) nanorods from ball-milled ilmenite. These nanorods have small dimensions (width: 5-20 nm, length: 50-100 nm, thickness: 2-5 nm) and possess large specific surface areas (up to 97 m(2)  g(-1)). Dissolution/hydrolysis/precipitation is proposed as a growth mechanism. The nanorods were found to have attractive photocatalytic properties in the degradation of oxalic acid. Their photocatalytic activity is close to that of the benchmark Degussa P25 material and better than that of a commercial high-surface-area rutile powder.

  18. CO2-Free Power Generation on an Iron Group Nanoalloy Catalyst via Selective Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol to Oxalic Acid in Alkaline Media

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Kitano, Sho; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Miho

    2014-01-01

    An Fe group ternary nanoalloy (NA) catalyst enabled selective electrocatalysis towards CO2-free power generation from highly deliverable ethylene glycol (EG). A solid-solution-type FeCoNi NA catalyst supported on carbon was prepared by a two-step reduction method. High-resolution electron microscopy techniques identified atomic-level mixing of constituent elements in the nanoalloy. We examined the distribution of oxidised species, including CO2, produced on the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst in the EG electrooxidation under alkaline conditions. The FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst exhibited the highest selectivities toward the formation of C2 products and to oxalic acid, i.e., 99 and 60%, respectively, at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), without CO2 generation. We successfully generated power by a direct EG alkaline fuel cell employing the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst and a solid-oxide electrolyte with oxygen reduction ability, i.e., a completely precious-metal-free system. PMID:25004118

  19. Ultra-structural mapping of sugarcane bagasse after oxalic acid fiber expansion (OAFEX) and ethanol production by Candida shehatae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diminishing supplies of fossil fuels and oil spills are rousing to explore the alternative sources of energy that can be produced from non-food/feed-based substrates. Due to its abundance, sugarcane bagasse (SB) could be a model substrate for the second-generation biofuel cellulosic ethanol. However, the efficient bioconversion of SB remains a challenge for the commercial production of cellulosic ethanol. We hypothesized that oxalic-acid-mediated thermochemical pretreatment (OAFEX) would overcome the native recalcitrance of SB by enhancing the cellulase amenability toward the embedded cellulosic microfibrils. Results OAFEX treatment revealed the solubilization of hemicellulose releasing sugars (12.56 g/l xylose and 1.85 g/l glucose), leaving cellulignin in an accessible form for enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest hydrolytic efficiency (66.51%) of cellulignin was achieved by enzymatic hydrolysis (Celluclast 1.5 L and Novozym 188). The ultrastructure characterization of SB using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform–near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed structural differences before and after OAFEX treatment with enzymatic hydrolysis. Furthermore, fermentation mediated by C. shehatae UFMG HM52.2 and S. cerevisiae 174 showed fuel ethanol production from detoxified acid (3.2 g/l, yield 0.353 g/g; 0.52 g/l, yield, 0.246 g/g) and enzymatic hydrolysates (4.83 g/l, yield, 0.28 g/g; 6.6 g/l, yield 0.46 g/g). Conclusions OAFEX treatment revealed marked hemicellulose degradation, improving the cellulases’ ability to access the cellulignin and release fermentable sugars from the pretreated substrate. The ultrastructure of SB after OAFEX and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulignin established thorough insights at the molecular level. PMID:23324164

  20. Oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalic acid is found in most plant species and can serve beneficial roles that protect the plant from a variety of environmental stresses. Excessive amounts of oxalate, however, can be detrimental to plant health. Thus, careful coordination of oxalate metabolism is needed. Despite the important impa...

  1. The bioavailability of magnesium in spinach and the effect of oxalic acid on magnesium utilization examined in diets of magnesium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Kikunaga, S; Ishii, H; Takahashi, M

    1995-12-01

    Spinach was evaluated for its bioavailability of magnesium in the experiment with magnesium-deficient rats. The effect of oxalic acid on absorption of dietary magnesium was also examined in the same experiment. After there were significant differences in the body weight of the rats between the control group and the magnesium-deficient group, and after the number of dead rats increased, the magnesium-deficient rats were divided into six groups. They were pair-fed for 8 days on the magnesium-deficient diet, magnesium-deficient diet supplemented with raw powdered spinach (R-sp), boiled powdered spinach (B-sp), or fried powdered spinach (F-sp), control diet supplemented with oxalic acid (Ox-C), and control diet (+Mg). On the 10th day, there was no significant difference in the food intake of the rats between the control group and magnesium-deficient group. However, the body weight, and body weight gain of the rats increased more significantly in the control group than in those of the magnesium-deficient group. Also, the contents of calcium and phosphorus in the liver and kidneys, and serum calcium content increased significantly in the magnesium-deficient rats compared with those of the control rats. However, the serum magnesium content decreased significantly in the magnesium-deficient rats. An especially large amount of calcium was accumulated in the kidneys of the magnesium-deficient rats. At the end of the experimental period, there were no significant differences in the food intake, body weight and body weight gain of the rats among the control group and each of the spinach-added groups. The body weight and body weight gain of the Ox-C rats decreased significantly in comparison with those of the control group and each of the spinach-added groups. Although, there were no significant differences in the concentrations of serum minerals (Mg, Ca and P) among each of the groups, kidney magnesium, calcium and phosphorus, and liver magnesium and phosphorus were

  2. Comparison of the hydrogen-bond patterns in 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazolium hydrogen oxalate, 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-succinic acid (1/2), 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-glutaric acid (1/1) and 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-adipic acid (1/1).

    PubMed

    Matulková, Irena; Císařová, Ivana; Němec, Ivan; Fábry, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The X-ray single-crystal structure determinations of the chemically related compounds 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazolium hydrogen oxalate, C2H4N3S(+)·C2HO4(-), (I), 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-succinic acid (1/2), C2H3N3S·2C4H6O4, (II), 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-glutaric acid (1/1), C2H3N3S·C5H8O4, (III), and 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-adipic acid (1/1), C2H3N3S·C6H10O4, (IV), are reported and their hydrogen-bonding patterns are compared. The hydrogen bonds are of the types N-H···O or O-H···N and are of moderate strength. In some cases, weak C-H···O interactions are also present. Compound (II) differs from the others not only in the molar ratio of base and acid (1:2), but also in its hydrogen-bonding pattern, which is based on chain motifs. In (I), (III) and (IV), the most prominent feature is the presence of an R2(2)(8) graph-set motif formed by N-H···O and O-H···N hydrogen bonds, which are present in all structures except for (I), where only a pair of N-H···O hydrogen bonds is present, in agreement with the greater acidity of oxalic acid. There are nonbonding S···O interactions present in all four structures. The difference electron-density maps show a lack of electron density about the S atom along the S···O vector. In all four structures, the carboxylic acid H atoms are present in a rare configuration with a C-C-O-H torsion angle of ∼0°. In the structures of (II)-(IV), the C-C-O-H torsion angle of the second carboxylic acid group has the more common value of ∼|180|°. The dicarboxylic acid molecules are situated on crystallographic inversion centres in (II). The Raman and IR spectra of the title compounds are presented and analysed.

  3. Solid state characterization of azelnidipine-oxalic acid co-crystal and co-amorphous complexes: The effect of different azelnidipine polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yahui; Pang, Wenzhe; Lv, Jie; Wang, Jing; Yang, Caiqin; Guo, Wei

    2017-02-04

    In present study, based on the two polymorphs (α and β form) of azelnidipine (AZE), 12 complexes of AZE and oxalic acid (OXA) were prepared by solvent-assisted grinding (SG) and neat powder grinding (NG) methods at the AZE/OXA molar ratios of 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2. The effect of the different polymorphs of AZE on the micro-structure of the complexes were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), tempreture modulated differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, cryo-field emission scanning electron microscope system, fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. β-AZE-OXA co-crystal was produced at β-AZE/OXA molar ratio of 2:1 when SG method was used; while α-AZE was used to produce α-AZE-OXA co-crystal at same condition. However, the other 10 combinations were in co-amorphous forms, including the NG samples with α (or β)-AZE/OXA molar ratios of 2:1, 1:1 (SG and NG), and 1:2 (SG and NG). Although the XRD pattern and IR spectra of the two co-crystals showed no difference, the melting enthalpy and specific heat cp of the β-AZE-OXA co-crystal was higher than that of the α-AZE-OXA co-crystal, indicating that the numbers of solvent molecules which entered the two co-crystal lattices were different. Interestingly, obvious difference occurred in the IR spectra between the α-AZE-OXA and β-AZE-OXA co-amorphous systems. 1745cm(-1) wave-numbers, which were assigned to the free CO groups, appeared in the α-AZE-OXA co-amorphous systems even when just a small amount of OXA was introduced, thereby indicating the presence of different intermolecular forces in the two series of co-amorphous forms. The solubility in different media and the dissolution rate in 0.1molL(-1) HCl of the 12 complexes were determined. The dramatically improved dissolution rates of the α- and β-AZE-OXA 1:2 (NG) combinations in vitro showed potential in improving the physicochemical properties of AZE by co-amorphous complex

  4. Two series of reactant's ratio-dependent lanthanide organic frameworks derived from nicotinic acid N-oxide and oxalate: synthesis, crystal structures and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhou, Yunshan; Zuhra, Zareen

    2015-03-14

    Two series of lanthanide(III)–organic frameworks with the molecular formula [Ln2(NNO)2(OX)2(H2O)4]n (Ln = Eu 1, Tb 2, Sm 3, Dy 4, Gd 5) and [Ln2(NNO)4(OX)(H2O)2]n (Ln = Eu 6, Tb 7, Sm 8, Dy 9, Gd 10) were synthesized successfully under the same hydrothermal conditions with nicotinic N-oxide (HNNO) and oxalic acid (H2OX) as the mixed ligands merely through varying the molar ratio of the reactants. The compounds were characterized by IR, elemental analysis, UV, TG-DTA and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray single-crystal diffraction analyses of compounds 1 and 7 selected as representatives and powder XRD analysis of the compounds revealed that both the series of compounds feature three-dimensional (3-D) open frameworks, and crystallize in the triclinic P1 space group while with different unit cell parameters. In compound 1, pairs of Eu(3+) ions and pairs of NNO(−) ligands connect with each other alternately to form a 1-D infinite Eu-NNO double chain, the adjacent 1-D double-chains are then joined together through OX(2−) ligands leading to a 2D layer, the 2-D layers are further ‘pillared’ by OX(2−) ligands resulting in a 3-D framework. In compound 7, the 1-D Tb-NNO infinite chain and its 2-D layer are formed in an almost similar fashion to that in compound 1. The difference between the structures of the two compounds 1 and 7 is that the adjacent 2-D layers in compound 7 are further connected by NNO(−) ligands resulting in a 3-D framework. The photoluminescence properties and energy transfer mechanism of the compounds were studied systematically. The energy level of the lowest triplet states of the HNNO ligand (23148 cm(−1)) was determined based on the phosphorescence spectrum of compound 5 at 77 K. The (5)D0 (Eu(3+)) and (5)D4 (Tb(3+)) emission lifetimes are 0.46 ms, 0.83 ms, 0.69 ms and 0.89 ms and overall quantum yields are 1.03%, 3.29%, 2.58% and 3.78% for the compounds 1, 2, 6 and 7, respectively.

  5. Organic Acid Production by Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Shoichi

    1965-01-01

    Sixty-seven strains belonging to 47 species of Basidiomycetes were examined for their acid-producing abilities in glucose media, in both the presence and absence of CaCO3, in stationary and shake cultures. Some strains were found to produce large quantities of oxalic acid. The oxalic acid-producing strains could be separated into two groups. Strains of one group (mostly brown-rot fungi) were able to produce oxalic acid, regardless of whether CaCO3 was present in the medium. Strains of the other group (mostly white-rot fungi) were characterized by their ability to produce oxalic acid only when CaCO3 was added to the medium. With the latter group, shake-culturing was generally more effective than stationary culturing in respect to acid production. In the CaCO3-containing media, Schizophyllum commune, Merulius tremellosus, and Porodisculus pendulus were found to produce substantial amounts of L-malic acid as a main metabolic product, along with small quantities of oxalic and other acids in shake cultures. Especially, S. commune and M. tremellosus may be employed as malic acid-producing species. PMID:5867653

  6. Selective adsorption in two porous triazolate–oxalate-bridged antiferromagnetic metal-azolate frameworks obtained via in situ decarboxylation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Juan-Juan; Xu, Xia; Jiang, Ning; Wu, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2015-03-15

    Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid (H{sub 2}atzc) and ammonium oxalate in different temperature produced two metal azolate frameworks, namely, [Cu{sub 3}(atzc){sub 2}(atz)(ox)]·1.5H{sub 2}O (1) and [Co{sub 5}(atz){sub 4}(ox){sub 3}(HCOO){sub 2}]·DMF (2) (H{sub 2}atzc=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylic acid, Hatz=3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, and ox=oxalate), in which the atzc precusor was in situ decarboxylated. Structural determination reveals that 1 contains [Cu{sub 3}(atzc){sub 2}(atz)]{sup 2−} layers of mixed μ{sub 4}-atzc and μ{sub 3}-atz ligands, which are pillared by ox{sup 2−} groups to form a 3D porous framework. Compound 2 contains 2D layers with basic spindle-shaped decanuclear units, which extended by ox{sup 2−} and formates to form 3D porous framework. Gas adsorption investigation revealed that two kinds of frameworks exhibited selective CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} sorption. Moreover, activated 2 shows H{sub 2} storage capacity. Additionally, magnetic properties of both the compounds have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal reactions of metal salts, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxylate and oxalate produced two metal azolate frameworks, which could store gas molecules, especially H{sub 2} due to small pores. in situ decarboxylation of precursor was observed. - Highlights: • Two MAFs were synthesized via in situ decarboxylation of H{sub 2}atzc. • Both activated frameworks exhibited selective CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} sorption. • Activated 2 could adsorb H{sub 2}, which makes it promising candidates for gas storage.

  7. USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15

    SciTech Connect

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2005-10-31

    This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

  8. Surface Crystallographic Dependence of Voltammetric Oxidation of Polyhydric Alcohols and Related Systems at Monocrystalline Gold-Acidic Aqueous Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    reactants formic acid and oxalic acid . Linear sweep voltammetric data were gathered for these reactions on seven gold crystallographic orientations: Au...quoted versus the saturated calomel electrode (SCE), and all measurements were performed at room temperature, 23±I°C. RESULTS Formic Acid and Oxalic Acid Following...voltammetric electrooxidation of oxalic acid under similar conditions. A representative set of anodic voltam- mograms obtained for 45 mM oxalic acid in 0.1 M

  9. Heterogeneous catalysis by solid superacids--14. Perfluorinated resinsulfonic acid (nafion-h) catalyzed Friedel-crafts alkylation of toluene and phenol with alkyl chloroformates and oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Meidar, D.; Malhotra, R.; Olah, J.A.; Narang, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    Product distributions obtained in the alkylation of toluene with methyl, ethyl, and isopropyl chloroformate and dimethyl oxalate and of phenol with methyl and ethyl chloroformate and dimethyl- and diethyloxalate.

  10. Cr{sup 3+} modified LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel intercalation cathodes through oxalic acid assisted sol-gel method for lithium rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Thirunakaran, R. . E-mail: rthirunakaran@yahoo.com; Kim, Ki-Tae; Kang, Yong-Mook; Young-Lee, Jai

    2005-01-04

    To improve the cycle performance of eco-friendly and cost-effective spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the cathode of 4 V class Li secondary batteries, the spinel phase LiCr{sub x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.01-0.20) was synthesized by soft chemistry method using oxalic acid as chelating agent. The present technique results in better homogeneity, good surface morphology, shorter heat treatment time, sub-micron sized particles, good agglomeration and better crystallinity. Electrochemical studies were monitored in the potential range of 3-4.5 V. The present paper reveals that chromium substituted manganese spinel improves the structural stability of the parent material.

  11. Determination of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in agricultural soil samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after simple and rapid solvent extraction using choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Matong, Joseph M; Nyaba, Luthando; Nomngongo, Philiswa N

    2017-01-01

    A rapid, simple and green ultrasound-assisted extraction method using deep eutectic solvents (DES) for extraction of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in soil samples, has been developed. Choline chloride-oxalic acid based DES was used as a solvent. The target analytes were subsequently quantified using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP OES). The parameters that affect the extraction of the target analytes was optimized using standard reference material of San Joaquin soil (SRM 2709a). In the optimization step, a two-level full factorial experimental design was used. The factors under investigation include extraction time, sample mass and acid concentration. Under optimized conditions, limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.009 to 0.1 and 0.03-0.3µgg(-1), respectively. The repeatability (n=20) estimated in terms of relative standard deviation (%RSD) ranged from 0.9% to 3.7%. The accuracy of the proposed method was carried out using SRM 2709a. The obtained and certified/ indicative values were statistically in good agreement at 95% confidence level. The proposed method applied for quantification of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in real soil samples. For comparison, the analytes of interest were also determined using a conventional acid digestion method. According to the paired t-test, the analytical results were not significant differences at 95% confidence level. The method was found to be accurate, precise and environmentally friendly.

  12. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  13. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  14. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  15. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  16. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  17. Crystal growth and physical characterization of picolinic acid cocrystallized with dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somphon, Weenawan; Haller, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are multicomponent materials containing an active pharmaceutical ingredient with another component in well-defined stoichiometry within the same unit cell. Such cocrystals are important in drug design, particularly for improving physicochemical properties such as solubility, bioavailability, or chemical stability. Picolinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan and is widely used for neuroprotective, immunological, and anti-proliferative effects within the body. In this paper we present cocrystallization experiments of a series of dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, succinic acid, DL-tartaric acid, pimelic acid, and phthalic acid, with picolinic acid. Characterization by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, DSC and TG/DTG analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction show that new compounds are formed, including a 1:1 picolinium tartrate monohydrate, a 2:1 monohydrate adduct of picolinic acid and oxalic acid, and a 2:1 picolinic acid-succinic acid monohydrate cocrystal.

  18. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  19. The effect of preincubation of seed crystals of uric acid and monosodium urate with undiluted human urine to induce precipitation of calcium oxalate in vitro : implications for urinary stone formation.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Phulwinder K.; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies demonstrated that crystals of uric acid (UA) and sodium urate (NaU) can induce the precipitation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) from its inorganic metastable solutions, but similar effects have not been unequivocally shown to occur in urine. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether preincubation of these seeds with urine alter their ability to induce deposition of CaOx from solution and thus provide a possible explanation for discrepancy of results obtained from aqueous inorganic solutions and undiluted urine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effects of commercial seed crystals of UA, NaU and CaOx (6 mg/100 ml) on CaOx crystallization were compared in a solution with the same crystals that had been preincubated for 3 hours with healthy male urine. A Coulter Counter was used to follow the crystallization and decrease in soluble (14) C-oxalate was measured to determine the deposition of CaOx. The precipitated particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The preincubated seeds were demineralized and proteins released were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). RESULTS: Analysis of (14) C-oxalate data revealed that while treated UA seeds did not affect CaOx deposition, those of NaU and CaOx inhibited the process by 51.9 (p<0.05) and 8.5% (p<0.05) relative to their respective untreated counterparts. Particle size analysis showed that the average modal sizes of particles precipitated in the presence of treated seed crystals of UA, NaU, and CaOx were very similar to those deposited in the presence of their respective untreated controls. These findings were confirmed by SEM which also showed that seed crystals of UA and NaU, untreated and treated, were attached like barnacles upon the surfaces of CaOx crystals which themselves were bigger than those precipitated in the presence of CaOx seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of the demineralized treated seeds showed that they all selectively

  20. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  1. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  2. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  3. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  4. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  5. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  6. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  7. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  8. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  9. Oxalate content of cereals and cereal products.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; Hönow, Ruth; Voss, Susanne; Seidler, Ana; Hesse, Albrecht

    2006-04-19

    Detailed knowledge of food oxalate content is of essential importance for dietary treatment of recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Dietary oxalate can contribute considerably to the amount of urinary oxalate excretion. Because cereal foods play an important role in daily nutrition, the soluble and total oxalate contents of various types of cereal grains, milling products, bread, pastries, and pasta were analyzed using an HPLC-enzyme-reactor method. A high total oxalate content (>50 mg/100 g) was found in whole grain wheat species Triticum durum (76.6 mg/100 g), Triticum sativum (71.2 mg/100 g), and Triticum aestivum (53.3 mg/100 g). Total oxalate content was comparably high in whole grain products of T. aestivum, that is, wheat flakes and flour, as well as in whole grain products of T. durum, that is, couscous, bulgur, and pasta. The highest oxalate content was demonstrated for wheat bran (457.4 mg/100 g). The higher oxalate content in whole grain than in refined grain cereals suggests that oxalic acid is primarily located in the outer layers of cereal grains. Cereals and cereal products contribute to the daily oxalate intake to a considerable extent. Vegetarian diets may contain high amounts of oxalate when whole grain wheat and wheat products are ingested. Recommendations for prevention of recurrence of calcium oxalate stone disease have to take into account the oxalate content of these foodstuffs.

  10. Dietary hyperoxaluria is not reduced by treatment with lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Secondary hyperoxaluria either based on increased intestinal absorption of oxalate (enteric), or high oxalate intake (dietary), is a major risk factor of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Oxalate-degrading bacteria might have beneficial effects on urinary oxalate excretion resulting from decreased intestinal oxalate concentration and absorption. Methods Twenty healthy subjects were studied initially while consuming a diet normal in oxalate. Study participants were then placed on a controlled oxalate-rich diet for a period of 6 weeks. Starting with week 2 of the oxalate-rich diet, participants received 2.6 g/day of a lactic acid bacteria preparation for 5 weeks. Finally, subjects were examined 4 weeks after treatment while consuming again a normal-oxalate diet. Participants provided weekly 24-hour urine specimens. Analyses of blood samples were performed before and at the end of treatment. Results Urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly from 0.354 ± 0.097 at baseline to 0.542 ± 0.163 mmol/24 h under the oxalate-rich diet and remained elevated until the end of treatment, as did relative supersaturation of calcium oxalate. Plasma oxalate concentration was significantly higher after 5 weeks of treatment compared to baseline. Four weeks after treatment, urinary oxalate excretion and relative supersaturation of calcium oxalate fell to reach initial values. Conclusions Persistent dietary hyperoxaluria and increased plasma oxalate concentration can already be induced in healthy subjects without disorders of oxalate metabolism. The study preparation neither reduced urinary oxalate excretion nor plasma oxalate concentration. The preparation may be altered to select for lactic acid bacteria strains with the highest oxalate-degrading activity. PMID:24330782

  11. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  13. Synthesis of labeled oxalic acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2004-06-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, specifically ##STR1## where each C* is selected from the group consisting of a carbon-12, i.e., .sup.12 C, or a carbon-13, i.e., .sup.13 C and at least one C* is .sup.13 C, R.sup.1 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl and aryl, and X is selected from the group of --NR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 are each independently selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl, --SR.sup.4 where R.sup.4 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl, and --OR.sup.5 where R.sup.5 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl with the proviso that when R.sup.1 is methyl then R.sup.5 is other than methyl, when R.sup.1 is ethyl then R.sup.5 is other than ethyl, and when R.sup.1 is benzyl then R.sup.5 is other than benzyl.

  14. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  15. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  16. [Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on speciation of exogenous Cu in an acid soil].

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Yong; Fu, Qing-Ling; Zhu, Jun; Wan, Tian-Ying; Hu, Hong-Qing

    2014-08-01

    In order to ascertain the effect of LMWOA (citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid) on Cu-contaminated soils and to investigate the change of Cu species, a red soil derived from quartz sandstone deposit was added by Cu (copper) in the form of CuSO4 x 5H2O so as to simulate soil Cu pollution, keeping the additional Cu concentrations were 0, 100, 200, 400 mg x kg(-1) respectively. After 9 months, different LMWOA was also added into the simulated soil, keeping the additional LMWOAs in soil were 0, 5, 10, 20 mmol x kg(-1) respectively. After 2 weeks incubation, the modified sequential extraction method on BCR (European Communities Bureau of Reference) was used to evaluate the effects of these LMWOAs on the changes of copper forms in soil. The result showed that the percentage of weak acid dissolved Cu, the most effective form in the soil increased with three organic acids increase in quantity in the simulated polluted soil. And there was a good activation effect on Cu in the soil when organic acid added. Activation effects on Cu increased with concentration of citric acid increasing, but it showed a rise trend before they are basically remained unchanged in the case of tartaric acid and oxalic acid added in the soil. On the contrary, the state of the reduction of copper which was regarded as a complement for effective state decreased with the increased concentration of organic acid in the soil, especially with citric acid. When 20 mmol x kg(-1) oxalic acid and citric acid were added into the soil, the activation effect was the best; whereas for tartaric, the concentration was 10 mmol x kg(-1). In general, the effect on the changes of Cu forms in the soil is citric acid > tartaric acid > oxalic acid.

  17. A ratiometric fluorescent probe for oxalate based on alkyne-conjugated carboxamidoquinolines in aqueous solution and imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    He, Chunsheng; Qian, Xuhong; Xu, Yufang; Yang, Chunmei; Yin, Liyan; Zhu, Weiping

    2011-02-07

    A novel ratiometric fluorescent probe for oxalic acid was designed and synthesized, based on the zinc-containing [DAQZ@2Zn(2+)] complex. It shows highly selective "on-off" fluorescence changes with a more than 20 nm blue shift in wavelength for oxalic acids in aqueous solution. Moreover, it can fluorescently respond to oxalic acid in living cells.

  18. Probiotics and Other Key Determinants of Dietary Oxalate Absorption1

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Michael; Al-Wahsh, Ismail A.

    2011-01-01

    Oxalate is a common component of many foods of plant origin, including nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes, and is typically present as a salt of oxalic acid. Because virtually all absorbed oxalic acid is excreted in the urine and hyperoxaluria is known to be a considerable risk factor for urolithiasis, it is important to understand the factors that have the potential to alter the efficiency of oxalate absorption. Oxalate bioavailability, a term that has been used to refer to that portion of food-derived oxalate that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is estimated to range from 2 to 15% for different foods. Oxalate bioavailability appears to be decreased by concomitant food ingestion due to interactions between oxalate and coingested food components that likely result in less oxalic acid remaining in a soluble form. There is a lack of consensus in the literature as to whether efficiency of oxalate absorption is dependent on the proportion of total dietary oxalate that is in a soluble form. However, studies that directly compared foods of varying soluble oxalate contents have generally supported the proposition that the amount of soluble oxalate in food is an important determinant of oxalate bioavailability. Oxalate degradation by oxalate-degrading bacteria within the GIT is another key factor that could affect oxalate absorption and degree of oxaluria. Studies that have assessed the efficacy of oral ingestion of probiotics that provide bacteria with oxalate-degrading capacity have led to promising but generally mixed results, and this remains a fertile area for future studies. PMID:22332057

  19. Oxalate content of foods and its effect on humans.

    PubMed

    Noonan, S C; Savage, G P

    1999-03-01

    Oxalic acid and its salts occur as end products of metabolism in a number of plant tissues. When these plants are eaten they may have an adverse effect because oxalates bind calcium and other minerals. While oxalic acid is a normal end product of mammalian metabolism, the consumption of additional oxalic acid may cause stone formation in the urinary tract when the acid is excreted in the urine. Soaking and cooking of foodstuffs high in oxalate will reduce the oxalate content by leaching. The mean daily intake of oxalate in English diets has been calculated to be 70-150 mg, with tea appearing to contribute the greatest proportion of oxalate in these diets; rhubarb, spinach and beet are other common high oxalate-content foods. Vegetarians who consume greater amounts of vegetables will have a higher intake of oxalates, which may reduce calcium availability. This may be an increased risk factor for women, who require greater amounts of calcium in the diet. In humans, diets low in calcium and high in oxalates are not recommended but the occasional consumption of high oxalate foods as part of a nuritious diet does not pose any particular problem.

  20. Estimation of the oxalate content of foods and daily oxalate intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Kennedy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate ingested may be an important risk factor in the development of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Reliable food tables listing the oxalate content of foods are currently not available. The aim of this research was to develop an accurate and reliable method to measure the food content of oxalate. METHODS: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) were compared as direct techniques for the estimation of the oxalate content of foods. Foods were thoroughly homogenized in acid, heat extracted, and clarified by centrifugation and filtration before dilution in water for analysis. Five individuals consuming self-selected diets maintained food records for three days to determine their mean daily oxalate intakes. RESULTS: Both techniques were capable of adequately measuring the oxalate in foods with a significant oxalate content. With foods of very low oxalate content (<1.8 mg/100 g), IC was more reliable than CE. The mean daily intake of oxalate by the five individuals tested was 152 +/- 83 mg, ranging from 44 to 352 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: CE appears to be the method of choice over IC for estimating the oxalate content of foods with a medium (>10 mg/100 g) to high oxalate content due to a faster analysis time and lower running costs, whereas IC may be better suited for the analysis of foods with a low oxalate content. Accurate estimates of the oxalate content of foods should permit the role of dietary oxalate in urinary oxalate excretion and stone formation to be clarified. Other factors, apart from the amount of oxalate ingested, appear to exert a major influence over the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.

  1. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  2. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  3. Acid Rain

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA Is Doing Acid Rain Program Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Progress Reports Educational Resources Kid's Site for ... Monitoring National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Exit Interstate Air Pollution Transport Contact Us to ask a question, provide ...

  4. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid can hide signs that you lack vitamin B12, which can cause nerve damage. 10 Do I ... Rosenberg, I.H., et al. (2007). Folate and vitamin B12 status in relation to anemia, macrocytosis and cognitive ...

  5. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  6. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants)

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, F.A. . Inst. of Biological Chemistry); Seib, P.A. . Dept. of Grain Science and Industry)

    1991-01-01

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  7. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, F.A.; Seib, P.A.

    1991-12-31

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  8. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  9. Evaluation of Oxalate Concentration in the U.S. Spinach Germplasm Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Oxalic acid may form crystals with minerals to reduce the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets, and calcium oxalate may deposit in the...

  10. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  11. Effects of organic and inorganic acids on phosphorus release from municipal sludge.

    PubMed

    Pakdil, N B; Filibeli, A

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of inorganic acids (sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid) and organic acids (citric acid, oxalic acids) for phosphorus recovery from sludge and struvite precipitation results. It was observed that both inorganic acid and organic acids were effective at phosphorus release. The studies on precipitation of released phosphorus from sludge as magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) were also done using nitric and oxalic acids. Phosphorus and heavy metals of leachate were analyzed before and after precipitation. It was observed that heavy metal concentrations in the extracted samples decrease after precipitation. Precipitation was accomplished by using extract derived with nitric acid; however, in oxalic acid applications, it was not achieved. When the chemical constituents of the dried material were examined oxygen, sodium and nitrogen were found to be the major elements.

  12. Increase of ascorbic acid content and nutritional quality in spinach leaves during physiological acclimation to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Simona; Moscatello, Stefano; Famiani, Franco; Battistelli, Alberto

    2009-08-01

    The effect of acclimation to 10 degrees C on the leaf content of ascorbic and oxalic acids, was investigated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). At 10 degrees C the content of ascorbic acid in leaves increased and after 7 days it was about 41% higher than in plants remaining under a 25 degrees C/20 degrees C day/night temperature regime. In contrast, the content of oxalate, remained unchanged. Transfer to 10 degrees C increased the ascorbic but not the oxalic acid content of the leaf intercellular washing fluid (IWF). Oxalate oxidase (OXO EC 1.2.3.4) activity was not detected in extracts of leaf blades. Therefore, oxalic acid degradation via OXO was not involved in the control of its content. Our results show that low temperature acclimation increases nutritional quality of spinach leaves via a physiological rise of ascorbic acid that does not feed-forward on the content of oxalic acid.

  13. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  14. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  15. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  16. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  17. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  18. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 007 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 79 - 43 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revi

  19. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 003F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 76 - 03 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2011 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has

  20. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  1. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  2. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  3. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  4. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  5. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  6. Azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro-Porro, M

    1987-12-01

    This review is an update on the literature accumulated over the past 10 years following the original observation that azelaic acid, a naturally occurring and nontoxic C9 dicarboxylic acid, possesses significant biologic properties and a potential as a therapeutic agent. These studies have shown that azelaic acid is a reversible inhibitor of tyrosinase and other oxidoreductases in vitro and that it inhibits mitochondrial respiration. It can also inhibit anaerobic glycolysis. Both in vitro and in vivo it has an antimicrobial effect on both aerobic and anaerobic (Propionibacterium acnes) microorganisms. In tissue culture it exerts a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on malignant melanocytes, associated with mitochondrial damage and inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis. Tumoral cell lines not containing tyrosinase are equally affected. Normal cells in culture exposed to the same concentrations of the diacid that are toxic for tumoral cells are in general not damaged. Radioactive azelaic acid has been shown to penetrate tumoral cells at a higher level than normal cells of the corresponding line. Topically applied (a 20% cream), it has been shown to be of therapeutic value in skin disorders of different etiologies. Its beneficial effect on various forms of acne (comedogenic, papulopustular, nodulocystic) has been clearly demonstrated. Particularly important is its action on abnormal melanocytes, which has led to the possibility of obtaining good results on melasma and highly durable therapeutic responses on lentigo maligna. It is also capable of causing regression of cutaneous malignant melanoma, but its role in melanoma therapy remains to be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The effects of oxalate treatment on the smear layer of ground surfaces of human dentine.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Galloway, S E

    1985-01-01

    The layer was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and by measurement of hydraulic conductance before and after 2-min topical treatment with potassium chloride, neutral potassium oxalate, half-neutralized oxalic acid or both neutral and acidic oxalates. The treated smear layers were then re-evaluated microscopically and functionally both before and after acid challenge. The layers treated with KCl were not altered either microscopically or functionally and were susceptible to acid etching. Dentine surfaces treated with either oxalate solutions became less permeable and were acid-resistant.

  8. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2 percent of organic geopolymers) of low-molecular-weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric, and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early digenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play geochemically important roles under natural conditions.

  9. Transport of malic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the yeast Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed

    Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1990-04-01

    DL-Malic acid-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula anomala formed a saturable transport system that mediated accumulative transport of L-malic acid with the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Vmax, 0.20 nmol.s-1.mg (dry weight)-1; Km, 0.076 mM L-malate. Uptake of malic acid was accompanied by proton disappearance from the external medium with rates that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics as a function of malic acid concentration. Fumaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, oxaloacetic acid, D-malic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors of succinic acid transport, and all induced proton movements that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting that all of these dicarboxylates used the same transport system. Maleic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid, as well as other Krebs cycle acids such as citric and isocitric acids, were not accepted by the malate transport system. Km measurements as a function of pH suggested that the anionic forms of the acids were transported by an accumulative dicarboxylate proton symporter. The accumulation ratio at pH 5.0 was about 40. The malate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated succinic acid entered the cells slowly by simple diffusion. The permeability of the cells by undissociated acid increased with pH, with the diffusion constant increasing 100-fold between pH 3.0 and 6.0.

  10. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  11. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  12. An oxalyl-CoA dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism plays a role in regulating calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and defending against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants pos...

  13. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  14. Effects of Iron Overload on Ascorbic Acid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Wapnick, A. A.; Lynch, S. R.; Krawitz, P.; Seftel, H. C.; Charlton, R. W.; Bothwell, T. H.

    1968-01-01

    Studies of the ascorbic acid status in two subjects with idiopathic haemochromatosis and in 12 with transfusional siderosis showed that all had decreased levels of white cell ascorbic acid. The urinary excretion of ascorbic acid was also diminished in those subjects in whom such measurements were made. The administration of ascorbic acid was followed by only a small rise in the urinary ascorbic acid output, while the oxalic acid levels (measured in two subjects) showed a significant rise. These findings resemble those described in siderotic Bantu, and support the thesis that increased iron stores lead to irreversible oxidation of some of the available ascorbic acid. PMID:5673960

  15. Effects of iron overload on ascorbic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wapnick, A A; Lynch, S R; Krawitz, P; Seftel, H C; Charlton, R W; Bothwell, T H

    1968-09-21

    Studies of the ascorbic acid status in two subjects with idiopathic haemochromatosis and in 12 with transfusional siderosis showed that all had decreased levels of white cell ascorbic acid. The urinary excretion of ascorbic acid was also diminished in those subjects in whom such measurements were made. The administration of ascorbic acid was followed by only a small rise in the urinary ascorbic acid output, while the oxalic acid levels (measured in two subjects) showed a significant rise. These findings resemble those described in siderotic Bantu, and support the thesis that increased iron stores lead to irreversible oxidation of some of the available ascorbic acid.

  16. An Increase Incidence in Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: Changing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Asha; Mittal, Pawan; Kumar, Rajender; Goel, Richa; Bansal, Piyush; Kumar, Himanshu Devender; Bhutani, Jaikrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nephrolithiasis is a complex disease affecting all age groups globally. As the causative factors for nephrolithiasis rises significantly, its incidence, prevalence and recurrence continues to baffle clinicians and patients. Aim To study the prevalence of different types of renal stones extracted by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and open surgical procedures. Materials and Methods Renal stones from 50 patients were retrieved by Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL), Ureterorenoscopy (URS) and open surgical techniques for qualitative tests for detection of calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphate, ammonium ion, carbonate, cystine and xanthine. Results Three patients had stone removed by open surgery and rest had undergone PCNL. Nine of the stones were pure of calcium oxalate, 9 were of pure uric acid and 32 were mixed stones. Forty one stones had calcium. Among the mixed stones, oxalate was present in 25 samples (39 of total), uric acid was seen in 17 (25 of total stones), phosphate was present in 23 (23 of total) and carbonate was present in 4 stones (4 of total). Only 1 patient had triple phosphate stone. 12 were of staghorn appearance of which 6 were of struvite type, 6 were pure uric acid and remaining were mixed oxalate-phosphate stones. Conclusion Our study, though in a small number of hospital based patients, found much higher prevalence of uric acid stones and mixed stones than reported by previous hospital based studies in north India (oxalate stones~90%, uric acid~1% and mixed stones~3%). Biochemical analysis of renal stones is warranted in all cases. PMID:27630833

  17. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  18. Longitudinal distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids in the marine aerosols from the central Pacific including equatorial upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Mir Md. Mozammal; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-03-01

    Remote marine aerosol samples (total suspended particles) were collected during a cruise in the central Pacific from Japan to Mexico (1°59'N-35°N and 171°54'E-90°58'W). The aerosol samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids as well as organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon, and total nitrogen (WSTN). During the study, diacids were the most abundant compound class followed by fatty acids, ω-oxoacids, and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular compositions of diacids showed a predominance of oxalic (C2) acid followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Oxalic acid comprises 74% of total diacids. This result suggests that photochemical production of oxalic acid is significant over the central Pacific. Spatial distributions of diacids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids together with total carbon and WSTN showed higher abundances in the eastern equatorial Pacific where the upwelling of high-nutrient waters followed by high biological productivity is common, indicating that their in situ production is important in the warmer central Pacific through photochemical oxidation from their gaseous and particulate precursors. This study demonstrates that there is a strong linkage in biogeochemical cycles of carbon in the sea-air interface via ocean upwelling, phytoplankton productivity, sea-to-air emissions of organic matter, and formation of secondary organic aerosols in the eastern equatorial Pacific.

  19. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  20. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  1. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  2. Semimicrodetermination of tantalum with selenous acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1958-01-01

    Tantalum is separated and determined gravimetrically by precipitation with selenous acid from a highly acidic solution containing oxalic and tartaric acids. The method is selective for the determination of up to 30 mg. of tantalum pentoxide, and tolerates relatively large amounts of scandium, yttrium, cerium, titanium, zirconium, thorium, vanadium, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, uranium, iron, aluminum, gallium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. The separation of tantalum from niobium and titanium is not strictly quantitative, and correction is made colorimetrically for the small amounts of niobium and titanium co-precipitating with the tantalum. The method was applied to the determination of tantalum in tantaloniobate ores.

  3. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.H.; Boyle, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain, says Boyle is a chemical leprosy eating into the face of North America and Europe, perhaps the major ecological problem of our time. Boyle describes the causes and scope of the phenomenon; the effects on man, wildlife, water, and our cultural heritage. He probes the delays of politicians and the frequent self-serving arguments advanced by industry in the face of what scientists have proved. The solutions he offers are to strengthen the Clean Air Act and require emission reductions that can be accomplished by establishing emission standards on a regional or bubble basis, burn low-sulfur coal, install scrubbers at critical plants, and invest in alternative energy sources. 73 references, 1 figure.

  4. PREPARATION OF OXALATES OF METALS OF ATOMIC NUMBER GREATER THAN 88

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of oxalates of metals of atomic number greater than 88. A solid peroxide of the heavy metal is contacted with an aqueous oxalic acid solution ai a temperature of about 50 C for a period of time sufficient to form the insoluble metal oxalate which is subsequentiy recovered as a pures crystalline compound.

  5. Genomic evaluation of oxalate-degrading transgenic soybean in response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalate oxidases catalyze the degradation of oxalic acid (OA). Highly resistant transgenic soybean carrying an oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene and its susceptible parent soybean line, AC Colibri, were tested for genome-wide gene expression in response to the necrotrophic, OA producing pathogen Sclerotini...

  6. High-level exogenous glutamic acid-independent production of poly-(γ-glutamic acid) with organic acid addition in a new isolated Bacillus subtilis C10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huili; Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Cai, Jin; Zhang, Anyi; Hong, Yizhi; Huang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2012-07-01

    A new exogenous glutamic acid-independent γ-PGA producing strain was isolated and characterized as Bacillus subtilis C10. The factors influencing the endogenous glutamic acid supply and the biosynthesis of γ-PGA in this strain were investigated. The results indicated that citric acid and oxalic acid showed the significant capability to support the overproduction of γ-PGA. This stimulated increase of γ-PGA biosynthesis by citric acid or oxalic acid was further proved in the 10 L fermentor. To understand the possible mechanism contributing to the improved γ-PGA production, the activities of four key intracellular enzymes were measured, and the possible carbon fluxes were proposed. The result indicated that the enhanced level of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity caused by oxalic acid was important for glutamic acid synthesized de novo from glucose. Moreover, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were the positive regulators of glutamic acid biosynthesis, while 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was the negative one.

  7. THORIUM OXALATE-URANYL ACETATE COUPLED PROCEDURE FOR THE SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Gofman, J.W.

    1959-08-11

    The recovery of fission products from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in acid and thorium oxalate is precipitated in ihe solution formed, whereby the fission products are carried on the thorium oxalate. The separated thorium oxalate precipitate is then dissolved in an aqueous oxalate solution and the solution formed is acidified, limiting ihe excess acidity to a maximum of 2 N, whereby thorium oxalate precipitates and carries lanthanum-rareearth- and alkaline-earth-metal fission products while the zirconium-fission-product remains in solution. This precipitate, too, is dissolved in an aqaeous oxalate solution at elevated temperature, and lanthanum-rare-earth ions are added to the solution whereby lanthanum-rare-earth oxalate forms and the lanthanum-rare-earth-type and alkalineearth-metal-type fission products are carried on the oxalate. The precipitate is separated from the solution.

  8. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  9. [Rapid determination of eight organic acids in plant tissue by sequential extraction and high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianzhi; Wang, Shijie; Liu Xiuming; Liu, Hong; Wu, Yanyou; Luo Xuqiang

    2014-12-01

    A sequential extraction method was developed to determine different forms of oxalate and seven oxalate-metabolism-related organic acids (glyoxylic acid, tartaric acid, glycolic acid, malic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid) in plant tissue. The ultra-pure water was used as the extraction medium to obtain water-soluble oxalic acid and the other seven water-soluble organic acids. After the extraction of the water-soluble organic acids, the residues were extracted by dilute hydrochloric acid successively to get the acid-soluble oxalate which entered the liquid phase. A Hypersil ODS column was used with 5 mmol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH 2. 8) as the mobile phase. The diode array detector was set at 210 nm and the column temperature at 30 °C with the injection volume of 5 µL. The flow rate was controlled at different times which allowed a good and rapid separation of the organic acids and hydrochloric acid. Under these conditions, the linear ranges of the method were 1-2000 mg/L for oxalic acid, 25-2,000 mg/L for acetic acid, and 10-2,000 mg/L for glyoxylic acid, tartaric acid, glycolic acid, malic acid, citric acid and succinic acid, with the correlation coefficients of the eight organic acids ≥ 0. 9996. The average recoveries of the eight organic acids in leaves and roots were 93. 5%-104. 4% and 85. 3%-105. 4% with RSDs of 0. 15% -2.43% and 0. 31%-2. 9% (n=7), respectively. The limits of detection ranged from 1 to 10 ng (S/N=3). The results indicated that the method is accurate, rapid and reproducible for the determination of organic acids in plant samples.

  10. Organic acids induce tolerance to zinc- and copper-exposed fungi under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Sazanova, Katerina; Osmolovskaya, Natalia; Schiparev, Sergey; Yakkonen, Kirill; Kuchaeva, Ludmila; Vlasov, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals, Zn and Cu, in high concentration (2 mM for Zn and 0.5 mM for Cu) have some inhibiting effect on the growth of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium citrinum. Toxic effects of these metals considerably depend on cultivation conditions including nitrogen sources, pH of nutrient media, and its consistency (presence or absence of agar). In general, nitrate media provides less inhibiting effect on fungal growth under heavy metal exposure than ammonium-containing media. Adding of Zn in nitrate media induces oxalic acid production by fungi. Importance of oxalic acid production in detoxification of heavy metals is confirmed by the formation of Zn-containing crystals in fungal cultures. Cu bringing to the cultural media had no stimulating effect on oxalic acid production as well as no copper-containing crystals were observed. But proceeding from essential increase in oxalic acid production during a long-term fungi adaptation to Cu, it may be proposed that oxalic acid plays some functional role in Cu tolerance of fungi as well. It may be concluded that the role of organic acids and oxalate, in particular, in fungi tolerance and adaptation to heavy metals can be determined by the nature of the metal and its ability to form stable complexes with an acid anion. Stimulating effect of metals on acid production is not universal for all species of fungi and largely depends on metal concentration, nitrogen form in a medium, and other cultivation conditions.

  11. HPLC method for the simultaneous quantification of the major organic acids in Angeleno plum fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Wei; Zhao, Zhilei; Cao, Jiankang

    2014-08-01

    A method was developed to profile major organic acids in Angeleno fruit by high performance liquid chromatography. Organic acids in plum were extracted by water with ultra- sonication at 50°C for 30 min. The extracts were chromatographed on Waters Atlantis T3 C18 column (4.6 mm×250 mm, 5 μm) with 0.01mol/L sulfuric acid and water as mobile phase, and flow rate was 0.5 ml/min. The column temperature was 40C, and chromatography was monitored by a diode array detector at 210 nm. The result showed that malic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid, succinic acid in Angeleno plum, and the malic acid was the major organic acids. The coefficient of determination of the standard calibration curve is R2 > 0.999. The organic acids recovery ranged from 99.11% for Malic acid to 106.70% for Oxalic acid, and CV (n=6) ranged from 0.95% for Malic acid to 6.23% for Oxalic acid, respectively. The method was accurate, sensitive and feasible in analyzing the organic acids in Angeleno plum.

  12. NIR spectroscopic properties of aqueous acids solutions.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Atan, Hanafi; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir

    2012-06-15

    Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R² above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918-925 nm and 990-996 nm, while at 975 nm for water.

  13. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  14. Hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated cellulose under mild hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Chimentão, R J; Lorente, E; Gispert-Guirado, F; Medina, F; López, F

    2014-10-13

    The hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated cellulose was investigated in a conventional oven and under microwave heating. Two acids--sulfuric and oxalic--were studied. For both hydrothermal conditions (oven and microwave) the resultant total organic carbon (TOC) values obtained by the hydrolysis of the cellulose pretreated with sulfuric acid were higher than those obtained by the hydrolysis of the cellulose pretreated with oxalic acid. However, the dicarboxylic acid exhibited higher hydrolytic efficiency towards glucose. The hydrolysis of cellulose was greatly promoted by microwave heating. The Rietveld method was applied to fit the X-ray patterns of the resultant cellulose after hydrolysis. Oxalic acid preferentially removed the amorphous region of the cellulose and left the crystalline region untouched. On the other hand, sulfuric acid treatment decreased the ordering of the cellulose by partially disrupting its crystalline structure.

  15. Organic acids tunably catalyze carbonic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-07-10

    Density functional theory calculations predict that the gas-phase decomposition of carbonic acid, a high-energy, 1,3-hydrogen atom transfer reaction, can be catalyzed by a monocarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid, including carbonic acid itself. Carboxylic acids are found to be more effective catalysts than water. Among the carboxylic acids, the monocarboxylic acids outperform the dicarboxylic ones wherein the presence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond hampers the hydrogen transfer. Further, the calculations reveal a direct correlation between the catalytic activity of a monocarboxylic acid and its pKa, in contrast to prior assumptions about carboxylic-acid-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions. The catalytic efficacy of a dicarboxylic acid, on the other hand, is significantly affected by the strength of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Transition-state theory estimates indicate that effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed decomposition are four orders-of-magnitude larger than those for the water-catalyzed reaction. These results offer new insights into the determinants of general acid catalysis with potentially broad implications.

  16. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  17. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  18. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  19. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  20. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  1. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  2. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  3. [Inhibition of growth of microscopic fungi with organic acids].

    PubMed

    Conková, E; Para, L; Kocisová, A

    1993-01-01

    Fungicidal effects of five selected organic acids (lactic, acetic, formic, oxalic, and propionic) in concentrations 3, 5, 10, 20 and 50 ml/l on nine selected species of moulds were tested. Lactic and oxalic acids did not prove the satisfactory fungicidal activity in any of the chosen concentrations. The antifungal effect of the other three acids, manifested by the growth inhibition of the tested moulds is shown in Tab. I and it can be expressed by sequence: propionic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid. These acids also had effects only in concentrations 20 ml/l and 50 ml/l. Propionic acid in concentration 20 ml/l inhibited the growth of five moulds (Penicillium glabrum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum). In testing of concentration 50 ml/l, the lower fungicidal ability was ascertained only in growth suppression of Aspergillus flavus. The fungicidal activity of formic acid was registered in concentration 20 ml/l in two cases and in concentration 50 ml/l in six cases. Acetic acid inhibited the growth in concentration 50 ml/l only in two cases. Tab. II shows the percentual evaluation of propionic acid and formic acid with regard to their inhibition abilities. The fungicidal efficiency of propionic acid resulting from the experiment is 88.9%.

  4. Behavior of carboxylic acids upon complexation with beryllium compounds.

    PubMed

    Mykolayivna-Lemishko, Kateryna; Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2014-07-31

    A significant acidity enhancement and changes on aromaticity were previously observed in squaric acid and its derivatives when beryllium bonds are present in those systems. In order to know if these changes on the chemical properties could be considered a general behavior of carboxylic acids upon complexation with beryllium compounds, complexes between a set of representative carboxylic acids RCOOH (formic acid, acetic acid, propanoic acid, benzoic acid, and oxalic acid) and beryllium compounds BeX2 (X = H, F, Cl) were studied by means of density functional theory calculations. Complexes that contain a dihydrogen bond or a OH···X interaction are the most stable in comparison with other possible BeX2 complexation patterns in which no other weak interactions are involved apart from the beryllium bond. Formic, acetic, propanoic, benzoic, and oxalic acid complexes with BeX2 are much stronger acids than their related free forms. The analysis of the topology of the electron density helps to clarify the reasons behind this acidity enhancement. Importantly, when the halogen atom is replaced by hydrogen in the beryllium compound, the dihydrogen bond complex spontaneously generates a new neutral complex [RCOO:BeH] in which a hydrogen molecule is lost. This seems to be a trend for carboxylic acids on complexing BeX2 compounds.

  5. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: Implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Cao, Fang; Lee, Meehye

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls, and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C values of particle phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly larger than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors. The values are consistently less negative in oxalic acid (C2, average -14.1‰), glyoxylic acid (-13.8‰), pyruvic acid (-19.4‰), glyoxal (-13.5‰), and methylglyoxal (-18.6‰) compared to other organic species (e.g., palmitic acid, -26.3‰), which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during atmospheric oxidation of pre-aged precursors (e.g., isoprene) and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after the evaporation of clouds or wet aerosols. The δ13C values of C2 is positively correlated with C2 to organic carbon ratio, indicating that photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation during long-range atmospheric transport. The isotopic results also suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a major formation process of oxalic acid via the intermediates such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photochemically aged in the western North Pacific rim.

  6. Determination of malic acid and other C4 dicarboxylic acids in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Andreas; Lammel, Gerhard

    2002-03-01

    An ion chromatographic method was developed which is able to separate five unsubstituted and hydroxy C4 dicarboxylic acids, succinic, malic, tartaric, maleic and fumaric acid, besides the other unsubstituted C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids, oxalic, malonic and glutaric acids, as well as inorganic ions in samples extracted from atmospheric particulate matter. By the application of this method it was found for both rural and urban sites and for various types of air masses that in the summer-time malic acid is the most prominent C4 diacid (64 ng m(-3) by average), exceeding succinic acid concentration (28 ng m(-3) by average) considerably. In winter-time considerably less, a factor of 4-15, C4 acids occurred and succinic acid was more concentrated than malic acid. Tartaric, fumaric and maleic acids were less concentrated (5.1, 5.0 and 4.5 ng m(-3) by average, respectively). Tartaric acid was observed for the first time in ambient air. The results indicate that in particular anthropogenic sources are important for the precursors of succinic, maleic and fumaric acids. Biogenic sources seem to influence the occurrence of malic acid significantly.

  7. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  8. Transport of malic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the yeast Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed Central

    Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1990-01-01

    DL-Malic acid-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula anomala formed a saturable transport system that mediated accumulative transport of L-malic acid with the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Vmax, 0.20 nmol.s-1.mg (dry weight)-1; Km, 0.076 mM L-malate. Uptake of malic acid was accompanied by proton disappearance from the external medium with rates that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics as a function of malic acid concentration. Fumaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, oxaloacetic acid, D-malic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors of succinic acid transport, and all induced proton movements that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting that all of these dicarboxylates used the same transport system. Maleic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid, as well as other Krebs cycle acids such as citric and isocitric acids, were not accepted by the malate transport system. Km measurements as a function of pH suggested that the anionic forms of the acids were transported by an accumulative dicarboxylate proton symporter. The accumulation ratio at pH 5.0 was about 40. The malate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated succinic acid entered the cells slowly by simple diffusion. The permeability of the cells by undissociated acid increased with pH, with the diffusion constant increasing 100-fold between pH 3.0 and 6.0. PMID:2339872

  9. Determining the biochemical properties of the Oxalate Biosynthetic Component (Obc)1 from Burkholderia mallei

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalic acid is produced by a variety of organisms ranging from simple microbes to complex animals. This acid has been proposed to fulfill various physiological and pathological functions which vary between organisms. In bacteria from the Burkholderia genus, oxalate secretion has been shown to be quo...

  10. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current evidence supports a single pathway of oxalate biosynthesis utilising ascorbic acid as the precursor. In this study, we begin to address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (cv. Jemalong genotyp...

  11. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Cao, F.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C of particle-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly higher than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors, associated with isotope fractionation during atmospheric oxidation. 13C is consistently more enriched for oxalic acid (C2), glyoxylic acid, pyruvic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal compared to other organic compounds identified, which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during aqueous-phase processing and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after clouds or wet aerosols evaporation δ13C of C2 is positively correlated with C2 and organic carbon ratio, indicating that a photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation process during long-range transport. The 13C results also suggest that aqueous-phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is major formation process of oxalic acid production via the major intermediates glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photo-chemically aged in this region.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions Containing Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-04

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel based alloy containing alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. It is highly corrosion resistant both under reducing and under oxidizing conditions. Electrochemical studies such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. Tests were also carried out in NaCl solutions containing oxalic acid or acetic acid. It is shown that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was higher in a solution containing oxalic acid than in a solution of the same pH acidified with HCl. Acetic acid was not corrosive to Alloy 22. The corrosivity of oxalic acid was attributed to its capacity to form stable complex species with metallic cations from Alloy 22.

  13. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  14. Determination of oxalate in black liquor by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Chai, Xin-Sheng; DeMartini, Nikolai; Zhan, Huaiyu; Fu, Shiyu

    2008-05-30

    This study demonstrated a headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of oxalate content in black liquor (alkaline aqueous solution of inorganic chemicals and dissolved wood species from the alkaline pulping of wood). The method described in this paper is based on the reaction between oxalic and manganese dioxide in an acidic medium, in which oxalic acid is converted to carbon dioxide that is measured with a GC using a thermal conductivity detector. The challenge in developing this method was ensuring complete conversion of oxalic acid while minimizing the contribution of side reactions between carbohydrates, lignin and manganese dioxide to the carbon dioxide measured. It was found that a complete conversion of oxalate to carbon dioxide can be achieved within 3 min at a temperature of 70 degrees C; a MnO(2):C(oxalate) (concentration of H(2)C(2)O(4)+HC(2)O(4)(-)+C(2)O(4)(2-)) mole ratio of 60 and H(2)SO(4) concentration of 0.005-0.01 mol/L in the headspace vial. The method can detect concentrations as low as 0.39 microg of oxalate. The standard deviation was found to be 7% while recovery experiments with black liquor showed recoveries of 93-108% which were deemed acceptable for analysis of oxalate in an industrial sample such as black liquor.

  15. Mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common organic acids: Dosage and time effects.

    PubMed

    Onireti, Olaronke O; Lin, Chuxia

    2016-03-01

    A batch experiment was conducted to investigate the mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common low-molecular-weight organic acids with a focus on dosage and time effects. The results show that oxalic acid behaved differently from citric acid and malic acid in terms of mobilizing As that was bound to iron compounds. At an equivalent molar concentration, reactions between oxalic acid and soil-borne Fe were kinetically more favourable, as compared to those between either citric acid or malic acid and the soil-borne Fe. It was found that reductive dissolution of soil-borne Fe played a more important role in liberating As, as compared to non-reductive reactions. Prior to the 7th day of the experiment, As mobility increased with increasing dose of oxalic acid while there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in mobilized As among the treatments with different doses of citric acid or malic acid. The dosage effect on soil-borne As mobilization in the citric acid and malic acid treatments became clear only after the 7th day of the experiment. Soluble Ca present in the soils could cause re-immobilization of As by competing with solution-borne Fe for available organic ligands to form practically insoluble organic compounds of calcium (i.e. calcium oxalate). This resulted in transformation of highly soluble organic complexes of iron (i.e. iron oxalate complexes) into slightly soluble organic compounds of iron (i.e. iron oxalate) or free ferric ion, which then reacted with the solution-borne arsenate ions to form practically insoluble iron arsenates in the latter part of the experiment.

  16. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  17. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; Kaplan, I R

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2% of organic geopolymers) of low molecular weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 degrees C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early diagenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play the following geochemically important roles under natural conditions: (1) the diacids dissolve carbonates and clay minerals to increase porosity and permeability, which enhances migration of oils and gas generated from catagenesis of kerogen dispersed in shale, and (2) the diacids may form organo-metal complexes, which are important for mobilization, transport and accumulation of trace metals in sedimentary basins.

  18. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  19. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan.

  20. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  1. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  2. Solid acid-catalyzed depolymerization of barley straw driven by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura; Haverinen, Jasmiina; Jaakkola, Mari; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a time and energy saving, solvent-free procedure for the conversion of lignocellulosic barley straw into reducing sugars by mechanocatalytical pretreatment. The catalytic conversion efficiency of several solid acids was tested which revealed oxalic acid dihydrate as a potential catalyst with high conversion rate. Samples were mechanically treated by ball milling and subsequently hydrolyzed at different temperatures. The parameters of the mechanical treatment were optimized in order to obtain sufficient amount of total reducing sugar (TRS) which was determined following the DNS assay. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) were carried out. Under optimal conditions TRS 42% was released using oxalic acid dihydrate as a catalyst. This study revealed that the acid strength plays an important role in the depolymerization of barley straw and in addition, showed, that the oxalic acid-catalyzed reaction generates low level of the degradation product 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF).

  3. Aircraft observations of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the aerosols over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Qing Fu, Ping; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Takami, Akinori; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vertical profiles of dicarboxylic acids, related organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer compounds in particle phase have not yet been simultaneously explored in East Asia, although there is growing evidence that aqueous-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds may be responsible for the elevated organic aerosols (OA) in the troposphere. Here, we found consistently good correlation of oxalic acid, the most abundant individual organic compounds in aerosols globally, with its precursors as well as biogenic-derived SOA compounds in Chinese tropospheric aerosols by aircraft measurements. Anthropogenically derived dicarboxylic acids (i.e., C5 and C6 diacids) at high altitudes were 4-20 times higher than those from surface measurements and even occasionally dominant over oxalic acid at altitudes higher than 2 km, which is in contrast to the predominance of oxalic acid previously reported globally including the tropospheric and surface aerosols. This indicates an enhancement of tropospheric SOA formation from anthropogenic precursors. Furthermore, oxalic acid-to-sulfate ratio maximized at altitudes of ˜ 2 km, explaining aqueous-phase SOA production that was supported by good correlations with predicted liquid water content, organic carbon and biogenic SOA tracers. These results demonstrate that elevated oxalic acid and related SOA compounds from both the anthropogenic and biogenic sources may substantially contribute to tropospheric OA burden over polluted regions of China, implying aerosol-associated climate effects and intercontinental transport.

  4. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine evidence for the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched for articles on the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. Level I and II evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in improving cardiovascular outcomes. MAIN MESSAGE Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids has declined by 80% during the last 100 years, while intake of omega-6 fatty acids has greatly increased. Omega-3 fatty acids are cardioprotective mainly due to beneficial effects on arrhythmias, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and thrombosis. There is also evidence that they improve endothelial function, lower blood pressure, and significantly lower triglycerides. CONCLUSION There is good evidence in the literature that increasing intake of omega-3 fatty acids improves cardiac outcomes. Physicians need to integrate dietary recommendations for consumption of omega-3 fatty acids into their usual cardiovascular care. PMID:16812965

  6. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  7. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Lactate test ... test. Exercise can cause a temporary increase in lactic acid levels. ... not getting enough oxygen. Conditions that can increase lactic acid levels include: Heart failure Liver disease Lung disease ...

  8. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  9. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  10. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  11. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  12. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  13. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  14. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  15. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  16. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  17. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  18. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  19. Infrared, Polarized Raman, and SERS Spectra of Betaine Hydrogen Oxalate Monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Daizy; Aruldhas, G.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared and polarized Raman spectra of betaine hydrogen oxalate monohydrate are recorded and analyzed. The observed bands are assigned on the basis of vibrations due to oxalic acid, betaine, and water molecules. In the crystal it is found that oxalic acid molecules occupy a lower site and that betaine exists in zwitterionic form. Oxalic acid and water molecules are involved in strong hydrogen bending. Band assignments are confirmed by deuteration. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra recorded in two silver colloids reveal chemisorption through different adsorption sites. The observed SERS spectra are interpreted on the basis of different adsorption sites, geometries, and adsorbate conformation/orientation. The change of the SERS spectrum with time is due to the different stabilities of the adsorbed states. The oxalic acid molecules of the compound are likely to be in a tilted orientation with respect to the silver surface.

  20. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  1. Refining Lurgi tar acids

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, N.P.

    1984-04-17

    There is disclosed a process for removing tar bases and neutral oils from the Lurgi tar acids by treating the tar acids with aqueous sodium bisulfate to change the tar bases to salts and to hydrolyze the neutral oils to hydrolysis products and distilling the tar acids to obtain refined tar acid as the distillate while the tar base salts and neutral oil hydrolysis products remain as residue.

  2. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  3. Thermal degradation of aqueous oxalate species

    SciTech Connect

    Crossey, L.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The aqueous thermal degradation of oxalic acid (a naturally occurring dicarboxylic acid) and its anions has been examined experimentally under variable conditions of temperature (160-230C), time (24-96 h), buffered pH (4-7), and ionic strength (0.2-0.5 M). Decomposition of oxalate species follows a first-order rate law. Degradation rate increases with decreasing pH; the effects of ionic strength are not significant. Changes in reaction rate over the temperature range studied give activation energies that range from 29-50 kcal/mol over a starting solution pH range of 5-7. Extrapolation of these data to sedimentary basin temperatures suggests that oxalate species may be long-lived in formation waters. At 80C, half-lives range from 2,500 to 28,000 years at pH values of 5 and 7, respectively. Formate species are relatively stable degradation products over the range of conditions studied. Comparison of these data are relatively stable degradation products over the range of conditions studied. Comparison of these data with results of other thermal degradation studies of carboxylic acids and their anions indicate that acetate stability {much gt} formate stability > oxalate stability > gallate and malonate stability. These results are consistent with the high concentrations of acetate relative to oxalate and malonate observed in formation waters.

  4. 78 FR 20029 - Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic..., polymer with adipic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid and ricinoleic acid (CAS Reg. No. 1357486-09- 9) when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide formulation. Advance Polymer Technology submitted a...

  5. Solubility and spectroscopic studies of the interaction of palladium with simple carboxylic acids and fulvic acid at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Scott A.; Tait, C. Drew; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri; Janecky, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of Pd with some O-donor organic acid anions has been investigated using solubility measurements and a variety of spectroscopic techniques (UV-visible, Raman, FTIR, 13C NMR). Some of the ligands investigated (acetate, oxalate and fulvic acid) occur naturally in relatively high concentrations, whereas others (phthalate and salicylate) serve as models of potential binding sites on humic and fulvic acids. Solubility measurements show that the presence of acetate, phthalate, salicylate and fulvic acid (oxalate was not studied via solubility methods) can increase the mobility of Pd over various pH ranges, depending on the organic ligand. In the case of acetate, UV-visible and Raman spectroscopy ( 13C NMR results were inconclusive) provide strong evidence for the formation of electrostatically bound, possibly outer-sphere palladium acetate complexes. Oxalate was confirmed by UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopy to compete favorably with chloride (0.56 M NaCl) for Pd even at oxalate concentrations as low as 1 mM at pH = 6-7. Available data from the literature suggest that oxalate may have an influence on Pd mobility at free oxalate concentrations as low as 10 -8-10 -9 M. UV-visible spectroscopy provides evidence of an initially rapid, followed by a slower, reaction between PdCl 42- and o-phthalate ion. Our findings lend support to the idea that similar binding sites on fulvic acid may be capable of complexing and solubilizing Pd in the natural environment. Although thermodynamic data are required to fully quantify the extent, it is concluded that simple carboxylic acid anions and/or fulvic and humic acids should be capable of significantly enhancing Pd transport in the surficial environment by forming truly dissolved complexes. On the other hand, flocculation of fulvic/humic acids, owing to changing ionic strengths or pH, or adsorption of these acids onto mineral surfaces, may also provide effective means of immobilizing Pd. These results have applications in

  6. Speciation and temporal characterization of dicarboxylic acids in PM 2.5 during a PM episode and a period of non-episodic pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wan, Meng-Wei; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Tsai, Ying I.

    PM 2.5 aerosol was collected during a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period between September and November 2004 in suburban southern Taiwan and dicarboxylic acid and inorganic species content and provenance were investigated. Oxalic acid was the dominant dicarboxylic acid species, followed by succinic acid and malonic acid. Tartaric acid concentrations were the lowest. There was 49.3% more dicarboxylic acid in PM episode aerosol than in non-episodic aerosol. However, daily oxalic acid concentration increased 72.7% in PM episode aerosol, while succinic acid fell 20.9% and malonic acid fell 21.6%, indicating higher conversion of these acids into oxalic acid in PM episode aerosol. Dicarboxylic acid concentrations, particularly oxalic acid, peaked at night during the PM episode, due to accumulation of daytime oxalic acid combined with low wind velocity and low mixing layer height at this time. SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ were the dominant ionic species in both PM episode and non-episodic aerosols. NO 3- concentration increased 106% during the PM episode, while HNO 3, a gaseous precursor of NO 3-, fell 57%, indicating a large conversion of HNO 3 to aerosol phase NO 3- in PM episode aerosol. Backward trajectory data indicate that burning of paddy fields may also contribute to oxalic acid content in PM episode aerosol in the study area, especially during nighttime. Principal component analyses showed that succinic acid, malonic acid and oxalic acid were important factors in both pollution periods and also that there was high correlation between tartaric acid and NO x or HNO 2, indicative of vehicle emissions. The mass ratio of oxalic acid to sulfate in this aerosol was as high as 60.3‰, 35.5% higher than in non-episodic aerosol. Principal component analyses showed that photochemical aerosols contributed by succinic acid, malonic acid and oxalic acid were important factors in both periods. There was high correlation between tartaric acid and NO x or HNO 2

  7. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  8. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  9. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  10. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  11. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  12. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  13. Plums (Prunus domestica L.) are a good source of yeasts producing organic acids of industrial interest from glycerol.

    PubMed

    García-Fraile, Paula; Silva, Luís R; Sánchez-Márquez, Salud; Velázquez, Encarna; Rivas, Raúl

    2013-08-15

    The production of organic acids from several yeasts isolated from mature plums on media containing glycerol as carbon source was analysed by HPLC-UV. The yeasts isolated were identified by sequencing the 5.8S internal transcribed spacer as Pichia fermentans, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida oleophila. The organic acid profiles of these strains comprise acetic, citric, succinic and malic acids that qualitatively and quantitatively vary between different species as well as among strains from the same species. The production from glycerol of succinic, acetic, citric, malic and oxalic acids from C. oleophila and W. anomalus, and that of succinic, oxalic and acetic acids by P. fermentans is reported for the first time in this work, as is the production of oxalic acid from glycerol in yeasts. Our results also showed that mature fruits can be a good source of new yeasts able to metabolise glycerol, producing different organic acids with industrial and biotechnological interest.

  14. Recovery of zinc and manganese, and other metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Cd, Cr, Na, K) from Zn-MnO2 and Zn-C waste batteries: Hydroxyl and carbonate co-precipitation from solution after reducing acidic leaching with use of oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobianowska-Turek, A.; Szczepaniak, W.; Maciejewski, P.; Gawlik-Kobylińska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article discusses the current situation of the spent batteries and portable accumulators management. It reviews recycling technologies of the spent batteries and portable accumulators which are used in the manufacturing installations in the world. Also, it presents the authors' research results on the reductive acidic leaching of waste material of the zinc-carbon batteries (Zn-C) and zinc-manganese batteries (alkaline Zn-MnO2) delivered by a company dealing with mechanical treatment of this type of waste stream. The research data proved that the reductive acidic leaching (H2SO4 + C2H2O4) of the battery's black mass allows to recover 85.0% of zinc and 100% of manganese. Moreover, it was found that after the reductive acidic leaching it is possible to recover nearly 100% of manganese, iron, cadmium, and chromium, 98.0% of cobalt, 95.5% of zinc, and 85.0% of copper and nickel from the solution with carbonate method. On the basis of the results, it is possible to assume that the carbonate method can be used for the preparation of manganese-zinc ferrite.

  15. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  16. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  17. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  18. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  19. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Latitudinal distributions of atmospheric dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls over the western North Pacific: Sources and formation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo

    2015-05-01

    The present study aims to assess the molecular distributions of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (diacids: C2-C12), oxocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) in aerosols collected over the western North Pacific (WNP) during a summer cruise (August to September 2008). The measured water-soluble organics show pronounced latitudinal distributions with higher concentrations in the region of 30°N-45°N (average 63 ng m-3) than 10°N-30°N (18 ng m-3). Mass fraction of oxalic acid (C2) in total aliphatic diacids (ΣC2-C12) showed higher values (72 ± 10%) in lower latitude (10°N-30°N) than that (56 ± 16%) in higher latitude (30°N-45°N), suggesting a photochemical production of C2 due to an increased insolation over the tropical WNP. A similar trend was found in other diagnostic ratios such as oxalic to succinic (C2/C4) and oxalic to glyoxylic acid (C2/ωC2), which further corroborate an enhanced photochemical aging over the WNP. In addition, relative abundances of oxalic acid in total diacids showed a marked increase as a function of ambient temperature, supporting their photochemical production. Constantly low concentration ratios of adipic and phthalic acids relative to azelaic acid suggest a small contribution of anthropogenic sources and an importance of oceanic sources during the study period. Significant production of C2 through oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emitted from the sea surface is also noteworthy, as inferred from the strong linear correlations among water-soluble organic carbon, methanesulphonic acid, and oxalic acid. Sea-to-air emission of unsaturated fatty acids also contributes to formation of diacids over the WNP.

  3. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  4. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  5. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  6. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  7. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  8. Experimental alkali feldspar dissolution at 100 degree C by carboxylic acids and their anions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessell, R.K. ); Pittman, E.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Feldspar dissolution will enhance sandstone porosity if the released aluminum can be transported away in the subsurface waters. Carboxylic acids have been proposed to provide hydrogen ions to promote dissolution and anions to complex aqueous aluminum to keep it in solution. However, the hydrogen ions should react quickly following acid generation in source beds, leaving monocarboxylic anions with lesser amounts of dicarboxylic acids and their anions on feldspar dissolution and the apparent complexing of aluminum in solution. Two-week dissolution experiments of alkali feldspar were run at 100{degree}C and 300 bars in acetic acid, oxalic acid, and sodium salt solutions of chloride, acetate, propionate, oxalate, and malonate. Extrapolation of the results, to reservoir conditions during sandstone diagenesis, implies that concentrations of aluminum-organic complexes are not significant for acetate and propionate and are possibly significant for oxalate and malonate, depending upon fluid compositions. Propionate appeared to inhibit feldspar dissolution and hence might decrease secondary porosity formation. Increases in aluminum concentrations in the presence of oxalic and acetic acid solutions appear to be due to enhanced dissolution kinetics and greater aluminum solubility under low-pH conditions. Such low-pH fluids are generally absent in subsurface reservoirs, making this an unlikely mechanism for enhancing porosity. Furthermore, the observed thermal instability of oxalate and malonate anions explains their general low concentrations in subsurface fluids which limits their aluminum complexing potential in reservoirs during late diagenesis.

  9. Evidence for a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek, C P; Schreferl-Kunar, G; Wöhrer, W; Röhr, M

    1988-01-01

    Oxalate accumulation of up to 8 g/liter was induced in Aspergillus niger by shifting the pH from 6 to 8. This required the presence of Pi and a nitrogen source and was inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Exogenously added 14CO2 was not incorporated into oxalate, but was incorporated into acetate and malate, thus indicating the biosynthesis of oxalate by hydrolytic cleavage of oxaloacetate. Inhibition of mitochondrial citrate metabolism by fluorocitrate did not significantly decrease the oxalate yield. The putative enzyme that was responsible for this was oxaloacetate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.1), which was induced de novo during the pH shift. Subcellular fractionation of oxalic acid-forming mycelia of A. niger showed that this enzyme is located in the cytoplasm of A. niger. The results are consistent with a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate formation which does not involve the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:3132096

  10. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  11. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  12. Some Organic Acids Acting as Stimulants of Recruitment and Feeding for the Formosan Subterranean Termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feeding stimulating properties of 3 organic acids (salicylic, oxalic, and glucuronic acids) and 2 nitrogen containing compounds (uric acid, and glucosamine) for the Formosan subterranean termite were tested. A two choice test between cellulosic matrices with the compounds and blanks showed that...

  13. Functional characterization of the oxaloacetase encoding gene and elimination of oxalate formation in the β-lactam producer Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Gombert, A K; Veiga, T; Puig-Martinez, M; Lamboo, F; Nijland, J G; Driessen, A J M; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2011-08-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is widely used as an industrial antibiotic producer, in particular in the synthesis of ß-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins. In industrial processes, oxalic acid formation leads to reduced product yields. Moreover, precipitation of calcium oxalate complicates product recovery. We observed oxalate production in glucose-limited chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum grown with or without addition of adipic acid, side-chain of the cephalosporin precursor adipoyl-6-aminopenicillinic acid (ad-6-APA). Oxalate accounted for up to 5% of the consumed carbon source. In filamentous fungi, oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC3.7.1.1) is generally responsible for oxalate production. The P. chrysogenum genome harbours four orthologs of the A. niger oahA gene. Chemostat-based transcriptome analyses revealed a significant correlation between extracellular oxalate titers and expression level of the genes Pc18g05100 and Pc22g24830. To assess their possible involvement in oxalate production, both genes were cloned in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast that does not produce oxalate. Only the expression of Pc22g24830 led to production of oxalic acid in S. cerevisiae. Subsequent deletion of Pc22g28430 in P. chrysogenum led to complete elimination of oxalate production, whilst improving yields of the cephalosporin precursor ad-6-APA.

  14. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  15. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  16. On the source of organic acid aerosol layers above clouds.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Lu, Miao-Ling; Brechtel, Fred J; Jonsson, Haflidi; Feingold, Graham; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-07-01

    During the July 2005 Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and the August-September 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed aerosols and cumulus clouds in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California and in southeastern Texas, respectively. An on-board particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) quantified inorganic and organic acid species with < or = 5-min time resolution. Ubiquitous organic aerosol layers above cloud with enhanced organic acid levels were observed in both locations. The data suggest that aqueous-phase reactions to produce organic acids, mainly oxalic acid, followed by droplet evaporation is a source of elevated organic acid aerosol levels above cloud. Oxalic acid is observed to be produced more efficiently relative to sulfate as the cloud liquid water content increases, corresponding to larger and less acidic droplets. As derived from large eddy simulations of stratocumulus underthe conditions of MASE, both Lagrangian trajectory analysis and diurnal cloudtop evolution provide evidence that a significant fraction of the aerosol mass concentration above cloud can be accounted for by evaporated droplet residual particles. Methanesulfonate data suggest that entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol can also be a source of organic acids above boundary layer clouds.

  17. Improving bioethanol production from olive pruning biomass by deacetylation step prior acid hydrolysis and fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Moya, Alberto J; Peinado, Silvia; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Sánchez, Sebastián

    2016-11-01

    In order to produce bioethanol from olive tree pruning biomass, deacetylation was performed employing sodium hydroxide. Optimal conditions were determined using experimental design techniques. The highest acetic acid removal (3.8g/dm(3)), obtained by response surface methodology, was at optimum pretreatment conditions of temperature 60°C, 0.8% NaOH and residence time 60min. After oxalic acid hydrolysis of pretreated biomass, the hydrolysates were directly used for ethanol production without further detoxification process. Ethanol yields ranged from 0.19 to 0.45g/g, reaching the maximum yield value when pretreatment was carried out at 130°C with 100mM oxalic acid, involving a combined severity factor (CSF) of 1.05. The highest ethanol concentration obtained from pretreated biomass was 6.2g/dm(3) at 150°C, using 75mM of oxalic acid (CSF=1.53).

  18. A review of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols: Molecular distributions, sources and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Bikkina, Srinivas

    2016-03-01

    This review aims to update our understanding on molecular distributions of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols with a focus on their geographical variability, size distribution, sources and formation pathways. In general, molecular distributions of diacids in aerosols from the continental sites and over the open ocean waters are often characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic acid (C3) and/or succinic acid (C4), while those sampled over the polar regions often follow the order of C4 ≥ C2 and C3. The most abundant and ubiquitous diacid is oxalic acid, which is principally formed via atmospheric oxidation of its higher homologues of long chain diacids and other pollution-derived organic precursors (e.g., olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons). However, its occurrence in marine aerosols is mainly due to the transport from continental outflows (e.g., East Asian outflow during winter/spring to the North Pacific) and/or governed by photochemical/aqueous phase oxidation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., oleic acid) and isoprene emitted from the productive open ocean waters. The long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants from mid latitudes to the Arctic in dark winter facilitates to accumulate the reactants prior to their intense photochemical oxidation during springtime polar sunrise. Furthermore, the relative abundances of C2 in total diacid mass showed similar temporal trends with downward solar irradiation and ambient temperatures, suggesting the significance of atmospheric photochemical oxidation processing. Compound-specific isotopic analyses of oxalic acid showed the highest δ13C among diacids whereas azelaic acid showed the lowest value, corroborating the significance of atmospheric aging of oxalic acid. On the other hand, other diacids gave intermediate values between these two diacids, suggesting that aging of oxalic acid is associated with 13C enrichment.

  19. Dissolution behavior of Caldag lateritic nickel ore subjected to a sequential organic acid leaching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursunoglu, Sait; Kaya, Muammer

    2015-11-01

    The dissolution behavior of Caldag lateritic nickel ore subjected to a sequential organic acid leaching method was investigated. The effects of the type of organic acid, acid concentration, leaching time, and leaching temperature on the lateritic nickel ore were examined. Organic acids were used individually prior to sequential leaching. Citric acid was more effective than the other two acids for the selective leaching of nickel and cobalt. An increase in the citric acid concentration negligibly affected the dissolution of the metals, whereas temperature exhibited a strong beneficial effect. Oxalic acid was determined to be the most appropriate organic acid for the second leaching step. After 8 h (4 h + 4 h) of leaching with organic acids (0.5 M citric + 0.5 M oxalic) in sequence at 90°C, 89.63% Ni, 82.89% Co, and 69.63% Fe were leached from the lateritic nickel ore. A sequential citric + oxalic acid leaching method could represent a viable alternative for the dissolution of metals from lateritic nickel ore.

  20. Metabolism of Fructose to Oxalate and Glycolate

    PubMed Central

    Knight, J.; Assimos, D. G.; Easter, L.; Holmes, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been recently directed at fructose consumption because of its association with obesity and subsequent development of chronic diseases. It was recently reported that an increased fructose intake increases the risk of forming kidney stones. It was postulated that fructose consumption may increase urinary oxalate, a risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. However, conflicting results have been obtained in human studies examining the relationship between fructose metabolism and oxalate synthesis. To test whether fructose intake influences urinary excretions impacting kidney stone risk, healthy subjects consumed diets controlled in their contents of fructose, oxalate, calcium, and other nutrients. Subjects consumed diets containing 4, 13, and 21% of calories as fructose in a randomized order. No changes in the excretions of oxalate, calcium, and uric acid were observed. In vitro investigations with cultured liver cells incubated with 13C-labeled sugars indicated that neither fructose nor glucose was converted to oxalate by these cells. Fructose metabolism accounted for 12.4 ± 1.6% of the glycolate detected in the culture medium and glucose 6.4 ± 0.9%. Our results suggest that mechanisms for stone risk associated with fructose intake may lie in factors other than those affecting the major stone risk parameters in urine. PMID:20842614

  1. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  2. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  3. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  4. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  5. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  6. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  7. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II) oxalate precursor layers

    PubMed Central

    Rückriem, Kai; Grotheer, Sarah; Vieker, Henning; Penner, Paul; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copper(II) oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM) using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II) acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II) oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Helium ion microscopy (HIM) reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor. PMID:27547602

  8. The chemistry of aminoguanidine derivatives - preparation, crystal structure, thermal properties, and molecular docking studies of aminoguanidinium salts of several carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, Rajendran; Geib, Steven J.; Muthu Sankar, Aathi; Premkumar, Thathan; Govindarajan, Subbaiah

    2015-11-01

    The reaction of aminoguanidine bicarbonate (Amg) with oxamic, oxalic, malonic and sulfoacetic acids yielded (AmgH)H2NOC-COO (1), OOC-CONHNHC(NH2)NH2 (2) (AmgH)HOOC-CH2-COO (3) and O3S-CH2-CONHNHC(NH2)NH2 (4), respectively. For the first time, we studied the salt-forming ability of aminoguanidine with several carboxylic acids, such as oxamic, oxalic, malonic and sulphoacetic acids. We also compared the structural and thermal properties of these salts. Oxamic and malonic acids form only mono-aminoguanidinium salts, whereas oxalic acid mainly forms di-aminoguanidinium oxalate. In addition, oxalic acid forms guanylhydrazido-oxalic acid which exists as zwitter ion. Unlike other acids, sulfoacetic acid readily forms only the zwitter ionic salts (2-guanylhydrazido-oxo-methanesulfonic acid) rather than the usual simple salt. This result may be a result of the highly acidic nature of the sulfonic group, which favors acid catalyzed condensation. More significantly, for the first time, the ability guanylhydrazido-oxalic acid (2) and 2-guanylhydrazido-oxo-methanesulfonic acid (4) to inhibit human butyrylcholinesterase (human BChE) receptor has been studied with a molecular docking approach. The binding of the compounds to human BChE was examined as it is crucial to understanding the biological significance of aminoguanidine derivatives. The compounds were identified and characterized by analytical, FT-IR spectroscopic and thermal studies. Furthermore, the structures of compounds 1, 2 and 4 were confirmed by single X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds 1 and 2 crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c and Cc space groups, respectively, whereas compound 4 crystalized in an orthorhombic system with a Pbca space group. All the compounds (1-4) underwent endo- followed by exothermic decomposition in the temperature range from 130 to 600 °C to yield gaseous products.

  9. Diterpenoid acids from Grindelia nana.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A A; Ahmed, A A; Tanaka, T; Iinuma, M

    2000-03-01

    Two new norditerpenoid acids of the labdane-type (norgrindelic acids), 4,5-dehydro-6-oxo-18-norgrindelic acid (1) and 4beta-hydroxy-6-oxo-19-norgrindelic acid (2), as well as a new grindelic acid derivative, 18-hydroxy-6-oxogrindelic acid (3), were isolated from the aerial parts of Grindelia nana. In addition, the known compounds, 6-oxogrindelic acid, grindelic acid, methyl grindeloate, 7alpha,8alpha-epoxygrindelic acid, and 4alpha-carboxygrindelic acid were also isolated. The structures of the new compounds were characterized on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  10. The thermal stability of organic acids in sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Crossey, L.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds in subsurface brines directly affect the evolution of porosity and permeability during sedimentary diagenesis. Recent examination of the aqueous thermal degradation of oxalic acid (a naturally occurring dicarboxylic acid) and its anions has implications for the thermal stability of dicarboxylic acids under sedimentary basin conditions. Because the thermal stability of these compounds is pH-dependent, consideration of the dissociation behavior of carboxylic acids as a function of temperature is essential for estimating the longevity of difunctional carboxylic acids. Results of burial history models suggest that dicarboxylic acid species may be long-lived in formation waters. Comparison with other experimental studies of carboxylic acids and their anion indicates that acetate stability is greater than formate stability, which is greater than oxalate stability, which is greater than gallate and malonate stability. In addition to the implications of natural systems, the aqueous degradation behavior is critical in evaluating other types of experimental results; notably mineral dissolution studies performed at elevated temperatures in the presence of organic materials and hydrous pyrolysis experiments involving kerogens.

  11. An oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although oxalic acid is common in nature, our understanding of the mechanism(s) regulating its turnover remains incomplete. In this study we identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-activating enzyme 3 (ScAAE3) as an enzyme capable of catalyzing the conversion of oxalate to oxalyl-CoA. Based on our fi...

  12. The effects of oxalate-containing products on the exposed dentine surface: an SEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Gillam, D G; Mordan, N J; Sinodinou, A D; Tang, J Y; Knowles, J C; Gibson, I R

    2001-11-01

    In-office products containing oxalates have been claimed to be clinically effective in reducing dentine sensitivity, although there has been limited supporting clinical data. The rationale for their use appears to be based on their potential to act as occluding and/or nerve desensitizing agents. Four commercially available oxalate-containing products were applied to etched dentine discs and the extent of tubule occlusion was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Tenure Quick (aluminium oxalate), Sensodyne Sealant (ferric oxalate) and MS Coat (oxalic acid) covered the dentine surface and occluded the tubules. However, Butler Protect (potassium oxalate) did not cover the surface to any great extent but provided some occlusion. The presence of oxalates after application to glass slides and dentine discs was examined using thin film X-ray diffraction. From samples on glass, only potassium oxalate could be clearly identified (JCPDS 14-0845). No oxalate was detected on dentine discs in either thin film geometry or standard theta two theta mode. We have demonstrated that professionally applied in-office products containing oxalate are capable of covering the dentine surface and/or occluding the tubules to varying degrees. However, X-ray diffraction analysis was unable to confirm the oxalate profile for all products as described in the available commercial literature.

  13. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  14. CO 2 and CO utilization: radiation-induced carboxylation of aqueous chloroacetic acid to malonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2003-07-01

    CO 2 and CO in addition to HCOOH/HCOO - can be used to produce the carboxylating radical rad COOH/ rad COO - under the influence of ionizing radiation. The carboxylation of ClCH 2COOH/ClCH 2COO - to malonic acid/malonate was studied at the pH range 2-7. A maximum yield G(malonic acid)=85 at pH=3 was observed by using 5×10 -2 mol dm -3 ClCH 2COOH, 1×10 -2 mol dm -3 HCOOH and 1×10 -3 mol dm -3 CO at a dose of 4.8 kGy. Oxalic and succinic acids were found as byproducts. The yield of the formed Cl - ions passes two maxima, at pH=3 ( G=7.5) and 7 ( G=15). Reaction mechanisms for the carboxylation process are presented.

  15. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to 'Averrhoa bilimbi' fruit juice ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bakul, G; Unni, V N; Seethaleksmy, N V; Mathew, A; Rajesh, R; Kurien, G; Rajesh, J; Jayaraj, P M; Kishore, D S; Jose, P P

    2013-07-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management.

  16. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid ... > For Parents > Folic Acid and Pregnancy A A A What's ...

  17. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  18. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  19. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...

  20. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  1. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  3. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  4. Production of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2012-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative production route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains productive for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. Production via fermentation is increasing. Other production methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, production in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed.

  5. Fatty acid production from amino acids and alpha-keto acids by Brevibacterium linens BL2.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Seefeldt, Kimberly; Weimer, Bart C

    2004-11-01

    Low concentrations of branched-chain fatty acids, such as isobutyric and isovaleric acids, develop during the ripening of hard cheeses and contribute to the beneficial flavor profile. Catabolism of amino acids, such as branched-chain amino acids, by bacteria via aminotransferase reactions and alpha-keto acids is one mechanism to generate these flavorful compounds; however, metabolism of alpha-keto acids to flavor-associated compounds is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of Brevibacterium linens BL2 to produce fatty acids from amino acids and alpha-keto acids and determine the occurrence of the likely genes in the draft genome sequence. BL2 catabolized amino acids to fatty acids only under carbohydrate starvation conditions. The primary fatty acid end products from leucine were isovaleric acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid. In contrast, logarithmic-phase cells of BL2 produced fatty acids from alpha-keto acids only. BL2 also converted alpha-keto acids to branched-chain fatty acids after carbohydrate starvation was achieved. At least 100 genes are potentially involved in five different metabolic pathways. The genome of B. linens ATCC 9174 contained these genes for production and degradation of fatty acids. These data indicate that brevibacteria have the ability to produce fatty acids from amino and alpha-keto acids and that carbon metabolism is important in regulating this event.

  6. Total syntheses of cis-cyclopropane fatty acids: dihydromalvalic acid, dihydrosterculic acid, lactobacillic acid, and 9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sayali; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-12-14

    cis-Cyclopropane fatty acids (cis-CFAs) are widespread constituents of the seed oils of subtropical plants, membrane components of bacteria and protozoa, and the fats and phospholipids of animals. We describe a systematic approach to the synthesis of enantiomeric pairs of four cis-CFAs: cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid, lactobacillic acid, dihydromalvalic acid, and dihydrosterculic acid. The approach commences with Rh2(OAc)4-catalyzed cyclopropenation of 1-octyne and 1-decyne, and hinges on the preparative scale chromatographic resolution of racemic 2-alkylcycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylic acids using a homochiral Evan's auxiliary. Saturation of the individual diastereomeric N-cycloprop-2-ene-1-carbonylacyloxazolidines, followed by elaboration to alkylcyclopropylmethylsulfones, allowed Julia-Kocienski olefination with various ω-aldehyde-esters. Finally, saponification and diimide reduction afforded the individual cis-CFA enantiomers.

  7. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  8. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  9. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  10. Gluconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G

    2007-01-01

    Gluconic acid, the oxidation product of glucose, is a mild neither caustic nor corrosive, non toxic and readily biodegradable organic acid of great interest for many applications. As a multifunctional carbonic acid belonging to the bulk chemicals and due to its physiological and chemical characteristics, gluconic acid itself, its salts (e.g. alkali metal salts, in especially sodium gluconate) and the gluconolactone form have found extensively versatile uses in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, construction and other industries. Present review article presents the comprehensive information of patent bibliography for the production of gluconic acid and compares the advantages and disadvantages of known processes. Numerous manufacturing processes are described in the international bibliography and patent literature of the last 100 years for the production of gluconic acid from glucose, including chemical and electrochemical catalysis, enzymatic biocatalysis by free or immobilized enzymes in specialized enzyme bioreactors as well as discontinuous and continuous fermentation processes using free growing or immobilized cells of various microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast-like fungi and fungi. Alternatively, new superior fermentation processes have been developed and extensively described for the continuous and discontinuous production of gluconic acid by isolated strains of yeast-like mold Aureobasidium pullulans, offering numerous advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi processes.

  11. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  12. Oxalate-minus mutants of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum via random mutagenesis retain pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a ubiquitous necrotrophic plant pathogen capable of infecting over 400 plant species including many economically important crops. Oxalic acid production has been shown in numerous studies to be a pathogenicity factor for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum through several mechanisms...

  13. Laboratory study on the hygroscopic behavior of external and internal C2-C4 dicarboxylic acid-NaCl mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxin; Ma, Jinzhu; Liu, Chang; Lai, Chengyue; He, Hong

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric aerosol is usually found to be a mixture of various inorganic and organic components in field measurements, whereas the effect of this mixing state on the hygroscopicity of aerosol particles has remained unknown. In this study, the hygroscopic behavior of mixtures of C2-C4 dicarboxylic acids and NaCl was investigated. For both externally and internally mixed malonic acid-NaCl and succinic acid-NaCl particles, correlation between water content and chemical composition was observed and the water content of these mixtures at relative humidity (RH) above 80% can be well predicted by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. In contrast, a nonlinear relation between the total water content of the mixtures and the water content of each chemical composition separately was found for oxalic acid-NaCl mixtures. Compared to the values predicted by the ZSR method, the dissolution of oxalic acid in external mixtures resulted in an increase in the total water content, whereas the formation of less hygroscopic disodium oxalate in internal mixtures led to a significant decrease in the total water content. Furthermore, we found that the hygroscopicity of the sodium dicarboxylate plays a critical role in determining the aqueous chemistry of dicarboxylic acid-NaCl mixtures during the humidifying and dehumidifying process. It was also found that the hydration of oxalic acid and the deliquescence of NaCl did not change in external oxalic acid-NaCl mixtures. The deliquescence relative humidity (DRHs) for both malonic acid and NaCl decreased in both external and internal mixtures. These results could help in understanding the conversion processes of dicarboxylic acids to dicarboxylate salts, as well as the substitution of Cl by oxalate in the atmosphere. It was demonstrated that the effect of coexisting components on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed aerosols should not be neglected.

  14. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of carbonyls: saturated normal dicarboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Meeks, J.L.; Findley, G.L.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1981-04-16

    The ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS) of oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, and adipic acids, and various of their simple derivatives, are presented and discussed. The four lowest-energy ionization events, (I(n/sub +/), I(n/sub -), I (..pi../sub +/), I(..pi../sub -/)), are assigned in all cases. Higher ionization events are not assigned because of molecule-limited resolution in the higher-energy UPS region.

  16. Global impacts of multiphase oxalate production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tost, Holger; Taraborrelli, Domenico

    2013-04-01

    Fine mode atmospheric aerosols are dominated by the organic fraction. A large fraction of these organic compounds consists of oxalates and carboxylic acids. Some of these compounds are produced in the gas phase and then subsequently partition into aerosol particles whereas others are produced directly in the aqueous phase in either cloud droplets or deliquesced aerosol particles. In this study we investigate the contribution of oxalates to the global organic aerosol burden using a comprehensive atmospheric chemistry general circulation model including explicit multiphase chemistry schemes for clouds and aerosols. For that purpose the aqueous phase chemistry has been augmented by a mechanism for oxalates, combined with a consistent gas phase chemistry of corresponding oxidation products from isoprene degradation. Using these tools we will present an analysis of both budget and transport estimates which provide indications for the climate impact of these compounds.

  17. Deletion of glucose oxidase changes the pattern of organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has potential as a cell factory for the production of different organic acids. At pH 5.5, A.carbonarius accumulates high amounts of gluconic acid when it grows on glucose based medium whereas at low pH, it produces citric acid. The conversion of glucose to gluconic acid is carried out by secretion of the enzyme, glucose oxidase. In this work, the gene encoding glucose oxidase was identified and deleted from A. carbonarius with the aim of changing the carbon flux towards other organic acids. The effect of genetic engineering was examined by testing glucose oxidase deficient (Δgox) mutants for the production of different organic acids in a defined production medium. The results obtained showed that the gluconic acid accumulation was completely inhibited and increased amounts of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid were observed in the Δgox mutants. PMID:25401063

  18. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin that result from exposure to sunlight and can develop into skin cancer) of the ... acid will make your skin very sensitive to sunlight (likely to get sunburn). Avoid exposure of treated ...

  19. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  20. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider ...

  1. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  2. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amoxicillin is in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth ... allergic to amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), clavulanic acid, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medications.tell your doctor ...

  3. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  4. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  5. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The normal range is 320 ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  6. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  7. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  8. Reflectance spectroscopy of oxalate minerals and relevance to Solar System carbon inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, Daniel M.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.

    2016-11-01

    The diversity of oxalate formation mechanisms suggests that significant concentrations of oxalic acid and oxalate minerals could be widely distributed in the Solar System. We have carried out a systematic study of the reflectance spectra of oxalate minerals and oxalic acid, covering the 0.2-16 μm wavelength region. Our analyses show that oxalates exhibit unique spectral features that enable discrimination between oxalate phases and from other commonly occurring compounds, including carbonates, in all regions of the spectrum except for the visible. Using these spectral data, we consider the possible contribution of oxalate minerals to previously observed reflectance spectra of many objects throughout the Solar System, including satellites, comets, and asteroids. We find that polycarboxylic acid dimers and their salts may explain the reflectance spectra of many carbonaceous asteroids in the 3 μm spectral region. We suggest surface concentration of these compounds may be a type of space weathering from the photochemical and oxidative decomposition of the organic macromolecular material found in carbonaceous chondrites. The stability and ubiquity of these minerals on Earth, in extraterrestrial materials, and in association with biological processes make them useful for many applications in Earth and planetary sciences.

  9. The linoleic acid and trans fatty acids of margarines.

    PubMed

    Beare-Rogers, J L; Gray, L M; Hollywood, R

    1979-09-01

    Fifty brands of margarine were analysed for cis-polyunsaturated acids by lipoxidase, for trans fatty acid by infared spectroscopy, and for fatty acid composition by gas-liquid chromatography. High concentrations of trans fatty acids tended to be associated with low concentrations of linoleic acid. Later analyses on eight of the brands, respresenting various proportions of linoleic to trans fatty acids, indicated that two of them contained still higher levels of trans fatty acids (greater than 60%) and negligible amounts of linoleic acid. It is proposed that margarine could be a vehicle for the distribution of some dietary linoleic acid and that the level of linoleic acid and the summation of the saturated plus trans fatty acids be known to ascertain nutritional characteristics.

  10. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  11. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  12. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  13. X-ray studies on crystalline complexes involving amino acids and peptides. XLII. Adipic acid complexes of L- and DL-arginine and supramolecular association in arginine-dicarboxylic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Siddhartha; Singh, Desh Deepak; Vijayan, M

    2005-02-01

    The adipic acid complexes of DL-arginine and L-arginine are made up of zwitterionic, singularly positively charged arginium ions and doubly negatively charged adipate ions, with a 2:1 stoichiometry. One of the two crystallographically independent arginium ions in the L-arginine complex has a conformation hitherto unobserved in crystal structures containing the amino acid. In the present study the structural data on arginine complexes of saturated dicarboxylic acids with 0-5 C atoms separating the two carboxyl functions are given. In terms of molecular aggregation, formic and acetic acid complexes behave in a similar way to those involving fairly long carboxylic acids such as adipic acid. By and large, the supramolecular assembly in complexes involving dicarboxylic acids with 3 or more C atoms separating the carboxyl groups (glutaric, adipic and pimelic acids), and those involving formic and acetic acids, have common features. The aggregation patterns in complexes involving oxalic, malonic and maleic acids do not share striking features among themselves (except for the mode of hydrogen-bonded dimerization of arginium ions) or with those involving larger dicarboxylic acids. Complexes of succinic acid, the shortest linear dicarboxylic acid, share features with those involving shorter as well as longer dicarboxylic acids. The difference in the behaviour of long and short dicarboxylic acids and the ambiguous behaviour of succinic acid can be broadly related to their lengths.

  14. Nickel Deficiency Disrupts Metabolism of Ureides, Amino Acids, and Organic Acids of Young Pecan Foliage[OA

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C.; Wood, Bruce W.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan. PMID:16415214

  15. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  16. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  17. Study on dicarboxylic acids in aerosol samples with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α , ω -dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50  μ L. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2-C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m(3).

  18. Pilot scale mineralization of organic acids by electro-Fenton process plus sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Casado, Juan; Fornaguera, Jordi; Galán, Maria Isabel

    2006-07-01

    The viability of the electro-Fenton degradation of aqueous solutions of benzoic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and oxalic acid has been studied at 20 A using a pilot flow reactor containing an anode and an oxygen diffusion cathode, both of 100 cm(2) section. Pollutants were preferentially oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed in solution from reaction of Fe(2+) with electrogenerated H(2)O(2), allowing mineralization of benzoic acid and 2,4-D. For oxalic acid no electrochemical mineralization was observed. After electrolysis, samples of the different effluents were exposed to sunlight (Helielectro-Fenton process) and almost complete mineralization was reached after ca. 30-50 min without additional cost. Effects of parameters such as electrolysis time, pH and solar irradiation time on the process efficiencies were studied.

  19. The second acidic constant of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Porto, Raffaella; De Tommaso, Gaetano; Furia, Emilia

    2005-01-01

    The second dissociation constant of salicylic acid (H2L) has been determined, at 25 degrees C, in NaCl ionic media by UV spectrophotometric measurements. The investigated ionic strength values were 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 M. The protolysis constants calculated at the different ionic strengths yielded, with the Specific Interaction Theory, the infinite dilution constant, log beta1(0) = 13.62 +/- 0.03, for the equilibrium L2- + H+ <==> HL-. The interaction coefficient between Na+ and L2-, b(Na+, L2-) = 0.02 +/- 0.07, has been also calculated.

  20. Differential activation of pregnane X receptor by carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Seow, Chun Ling; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2017-03-10

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the expression of many genes, including those involved in drug metabolism and transport, and has been linked to various diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we determined whether carnosic acid and other chemicals in rosemary extract (carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid) are PXR activators. As assessed in dual-luciferase reporter gene assays, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, activated human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR), whereas carnosol and ursolic acid, but not carnosic acid or rosmarinic acid, activated rat PXR (rPXR). Dose-response experiments indicated that carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid activated hPXR with EC50 values of 0.79, 2.22, and 10.77μM, respectively. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, transactivated the ligand-binding domain of hPXR and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), SRC-2, and SRC-3 to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, increased hPXR target gene expression, as shown by an increase in CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and ABCB1 mRNA expression in LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Rosmarinic acid did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting it is not an antagonist of hPXR. Overall, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, are hPXR agonists, and carnosic acid shows species-dependent activation of hPXR and mPXR, but not rPXR. The findings provide new mechanistic insight on the effects of carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid on PXR-mediated biological effects.